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Sample records for diverticulitis

  1. Epidemiologic Analysis of Diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Jena, Marie D; Marcello, Peter W; Roberts, Patricia L; Read, Thomas E; Schoetz, David J; Hall, Jason F; Francone, Todd; Ricciardi, Rocco

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate geographic variation in the incidence of diverticulitis and examine behavioral and environmental factors associated with high rates of diverticulitis across the United States. We used state hospital discharge data from 20 states to determine rates of inpatient diverticulitis from January 2002 to December 2004 at patient's county of residence. Next, we merged the county level data with behavioral and environmental survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Finally, we determined the association between behavioral and environmental factors (i.e., teeth removal, dental cleaning, air quality, smoking, alcohol, vaccine, vitamins, and mental health) and high rates of diverticulitis. From January 1, 2002, to December 31, 2004, a total of 345,216 hospitalizations for acute diverticulitis were recorded for 1,055 counties. We identified rates of diverticulitis that ranged from 35.4 to 332.7 per 100,000 population. On univariate analysis, high diverticulitis burden was associated with regions of the country with substantial tooth loss from dental disease (45.8% for high diverticulitis counties vs. 37.5% for low diverticulitis counties; p = 0.0001). There is considerable variability in diverticulitis cases by county of residence across the nation. Potential triggers of diverticulitis may be associated with tooth removal and sun exposure. PMID:27582652

  2. Current management of diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, Michael H; Roth, Leslie; Jorden, Jeffrey

    2008-11-01

    Diverticulitis is classified as uncomplicated or complicated, i.e., associated with perforation, fistula, or obstruction. CT allows more reliable characterization of an acute attack of diverticulitis. Medical management is reserved for uncomplicated diverticulitis and the initial phase of treatment of diverticulitis associated with abscess formation. Percutaneous abscess drainage is a major advance, which permits one-stage resection in a majority of cases. Diverticulitis associated with free perforation can be selectively managed with resection and primary anastomosis, although a Hartmann resection is likely to be performed. A fistula associated with diverticulitis can usually be managed with a one-stage resection. Obstruction can be managed selectively with resection with on-table bowel preparation, primary anastomosis, and proximal diversion. Laparoscopic techniques permit successful performance of elective resections most of the time. Hand assistance is of particular value when the patient has dense fibrosis. PMID:19062658

  3. Sigmoid diverticulitis: US findings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute diverticulitis (AD) results from inflammation of a colonic diverticulum. It is the most common cause of acute left lower-quadrant pain in adults and represents a common reason for acute hospitalization, as it affects over half of the population over 65 years with a prevalence that increases with age. Although 85% of colonic diverticulitis will recover with a nonoperative treatment, some patients may have complications such as abscesses, fistulas, obstruction, and /or perforation at presentation. For these reasons, different classifications were introduced through times to help clinicians to develop a correct diagnosis and guide the treatment and for the same reasons imaging is used in most cases both to realise a differential diagnosis and to guide the therapeutic management. US and CT are both usefull in diagnosis of diverticolitis, and their sensibility and specificity are similar. However CT scanning is essential for investigating complicated diverticular disease especially where there are diffuse signs and clinical suspicion of secondary peritonitis; instead in most uncomplicated cases the experienced sonographer may quickly confirm a diagnosis guided by the clinical signs. US is to be recommended in premenopausal women, and in young people to reduce dose exposure. PMID:23902791

  4. Sigmoid diverticulitis: US findings.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Guerrini, Susanna; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Cagini, Lucio; Macarini, Luca; Giganti, Melchiore; Volterrani, Luca

    2013-07-15

    Acute diverticulitis (AD) results from inflammation of a colonic diverticulum. It is the most common cause of acute left lower-quadrant pain in adults and represents a common reason for acute hospitalization, as it affects over half of the population over 65 years with a prevalence that increases with age. Although 85% of colonic diverticulitis will recover with a nonoperative treatment, some patients may have complications such as abscesses, fistulas, obstruction, and /or perforation at presentation. For these reasons, different classifications were introduced through times to help clinicians to develop a correct diagnosis and guide the treatment and for the same reasons imaging is used in most cases both to realise a differential diagnosis and to guide the therapeutic management. US and CT are both usefull in diagnosis of diverticolitis, and their sensibility and specificity are similar. However CT scanning is essential for investigating complicated diverticular disease especially where there are diffuse signs and clinical suspicion of secondary peritonitis; instead in most uncomplicated cases the experienced sonographer may quickly confirm a diagnosis guided by the clinical signs. US is to be recommended in premenopausal women, and in young people to reduce dose exposure. PMID:23902791

  5. Colon Cancer After Acute Diverticulitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kwang Hoon; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Je Hoon; Choi, Kyu Un; Han, Myung Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2013-01-01

    Diverticulitis is the most common clinical complication of diverticular disease, affecting 10-25% of the patients with diverticula. The prevalences of diverticulitis and colon cancer tend to increase with age and are higher in industrialized countries. Consequently, diverticulitis and colon cancer have been reported to have similar epidemiological characteristics. However, the relationship between these diseases remains controversial, as is the performance of routine colonoscopy after an episode of diverticulitis to exclude colon cancer. Recently, we experienced three cases of colon cancer after treating acute diverticulitis, based on which we suggest the importance of follow-up colonoscopy after acute diverticulitis. PMID:24032118

  6. Assessment of Risk for Recurrent Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Sallinen, Ville; Mali, Juha; Leppäniemi, Ari; Mentula, Panu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recurrence of acute diverticulitis is common, and—especially complicated recurrence—causes significant morbidity. To prevent recurrence, selected patients have been offered prophylactic sigmoid resection. However, as there is no tool to predict whose diverticulitis will recur and, in particular, who will have complicated recurrence, the indications for sigmoid resections have been variable. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors predicting recurrence of acute diverticulitis. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients presenting with computed tomography–confirmed acute diverticulitis and treated nonresectionally during 2006 to 2010. Risk factors for recurrence were identified using uni- and multivariate Cox regression. A total of 512 patients were included. History of diverticulitis was an independent risk factor predicting uncomplicated recurrence of diverticulitis (1–2 earlier diverticulitis HR 1.6, 3 or more—HR 3.2). History of diverticulitis (HR 3.3), abscess (HR 6.2), and corticosteroid medication (HR 16.1) were independent risk factors for complicated recurrence. Based on regression coefficients, risk scoring was created: 1 point for history of diverticulitis, 2 points for abscess, and 3 points for corticosteroid medication. The risk score was unable to predict uncomplicated recurrence (AUC 0.48), but was able to predict complicated recurrence (AUC 0.80). Patients were further divided into low-risk (0–2 points) and high-risk (>2 points) groups. Low-risk and high-risk groups had 3% and 43% 5-year complicated recurrence rates, respectively. Risk for complicated recurrence of acute diverticulitis can be assessed using risk scoring. The risk for uncomplicated recurrence increases along with increasing number of previous diverticulitis. PMID:25715253

  7. Natural history of uncomplicated sigmoid diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Buchs, Nicolas C; Mortensen, Neil J; Ris, Frederic; Morel, Philippe; Gervaz, Pascal

    2015-11-27

    While diverticular disease is extremely common, the natural history (NH) of its most frequent presentation (i.e., sigmoid diverticulitis) is poorly investigated. Relevant information is mostly restricted to population-based or retrospective studies. This comprehensive review aimed to evaluate the NH of simple sigmoid diverticulitis. While there is a clear lack of uniformity in terminology, which results in difficulties interpreting and comparing findings between studies, this review demonstrates the benign nature of simple sigmoid diverticulitis. The overall recurrence rate is relatively low, ranging from 13% to 47%, depending on the definition used by the authors. Among different risk factors for recurrence, patients with C-reactive protein > 240 mg/L are three times more likely to recur. Other risk factors include: Young age, a history of several episodes of acute diverticulitis, medical vs surgical management, male patients, radiological signs of complicated first episode, higher comorbidity index, family history of diverticulitis, and length of involved colon > 5 cm. The risk of developing a complicated second episode (and its corollary to require an emergency operation) is less than 2%-5%. In fact, the old rationale for elective surgery as a preventive treatment, based mainly on concerns that recurrence would result in a progressively increased risk of sepsis or the need for a colostomy, is not upheld by the current evidence. PMID:26649154

  8. Natural history of uncomplicated sigmoid diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Buchs, Nicolas C; Mortensen, Neil J; Ris, Frederic; Morel, Philippe; Gervaz, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    While diverticular disease is extremely common, the natural history (NH) of its most frequent presentation (i.e., sigmoid diverticulitis) is poorly investigated. Relevant information is mostly restricted to population-based or retrospective studies. This comprehensive review aimed to evaluate the NH of simple sigmoid diverticulitis. While there is a clear lack of uniformity in terminology, which results in difficulties interpreting and comparing findings between studies, this review demonstrates the benign nature of simple sigmoid diverticulitis. The overall recurrence rate is relatively low, ranging from 13% to 47%, depending on the definition used by the authors. Among different risk factors for recurrence, patients with C-reactive protein > 240 mg/L are three times more likely to recur. Other risk factors include: Young age, a history of several episodes of acute diverticulitis, medical vs surgical management, male patients, radiological signs of complicated first episode, higher comorbidity index, family history of diverticulitis, and length of involved colon > 5 cm. The risk of developing a complicated second episode (and its corollary to require an emergency operation) is less than 2%-5%. In fact, the old rationale for elective surgery as a preventive treatment, based mainly on concerns that recurrence would result in a progressively increased risk of sepsis or the need for a colostomy, is not upheld by the current evidence. PMID:26649154

  9. [Acute diverticulitis of the cecum].

    PubMed

    Mandarano, R; Ciccone, A; Sereni, P; Venturini, N

    1994-06-01

    Following a brief introduction regarding the epidemiology of diverticular disease, the authors report a rare case of diverticulitis of the cecum which had developed into an abscess. The patient was a 37-year-old man who was referred to the authors' attention with classic symptoms of acute appendicitis and it was therefore decided to operate. During laparotomy a small paracecal abscess involving a diverticulum with suppurating infection was found on the anterior wall of the cecum, whereas the appendix appeared to be completely unaffected. The diverticulum was removed together with a small area of the surrounding healthy tissue using a double-layer suture of the cecal wall. In the discussion the authors analyse the similarities and rarities of the case and compare it with national and international findings. Special attention is drawn to the problems of differential diagnosis raised by this rare pathology. In conclusion, the authors state that it is difficult to make a preoperative diagnosis and that therefore the decision to operate must be extemporary. PMID:7970067

  10. Diverticula and Diverticulitis: Time for a Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Alberto O.; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonic diverticula are very common and may be associated with symptoms or complicated by diverticulitis and its associated problems. Many of the traditional concepts relating to the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these entities have been questioned recently based on findings from high-quality prospective studies. Although dietary fiber may protect against symptoms and complications, its impact on the formation of diverticula may be limited. It is now evident that the risk for an episode of diverticulitis in an individual with diverticula is lower than previously thought. Furthermore, the necessity for antibiotic use in uncomplicated diverticulitis has been questioned and serious doubt cast upon the belief that surgery should be performed when a second attack occurs. Although data are far from conclusive, there is some evidence to suggest that diverticulosis may be associated with chronic abdominal symptoms, with or without underlying chronic inflammatory changes in the involved segment of the colon. In addition, colonoscopy is not routinely required after an attack of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, as the risk of cancer in this population is not much higher than in the general population. PMID:27330495

  11. Diverticula and Diverticulitis: Time for a Reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Alberto O; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-10-01

    Colonic diverticula are very common and may be associated with symptoms or complicated by diverticulitis and its associated problems. Many of the traditional concepts relating to the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of these entities have been questioned recently based on findings from high-quality prospective studies. Although dietary fiber may protect against symptoms and complications, its impact on the formation of diverticula may be limited. It is now evident that the risk for an episode of diverticulitis in an individual with diverticula is lower than previously thought. Furthermore, the necessity for antibiotic use in uncomplicated diverticulitis has been questioned and serious doubt cast upon the belief that surgery should be performed when a second attack occurs. Although data are far from conclusive, there is some evidence to suggest that diverticulosis may be associated with chronic abdominal symptoms, with or without underlying chronic inflammatory changes in the involved segment of the colon. In addition, colonoscopy is not routinely required after an attack of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis, as the risk of cancer in this population is not much higher than in the general population. PMID:27330495

  12. [Treatment of the acute diverticulitis: A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Dréanic, Johann; Sion, Elena; Dhooge, Marion; Dousset, Bertrand; Camus, Marine; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2015-11-01

    Acute diverticulitis is a common disease with increasing incidence. In most of cases, diagnosis is made at an uncomplicated stage offering a curative attempt under medical treatment and use of antibiotics. There is a risk of diverticulitis recurrence. Uncomplicated diverticulitis is opposed to complicated forms (perforation, abscess or fistula). Recent insights in the pathophysiology of diverticulitis, the natural history, and treatments have permitted to identify new treatment strategies. For example, the use of antibiotics tends to decrease; surgery is now less invasive, percutaneous drainage is preferred, peritoneal lavage is encouraged. Treatments of the diverticulitis are constantly evolving. In this review, we remind the pathophysiology and natural history, and summarize new recommendations for the medical and surgical treatment of acute diverticulitis. PMID:26358668

  13. Perforated diverticulitis presenting as necrotising fasciitis of the leg.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Timothy J; Southgate, Jeremy; Talbot, Robert; Nash, Guy F

    2008-01-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is a common condition of increasing age. Complications of diverticulitis including stricture, perforation and fistula formation often require surgery. Perforated diverticulitis may rarely present with spreading superficial sepsis. We describe for the first time, to our knowledge, a case of retroperitoneal diverticula perforation presenting as necrotising fasciitis of the leg necessitating hind-quarter amputation. PMID:18304351

  14. [Current treatment for diverticulitis: state of affairs in 2016].

    PubMed

    van Dijk, S; Boermeester, M A

    2016-01-01

    - Uncomplicated diverticulitis does not routinely require antibiotic treatment and can even be managed in the outpatient setting.- As yet no medical therapies have proven themselves useful in the prevention of recurrence.- Complicated diverticulitis with an abscess smaller than 4 cm is treated with antibiotics, larger abscesses are treated by percutaneous drainage, and only if treatment fails surgery is required.- Laparoscopic lavage is no better than partial resection in purulent peritonitis.- Perforated diverticulitis with faecal peritonitis is treated by a Hartmann's procedure; in selected cases resection and primary anastomosis may be considered.- The decision whether a resection should be laparoscopic or open is based on the surgeon's experience.- The choice for elective resection for recurrent diverticulitis is still made on a patient-by-patient basis.- Only high-risk patients should have a follow-up colonoscopy to exclude malignancy. The remaining patients are referred back to the Dutch national colorectal cancer screening programme. PMID:27334091

  15. Outpatient treatment of uncomplicated diverticulitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Grande, Luis; Pera, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Acute diverticulitis occurs in up to 25% of patients with diverticulosis. The majority of cases are mild or uncomplicated and it has become a frequent reason for consultation in the emergency department. On the basis of the National Inpatient Sample database from the USA, 86% of patients admitted with diverticulitis were treated with medical therapy. However, several recent studies have shown that outpatient treatment with antibiotics is safe and effective. The aim of this systematic review is to update the evidence published in the outpatient treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. We performed a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines and searched in MEDLINE and Cochrane databases all English-language articles on the management of acute diverticulitis using the following search terms: 'diverticulitis', 'outpatient', and 'uncomplicated'. Data were extracted independently by two investigators. A total of 11 articles for full review were yielded: one randomized controlled trial, eight prospective cohort studies, and two retrospective cohort studies. Treatment successful rate on an outpatient basis, which means that no further complications were reported, ranged from 91.5 to 100%. Fewer than 8% of patients were readmitted in the hospital. Intolerance to oral intake and lack of family or social support are common exclusion criteria used for this approach, whereas severe comorbidities are not definitive exclusion criteria in all the studies. Ambulatory treatment of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis is safe, effective, and economically efficient when applying an appropriate selection in most reviewed studies. PMID:26891198

  16. Laparoscopic Resection of Chronic Sigmoid Diverticulitis with Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Abbass, Mohammad A.; Tsay, Anna T.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A growing number of operations for sigmoid diverticulitis are being done laparoscopically. There is a paucity of data on the outcome of laparoscopy for sigmoid diverticulitis complicated by colonic fistula. The aim of this study was to compare the results of laparoscopic resection of sigmoid diverticulitis with and without colonic fistula. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent laparoscopic resection of sigmoid diverticulitis complicated by fistula at a single tertiary care institution over a 7-year period. Comparison was made with a group of patients who underwent resection for diverticulitis without fistula during the same study period. Results: Forty-two patients were analyzed (group 1: diverticular fistula, group 2: no fistula). The median age was similar (49 vs. 50 years, P = .68). A chronic abscess was present in 24% of patients in group 1 and 10% in group 2 (P = .40). Fistula types were colovesical (71%), colovaginal (19%), and colocutaneous (10%). Operation types were sigmoidectomy (57% vs. 81%) and anterior resection (43% vs. 19%) in groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = .18). Ureteral catheters were used more frequently in group 1 (67% vs. 33% [P = .06]). No difference was noted in operative time, blood loss, conversion rate, length of stay, overall complications, wound infection rate, readmission rate, reoperation rate, and mortality. All patients healed without fistula recurrence. Conclusions: Patients with sigmoid diverticulitis with fistula can be successfully treated with laparoscopic excision, with similar outcomes for patients without fistula. PMID:24398208

  17. Ultrasonography in acute diverticulitis - credit where credit is due.

    PubMed

    Lembcke, B

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing diverticulitis implies physical and laboratory examination, cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography [CT] or ultrasonography [US]), and a classification of the type of diverticular disease. This article illustrates the role of ultrasonography in view of the recently published Guidelines on diverticular disease of the Consensus Conference of the German Societies of Gastroenterology (DGVS) and Visceral Surgery (DGAV). The focus is to foster both sensitivity for pictorial analysis and improving practical accomplishments of US in diverticulitis. Based on the German classification of diverticular disease (CDD), characteristic features of each type of diverticulitis are presented and commented along with possible differential diagnoses. In the literature qualified US is equipotent to qualified CT. US is frequently effective for the diagnosis and unsurpassed resolution enables detailed imaging thereby allowing one to differentiate and stratify the relevant types of diverticular disease according to the new classification. This educational review is a guided tour through the different facettes of diverticulitis on ultrasonography thereby expanding and multiplying individual competence to more users. With expert performance, US is in the pole position for diagnosing diverticulitis, however, this does come with the price of responsibility and requires transfer of advanced standards and performance in the broad. PMID:26751117

  18. Solitary caecum diverticulitis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Hot, Semih; Eğin, Seracettin; Gökçek, Berk; Yeşiltaş, Metin; Alemdar, Ali; Akan, Arzu; Karahan, Servet Rüştü

    2015-12-01

    Solitary cecum diverticulum is a benign formation, but it can be complicated with inflammation, perforation and bleeding. Cecum diverticulitis (CD) is the most common complication of caecal diverticulum and it has the highest incidence among Asians, but it is a rare condition in the western world. The incidence of colonic diverticular disease can vary according to national origin, cultural structure and nutritional habits. CD is not common in our country, but it is an important situation because of its clinical similarity with the commonly seen acute right side abdominal diseases like acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult, and hence, the actual frequency is not known. The treatment of CD can vary from medical therapy to right hemi colectomy. In this study, we presented ten CD cases on whom surgical resection was performed in our surgery unit during the last 8 years. Our purpose was to increase the awareness of surgeons about this situation, and so, make them pay attention for not having their first experience in the operating room. PMID:27054646

  19. A proposal for a CT driven classification of left colon acute diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Moore, Frederick A; Ansaloni, Luca; Di Saverio, Salomone; Coccolini, Federico; Griffiths, Ewen A; Coimbra, Raul; Agresta, Ferdinando; Sakakushev, Boris; Ordoñez, Carlos A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Augustin, Goran; Costa Navarro, David; Ulrych, Jan; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Melo, Renato B; Marwah, Sanjay; Zachariah, Sanoop K; Wani, Imtiaz; Shelat, Vishal G; Kim, Jae Il; McFarlane, Michael; Pintar, Tadaja; Rems, Miran; Bala, Miklosh; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Faro, Mario Paulo; Pereira, Gerson Alves; Catani, Marco; Baiocchi, Gianluca; Bini, Roberto; Anania, Gabriele; Negoi, Ionut; Kecbaja, Zurabs; Omari, Abdelkarim H; Cui, Yunfeng; Kenig, Jakub; Sato, Norio; Vereczkei, Andras; Skrovina, Matej; Das, Koray; Bellanova, Giovanni; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Segovia Lohse, Helmut A; Kong, Victor; Kok, Kenneth Y; Massalou, Damien; Smirnov, Dmitry; Gachabayov, Mahir; Gkiokas, Georgios; Marinis, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Charalampos; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Bouliaris, Konstantinos; Tepp, Jaan; Lohsiriwat, Varut; Çolak, Elif; Isik, Arda; Rios-Cruz, Daniel; Soto, Rodolfo; Abbas, Ashraf; Tranà, Cristian; Caproli, Emanuele; Soldatenkova, Darija; Corcione, Francesco; Piazza, Diego; Catena, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is the most appropriate diagnostic tool to confirm suspected left colonic diverticulitis. However, the utility of CT imaging goes beyond accurate diagnosis of diverticulitis; the grade of severity on CT imaging may drive treatment planning of patients presenting with acute diverticulitis. The appropriate management of left colon acute diverticulitis remains still debated because of the vast spectrum of clinical presentations and different approaches to treatment proposed. The authors present a new simple classification system based on both CT scan results driving decisions making management of acute diverticulitis that may be universally accepted for day to day practice. PMID:25972914

  20. Acute diverticulitis. Comparison of treatment in immunocompromised and nonimmunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Perkins, J D; Shield, C F; Chang, F C; Farha, G J

    1984-12-01

    The clinical course and required treatment of diverticulitis were reviewed in 76 nonimmunocompromised patients and 10 immunocompromised patients. The immunocompromised patients presented with either minimal or no symptoms and findings. Therefore, to make the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in this group, a high index of suspicion must be maintained. The required treatment varied considerably between the two groups. In 45 nonimmunocompromised patients (76 percent), medical therapy was successful. Medical treatment failed in the other 14 patients (24 percent). However, the compromised group had no patients in whom medical therapy was successful (100 percent failure rate). Thirty-one of the nonimmunocompromised patients (41 percent) required an operation, whereas 100 percent of the immunocompromised patients with acute diverticulitis required an operation. By relating postoperative complications, we were unable to determine the initial operative procedure of choice in the nonimmunocompromised group; however, in the immunocompromised group, colostomy and resection had fewer surgical complications than colostomy and drainage. The immunocompromised patient with acute diverticulitis requires operation. We believe the operation of choice is colostomy and resection of the involved segment. PMID:6507744

  1. Temporal Trends in the Incidence and Natural History of Diverticulitis: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Parthasarathy, Gopanandan; Ditah, Ivo; Fletcher, J. G.; Ewelukwa, Ofor; Pendlimari, Rajesh; Yawn, Barbara P.; Melton, L. Joseph; Schleck, Cathy; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Data on the incidence and natural history of diverticulitis are largely hospital-based and exclude the majority of diverticulitis patients, who are treated in an outpatient setting for uncomplicated diverticulitis. We assessed temporal trends in the epidemiology of diverticulitis in the general population. Methods Through the Rochester Epidemiology Project we reviewed the records of all individuals with a diagnosis of diverticulitis from 1980–2007 in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Results In 1980–1989 the incidence of diverticulitis was 115/100,000 person-years, which increased to 188/100,000 in 2000–2007 (P<.001). Incidence increased with age (P<.001); however, the temporal increase was greater in younger people (P<.001). Ten years after the index and second diverticulitis episodes, 22% and 55% had a recurrence, respectively. This recurrence rate was greater in younger people (hazard ratio [HR] per decade 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59–0.66) and women (HR 0.68; 95% CI, 0.58–0.80). Complications were seen in 12%; this rate did not change over time. Recurrent diverticulitis was associated with a decreased risk of complications (P<.001). Age was associated with increased risk of local (odds ratio [OR] 1.27 per decade; 95% CI, 1.04–1.57) and systemic (OR 1.83; 95% CI, 1.20–2.80) complications. Survival after diverticulitis was lower in older people (P<.001) and men (P<.001) and worsened over time (P<.001). The incidence of surgery for diverticulitis did not change from 1980–2007. Conclusions The incidence of diverticulitis has increased by 50% in 2000–2007 compared to 1990–1999, and more so in younger people. Complications are relatively uncommon. Recurrent diverticulitis is frequent but typically uncomplicated. Younger people with diverticulitis had less severe disease, more recurrence, and better survival. PMID:26416187

  2. Spontaneous Colo-Umbilical Fistula Complicating Diverticulitis of the Sigmoid Colon

    PubMed Central

    Kouklakis, Georgios; Courcoutsakis, Nikos; Oikonomou, Panagoula; Karayiannakis, Anastasios J.

    2013-01-01

    Colocutaneous fistula caused by diverticulitis is relatively uncommon with colo-umbilical fistulas being even rarer. We herein report a rare case of a spontaneous colo-umbilical fistula due to diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon. The fistula developed from a diverticulum of the sigmoid colon that discharged through the umbilicus after two episodes of acute diverticulitis. The condition was successfully treated by resectional surgery. PMID:23841011

  3. The Impact of Delaying Elective Resection of Diverticulitis on Laparoscopic Conversion Rate

    PubMed Central

    Simianu, Vlad V.; Sinanan, Mika N.; Bastawrous, Amir L.; Billingham, Richard P.; Fichera, Alessandro; Florence, Michael G.; Herzig, Daniel O.; Johnson, Eric K.; Steele, Scott R.; Thirlby, Richard C.; Flum, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Delaying elective colectomy for diverticulitis may increase the difficulty of laparoscopic colectomy due to chronic inflammation. An increasing number of prior episodes of diverticulitis was not associated with higher conversion rates. Introduction Guideline-concordant delay in elective laparoscopic colectomy for diverticulitis may result in repeated bouts of inflammation. We aimed to determine whether conversion rates from elective laparoscopic colectomy are higher after multiple episodes of diverticulitis. Methods Prospective cohort study evaluating laparoscopic colectomy conversion rates for diverticulitis from 42 hospitals. Results Between 2010 and 2013, 1,790 laparoscopic colectomies for diverticulitis (mean age 57.8 ± 13; 47% male) resulted in 295 (16.5%) conversions. Conversion occurred more frequently in non-elective operations (p<0.001) and with fistula indications (p=0.012). Conversion rates decreased with surgeon case-volume (p=0.028). Elective colectomy exclusively for episode-based indications (n=784) had a conversion rate of 12.9%. Increasing episodes of diverticulitis were not associated with higher conversion rates, even among surgeons with similar experience levels. Discussions Conversion from laparoscopic colectomy for diverticulitis did not increase after multiple episodes of diverticulitis. Delaying elective resection appears to not prevent patients from the benefits of laparoscopy. PMID:25773308

  4. Solitary Large Intestinal Diverticulitis in Leatherback Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea).

    PubMed

    Stacy, B A; Innis, C J; Daoust, P-Y; Wyneken, J; Miller, M; Harris, H; James, M C; Christiansen, E F; Foley, A

    2015-07-01

    Leatherback sea turtles are globally distributed and endangered throughout their range. There are limited data available on disease in this species. Initial observations of solitary large intestinal diverticulitis in multiple leatherbacks led to a multi-institutional review of cases. Of 31 subadult and adult turtles for which complete records were available, all had a single exudate-filled diverticulum, as large as 9.0 cm in diameter, arising from the large intestine immediately distal to the ileocecal junction. All lesions were chronic and characterized by ongoing inflammation, numerous intralesional bacteria, marked attenuation of the muscularis, ulceration, and secondary mucosal changes. In three cases, Morganella morganii was isolated from lesions. Diverticulitis was unrelated to the cause of death in all cases, although risk of perforation and other complications are possible. PMID:25239052

  5. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic lavage for Hinchey III diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Gervaz, Pascal; Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic lavage and drainage is a novel approach for managing patients with Hinchey III diverticulitis. However, this less invasive technique has important limitations, which are highlighted in this systematic review. We performed a PubMed search and identified 6 individual series reporting the results of this procedure. An analysis was performed regarding treatment-related morbidity, success rates, and subsequent elective sigmoid resection. Data was available for 287 patients only, of which 213 (74%) were actually presenting with Hinchey III diverticulitis. Reported success rate in this group was 94%, with 3% mortality. Causes of failure were: (1) ongoing sepsis; (2) fecal fistula formation; and (3) perforated sigmoid cancer. Although few patients developed recurrent diverticulitis in follow-up, 106 patients (37%) eventually underwent elective sigmoid resection. Our data indicate that laparoscopic lavage and drainage may benefit a highly selected group of Hinchey III patients. It is unclear whether laparoscopic lavage and drainage should be considered a curative procedure or just a damage control operation. Failure to identify patients with either: (1) feculent peritonitis (Hinchey IV); (2) persistent perforation; or (3) perforated sigmoid cancer, are causes of concern, and will limit the application of this technique. PMID:27231515

  6. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic lavage for Hinchey III diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Gervaz, Pascal; Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-05-27

    Laparoscopic lavage and drainage is a novel approach for managing patients with Hinchey III diverticulitis. However, this less invasive technique has important limitations, which are highlighted in this systematic review. We performed a PubMed search and identified 6 individual series reporting the results of this procedure. An analysis was performed regarding treatment-related morbidity, success rates, and subsequent elective sigmoid resection. Data was available for 287 patients only, of which 213 (74%) were actually presenting with Hinchey III diverticulitis. Reported success rate in this group was 94%, with 3% mortality. Causes of failure were: (1) ongoing sepsis; (2) fecal fistula formation; and (3) perforated sigmoid cancer. Although few patients developed recurrent diverticulitis in follow-up, 106 patients (37%) eventually underwent elective sigmoid resection. Our data indicate that laparoscopic lavage and drainage may benefit a highly selected group of Hinchey III patients. It is unclear whether laparoscopic lavage and drainage should be considered a curative procedure or just a damage control operation. Failure to identify patients with either: (1) feculent peritonitis (Hinchey IV); (2) persistent perforation; or (3) perforated sigmoid cancer, are causes of concern, and will limit the application of this technique. PMID:27231515

  7. Smoking Is Associated with an Increased Risk for Surgery in Diverticulitis: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Michael J.; Schaffer, Samuel; Coward, Stephanie; Kuenzig, M. Ellen; Hubbard, James; Eksteen, Bertus; Heitman, Steven; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Cigarette smoking increases the risk of surgery in Crohn’s disease. However, the effect of smoking on the need for surgery for diverticulitis is unknown. Objective We evaluated whether smoking was a risk factor for surgery among patients admitted to hospital with acute diverticulitis. Design We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study of patients admitted to hospital for diverticulitis who were treated with medical versus surgical management. Setting & Participants We used the population-based Discharge Abstract Database to identify 176 adults admitted emergently with a diagnosis of diverticulitis between 2009 and 2010 in Calgary. Intervention & Main Outcome We performed a medical chart review to confirm the diagnosis of diverticulitis and to extract clinical data. The primary outcome was a partial colectomy during hospitalization. Logistic regression evaluated the association between smoking and surgery after adjusting for potential confounders, including age, sex, comorbidity, and disease severity. Results A partial colectomy was performed on 35.6% of patients with diverticulitis and 1.3% died. Among diverticulitis patients, 26.8% were current smokers, 31.5% were ex-smokers, and 41.6% never smoked. Compared to non-smokers, current smokers (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.47–32.97) and former smokers (adjusted OR 5.41; 95% CI: 1.54–18.96) had increased odds of surgery. Conclusion and Relevance Smoking is associated with the need for surgical management of diverticulitis. PMID:27467077

  8. Colonic diverticulitis in adolescents: an index case and associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santin, Brian J; Prasad, Vinay; Caniano, Donna A

    2009-10-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon, a common problem among adults, is diagnosed rarely in children. We report an adolescent patient with sigmoid diverticulitis who required operative treatment. Pediatric patients with the complications of diverticula typically have conditions that result in genetic alterations affecting the components of the colonic wall. Our patient had Williams-Beuren syndrome, although Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and cystic fibrosis may also be associated with colonic diverticula in adolescence. Pediatric patients with these disorders who experience abdominal pain should be evaluated for the presence of colonic diverticular complications. PMID:19711089

  9. Colonoscopy after CT-diagnosed acute diverticulitis: Is it really necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Rosenfeld, Greg; Brown, Jacqueline; Chan, Nathan; Hong, Thomas; Lim, Howard; Bressler, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) scans are commonly used to diagnose acute diverticulitis, but there are overlapping features between diverticulitis and colorectal cancer (CRC) on imaging studies. Hence, colonoscopy is typically recommended after an episode of acute diverticulitis to rule out underlying malignancy. Currently, 64-slice multidetector CT scanners are capable of providing higher-resolution images and may be able to distinguish malignancy from diverticular inflammation. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CRC among patients with CT-diagnosed acute diverticulitis. Methods We performed a retrospective study of patients with acute diverticulitis diagnosed on CT scan between December 2005 and December 2010 at St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Nonresidents were excluded. We reviewed CT scan reports that included the term “diverticulitis,” reports of follow-up colonic evaluation within 1 year of diagnosis and pathology results. We queried the provincial cancer registry to ensure no cases of CRC were missed. Results A total of 293 patients had acute diverticulitis diagnosed on CT scan, but 8 were nonresidents and were excluded. Of the 285 included in the analysis, the mean age was 59.4 ± 15.1 years, and 167 (58.6%) were men. Among the 114 patients who underwent follow-up evaluation, malignancy was diagnosed in 4 (3.5%). The overall prevalence of malignancy among patients with CT-diagnosed diverticulitis was 1.4%. Conclusion Routine endoscopic evaluation after an episode of diverticulitis diagnosed with high-resolution CT scan does not appear to be necessary. Selective approach in patients with protracted clinical course or those with mass lesion/obstruction on CT scan may be of benefit. PMID:26022155

  10. WSES Guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Coccolini, Federico; Griffiths, Ewen A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Di Saverio, Salomone; Ulrych, Jan; Kluger, Yoram; Ben-Ishay, Ofir; Moore, Frederick A; Ivatury, Rao R; Coimbra, Raul; Peitzman, Andrew B; Leppaniemi, Ari; Fraga, Gustavo P; Maier, Ronald V; Chiara, Osvaldo; Kashuk, Jeffry; Sakakushev, Boris; Weber, Dieter G; Latifi, Rifat; Biffl, Walter; Bala, Miklosh; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Inaba, Kenji; Ordonez, Carlos A; Hecker, Andreas; Augustin, Goran; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Melo, Renato Bessa; Marwah, Sanjay; Zachariah, Sanoop K; Shelat, Vishal G; McFarlane, Michael; Rems, Miran; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Faro, Mario Paulo; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Negoi, Ionut; Cui, Yunfeng; Sato, Norio; Vereczkei, Andras; Bellanova, Giovanni; Birindelli, Arianna; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Kok, Kenneth Y; Gachabayov, Mahir; Gkiokas, Georgios; Bouliaris, Konstantinos; Çolak, Elif; Isik, Arda; Rios-Cruz, Daniel; Soto, Rodolfo; Moore, Ernest E

    2016-01-01

    Acute left sided colonic diverticulitis is one of the most common clinical conditions encountered by surgeons in acute setting. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference on acute diverticulitis was held during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES in Jerusalem, Israel, on July 7th, 2015. During this consensus conference the guidelines for the management of acute left sided colonic diverticulitis in the emergency setting were presented and discussed. This document represents the executive summary of the final guidelines approved by the consensus conference. PMID:27478494

  11. [Summary of the practice guideline on diverticulitis in the colon: diagnostics and treatment in specialty care].

    PubMed

    Andeweg, Caroline S; Felt-Bersma, Richelle J F; Verbon, Annelies; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A; Bleichrodt, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    The natural course of diverticulitis is usually mild and often requires only conservative treatment. The combination of pain in the lower left abdomen on physical examination, the absence of vomiting and a CRP > 50 mg/l is highly predictive of diverticulitis; further investigation by means of imaging may then be omitted. An initial ultrasound - and CT scanning only if this investigation proves negative or inconclusive - provides the best results in terms of imaging. There is no evidence substantiating the efficacy of routine antibiotic administration to patients with clinically mild and uncomplicated diverticulitis. Pericolic or pelvic abscesses can initially be treated with antibiotics, possibly in combination with percutaneous drainage; surgical intervention is only necessary if this treatment regimen fails. A patient with perforated diverticulitis resulting in peritonitis should undergo an operation; the optimal surgical strategy is currently under debate. PMID:23575295

  12. Acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: clinical expressions, therapeutic insights, and role of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach of patients with suspected acute diverticulitis remains debated. On the one hand, a scoring system with the best predictive value in diagnosing acute diverticulitis has been developed in order to reduce the use of computed tomography (CT) scan, while, on the other hand, patients with a high probability of acute diverticulitis should benefit from CT scan from a clinical viewpoint, ensuring that they will receive the most appropriate treatment. The place and classification of CT scan for acute diverticulitis need to be reassessed. If the management of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, abscess, and fecal peritonitis is now well codified, urgent surgical or medical treatment of hemodynamically stable patients presenting with intraperitoneal air or fluid without uncontrolled sepsis is still under discussion. Furthermore, the indications for laparoscopic lavage are not yet well established. It is known for years that episode(s) of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis may induce painful recurrent bowel symptoms, known as symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome-like diverticular disease. These two clinical expressions of diverticular disease, that may darken quality of life, are treated medically aimed at symptom relief. The possible place of surgery should be discussed. Clinical and CT scan classifications should be separated entities. PMID:27574459

  13. Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory complications of acute sigmoid diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Fine, A P

    2001-01-01

    From March 1995 through March 2000, we treated patients with the laparoscopic approach who had emergent and urgent indications for surgery. We report a series of 17 procedures in 16 patients in the acute category excluding those with active bleeding. One case of morbidity (DVT) but no moralities occurred, with 3 of 17 patients converted to an open approach. The postoperative course and subsequent recoveries compare favorably with the open approach to this disease process. Three other series are discussed for comparison, all showing similar favorable results. We concluded that given sufficient experience in minimally invasive colon surgery, surgeons can manage acute inflammatory complications of sigmoid diverticulitis laparoscopically with potential benefit to the patient. PMID:11548828

  14. Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Complications of Acute Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    From March 1995 through March 2000, we treated patients with the laparoscopic approach who had emergent and urgent indications for surgery. We report a series of 17 procedures in 16 patients in the acute category excluding those with active bleeding. One case of morbidity (DVT) but no moralities occurred, with 3 of 17 patients converted to an open approach. The postoperative course and subsequent recoveries compare favorably with the open approach to this disease process. Three other series are discussed for comparison, all showing similar favorable results. We concluded that given sufficient experience in minimally invasive colon surgery, surgeons can manage acute inflammatory complications of sigmoid diverticulitis laparoscopically with potential benefit to the patient. PMID:11548828

  15. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B.; Havens, Joaquim M.; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED). Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. Methods : We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006–2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13). We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age <50 with no comorbidities (Elixhauser). We used hierarchical multivariate logistic regression to identify patient characteristics associated with admission for diverticulitis. Results Fryom 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (−7.2%, 95% CI [−7.78 to −6.62]; p<0.001 for trend). The admission rate among low-risk patients decreased from 35.2% in 2006 to 26.8% in 2011 (−8.4%, 95% CI [−9.6 to −7.2]; p<0.001 for trend). Admission for diverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (−1.8%, 95% CI [−2.1 to −1.5]; p<0.001 for trend), and among low-risk patients decreased from 4.0% to 2.2% (−1.8%, 95% CI [−4.5 to −1.7]; p<0.001 for trend). Conclusion From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased

  16. Diverticulitis in immunosuppressed patients: A fatal outcome requiring a new approach?

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Andreas; Kratzer, Theresa; Kafka-Ritsch, Reinhold; Braunwarth, Eva; Denecke, Christian; Weiss, Sascha; Atanasov, Georgi; Sucher, Robert; Biebl, Matthias; Aigner, Felix; Pratschke, Johann; Öllinger, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of diverticulitis in immunosuppressed patients are more challenging than in immunocompetent patients, as maintenance immunosuppressive therapies may mask symptoms or impair the patient’s ability to counteract the local and systemic infective sequelae of diverticulitis. The purpose of this study was to compare the in-hospital mortality and morbidity due to diverticulitis in immunosuppressed and immunocompetent patients and identify risk factors for lethal outcomes. Methods This retrospective study included consecutive in-patients who received treatment for colonic diverticulitis at our institution between April 2008 and April 2014. Patients were divided into immunocompetent and immunosuppressed groups. Primary end points were mortality and morbidity during treatment. Risk factors for death were evaluated. Results Of the 227 patients included, 15 (6.6%) were on immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation, autoimmune disease, or cerebral metastasis. Thirteen of them experienced colonic perforation and showed higher morbidity (p = 0.039). Immunosuppressed patients showed longer stays in hospital (27.6 v. 14.5 d, p = 0.016) and in the intensive care unit (9.8 v. 1.1 d, p < 0.001), a higher rate of emergency operations (66% v. 29.2%, p = 0.004), and higher in-hospital mortality (20% v. 4.7%, p = 0.045). Age, perforated diverticulitis with diffuse peritonitis, emergency operation, C-reactive protein > 20 mg/dL, and immunosuppressive therapy were significant predictors of death. Age (hazard ratio [HR] 2.57, p = 0.008) and emergency operation (HR 3.03, p = 0.003) remained significant after multivariate analysis. Conclusion Morbidity and mortality due to sigmoid diverticulitis is significantly higher in immunosuppressed patients. Early diagnosis and treatment considering elective sigmoid resection for patients with former episodes of diverticulitis who are wait-listed for transplant is crucial to prevent death. PMID:27240131

  17. Rethinking elective colectomy for diverticulitis: a strategic approach to population health.

    PubMed

    Simianu, Vlad V; Flum, David R

    2014-11-28

    Diverticulitis is one of the leading indications for elective colon resection. Surgeons are trained to offer elective operations after a few episodes of diverticulitis in order to prevent future recurrences and potential emergency. However, most emergency surgery happens during the initial presentation. After recovery from an episode, much of the subsequent management of diverticulitis occurs in the outpatient setting, rendering inpatient "episode counting" a poor measure of the severity or burden of disease. Evidence also suggests that the risk of recurrence of diverticulitis is small and similar with or without an operation. Accordingly, contemporary evaluations of the epidemiologic patterns of treatments for diverticulitis have failed to demonstrate that the substantial rise in elective surgery over the last few decades has been successful at preventing emergency surgery at a population level. Multiple professional societies are calling to "individualize" decisions for elective colectomy and there is an international focus on "appropriate" indications for surgery. The rethinking of elective colectomy should come from a patient-centered approach that considers the risks of recurrence, quality of life, patient wishes and experiences about surgical and medical treatment options as well as operative morbidity and risks. PMID:25469029

  18. Perforated diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon causing a subcutaneous emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Kassir, Radwan; Abboud, Karine; Dubois, Joelle; Baccot, Sylviane; Debs, Tarek; Favre, Jean-Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Gastaldi, Pauline; Amor, Imed Ben; Tiffet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although diverticular disease of the colon is frequent, perforated diverticulitis causing subcutaneous emphysema is a uncommon entity. We wish to present this extremely rare case of perforated colonic diverticulum in the subcutaneous tissue, which is the first one that we have encountered in our practice, along with the accompanying diagnostic and therapeutic issues and a review of the literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of an 83-year-old man who admitted to the emergency room due to an abdominal subcutaneous emphysema. Physical examination revealed a severe subcutaneous emphysema especially in the left iliac fossa and abdominal pain. An urgent contrast enhanced abdominal CT scan showed multiple diverticula in the sigmoid colon and multiple air bubbles in the subcutaneous tissue. The exploratory laparotomy identified a perforation of diverticular in subcutaneous tissue. Forty centimeters of colon were resected. The subcutaneous emphysema resolved without specific treatment. The postoperative period was uncomplicated. DISCUSSION Subcutaneous emphysema of anterior abdomen wall is an obvious physical sign but its etiology is complex to determine and may be potentially lethal. The pathophysiological mechanism involved is the emergence of a pressure gradient between the peritoneum and surrounding structures, causing rupture of the anterior abdominal wall, allowing gas from a perforation to diffuse along tissue planes. CONCLUSION This physical sign may be of especial value in elderly patient groups amongst whom perforation may be less clinically obvious. General surgeons should bear in mind this rare complication of colonic diverticulosis. PMID:25437673

  19. Morphologic Basis for Developing Diverticular Disease, Diverticulitis, and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, Thilo; Barrenschee, Martina; Lange, Christina; Cossais, François; Böttner, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Diverticula of the colon are pseudodiverticula defined by multiple outpouchings of the mucosal and submucosal layers penetrating through weak spots of the muscle coat along intramural blood vessels. A complete prolapse consists of a diverticular opening, a narrowed neck, and a thinned diverticular dome underneath the serosal covering. The susceptibility of diverticula to inflammation is explained by local ischemia, translocation of pathogens due to retained stool, stercoral trauma by fecaliths, and microperforations. Local inflammation may lead to phlegmonous diverticulitis, paracolic/mesocolic abscess, bowel perforation, peritonitis, fistula formation, and stenotic strictures. Diverticular bleeding is due to an asymmetric rupture of distended vasa recta at the diverticular dome and not primarily linked to inflammation. Structural and functional changes of the bowel wall in diverticular disease comprise: i) Altered amount, composition, and metabolism of connective tissue; ii) Enteric myopathy with muscular thickening, deranged architecture, and altered myofilament composition; iii) Enteric neuropathy with hypoganglionosis, neurotransmitter imbalance, deficiency of neurotrophic factors and nerve fiber remodeling; and iv) Disturbed intestinal motility both in vivo (increased intraluminal pressure, motility index, high-amplitude propagated contractions) and in vitro (altered spontaneous and pharmacologically triggered contractility). Besides established etiologic factors, recent studies suggest that novel pathophysiologic concepts should be considered in the pathogenesis of diverticular disease. PMID:26989376

  20. Management of Complications Following Emergency and Elective Surgery for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical spectrum of sigmoid diverticulitis (SD) varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications. Sigmoid colectomy with restoration of continuity has been the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent SD, and is often performed as a laparoscopy-assisted procedure. For elective sigmoid colectomy, the postoperative morbidity rate is 15-20% whereas morbidity rates reach up to 30% in patients who undergo emergency surgery for perforated SD. Some of the more common and serious surgical complications after sigmoid colectomy are anastomotic leaks and peritonitis, wound infections, small bowel obstruction, postoperative bleeding, and injuries to the urinary tract structures. Regarding the management of complications, it makes no difference whether the complication is a result of an emergency or an elective procedure. Methods The present work gives an overview of the management of complications in the surgical treatment of SD based on the current literature. Results To achieve successful management, early diagnosis is mandatory in cases of deviation from the normal postoperative course. If diagnostic procedures fail to deliver a correlate for the clinical situation of the patient, re-laparotomy or re-laparoscopy still remain among the most important diagnostic and/or therapeutic principles in visceral surgery when a patient's clinical status deteriorates. Conclusion The ability to recognize and successfully manage complications is a crucial part of the surgical treatment of diverticular disease and should be mastered by any surgeon qualified in this field. PMID:26989382

  1. SILS Sigmoidectomy Versus Multiport Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Pottel, Hans; Devriendt, Dirk; Van Rooy, Frank; Vansteenkiste, Franky; Van Ooteghem, Barbara; De Corte, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In this single-institution study, we aimed to compare the safety, feasibility, and outcomes of single-incision laparoscopic sigmoidectomy (SILSS) with multiport laparoscopic sigmoidectomy (MLS) for recurrent diverticulitis. Methods: Between October 2011 and February 2013, 60 sigmoidectomies were performed by the same surgeon. Forty patients had a MLS and 20 patients had a SILSS. Outcomes were compared. Results: Patient characteristics were similar. There was no difference in morbidity, mortality or readmission rates. The mean operative time was longer in the SILSS group (P = .0012). In a larger proportion of patients from the SILSS group, 2 linear staplers were needed for transection at the rectum (P = .006). The total cost of disposable items was higher in the SILSS group (P < .0001). No additional ports were placed in the SILSS group. Return to bowel function or return to oral intake was faster in the SILSS group (P = .0446 and P = .0137, respectively). Maximum pain scores on postoperative days 1 and 2 were significantly less for the SILSS group (P = .0014 and P = .047, respectively). Hospital stay was borderline statistically shorter in the SILSS group (P = .0053). SILSS was also associated with better cosmesis (P < .0011). Conclusion: SILSS is feasible and safe and is associated with earlier recovery of bowel function, a significant reduction in postoperative pain, and better cosmesis. PMID:25392639

  2. Recent advances in the treatment of colonic diverticular disease and prevention of acute diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Elisei, Walter; Tursi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of diverticulosis and diverticular disease of the colon is increasing worldwide. Although the majority of patients remains asymptomatic long-life, the prevalence of diverticular disease of the colon, including acute diverticulitis, is substantial and is becoming a significant burden on National Health Systems in terms of direct and indirect costs. Focus is now being drawn on identifying the correct therapeutic approach by testing various treatments. Fiber, non-absorbable antibiotics and probiotics seem to be effective in treating symptomatic and uncomplicated patients, and 5-aminosalicylic acid might help prevent acute diverticulitis. Unfortunately, robust evidence on the effectiveness of a medical strategy to prevent acute diverticulitis recurrence is still lacking. We herein provide a concise review on the effectiveness and future perspectives of these treatments. PMID:26752946

  3. Laparoscopic surgery for sigmoidocutaneous fistula due to diverticulitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Eiji; Nakahara, Kenta; Maeda, Chiyo; Takehara, Yusuke; Ishida, Fumio; Kudo, Shin-ei

    2015-08-01

    Sigmoidocutaneous fistulas due to sigmoid colon diverticulitis are very rare. Here we report a case in which laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was used to successfully treat a sigmoidocutaneous fistula due to diverticulitis. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of redness and swelling of the left inguinal skin. Enhanced abdominal CT revealed a subcutaneous abscess in the left lower abdomen. Percutaneous drainage was performed, and fistulography revealed a fistula between the sigmoid colon and left inguinal skin. Therefore, a sigmoidocutaneous fistula was diagnosed, and laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and fistulectomy were performed. The sigmoid colon had several diverticula, and a pathological examination revealed that the sigmoidocutaneous fistula was due to diverticulitis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8. In cases of sigmoidocutaneous fistula, laparoscopic treatment can be safely performed. PMID:26303733

  4. Recent advances in the treatment of colonic diverticular disease and prevention of acute diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Elisei, Walter; Tursi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of diverticulosis and diverticular disease of the colon is increasing worldwide. Although the majority of patients remains asymptomatic long-life, the prevalence of diverticular disease of the colon, including acute diverticulitis, is substantial and is becoming a significant burden on National Health Systems in terms of direct and indirect costs. Focus is now being drawn on identifying the correct therapeutic approach by testing various treatments. Fiber, non-absorbable antibiotics and probiotics seem to be effective in treating symptomatic and uncomplicated patients, and 5-aminosalicylic acid might help prevent acute diverticulitis. Unfortunately, robust evidence on the effectiveness of a medical strategy to prevent acute diverticulitis recurrence is still lacking. We herein provide a concise review on the effectiveness and future perspectives of these treatments. PMID:26752946

  5. Routine colonic endoscopic evaluation following resolution of acute diverticulitis: is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit K; Karanjawala, Burzeen E; Maykel, Justin A; Johnson, Eric K; Steele, Scott R

    2014-09-21

    Diverticular disease incidence is increasing up to 65% by age 85 in industrialized nations, low fiber diets, and in younger and obese patients. Twenty-five percent of patients with diverticulosis will develop acute diverticulitis. This imposes a significant burden on healthcare systems, resulting in greater than 300000 admissions per year with an estimated annual cost of $3 billion USD. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) is the diagnostic study of choice, with a sensitivity and specificity greater than 95%. Unfortunately, similar CT findings can be present in colonic neoplasia, especially when perforated or inflamed. This prompted professional societies such as the American Society of Colon Rectal Surgeons to recommend patients undergo routine colonoscopy after an episode of acute diverticulitis to rule out malignancy. Yet, the data supporting routine colonoscopy after acute diverticulitis is sparse and based small cohort studies utilizing outdated technology. While any patient with an indication for a colonoscopy should undergo appropriate endoscopic evaluation, in the era of widespread use of high-resolution computed tomography, routine colonic endoscopic evaluation following resolution of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis poses additional costs, comes with inherent risks, and may require further study. In this manuscript, we review the current data related to this recommendation. PMID:25253951

  6. Difficulty in differentiating two cases of sigmoid stenosis by diverticulitis from cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Noriko; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintarou; Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-07-21

    The incidence of colonic diverticulosis with or without diverticulitis has increased in the Japanese population due to the modernization of food and aging. The rate of diverticulitis in colon diverticulosis ranges from 8.1% to 9.6%. However, few cases of stenosis due to diverticulitis have been reported. These reports suggest that the differentiation between sigmoid diverticulitis and colon cancer is difficult. This report describes two cases of colon stenosis due to diverticulitis that were difficult to differentiate from colon cancer. Case 1 was a 70-year-old woman with narrowed stools for 1 month who underwent colonofiberscopy (CFS). CFS revealed a diverticulum and circumferential stenosis in the sigmoid colon. Barium enema revealed a marked, hourglass-shaped, 2-cm circumferential stenosis in the sigmoid colon. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography computed tomography (CT) revealed an increased FDG uptake at the affected portion of the sigmoid colon. Sigmoid colon cancer was suspected, and laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was performed. Pathological examination demonstrated active inflammation with no evidence of malignancy. Case 2 was a 50-year-old man who presented to a nearby clinic with reduced stool output despite the urge to defecate. CFS detected severe stenosis in the sigmoid colon approximately 25 cm from the dentate line. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT revealed multiple diverticula, wall thickening, and swelling of the lymph nodes around the peritoneal aorta and the inferior mesenteric artery. A partial sigmoidectomy was performed. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed no changes in the mucosal epithelial surface, but a marked infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed. PMID:22826630

  7. Difficulty in differentiating two cases of sigmoid stenosis by diverticulitis from cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Noriko; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintarou; Kobayashi, Mitsuyoshi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of colonic diverticulosis with or without diverticulitis has increased in the Japanese population due to the modernization of food and aging. The rate of diverticulitis in colon diverticulosis ranges from 8.1% to 9.6%. However, few cases of stenosis due to diverticulitis have been reported. These reports suggest that the differentiation between sigmoid diverticulitis and colon cancer is difficult. This report describes two cases of colon stenosis due to diverticulitis that were difficult to differentiate from colon cancer. Case 1 was a 70-year-old woman with narrowed stools for 1 month who underwent colonofiberscopy (CFS). CFS revealed a diverticulum and circumferential stenosis in the sigmoid colon. Barium enema revealed a marked, hourglass-shaped, 2-cm circumferential stenosis in the sigmoid colon. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography computed tomography (CT) revealed an increased FDG uptake at the affected portion of the sigmoid colon. Sigmoid colon cancer was suspected, and laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was performed. Pathological examination demonstrated active inflammation with no evidence of malignancy. Case 2 was a 50-year-old man who presented to a nearby clinic with reduced stool output despite the urge to defecate. CFS detected severe stenosis in the sigmoid colon approximately 25 cm from the dentate line. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT revealed multiple diverticula, wall thickening, and swelling of the lymph nodes around the peritoneal aorta and the inferior mesenteric artery. A partial sigmoidectomy was performed. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed no changes in the mucosal epithelial surface, but a marked infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed. PMID:22826630

  8. Use of Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increases Risk for Diverticulitis and Diverticular Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Liu, Yan L.; Huang, Edward S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, have been implicated in diverticular complications. We examined the influence of aspirin and NSAID use on risk of diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding in a large prospective cohort. METHODS We studied 47,210 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohort who were 40–75 years old at baseline, in 1986. We assessed use of aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and other risk factors biennially. We identified men with diverticulitis or diverticular bleeding based on responses to biennial and supplemental questionnaires. RESULTS We documented 939 cases of diverticulitis and 256 cases of diverticular bleeding during a 22-year period of follow-up. After adjustment for risk factors, men who used aspirin regularly (≥2 times per week) had a multivariable relative risk (RR) of 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.47) for diverticulitis and RR of 1.70 (95% CI, 1.21–2.39) for diverticular bleeding, compared with non-users of aspirin and NSAIDs. Use of aspirin at intermediate doses (2–5.9 standard, 325 mg, tablets per week) and frequency (4–6 days per week) were associated with the highest risk of bleeding (multivariable RR=2.32; 95% CI, 1.34–4.02, and multivariable RR=3.13; 95% CI, 1.82–5.38, respectively). Regular users of non-aspirin NSAIDs also had an increased risk of diverticulitis (multivariable RR=1.72; 95% CI, 1.40–2.11) and diverticular bleeding (multivariable RR=1.74; 95% CI, 1.15–2.64), compared with men who denied use of these medications. CONCLUSIONS Regular use of aspirin or NSAIDs is associated with an increased risk for diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding. Patients at risk of diverticular complications should carefully consider the potential risks and benefits of using these medications. PMID:21320500

  9. Laparoscopic Lavage Is Feasible and Safe for the Treatment of Perforated Diverticulitis With Purulent Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Angenete, Eva; Thornell, Anders; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Skullman, Stefan; Bisgaard, Thue; Jess, Per; Läckberg, Zoltan; Matthiessen, Peter; Heath, Jane; Rosenberg, Jacob; Haglind, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate short-term outcomes of a new treatment for perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis in a randomized controlled trial. Background: Perforated diverticulitis with purulent peritonitis (Hinchey III) has traditionally been treated with surgery including colon resection and stoma (Hartmann procedure) with considerable postoperative morbidity and mortality. Laparoscopic lavage has been suggested as a less invasive surgical treatment. Methods: Laparoscopic lavage was compared with colon resection and stoma in a randomized controlled multicenter trial, DILALA (ISRCTN82208287). Initial diagnostic laparoscopy showing Hinchey III was followed by randomization. Clinical data was collected up to 12 weeks postoperatively. Results: Eighty-three patients were randomized, out of whom 39 patients in laparoscopic lavage and 36 patients in the Hartmann procedure groups were available for analysis. Morbidity and mortality after laparoscopic lavage did not differ when compared with the Hartmann procedure. Laparoscopic lavage resulted in shorter operating time, shorter time in the recovery unit, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: In this trial, laparoscopic lavage as treatment for patients with perforated diverticulitis Hinchey III was feasible and safe in the short-term. PMID:25489672

  10. One of the Rare Causes of Acute Abdomen Leading to Subileus: Jejunal Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Elçin; Yerli, Hasan; Avcı, Tevfik; Yılmaz, Tuğbahan; Gülay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Jejunal diverticulitis is one of the rare causes of acute abdomen generally seen in the elderly. Jejunal diverticulosis was defined as the herniation of the mucosa and the submucosa from the inside of the muscular layer of the bowel wall on the mesenteric side of the intestine. Case Report: We presented the intraoperative and pathological findings of a 69-year-old male patient who had presented with complaints about abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting and been operated upon due to subileus and peritonitis induced by large-sized jejunal diverticulitis, along with his computed tomography (CT) findings. Conclusion: Jejunal diverticulitis is uncommon and may be a disease which might be difficult to diagnose when it develops on the basis of the large-sized diverticula resembling intestinal ansae. To the best of our knowledge, the computed tomography and intraoperative findings of a case in which partial resection is applied to the jejunum due to subileus have not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:27308082

  11. Perforated diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon revealed by a perianal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Imed Ben; Kassir, Radwan; Bachir, Elias; Katharina, Hufschmidt; Debs, Tarek; Gugenheim, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diverticular disease of the colon is a frequent pathology; however, perforated diverticulitis with a spontaneous sigmoidocutaneous fistula revealed by a perianal abscess is an uncommon presentation. We present this extremely rare case of a perforated sigmoid diverticulum in the perianal area, which is the first case that we have encountered in our practice and in the literature, along with the accompanying diagnostic and therapeutic issues and a review of the literature. Presentation of case We report the case of a 47-year-old man who was admitted to the emergency room due to a perianal abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room on an emergency basis. In the lithotomy position, the abscess was located at the 4 o’clock position. Incision and drainage was performed. Intraoperatively, the abscess was found to be deep, and considered an ischiorectal abscess. No fistulous tract was identified. An MRI of the pelvis was performed one month postoperatively which revealed a perforated diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon causing a perianal fistula. After the abscess was successfully treated, a sigmoidectomy was performed. Fifteen centimeters of the colon were resected. No postoperative complications occurred. Discussion Perianal fistula is an obvious physical sign but its etiology is complex to determine. The pathophysiological mechanism involved is the emergence of a pressure gradient between the peritoneum and surrounding structures, causing rupture of the perianal tissue, allowing gas from a perforation to diffuse along tissue planes. Conclusion General surgeons should bear in mind this rare presentation of a sigmoid diverticulitis. PMID:25635602

  12. [Sigmoidoperianal fistula associated with diverticulitis and Cul de Sac situation--diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Weyand, G; Rinast, E; Englert, A; Houf, M

    2002-07-01

    We report on the case of a 64-year-old female patient who presented herself in our outpatient clinic because of a perianal fistula with recurrent abscesses. We describe the step diagnostics and the surgical treatment of the causal sigmoido-perianal fistula with diverticulitis and Cul de sac situation. Clinical examination, fistulography, colonoscopy and MRT were part of the precise representation and preparation for the high anterior rectosigmoidal resection with simultaneous rectopexy according to Sudeck which were performed without complications. The sigmoidoperianal fistula must be taken into account as a differential diagnosis of a recalcitrant high perianal fistula. PMID:12122593

  13. Lethal complications in a case of sigmoid diverticulitis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Oehler, U; Bulatko, A; Jenss, H; Helpap, B

    1997-02-01

    A 61-year-old female complaining of arthralgia was repeatedly treated with antibiotics and also with prednisolone. A chronic polyarthritis was assumed. In hospital, leukocytosis of 21.000 was found one day before death as well as moderate anemia. Colonoscopy was rejected by the patient. A computer tomography revealed destructive arthritis of the symphysis, vertebral osteochondrosis L5/S1, and sigmoid diverticulosis. The patient died with clinical signs of central dysregulation. At autopsy, a covered perforation of a sigmoid diverticulum with purulent peridiverticulitis was found. The 5th lumbal vertebra and the symphysis showed hematogenic abscesses. Microabscedating pneumonia, purulent meningitis and hypophysitis, and mycotic aneurysm of the basilar artery with lethal rupture were further results of hematogenic spread. Death was caused by massive subarachnoidal hemorrhage. This history is not untypical for elder patients with complicated diverticular disease. The intestinal perforation is often clinically occult due to only few and unspecific symptoms which cannot be exactly attributed to the colon. In the last ten years, we have found lethal complications of sigmoid diverticulitis at a frequency of 0.32% (5 cases in 1.557 subsequent autopsies). The clinical differential diagnosis included diverticulitis in none of the cases. This underlines the importance of autopsies for quality control in medicine, because modern diagnostic methods such as computer tomography were not able to give the correct diagnosis in these cases. PMID:9065589

  14. Fusobacterium Nucleatum: Atypical Organism of Pyogenic Liver Abscess Might be Related to Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Yuklyaeva, Nataliya; Sornprom, Suthanya; Hyman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) are the most common form of liver abscesses in the United States. Most cases are caused by enteric bacteria and anaerobes. We report a case of PLA caused by a rare pathogen, Fusobacterium nucleatum, from an unusual primary site of infection. Case Report: A 60-year-old male presented with subacute fever. Initial work-up revealed leukocytosis and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Dental examination and Panorex x-ray were normal. Imaging of the liver with abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a 5.5 cm abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Culture of the aspirate grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. He improved with abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy with moxifloxacin and metronidazole. Colonoscopy performed a few weeks later, demonstrated sigmoid ulceration most likely from the previous diverticulitis. Conclusion: PLAs can be a complication of sigmoid diverticulitis and as a result of occult dental disease as well. The clinical presentation of Fusobacterium infection is diverse and can be fatal if diagnosis is delayed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to preventing serious complications. PMID:27213146

  15. Anaphylaxis to Polyethylene Glycol (Colyte®) in a Patient with Diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Hee; Hwang, Sun Hyuk; Park, Jin Soo; Park, Hae Sim; Shin, Yoo Seob

    2016-10-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are believed to be chemically inert agents, but larger PEG polymers could have immunogenicity. A 39-year-old man was referred to emergency room for loss of consciousness and dyspnea after taking of PEG-3350 (Colyte®). In laboratory findings, the initial serum tryptase level was increased to 91.9 mg/L (normal range: 0.00-11.40 mg/L) without any other laboratory abnormalities. The intradermal test with 10 mg/mL Colyte® showed a 5 × 5 mm wheal, but basophil activation and histamine releasability tests were negative. PEG-3350 is widely used as an osmotic laxative due to its lack of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. However, the loss of mucosal integrity at gastrointestinal membrane such as diverticulitis may be a predisposing factor for anaphylaxis to Colyte®. We report a case of anaphylaxis induced by the ingestion of PEG-3350 in a patient with diverticulitis which might be a risk factor of anaphylaxis. PMID:27550498

  16. Acute colonic diverticulitis: an update on clinical classification and management with MDCT correlation.

    PubMed

    Barat, Maxime; Dohan, Anthony; Pautrat, Karine; Boudiaf, Mourad; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Pocard, Marc; Hoeffel, Christine; Eveno, Clarisse; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the most commonly used classification of acute colonic diverticulitis (ACD) is the modified Hinchey classification, which corresponds to a slightly more complex classification by comparison with the original description. This modified classification allows to categorize patients with ACD into four major categories (I, II, III, IV) and two additional subcategories (Ia and Ib), depending on the severity of the disease. Several studies have clearly demonstrated the impact of this classification for determining the best therapeutic approach and predicting perioperative complications for patients who need surgery. This review provides an update on the classification of ACD along with a special emphasis on the corresponding MDCT features of the different categories and subcategories. This modified Hinchey classification should be known by emergency physicians, radiologists, and surgeons in order to improve patient care and management because each category has a specific therapeutic approach. PMID:27138434

  17. Left Colon Diverticulitis Presenting as Perforated Lumbar Abscess: A Case Report and Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Paramythiotis, Daniel; Kofina, Konstantinia; Papadopoulos, Vassileios N.; Michalopoulos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Diverticular perforation is a common complication of diverticulitis and can lead to the creation of abscesses. The presence of such abscesses on the abdominal wall is rare and can lead to misdiagnosis. We present the case of a patient with abdominal pain and the formation of a large left lumbar abscess due to perforation of a diverticulum of the left colon and our surgical treatment of choice with favorable results. PMID:26881151

  18. Risk Factors for Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis, Diverticular Perforation, and Bleeding: A Plea for More Subtle History Taking

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Stephan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticulosis is a very common condition. Around 20% of diverticula carriers are believed to suffer from diverticular disease during their lifetime. This makes diverticular disease one of the clinically and economically most significant conditions in gastroenterology. The etiopathogenesis of diverticulosis and diverticular disease is not well understood. Epidemiological studies allowed to define risk factors for the development of diverticulosis and the different disease entities associated with it, in particular diverticulitis, perforation, and diverticular bleeding. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed, and the current knowledge about risk factors for diverticulosis and associated conditions reviewed. Results Non-controllable risk factors like age, sex, and genetics, and controllable risk factors like foods, drinks, and physical activity were identified, as well as comorbidities and drugs which increase or decrease the risk of developing diverticula or of suffering from complications. In naming risk factors, it is of utmost importance to differentiate between diverticulosis and the different disease entities. Conclusion Risk factors for diverticulosis and diverticular disease may give a clue towards the possible etiopathogenesis of the conditions. More importantly, knowledge of comorbidities and particularly drugs conferring a risk for development of complicated disease is crucial for patient management. PMID:26989377

  19. Le diverticule de l'urètre féminin: à propos de 18 cas

    PubMed Central

    Statoua, Mouad; El Ghanmi, Jihad; Karmouni, Tarik; El Khader, Khalid; Koutani, Abdellatif; Attya, Ahmed Iben

    2014-01-01

    Le diverticule de l'urètre ou poche sous urétrale est une affection rare, d’étiopathogénie non clairement établie, le diagnostique est clinique confirmé par l'urétrocystographie et le traitement est principalement chirurgicale consistant en une diverticulectomie par voie transvaginale. Nous rapportons l'expérience de notre service dans la prise en charge de cette affection en présentons une étude rétrospective sur une durée de 14 ans (entre 2000 et 2014) où on a pris en charge 18 patientes qui présentait un diverticule de l'urètre, l’âge moyen était de 36 ans, une symptomatologie urinaire ramenait les patientes à consulter où le diagnostic de DU a été posé par examen clinique confirmé en précisant ses caractéristiques en urétrocystographie, la prise en charge était chirurgicale et consistait en une diverticulectomie par voie transvaginale. Les suites post-opératoire était simples, la sonde vésicale retirée en moyenne 5,8 jours après l'intervention, on n'a noté aucune complication chez toute nos patientes, hormis un cas de récidives repris. Devant des troubles mictionnels récidivants de la femme, il est indispensable de rechercher un diverticule uréthral à l'examen clinique. La diverticulectomie transvaginale est l'intervention de choix offrant les meilleurs résultats. PMID:25400845

  20. Meckel's Diverticulitis as a Cause of an Acute Abdomen in the Second Trimester of Pregnancy: Laparoscopic Management

    PubMed Central

    Pandeva, Ivilina; Kumar, Sumit; Alvi, Atif; Nosib, Hema

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Meckel's diverticulitis is an extremely rare cause of an acute abdomen in pregnancy. Its clinical presentation tends to be rather unusual and therefore commonly delaying diagnosis. The surgical method of exploration can be either by laparoscopy or through an open incision. Case Report. We report a case of a 34-year-old, P1 with previous Caesarean section, who presented at 20 weeks with worsening right-sided abdominal pain, distention, and peritonism. Ultrasound scan showed an area of a possibly thickened loop of bowel inconsistent with an appendicitis. The findings at laparoscopy were purulent fluid in the pelvis, a congested appendix, and inflamed Meckel's diverticulum. An appendectomy and excision of the diverticulum was performed using stapler technique. Discussion. Meckel's diverticulitis in pregnancy can have nonspecific presentation and poses difficulties for preoperative diagnosis. Delay in diagnosis and management poses significant maternal and fetal risks. The use of laparoscopy if the gestational age and uterine size permit its use allows a thorough exploration of the abdominal cavity and management of rarer and unexpected pathology. Laparoscopic management of acute abdomen in the midtrimester of pregnancy has been found to be safe and effective. PMID:25648324

  1. Perioperative and postoperative outcomes of perforated diverticulitis Hinchey II and III: open Hartmann's procedure vs. laparoscopic lavage and drainage in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Valentina; Ferrarese, Alessia; Marola, Silvia; Surace, Alessandra; Borello, Alessandro; Ferrara, Yuri; Enrico, Stefano; Martino, Valter; Nano, Mario; Solej, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Hartmann's procedure (HP) is the most performed technique for acute diverticulitis. Laparoscopic lavage and drainage (LLD) is an option evaluated as definitive treatment for diverticulitis Hinchey grade II-III. Aim of the study is to analyze and compare LLD vs HP outcomes. From January 1st 2009 and December 31st 2012 we prospectively enrolled 30 patients with diagnosis of acute diverticulitis Hinchey grade II-III. Fourteen patients underwent to LLD (LLD group, LLDG) and 16 patients to HP (Hartmann group, HG). We evaluated: demographic variables, comorbidities, admission clinical status, radiological imaging, intraoperative outcomes (operative time), postoperative outcomes (admission to ICU, timing of drainage removal, restore of bowel functions, timing of oral solid intake), mortality rate (perioperative and after 12 months) and morbidity rate (surgical, infectious, cardiovascular, renal and systemic complications). Exclusion criteria were: other diseases, colon cancer's suspect or diagnosis, conversion to HP. Patients' mean age was 64.8 years in HG and 62.6 in LLDG. M:F ratio was 6:10 in HG, 8:6 in LLDG. Data showed improved outcomes in LLDG for: total operative time (p < 0.0001), admission to ICU (p 0.0447), restoration of bowel functions (p 0.0035 for gases, p 0.0152 for feces), mobilization (p 0.0087) and length of hospital stay (p 0.0132). According to literature, LLD is related to operative risk, morbidity and mortality rate and length of stay lower than HP. LLD also gives the possibility to avoid stoma. Despite limits of our study, we consider LLD as a "safe and effective" treatment for Hinchey grade II-III acute diverticulitis. PMID:25172780

  2. Elective colonic resection after acute diverticulitis improves quality of life, intestinal symptoms and functional outcome: experts' perspectives and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Forgione, Antonello; Guraya, Salman Yousuf

    2016-03-01

    The decision whether to operate for diverticular disease and the appropriate selection of right candidates for elective colectomy after recovery from an uncomplicated episode of acute diverticulitis remains controversial. Although both the impact of symptomatic disease and occurrence of its complications are extensively studied, there is no consensus about the role of elective colonic resection in the management of symptomatic recurrent diverticulitis. In this study, the database of ERIC, the Web of Science, EMBASE, and MEDLINE were searched for the English-language published articles about the functional outcomes and symptomatic improvement in patients after elective surgery for diverticular disease. A majority of clinical trials showed that elective surgery following a successful conservative treatment of acute diverticulitis resulted in significantly better social and functional well-being. In addition, elective surgery greatly reduces the potential events of disease recurrence, thus decreasing financial burden on the national health services. However, to obtain the best functional outcome surgical intervention must be individualized and tailored to meet every single patient's specific indigenous symptomatology. PMID:27015932

  3. Cochleo-saccular degeneration in one of three sisters with hereditary deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and progressive sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, M; MacRae, D; O-Uchi, T; Alford, B R

    1981-01-01

    This is a report of cochleo-saccular degeneration found in temporal bones from a patient who had suffered from slowly progressive and total sensorineural deafness which had an inherited origin. At age 8, this patient began to complain of hearing loss, and by age 10 she was totally deaf. The patient was 1 of 3 female siblings who have suffered from an exactly identical progressive disease: deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and ulceration, and sensory neuropathy. The temporal bone pathology found in this case was the degenerative change in the cochlear duct and sacculus. No pathology was found in the utriculus and semicircular canals. PMID:6937848

  4. The AFC Score: Validation of a 4-Item Predicting Score of Postoperative Mortality After Colorectal Resection for Cancer or Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Arnaud; Panis, Yves; Mantion, Georges; Slim, Karem; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Vicaut, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present prospective study was to validate externally a 4-item predictive score of mortality after colorectal surgery (the AFC score) by testing its generalizability on a new population. Summary Background Data: We have recently reported, in a French prospective multicenter study, that age older than 70 years, neurologic comorbidity, underweight (body weight loss >10% in <6 months), and emergency surgery significantly increased postoperative mortality after resection for cancer or diverticulitis. Patients and Methods: From June to September 2004, 1049 consecutive patients (548 men and 499 women) with a mean age of 67 ± 14 years, undergoing open or laparoscopic colorectal resection, were prospectively included. The AFC score was validated in this population. We assessed also the predictive value of other scores, such as the “Glasgow” score and the ASA score. To express and compare the predictive value of the different scores, a receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated. Results: Postoperative mortality rate was 4.6%. Variables already identified as predictors of mortality and used in the AFC score were also found to be associated with a high odds ratio in this study: emergency surgery, body weight loss >10%, neurologic comorbidity, and age older than 70 years in a multivariate logistic model. The validity of the AFC score in this population was found very high based both on the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test (P = 0.37) and on the area under the ROC curve (0.89). We also found that discriminatory capacity was higher than other currently used risk scoring systems such as the Glasgow or ASA score. Conclusion: The present prospective study validated the AFC score as a pertinent predictive score of postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery. Because it is based on only 4 risk factors, the AFC score can be used in daily practice. PMID:17592296

  5. Complications du diverticule de Meckel (DM) chez l'adulte: à propos de 11 cas au CHU-Yalgado Ouédraogo au Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouangré, Edgar; Zida, Maurice; Bazongo, Moussa; Sanou, Adama; Bonkoungou, Gilbert Patindé; Doamba, Rodrigue Namékinsba; Sawadogo, Elie Yamba; Ouédraogo, Sidziguin; Zongo, Nayi; Traore, Si Simon

    2015-01-01

    Le diverticule de Meckel (DM) est la persistance partielle du canal omphalomésentérique. Ses complications sont rares. Le diagnostic est le plus souvent per opératoire. L'objectif a été de décrire les complications du diverticule de Meckel chez l'adulte dans le service de chirurgie générale et digestive du CHU Yalgado Ouédraogo. Il s'est agi d'une étude transversale descriptive sur 10 ans (janvier 2004-décembre 2013) portant sur les dossiers des patients âgés de plus de 15 ans ayant présenté un DM compliqué. Durant la période d’étude, 11 cas ont été colligés. L'incidence annuelle a été de 11 cas. Nous avons noté une prédominance masculine avec un sex-ratio de 4,5. L’âge moyen des patients était de 29,8 ans. Le diagnostic préopératoire a été dans huit cas une occlusion intestinale aiguë, une appendicite aiguë dans deux cas, une péritonite aiguë généralisée dans un cas. Il a été diagnostiqué en peropératoire une occlusion intestinale dans neuf cas; une diverticulite dans un cas et un cas de perforation du DM. Tous les DM avaient été réséqués dont huit résections segmentaires iléales emportant le DM et trois résections cunéiformes. Tous les DM étaient situés à moins d'un mètre de la jonction iléo-caecale. L'histologie réalisée dans deux cas avait conclu à une diverticulite. Les suites opératoires ont été simples dans neuf cas, compliquées dans deux cas dont une éventration et un décès. Les complications du diverticule de Meckel sont rares. Le diagnostic préopératoire est difficile. Le traitement est essentiellement chirurgical. PMID:26958137

  6. Surgical Treatment of Diverticulitis: Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Resection Is Predominantly Used for Complex Cases and Is Associated With Increased Postoperative Complications and Prolonged Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Hiromichi; Rhee, Rebecca; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Yan, Xiaohong; Njoh, Linda; Cekic, Vesna; Whelan, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic (LAP) colectomy is now the "gold" standard for diverticulitis; the role of hand-assisted LAP (HAL) and Open methods today is unclear. This study assessed the elective use of these methods for diverticulitis. Methods A retrospective review of demographic, comorbidity (Carlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]), resection type, and short-term outcomes was carried out. Results There were 125 (44.5%) LAP, 125 (44.5%) HAL, and 31 (11%) Open cases (overall N = 281). The mean age, body mass index, and percentage of high-risk patients (CCI score >2) of the HAL group were greater (P < .05) than the LAP group (vs Open, P = ns). The Open group's mean age and percent with CCI >2 was greater when compared with the LAP group (P < .05). More Open (P < .05) and HAL patients had complex disease (Open, 63%; HAL, 40%, LAP, 22%) and were diverted (Open, 35%; HAL, 10%; LAP, 3%). Time to bowel movement was not different; however, there was a stepwise increase in median length of stay (LOS; days) from the LAP (5 days) to HAL (6 days) to Open group (7 days) (P < .05 for all). The LAP complication rate (22.4%) was lower (P < .05) than the HAL (42.4%) or Open groups' (45.2%) rates. The LAP surgical site infection rate (5.6%) was lower (P < .05) than the HAL (12.8%) or Open groups (19.6%). Conclusion The HAL and Open groups had more high risk, complex disease, diverted, and older patients than the LAP group; likewise, the overall complication rate and LOS was higher in the HAL and Open groups. Use of HAL methods likely contributed to the high minimally invasive surgery utilization rate (89%). PMID:26611789

  7. Diverticulitis and diverticulosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... and sweet potatoes Lettuce and peeled potatoes Vegetable juices High-fiber cereals (such as shredded wheat) and muffins Hot cereals, such as oatmeal, farina, and cream of wheat Whole-grain breads (whole wheat or whole rye)

  8. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  9. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctors believe the main cause is a low-fiber diet. Most people with diverticulosis don't have symptoms. ... a colonoscopy to screen for cancer. A high-fiber diet and mild pain reliever will often relieve symptoms. ...

  10. Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Medline Plus GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel ... GI Symptoms Gastroparesis See All Topics (A-Z) GI Procedures Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer Screening See All Procedures ( ...

  11. Diverticula, Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 03 August 2015 Print Tweet GERD GERD Awareness Week November 21–27, 2010 For Immediate Release Media ... 1799 MILWAUKEE, Nov. 8, 2010 -- National GERD Awareness Week takes place the week of Thanksgiving, a prime ...

  12. Diverticula, Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common Questions Does Pancreatitis Cause FAPS and IBS? Hirschsprung's Disease Intestinal Psuedo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome Other ... Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  13. Uncommon Caecum Diverticulitis Mimicking Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Özkan; Kiziltan, Remzi; Bayrak, Vedat; Çelik, Sebahattin; Çalli, Iskan

    2016-01-01

    Diverticulum of the cecum is a rarely seen reason of acute abdomen and it is difficult to be distinguished from appendicitis. The diagnosis is generally made during operation. We have presented this case in order to remember that it is a disease which should be kept in mind in cases of right lower quadrant pain. PMID:27006852

  14. Diverticula, Diverticulosis, Diverticulitis: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and how improve living with these conditions . Publication Library Books of Interest Medical Definitions About IFFGD About us Our Mission Awareness Activities Advocacy Activities Research Leadership IFFGD Symposium Report Industry Council Contact Us News Industry Treatment News Medical ...

  15. Unusual presentation of sigmoid diverticulitis as an acute scrotum.

    PubMed

    Klutke, C G; Miles, B J; Obeid, F

    1988-02-01

    We report a case of inflammation of the spermatic cord and testicle resulting from a perforated diverticulum of the sigmoid colon. Management included sigmoid resection with diversion, right orchiectomy and débridement of the right groin. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis presenting initially as an acute scrotum. PMID:3339751

  16. Effectiveness of Elective Laparoscopic Treatment for Colonic Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Grillone, Gianluca; Frattini, Paolo; De Luca, Antonio; Girardi, Valerio; Scandroglio, Ildo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the short- and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy for the elective treatment of diverticular disease. Methods: A consecutive unselected series of 94 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy for diverticular disease from 2008 to 2012 was analyzed. We collected patients-, surgery- and hospital stay–related data, as well as the short- and long-term outcomes. Operative steps, instrumentation, and postoperative cares were standardized. Comorbidity was assessed by Charlson comorbidity index. Complications were classified using the Clavien-Dindo classification system. The qualitative long-term assessment was carried out by subjecting patients to the validated gastrointestinal quality of life index questionnaire before and after surgery. Results: The mean age of our cohort was 61.3 ± 11.0 years with a Charlson comorbidity index of 1.2 ± 1.5. Mean operative time was 213.5 ± 60.8 minutes and estimated blood loss was 67.2 ± 94.3 mL. We had 3 cases (3.2%) of conversion to open laparotomy. The rates of postoperative complications were 35.1%, 6.3%, 2.1%, and 1.06%, respectively, for grades 1, 2, 3b, and 5 according to the Clavien-Dindo system. Length of hospital stay was 8.1 ± 1.9 days, and we have not recorded readmissions in patients discharged within 60 days after surgery. Median follow-up was of 9.6 ± 2.7 months. We observed no recurrence of diverticular disease, but there was evidence of 3 cases of incisional hernia (3.19%). The difference between preoperative and late gastrointestinal quality of life index score was statistically significant (97.1 ± 5.8 vs 129.6 ± 8.0). Conclusions: Elective laparoscopic treatment of colonic diverticular disease represents an effective option that produces adequate postoperative results and ensures a satisfactory functional outcome. PMID:26005319

  17. Understanding Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... causing serious illness. Causes The leading but unproven theory is that a low-fiber diet causes diverticular disease. The disease was first noticed in the United States in the early 1900s, around the time processed ...

  18. Understanding Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect infections. Stool sample. This test may show bleeding in the digestive tract. Digital rectal exam. Your healthcare provider will insert a gloved finger into your rectum to check for pain, bleeding, or a blockage. Imaging tests, including CT scan, ...

  19. Dealing with Diverticulitis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walking really does speed recovery—it gets your system moving again! That, plus good pain management, assured my recovery was excellent. “…so painful, I couldn't walk across the room.” — Sharon Ellison , Facilitator, Educational Resources for Learning Disabled Youth Washington, DC I gradually began to ...

  20. Subcutaneous Emphysema, Pneumomediastinum, Pneumoretroperitoneum, and Pneumoscrotum: Unusual Complications of Acute Perforated Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Fosi, S.; Giuricin, V.; Girardi, V.; Di Caprera, E.; Costanzo, E.; Di Trapano, R.; Simonetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema usually result from spontaneous alveolar wall rupture and, far less commonly, from disruption of the upper airways or gastrointestinal tract. Subcutaneous neck emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and retropneumoperitoneum caused by nontraumatic perforations of the colon have been infrequently reported. The main symptoms of spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema are swelling and crepitus over the involved site; further clinical findings in case of subcutaneous cervical and mediastinal emphysema can be neck and chest pain and dyspnea. Radiological imaging plays an important role to achieve the correct diagnosis and extension of the disease. We present a quite rare case of spontaneous subcutaneous cervical emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and pneumoretroperitoneum due to perforation of an occult sigmoid diverticulum. Abdomen ultrasound, chest X-rays, and computer tomography (CT) were performed to evaluate the free gas extension and to identify potential sources of extravasating gas. Radiological diagnosis was confirmed by the subsequent surgical exploration. PMID:25136471

  1. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: News From Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flor, Nicola; Soldi, Simone; Zanchetta, Edoardo; Sbaraini, Sara; Pesapane, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    Different scenarios embrace computed tomography imaging and diverticula, including asymptomatic (diverticulosis) and symptomatic patients (acute diverticulitis, follow-up of acute diverticulitis, chronic diverticulitis). If the role of computed tomography is validated and widely supported by evidence in case of acute diverticulitis, this is not the case of patients in their follow-up for acute diverticulitis or with symptoms related to diverticula, but without acute inflammation. In these settings, computed tomography colonography is gaining consensus as the preferred radiologic test. PMID:27622355

  2. "Eat Fresh Vegetables, Fruit, and Whole Grain Products"

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diverticulitis "Eat fresh vegetables, fruit, and whole grain products." Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... diverticulitis. I once again eat fresh vegetables and fruit and whole grain products. My two episodes of ...

  3. Eat fresh vegetables, fruit, and whole grain products | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diverticulitis "Eat fresh vegetables, fruit, and whole grain products." Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... diverticulitis. I once again eat fresh vegetables and fruit and whole grain products. My two episodes of ...

  4. Mesenteric venous thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the tissues surrounding the veins, and include: Appendicitis Cancer Diverticulitis Liver disease with cirrhosis Pancreatitis Patients ... Mesenteric venous thrombosis. Mayo Clin Proc Read More Appendicitis Blood clots Cirrhosis Diverticulitis Small intestinal ischemia and ...

  5. Diverticulosis

    MedlinePlus

    Diverticula - diverticulosis; Diverticulitis - diverticulosis; Diverticular disease - diverticulosis; G.I. bleed - diverticulosis; Gastrointestinal hemorrhage - diverticulosis; Gastrointestinal bleed - diverticulosis

  6. Gastrointestinal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by a variety of illnesses. These include: Appendicitis Cancer Crohn's disease Diverticulitis Gallbladder disease Peptic ulcer disease Ulcerative colitis It may also be caused by abdominal surgery.

  7. Treatment of Diverticular Disease With Aminosalicylates: The Evidence.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Barbaro, Maria R; Bellacosa, Lara; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Colonic diverticulosis is an increasingly common condition in Western industrialized countries. About 20% of patients develop symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, and, eventually, diverticulitis or other complications. The management of symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD) and the prevention of acute diverticulitis remains a challenge for the clinician. The rationale for the use of aminosalicylates, such as mesalazine, is based on the assumption of low-grade inflammation in SUDD and symptoms generation, whereas an overt inflammation may induce diverticulitis in patients with diverticular disease. Clinical scenarios in which the efficacy and safety of mesalazine have been studied include SUDD, prevention of diverticulitis, and of recurrent diverticulitis. Data from uncontrolled studies suggest a benefit of mesalazine on patients with SUDD, whereas data from randomized controlled trials showed some evidence of improvement of symptoms, although contrasting results are reported. The largest study so far published on the efficacy of mesalamine in the prevention of recurrence of diverticulitis showed that mesalamine was not superior to placebo. At this time, the role of mesalazine in the prevention of acute diverticulitis remains to be defined with many issues open and unresolved. PMID:27622369

  8. Modern concepts in diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Danielle; Winter, Des C

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been a striking shift in our understanding of the epidemiology, pathology, and management of diverticular disease. Indeed, many of the guidelines published in the late nineties and early 2000s are now redundant. High-fiber diets, avoidance of nuts and seeds, antibiotic treatment for mild diverticulitis, elective resection after 2 attacks of diverticulitis, Hartmann's procedure (HP), and aggressive management of young patients are all open to question. The more we challenge our understanding of diverticulitis it becomes apparent how little we know about this disease entity. This review aims update the reader on current hypotheses and evidencebased modern management strategies in diverticular disease. PMID:25811113

  9. Diverticulite duodénale: complication inhabituelle pas toujours facile à gérer

    PubMed Central

    Elhjouji, Abderrahman; Jaiteh, Lamine; Bounaim, Ahmed; Aitali, Abdelmounaim; Sair, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Les diverticules duodénaux sont assez fréquents, la majorité reste asymptomatique. Les complications les plus fréquemment rapportées sont les hémorragies et les pancréatites. Contrairement aux diverticules coliques, la survenue de diverticulite est rare. Nous rapportons le cas d'une infection d'un gros diverticule duodénal en mettant le point sur la difficulté de la prise en charge de cette entité pathologique. PMID:26958122

  10. Support Vector Machine Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnsdotter, Malin; Nalin, Kajsa; Hansson, Lars-Erik; Malmgren, Helge

    This study explores the feasibility of a decision-support system for patients seeking care for acute abdominal pain, and, specifically the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis. We used a linear support vector machine (SVM) to separate diverticulitis from all other reported cases of abdominal pain and from the important differential diagnosis non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP). On a database containing 3337 patients, the SVM obtained results comparable to those of the doctors in separating diverticulitis or NSAP from the remaining diseases. The distinction between diverticulitis and NSAP was, however, substantially improved by the SVM. For this patient group, the doctors achieved a sensitivity of 0.714 and a specificity of 0.963. When adjusted to the physicians' results, the SVM sensitivity/specificity was higher at 0.714/0.985 and 0.786/0.963 respectively. Age was found as the most important discriminative variable, closely followed by C-reactive protein level and lower left side pain.

  11. Recent Advances in Diverticular Disease.

    PubMed

    Peery, Anne F

    2016-07-01

    Diverticular disease is common and accounts for substantial health care utilization in the USA. Recent publications in the areas of diverticulosis and diverticular disease have highlighted several notable advances that are now changing practice. Despite colonic diverticula being common, only 1-4 % of individuals with colonic diverticula will develop diverticulitis. After a first occurrence of acute diverticulitis, the risk of recurrence is 20 % at 5 years. Complications most commonly occur with the first occurrence of acute diverticulitis and not with recurrent episodes. After an episode of diverticulitis, many patients continue to experience chronic gastrointestinal symptoms. Prophylactic surgery is an option to reduce the risk of recurrence and its negative impact on quality of life. Importantly, the rationale for surgery is no longer to prevent complications because this risk is low. The review concludes with practical recommendations for patients with diverticulosis and diverticular disease. PMID:27241190

  12. Retrograde cystography

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bladder or urethra Tumor of the bladder Urinary tract infection Vesicoureteric reflux Normal Results The bladder appears normal. ... More Bladder stones Blood clots Diverticulitis Reflux nephropathy Urinary tract infection - adults X-ray Update Date 1/21/2015 ...

  13. Digestive Health Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vegetables Highest in Fiber Per Serving Fruits Artichokes Apples, pears (with skin) Berries (blackberries, blueberries, raspberries) Dates ... Usually no symptoms Complications of diverticulosis include: Bright red rectal bleeding with clots Diverticulitis Ways to prevent ...

  14. Anorectal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by intestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease or diverticulitis . The following factors increase your risk ... used to treat cancer Diabetes Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis ) Use of corticosteroid medicines Weakened ...

  15. Diverticular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ordered for a different reason, such as routine screening that checks for colorectal cancer or other digestive ... For mild cases of diverticulitis, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics. He or she may also suggest that you ...

  16. Abdominal exploration

    MedlinePlus

    ... these are aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), vitamin E, warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), or ticlopidine (Ticlid). Ask your ... Biopsy Cancer Chronic pancreatitis CT scan Diverticulitis Ectopic pregnancy Endometriosis Hodgkin lymphoma Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) Peritonitis - ...

  17. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many potential causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  18. Management of Diverticular Disease in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Johannes K; Yaqub, Sheraz; Øresland, Tom

    2016-10-01

    Throughout the last century, the incidence of diverticular disease of the colon has increased tremendously in industrialized countries; nevertheless, the management of this condition is still controversial. Although several international guidelines for the management of diverticular disease are based on the same evidence, the recommendations differ greatly, emphasizing the lack of high-quality prospective studies. In Scandinavia, official guidelines for the management of diverticular disease exist only in Denmark. However, the treatment policies are quite similar in all Scandinavian countries. Computed tomography is the first choice for imaging of acute diverticulitis and its complications. Furthermore, the use of antibiotics in uncomplicated diverticulitis is nearly abandoned in Scandinavia, whereas several international guidelines still recommend their use. There is a broad consensus that abscesses secondary to acute diverticulitis can safely be managed with percutaneous drainage, which is in line with international recommendations. The surgical management of perforated diverticulitis with peritonitis is still as controversial in Scandinavia as elsewhere. Common surgical options are laparoscopic peritoneal lavage, primary resection with anastomosis, and primary resection with terminal colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). Elective sigmoid resection in patients with diverticular disease seems to be performed less frequently in Scandinavia than in other European countries; the right indications are a current matter of debate. Symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease in the absence of diverticulitis has not gained great attention in Scandinavia. PMID:27622365

  19. Diverticulosis today: unfashionable and still under-researched

    PubMed Central

    Tursi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is a widespread disease, and its prevalence is increasing especially in the developing world. The underlying pathological mechanisms that cause the formation of colonic diverticula remain unclear but are likely to be the result of complex interactions among age, diet, genetic factors, colonic motility, and changes in colonic structure. The large majority of patients remain asymptomatic throughout their life, one fifth of them become symptomatic (developing the so-called ‘diverticular disease’) while only a minority of these will develop acute diverticulitis. The factors predicting the development of symptoms remain to be identified. Again, it is generally recognized that diverticular disease occurrence is probably related to complex interactions among colonic motility, diet, lifestyle, and genetic features. Changes in intestinal microflora due to low-fiber diet and consequent low-grade inflammation are thought to be one of the mechanisms responsible for symptoms occurrence of both diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis. Current therapeutic approaches with rifaximin and mesalazine to treat the symptoms seem to be promising. Antibiotic treatment is currently advised only in acute complicated diverticulitis, and no treatment has currently proven effective in preventing the recurrence of acute diverticulitis. Further studies are required in order to clarify the reasons why diverticulosis occurs and the factors triggering occurrence of symptoms. Moreover, the reasons why rifaximin and mesalazine work in symptomatic diverticular disease but not in acute diverticulitis are yet to be elucidated. PMID:26929783

  20. Diverticulosis today: unfashionable and still under-researched.

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Diverticulosis of the colon is a widespread disease, and its prevalence is increasing especially in the developing world. The underlying pathological mechanisms that cause the formation of colonic diverticula remain unclear but are likely to be the result of complex interactions among age, diet, genetic factors, colonic motility, and changes in colonic structure. The large majority of patients remain asymptomatic throughout their life, one fifth of them become symptomatic (developing the so-called 'diverticular disease') while only a minority of these will develop acute diverticulitis. The factors predicting the development of symptoms remain to be identified. Again, it is generally recognized that diverticular disease occurrence is probably related to complex interactions among colonic motility, diet, lifestyle, and genetic features. Changes in intestinal microflora due to low-fiber diet and consequent low-grade inflammation are thought to be one of the mechanisms responsible for symptoms occurrence of both diverticular disease and acute diverticulitis. Current therapeutic approaches with rifaximin and mesalazine to treat the symptoms seem to be promising. Antibiotic treatment is currently advised only in acute complicated diverticulitis, and no treatment has currently proven effective in preventing the recurrence of acute diverticulitis. Further studies are required in order to clarify the reasons why diverticulosis occurs and the factors triggering occurrence of symptoms. Moreover, the reasons why rifaximin and mesalazine work in symptomatic diverticular disease but not in acute diverticulitis are yet to be elucidated. PMID:26929783

  1. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation. PMID:27133242

  2. Snapshot in surgery: brain abscess as a complication of a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhaowei; Wuppalapati, Siddhartha; Scott, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 35-year-old man was found to have a cerebral abscess secondary to a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess. Both cultures grew Streptococcus anginosus. Brain abscess is a rare but potential complication of sigmoid diverticulitis. Streptococcus anginosus, which is found in human gut flora, is a common cause of brain abscess. PMID:26185659

  3. [Prevention of complications of colonic diverticular disease in outpatient practice].

    PubMed

    Levchenko, S V; Komissarenko, I A; Lazebnik, L B

    2016-01-01

    The literature review gives an update on the frequency and risk factors of complications of colonic diverticular disease, the results of recent investigations, which suggest the success and safety of outpatient treatment for uncomplicated acute diverticulitis. It evaluates the efficacy of pharmacological agents from different groups in preventing complications of colonic diverticular disease. PMID:27014782

  4. Point of Care 3D Ultrasound for Various Applications: A Pilot Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Appendicitis; Evidence of Cholecystectomy; Gallstones; Pregnancy, Ectopic; Aortic Aneurysm; Kidney Stones; Intrauterine Pregnancy; Diverticulitis; Abdominal Injuries; Tumors; Pancreatitis; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intraabdominal Infections; Intestinal Diseases; Pregnancy; Vascular Disease; Uterine Fibroids; Ovarian Cysts; Uterine Abnominalies; Bladder Abnominalies; Testicular Abnominalies; Polyps

  5. Two Cases of Omental Torsion Mimicking Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Liaqat, Naeem; Dar, Sajid Hameed; Sandhu, Asif Iqbal; Nayyer, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is often simulated by other entities like mesenteric adenitis, worm infestation, Meckel’s diverticulitis, urinary tract infection and rarely omental torsion. We report two cases, a 6 year old boy and an 11 year old girl, who presented with symptoms and signs of acute appendicitis but upon exploration turned out to be omental torsion. PMID:24834389

  6. Prognostic Indicators as Provided by the EPIC ClearView

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-18

    Coronary Artery Disease; Congestive Heart Failure; Valvular Heart Disease; Atrial Fibrillation; Hypertension; Pyelonephritis; Acute Renal Failure; Renal Failure; Viral Hepatitis; Alcoholic Hepatitis; Steatohepatitis; Cirrhosis; Asthma; COPD; Bronchitis; Emphysema; Pneumonia; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Diverticulitis; Peptic Ulcer Disease; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Cholecystitis; Pancreatitis; Malabsorption Disorders; Celiac Sprue; Diabetes

  7. Laparoscopically Assisted Surgery for Colonic Perforation with Peritonitis - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    1998-01-01

    Elective laparoscopic colonic surgery is increasingly recognized as feasible and perhaps preferential. A case of laparoscopically assisted surgery for trauma to the rectum with bacterial peritonitis is presented. It presents an example of the application of this modality to the treatment of iatrogenic colon perforations and perhaps selected diverticulitis. PMID:9876737

  8. Diverticular disease as a chronic illness: evolving epidemiologic and clinical insights.

    PubMed

    Strate, Lisa L; Modi, Rusha; Cohen, Erica; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2012-10-01

    Diverticular disease imposes a significant burden on Western and industrialized societies. The traditional pathogenesis model posits that low dietary fiber predisposes to diverticulosis, and fecalith obstruction prompts acute diverticulitis that is managed with broad-spectrum antibiotics or surgery. However, a growing body of knowledge is shifting the paradigm of diverticular disease from an acute surgical illness to a chronic bowel disorder composed of recurrent abdominal symptoms and considerable psychosocial impact. New research implicates a role for low-grade inflammation, sensory-motor nerve damage, and dysbiosis in a clinical picture that mimics irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and even inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Far from being an isolated event, acute diverticulitis may be the catalyst for chronic symptoms including abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and "post-diverticulitis IBS." In addition, studies reveal lower health-related quality of life in patients with chronic diverticular disease vs. controls. Health-care providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for the multifaceted presentations of diverticular disease, and remain aware that it might contribute to long-term emotional distress beyond traditional diverticulitis attacks. These developments are prompting a shift in therapeutic approaches from widespread antimicrobials and supportive care to the use of probiotics, mesalamine, and gut-directed antibiotics. This review addresses the emerging literature regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of chronic, symptomatic diverticular disease, and provides current answers to common clinical questions. PMID:22777341

  9. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the small intestine (duodenum) may be caused by cancer of the pancreas, scarring from an ulcer, or Crohn disease . Rarely, a gallstone, a mass of undigested food, or a collection of parasitic worms may block ... commonly caused by cancer, diverticulitis , or a hard lump of stool (fecal ...

  10. Butyricimonas virosa bacteraemia and bowel disease: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Enemchukwu, C U; Ben-Faras, H; Gialanella, P; Szymczak, W A; Nosanchuk, J D; Madaline, T F

    2016-09-01

    Only two cases of human infection with the anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus Butyricimonas virosa have been previously reported. We describe the case of a 69-year-old man with B. virosa and diverticulitis, further supporting an association of bacteraemia with this pathogen to bowel disease. We also summarize the characteristics of the previously described cases. PMID:27408738

  11. Laparoscopic approach in complicated diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Rotholtz, Nicolás A; Canelas, Alejandro G; Bun, Maximiliano E; Laporte, Mariano; Sadava, Emmanuel E; Ferrentino, Natalia; Guckenheimer, Sebastián A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the results of laparoscopic colectomy in complicated diverticular disease. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted at an academic teaching hospital. Data were collected from a database established earlier, which comprise of all patients who underwent laparoscopic colectomy for diverticular disease between 2000 and 2013. The series was divided into two groups that were compared: Patients with complicated disease (abscess, perforation, fistula, or stenosis) (G1) and patients undergoing surgery for recurrent diverticulitis (G2). Recurrent diverticulitis was defined as two or more episodes of diverticulitis regardless of patient age. Data regarding patient demographics, comorbidities, prior abdominal operations, history of acute diverticulitis, classification of acute diverticulitis at index admission and intra and postoperative variables were extracted. Univariate analysis was performed in both groups. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixty patients were included: 28% (72 patients) belonged to G1 and 72% (188 patients) to G2. The mean age was 57 (27-89) years. The average number of episodes of diverticulitis before surgery was 2.1 (r 0-10); 43 patients had no previous inflammatory pathology. There were significant differences between the two groups with respect to conversion rate and hospital stay (G1 18% vs G2 3.2%, P = 0.001; G1: 4.7 d vs G2 3.3 d, P < 0.001). The anastomotic dehiscence rate was 2.3%, with no statistical difference between the groups (G1 2.7% vs G2 2.1%, P = 0.5). There were no differences in demographic data (body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiology and previous abdominal surgery), operative time and intraoperative and postoperative complications between the groups. The mortality rate was 0.38% (1 patient), represented by a death secondary to septic shock in G2. CONCLUSION: The results support that the laparoscopic approach in any kind of complicated diverticular disease can be performed with low morbidity and

  12. Laparoscopic Peritoneal Lavage: A Definitive Treatment for Diverticular Peritonitis or a “Bridge” to Elective Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Trastulli, Stefano; Vettoretto, Nereo; Milani, Diego; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Adamenko, Olga; Desiderio, Jacopo; Burattini, Maria Federica; Parisi, Amilcare; Arezzo, Alberto; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To this day, the treatment of generalized peritonitis secondary to diverticular perforation is still controversial. Recently, in patients with acute sigmoid diverticulitis, laparoscopic lavage and drainage has gained a wide interest as an alternative to resection. Based on this backdrop, we decided to perform a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of peritoneal lavage in perforated diverticular disease. A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed for case series and comparative studies published between January 1992 and February 2014 describing laparoscopic peritoneal lavage in patients with perforated diverticulitis. A total of 19 articles consisting of 10 cohort studies, 8 case series, and 1 controlled clinical trial met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. In total these studies analyzed data from 871 patients. The mean follow-up time ranged from 1.5 to 96 months when reported. In 11 studies, the success rate of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage, defined as patients alive without surgical treatment for a recurrent episode of diverticulitis, was 24.3%. In patients with Hinchey stage III diverticulitis, the incidence of laparotomy conversion was 1%, whereas in patients with stage IV it was 45%. The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 2.9%. The 30-day postoperative reintervention rate was 4.9%, whereas 2% of patients required a percutaneous drainage. Readmission rate after the first hospitalization for recurrent diverticulitis was 6%. Most patients who were readmitted (69%) required redo surgery. A 2-stage laparoscopic intervention was performed in 18.3% of patients. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage should be considered an effective and safe option for the treatment of patients with sigmoid diverticulitis with Hinchey stage III peritonitis; it can also be consider as a “bridge” surgical step combined with a delayed and elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in order to avoid a Hartmann procedure

  13. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage: a definitive treatment for diverticular peritonitis or a "bridge" to elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy?: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Trastulli, Stefano; Vettoretto, Nereo; Milani, Diego; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Adamenko, Olga; Desiderio, Jacopo; Burattini, Maria Federica; Parisi, Amilcare; Arezzo, Alberto; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    To this day, the treatment of generalized peritonitis secondary to diverticular perforation is still controversial. Recently, in patients with acute sigmoid diverticulitis, laparoscopic lavage and drainage has gained a wide interest as an alternative to resection. Based on this backdrop, we decided to perform a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of peritoneal lavage in perforated diverticular disease.A bibliographic search was performed in PubMed for case series and comparative studies published between January 1992 and February 2014 describing laparoscopic peritoneal lavage in patients with perforated diverticulitis.A total of 19 articles consisting of 10 cohort studies, 8 case series, and 1 controlled clinical trial met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. In total these studies analyzed data from 871 patients. The mean follow-up time ranged from 1.5 to 96 months when reported. In 11 studies, the success rate of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage, defined as patients alive without surgical treatment for a recurrent episode of diverticulitis, was 24.3%. In patients with Hinchey stage III diverticulitis, the incidence of laparotomy conversion was 1%, whereas in patients with stage IV it was 45%. The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 2.9%. The 30-day postoperative reintervention rate was 4.9%, whereas 2% of patients required a percutaneous drainage. Readmission rate after the first hospitalization for recurrent diverticulitis was 6%. Most patients who were readmitted (69%) required redo surgery. A 2-stage laparoscopic intervention was performed in 18.3% of patients.Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage should be considered an effective and safe option for the treatment of patients with sigmoid diverticulitis with Hinchey stage III peritonitis; it can also be consider as a "bridge" surgical step combined with a delayed and elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in order to avoid a Hartmann procedure. This minimally

  14. Diverticular disease: Epidemiology and management

    PubMed Central

    Weizman, Adam V; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon is among the most prevalent conditions in western society and is among the leading reasons for outpatient visits and causes of hospitalization. While previously considered to be a disease primarily affecting the elderly, there is increasing incidence among individuals younger than 40 years of age. Diverticular disease most frequently presents as uncomplicated diverticulitis, and the cornerstone of management is antibiotic therapy and bowel rest. Segmental colitis associated with diverticula shares common histopathological features with inflammatory bowel disease and may benefit from treatment with 5-aminosalicylates. Surgical management may be required for patients with recurrent diverticulitis or one of its complications including peridiverticular abscess, perforation, fistulizing disease, and strictures and/or obstruction. PMID:21876861

  15. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly: a rare aetiology masquerading as a diverticular bleed.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikita R; Boland, Michael R; Abdelraheem, Omar; Merrigan, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding per rectum is a relatively common acute surgical presentation. Common causes include diverticular disease, colitis, haemorrhoids, polyps, etc. An 83-year-old man with a history of recurrent rectosigmoid diverticulitis and bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms for 2 years presented with rectal bleeding. He was suspected to have a diverticular bleed based on history and examination. A CT scan revealed a large haematoma adjacent to the right isolated internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIIAA) almost indistinguishable from the adjacent rectosigmoid, consistent with a ruptured IIIAA and an ileorectal fistula. The fistula was of a primary vascular enteric type and was accentuated by the inflammation arising from the diverticulitis. Hence, presence of more common or apparently obvious causes should not deter clinicians from thoroughly investigating the case. Rare causes should be kept in mind while dealing with common acute presentations, especially in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. PMID:27033287

  16. Suppurative Meckel Diiverticulum in a 3-Year-Old Girl Presenting with Periumbilical Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Sook; Lim, Chun Woo; Park, Taejin; Cho, Jae-Min; Youn, Hee-Shang

    2015-01-01

    Meckel diverticulum (MD) is one of the most common congenital gastrointestinal anomalies and occurs in 1.2-2% of the general population. MD usually presents with massive painless rectal bleeding, intestinal obstruction or inflammation in children and adults. Suppurative Meckel diverticulitis is uncommon in children. An experience is described of a 3-year-old girl with suppurative inflammation in a tip of MD. She complained of acute colicky abdominal pain, vomiting and periumbilical erythema. Laparoscopic surgery found a relatively long MD with necrotic and fluid-filled cystic end, which was attatched to abdominal wall caused by inflammation. Herein, we report an interesting and unusual case of a suppurative Meckel diverticulitis presenting as periumbilical cellulitis in a child. Because of its varied presentations, MD might always be considered as one of the differential diagonosis. PMID:25866736

  17. Prognostic Role of the Endoscopic Classification "DICA".

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Elisei, Walter; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular inflammation and complication assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Its predictive value in those patients was recently retrospectively assessed. For each patient, the following parameters were recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein, fecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis, months of follow-up, therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any), occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis, and need of surgery. A total of 1651 patients (793 male, 858 female, mean age 66.6±11.1 y) were enrolled: 939 (56.9%) classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) as DICA 2, and 211 (12.8%) as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9 to 138) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients, and surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated with the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ=405.029; P<0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=4.319; 95% CI, 3.639-5.126; P<0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients scheduled therapy was effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391-0.914) (P=0.006, log-rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and need of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122-0.364) and 0.459 (0.258-0.818), respectively. DICA classification seems to be a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon. PMID:27622352

  18. [Primary appendagitis epiploica: diagnosis and follow-up with CT (case report)].

    PubMed

    Cakirer, Sinan; Savaş, Mahmut R

    2004-06-01

    Primary appendagitis epiploica is a rare benign self-limiting inflammatory condition of the colonic epiploic appendices. It causes acute localized abdominal pain thought to be the result of torsion or spontaneous vascular thrombosis of epiploic appendices. This is a non-surgical situation that clinically mimics other conditions requiring surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. In this report, CT findings of this rare disease are presented at the stage of initial diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:15236131

  19. Comparison of putative circulating cancer stem cell detection between the hepatic portal system and peripheral blood in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung Soo; Jung, Seok Yun; Kwon, Sang Mo; Bae, Jae Ho; Lee, Sun Min; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present pilot study was conducted to detect putative cancer stem cell (CSC) from the hepatic portal system and peripheral blood in the colorectal cancer patients and to compare them to healthy donor and diverticulitis patients. Methods Laboratory study was performed to identify the expression of cell surface markers, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), cytokeratin (CK) 18, CK20, CD44, and CD133, on several colon cancer cell lines. Clinical pilot study was conducted to detect putative circulating CSC as EpCAM+CD133+ cell in colorectal cancer (n = 10), diverticulitis (n = 5), and four healthy donors, by using flow cytometry. Blood was drawn from the hepatic portal system and peripheral vein. Results On laboratory study, EpCAM was expressed in whole colon cancer cell lines, and CD44 and CD133 were simultaneously expressed in 50% of the cell lines with stemness phenotype, but CK18 and CK20 were not expressed in most of the cell lines. On clinical study, the mean EpCAM+CD133+ cell counts of 11.6/105 in the hepatic portal system were somewhat lower than 15.4/105 in peripheral vein (P = 0.241). As for diverticulitis patients, EpCAM+CD133+ cells were also detected to have steeper dropped to near zero, after the surgery. Conclusion The numbers of putative CSC were not statistically different between the detection sites of the portal vein and peripheral vein in the colon cancer patients. Therefore, we may not have benefitted by getting the cells from the hepatic portal system. In addition, the CD133+EpCAM+ cells in the colon cancer patients might contain normal stem cells from cancer inflammation similar to diverticulitis. PMID:25368848

  20. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms. Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values). Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue. Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation. PMID:26290799

  1. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage: our experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Amilcare; Desiderio, Jacopo; Petrina, Adolfo; Trastulli, Stefano; Grassi, Veronica; Sani, Marco; Pironi, Daniele; Santoro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the years various therapeutic techniques for diverticulitis have been developed. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage (LPL) appears to be a safe and useful treatment, and it could be an effective alternative to colonic resection in emergency surgery. Aim This prospective observational study aims to assess the safety and benefits of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage in perforated sigmoid diverticulitis. Material and methods We surgically treated 70 patients urgently for complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. Thirty-two (45.7%) patients underwent resection of the sigmoid colon and creation of a colostomy (Hartmann technique); 21 (30%) patients underwent peritoneal laparoscopic lavage; 4 (5.7%) patients underwent colostomy by the Mikulicz technique; and the remaining 13 (18.6%) patients underwent resection of the sigmoid colon and creation of a colorectal anastomosis with a protective ileostomy. Results The 66 patients examined were divided into 3 groups: 32 patients were treated with urgent surgery according to the Hartmann procedure; 13 patients were treated with resection and colorectal anastomosis; 21 patients were treated urgently with laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. We had no intraoperative complications. The overall mortality was 4.3% (3 patients). In the LPL group the morbidity rate was 33.3%. Conclusions Currently it cannot be said that LPL is better in terms of mortality and morbidity than colonic resection. These data may, however, be proven wrong by greater attention in the selection of patients to undergo laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. PMID:27458487

  2. Colonic diverticular disease. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Gargallo Puyuelo, Carla J; Sopeña, Federico; Lanas Arbeloa, Angel

    2015-12-01

    Diverticular disease represents the most common disease affecting the colon in the Western world. Most cases remain asymptomatic, but some others will have symptoms or develop complications. The aims of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease are to prevent complications and reduce the frequency and intensity of symptoms. Fibre, probiotics, mesalazine, rifaximin and their combinations seem to be usually an effective therapy. In the uncomplicated diverticulitis, outpatient management is considered the optimal approach in the majority of patients, and oral antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment. Admission to hospital and intravenous antibiotic are recommended only when the patient is unable to intake food orally, affected by severe comorbidity or does not improve. However, inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated diverticulitis. The role of surgery is also changing. Most diverticulitis-associated abscesses can be treated with antibiotics and/or percutaneous drainage and emergency surgery is considered only in patients with acute peritonitis. Finally, patient related factors, and not the number of recurrences, play the most important role in selecting recipients of elective surgery to avoid recurrences. PMID:25979437

  3. [Diverticular disease: towards 2020. An evidence-based approach].

    PubMed

    Koch, Maurizio; Festa, Virginia; Chiesara, Francesca; Moretti, Alessandra; Bianchi, Marco; Dezi, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) of the colon has an increasing burden on health service resources, in terms of hospital admissions, mortality and surgery rate. We present an overview of the clinical history of DD, and of the ways that gastroenterologists have to modify it. Prevalence of the disease increases with aging. Most of diverticulosis are occasionally identified on colonscopy, and most of them remain asymptomatic for all life. Only 4% of these subjects develop diverticulitis. However, 4-25% of these patients are expected to present a second episode of diverticulitis, and 15% of them develop complications. Hospitalizations for diverticulitis and relapses of diverticulitis show strong growth (+21% 2013 vs 2003 in USA). The total annual costs for hospitalization for DD in USA are over 2,2 billion of dollars, and in Italy exceed 63 million of euros. In-hospital mortality can reach 0,5%. Diagnosis of diverticulitis is based on clinical history, lab tests and imaging (ultrasonography, CAT). Clinical diagnosis has a sensitivity of 68% and specificity around 98%. According to a meta-analysis, the performance of ultrasonograhy and CAT results very high ("pooled" sensitivity 92-94%, and specificity 90-99%; "pooled" Likelihood Ratio positive 9.6 for ultrasonography and 78.4 for CAT. Likelihood Rato negative 0.09 and 0.06 respectively). Evidences for preventing relapse are poor. Anyway, a very recent meta-analysis on 6 RCTs suggests no role for mesalazine (GRADE SCALE for evidence 3). Non absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin) have been used in two studies (one RCT, one retrospective observational). Data from the two studies suggest some evidence in favour of its use (GRADE SCALE 1). The number of admitted patients is 291. Considering a base-line risk of 19 relapses every 100 patients (5-year observation period), the absolute risk difference is minus 9 patients with relapse (CI 95% -14 a + 3) in the RCT and minus 14 patients (CI 95% -17 a -5) in the observational study. A 2020

  4. Jejunoileal diverticulosis, a rare cause of ileal perforation – Case report

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Nádia; Moreira, Herculano; Silva, Sílvia; Marques, Rita; Monteiro, Ana; Gaspar, João; Oliveira, António

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Jejunoileal diverticulosis (JID) is a rare condition associated with nonspecific symptoms, consisting of acquired false diverticula. It frequently co-exists with colonic diverticulosis. Diagnosis is usually made incidentally or after complications. These include hemorrhage, obstruction and diverticulitis, with or without perforation. Presentation of case 81-year-old man presented with a painful abdominal mass in the right lower quadrant (RLQ), diffuse abdominal discomfort and fever. Abdominal examination confirmed a well-defined mass in the RLQ without rebound tenderness. Laboratory analysis revealed elevated inflammatory markers and CT scan showed a cavitated lesion with an air-fluid level in the RLQ, without evidence of intraperitoneal free air or fluid. Admitted for conservative treatment, failure to improve led to laparotomy on the 6th day of hospitalization, with identification of jejunoileal diverticulosis complicated with diverticulitis and walled-off perforation. We performed segmental enterectomy. Discussion The incidence of JID is estimated at 0.2–7% and it is usually diagnosed in the sixth/seventh decade of life. From a diagnostic perspective, JID is a challenging disorder, without reliable diagnostic tests. Diverticulitis is the most common complication. Perforation generally causes only localized peritonitis, as involved diverticula are often walled off by the surrounding mesentery. In selected cases, medical therapy may suffice. For all other patients prompt laparotomy with segmental intestinal resection is the treatment of choice. Conclusion JID remains under diagnosed. When it presents as an acute complication it may require immediate surgical intervention. In an elderly person, especially with known gastrointestinal diverticulosis, one must have a high index of suspicion for perforation. PMID:26949530

  5. Is the prevalence of colonic neuroendocrine tumors increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Vierdag, Wouter-Michiel A M; Kievit, Wietske; Bosch, Steven; Hoentjen, Frank; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients may bear an increased neuroendocrine tumor (NET) risk. These tumors are mostly reported as coincidental findings during surgery. We aimed to determine the prevalence of colonic NET in a Dutch nationwide IBD cohort and calculate the prevalence rate ratios (PRR) compared with the general Dutch population. Our second aim was to investigate whether a high bowel surgery rate in IBD could result in a high PRR for NET. The Dutch Pathology Registry (PALGA) was searched to identify all IBD patients with colonic NET in The Netherlands between 1991 and 2011. We determined the prevalence and PRR of colonic NET in a 20-year period. For our second aim, we compared NET prevalence in colonic resection specimens between IBD cases and non-IBD controls (diverticulitis and ischemia). We identified 51 IBD patients who developed colonic NET resulting in a prevalence of 60.4-89.3 per 100,000 patients in a 20-year period with a PRR of 2.8-4.1. However, adjusted for resection type, sex and age, a higher NET prevalence was shown in diverticulitis (OR 5.52, 95% CI 3.47-8.78) and ischemia (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.09-3.58) compared with IBD. Our key finding is that NET are more prevalent in IBD patients compared with the general population (PRR 2.8-4.1). This might be attributed to a high rate of incidental NET as IBD patients frequently undergo intestinal surgery. A lower adjusted NET prevalence in colonic resection specimens for IBD compared to ischemia and diverticulitis supports this hypothesis. PMID:26992110

  6. Duodenal gland cysts and pseudodiverticula in sheep.

    PubMed

    Penadés, Mariola; Guerrero, Irene; Benito-Peña, Alberto; Corpa, Juan M

    2010-07-01

    Six cases of acquired duodenal diverticulitis (pseudodiverticula) were found in a flock of sheep over a short period of time. All the animals had duodenal lesions characterized by the presence of multiple saccular dilations filled with feed material. The mucosal surface was elevated by multiple small nodules that histologically corresponded to cystic dilatations of the duodenal glands, which likely caused the displacement, atrophy, and disappearance of the muscular layer, leading to pseudodiverticula. The gross appearance, microscopic findings, and epidemiological characteristics suggest that this is a different pathological process to that described for diverticula in animals to date. PMID:20622244

  7. Tubo-Ovarian Abscess: Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Newton G.

    1986-01-01

    That a female patient with abdominal pain is often considered to have pelvic inflammatory disease until proven otherwise is ubiquitous in the medical literature. This view is dangerous and should be challenged because it has resulted in episodes of ruptured appendix, death from ruptured ectopic pregnancies, and serious morbidity from delayed diagnoses of such entities as diverticulitis and endometriosis. Proper diagnostic steps should be taken for all patients with abdominal pain of unclear etiology. This article reviews the pathogenesis of tubo-ovarian abscesses so as to separate and clearly identify fact from fiction. Diagnostic steps and management guidelines are discussed. PMID:3537321

  8. Diverticular disease treated with corticotrophin

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Charles

    1985-01-01

    Since 1968 the inflammatory stage of diverticular disease (acute and chronic diverticulitis) has been treated with tetracosactrin in one practice. This paper reviews 100 episodes treated in this way and compares these with 50 episodes treated with rest in bed and dietary measures. Abatement of pyrexia, swelling and tenderness, as well as relief of the symptoms of pain and malaise, were usually found to occur within 24 hours of the administration of tetracosactrin zinc (1 mg) intramuscularly. No complications directly attributable to this therapy have been observed, while the duration of the clinical illness has been reduced by more than half. In neither group were antibiotics found to influence the outcome. PMID:3001302

  9. Predictive value of the Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification on the outcome of diverticular disease of the colon: An international study

    PubMed Central

    Brandimarte, Giovanni; Di Mario, Francesco; Annunziata, Maria L; Bafutto, Mauro; Bianco, Maria A; Colucci, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Danese, Silvio; De Bastiani, Rudi; Elisei, Walter; Escalante, Ricardo; Faggiani, Roberto; Ferrini, Luciano; Forti, Giacomo; Latella, Giovanni; Graziani, Maria G; Oliveira, Enio C; Papa, Alfredo; Penna, Antonio; Portincasa, Piero; Søreide, Kjetil; Spadaccini, Antonio; Usai, Paolo; Bonovas, Stefanos; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Picchio, Marcello; Lecca, Piera G; Zampaletta, Costantino; Cassieri, Claudio; Damiani, Alberto; Desserud, Kari F; Fiorella, Serafina; Landi, Rosario; Goni, Elisabetta; Lai, Maria A; Pigò, Flavia; Rotondano, Gianluca; Schiaccianoce, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease. Aims We assessed retrospectively the predictive value of DICA in patients for whom endoscopic data and clinical follow-up were available. Methods For each patient, we recorded: age, severity of DICA, presence of abdominal pain, C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin test (if available) at the time of diagnosis; months of follow-up; therapy taken during the follow-up to maintain remission (if any); occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis; need of surgery. Results We enrolled 1651 patients (793 M, 858 F, mean age 66.6 ± 11.1 years): 939 (56.9%) patients were classified as DICA 1, 501 (30.3%) patients as DICA 2 and 211 (12.8%) patients as DICA 3. The median follow-up was 24 (9–38) months. Acute diverticulitis (AD) occurred/recurred in 263 (15.9%) patients; surgery was necessary in 57 (21.7%) cases. DICA was the only factor significantly associated to the occurrence/recurrence of diverticulitis and surgery either at univariate (χ2 = 405.029; p < 0.0001) or multivariate analysis (hazard ratio = 4.319, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.639–5.126; p < 0.0001). Only in DICA 2 patients was therapy effective for prevention of AD occurrence/recurrence with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.598 (0.391–0.914) (p = 0.006, log rank test). Mesalazine-based therapies reduced the risk of AD occurrence/recurrence and needs of surgery with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.2103 (0.122–0.364) and 0.459 (0.258–0.818), respectively. Conclusions DICA classification is a valid parameter to predict the risk of diverticulitis occurrence/recurrence in patients suffering from diverticular disease of the colon.

  10. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV.

    PubMed

    Normatov, Inessa; Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B; McConnie, Randolph M

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  11. Perisigmoid Abscess Leading to a Diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Anil; Srikumar, Pillai B.; McConnie, Randolph M.

    2016-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by triad of joint hypermobility, skin extensibility, and tissue fragility. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV places patients at risk for life-threatening, spontaneous, vascular or visceral rupture due to reduced or abnormal secretion of type III collagen. We present an adolescent male who was found to have a perisigmoid abscess with a fistula connecting to adjacent sigmoid colon secondary to undiagnosed EDS type IV. Conservative management with antibiotics and bowel rest was pursued to allow for elective resection for his acute complicated diverticulitis at a safer time. PMID:26958560

  12. Multiple giant diverticula of the jejunum causing intestinal obstruction: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Multiple diverticulosis of jejunum represents an uncommon pathology of the small bowel. The disease is usually asymptomatic and must be taken into consideration in cases of unexplained malabsorption, anemia, chronic abdominal pain or discomfort. Related complications such as diverticulitis, perforation, bleeding or intestinal obstruction appear in 10-30% of the patients increasing morbidity and mortality rates. We herein report a case of a 55 year-old man presented at the emergency department with acute abdominal pain, vomiting and fever. Preoperative radiological examination followed by laparotomy revealed multiple giant jejunal diverticula causing intestinal obstruction. We also review the literature for this uncommon disease. PMID:21385440

  13. Small Bowel Perforations: What the Radiologist Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Mantia, Francesca La; Picone, Dario; Salerno, Sergio; Vernuccio, Federica; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of small bowel perforation is low but can develop from a variety of causes including Crohn disease, ischemic or bacterial enteritis, diverticulitis, bowel obstruction, volvulus, intussusception, trauma, and ingested foreign bodies. In contrast to gastroduodenal perforation, the amount of extraluminal air in small bowel perforation is small or absent in most cases. This article will illustrate the main aspects of small bowel perforation, focusing on anatomical reasons of radiological findings and in the evaluation of the site of perforation using plain film, ultrasound, and multidetector computed tomography equipments. In particular, the authors highlight the anatomic key notes and the different direct and indirect imaging signs of small bowel perforation. PMID:26827735

  14. Meckel's diverticulum with intussusception in a 5-year-old patient with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mohammed Omer; Ahmed, Hamza Ibn; Al Hindi, Saeed; Al Omran, Yasser

    2014-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is understood to be the commonest congenital malformation within the gastrointestinal tract with a prevalence of 2%, as found on autopsy studies. Although many cases are asymptomatic, complications can occur including haemorrhage, diverticulitis, chronic ulceration and intestinal obstruction. Intussusception is also a complication, but extremely rare. We present a rare case of Meckel's diverticulum causing intussusception, which was surgically resolved, in a 5-year-old girl. Our aim through this case report is to generate greater awareness of this complication and to provide some potential guidance towards its treatment. PMID:25540213

  15. Non-interventional study evaluating efficacy and tolerability of rifaximin for treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Stallinger, Sylvia; Eller, Norbert; Högenauer, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease represent a spectrum of patients who report recurrent abdominal symptoms, however are lacking substantial colonic inflammation in contrast to patients with acute diverticulitis. This non-interventional study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of rifaximin, a broad-spectrum poorly absorbable antibiotic, in cyclic treatment of these patients. Adult patients with uncomplicated diverticular disease in care of physicians in private practice intended to be treated with rifaximin were included. Patients with acute diverticulitis and symptoms suggestive of more severe intestinal inflammation were excluded. Data of 1,003 patients treated in cycles of 7-10 days per month over a period of 3 months were evaluated. In total, 75 % of patients had more than three episodes of symptoms in the last year before inclusion in the study. However, two-third of patients did not receive any treatment before. Over the 3-month treatment period with rifaximin, all assessed symptoms of diverticular disease, such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea and flatulence, improved significantly. There was an overall good compliance to the scheme of cyclic drug administration of rifaximin. During the study, 24 adverse events in 20 patients were recorded, of which 6 adverse events showed a causal relationship to the use of rifaximin (0.6 %). We conclude that cyclic rifaximin shows good clinical efficacy and tolerability in patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease treated in a routine private practice outpatient setting. PMID:24240607

  16. Pylephlebitis: a Review of 95 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Asad J.; Baghdadi, Yaser M. K.; Amr, Mahmoud A.; Alzghari, Mohammad J.; Jenkins, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Pylephlebitis, or suppurative thrombophlebitis of the portal mesenteric venous system occurring in the setting of abdominal inflammatory processes, is a rare but deadly disease commonly associated with diverticulitis. We review our institutional experience in the management of patients with this condition. A retrospective review of medical records from 2002 to 2012 was performed. Patients with a portal mesenteric vein thrombosis (PMVT) within 30 days of an intra-abdominal inflammatory process were identified and evaluated. Ninety-five patients were included. The mean patient age at presentation was 57 years (range, 24–88). The most common associated processes were pancreatitis (31 %), followed by diverticulitis (19 %). Bacteremia was noted in 34 (44 %) patients. The most common organism cultured was Streptococcus viridans. Antibiotic and anticoagulation therapy was given in 86 (91 %) and 78 (82 %) patients, respectively. Overall, we report an 11 % mortality rate. Albeit rare, pylephlebitis most commonly was manifested in the setting of pancreatitis. Treatment should be individualized to culture results and extent of thrombosis. If diagnosed early and managed appropriately, a favorable outcome is possible. PMID:26160320

  17. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for the Treatment of the Open Abdomen and Incidence of Enteral Fistulas: A Retrospective Bicentre Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dold, Stefan; Doberauer, Johannes P.; Mai, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The open abdomen (OA) is often associated with complications. It has been hypothesized that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the treatment of OA may provoke enteral fistulas. Therefore, we analyzed patients with OA and NPWT with special regard to the occurrence of intestinal fistulas. Methods. The present study included all consecutive patients with OA treated with NWPT from April 2010 to August 2011 in two hospitals. Patients' demographics, indications for OA, risk factors, complications, outcome and incidence of fistulas before, during and after NPWT were recorded. Results. Of 81 patients with OA, 26 had pre-existing fistulas and 55 were free from a fistula at the beginning of NPWT. Nine of the 55 patients developed fistulas during (n = 5) or after NPWT (n = 4). Seventy-five patients received ABThera therapy, 6 patients other temporary abdominal closure devices. Only diverticulitis seemed to be a significant predisposing factor for fistulas. Mortality was slightly lower for patients without fistulas. Conclusion. The present study revealed no correlation between occurrence of fistulas before, during, and after NWPT, with diverticulitis being the only risk factor. Fistula formation during NPWT was comparable to reports from literature. Prospective studies are mandatory to clarify the impact of NPWT on fistula formation. PMID:24285953

  18. Is it possible to limit the use of CT scanning in acute diverticular disease without compromising outcomes? A preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Pierpaolo; Rovagnati, Marco; Carzaniga, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of CT scanning in the assessment of acute diverticulitis can be reduced without a negative effect on outcome. Our series consisted of 93 out of 100 patients with acute diverticulitis admitted to the Emergency Room of our institution in the period from February 2012 to March 2013.The Hinchey classification system was used to stage disease based on findings on ultrasound (US) examination and/or computed tomography (CT) scanning. We compared the patients' Hinchey stage (HS) on admission and 72 hours later. Types of treatment were defined as emergency or delayed intervention (operative approaches (OA); ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage (UPD), and surgery. The borderline between conservative and surgical management was identified. In patients with a HS

  19. Laparoscopic treatment of complicated colonic diverticular disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Ronald; Barouki, Elie; Chouillard, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Up to 10% of acute colonic diverticulitis may necessitate a surgical intervention. Although associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, Hartmann’s procedure (HP) has been considered for many years to be the gold standard for the treatment of generalized peritonitis. To reduce the burden of surgery in these situations and as driven by the accumulated experience in colorectal and minimally-invasive surgery, laparoscopy has been increasingly adopted in the management of abdominal emergencies. Multiple case series and retrospective comparative studies confirmed that with experienced hands, the laparoscopic approach provided better outcomes than the open surgery. This technique applies to all interventions related to complicated diverticular disease, such as HP, sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis (RPA) and reversal of HP. The laparoscopic approach also provided new therapeutic possibilities with the emergence of the laparoscopic lavage drainage (LLD), particularly interesting in the context of purulent peritonitis of diverticular origin. At this stage, however, most of our knowledge in these fields relies on studies of low-level evidence. More than ever, well-built large randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer present interrogations such as the exact place of LLD or the most appropriate sigmoid resection procedure (laparoscopic HP or RPA), as well as to confirm the advantages of laparoscopy in chronic complications of diverticulitis or HP reversal. PMID:26981187

  20. Acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Gervais, Debra A; Hahn, Peter F; Sagar, Pallavi; Mueller, Peter R; Novelline, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Acute epiploic appendagitis most commonly manifests with acute lower quadrant pain. Its clinical features are similar to those of acute diverticulitis or, less commonly, acute appendicitis. The conditions that may mimic acute epiploic appendagitis at computed tomography (CT) include acute omental infarction, mesenteric panniculitis, fat-containing tumor, and primary and secondary acute inflammatory processes in the large bowel (eg, diverticulitis and appendicitis). Whereas the location of acute epiploic appendagitis is most commonly adjacent to the sigmoid colon, acute omental infarction is typically located in the right lower quadrant and often is mistaken for acute appendicitis. It is important to correctly diagnose acute epiploic appendagitis and acute omental infarction on CT images because these conditions may be mistaken for acute abdomen, and the mistake may lead to unnecessary surgery. The CT features of acute epiploic appendagitis include an oval lesion 1.5-3.5 cm in diameter, with attenuation similar to that of fat and with surrounding inflammatory changes, that abuts the anterior sigmoid colon wall. The CT features of acute omental infarction include a well-circumscribed triangular or oval heterogeneous fatty mass with a whorled pattern of concentric linear fat stranding between the anterior abdominal wall and the transverse or ascending colon. As CT increasingly is used for the evaluation of acute abdomen, radiologists are likely to see acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics more often. Recognition of these conditions on CT images will allow appropriate management of acute abdominal pain and may help to prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:16284132

  1. Outcomes of Colostomy Reversal in a Public Safety Net Hospital: The End or Beginning of a New Problem?

    PubMed

    Adam, Nadir; Rahbar, Shahrzad; Skinner, Ruby

    2015-10-01

    Colostomy reversals can be technically challenging and linked to significant morbidity. There is sparse evidence that evaluates outcomes after colostomy reversals performed by acute care surgeons. We performed a review of 61 colostomy reversals from January 2011 to January 2014. Colostomies for acute diverticulitis were predominate, n = 32 (52%). Traumatic colorectal injuries were n = 15, 25 per cent. Colorectal cancer was n = 8, 13 per cent. Sigmoid volvulus accounted for n = 2 cases. Abdominal sepsis from adhesions was n = 3. A rectal foreign body was for n = 1 case. The time to reversal was 360 ± 506 days. Completion of reversals was successful in 90 per cent of cases and protecting stoma use was in n = 12, (22%). Surgical site infections occurred in n = 20, patients (32%). Surgical site infections were prevalent in obese patients, (55%). Anastomotic leaks (ALs) occurred at 12 per cent, and were prevalent in obese, [obese (22%) vs nonobese (8%), P = 0.1]. The majority of AL n = 6, (85%) were in acute diverticulitis and trauma. There were no ALs in cases with protective diversion. No deaths occurred. The elective nature of colostomy reversals does not imply low morbidity. Obesity and major inflammatory processes were associated with major surgical complications. These data suggest that protective stomas should be applied liberally, particularly in high-risk cases. PMID:26463313

  2. Removal of gallstone from mesorectum after laparoscopic cholecystectomy - new indication for transanal endoscopic microsurgery technique.

    PubMed

    Szczepkowski, Marek; Przywózka, Alicja; Zieliński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is a minimally invasive technique for local excision of benign and malignant neoplasms in the rectum. Indications for this technique are constantly changing and extending. The aim of this study is to describe a case of a unique and innovative application of this surgical technique. A 72-year-old patient was admitted to the Clinical Department of General and Colorectal Surgery for elective resection of a tumor located in the perianal area using the TEM surgical technique. In August 2005 the patient underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to symptomatic cholecystitis. From March 2011 the patient complained about ongoing sharp pain in the perianal and presacral area. Computed tomography revealed two oval areas approximately 30 mm in size to the right of the sigmoido-rectal region communicating with the colon lumen. Subsequently diverticulitis was diagnosed. The TEM technique was uniquely used to successfully remove the gallstone from the 72-year-old patient's presacral area. PMID:26865896

  3. Pathology Image of the Month: Abdominal Pain and Peripheral Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, Reggie; Alquist, Caroline Raasch; Farris, K Barton; McGoey, Robin

    2015-01-01

    A 69 year-old man presented to his primary care physician with abdominal discomfort. Medical history was notable for diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with recent (one week prior) steroid use and hypertension. Surgical history was significant for a remote sigmoid hemicolectomy for diverticulitis with a synthetic mesh abdominal repair. He was admitted to the hospital for suspected gastroparesis. An upper GI series showed a distended stomach with delayed gastric motility. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and a duodenal biopsy was taken. He remained afebrile but had an elevated white blood cell count of 19.1 x 103/mcL (4.5 - 11.0 x 103/mcL) with 28.8 percent eosinophils on differential. Microscopic images of the duodenal biopsy are shown below. PMID:27159605

  4. Recurrence of an NSAID-induced diaphragmatic disease of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Daniel; Sahota, Jagjit; Schofield, John

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was referred to the surgical team from clinic, reporting of a 1-week history of vomiting and abdominal distension on a background of previous large bowel resection for a flare up of diverticulitis with a suspicion of diaphragm disease of the small intestine diagnosed at the same time. She was initially managed conservatively owing to the likely diagnosis of adhesion(s) leading to small bowel obstruction, but a CT of the abdomen a day later revealed a recurrence of diaphragmatic disease of the small bowel causing an obstruction, most likely due to chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. She was taken to theatre for an emergency laparotomy and small bowel resection due to previous resections, from which she made a good recovery; she was discharged from hospital 8 days later. PMID:27170609

  5. Fecal Impaction: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Obokhare, Izi

    2012-01-01

    Fecal impaction (FI) is a common cause of lower gastrointestinal tract obstruction lagging behind stricture for diverticulitis and colon cancer. It is the result of chronic or severe constipation and most commonly found in the elderly population. Early recognition and diagnosis is accomplished by way of an adequate history and physical examination in conjunction with an acute abdominal series. Prompt identification and treatment minimizes the risks of complications such as bowel obstruction leading to aspiration, stercoral ulcers, perforation, and peritonitis. Treatment options include gentle proximal softening in the absence of complete bowel obstruction, distal washout, and manual extraction. Surgical resection of the involved colon or rectum is reserved for cases of FI complicated by ulceration and perforation leading to peritonitis. Recurrence is common, and can be managed by increasing dietary fiber content to 30 gm/day, increased water intake, and discontinuation of medications that can contribute to colonic hypomotility. PMID:23449376

  6. Extra-abdominal lumbar abscesses caused by retroperitoneal gastrointestinal perforations through the lumbar triangle of Petit: report of two cases diagnosed by CT.

    PubMed

    Coulier, Bruno; Gogoase, Monica; Ramboux, Adrien; Pierard, Frederic

    2012-12-01

    Extra-abdominal abscesses of gastrointestinal origin developing within the lumbar subcutaneous tissues are extremely rare. We report two cases of retroperitoneal bowel perforation presenting spontaneously at admission with a lumbar abscess trespassing the lumbar triangle of Petit, a classical "locus of minus resistencia" of the posterior abdominal wall. The first case was caused by perforation of a retrocecal appendicitis--being concomitantly responsible of a necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh--and in the second case perforation was caused by left colonic diverticulitis. In both cases, the full diagnosis was made with abdominal CT. The patients were threatened by a two-step surgical approach comprising a direct posterior percutaneous drainage of the abscess followed by classical laparotomy. PMID:22270582

  7. CT in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Gatewood, O.M.B.; Jones, B.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    Enterovesical fistulae are difficult to demonstrate by conventional radiographic methods. Computed tomography (CT), a sensitive, noninvasive method of documenting the presence of such fistulae, is unique in its ability to outline the extravesical component of the primary disease process. Twenty enterovesical fistulae identified by CT were caused by diverticulitis (nine), carcinoma of the rectosigmoid (two), Crohn disease (three), gynecologic tumors (two), bladder cancer (one), cecal carcinoma (one), prostatic neoplasia (one), and appendiceal abscess (one). The CT findings included intravesical air (90%), passage of orally or rectally administered contrast medium into the bladder (20%), focal bladder-wall thickening (90%), thickening of adjacent bowel wall (85%), and an extraluminal mass that often contained air (75%). CT proved to be an important new method in the diagnosis of enterovesical fistulae.

  8. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to a diastatic rupture of the cecum

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; BASILE, F.; SPATARO, C.; GIULIA, G.; LEANZA, V.; MARCHESE, S.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum usually occurs after esophageal or chest trauma. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema as a presentation of non-traumatic colonic perforation following colorectal cancer or diverticulitis, is very rare. We report a case of a patient with rectal cancer who developed a diastatic cecum retroperitoneal perforation with a secondary pneumo-mediastinum and cervical emphysema. The patient was in treatment with a neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for a low rectal cancer. Treatment consisted in an emergency right hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and performance of distal colonic fistula. The Authors discuss the occurrence of pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema complicating rectal cancer, pointing out ethio-pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. The importance of performing a diverting colostomy when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is scheduled in patients with stenotic rectal cancer, although not clinically occluded PMID:26888704

  9. Radiologist's perspective for the Meckel's diverticulum and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, V K; Saboo, S S; Shanbhogue, A K P; Virmani, V; Marginean, E C; Menias, C O

    2014-01-01

    The Meckel's diverticulum is the commonest congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, often presenting with complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding, intussusception, bowel obstruction and diverticulitis, which are often misdiagnosed. Imaging plays an important role in the early diagnosis and characterization of these conditions and is very helpful in decision making. The Meckel's diverticulum and its complications have myriad presentations and appearances on various imaging modalities. Thus, sound knowledge of the anatomy, embryology, clinical presentation, imaging characteristics and complications is crucial to the practice of abdominal imaging. We present a review of the literature and current radiological practices in the diagnosis and management of the Meckel's diverticulum and its various complications with special emphasis on the imaging of various complications, mimickers and pathological correlation. PMID:24611767

  10. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to a diastatic rupture of the cecum.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Intagliata, E; Basile, F; Spataro, C; Giulia, G; Leanza, V; Marchese, S

    2015-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum usually occurs after esophageal or chest trauma. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema as a presentation of non-traumatic colonic perforation following colorectal cancer or diverticulitis, is very rare. We report a case of a patient with rectal cancer who developed a diastatic cecum retroperitoneal perforation with a secondary pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema. The patient was in treatment with a neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for a low rectal cancer. Treatment consisted in an emergency right hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and performance of distal colonic fistula. The Authors discuss the occurrence of pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema complicating rectal cancer, pointing out ethiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. The importance of performing a diverting colostomy when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is scheduled in patients with stenotic rectal cancer, although not clinically occluded. PMID:26888704

  11. Single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) sigmoid colectomy and uterus-preserving repair for colo-uterine fistula secondary to severe diverticular disease: an unusual technical solution for an unusual presentation of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Banky, Balazs; Marlborough, Fergal; MacLeod, Iona; Gill, Talvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Colouterine fistula as a potential complication of chronic diverticulitis is a rare entity with less than 30 cases reported worldwide. Generally, patients require a multidisciplinary approach including a major laparotomy with hysterectomy and sigmoid colectomy, and, occasionally, temporary colostomy. We report the first attempt of a novel, minimally invasive technique for managing a case of benign colouterine fistula with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) sigmoid colectomy and uterus preservation. A small, 3 cm incision site provided access for the whole operation, as well as played a role as the specimen extraction site. Malignant fistulas and large uterine defects may require hysterectomy, however, laparoscopic closure of uterine wall defects can be considered as a reasonable alternative in selected patients, avoiding the higher risks associated with hysterectomy and keeping fertility at younger ages. Single incision laparoscopy in complicated diverticular disease and fistula formation cases is a challenging but technically feasible option, in experienced hands. PMID:27177935

  12. Removal of gallstone from mesorectum after laparoscopic cholecystectomy – new indication for transanal endoscopic microsurgery technique

    PubMed Central

    Przywózka, Alicja; Zieliński, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is a minimally invasive technique for local excision of benign and malignant neoplasms in the rectum. Indications for this technique are constantly changing and extending. The aim of this study is to describe a case of a unique and innovative application of this surgical technique. A 72-year-old patient was admitted to the Clinical Department of General and Colorectal Surgery for elective resection of a tumor located in the perianal area using the TEM surgical technique. In August 2005 the patient underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to symptomatic cholecystitis. From March 2011 the patient complained about ongoing sharp pain in the perianal and presacral area. Computed tomography revealed two oval areas approximately 30 mm in size to the right of the sigmoido-rectal region communicating with the colon lumen. Subsequently diverticulitis was diagnosed. The TEM technique was uniquely used to successfully remove the gallstone from the 72-year-old patient's presacral area. PMID:26865896

  13. [Role of rifaximin in the treatment of colonic diverticular disease].

    PubMed

    Moretti, A; Spagnolo, A; Mangone, M; Chiesara, F; Aratari, A; Papi, C; Koch, M

    2012-01-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon is the fifth most important gastrointestinal disease in terms of direct and indirect healthcare costs in western countries. Although most patients with colonic diverticula remain asymptomatic for their whole life, in 20-25% of cases will develop symptoms. Antibiotics are commonly used in the treatment of inflammatory complication of diverticular disease. Several clinical observation suggest a role of rifaximin in the management of symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease of the colon. This is a critical review of clinical studies addressing the role of long term administration of rifaximin for the treatment of symptomatic colonic diverticular disease. The evidence from prospective controlled trials suggests that rifaximin is effective for obtaining symptomatic relief in patients with uncomplicated diverticular disease. The therapeutic gain compared with fiber supplementation only is approximately 30%. No definitive conclusion can be drawn regard a possible role of rifaximin for preventing diverticulitis. PMID:22362232

  14. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting in the Management of a Benign Colonic Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ozden, Nuri; Simon, Howard M.; Kobrossi, Semaan; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya

    2016-01-01

    Colonic postanastomotic strictures occur in 1.5–8% of patients following colorectal surgery. Traditionally, colonic strictures were treated by multiple modalities including endoscopic dilatation. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been indicated in the management of benign colonic strictures; however, there are limited available data with regard to their efficacy. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who had perforated sigmoid diverticulitis followed by Hartmann's procedure with eventual reanastomosis 6 months later. He subsequently developed benign colonic stricture, which was treated with a metal stent. SEMS are associated with a low mortality rate and are appropriate in treating acute colonic obstruction as a result of benign stricture in the setting of postanastomosis. PMID:27403114

  15. Use of rifaximin in gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Shayto, Rani H; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Sharara, Ala I

    2016-08-01

    Rifaximin is a broad spectrum oral antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It is poorly absorbed and thus has a highly favorable safety profile. Rifaximin has been shown to be effective in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea, functional bloating and irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and in the prevention of recurrent overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, there is emerging evidence for a possible beneficial effect of rifaximin in the treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease and in the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. The use of rifaximin is associated with a low incidence of development, or persistence of spontaneous bacterial mutants. Moreover, the development of important drug resistance among extra-intestinal flora during rifaximin therapy is unlikely because of minimal systemic absorption and limited cross-resistance of rifaximin with other antimicrobials. This review addresses the current and emerging role of rifaximin in the treatment of gastrointestinal and liver disorders. PMID:27547007

  16. Editorial: new thoughts on the association between diverticulosis and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2014-12-01

    As our population ages it is increasingly common to encounter patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms and diverticulosis, but the nature of the association is obscure. This Editorial discusses the paper from Japan showing an association between IBS-like symptoms and left-sided but not right-sided diverticulosis. The left colon with its higher motor activity is more likely to be associated with complications of diverticulosis, including perforation and abscess formation. The underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome of post-diverticulitis IBS is discussed and clinical markers of centrally driven symptoms suggested as a means to avoid ineffective colonic resections in those with IBS-like diverticular disease. PMID:25470583

  17. Intussusceptions as acute abdomen caused by Burkitt lymphoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly malignant, aggressive and rapidly growing B-cell neoplasm, which has low long-term survival rates. The abdomen is the most frequent onset site of non endemic Burkitt's lymphoma. Symptoms are often misleading and make diagnosis difficult. Ileum intussusception as acute abdomen caused by Burkitt lymphoma is rare. Case presentation We are presenting a case of a 16 year-old male with acute abdomen, which three weeks prior initially has been surgically treated for acute appendicitis and Meckel diverticulitis. Following this was a second urgent operation of ileoileal intusussception caused by Burkitt lymphoma. Right extended haemicolectomy was performed. Conclusion Affected terminal ileum by Burkitt's lymphoma may mimic clinically acute appendicitis and investigation tools sometimes may not provide proper diagnosis. Complete resection results in improved survival. PMID:20062585

  18. [Clinical study of enterovesical fistulas].

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Takeshi; Magaribuchi, Toshihiro; Takao, Noriyasu; Shirahase, Toshiaki; Taki, Yoji; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    We conducted a retrospective review of 16 patients who were diagnosed with enterovesical fistula in our hospital between January 2000 and July 2013. The patient's median age was 74 years old and 4 were female. Most of the chief complaints were pneumaturia and fecaluria. There was a vesicosigmoidal fistula in 12 patients, an ileovesical fistula in 2, and a rectovesical fistula in 2. The main underlying cause was diverticulitis in 9 patients and a sigmoid colon carcinoma in 3. Diagnoses were made based on the findings of cystoscopy, barium enema, abdominal computed tomography and so on. Treatment varied in each case depending on the etiology and the patient's condition. The procedure was mostly open surgery, but laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was performed preserving the bladder in the two most recent cases. PMID:25179986

  19. Enterovesical fistula caused by regressive change of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YU-TING; CHEN, YING-YUAN; WU, CHIA-YUN; CHEN, HUNG-MING; TZENG, CHENG-HWAI; CHIOU, TZEON-JYE

    2016-01-01

    Enterovesical fistula (EVF) is a rare complication of diverticulitis, as well as Crohn's disease, intestinal malignancy, radiotherapy and trauma. EVF formation is associated with inflammation of the involved bowel segments. The current study presents the case of a 35-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed pneumaturia, fecaluria and recurrent urinary tract infections following chemotherapy, accompanied by regressive change of the lymphoma. Abdominal computed tomography scans revealed that the terminal ileum had adhered to the bladder wall. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and partial resection of the terminal ileum, and EVF was confirmed. Histological examination revealed an inflammatory response but no evidence of residual lymphoma. The diagnosis of EVF is occasionally difficult and requires appropriate radiographic examination. Surgical treatment is recommended. PMID:27347146

  20. [Intestinal endometriosis].

    PubMed

    González Rodríguez, C I; Cires, M; Jiménez, F J; Rubio, T

    2008-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation). In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment, this will depend on the clinical features and the age of the patient, as well as her wishes with regard to pregnancy. PMID:18953367

  1. Idiopathic Intractable Diarrhoea Leading to Torsade de Pointes

    PubMed Central

    Mouyis, Kyriacos; Okonko, Darlington; Missouris, Constantinos G.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old lady was admitted to our hospital with a 3-year history of noninfective diarrhoea and recurrent syncopal events over the last 3 months. Her initial electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed trigeminy and prolonged QTc interval. She had a structurally normal heart with no coronary artery disease. Investigations revealed low potassium at 3.0 mmol/L. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy suggested a possible diagnosis of diverticulitis. Soon after admission she had an unresponsive episode with spontaneous recovery. Telemetry and Holter analysis confirmed multiple episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (Torsade de Pointes). Following electrolyte supplementation the episodes of polymorphic VT improved. Due to the protracted nature of the diarrhoea, the recurrent syncopal events, and recurrent hypokalaemia documented over recent years, an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) was sanctioned by the multidisciplinary team (MDT). In summary, chronic diarrhoea may result in life threatening polymorphic VT due to hypokalaemia and QTc prolongation. In these patients an ICD may be considered. PMID:27313906

  2. Detection of occult colovesical fistula by the Bourne test.

    PubMed

    Amendola, M A; Agha, F P; Dent, T L; Amendola, B E; Shirazi, K K

    1984-04-01

    The value of different diagnostic tests in the detection of colovesical fistulas was studied in 28 surgically proven cases seen during the last 10 years at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Etiologies were diverticulitis (19), Crohn disease (three), postradiation therapy (four), previous trauma (one), and bladder carcinoma (one). The fistulas were demonstrated by barium enema in 10 of 20 patients and by cystography in eight of 26. Cystoscopy was diagnostic in 11 of 25 patients and sigmoidoscopy in four of 24. Methylene blue test was positive in five of six patients, and in one patient given a charcoal enema the material appeared in the urine. The Bourne test, consisting of radiography of the centrifuged urine samples obtained immediately after a nondiagnostic barium enema, was positive in nine of 10 patients. In seven of these 10 patients, the Bourne test was the only positive evidence of an otherwise occult colovesical fistula later proven at surgery. PMID:6608228

  3. [2012 literature findings in ambulatory internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Vu, F; Ceppi, M; Fasel, E; Dory, E; Amstutz, V; Monney, C; Nanchen, D; Willi, C Clair; Pasche, O; Vauthey, L; Bodenmann, P

    2013-01-23

    In 2012 several articles reported interesting findings for the ambulatory practice in internal general medicine. A negative rapid test for influenza does not rule out that diagnosis. A test assessing the walking speed in the elderly can help determining who would benefit from antihypertensive therapy. Antibiotic treatment has no benefit for acute uncomplicated rhinosinusitis and diverticulitis. Probiotics can reduce the risk of post-antibiotic diarrhea. Daily coffee intake could reduce mortality. Oral supplementation of calcium can be harmful to the cardiovascular system. Subclinical hyperthyroidism should be treated to prevent cardiovascular complications. Aspirin can prevent recurrences in case of a primary thromboembolic event. Local injection of corticosteroids under ultrasonographic guidance for plantar fasciitis can be a safe treatment. Ibuprofen can prevent acute mountain sickness. PMID:23413648

  4. Folate Receptor-Beta Has Limited Value for Fluorescent Imaging in Ovarian, Breast and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Esther; van der Vegt, Bert; van der Sluis, Tineke; Kooijman, Paulien; Low, Philip S.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Arts, Henriette J. G.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Bart, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Aims Tumor-specific targeted imaging is rapidly evolving in cancer diagnosis. The folate receptor alpha (FR-α) has already been identified as a suitable target for cancer therapy and imaging. FR-α is present on ~40% of human cancers. FR-β is known to be expressed on several hematologic malignancies and on activated macrophages, but little is known about FR-β expression in solid tumors. Additional or simultaneous expression of FR-β could help extend the indications for folate-based drugs and imaging agents. In this study, the expression pattern of FR-β is evaluated in ovarian, breast and colorectal cancer. Methods FR-β expression was analyzed by semi-quantitative scoring of immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays (TMAs) of 339 ovarian cancer patients, 418 breast cancer patients, on 20 slides of colorectal cancer samples and on 25 samples of diverticulitis. Results FR-β expression was seen in 21% of ovarian cancer samples, 9% of breast cancer samples, and 55% of colorectal cancer samples. Expression was weak or moderate. Of the diverticulitis samples, 80% were positive for FR-β expression in macrophages. FR-β status neither correlated to known disease-related variables, nor showed association with overall survival and progression free survival in ovarian and breast cancer. In breast cancer, negative axillary status was significantly correlated to FR-β expression (p=0.022). Conclusions FR-β expression was low or absent in the majority of ovarian, breast and colorectal tumor samples. From the present study we conclude that the low FR-β expression in ovarian and breast tumor tissue indicates limited practical use of this receptor in diagnostic imaging and therapeutic purposes. Due to weak expression, FR-β is not regarded as a suitable target in colorectal cancer. PMID:26248049

  5. Cause-specific mortality in individuals with severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency in comparison with the general population in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Tanash, Hanan A; Ekström, Magnus; Wagner, Philippe; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZZ) predisposes to morbidity and mortality due to early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The risk of death from other causes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer, has not been well investigated. We aimed to analyze cause-specific mortality in PiZZ individuals compared with the general Swedish population. Methods Data on 1,561 PiZZ individuals from the Swedish National AAT Deficiency Register, prospectively followed from 1991 to 2014, were analyzed. Causes of death according to the Swedish National Causes of Death Register for the study group were compared with those for the general Swedish population matched for age, sex, and calendar year, with the excess mortality expressed as standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results There were 524 deaths during the follow-up period. PiZZ individuals had excess all-cause mortality compared with the Swedish general population (SMR 3.6, 95% CI 3.3–3.9). SMR for ischemic heart disease (IHD) was 0.5 (95% CI 0.3–0.8) and was similar for never and ever-smokers, and in males and females. SMR for lung cancer was 0.9 (95% CI 0.4–1.7). PiZZ individuals had increased mortality compared with the general population for the following diseases: respiratory disease, SMR 48.4 (95% CI 43.0–54.5); primary liver carcinoma, SMR 90.0 (95% CI 59.3–130.9); complicated colon diverticulitis, SMR 20.8 (95% CI 6.7–48.6); and pulmonary embolism, SMR 6.9 (95% CI 3.3–12.7). Conclusion PiZZ individuals had a reduced mortality risk of IHD. Mortality due to respiratory, hepatic disease, diverticulitis, and pulmonary embolism was markedly increased compared with the age- and sex-matched Swedish population. PMID:27555756

  6. Development of pH sensitive microparticles of Karaya gum: By response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Raizaday, Abhay; Yadav, Hemant K S; Kumar, S Hemanth; Kasina, Susmitha; Navya, M; Tashi, C

    2015-12-10

    The objective of the proposed work was to prepare pH sensitive microparticles (MP) of Karaya gum using distilled water as a solvent by spray drying technique. Different formulations were designed, prepared and evaluated by employing response surface methodology and optimal design of experiment technique using Design Expert(®) ver 8.0.1 software. SEM photographs showed that MP were roughly spherical in shape and free from cracks. The particle size and encapsulation efficiency for optimized MP was found to be between 3.89 and 6.5 μm and 81-94% respectively with good flow properties. At the end of the 12th hour the in vitro drug release was found to be 96.9% for the optimized formulation in pH 5.6 phosphate buffer. Low prediction errors were observed for Cmax and AUC0-∞ which demonstrated that the Frusemide IVIVC model was valid. Hence it can be concluded that pH sensitive MP of Karaya gum were effectively prepared by spray drying technique using aqueous solvents and can be used for treating various diseases like chronic hypertension, Ulcerative Colitis and Diverticulitis. PMID:26428135

  7. Preoperative mechanical preparation of the colon: the patient's experience

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Barbel; Lannerstad, Olof; Påhlman, Lars; Arodell, Malin; Unosson, Mitra; Nilsson, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Background Preoperative mechanical bowel preparation can be questioned as standard procedure in colon surgery, based on the result from several randomised trials. Methods As part of a large multicenter trial, 105 patients planned for elective colon surgery for cancer, adenoma, or diverticulitis in three hospitals were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding perceived health including experience with bowel preparation. There were 39 questions, each having 3 – 10 answer alternatives, dealing with food intake, pain, discomfort, nausea/vomiting, gas distension, anxiety, tiredness, need of assistance with bowel preparation, and willingness to undergo the procedure again if necessary. Results 60 patients received mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) and 45 patients did not (No-MBP). In the MBP group 52% needed assistance with bowel preparation and 30% would consider undergoing the same preoperative procedure again. In the No-MBP group 65 % of the patients were positive to no bowel preparation. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain and nausea. On Day 4 (but not on Days 1 and 7 postoperatively) patients in the No-MBP group perceived more discomfort than patients in the MBP group, p = 0.02. Time to intake of fluid and solid food did not differ between the two groups. Bowel emptying occurred significantly earlier in the No-MBP group than in the MBP group, p = 0.03. Conclusion Mechanical bowel preparation is distressing for the patient and associated with a prolonged time to first bowel emptying. PMID:17480223

  8. Biomarkers in diverticular diseases of the colon.

    PubMed

    Tursi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Recent data found that diverticular disease (DD) of the colon shows similarities with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In particular, the detection of microscopic inflammation and the clinical response to mesalazine seem to confirm the hypothesis that inflammation may be a key point for the appearance of symptoms and development of complications. In light of this hypothesis, several studies have recently focused their attention on the role of biomarkers in predicting and monitoring the course of the disease. C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and fecal calprotectin (FC) have therefore been investigated. As in IBD, CRP seems to be the most effective marker of histological and clinical severity of the disease. In particular, CRP below 50 mg/l suggests an acute uncomplicated diverticulitis (AUD), whereas CRP higher than 200 mg/l is a strong indicator of DD complicated by perforation. As in IBD, FC seems to be a noninvasive sensitive marker of DD severity. In particular, FC may show slight increased valued already in symptomatic uncomplicated DD (SUDD) (FC value ≥15 μg/ml seems to be predictive of SUDD). As expected, FC shows higher values in AUD (FC value ≥60 μg/ml seems to be predictive of AUD). Finally, FC seems to be useful also in monitoring the therapeutic response in DD. In fact, FC values decreased significantly in patients responding to therapy, whereas they persisted to increase in patients who failed to obtain remission. PMID:22572679

  9. Morbidity after reversal of Hartmann operation: retrospective analysis of 56 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zarnescu (Vasiliu), EC; Zarnescu, NO; Costea, R; Rahau, L; Neagu, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite patient selection, postoperative morbidity after reversal of Hartmann’s procedure remains significant. Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with morbidity after conversion of Hartmann’s operation. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of 56 patients who underwent reversal procedures between January 2004 and May 2015 in a single center. We evaluated the following variables: demographic characteristics, medical comorbidities, etiology for Hartmann operation, preoperative lab values, intraoperative surgical details and short-term outcomes (hospital stay, medical and surgical complications, mortality). Results: There were 37 men (66.1%) and the mean age was 57 years. The most frequent indications for Hartmann’s procedure were colorectal cancer in 25 patients (44.6%) and complicated diverticulitis in 10 patients (17.9%). The mean time to the reversal procedure was 9 months. Morbidity rate was 16.1% (9 patients) with an anastomotic leakage rate of 3.6% (2 patients) and mortality rate was 3.6% (2 patients). The most common medical complication was diarrhea (4 patients, 7.2%). Bivariate analysis demonstrated that the only factor significantly associated with postoperative complications was presence of multiple comorbidities. Conclusions: Multiple medical comorbidities is the only predictive factor for postoperative complications after Hartmann’s reversal and therefore patient selection for this type of surgery is critical. PMID:26664476

  10. Morphological and molecular identification of the ectomycorrhizal association of Lactarius fumosibrunneus and Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana trees in eastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garay-Serrano, Edith; Bandala, Victor Manuel; Montoya, Leticia

    2012-11-01

    A population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana (covering ca. 4.7 ha) is established in a montane cloud forest refuge at Acatlan Volcano in eastern Mexico (Veracruz State), and it represents one of only ten populations of this species known to occur in the country (each stand covers ca. 2-35 ha in extension) and one of the southernmost in the continent. Sporocarps of several ectomycorrhizal macrofungi have been observed in the area, and among them, individuals of the genus Lactarius are common in the forest. However, the morphological and molecular characterization of ectomycorrhizae is still in development. Currently, two species of Lactarius have been previously documented in the area. Through the phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizae, we identified the Lactarius fumosibrunneus ectomycorrhiza. The host, F. grandifolia var. mexicana, was determined comparing the amplified ITS sequence from ectomycorrhizal root tips in the GenBank database with Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. The mycorrhizal system of L. fumosibrunneus is monopodial-pyramidal, characterized by its shiny, white to silver and pruinose surface, secreting a white latex when damaged, composed of three plectenchymatous mantle layers, with diverticulated terminal elements at the outer mantle. It lacks emanating hyphae, rhizomorphs, and sclerotia. A detailed morphological and anatomical description, illustrations, and photographs of the ectomycorrhiza are presented. The comparison of L. fumosibrunneus and other Lactarius belonging to subgenus Plinthogalus is presented. PMID:22402818

  11. [Single-port colonic surgery : techniques and indications].

    PubMed

    Vestweber, B; Straub, E; Kaldowski, B; Paul, C; Alfes, A; Haaf, F; Vestweber, K H

    2011-05-01

    Colonic surgery is feasible with the single-port technique using standard laparoscopic instruments. Operative time and complication rates are comparable to conventional standard laparoscopic procedures. Position of instruments (crossed over) and orientation are somewhat different and need to be trained and practiced. In this patient collective 200 colon resections covering the complete spectrum of colonic surgery were done in our department. Of these 120 patients were operated on because of sigma diverticulitis. The average operative time was 149 min whereby 6 patients (5.0%) had to be converted to an open procedure, 12 (10.0%) patients had early complications, of which 6 (5.0%) had minor wound complications which were treated conservatively and 4 (3.3%) patients had late complications (2 stenoses and 2 hernias) during the mean follow-up time of 7.5 months (range 6-14 months). The cosmetic effect was very good and functional results were good. Single-port colon operations are the least invasive procedure available at the moment. PMID:21431623

  12. Health effects of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Otles, Semih; Ozgoz, Selin

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fibre is a group of food components which is resistant to digestive enzymes and found mainly in cereals, fruits and vegetables. Dietary fi ber and whole grains contain a unique blend of bioactive components including resistant starches, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidants. Dietary fi ber which indigestible in human small intestinal, on the other hand digested completely or partially fermented in the large intestine, is examined in two groups: water-soluble and water insoluble organic compounds. Dietary fi ber can be separated into many different fractions. These fractions include arabinoxylan, inulin, pectin, bran, cellulose, β-glucan and resistant starch. Dietary fibres compose the major component of products with low energy value that have had an increasing importance in recent years. Dietary fibres also have technological and functional properties that can be used in the formulation of foods, as well as numerous beneficial effects on human health. Dietary fibre components organise functions of large intestine and have important physiological effects on glucose, lipid metabolism and mineral bioavailability. Today, dietary fibers are known to be protective effect against certain gastrointestinal diseases, constipation, hemorrhoids, colon cancer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, duodenal ulcer, diverticulitis, obesity, diabetes, stroke, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. In this review the physicochemical and biological properties of dietary fibers and their important implications on human health will be investigated. PMID:24876314

  13. Pneumoretroperitoneum and Pneumomediastinum Revealing a Left Colon Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Montori, Giulia; Di Giovanni, Giacomo; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Angot, Cedric; Al Samman, Sophie; Solaini, Leonardo; Cheynel, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Left colon perforation usually occurs in complicated diverticulitis or cancer. The most frequent signs are intraperitoneal abscess or peritonitis. In cases of retroperitoneal colonic perforation, diagnosis may be difficult. A 59-year-old woman presented with left thigh pain and with abdominal discomfort associated with mild dyspnea. Computed tomography scan showed air bubbles and purulent collection in the retroperitoneum, with subcutaneous emphysema extending from the left thigh to the neck. Computed tomography scan also revealed portal vein gas and thrombosis with multiple liver abscesses. An emergency laparotomy revealed a perforation of the proximal left colon. No masses were found. A left colectomy was performed. The retroperitoneum was drained and washed extensively. A negative pressure wound therapy was applied. A second-look laparotomy was performed 48 hours later. The retroperitoneum was drained and an end colostomy was performed. Intensive Care Unit postoperative stay was 9 days, and the patient was discharged on the 32nd postoperative day. Pneumoretroperitoneum and pneumomediastinum are rare signs of colonic retroperitoneal perforation. The diagnosis may be delayed, especially in the absence of peritoneal irritation. Clinical, laboratory, and especially radiologic parameters might be useful. Surgical treatment must be prompt to improve prognosis. PMID:26414818

  14. Radiological evidence of subcutaneous emphysema leading to a diagnosis of retroperitoneal perforated diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Sivarajah, Vernon; Jones, Christopher; Pittathankal, Antony

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This case report outlines the investigation and management of a young patient presenting with left iliac fossa pain and sepsis. A CT was performed which was initially reported as not showing a perforation, however closer analysis provided evidence of subcutaneous emphysema in the anterior abdominal wall. This evidence justified urgent operative intervention. We review the evidence with regard to this presentation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A previously fit 24-year-old male presented with left iliac fossa pain and features of sepsis. A CT provided subtle but distinctive evidence of retroperitoneal perforation secondary to diverticulitis, in the form of surgical emphysema in the anterior abdominal wall. In view of this, urgent operation was considered justified on suspicion of visceral perforation. A diverticular perforation was confirmed intra-operatively, and a sigmoid colectomy with primary anastomosis was performed, together with a covering ileostomy. The patient made a good post-operative recovery. DISCUSSION Diverticular disease and its complications are becoming more common in a younger age group, in whom perforation may present late or may not be suspected. In this context special attention must be paid to any radiological evidence of perforation. CONCLUSION Surgical emphysema in the abdominal wall is an indicator of retroperitoneal perforation, and its presence should be excluded before the possibility of perforation is dismissed. This may be of especial value in younger age groups amongst whom perforation may be less clinically obvious. PMID:23598175

  15. Resolution of Severe Ulcerative Colitis with the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.

    PubMed

    Khandalavala, Birgit N; Nirmalraj, Maya C

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old female of Asian origin was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) after initial gastrointestinal symptoms of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. She had a relatively benign course over the subsequent 12 years. In 2009, she had increased left-sided abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and progressive weight loss, due to a severe exacerbation. In spite of a variety of standard treatments, her condition continued to decline with a significant impact on normal life and functioning. In December of 2010, repeat colonoscopy and microscopy confirmed pancolitis, without diverticulitis. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) was initiated due to failure of conventional therapies. Following this highly restricted diet, within a period of 3-6 months, improvement was noted, and within a year, no abdominal pain or diarrhea were present, and she returned to her baseline functioning and career. Two years later, repeat colonoscopy showed resolution of the pancolitis, confirmed with microscopic evaluation. Successful use of the SCD in children with UC has been documented. We describe previously unreported, highly beneficial results with both symptomatic and clinical improvement and complete remission of UC in an adult female with the SCD. PMID:26351419

  16. A case of surgically treated peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; O'Brien, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is difficult to diagnose and treat. It is characterized by the rapid progression of painful necrotic ulcer surrounding an area of abdominal stoma. It is almost exclusively associated with inflammatory bowel disease even after bowel surgery and is associated with significant morbidity. Diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum is based on exclusion of other disorders replicating some of its clinical features and histopathological evidence.This is a case report of a 56-year-old lady with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with rapidly progressing abdominal ulcer 8 months after a Hartmanns procedure for perforated diverticulitis. The ulcer had formed a large cavity causing faecal filling in the dependent defect. The other causes of ulcer were excluded with negative histopathology, negative polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium ulcerans and negative acid fast bacillus (AFB) test. She was diagnosed with PPG which is routinely treated medically due to risk of setting off a second focus of pyoderma if surgically intervened. However due to increased risk of faecal peritonitis, it was decided to proceed with surgical debridement. This article will discuss the case in more detail and briefly discuss diagnosis and treatment options for PPG. PMID:27302499

  17. An unusual case of intraabdominal abscess and acute abdomen caused by axial torsion of a Meckel's diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Yıldız, İhsan; Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Barut, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Meckel's diverticulum (MD), the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract, is a true diverticulum. MD is mostly seen in pediatric age groups but may be seen in adults as well. Is twice common in men than women. Surgical treatment is required in symptomatic MD patients. We present a 21-year-old female patient who was admitted with acute abdomen and underwent diverticulectomy with diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum. Presentation of case The 21-year-old female patient was admitted to emergency service with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Physical examination revealed abdominal distention, rebound tenderness and defense. Abdominal radiography revealed air-fluid levels. White blood cell count was high. In the exploration, torsion of MD was observed and diverticulectomy was performed. Histopathologic analysis indicated the presence of MD. The patient recovered without complication, and was uneventfully discharged. Discussion MD is found in 2% of the general population. Common complications of MD include gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction, perforation and diverticulitis. However, axial torsion of MD is a rare complication. Simple diverticulectomy is sufficient in the treatment of most MD cases; however, ileal resection may be required in some cases. Diagnosis of MD is established by histopathologic analysis. Conclusion Although MD is known as a pediatric disease, it is likely to occur in adults as well. Axial torsion of Meckel's diverticulum should be kept in mind the adults presenting with symptoms of acute abdomen. PMID:26955478

  18. Medical Treatment of Diverticular Disease: Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lué, Alberto; Laredo, Viviana; Lanas, Angel

    2016-10-01

    Diverticular disease (DD) of the colon represents the most common disease affecting the large bowel in western countries. Its prevalence is increasing. Recent studies suggest that changes in gut microbiota could contribute to development of symptoms and complication. For this reason antibiotics play a key role in the management of both uncomplicated and complicated DD. Rifaximin has demonstrated to be effective in obtaining symptoms relief at 1 year in patients with uncomplicated DD and to improve symptoms and maintain periods of remission following acute colonic diverticulitis (AD). Despite absence of data that supports the routine use of antibiotic in uncomplicated AD, they are recommended in selected patients. In patients with AD that develop an abscess, conservative treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics is successful in up to 70% of cases. In patients on conservative treatment where percutaneous drainage fails or peritonitis develops, surgery is considered the standard therapy. In conclusion antibiotics seem to remain the mainstay of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated DD and AD. Inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated AD, while outpatient management is considered the best strategy in the majority of uncomplicated patients. PMID:27622367

  19. Systematic review of emergent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for benign and malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed RS; Gupta, Ashish; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris; Parvaiz, Amjad; Mirnezami, Alex H; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become well established in the management of both and malignant colorectal disease. The last decade has seen increasing numbers of surgeons trained to a high standard in minimally-invasive surgery. However there has not been the same enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in emergency colorectal surgery. There is a perception that emergent surgery is technically more difficult and may lead to worse outcomes. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the available literature on the use of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) in the emergency setting. The literature is broadly divided by the underlying pathology; that is, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis and malignant obstruction. There were no randomized trials and the majority of the studies were case-matched series or comparative studies. The overall trend was that LCS is associated with shorter hospital stay, par or fewer complications but an increased operating time.Emergency LCS can be safely undertaken for both benign and malignant disease providing there is appropriate patient selection, the surgeon is adequately experienced and there are sufficient resources to allow for a potentially more complex operation. PMID:25493008

  20. Use of rifaximin in gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shayto, Rani H; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Sharara, Ala I

    2016-01-01

    Rifaximin is a broad spectrum oral antibiotic with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It is poorly absorbed and thus has a highly favorable safety profile. Rifaximin has been shown to be effective in the treatment of traveler’s diarrhea, functional bloating and irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and in the prevention of recurrent overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, there is emerging evidence for a possible beneficial effect of rifaximin in the treatment of uncomplicated diverticular disease and in the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis. The use of rifaximin is associated with a low incidence of development, or persistence of spontaneous bacterial mutants. Moreover, the development of important drug resistance among extra-intestinal flora during rifaximin therapy is unlikely because of minimal systemic absorption and limited cross-resistance of rifaximin with other antimicrobials. This review addresses the current and emerging role of rifaximin in the treatment of gastrointestinal and liver disorders. PMID:27547007

  1. Clinical outcomes in surgical and non-surgical management of hepatic portal venous gas

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Soo-Kyung; Park, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is a rare condition, with poor prognosis and a mortality rate of up to 75%. Indications for surgical and non-surgical management of HPVG including associated complications and mortality remain to be clarified. Methods From January 2008 to December 2014, 18 patients with HPVG diagnosed through abdominal computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively identified. Clinical symptoms, laboratory data, underlying diseases, treatment, and mortality rate were analyzed. Patients were classified into 2 groups: surgical management recommended (SR, n=10) and conservative management (CM, n=8). The SR group was further subdivided into patients who underwent surgical management (SM-SR, n=5) and those who were managed conservatively (NS-SR, n=5). Results Conditions underlying HPVG included mesenteric ischemia (38.9%), intestinal obstruction (22.2%), enteritis (22.2%), duodenal ulcer perforation (5.6%), necrotizing pancreatitis (5.6%), and diverticulitis (5.6%). In terms of mortality, 2 patients (40%) died in the SM-SR group, 1 (12.5%) in the CM group, and 100% in the NS-SR group. Higher scores from Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II predicted the mortality rates of the NS-SR and CM groups. Conclusions Identification of HPVG requires careful consideration for surgical management. If surgical management is indicated, prompt laparotomy should be performed. However, even in the non-surgical management condition, aggressive laparotomy can improve survival rates for patients with high APACHE II scores. PMID:26693238

  2. Prevalence of Duodenal Diverticulum in South Indians: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannaiyan, Kavitha; Thiagarajan, Sivakami

    2013-01-01

    Background. Duodenum is the second most common site of diverticula after the colon. Diagnosis of duodenal diverticula is incidental and found during other therapeutic procedures. In 90% of cases, they are asymptomatic, and less than 10% develop clinical symptoms. The difficulty to ascertain the true incidence of duodenal diverticula demanded for the present study to elucidate the prevalence of the duodenal diverticulum in South Indians. Materials and Methods. One hundred and twenty specimens of duodenum were utilized for the study. The prevalence, anatomical location, and dimension of duodenal diverticulum were studied. Results. Among the 120 specimens of duodenum, five specimens had solitary, extraluminal, and globular-shaped diverticula in the medial wall of the duodenum. In three (60%) cases, it was found in the second part of duodenum and in two (40%) cases in the third part. The mean size of the diverticula was 1.4 cm. Conclusion. In the present study in South Indian people, the prevalence (4.2%) of duodenal diverticula is low comparable to other studies in the literature. Even though most of the duodenal diverticula are asymptomatic, the knowledge about its frequency and location is of great importance to prevent complications like diverticulitis, hemorrhage, obstructive jaundice, and perforation. PMID:25938103

  3. Meckel's diverticulum--a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults.

    PubMed

    Bălălău, C; Bacalbaşa, N; Motofei, I; Popa, Fl; Voiculescu, S; Scăunaşu, R V

    2015-01-01

    Although many people have Meckel's diverticulum, only some experience any symptoms, most under the age of 10. In adults it is usually asymptomatic but approximately 4% develop complications. Meckel's diverticulum is usually diagnosed in the first years of life and after that the risk of the complications decreases with increasing age, with no predictive factors for the development of complications. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man admitted in the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, flatulence and lack of transit for feces and gas. The patient had been previously operated for peritonitis due to a perforated ulcer. Clinical examination and paraclinical investigations (abdominal radiography and ultrasound) suggested the diagnosis of intestinal obstruction, probably produced by adhesions due to previous abdominal intervention. The diverticulum was resected using a linear stapler and the patient recovered without any complications. Small bowel obstruction due to Meckel's diverticulitis may be caused by entangled loop of small bowel around a fibrous cord, intussusception, volvulus, or incarceration within a hernia sac. The discovery of a Meckel's diverticulum complication in a mid thirties patient represented an intra-operatory surprise and is the peculiarity of the case. PMID:25970960

  4. Intestinal Ultrasound in Rare Gastrointestinal Diseases, Update, Part 2.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Lembcke, B; Jenssen, C; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Hollerweger, A

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal ultrasound has become an established and valid diagnostic method for inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, appendicitis, bowel obstruction, perforation and intussusception. However, little is known about sonographic findings in other rarer intestinal diseases. Ultrasound may display the transformation of the intestinal wall from a normal to a pathological state both in inflammatory and neoplastic disease. Besides demonstrating the transmural aspect, it also shows the mesenteric reaction as well as complications such as fistula, abscesses, stenosis, or ileus. Furthermore, in some diseases intestinal ultrasound may serve as a diagnostic clue if typical patterns of the bowel wall and impaired peristalsis can be demonstrated. This may lead to an important reduction of invasive and expensive (follow-up) procedures. The information gained by ultrasound regarding intestinal disease, however, is as important and valid as e. g. in case of focal lesions of the liver. Serving as tertiary referral centers for a broad spectrum of intestinal diseases, we therefore report some aspects of ultrasound in patients with less often recognized diseases. The article is divided into two parts, the first focusing on examination techniques, infectious diseases and celiac sprue and the second on hereditary, vascular and neoplastic diseases and varia. PMID:26091002

  5. Probiotics for the Treatment of Symptomatic Uncomplicated Diverticular Disease: Rationale and Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, Carmelo; Bertelé, Anna; Tursi, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Changes in the colonic microbiota are critical to the pathogenesis of diverticular complications such as diverticulitis and peridiverticular abscesses. However, more subtle changes in microbiota composition may well be important to the more chronic manifestations of diverticulosis. Some studies have shown the presence of bacterial overgrowth in subgroups of patients with diverticular disease and recent studies, using molecular biology techniques, found an increase of proteobacteria and actinobacteria in patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD), compared with healthy controls. The use of probiotics to modulate intestinal microecology in SUDD appears therefore rational. Although several investigations evaluating the clinical efficacy of probiotics have been performed, no definitive results have yet been achieved, mainly due to the heterogeneity of the available studies. Most of the studies used probiotics in combination with poorly absorbed antimicrobials or anti-inflammatory drugs. In only 4 studies, there was a harm using probiotics alone, but only 1 was a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. The analysis of the available evidence reveals a poor quality of the published studies, whose design was heterogeneous, with only 2 out of 11 trials being double-blind and randomized. Therefore, available data can only suggest a benefit of probiotics in SUDD, but do not allow any evidence-based definite conclusion. As a consequence, current guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to recommend probiotics for symptom relief in patients with diverticular disease. PMID:27622371

  6. Complicated intra-abdominal infections in Europe: a comprehensive review of the CIAO study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The CIAO Study (“Complicated Intra-Abdominal infection Observational” Study) is a multicenter investigation performed in 68 medical institutions throughout Europe over the course of a 6-month observational period (January-June 2012). Patients with either community-acquired or healthcare-associated complicated intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) were included in the study. 2,152 patients with a mean age of 53.8 years (range: 4–98 years) were enrolled in the study. 46.3% of the patients were women and 53.7% were men. Intraperitoneal specimens were collected from 62.2% of the enrolled patients, and from these samples, a variety of microorganisms were collectively identified. The overall mortality rate was 7.5% (163/2.152). According to multivariate analysis of the compiled data, several criteria were found to be independent variables predictive of patient mortality, including patient age, the presence of an intestinal non-appendicular source of infection (colonic non-diverticular perforation, complicated diverticulitis, small bowel perforation), a delayed initial intervention (a delay exceeding 24 hours), sepsis and septic shock in the immediate post-operative period, and ICU admission. Given the sweeping geographical distribution of the participating medical centers, the CIAO Study gives an accurate description of the epidemiological, clinical, microbiological, and treatment profiles of complicated intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) throughout Europe. PMID:23190741

  7. Intestinal Obstruction: Still a Lethal Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Canady, Jerome; Jamil, Zafar; Wilson, Jerome; Bernard, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 70 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of intestinal obstruction from January 1983 to September 1985 was reviewed. Mean age was 62 years. Etiological factors included adhesions 50 percent, malignancy 24 percent, volvulus 12 percent, diverticulitis 7 percent, hernias 4 percent, and radiation enteritis, mesenteric infarction, and perforation of the cecum in the remaining 3 percent. Complications included wound infection 9 percent (n = 6), intra-abdominal sepsis 7 percent (n = 5), and recurrent small bowel obstruction 4 percent (n = 3). Overall mortality was 24 percent (n = 7). Results of the univariant analysis showed no association between the clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, that is, fever, tachycardia, leukocytosis, and local tenderness, and gangrenous bowel. A multiple regression analysis showed, however, that only 14 percent of the variance was able to predict the gangrenous bowel based on clinical signs. In conclusion, the classical signs of intestinal obstruction are poor indicators for compromised bowel, and early surgical intervention will reduce the incidence of ischemic bowel and mortality. PMID:3323541

  8. [Diverticular disease complicated by peritonitis: role of conservative surgical therapy].

    PubMed

    Lippi, Carlo Ettore; Braini, Andrea; Cervia, Silvio; Fabbricotti, Alaido; Ferrari, Teresa; Maruelli, Piero; Spessa, Elisabetta; Sturlese, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Peritonitis complicating diverticular disease may be treated by sigmoid resection (with or without primary anastomosis) or by a conservative surgical approach, either laparoscopically or by open surgery. The choice depends on the severity of the peritonitis (Hinchey), the patient's conditions (ASA) and the surgeon's experience. Sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis has a lower morbidity and mortality vs Hartmann's procedure. After the introduction of laparoscopy in colorectal surgery, exploratory laparoscopy combined with drainage has been proposed to treat acute episodes, followed by laparoscopic resection. Since 1982, over 1000 patients have been operated on for colorectal disease: 119 for complicated diverticulitis, 55 of which complicated by peritonitis. In the latter, we performed conservative surgery (25 patients) and resection (30 patients) laparoscopically or by open surgery. Our results show a higher morbidity and mortality for the Hartmann procedure vs sigmoid resection with primary anastomosis and a lower specific morbidity in patients undergoing laparoscopic exploration and drainage. Moreover, there was a low percentage (52%) of re-canalisations with the Hartmann procedure, with a morbidity of 32% associated with this procedure. In conclusion, we believe that a conservative laparoscopic surgical approach may be advocated in selected cases (Hinchey II and III without clear perforation), followed by laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, resection with primary anastomosis in Hinchey I or in cases of evident perforation with purulent or faecal peritonitis (possibly combined with a stoma), reserving the Hartmann procedure for compromised patients. PMID:18019645

  9. Laparoscopic Management of Diverticular Colovesical Fistula: Experience in 15 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Marney, Lucy A.; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Colovesical fistulas secondary to diverticular disease may be considered a contraindication to the laparoscopic approach. The feasibility of laparoscopic management of complicated diverticulitis and mixed diverticular fistulas has been demonstrated. However, few studies on the laparoscopic management of diverticular colovesical fistulas exist. A retrospective analysis was performed of 15 patients with diverticular colovesical fistula, who underwent laparoscopic-assisted anterior resection and bladder repair. Median operating time was 135 minutes and median blood loss, 75 mL. Five patients were converted to an open procedure (33.3%) with an associated increase in hospital stay (P = 0.035). Median time to return of bowel function was 2 days and median length of stay, 6 days. Overall morbidity was 20% with no major complications. There was no mortality. There was no recurrence during median follow-up of 12.4 months. These results suggest that laparoscopic management of diverticular colovesical fistulas is both feasible and safe in the setting of appropriate surgical expertise. PMID:23701143

  10. Laparoscopic management of intra-abdominal infections: Systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Tranà, Cristian; Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Saverio, Salomone Di; Manfredi, Roberto; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Falcone, Chiara; Ansaloni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of intra abdominal infections. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed including studies where intra abdominal infections were treated laparoscopically. RESULTS: Early laparoscopic approaches have become the standard surgical technique for treating acute cholecystitis. The laparoscopic appendectomy has been demonstrated to be superior to open surgery in acute appendicitis. In the event of diverticulitis, laparoscopic resections have proven to be safe and effective procedures for experienced laparoscopic surgeons and may be performed without adversely affecting morbidity and mortality rates. However laparoscopic resection has not been accepted by the medical community as the primary treatment of choice. In high-risk patients, laparoscopic approach may be used for exploration or peritoneal lavage and drainage. The successful laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers for experienced surgeons, is demonstrated to be safe and effective. Regarding small bowel perforations, comparative studies contrasting open and laparoscopic surgeries have not yet been conducted. Successful laparoscopic resections addressing iatrogenic colonic perforation have been reported despite a lack of literature-based evidence supporting such procedures. In post-operative infections, laparoscopic approaches may be useful in preventing diagnostic delay and controlling the source. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy has a good diagnostic accuracy and enables to better identify the causative pathology; laparoscopy may be recommended for the treatment of many intra-abdominal infections. PMID:26328036

  11. The role of vitamin D in reducing gastrointestinal disease risk and assessment of individual dietary intake needs: Focus on genetic and genomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Laing, Bobbi; Marlow, Gareth; Bishop, Karen

    2016-01-01

    With the endogenous formation of vitamin D being significantly curtailed because of public awareness of skin cancer dangers, attention is turning to dietary sources. Cumulative evidence has implicated vitamin D deficiency in increasing susceptibility to various gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also reason to suggest adjunct vitamin D therapy for such diseases. Although there is justification for increasing vitamin D intake overall, optimal intakes will vary among individuals. Genomic technologies have revealed several hundreds of genes associated with vitamin D actions. The nature of these genes emphasizes the potentially negative implications of modulating vitamin D intakes in the absence of complementary human genetic and genomic data, including information on the gut microbiome. However, we are not yet in a position to apply this information. Genomic data (transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) could provide evidence that vitamin D sufficiency has been achieved. We suggest that there is an increasingly strong case for considering the more widespread use of vitamin D fortified foods and/or dietary supplements to benefit gastrointestinal health. However, intake levels might beneficially be informed by personalized genetic and genomic information, for optimal disease prevention and maintenance of remission. PMID:26251177

  12. [A case of intestinal occlusion caused by endometriosis of the cecum].

    PubMed

    Veneziano, M; Zaraca, F; Framarino, M; Di Paola, M; Giobbe, M; Montemurro, L; Fabiani, C; Filippoussis, P; Mancicni, B; Marzetti, L; Carboni, M

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to heighten awareness of intestinal endometriosis, a disease that may mimic other abdominal pathologies (bowel carcinoma, intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis), sometimes found in the emergency setting. The Authors report a case of acute bowel obstruction due to coecal endometriosis with appendix mucocele, peritoneal pseudomyxoma and ovarian endometrioma. The patient was operated on in the emergency setting, a right colectomy was performed and she then received pharmacological suppressive treatment with Gn-RH analogues and danatrol. We remark that preoperative diagnosis is very difficult in those cases that do not have a past history of pelvic endometriosis. An accurate anamnesis regarding the chronology of pain onset (typically only during the menstruation at first), but especially intraoperative histopathologic examination are useful for diagnosis. An increased awareness of intestinal endometriosis in reproductive age women with acute bowel obstruction, associated with an accurate anamnesis of menstrual history may allow pre- or intraoperative diagnosis, which is the clue to a less aggressive operation. Postoperative follow up and hormonal therapy are mandatory. PMID:10793771

  13. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in older patients.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Corey; Clark, Dwayne C

    2006-11-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions such as abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and mesenteric ischemia. Changes that occur in the biliary system because of aging make older patients vulnerable to acute cholecystitis, the most common indication for surgery in this population. In older patients with appendicitis, the initial diagnosis is correct only one half of the time, and there are increased rates of perforation and mortality when compared with younger patients. Medication use, gallstones, and alcohol use increase the risk of pancreatitis, and advanced age is an indicator of poor prognosis for this disease. Diverticulitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in the older patient; in appropriately selected patients, it may be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics. Small and large bowel obstructions, usually caused by adhesive disease or malignancy, are more common in the aged and often require surgery. Morbidity and mortality among older patients presenting with acute abdominal pain are high, and these patients often require hospitalization with prompt surgical consultation. PMID:17111893

  15. A case of surgically treated peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; O'Brien, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is difficult to diagnose and treat. It is characterized by the rapid progression of painful necrotic ulcer surrounding an area of abdominal stoma. It is almost exclusively associated with inflammatory bowel disease even after bowel surgery and is associated with significant morbidity. Diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum is based on exclusion of other disorders replicating some of its clinical features and histopathological evidence. This is a case report of a 56-year-old lady with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with rapidly progressing abdominal ulcer 8 months after a Hartmanns procedure for perforated diverticulitis. The ulcer had formed a large cavity causing faecal filling in the dependent defect. The other causes of ulcer were excluded with negative histopathology, negative polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium ulcerans and negative acid fast bacillus (AFB) test. She was diagnosed with PPG which is routinely treated medically due to risk of setting off a second focus of pyoderma if surgically intervened. However due to increased risk of faecal peritonitis, it was decided to proceed with surgical debridement. This article will discuss the case in more detail and briefly discuss diagnosis and treatment options for PPG. PMID:27302499

  16. Laparoscopic Reversal of Hartmann's Procedure: State of the Art 20 Years after the First Reported Case

    PubMed Central

    Ardiri, Annalisa; Mannino, Maurizio; Politi, Antonio; Di Stefano, Andrea; Aftab, Zia; Abdelaal, Abdelrahman; Arcerito, Maria Concetta; Cavallaro, Andrea; Cavallaro, Marco; Bertino, Gaetano; Di Carlo, Isidoro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of the present work is to review the literature to point out the role of laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann procedure. Material and Methods. Number of patients, age, sex, etiology, Hinchey classification, interval between procedure and reversal, position of the first trocars, mean operative time (min), number and causes of conversion, length of stay, mortality, complications, and quality of life were considered. Results. 238 males (52.4%) and 216 females (47.6%) between 38 and 67 years were analyzed. The etiology was diverticulitis in 292 patients (72.1%), carcinoma in 43 patients (10.6%), and other in 70 patients (17.3%). Only 7 articles (22.6%) reported Hinchey classification. The interval between initial procedure and reversal was between 50 and 330 days. The initial trocar was open positioned in 182 patients (43.2%) through umbilical incision, in 177 patients (41.9%) in right upper quadrant, and in 63 patients (14.9%) in colostomy site. The operative time was between 69 and 285 minutes. A total of 83 patients (12.1%) were converted and the causes were reported in 67.4%. The length of stay was between 3 and 12 days. 5 patients (0.7%) died. The complications concern 112 cases (16.4%). Conclusion. The laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal is safer and achieves faster positive results. PMID:25210510

  17. Diverticular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: Incidental Diagnosis or Real Association? Final Answer.

    PubMed

    Regula, Jaroslaw

    2016-10-01

    Associations between diverticular disease of the colon and the colorectal cancer has been studied for >60 years. Observational, cross-sectional, and case-control studies as well as large population-based studies gave conflicting results and association was not fully proven. Obtaining the proof was difficult because both diseases share similar clinical characteristics, both increase with age, and both involve similar dietary factors. Long-term observations are difficult as diagnostic methods changed over time from barium enema 50 to 60 years ago, through endoscopy, up to CT and MR in recent years. Cancer or adenomas may be missed within diverticular segment; diverticula may be underreported in patients with colon cancer diagnosis. Most recent 2 large cohort studies have solved the dilemma. These studies have clearly shown that diverticular disease does not increase the risk of colon cancer after the first year of diagnosis. Within the first year of diagnosis the association is strong, most probably due to difficulties with differential diagnosis and misclassifications and shared symptoms. Findings of these studies have led to the conclusion that colon cancer has to be excluded using modern techniques after the first episode of suspected diverticulitis. PMID:27622360

  18. Myenteric plexitis: A frequent feature in patients undergoing surgery for colonic diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Sidoni, Angelo; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Dore, Maria P; Binda, Gian A; Bandelloni, Roberto; Salemme, Marianna; Del Sordo, Rachele; Cadei, Moris; Manca, Alessandra; Bernardini, Nunzia; Maurer, Christoph A; Cathomas, Gieri

    2015-01-01

    Background Diverticular disease of the colon is frequent in clinical practice, and a large number of patients each year undergo surgical procedures worldwide for their symptoms. Thus, there is a need for better knowledge of the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms of this disease entity. Objectives Because patients with colonic diverticular disease have been shown to display abnormalities of the enteric nervous system, we assessed the frequency of myenteric plexitis (i.e. the infiltration of myenteric ganglions by inflammatory cells) in patients undergoing surgery for this condition. Methods We analyzed archival resection samples from the proximal resection margins of 165 patients undergoing left hemicolectomy (60 emergency and 105 elective surgeries) for colonic diverticulitis, by histology and immunochemistry. Results Overall, plexitis was present in almost 40% of patients. It was subdivided into an eosinophilic (48%) and a lymphocytic (52%) subtype. Plexitis was more frequent in younger patients; and it was more frequent in those undergoing emergency surgery (50%), compared to elective (28%) surgery (p = 0.007). All the severe cases of plexitis displayed the lymphocytic subtype. Conclusions In conclusion, myenteric plexitis is frequent in patients with colonic diverticular disease needing surgery, and it might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26668745

  19. Enterolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Lan, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Enterolithiasis or formation of gastrointestinal concretions is an uncommon medical condition that develops in the setting of intestinal stasis in the presence of the intestinal diverticula, surgical enteroanastomoses, blind pouches, afferent loops, incarcerated hernias, small intestinal tumors, intestinal kinking from intra-abdominal adhesions, and stenosing or stricturing Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis. Enterolithiasis is classified into primary and secondary types. Its prevalence ranges from 0.3% to 10% in selected populations. Proximal primary enteroliths are composed of choleic acid salts and distal enteroliths are calcified. Clinical presentation includes abdominal pains, distention, nausea, and vomiting of occasionally sudden but often fluctuating subacute nature which occurs as a result of the enterolith tumbling through the bowel lumen. Thorough history and physical exam coupled with radiologic imaging helps establish a diagnosis in a patient at risk. Complications include bowel obstruction, direct pressure injury to the intestinal mucosa, intestinal gangrene, intussusceptions, afferent loop syndrome, diverticulitis, iron deficiency anemia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and perforation. Mortality of primary enterolithiasis may reach 3% and secondary enterolithiasis 8%. Risk factors include poorly conditioned patients with significant obstruction and delay in diagnosis. Treatment relies on timely recognition of the disease and endoscopic or surgical intervention. With advents in new technology, improved outcome is expected for patients with enterolithiasis. PMID:25548480

  20. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Multimodality Imaging Approach with Clinical-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Revzin, Margarita V; Mathur, Mahan; Dave, Haatal B; Macer, Matthew L; Spektor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a common medical problem, with almost 1 million cases diagnosed annually. Historically, PID has been a clinical diagnosis supplemented with the findings from ultrasonography (US) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, the diagnosis of PID can be challenging because the clinical manifestations may mimic those of other pelvic and abdominal processes. Given the nonspecific clinical manifestations, computed tomography (CT) is commonly the first imaging examination performed. General CT findings of early- and late-stage PID include thickening of the uterosacral ligaments, pelvic fat stranding with obscuration of fascial planes, reactive lymphadenopathy, and pelvic free fluid. Recognition of these findings, as well as those seen with cervicitis, endometritis, acute salpingitis, oophoritis, pyosalpinx, hydrosalpinx, tubo-ovarian abscess, and pyometra, is crucial in allowing prompt and accurate diagnosis. Late complications of PID include tubal damage resulting in infertility and ectopic pregnancy, peritonitis caused by uterine and/or tubo-ovarian abscess rupture, development of peritoneal adhesions resulting in bowel obstruction and/or hydroureteronephrosis, right upper abdominal inflammation (Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome), and septic thrombophlebitis. Recognition of these late manifestations at CT can also aid in proper patient management. At CT, careful assessment of common PID mimics, such as endometriosis, adnexal torsion, ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst, adnexal neoplasms, appendicitis, and diverticulitis, is important to avoid misinterpretation, delay in management, and unnecessary surgery. Correlation with the findings from complementary imaging examinations, such as US and MR imaging, is useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618331

  1. Effect of glucagon on the diagnostic accuracy of double-contrast barium enema examinations.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, R F; Vandeman, F; Wall, S D

    1984-01-01

    The effect of glucagon-induced hypotonicity on the diagnostic accuracy of double-contrast barium enema examinations was determined in 133 consecutive patients in a double-blind crossover study. All patients underwent colonoscopy and served as their own controls by undergoing a double-contrast study after intravenous injection of 1 mg of glucagon and another after intravenous injection of 1 ml of saline placebo, in randomized order. The frequencies of good/excellent hypotonicity and quality of examinations after first doses of glucagon (55.3% and 80.8%) were not significantly different from the frequencies of good/excellent results after first doses of saline (51.3% and 86.5%). The sensitivity was 72.6% after glucagon and 64.5% after placebo; the specificity was 88.7% after glucagon and 77.9% after placebo; and the respective accuracies were 81.2% and 71.9%. These percentages should be used only to compare results with and without glucagon and, by study design, do not represent results of a complete double-contrast study. The variation among these percentages was not statistically significant, but diverticulitis was more accurately diagnosed after glucagon. It was concluded that glucagon does not significantly improve the sensitivity and specificity of the double-contrast barium enema examination and should be used only in selected instances. PMID:6606942

  2. Spontaneous perforation of Meckel's diverticulum: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Farah, Robleh Hassan; Avala, Prude; Khaiz, Driss; Bensardi, Fatmazahra; Elhattabi, Khalid; Lefriyekh, Rachid; Berrada, Saad; Fadil, Abdelaziz; Zerouali, Najib Ouariti

    2015-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the commonest congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract. Hemorrhage, obstruction and inflammation are the three main categories of complications resulting from Meckel's diverticulum. Spontaneously perforation of Meckel's diverticulum is very rare and mimics acute appendicitis. We report a case of 26 year-old male, who presented since 5 days worsening abdominal pain predominantly in the right iliac fossa associated with high grade fever. On physical examination his abdomen was distended with guarding and rigidity. A provisional diagnosis of appendiculaire peritonitis was made. Our patient had an emergency laparotomy, where a perforated Meckel's diverticulum and advanced peritonitis were discovered. A diverticulectomy with ileostomy were performed. Heterotopic mucosa of diverticulitis was confirmed on histopathology. The patient made an uneventful recovery postoperatively and ileostomy reconstruction was done two months later. This case report is an interesting and unusual case of Meckel's diverticulum complications and highlights the importance of considering Meckel's diverticulum as a differential diagnosis in every patient presenting with acute abdomen. PMID:26175810

  3. Resolution of Severe Ulcerative Colitis with the Specific Carbohydrate Diet

    PubMed Central

    Khandalavala, Birgit N.; Nirmalraj, Maya C.

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old female of Asian origin was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) after initial gastrointestinal symptoms of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. She had a relatively benign course over the subsequent 12 years. In 2009, she had increased left-sided abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and progressive weight loss, due to a severe exacerbation. In spite of a variety of standard treatments, her condition continued to decline with a significant impact on normal life and functioning. In December of 2010, repeat colonoscopy and microscopy confirmed pancolitis, without diverticulitis. The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) was initiated due to failure of conventional therapies. Following this highly restricted diet, within a period of 3–6 months, improvement was noted, and within a year, no abdominal pain or diarrhea were present, and she returned to her baseline functioning and career. Two years later, repeat colonoscopy showed resolution of the pancolitis, confirmed with microscopic evaluation. Successful use of the SCD in children with UC has been documented. We describe previously unreported, highly beneficial results with both symptomatic and clinical improvement and complete remission of UC in an adult female with the SCD. PMID:26351419

  4. Infection of the sigmoid colon during TNFα antagonist therapy for chronic inflammatory joint disease.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Chantal; Beldjerd, Mounir; Pécourneau, Virginie; Billey, Thierry; Lassoued, Slim

    2014-05-01

    We report 7 cases of sigmoid colon infection in patients taking TNFα antagonist therapy to treat chronic inflammatory joint disease. There were 5 women and 2 men with a mean age of 57.5 years (range, 21-77 years). The presenting symptoms were abdominal pain, bowel habit changes, and a fever. These symptoms developed within 6 months after starting TNFα antagonist therapy in 5 of the 7 patients. Empirical antibiotic therapy was used in all 7 patients. Surgical colectomy was performed in 4 patients, including 1 who required a temporary Hartmann's procedure. The risk of infection associated with TNFα antagonist therapy is well documented. However, few cases of colon infection have been reported and little is known about this potentially severe complication. Glucocorticoids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may worsen the infection, particularly as they can attenuate the clinical symptoms, thereby delaying the diagnosis. A history of sigmoid colon infection, diverticulosis, and/or diverticulitis must be sought before starting treatment with a biological agent. Prophylactic treatment may be considered if such a history is found. Diagnostic investigations are in order to develop a standardized management strategy in patients with a history of intestinal tract infection. PMID:24176737

  5. Unexpected Histopathological Findings in Appendectomy Specimens: a Retrospective Study of 1627 Cases.

    PubMed

    Limaiem, Faten; Arfa, Nafaa; Marsaoui, Lobna; Bouraoui, Saadia; Lahmar, Ahlem; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2015-12-01

    Pathologic evaluation of the appendix after appendectomy is routine and can occasionally identify unexpected findings. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence and type of pathologic diagnoses found in appendectomy specimens at our institution. The clinicopathological data of 1627 patients who underwent appendectomies for presumed acute appendicitis from January 2008 to October 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 986 men and 641 women (sex ratio M/F = 1.5) aged between 16 months and 90 years (mean = 30 years). All patients underwent appendectomy (either open or laparoscopic). Histological examination of the surgical specimen showed acute inflammation of the appendix in 1455 cases (89.42 %), fibrosed appendix in 37 cases (2.27 %), and Enterobius vermicularis (n = 23). In 101 cases (6.2 %), the appendix was histologically normal. Incidental unexpected pathological diagnoses were noted in 57 appendectomy specimens. They included pinworm (n = 23), mucinous neoplasms (n = 12), neuroendocrine tumors (NET) (n = 8), adenocarcinoma (n = 2), granulomatous inflammation (n = 5), tuberculosis (n = 2), hyperplastic polyp (n = 1), tubular adenoma (n = 1), diverticulitis (n = 1), endometriosis (n = 1), and actinomycosis (n = 1). The routine histopathological examination of the appendix is of value for identifying unsuspected conditions requiring further postoperative management. Gross examination alone does not appear to be a good indicator of an unexpected finding on microscopic exam. It is recommended that in order to avoid misdiagnoses, all appendices should be histopathologically examined. PMID:27011552

  6. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W.; Roberts, Christian K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause vs. treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction [including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity]; and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [Accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  7. Blood flukes (Digenea: Aporocotylidae) infecting body cavity of South American catfishes (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae): two new species from rivers in Bolivia, Guyana and Peru with a re-assessment of Plehniella Szidat, 1951.

    PubMed

    Orelis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Plehniella Szidat, 1951 is emended based on new collections from South American long-whiskered catfishes. It is clearly differentiated from Sanguinicola Plehn, 1905 by lacking lateral tegumental body spines and by having 6 asymmetrical caeca. Plehniella sabajperezi sp. n. infects body cavity of Pimelodus albofasciatus (Mees) from the Demerara and Rupununi Rivers (Guyana) and Pimelodus blochii (Valenciennes) from Lake Tumi Chucua (Bolivia) and Napo River (Peru). It differs from Plehniella coelomicola Szidat, 1951 (type species) by having a thin-walled vas deferens that greatly exceeds the length of cirrus-sac and that joins the cirrus-sac at level of ovovitelline duct and ootype, an internal seminal vesicle that is absent or diminutive, and a cirrus-sac that is spheroid, nearly marginal, and envelops the laterally-directed distal portion of the male genitalia. Plehniella armbrusteri sp. n. infects body cavity of P. blochii from Lake Tumi Chucua (Bolivia). It differs from P. coelomicola and P. sabajperezi by having a relatively ovoid body, a massive intestine comprising caeca that are deeply-lobed to diverticulate and terminate in the posterior half of the body, a testis that flanks the distal tips of the posteriorly-directed caeca, and a proximal portion of the vas deferens that loops ventral to the testis. Small adults (Plehniella sp.) collected from body cavity of Pimelodus grosskopfii (Steindachner) from Cienega de Jobo and Canal del Dique (Colombia) differ from congeners by having a posteriorly-constricted body region, an anterior sucker with concentric rows of minute spines, an elongate anterior oesophageal swelling, short and wide caeca, and a male genital pore that opens proportionally more anteriad. This study nearly doubles the number of aporocotylids documented from South America Rivers and comprises the first record of a fish blood fluke from P. blochii, P. albofasciatus and P. grosskopfii as well as from Bolivia, Colombia, Guyana or Peru. PMID:26373332

  8. Computed tomography colonography in 2014: an update on technique and indications.

    PubMed

    Laghi, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Twenty years after its introduction, computed tomographic colonography (CTC) has reached its maturity, and it can reasonably be considered the best radiological diagnostic test for imaging colorectal cancer (CRC) and polyps. This examination technique is less invasive than colonoscopy (CS), easy to perform, and standardized. Reduced bowel preparation and colonic distention using carbon dioxide favor patient compliance. Widespread implementation of a new image reconstruction algorithm has minimized radiation exposure, and the use of dedicated software with enhanced views has enabled easier image interpretation. Integration in the routine workflow of a computer-aided detection algorithm reduces perceptual errors, particularly for small polyps. Consolidated evidence from the literature shows that the diagnostic performances for the detection of CRC and large polyps in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals are similar to CS and are largely superior to barium enema, the latter of which should be strongly discouraged. Favorable data regarding CTC performance open the possibility for many different indications, some of which are already supported by evidence-based data: incomplete, failed, or unfeasible CS; symptomatic, elderly, and frail patients; and investigation of diverticular disease. Other indications are still being debated and, thus, are recommended only if CS is unfeasible: the use of CTC in CRC screening and in surveillance after surgery for CRC or polypectomy. In order for CTC to be used appropriately, contraindications such as acute abdominal conditions (diverticulitis or the acute phase of inflammatory bowel diseases) and surveillance in patients with a long-standing history of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and in those with hereditary colonic syndromes should not be overlooked. This will maximize the benefits of the technique and minimize potential sources of frustration or disappointment for both referring clinicians and patients. PMID:25492999

  9. Routine Histopathologic Examination of Appendectomy Specimens: Retrospective Analysis of 1255 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emre, Arif; Akbulut, Sami; Bozdag, Zehra; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kanlioz, Murat; Emre, Rabia; Sahin, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical benefit of histopathologic analysis of appendectomy specimens from patients with an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed the demographic and histopathologic data of 1255 patients (712 males, 543 females; age range, 17–85 years) who underwent appendectomy to treat an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients who underwent incidental appendectomy during other surgeries were excluded from the study. Histopathologic findings of the appendectomy specimens were used to confirm the initial diagnosis. Ninety-four percent of the appendectomy specimens were positive for appendicitis. Of those, 880 were phlegmonous appendicitis, 148 were gangrenous appendicitis with perforation, and the remaining 88 showed unusual histopathologic findings. In the 88 specimens with unusual pathology, fibrous obliteration was observed in 57 specimens, carcinoid tumor in 11, Encheliophis vermicularis parasite infection in 8, granulatomous inflammation in 6, appendiceal endometriosis in 2, and 1 specimen each showed mucocele, eosinophilic infiltration, Taenia saginata parasite infection, and appendicular diverticulitis. All carcinoid tumors were located in the distal appendix. Six of the 11 carcinoid tumors were defined by histopathology as involving tubular cells, and the other 5 as involving enterochromaffin cells. Six patients had muscularis propria invasion, 2 patients had submucosa invasion, 2 patients had mesoappendix invasion, and 1 patient had serosal invasion. All patients with tumors remained disease free during the follow-up (range, 1–27 months). We conclude that when the ratio of unusual pathologic findings for appendectomy specimens is considered, it is evident that all surgical specimens should be subjected to careful histologic examination. PMID:24229023

  10. Computed tomography colonography in 2014: An update on technique and indications

    PubMed Central

    Laghi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Twenty years after its introduction, computed tomographic colonography (CTC) has reached its maturity, and it can reasonably be considered the best radiological diagnostic test for imaging colorectal cancer (CRC) and polyps. This examination technique is less invasive than colonoscopy (CS), easy to perform, and standardized. Reduced bowel preparation and colonic distention using carbon dioxide favor patient compliance. Widespread implementation of a new image reconstruction algorithm has minimized radiation exposure, and the use of dedicated software with enhanced views has enabled easier image interpretation. Integration in the routine workflow of a computer-aided detection algorithm reduces perceptual errors, particularly for small polyps. Consolidated evidence from the literature shows that the diagnostic performances for the detection of CRC and large polyps in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals are similar to CS and are largely superior to barium enema, the latter of which should be strongly discouraged. Favorable data regarding CTC performance open the possibility for many different indications, some of which are already supported by evidence-based data: incomplete, failed, or unfeasible CS; symptomatic, elderly, and frail patients; and investigation of diverticular disease. Other indications are still being debated and, thus, are recommended only if CS is unfeasible: the use of CTC in CRC screening and in surveillance after surgery for CRC or polypectomy. In order for CTC to be used appropriately, contraindications such as acute abdominal conditions (diverticulitis or the acute phase of inflammatory bowel diseases) and surveillance in patients with a long-standing history of ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease and in those with hereditary colonic syndromes should not be overlooked. This will maximize the benefits of the technique and minimize potential sources of frustration or disappointment for both referring clinicians and patients. PMID

  11. Effect of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy and Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantini, Giovanna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Balducci, Mario; Frascino, Vincenzo; Dinapoli, Nicola; Di Gesu, Cinzia; Ippolito, Edy; Morganti, Alessio G.; Cellini, Numa

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in prostate cancer patients treated with RT and long-term (>1 year) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and materials: Prostate cancer patients with high-risk features (Stage T3-T4 and/or Gleason score {>=}7 and/or prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL) who had undergone RT and long-term ADT were included in the present analysis. Patients with bowel inflammatory disease, colon diverticula, and colon diverticulitis were excluded from WPRT and treated with prostate-only radiotherapy (PORT). Patients were grouped according to nodal risk involvement as assessed by the Roach formula using different cutoff levels (15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%). Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was analyzed in each group according to the RT type (WPRT or PORT). Results: A total of 358 patients treated between 1994 and 2007 were included in the analysis (46.9% with WPRT and 53.1% with PORT). The median duration of ADT was 24 months (range, 12-38). With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 20-150), the overall 4-year bDFS rate was 90.5%. The 4-year bDFS rate was similar between the patients who had undergone WPRT or PORT (90.4% vs. 90.5%; p = NS). However, in the group of patients with the greatest nodal risk (>30%), a significant bDFS improvement was recorded for the patients who had undergone WPRT (p = .03). No differences were seen in acute toxicity among the patients treated with WPRT or PORT. The late gastrointestinal toxicity was similar in patients treated with PORT or WPRT (p = NS). Conclusions: Our analysis has supported the use of WPRT in association with long-term ADT for patients with high-risk nodal involvement (>30%), although a definitive recommendation should be confirmed by a randomized trial.

  12. Can lab data be used to reduce abdominal computed tomography (CT) usage in young adults presenting to the emergency department with nontraumatic abdominal pain?

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Mahadevia, Soham; Stein, Evan G; Freeman, Katherine; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2010-09-01

    We sought to determine whether laboratory parameters could be found, predictive of a negative abdominal CT scan in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Following institutional review board approval, we evaluated CT reports of 522 patients, aged 21-35 years old, who presented to the Emergency Department with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Bivariate analyses relating ten laboratory parameters to whether the CT detected a cause for abdominal pain were conducted. A multivariate logistic regression model was then derived, with all variables in the final model significant at p < 0.05. Variables were dichotomized to yield odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 522 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 45% had a cause for pain demonstrated by CT. Predictors of a negative CT in men were normal hematocrit and negative urine blood (p = 0.045, p = 0.016, respectively), and in women normal hematocrit, granulocyte percent, and alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.023, p = 0.039, p < 0.0001, respectively). When standard normal values were used to calculate descriptive statistics, only granulocyte percent in women had a significant confidence interval (odds ratio 2.5, confidence interval 1.6-4.0). Among the 208 women with normal granulocyte percent, the final clinical diagnosis was appendicitis, cholecystitis, and diverticulitis, in three, three, and two cases, respectively (4% combined). In summary, no laboratory test was sufficient to offer reassurance that a CT is not necessary in a young adult patient with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Alternative strategies should be considered to decrease the use of CT, and its associated radiation exposure, in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. PMID:20306104

  13. Human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes have progenitor capacity and are a source of αSMA+ cells during repair.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; González, M; Sáez, F J; Aparicio, F; Díaz-Flores, L; Madrid, J F

    2015-05-01

    We studied the progenitor capacity of human resident CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes (SC/TCs) in the enteric wall affected by inflammatory/repair processes (appendicitis, diverticulitis of large bowel and Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum) at different stages of evolution (inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling). In these conditions, CD34+ SC/TCs are activated, showing changes, which include the following overlapping events: 1) separation from adjacent structures (e.g., from vascular walls) and location in oedematous spaces, 2) morphological modifications (in cell shape and size) with presence of transitional cell forms between quiescent and activated CD34+ SC/TCs, 3) rapid proliferation and 4) loss of CD34 expression and gain of αSMA expression. These events mainly occur in the inflammatory and proliferative stages. During the loss of CD34 expression, the following findings are observed: a) irregular cell labelling intensity for anti-CD34, b) co-localization of CD34 and actin, c) concurrent irregular labelling intensity for αSMA and d) αSMA expression in all stromal cells, with total loss of CD34 expression. While CD34 expression was conserved, a high proliferative capacity (Ki-67 expression) was observed and vice versa. In the segments of the ileum affected by Crohn's disease, the stromal cells around fissures were αSMA+ and, in the transitional zones with normal enteric wall, activated CD34+ SC/TCs were observed. In conclusion, human resident CD34+ SC/TCs in the enteric wall have progenitor capacity and are activated with or without differentiation into αSMA+ stromal cells during inflammatory/repair processes. PMID:25500909

  14. Feasibility Trial of Partial Breast Irradiation With Concurrent Dose-Dense Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zellars, Richard C.; Stearns, Vered; Frassica, Deborah; Asrari, Fariba; Tsangaris, Theodore; Myers, Lee; DiPasquale, Shirley; Lange, Julie R.; Jacobs, Lisa K.; Emens, Leisha A.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Fetting, John H.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Davidson, Nancy E.; Wolff, Antonio C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Anthracyclines and concurrent whole-breast irradiation result in prohibitive cutaneous toxicity. We hypothesized that anthracycline-based chemotherapy and concurrent partial breast irradiation (PBI) is safe and conducted a single-arm feasibility trial testing this hypothesis with dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (ddAC). Patients and Methods Women with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer with ≥ 3 mm lumpectomy margins received PBI (40.5 Gy, 15 daily 2.7-Gy fractions) concurrently with the first two of four cycles of ddAC (60 and 600 mg/m2 of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, respectively, every 14 days with colony-stimulating support). Primary end points were local and systemic toxicity. Additional systemic therapy was given at the physician's discretion. Results Twenty-seven patients enrolled between November 2004 and January 2007, but two patients did not receive protocol therapy (one found with additional local disease and one withdrew consent). Twenty-five women completed all planned PBI. Four (16%) of 25 did not complete all ddAC (febrile neutropenia [FN], n = 2; diverticulitis and neutropenia, n = 1; and social/economic reasons, n = 1). Four among the remaining 21 who completed all ddAC had a cycle delayed (FN, n = 1; acute respiratory illness, n = 1; foot blisters, n = 1; perianal dermatitis, n = 1). There was no grade 3 to 4 anemia or thrombocytopenia. Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities (none grade 4) occurred in 28% (seven of 25) of patients (nausea/vomiting, n = 3; stomatitis, n = 2; contralateral breast abscess, n = 1; fatigue, n = 1; and cough/bronchospasms, n = 1). The observed rate of ≥ grade 2 skin toxicity was 0% (0 of 25; one-sided 95% CI, 0% to 11%). Conclusion PBI with concurrent ddAC is feasible, and local/systemic toxicity is acceptable. Larger studies are warranted to assess long-term locoregional control and late toxicities. PMID:19332718

  15. The Casanova Complex of the Northern Apennines: A mélange formed on a distal passive continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Michaél A.

    1982-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Palaeocene Casanova Complex occurs in two thrust sheets of the eugeosynclinal Ligurids of the Northern Apennines. It is a sedimentary mélange with ophiolitic and quartzose turbidites or limestone-shale olistostrome (submarine debris flows) as matrix. Exotic blocks of ophiolite and granite, serpentinite breccias and lenticular ophiolitic breccias and olistostromes contribute to the mélange character of the complex. Deformational structures include soft-sediment slump folds (indicating a SW-dipping palaeoslope) and boudins, a gradational slumped top to the mélange, small-scale faults in chert blocks and deformation associated with the emplacement of the exotic slide blocks. The blocks were shed as rotational slides from submarine fault scarps and are surrounded by haloes of debris created by submarine weathering. The stacking pattern of the blocks, with the originally stratigraphically highest ophiolite lithologies lowest in the pile of blocks, is explained by a diverticulation model with progressively deeper erosion. Mechanical analysis shows that the blocks were stable when partly exposed resting on a soft sediment substratum. Criteria which distinguish the Casanova Complex from a tectonic mélange, and which may be of value in other mélanges, are discussed. Previous interpretations of the complex as a precursor olistostrome to northeastward nappe emplacement (the Bracco ridge model) are rejected. The mélange is believed to have formed on ocean crust as a result of turbidite and debris flow sedimentation, soft sediment deformation, block faulting, gravity sliding and submarine erosion at the distal edge of a uniformly SW-dipping continental margin.

  16. Phase I Study of Vandetanib With Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Drappatz, Jan; Norden, Andrew D.; Wong, Eric T.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Increasing evidence has suggested that angiogenesis inhibition might potentiate the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). In addition, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition might be of therapeutic benefit, because the epidermal growth factor receptor is upregulated in GBM and contributes to radiation resistance. We conducted a Phase I study of vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and epidermal growth factor receptor, in patients with newly diagnosed GBM combined with RT and temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: A total of 13 GBM patients were treated with vandetanib, radiotherapy, and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ, using a standard '3 + 3' dose escalation. The maximal tolerated dose was defined as the dose with <1 of 6 dose-limiting toxicities during the first 12 weeks of therapy. The eligible patients were adults with newly diagnosed GBM, Karnofsky performance status of {>=}60, normal organ function, who were not taking enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Results: Of the 13 patients, 6 were treated with vandetanib at a dose of 200mg daily. Of the 6 patients, 3 developed dose-limiting toxicities within the first 12 weeks, including gastrointestinal hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia in 1 patient, neutropenia in 1 patient, and diverticulitis with gastrointestinal perforation in 1 patient. The other 7 patients were treated with 100 mg daily, with no dose-limiting toxicities observed, establishing this dose as the maximal tolerated dose combined with TMZ and RT. Conclusion: Vandetanib can be safely combined with RT and TMZ in GBM patients. A Phase II study in which patients are randomized to vandetanib 100 mg daily with RT and TMZ or RT and TMZ alone is underway.

  17. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  18. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Christian K; Laye, Matthew J

    2012-04-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause versus treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction (including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity); and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  19. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-01

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  20. Gastroparesis - a novel cause of persistent thyroid stimulating hormone elevation in hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    O S, Khraisha; M M, Al-Madani; A N, Peiris; T K, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is easily treated by levothyroxine therapy which has an 80 percent absorption rate, mostly in the jejunum. The replacement dose of daily levothyroxine is usually calculated at 1.6 mcg/kg body weight per day. We report a 77-year-old man who required supraphysiologic thyroxine replacement (>2.7 mcg/ kg/day) to treat his hypothyroidism. The patient was referred for persistent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) elevation (40 mcIU/ml) while on 175 mcg of levothyroxine. Patient was compliant with medication. Medical history included diabetes mellitus type 2, cerebrovascular accident, depression, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, vitamin B12 deficiency, Addison’s disease, as well as a colostomy secondary to diverticulitis. He was taking aspirin, carvedilol, cholecalciferol, finasteride, fluoxetine, furosemide, ketoconazole, levothyroxine, prednisone, and albuterol/ipratropium inhaler. His height was 180.3 cm; weight, 107 kg. Thyroid was impalpable, and he was clinically euthyroid. Despite discontinuation of iron and statin which are known to interfere with thyroxine absorption and crushing of thyroxine tablets to enhance absorption, his TSH remained elevated. Celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection were ruled out with serological testing. There was no proteinuria and anti-parietal cell antibody was positive. Gastroparesis was confirmed by gastric emptying study. He continued to require increasing doses of thyroxine with increment to 300 mcg daily. To our knowledge, this is the first documented association between gastroparesis and thyroxine malabsorption. We recommend that gastroparesis be considered in any patient with persistent TSH elevation despite usual thyroxine doses. PMID:25978052

  1. Routine histopathologic examination of appendectomy specimens: retrospective analysis of 1255 patients.

    PubMed

    Emre, Arif; Akbulut, Sami; Bozdag, Zehra; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kanlioz, Murat; Emre, Rabia; Sahin, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical benefit of histopathologic analysis of appendectomy specimens from patients with an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We retrospectively analyzed the demographic and histopathologic data of 1255 patients (712 males, 543 females; age range, 17-85 years) who underwent appendectomy to treat an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients who underwent incidental appendectomy during other surgeries were excluded from the study. Histopathologic findings of the appendectomy specimens were used to confirm the initial diagnosis. Ninety-four percent of the appendectomy specimens were positive for appendicitis. Of those, 880 were phlegmonous appendicitis, 148 were gangrenous appendicitis with perforation, and the remaining 88 showed unusual histopathologic findings. In the 88 specimens with unusual pathology, fibrous obliteration was observed in 57 specimens, carcinoid tumor in 11, Encheliophis vermicularis parasite infection in 8, granulatomous inflammation in 6, appendiceal endometriosis in 2, and 1 specimen each showed mucocele, eosinophilic infiltration, Taenia saginata parasite infection, and appendicular diverticulitis. All carcinoid tumors were located in the distal appendix. Six of the 11 carcinoid tumors were defined by histopathology as involving tubular cells, and the other 5 as involving enterochromaffin cells. Six patients had muscularis propria invasion, 2 patients had submucosa invasion, 2 patients had mesoappendix invasion, and 1 patient had serosal invasion. All patients with tumors remained disease free during the follow-up (range, 1-27 months). We conclude that when the ratio of unusual pathologic findings for appendectomy specimens is considered, it is evident that all surgical specimens should be subjected to careful histologic examination. PMID:24229023

  2. CN-15ADVERSE EFFECTS OF BEVACIZUMAB IN BRAIN TUMOR PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Tushar; Ladha, Harshad; Mandel, Jacob; Gilbert, Mark; O'Brien, Barbara; Hamza, Mohamed; Armstrong, Terri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab is humanized monoclonal antibody inhibiting angiogenesis and the only FDA approved treatment for recurrent glioblastoma. The aim of this study was to look at the occurrence of various adverse effects associated with use of bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma. METHODS: In this retrospective chart review, we studied 280 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with Bevacizumab between 2005-2011 to characterize the known adverse effects of bevacizumab including hypertension, grade 3-4 myelosuppression, wound healing complications, thrombo-embolic events, stroke, hemorrhage and gastrointestinal complications. RESULTS: The study population included 168 males and 112 females. The median age was 53.5 years(range 8.1-81.3). TREATMENT: Bevacizumab only(58), Bevacizumab + CPT(11), Bevacizumab + TMZ(32) or Bevacizumab + Other(34). Patients were treated at recurrence(1st = 96; 2nd = 126, 3rd = 58). Hypertension was the most common adverse effect occurring in 131(49%). The median duration from treatment start to development was 82 days (Range 7-1143). However, only 33(25%) were started on antihypertensive medication. Grade 3-4 Myelosuppression occurred in 52(19%)causing treatment discontinuation in 8. Thrombo-embolic events were reported in 5%(15) patients including DVT(9), PE(2), Central venous thrombosis(1) and Stroke(3). Thirty-six patients (13%) were on anti-coagulant medication at bevacizumab initiation. Median time to a thromboembolic complication was 113 days (Range 8-1145). Wound healing complications were noted in 7(3%) patients, 3 craniotomy dehiscence and 4 at soft tissue sites. Five patients (2%) developed GI complications, including perforations(3), pancreatitis(1), and diverticulitis(1). Median time to development was 92 days(Range 10-651). There was a high rate 46%(129) of grade 3-4 lymphocytopenia; median time to develop lymphocytopenia was 50 days(Range = 3-564). CONCLUSION: The range of toxicities was similar to other reports

  3. Position of the American Dietetic Association: health implications of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Marlett, Judith A; McBurney, Michael I; Slavin, Joanne L

    2002-07-01

    Dietary fiber consists of the structural and storage polysaccharides and lignin in plants that are not digested in the human stomach and small intestine. A wealth of information supports the American Dietetic Association position that the public should consume adequate amounts of dietary fiber from a variety of plant foods. Recommended intakes, 20-35 g/day for healthy adults and age plus 5 g/day for children, are not being met, because intakes of good sources of dietary fiber, fruits, vegetables, whole and high-fiber grain products, and legumes are low. Consumption of dietary fibers that are viscous lowers blood cholesterol levels and helps to normalize blood glucose and insulin levels, making these kinds of fibers part of the dietary plans to treat cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Fibers that are incompletely or slowly fermented by microflora in the large intestine promote normal laxation and are integral components of diet plans to treat constipation and prevent the development of diverticulosis and diverticulitis. A diet adequate in fiber-containing foods is also usually rich in micronutrients and nonnutritive ingredients that have additional health benefits. It is unclear why several recently published clinical trials with dietary fiber intervention failed to show a reduction in colon polyps. Nonetheless, a fiber-rich diet is associated with a lower risk of colon cancer. A fiber-rich meal is processed more slowly, which promotes earlier satiety, and is frequently less calorically dense and lower in fat and added sugars. All of these characteristics are features of a dietary pattern to treat and prevent obesity. Appropriate kinds and amounts of dietary fiber for the critically ill and the very old have not been clearly delineated; both may need nonfood sources of fiber. Many factors confound observations of gastrointestinal function in the critically ill, and the kinds of fiber that would promote normal small and large intestinal function are usually

  4. Update on new medicinal applications of gentamicin: evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changhua; Chen, Yumin; Wu, Pinpin; Chen, Baoyuan

    2014-02-01

    Gentamicin (GM) was discovered in 1963 and was introduced into parenteral usage in 1971. Since then, GM has been widely used in medicinal applications. The Food and Drug Administration of the United States approved the routine prescription of GM to treat the following infectious disorders: infection due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter spp., Enterobacteriaceae spp., Pseudomonas spp.; Staphylococcus infectious disease; bacterial meningitis; bacterial sepsis of newborns; bacterial septicemia; infection of the eye, bone, skin and/or subcutaneous tissue; infective endocarditis; peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis due to Pseudomonas and other gram-negative organisms; peritonitis due to gastrointestinal tract infections; respiratory tract infections; and urinary tract infectious disease. GM is an old antibiotic and is used widely beyond its FDA-labeled indications as follows: actinomycotic infection; Staphylococcus saprophyticus bacteremia with pyelonephritis; appendicitis; cystic fibrosis; diverticulitis; adjunct regimen for febrile neutropenia; female genital infection; uterine infection; postnatal infection; necrotizing enterocolitis in fetus or newborn; osteomyelitis; pelvic inflammatory disease; plague; gonorrhea; tularemia; prophylaxis of post-cholecystectomy infection, transrectal prostate biopsy, and post-tympanostomy-related infection; malignant otitis externa; and intratympanically or transtympanically for Ménière's disease. GM is also used in combination regimens, such as with beta-lactam antibiotics to treat mixed infection and with bacteriophage to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections. It is also added to medical materials, such as GM-loaded cement spacers for osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint-associated infections. Overall, there are many medicinal applications for GM. To reduce the development of GM-resistant bacteria and to maintain its effectiveness, GM should be used only to treat or prevent

  5. Increased Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients With Diverticular Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yang, Chih-Hui; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    Diverticular disease and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are common disorders that share several risk factors. Few researchers have evaluated the association between diverticular disease and ACS. We aimed to assess the risk of ACS in patients with diverticular disease. A nationwide retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. All patients aged ≥20 years with a diagnosis of diverticular disease from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011, were included in this study. For comparison, patients without diverticular disease were randomly selected and matched with the study cohort at a 4:1 ratio according to age, sex, and the year of the diagnosis of diverticular disease. Patients with incomplete age or sex information and a history of cardiovascular diseases were excluded from the study. All patients were followed until an ACS event, withdrawal from the insurance program, or December 31, 2011. In this study, 52,681 patients with diverticular disease and 210,724 patients without diverticular disease were included. Men accounted for 56.1% of patients and 57.8% of patients were ≥50 years old. The overall incidence density of ACS in patients with diverticular disease (45.5 per 10,000 person-years) was significantly higher than in those without diverticular disease (30.3 per 10,000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.32) after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. The cumulative incidence of ACS in patients with diverticular disease was significantly higher than that in the control cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001). The adjusted HRs for the development of ACS were 1.25 (95% CI, 1.15-1.37) and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.07-1.32) in patients with diverticulitis and diverticulosis, respectively. The adjusted HRs of ACS in patients with diverticular disease additionally increased from 1.97 (95% CI, 1.73-2.23) in patients with 1 comorbidity to

  6. Diverticular disease at colonoscopy in Lagos State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oluyemi, Aderemi; Odeghe, Emuobor

    2016-01-01

    Background: The upsurge in the reported cases of diverticular disease (DD) has led to a re-appraisal of the earlier held views that it was a rare entity in Nigeria. The advent of colonoscopy has contributed in no small way to this change. We sought to determine the clinical characteristics, indications for colonoscopy, and intra-procedural findings among these patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out on the colonoscopy records from four private endoscopy units based in Lagos State, Nigeria. The records were drawn from a 5-year period (August 2010 to July 2015). The endoscopy logs and reports were reviewed, and the bio data, indications, and colonoscopy findings were gleaned. Results: A total of 265 colonoscopies were carried out in the stated period. Of these, 28 (10.6%) had DD. Of the patients with DD, 5 (17.9%) were females while 23 (82.1%) were males. Their ages ranged from 46 to 94 years (mean = 68.2 ± 11 years). Fifteen patients had been referred for the procedure on account of hematochezia alone (15 = 53.6%). Other reasons for referral included abdominal pain alone (2 = 7%), hematochezia plus abdominal pain (5 = 17.9%), and change in bowel habits (3 = 10.8%). Ten (35%) patients had pan-colonic involvement. Regional disease involved the right side alone in only one case (3.5%) while the other combinations of sites are as follows; 6 (21.4%) in the sigmoid colon alone, 2 (7%) in the descending colon alone, 5 (17.9%) in the sigmoid–descending colon, 4 (14.3%) in the sigmoid-descending-transverse colon, thus the sigmoid colon was involved in 25 (89.3%) cases. Five cases (17.9%) had endoscopic features suggestive of diverticulitis. Conclusions: DD should no longer be regarded as a rare problem in the Nigerian patient. The study findings support the notion of higher prevalence among the elderly, in males, and of sigmoid colon involvement. PMID:27226685

  7. Implications of the colonic deposition of free hemoglobin-alpha chain: a previously unknown tissue by-product in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeremy N.; Schäffer, Michael W.; Korolkova, Olga Y.; Williams, Amanda D.; Gangula, Pandu R.; M’Koma, Amosy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed inflamed mucosal/submucosal layers of ulcerative colitis (UC=63) and Crohn’s colitis (CC=50) and unexpectedly we unveiled a pool of free-hemoglobin-alpha (Hb-α) chain. Patients with colitides have increased ROS, DNA-oxidation products, free-iron in mucosa, in pre-neoplastic, and in colitis-cancers and increased risks of developing colorectal-cancer (CRC). All IBD-related-CRC lesions are found in segments with colitis. Linking this information we investigated whether free-Hb-α is key transformational stepping that increases colitis-related-CRC vulnerability. Methods UC/CC samples were profiled using MALDI-MS; protein identification was made by LCM. Diverticulitis (DV) was used as control (Ctrl). The presence of Hb(n) (n=α, β and hemin)/Hb was validated by Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We tested for DNA-damage (DNAD) by exposing normal colonic-epithelial-cell-line, NCM460, to 10μM and 100μM of Hb(n)/Hb, individually for 2 h, 6 h, and 12 h. Quantification of Hb-α-staining was done by Nikon Elements Advance Research Analysis software. ROS was measured by the production of 8-OHdG. DNAD was assessed by Comet-assay. Colonic tissue homogenate antioxidants Nrf2-, CAT-, SOD- and GPx-expressions was analyzed densitometrically/ normalized by β-actin. Results IHC of CC/UC mucosal/submucosal-compartments stained strongly positive for Hb-α and significantly higher vs. Ctrl. NCM460 exposed to Hb(n)/Hb exhibited steadily-increasing ROS and subsequent DNAD. DNAD was higher in 10μM than 100μM in Hb-β/hemin the first 2 h then plateaued followed by DNAD-repair. This may be likely due to apoptosis in the later concentration. Nrf2 enzyme activities among UC, CC and UCAC were observed impaired in all IBD subjects. Decreased levels of Nrf2 among UC vs. CC patients with active disease was insignificant as well as vs. Ctrls but significantly lower in UCAC vs. Ctrl. SOD was decreased in UC and UCAC and GPx in CC but statistically not

  8. [Ultrasonography in acute pelvic pain].

    PubMed

    Kupesić, Sanja; Aksamija, Alenka; Vucić, Niksa; Tripalo, Ana; Kurjak, Asim

    2002-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain may be the manifestation of various gynecologic and non-gynecologic disorders from less alarming rupture of the follicular cyst to life threatening conditions such as rupture of ectopic pregnancy or perforation of inflamed appendix. In order to construct an algorithm for differential diagnosis we divide acute pelvic pain into gynecologic and non-gynecologic etiology, which is than subdivided into gastrointestinal and urinary causes. Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency and should always be considered in differential diagnosis if appendix has not been removed. Apart of clinical examination and laboratory tests, an ultrasound examination is sensitive up to 90% and specific up to 95% if graded compression technique is used. Still it is user-depended and requires considerable experience in order to perform it reliably. Meckel's diverticulitis, acute terminal ileitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis and functional bowel disease are conditions that should be differentiated from other causes of low abdominal pain by clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging tests. Dilatation of renal pelvis and ureter are typical signs of obstructive uropathy and may be efficiently detected by ultrasound. Additional thinning of renal parenchyma suggests long-term obstructive uropathy. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis and hemorrhagic ovarian cysts are three most commonly diagnosed gynecologic conditions presenting as an acute abdomen. Degenerating leiomyomas and adnexal torsion occur less frequently. For better systematization, gynecologic causes of acute pelvic pain could be divided into conditions with negative pregnancy test and conditions with positive pregnancy test. Pelvic inflammatory disease may be ultrasonically presented with numerous signs such as thickening of the tubal wall, incomplete septa within the dilated tube, demonstration of hyperechoic mural nodules, free fluid in the "cul-de-sac" etc. Color Doppler ultrasound contributes to more