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Sample records for divertor pump cryogenic

  1. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  2. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  3. A compact cryogenic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Caldwell, Shane; Clark, Jason A.; Gulick, Sidney; Hecht, Adam; Lascar, Daniel D.; Levand, Tony; Morgan, Graeme; Orford, Rodney; Savard, Guy; Sharma, Kumar S.; Van Schelt, Jonathon

    2016-04-01

    A centrifugal cryogenic pump has been designed at Argonne National Laboratory to circulate liquid nitrogen (LN2) in a closed circuit allowing the recovery of excess fluid. The pump can circulate LN2 at rates of 2-10 L/min, into a head of 0.5-3 m. Over four years of laboratory use the pump has proven capable of operating continuously for 50-100 days without maintenance.

  4. A Magnetically Coupled Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Walter; Jumper, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cryogenic pumps used for propellant loading at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and other NASA Centers have a bellows mechanical seal and oil bath ball bearings, both of which can be problematic and require high maintenance. Because of the extremely low temperatures, the mechanical seals are made of special materials and design, have wearing surfaces, are subject to improper installation, and commonly are a potential leak path. The ball bearings are non-precision bearings [ABEC-1 (Annular Bearing Engineering Council)] and are lubricated using LOX compatible oil. This oil is compatible with the propellant to prevent explosions, but does not have good lubricating properties. Due to the poor lubricity, it has been a goal of the KSC cryogenics community for the last 15 years to develop a magnetically coupled pump, which would eliminate these two potential issues. A number of projects have been attempted, but none of the pumps was a success. An off-the-shelf magnetically coupled pump (typically used with corrosive fluids) was procured that has been used for hypergolic service at KSC. The KSC Cryogenics Test Lab (CTL) operated the pump in cryogenic LN2 as received to determine a baseline for modifications required. The pump bushing, bearings, and thrust rings failed, and the pump would not flow liquid (this is a typical failure mode that was experienced in the previous attempts). Using the knowledge gained over the years designing and building cryogenic pumps, the CTL determined alternative materials that would be suitable for use under the pump design conditions. The CTL procured alternative materials for the bearings (bronze, aluminum bronze, and glass filled PTFE) and machined new bearing bushings, sleeves, and thrust rings. The designed clearances among the bushings, sleeves, thrust rings, case, and case cover were altered once again using experience gained from previous cryogenic pump rebuilds and designs. The alternative material parts were assembled into

  5. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds. (LCL)

  6. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, J. W.; Miller, J. R.; Walstrom, P. L.; Herz, W.

    1981-02-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through internally cooled superconductor magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds.

  7. Using Composite Materials in a Cryogenic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batton, William D.; Dillard, James E.; Rottmund, Matthew E.; Tupper, Michael L.; Mallick, Kaushik; Francis, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications have been made to the design and operation of an extended-shaft cryogenic pump to increase the efficiency of pumping. In general, the efficiency of pumping a cryogenic fluid is limited by thermal losses which is itself caused by pump inefficiency and leakage of heat through the pump structure. A typical cryogenic pump includes a drive shaft and two main concentric static components (an outer pressure containment tube and an intermediate static support tube) made from stainless steel. The modifications made include replacement of the stainless-steel drive shaft and the concentric static stainless-steel components with components made of a glass/epoxy composite. The leakage of heat is thus reduced because the thermal conductivity of the composite is an order of magnitude below that of stainless steel. Taking advantage of the margin afforded by the decrease in thermal conductivity, the drive shaft could be shortened to increase its effective stiffness, thereby increasing the rotordynamic critical speeds, thereby further making it possible to operate the pump at a higher speed to increase pumping efficiency. During the modification effort, an analysis revealed that substitution of the shorter glass/epoxy shaft for the longer stainless-steel shaft was not, by itself, sufficient to satisfy the rotordynamic requirements at the desired increased speed. Hence, it became necessary to increase the stiffness of the composite shaft. This stiffening was accomplished by means of a carbon-fiber-composite overwrap along most of the length of the shaft. Concomitantly with the modifications described thus far, it was necessary to provide for joining the composite-material components with metallic components required by different aspects of the pump design. An adhesive material formulated specially to bond the composite and metal components was chosen as a means to satisfy these requirements.

  8. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a .DELTA.T=100.degree. C. characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5.times.10.sup.-4 Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1.times.10.sup.-7 to 3.times.10.sup.-9 Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2.times.10.sup.-7 Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5.degree., and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof.

  9. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.

    1997-11-18

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump is described for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a {Delta}T=100 C characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1{times}10{sup {minus}7} to 3{times}10{sup {minus}9} Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2{times}10{sup {minus}7} Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5{degree}, and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof. 2 figs.

  10. Elimination of Thermal Acoustic Oscillations in Cryogenic Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. J.; Gu, Y.

    2006-04-01

    Thermal acoustic oscillations (TAOs) were recently observed and eliminated in two vacuum-housing cryogenic pumps. This paper documents the results of research performed to identify the critical parameters that affect thermal acoustic oscillations in a vacuum-housing cryogenic pump. Techniques for simplifying this complex oscillation system were developed so that an existing mathematical model for a straight tube with uniform radius could be applied. Based on the simplified model, criteria were defined. These criteria provide design guidelines to prevent thermal acoustic oscillations from occurring inside vacuum-housing cryogenic pumps.

  11. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed. PMID:26932041

  12. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-01

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed.

  13. Comprehensive Testing of a Neon Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark C.; Ku, Jentung; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive test program of a cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL) using neon as the working fluid in the temperature range between 30 K and 40 K. The test article was originally designed to be used with nitrogen in the 70 K to 100 K temperature range, and was refurbished for testing with neon. Tests performed included start up from a supercritical state, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, heat transport limit, low power limit, reservoir set point change and long duration operation. The neon CCPL has demonstrated excellent performance under various conditions.

  14. The DIII-D Radiative Divertor Project: Status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.P.; Baxi, C.B.; Bozek, A.S.

    1996-10-01

    New divertor hardware is being designed and fabricated for the Radiative Divertor modification of the DIII-D tokamak. The installation of the hardware has been separated into two phases, the first phase starting in October of 1996 and the second and final phase, in 1998. The phased approach enables the continuation of the divertor characterization research in the lower divertor while providing pumping for density control in high triangularity, single- or double-null advanced tokamak discharges. When completed, the Radiative Divertor Project hardware will provide pumping at all four strike points of a double-null, high triangularity discharge and provide baffling of the neutral particles from transport back to the core plasma. By puffing neutral gas into the divertor region, a reduction in the heat flux on the target plates will be be demonstrated without a large rise in core density. This reduction in heat flux is accomplished by dispersing the power with radiation in the divertor region. Experiments and modeling have formed the basis for the new design. The capability of the DIII-D cryogenic system is being upgraded as part of this project. The increased capability of the cryogenic system will allow delivery of liquid helium and nitrogen to three new cryopumps. Physics studies on the effects of slot width and length can be accomplished easily with the design of the Radiative Divertor. The slot width can be varied by installing graphite tiles of different geometry. The change in slot length, the distance from the X-point to the target plate, requires relocating the structure vertically and can be completed in about 6-8 weeks. Radiative Divertor diagnostics are being designed to provide comprehensive measurements for diagnosing the divertor. Required diagnostic modifications will be minimal for Phase 1, but extensive for Phase 2 installation. These Phase 2 diagnostics will be required to fully diagnose the high triangularity discharges in the divertor slots.

  15. The cryogenic diffusion pump; An advanced design for fusion reactor primary pumping and fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmerich, J.L. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports on a re-evaluation of the characteristics of the intermediate flow regime with simultaneous thermal accommodation has shown the full potential of the Cryogenic Diffusion Pump for Fusion Reactor applications. A device with a characteristic diameter of 1m will have a pumping speed of 150m{sup 3}s{sup {minus}1} for Deuterium at an inlet pressure of 2 {times} 10{sup 2}Pa (Reactor Burn phased) and 400m{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} at an inlet pressure of 0.1 Pa (Reactor Dwell phase). Simultaneously, it separates impurities, Hydrogen isotopes and Helium and compresses the Helium. The Helium compression ratio (already proven to be {ge}25 for 3% Helium in D{sub 2}) can be further enhanced by additional D{sub 2} or He driven Diffusion Pump and Ejector stages. The latter feature will also simplify pumping requirements for the Helium Glow Discharge scenario: recirculation of Helium at 0.1 Pa (driven by D{sub 2} or He Ejector) and simultaneous removal of DT and impurities by cryocondensation requires no mechanical pump at all or only small turbomolecular-drag pump combinations of He jet drive. The design offers superior tritium compatibility: all metal, fully bakeable, it avoids use of absorbers and argon for helium pumping, thereby reducing overall tritium inventory both in the pump itself and by replacing major fuel clean-up facilities. The advantages of using the Cryogenic Diffusion Pump in a Fusion Reactor Vacuum System are discussed in detail.

  16. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pfotenhauer, John M.; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  17. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Garcia, J.; Lathrop, A.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-01

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL).

  18. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Lathrop, A.; Garcia, J.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-29

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL)

  19. Modeling results for the ITER cryogenic fore pump

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. S.; Miller, F. K.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2014-01-29

    The cryogenic fore pump (CFP) is designed for ITER to collect and compress hydrogen isotopes during the regeneration process of torus cryopumps. Different from common cryopumps, the ITER-CFP works in the viscous flow regime. As a result, both adsorption boundary conditions and transport phenomena contribute unique features to the pump performance. In this report, the physical mechanisms of cryopumping are studied, especially the diffusion-adsorption process and these are coupled with standard equations of species, momentum and energy balance, as well as the equation of state. Numerical models are developed, which include highly coupled non-linear conservation equations of species, momentum and energy and equation of state. Thermal and kinetic properties are treated as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition. To solve such a set of equations, a novel numerical technique, identified as the Group-Member numerical technique is proposed. It is presented here a 1D numerical model. The results include comparison with the experimental data of pure hydrogen flow and a prediction for hydrogen flow with trace helium. An advanced 2D model and detailed explanation of the Group-Member technique are to be presented in following papers.

  20. The design and fabrication of a toroidally continuous cryocondensation pump for the D3-D advanced divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. P.; Baxi, C. B.; Reis, E.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.; Menon, M. M.

    1991-11-01

    A cryocondensation pump will be installed in the baffle chamber of the DIII-D tokamak in the spring of 1992. The design is complete and fabrication of this pump is in progress. The purpose of the pump is to study plasma density control by pumping the divertor. The pump is toroidally continuous, approximately 10 m long, in the lower outer corner of the vacuum vessel interior. It consists of a 1 m(exp 2) liquid helium cooled surface surrounded by a liquid nitrogen cooled shield to limit the heat load on the helium cooled surface. The stainless steel liquid nitrogen shell has a copper coating on it to enhance thermal conductivity, but the coating is broken to keep the toroidal electrical resistance high. The liquid nitrogen cooled surface is surrounded by a radiation/particle shield to prevent energetic particles from impacting and releasing condensed water molecules. The whole pump is supported off the water cooled vacuum vessel wall. Key design considerations were: how to accommodate the temperature differences between the various components, developing low heat leak paths for the various supports, and maintaining electrical insulation in a low pressure environment in the presence of induced voltage spikes. A single point ground for the system was used to limit disruption induced currents and the resulting electro-mechanical forces on the pump. A testing program was used to develop coating techniques to enhance heat transfer and emissivity of the various surfaces. Fabrication tests were done to determine the best method of attaching the liquid nitrogen flow tubes to their shield surfaces. A prototype sector of the pump was built to verify fabrication and assembly techniques.

  1. Leak testing of cryogenically pumped large-volume high-vacuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, Charles N.

    1988-01-01

    The problems that may occur in the cryogenically pumped large-volume high-vacuum chambers (LVHVCs), used for the environmental testing of aerospace components and systems, are examined. Consideration is given to the designs of the LVHVCs and the cryogenic pumps. In the procedure of leak testing with tracer gas, the success of testing depends on attaining the required test sensitivity with speed, economy, and reliability. The steps required to speed up the leak location phase of the leak testing procedure and to thoroughly clean every penetration (i.e., fitting or nozzle) of the system are discussed.

  2. SOLPS analysis of the MAST-U divertor with the effect of heating power and pumping on the access to detachment in the Super-x configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlíčková, E.; Harrison, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Fishpool, G.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Wischmeier, M.; Elmore, S.; Allan, S.

    2015-11-01

    SOLPS simulations of MAST-U have been carried out to identify in more detail the physics and operational properties of novel divertor configurations such as Super-x divertor (SXD), in particular the physics of detachment. A well diagnosed L-mode discharge from MAST has been utilised to determine L-mode transport coefficients representative for MAST-U L-mode plasmas. Simulations show that under the same core plasma conditions, the MAST-U SXD is strongly detached whilst the conventional divertor (CD) is not (1 eV versus 20 eV at the divertor plate). The detachment and higher power losses (1.6×) in the SXD versus the attached CD lead to a factor of 25 reduction in the target power load and are attributed to changes in radial location of the target. An attached regime can be established for the SXD in L-mode for higher pumping speed and/or heating power. In contrast, the simulation predicts that the MAST-U CD requires 3×  higher density or 4×  reduced power than the SXD to detach. Comparing two versions of the SXD, each with a different amount of poloidal expansion in the region near the divertor plate, we find that the effect of additional poloidal flux expansion of the SXD on an already detached plasma is small for a change in flux expansion in volume by a factor of 2–3 (target temperature 0.7 eV versus 1.1 eV). The poloidal flux expansion re-arranges the radiation pattern with only a small increase in divertor power losses (1.06×) compared to changing from the CD to SXD topology. By artifically increasing the leakage from the divertor chamber, we confirmed that the tight closure of the divertor region leads to strong increases in neutral density with concomitant power losses.

  3. A small centrifugal pump for circulating cryogenic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, W.; Sixsmith, H.

    1982-01-01

    A small centrifugal pump is described which has been developed to circulate supercritical helium through a test loop for superconducting magnets. The pump has a fully enclosed warm and which contains the adjustable speed brushless DC drive motor and self-acting bearings operating in helium gas. The drive and bearing system is designed to minimize contaimination to the circulating supercritical helium in the test loop. The performance data which have been obtained show that the pump operates very close to its design specifications. Additional tests are planned to provide a more complete range of performance data for the pump. Subsequent record discussion concerned the pump shaft and the efficiency of the heat leak to the heat station. Efficiency of at least 65% is attainable with this pump, including all heat leak.

  4. Experimental and CFD analyses of a thermal radiation shield dimple plate for cryogenic pump application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannapiego, M.; Day, C.

    2015-12-01

    Large customized cryogenic pumps are used in fusion reactors to evacuate the plasma exhaust from the torus. Cryopumps usually consist of an active pumping surface area cooled below 5 K and shielded from direct outer thermal radiation by plates cooled at 80K. In nuclear fusion applications, cryopumps are exposed to excessively high heat fluxes during pumping operation, and follow-up regeneration cycles with rapid warm-up and cool-down phases. Therefore, high cryogenic operational mass flows are required and thus pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics become key issues for the design of the pump cryogenic circuits. Actively cooled dimple plates are a preferred design solution for the thermal radiation shield. A test plate with a rhomb pattern of dimples has been manufactured and tested in terms of pressure drop with a dedicated test facility using water. In the present work, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the test dimple plate have been performed, and computed pressure drops have been compared to experimental results. Despite the complexity of the geometry, a good agreement with the experimental results was found. Then, the validated CFD approach has been further extended to relevant operation conditions, using gaseous helium at cryogenic temperature as working fluid. The resulting pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics are finally presented.

  5. Design and Testing of a Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugby, David C.; Kroliczek, Edward J.; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Ted; Tomlinson, B. J.; Davis, Thomas M.; Baumann, Jane; Cullimore, Brent

    1998-01-01

    This paper details the flight configuration and pre-flight performance test results of the fifth generation cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL-5). This device will fly on STS-95 in October 1998 as part of the CRYOTSU Flight Experiment. This flight represents the first in-space demonstration of a CCPL, a miniaturized two-phase fluid circulator for thermally linking cryogenic cooling sources to remote cryogenic components. CCPL-5 utilizes N2 as the working fluid and has a practical operating range of 75-110 K. Test results indicate that CCPL-5, which weighs about 200 grams, can transport over 10 W of cooling a distance of 0.25 m (or more) with less than a 5 K temperature drop.

  6. TIMO-2-A cryogenic test bed for the ITER cryosorption pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Horst; Day, Christian; Herzog, Friedhelm

    2012-06-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has been carrying out research and development in the field of vacuum cryopumps for nuclear fusion devices over the last decade. Together with the development activities also experience in the operation of the needed cryogenic systems necessary for such type of large scale cryopumps was collected. Due to the specific requirements of a large fusion device, such as ITER, the cryogenic distribution is based on gaseous helium at the needed temperature levels rather than liquid nitrogen or liquid helium. KIT has set up a large scale research facility, called TIMO-2, fully equipped with supercritical helium supply at large flow rates to be able to perform cryogenic tests of components under ITER-relevant conditions. During first test campaigns at TIMO-2 with a large scale model cryopump the ITER cryosorption vacuum pumping concept was successfully validated. After major refurbishments and upgrades, the TIMO-2 facility is now ready for the acceptance tests of the ITER torus cryopump. This paper describes the modified test facility TIMO-2 with particular attention to the available cryogenic supply at different temperature levels. The new 100 K helium supply facility will be described in detail.

  7. Fiber laser pumped high energy cryogenically cooled Ho:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, Espen; Fonnum, Helge; Stenersen, Knut

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we report on a high energy, low repetition rate 2-micron-laser, with high conversion efficiency in terms of output energy per pump power. The laser consists of a Ho3+-doped LiYF4 (YLF) crystal cooled to cryogenic temperatures in an unstable resonator, pumped by a thulium fiber laser. The cooling to 77 K makes Ho:YLF a quasi four level laser system, which greatly enhances the extraction efficiency. We achieved 356 mJ in Q-switched operation at 1 Hz PRF when pumping the laser with 58 W for 36 ms. The high beam quality from the fiber laser and the use of an unstable resonator with a graded reflectivity mirror (GRM) resulted in a high quality laser beam with a M2-value of 1.3.

  8. Design and Testing of a Cryogenic Capillary Pumped Loop Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugby, David C.; Kroliczek, Edward J.; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Ted; Tomlinson, B. J.; Davis, Thomas M.; Baumann, Jane; Cullimore, Brent

    1998-01-01

    This paper details the flight configuration and pre-flight performance test results of the fifth generation cryogenic capillary pumped loop (CCPL-5). This device will fly on STS-95 in October 1998 as part of the CRYOTSU Flight Experiment. This flight represents the first in-space demonstration of a CCPL; a miniaturized two-phase fluid circulator for thermally linking cryogenic components. CCPL-5 utilizes N2 as the working fluid and has a practical operating range of 75-110 K. Test results indicate that CCPL-5, which weighs about 200 grams, can transport over 10 W of cooling a distance of 0.25 m (or more) with less than a 5 K temperature drop.

  9. High-efficiency 10 J diode pumped cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Mason, Paul D; Phillips, P Jonathan; Siebold, Mathias; Loeser, Markus; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Collier, John L

    2012-06-15

    We report on the first demonstration of a diode-pumped, gas cooled, cryogenic multislab Yb:YAG amplifier. The performance was characterized over a temperature range from 88 to 175 K. A maximum small-signal single-pass longitudinal gain of 11.0 was measured at 88 K. When amplifying nanosecond pulses, recorded output energies were 10.1 J at 1 Hz in a four-pass extraction geometry and 6.4 J at 10 Hz in a three-pass setup, corresponding to optical to optical conversion efficiencies of 21% and 16%, respectively. To our knowledge, this represents the highest pulse energy so far obtained from a cryo-cooled Yb-laser and the highest efficiency from a multijoule diode pumped solid-state laser system. PMID:22739846

  10. Cryogenic Subsystem to Provide for Nominal Operation and Fast Regeneration of the ITER Primary Cryo-sorption Vacuum Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinine, V.; Haange, R.; Shatil, N.; Millet, F.; Guillemet, L.; Wykes, M.; Day, C.; Mack, A.

    2004-06-23

    The ITER cryogenic system includes provision for cooling the eight cryo-sorption pumps that maintain vacuum conditions within the tokamak plasma vacuum vessel. The eight pumps are operated such that at any given instant four pumps pump the plasma vessel and four pumps are undergoing four sequential stages of regeneration, each having a duration of 150 s. The regeneration includes a cold helium exhaust stage, warm-up from 4.5 K to 80-100 K, desorption and pump-out of released gases and cool-down from 80-100 K to 4.5 K. Thus after every 150 s of operation one of the four pumps is taken off-line for regeneration and another just-regenerated pump is restored to the set of four pumps that provide the nominal pumping.This paper presents the current design status of the cryogenic subsystems for cooling and heating the cryopumps during pumping and fast regeneration and details of the fluid-dynamic numerical analysis of the cryopumps (Vincenta code) used to study the transient behaviour of helium flow in the cryo-sorption panels during regeneration.

  11. Cryogenic Subsystem to Provide for Nominal Operation and Fast Regeneration of the ITER Primary Cryo-sorption Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinine, V.; Haange, R.; Shatil, N.; Millet, F.; Guillemet, L.; Wykes, M.; Day, C.; Mack, A.

    2004-06-01

    The ITER cryogenic system includes provision for cooling the eight cryo-sorption pumps that maintain vacuum conditions within the tokamak plasma vacuum vessel. The eight pumps are operated such that at any given instant four pumps pump the plasma vessel and four pumps are undergoing four sequential stages of regeneration, each having a duration of 150 s. The regeneration includes a cold helium exhaust stage, warm-up from 4.5 K to 80-100 K, desorption and pump-out of released gases and cool-down from 80-100 K to 4.5 K. Thus after every 150 s of operation one of the four pumps is taken off-line for regeneration and another just-regenerated pump is restored to the set of four pumps that provide the nominal pumping. This paper presents the current design status of the cryogenic subsystems for cooling and heating the cryopumps during pumping and fast regeneration and details of the fluid-dynamic numerical analysis of the cryopumps (Vincenta code) used to study the transient behaviour of helium flow in the cryo-sorption panels during regeneration.

  12. Efficient laser performance of a cryogenic Yb:YAG laser pumped by fiber coupled 940 and 969 nm laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambunathan, V.; Miura, T.; Těsnohlídková, L.; Lucianetti, A.; Mocek, T.

    2015-01-01

    Laser performance of Yb:YAG at different cryogenic temperatures pumped by a fiber coupled diode laser emitting at 940 and 969 nm were presented. The pump laser diode bandwidth, absorption bandwidth as well as absorption of the laser material at cryogenic temperatures play a vital role on laser performance. The laser threshold decreases and the output power and slope efficiency increase when cooled to cryogenic temperatures.

  13. Divertor detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    The heat exhaust is one of the main conceptual issues of magnetic fusion reactor. In a standard operational regime the large heat flux onto divertor target reaches unacceptable level in any foreseeable reactor design. However, about two decades ago so-called ``detached divertor'' regimes were found. They are characterized by reduced power and plasma flux on divertor targets and look as a promising solution for heat exhaust in future reactors. In particular, it is envisioned that ITER will operate in a partly detached divertor regime. However, even though divertor detachment was studied extensively for two decades, still there are some issues requiring a new look. Among them is the compatibility of detached divertor regime with a good core confinement. For example, ELMy H-mode exhibits a very good core confinement, but large ELMs can ``burn through'' detached divertor and release large amounts of energy on the targets. In addition, detached divertor regimes can be subject to thermal instabilities resulting in the MARFE formation, which, potentially, can cause disruption of the discharge. Finally, often inner and outer divertors detach at different plasma conditions, which can lead to core confinement degradation. Here we discuss basic physics of divertor detachment including different mechanisms of power and momentum loss (ionization, impurity and hydrogen radiation loss, ion-neutral collisions, recombination, and their synergistic effects) and evaluate the roles of different plasma processes in the reduction of the plasma flux; detachment stability; and an impact of ELMs on detachment. We also evaluate an impact of different magnetic and divertor geometries on detachment onset, stability, in- out- asymmetry, and tolerance to the ELMs. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-DE-FG02-04ER54739 at UCSD.

  14. Plasma Fueling, Pumping, and Tritium Handling Considerations for FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Gentile, C.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1999-11-13

    Tritium pellet injection will be utilized on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) for efficient tritium fueling and to optimize the density profile for high fusion power. Conventional pneumatic pellet injectors, coupled with a guidetube system to launch pellets into the plasma from the high, field side, low field side, and vertically, will be provided for fueling along with gas puffing for plasma edge density control. About 0.1 g of tritium must be injected during each 10-s pulse. The tritium and deuterium will be exhausted into the divertor. The double null divertor will have 16 cryogenic pumps located near the divertor chamber to provide the required high pumping speed of 200 torr-L/s.

  15. Snowflake divertor configuration studies for NSTX-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A

    2011-11-12

    Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide basis for PMI development toward NSTX-Upgrade. Snowflake configuration formation was followed by radiative detachment. Significant reduction of steady-state divertor heat flux observed in snowflake divertor. Impulsive heat loads due to Type I ELMs are partially mitigated in snowflake divertor. Magnetic control of snowflake divertor configuration is being developed. Plasma material interface development is critical for NSTX-U success. Four divertor coils should enable flexibility in boundary shaping and control in NSTX-U. Snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX provide good basis for PMI development in NSTX-Upgrade. FY 2009-2010 snowflake divertor experiments in NSTX: (1) Helped understand control of magnetic properties; (2) Core H-mode confinement unchanged; (3) Core and edge carbon concentration reduced; and (4) Divertor heat flux significantly reduced - (a) Steady-state reduction due to geometry and radiative detachment, (b) Encouraging results for transient heat flux handling, (c) Combined with impurity-seeded radiative divertor. Outlook for snowflake divertor in NSTX-Upgrade: (1) 2D fluid modeling of snowflake divertor properties scaling - (a) Edge and divertor transport, radiation, detachment threshold, (b) Compatibility with cryo-pump and lithium conditioning; (2) Magnetic control development; and (3) PFC development - PFC alignment and PFC material choice.

  16. Optimization and testing of the Beck Engineering free-piston cryogenic pump for LNG systems on heavy vehicles. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Douglas S.

    2003-01-10

    Task 7 was completed by reaching Milestone 7: Test free piston cryogenic pump (FPCP) in Integrated LNG System. Task 4: Alternative Pump Design was also completed. The type of performance of the prototype LNG system is consistent with requirements of fuel systems for heavy vehicles; however, the maximum flow capacity of the prototype LNG system is significantly less than the total flow requirement. The flow capacity of the prototype LNG system is determined by a cavitation limit for the FPCP.

  17. 250 W average power, 100 kHz repetition rate cryogenic Yb:YAG amplifier for OPCPA pumping.

    PubMed

    Zapata, L E; Reichert, F; Hemmer, M; Kärtner, F X

    2016-02-01

    A cryogenically cooled, bulk Yb:YAG, four-pass amplifier delivering up to 250 W average power at 100 kHz repetition rate is reported. The 2.5 mJ amplified optical pulses show a sub-20 ps duration before temporal compression and a spectrum supporting a transform-limited duration of 3.6 ps. The power instabilities were measured to be <0.5% rms over 30 min at full power, and the spatial intensity profile showed a flat-top distribution and near diffraction-limited beam quality. This compact amplifier is an ideal source for pumping either near-IR or mid-IR optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers. PMID:26907405

  18. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 4: Combined correlations for venturi, hydrofoil, ogives, and pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a series of experimental and analytical cavitation studies are presented. Cross-correlation is performed of the developed cavity data for a venturi, a hydrofoil and three scaled ogives. The new correlating parameter, MTWO, improves data correlation for these stationary bodies and for pumping equipment. Existing techniques for predicting the cavitating performance of pumping machinery were extended to include variations in flow coefficient, cavitation parameter, and equipment geometry. The new predictive formulations hold promise as a design tool and universal method for correlating pumping machinery performance. Application of these predictive formulas requires prescribed cavitation test data or an independent method of estimating the cavitation parameter for each pump. The latter would permit prediction of performance without testing; potential methods for evaluating the cavitation parameter prior to testing are suggested.

  19. Small, high-speed bearing technology for cryogenic turbo-pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M. W.; Smalley, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    The design of 20-mm bore ball bearings is described for cryogenic turbo-machinery applications, operating up to speeds of 120,000 rpm. A special section is included on the design of hybrid bearings. Each hybrid bearing is composed of a ball bearing in series with a conventional pressurized fluid-film journal bearing. Full details are presented on the design of a test vehicle which possesses the capability of testing the above named bearings within the given speed range under externally applied radial and axial loads.

  20. Solid tungsten Divertor-III for ASDEX Upgrade and contributions to ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, A.; Greuner, H.; Jaksic, N.; Balden, M.; Kallenbach, A.; Krieger, K.; de Marné, P.; Rohde, V.; Scarabosio, A.; Schall, G.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-06-01

    ASDEX Upgrade became a full tungsten experiment in 2007 by coating its graphite plasma facing components with tungsten. In 2013 a redesigned solid tungsten divertor, Div-III, was installed and came into operation in 2014. The redesign of the outer divertor geometry provided the opportunity to increase the pumping efficiency in the lower divertor by increasing the gap between divertor and vessel. In parallel, a by-pass was installed into the cryo-pump in the divertor region allowing adapting of the pumping speed to the required edge density. Safe divertor operation and heat removal becomes more and more significant for future fusion devices. This requires developing ‘tools’ for divertor heat load control and to optimize the divertor design. The new divertor manipulator, DIM-II, allows retracting a relevant part of the outer divertor into a target exchange box without venting ASDEX Upgrade. Different front-ends can be installed and exposed to the plasma. At present, front-ends for probe exposition, gas puffing, electrical probes and actively cooled prototype targets are under construction. The installation of solid tungsten, the control of the pumping speed and the flexibility for testing divertor modifications on a weekly base is a unique feature of ASDEX Upgrade and offers together with the extended set of diagnostics the possibility to investigate dedicated questions for a future divertor design.

  1. Divertor parameters and divertor operation in ASDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussmann, G.; Ditte, U.; Eckstein, W.; Grave, T.; Keilhacker, M.; McCormick, K.; Murmann, H.; Röhr, H.; Elshaer, M.; Steuer, K.-H.; Szymanski, Z.; Wagner, F.; Becker, G.; Bernhardi, K.; Eberhagen, A.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hesse, M.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Kissel, S.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H. M.; Meisel, D.; Müller, E. R.; Poschenrieder, W.; Ryter, F.; Rapp, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Vollmer, O.

    1984-12-01

    Recent measurements of plasma boundary and divertor scrape-off parameters for ohmically and neutral injection heated plasmas are presented. For these data the power flow onto the divertor plates and the sputtering rates at the plates are calculated and compared with separate measurements. The impurity behaviour in front of the plates is also discussed.

  2. Modeling detachment physics in the NSTX snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, E. T.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B. P.; McLean, A. G.; Podestà, M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Scotti, F.

    2015-08-01

    The snowflake divertor is a proposed technique for coping with the tokamak power exhaust problem in next-step experiments and eventually reactors, where extreme power fluxes to material surfaces represent a leading technological and physics challenge. In lithium-conditioned National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) discharges, application of the snowflake divertor typically induced partial outer divertor detachment and severalfold heat flux reduction. UEDGE is used to analyze and compare conventional and snowflake divertor configurations in NSTX. Matching experimental upstream profiles and divertor measurements in the snowflake requires target recycling of 0.97 vs. 0.91 in the conventional case, implying partial saturation of the lithium-based pumping mechanism. Density scans are performed to analyze the mechanisms that facilitate detachment in the snowflake, revealing that increased divertor volume provides most of the parallel heat flux reduction. Also, neutral gas power loss is magnified by the increased wetted area in the snowflake, and plays a key role in generating volumetric recombination.

  3. Generation of 6.05J nanosecond pulses at a 1Hz repetition rate from a cryogenic cooled diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Yang, Zhongguo; Liu, Jin; Li, Lei; Shi, Xiangchun; Huang, Wenfa; Wang, Jiangfeng; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    Diode-pumped solid state laser system based on cryogenic Yb:YAG active-mirror scheme are presented with recent energy output. With improved optical design, 6.05J/1Hz pulse energy is achieved and a conceptual design with 30J output energy is theoretical simulated. The doubling efficiency of YCa4O (BO3)(YCOB) crystal is also discussed in this paper.

  4. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 to 80 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Shannon; Gausa, Michael; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 80 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on two sounding rockets to the mesosphere. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void behind (relative to the direction of motion) an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed forward of an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened during flight to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region behind it. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ∼80 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  5. Channel electron multiplier operated on a sounding rocket without a cryogenic vacuum pump from 120 - 75 km altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, S.; Gausa, M. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate that a channel electron multiplier (CEM) can be operated on a sounding rocket in the pulse-counting mode from 120 km to 75 km altitude without the cryogenic evacuation used in the past. Evacuation of the CEM is provided only by aerodynamic flow around the rocket. This demonstration is motivated by the need for additional flights of mass spectrometers to clarify the fate of metallic compounds and ions ablated from micrometeorites and their possible role in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds. The CEMs were flown as guest instruments on the two sounding rockets of the CHAMPS (CHarge And mass of Meteoritic smoke ParticleS) rocket campaign which were launched into the mesosphere in October 2011 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. Modeling of the aerodynamic flow around the payload with Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) code showed that the pressure is reduced below ambient in the void beneath an aft-facing surface. An enclosure containing the CEM was placed above an aft-facing deck and a valve was opened on the downleg to expose the CEM to the aerodynamically evacuated region below. The CEM operated successfully from apogee down to ~75 km. A Pirani gauge confirmed pressures reduced to as low as 20% of ambient with the extent of reduction dependent upon altitude and velocity. Additional DSMC simulations indicate that there are alternate payload designs with improved aerodynamic pumping for forward mounted instruments such as mass spectrometers.

  6. Cryogenic Ho:CaF2 laser pumped by Tm:fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Ma, Weiwei; Zhao, Beibei; Jiang, Dapeng; Su, Liangbi

    2016-06-01

    The laser operation in the pulsed as well as continuous-wave regime of a modified-Bridgeman-grown 0.5 at.% Ho:CaF2 crystal at 83 K pumped by a Tm:fiber laser is reported. The maximum output power was 2.37 W at 2060 nm or 1.3 W at 2110 and 2130 nm. Continuous tuning range over 90 nm from 2030 to 2120 nm was achieved using a birefringent filter. The Ho:CaF2 fundamental spectroscopic properties as absorption and fluorescence spectra at 83 and 293 K are also presented.

  7. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  8. Models for poloidal divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.E.; Heifetz, D.; Petravic, M.

    1982-07-01

    Recent progress in models for poloidal divertors has both helped to explain current divertor experiments and contributed significantly to design efforts for future large tokamak (INTOR, etc.) divertor systems. These models range in sophistication from zero-dimensional treatments and dimensional analysis to two-dimensional models for plasma and neutral particle transport which include a wide variety of atomic and molecular processes as well as detailed treatments of the plasma-wall interaction. This paper presents a brief review of some of these models, describing the physics and approximations involved in each model. We discuss the wide variety of physics necessary for a comprehensive description of poloidal divertors. To illustrate the progress in models for poloidal divertors, we discuss some of our recent work as typical examples of the kinds of calculations being done.

  9. Divertor efficiency in ASDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, W.; Becker, G.; Behringer, K.; Campbell, D.; Eberhagen, A.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gierke, G. V.; Glock, E.; Haas, G.; Huang, M.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; KlÜber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H.-M.; Meisel, D.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Steuer, K.-H.; Venus, G.; Vernickel, H.; Wagner, F.

    1982-12-01

    The divertor efficiency in ASDEX is discussed for ohmically heated plasmas. The parameters of the boundary layer both in the torus midplane and the divertor chamber have been measured. The results are reasonably well understood in terms of parallel and perpendicular transport. A high pressure of neutral hydrogen builds up in the divertor chamber and Franck-Condon particles recycle back through the divertor throat. Due to dissociation processes the boundary plasma is effectively cooled before it reaches the neutralizer plates. The shielding property of the boundary layer against impurity influx is comparable to that of a limiter plasma. The transport of iron is numerically simulated for an iron influx produced by sputtering of charge exchange neutrals at the wall. The results are consistent with the measured iron concentration. First results from a comparison of the poloidal divertor with toroidally closed limiters (stainless steel, carbon) are given. Diverted discharges are considerably cleaner and easier to create.

  10. Performance of the INTOR poloidal divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.E.; Petravic, M.; Schmidt, J.A.; Heifetz, D.

    1981-10-01

    The next generation of large tokamak experiments is expected to have large particle and heat outfluxes (approx. 10/sup 23/ particles/sec and 80 MW). These outfluxes must be controlled to provide adequate pumping of the helium ash and to minimize the sputtering erosion of the vacuum vessel walls, limiters, and neutralizer plates. A poloidal divertor design to solve these problems for INTOR has been done using a two-dimensional code which models the plasma as a fluid and solves equations for the flow of particles, momentum and energy, and calculates the neutral gas transport with Monte-Carlo techniques. These calculations show that there is a regime of operation where the density in the divertor is high and the temperature is low, thus easing the heat load and erosion problems. The neutral pressure at the plate is high, resulting in high gas throughputs, with modest pumping speeds.

  11. Spectroscopy of divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Isler, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The requirements for divertor spectroscopy are treated with respect to instrumentation and observations on present machines. Emphasis is placed on quantitative measurements.of impurity concentrations from the interpretation of spectral line intensities. The possible influence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions on spectral line excitation in the divertor is discussed. Finally the use of spectroscopy for determining plasma temperature, density, and flows is examined.

  12. Divertor design for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.N.; Braams, B.; Brooks, J.N.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the present divertor design for the planned TPX tokamak, which will explore the physics and technology of steady-state (1000s pulses) heat and particle removal in high confinement (2--4{times} L-mode), high beta ({beta}{sub N} {ge} 3) divertor plasmas sustained by non-inductive current drive. The TPX device will operate in the double-null divertor configuration, with actively cooled graphite targets forming a deep (0.5 m) slot at the outer strike point. The peak heat flux on, the highly tilted (74{degrees} from normal) re-entrant (to recycle ions back toward the separatrix) will be in the range of 4--6 MW/m{sup 2} with 18 MW of neutral beams and RF heating power. The combination of active pumping and gas puffing (deuterium plus impurities), along with higher heating power (45 MW maximum) will allow testing of radiative divertor concepts at ITER-like power densities.

  13. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  14. Status of National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Viola, M.; Ellis, R.; Bell, M.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Roquemore, A. L.; Schneider, H.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Nygren, R. E.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2009-11-01

    Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on plasma facing components to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is the 2009 installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD). The 20 cm wide LLD located on the lower outer divertor, consists of four, 80 degree sections; each section is separated by a row of graphite diagnostic tiles. The temperature controlled LLD structure consists of a 0.01cm layer of vacuum flame-sprayed, 50 percent porous molybdenum, on top of 0.02 cm, 316-SS brazed to a 1.9 cm Cu base. The physics design of the LLD encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  15. The snowflake divertor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryutov, D. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2015-11-17

    The snowflake magnetic configuration is characterized by the presence of two closely spaced poloidal field nulls that create a characteristic hexagonal (reminiscent of a snowflake) separatrix structure. The magnetic field properties and the plasma behaviour in the snowflake are determined by the simultaneous action of both nulls, this generating a lot of interesting physics, as well as providing a chance for improving divertor performance. One of the most interesting effects of the snowflake geometry is the heat flux sharing between multiple divertor channels. The authors summarise experimental results obtained with the snowflake configuration on several tokamaks. Wherever possible, relation tomore » the existing theoretical models is described. Divertor concepts utilizing the properties of a snowflake configuration are briefly discussed.« less

  16. The snowflake divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2015-11-17

    The snowflake magnetic configuration is characterized by the presence of two closely spaced poloidal field nulls that create a characteristic hexagonal (reminiscent of a snowflake) separatrix structure. The magnetic field properties and the plasma behaviour in the snowflake are determined by the simultaneous action of both nulls, this generating a lot of interesting physics, as well as providing a chance for improving divertor performance. One of the most interesting effects of the snowflake geometry is the heat flux sharing between multiple divertor channels. The authors summarise experimental results obtained with the snowflake configuration on several tokamaks. Wherever possible, relation to the existing theoretical models is described. Divertor concepts utilizing the properties of a snowflake configuration are briefly discussed.

  17. A superconducting linear motor drive for a positive displacement bellows pump for use in the g-2 cryogenics system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    Forced two-phase cooling of indirectly cooled magnets requires circulation of liquid helium through the magnet cooling channel. A bellows helium pump is one possible way of providing helium flow to a magnet cooling system. Since the bellows type of helium pump is immersed in liquid helium, a superconducting linear motor drive appears to be an attractive option. This report describes a linear motor drive that employs oriented permanent magnet materials such as samarium-cobalt as the stator magnet system and a superconducting loud speaker voice coil type of drive as the armature of the linear motor. This report examines drive motor requirements for a helium pump.

  18. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m{sup 3}), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts.

  19. Structural design of the DIII-D radiative divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, E.E.; Smith, J.P.; Baxi, C.B.; Bozek, A.S.; Chin, E.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Laughon, G.J.; Sevier, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    The divertor of the DIII-D tokamak is being modified to operate as a slot type, dissipative divertor. This modification, called the Radiative Divertor Program (RDP) is being carried out in two phases. The design and analysis is complete and hardware is being fabricated for the first phase. This first phase consists of an upper divertor baffle and cryopump to provide some density control for high triangularity, single or double null discharges. Installation of the first phase is scheduled to start in October, 1996. The second phase provides pumping at all four divertor strike points of double null high triangularity discharges and baffling of the neutral particles from transport back to the core plasma. Studies of the effects of varying the slot length and width of the divertor can be easily accomplished with the design of RDP hardware. Static and dynamic analyses of the baffle structures, new cryopumps, and feedlines were performed during the preliminary and final design phases. Disruption loads and differential thermal displacements must be accommodated in the design of these components. With the full RDP hardware installed, the plasma current in DIII-D will be a maximum of 3.0 MA. Plasma disruptions induce toroidal currents in the cryopump, producing complex dynamic loads. Simultaneously, the vacuum vessel vibrations impose a sinusoidal base excitation to the supports for the cryopump. Static and dynamic analyses of the cryopump demonstrate that the stresses due to disruption and thermal loadings satisfy the stress and deflection criteria.

  20. Optimal thermal-hydraulic performance for helium-cooled divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Izenson, M.G.; Martin, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    Normal flow heat exchanger (NFHX) technology offers the potential for cooling divertor panels with reduced pressure drops (<0.5% {Delta}p/p), reduced pumping power (<0.75% pumping/thermal power), and smaller duct sizes than conventional helium heat exchangers. Furthermore, the NFHX can easily be fabricated in the large sizes required for divertors in large tokamaks. Recent experimental and computational results from a program to develop NFHX technology for divertor coolings using porous metal heat transfer media are described. We have tested the thermal and flow characteristics of porous metals and identified the optimal heat transfer material for the divertor heat exchanger. Methods have been developed to create highly conductive thermal bonds between the porous material and a solid substrate. Computational fluid dynamics calculations of flow and heat transfer in the porous metal layer have shown the capability of high thermal effectiveness. An 18-kW NFHX, designed to meet specifications for the international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor divertor, has been fabricated and tested for thermal and flow performance. Preliminary results confirm design and fabrication methods. 11 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  1. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  2. Performance characteristics of the DIII-D advanced divertor cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Baxi, C.B.; Campbell, G.L.; Holtrop, K.L.; Hyatt, A.W.; Laughon, G.J.; Makariou, C.C.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Reis, E.E.; Schaffer, M.J.; Schaubel, K.M.; Scoville, J.T.; Smith, J.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.

    1993-10-01

    A cryocondensation pump, cooled by forced flow of two-phase helium, has been installed for particle exhaust from the divertor region of the DIII-D tokamak. The Inconel pumping surface is of coaxial geometry, 25.4 mm in outer diameter and 11.65 m in length. Because of the tokamak environment, the pump is designed to perform under relatively high pulsed heat loads (300 Wm{sup {minus}2}). Results of measurements made on the pumping characteristics for D{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and Ar are discussed.

  3. Divertor plasma detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Pshenov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Regime with the plasma detached from the divertor targets (detached divertor regime) is a natural continuation of the high recycling conditions to higher density and stronger impurity radiation loss. Both the theoretical considerations and experimental data show clearly that the increase of the impurity radiation loss and volumetric plasma recombination causes the rollover of the plasma flux to the target when the density increases, which is the manifestation of detachment. Plasma-neutral friction (neutral viscosity effects), although important for the sustainment of high density/pressure plasma upstream and providing the conditions for efficient recombination and power loss, is not directly involved in the reduction of the plasma flux to the targets. The stability of detachment is also discussed.

  4. The snowflake divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    The snowflake magnetic configuration is characterized by the presence of two closely spaced poloidal field nulls that create a characteristic hexagonal (reminiscent of a snowflake) separatrix structure. The magnetic field properties and the plasma behaviour in the snowflake are determined by the simultaneous action of both nulls, this generating a lot of interesting physics, as well as providing a chance for improving divertor performance. Among potential beneficial effects of this geometry are: increased volume of a low poloidal field around the null, increased connection length, and the heat flux sharing between multiple divertor channels. The authors summarise experimental results obtained with the snowflake configuration on several tokamaks. Wherever possible, relation to the existing theoretical models is described.

  5. Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    R.C. O'Neill; A.S. Bozek; M.E. Friend; C.B. Baxi; E.E. Reis; M.A. Mahdavi; D.G. Nilson; S.L. Allen; W.P. West

    1999-11-01

    The Radiative Divertor Program of DIII-D is in its final phase with the installation of the cryopump and baffle structure (Phase 1B Divertor) in the upper inner radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel at the end of this calendar year. This divertor, in conjunction with the Advanced Divertor and the Phase 1A Divertor, located in the lower and upper outer radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel respectively, provides pumping for density control of the plasma while minimizing the effects on the core confinement. Each divertor consists of a cryobelium cooling ring and a shielded protective structure. The cryo/helium-cooled pumps of all three diverters exhaust helium from the plasma. The protective shielded structure or baffle structure, in the case of the diverters located at the top of the vacuum vessel, provides baffling of neutral charged particles and minimize the flow of impurities back into the core of the plasma. The baffles, which consist of water-cooled panels that allow for the attachment of tiles of various sizes and shapes, house gas puff systems. The intent of the puffing systems is to inject gas in and around the divertor to minimize the heat flux on specific areas on the divertor and its components. The reduction of the heat flux on the divertor minimizes the impurities that are generated from excess heat on divertor components, specifically tiles. Experiments involving the gas puff systems and the divertor structures have shown the heat flux can be spread over a large area of the divertor, reducing the peak heat flux in specific areas. The three diverters also incorporate a variety of diagnostic tools such as halo current monitors, magnetic probes and thermocouples to monitor certain plasma characteristics as well as determine the effectiveness of the cryopumps and baffle configurations. The diverters were designed to optimize pumping performance and to withstand the electromagnetic loads from both halo currents and toroidal induced currents. Incorporated also

  6. Turbopumps for cryogenic upper stage engines. [fabrication and evaluation of turbine pumps for liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachary, A. T.; Csomor, A.; Tignac, L. L.

    1973-01-01

    Small, high-performance LO2 and LH2 turbopump assembly configurations were selected, detail designs were prepared and two of each unit were fabricated with each unit consisting of pump, turbine gas generator, and appropriate controls. Following fabrication, development testing was conducted on each type to demonstrate performance, durability, transient characteristics, and heat transfer under simulated altitude conditions. Following successful completion of development effort, the two LO2 turbopump units and one LH2 turbopump unit were acceptance tested as specified. Inspection of the units following development testing revealed no deleterious effects of testing. The test results of LO2 turbopump assembly testing correlated well with predicted performance while the LH2 turbopump test results, though generally consistent with predicted values, did show lower than anticipated developed head at the design point and in the high flow range of operation.

  7. Asymmetric divertor biasing in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, P.; Cohen, R.; Counsell, G. C.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments are being carried out on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) where the divertor tiles are electrically biased in a toroidally alternating way. The aim is to induce convective cells in the divertor plasma, broaden the SOL and reduce the divertor heat load. This paper describes the underlying theory and experimental results. Criteria are presented for achieving strong broadening and exciting shear-flow turbulence in the SOL, and properties of the expected turbulence are derived. It is also shown that magnetic shear near the X-point is likely to confine the potential perturbations to the divertor region, leaving the part of the SOL that is in direct contact with the core plasma intact. Preliminary comparison of the theory with MAST data is encouraging: the distortion of the heat deposition pattern, its broadening, and the incremental heat load are qualitatively in agreement; quantitative comparisons are underway.

  8. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Volume 33 - Proceedings of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Saint Charles, IL, June 14-18, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on superconductivity applications including magnets, electronics, rectifiers, magnet stability, coil protection, and cryogenic techniques. Also considered are insulation, heat transfer to liquid helium and nitrogen, heat and mass transfer in He II, superfluid pumps, and refrigeration for superconducting systems. Other topics include cold compressors, refrigeration and liquefaction, magnetic refrigeration, and refrigeration for space applications. Papers are also presented on cryogenic applications, commercial cryogenic plants, the properties of cryogenic fluids, and cryogenic instrumentation and data acquisition.

  9. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  10. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Henn, T.; Kiessling, T. Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V.

    2013-12-15

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast “white light” supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  11. Design of a diagnostic residual gas analyzer for the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Biewer, T. M.; Graves, Van B; Andrew, P.; Marcus, Chris; Shimada, M.; Hughes, S.; Boussier, B.; Johnson, D. W.; Gardner, W. L.; Hillis, D. L.; Vayakis, G.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the ITER diagnostics having reached an advanced design stage is a diagnostic RGA for the divertor, i.e. residual gas analysis system for the ITER divertor, which is intended to sample the divertor pumping duct region during the plasma pulse and to have a response time compatible with plasma particle and impurity lifetimes in the divertor region. Main emphasis is placed on helium (He) concentration in the ducts, as well as the relative concentration between the hydrogen isotopes (H2, D2, T2). Measurement of the concentration of radiative gases, such as neon (Ne) and nitrogen (N2), is also intended. Numerical modeling of the gas flow from the sampled region to the cluster of analysis sensors, through a long (~8m long, ~110mm diameter) sampling pipe terminating in a pressure reducing orifice, confirm that the desired response time (~1s for He or D2) is achieved with the present design.

  12. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  13. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  14. Impurity Transport in a Simulated Gas Target Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blush, L. M.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Whyte, D.; Conn, R. W.; Schmitz, L.

    1997-11-01

    Previous simulated gas target divertor experiments in the PISCES-A linear plasma device (n <= 3 × 10^19 m-3, kTe <= 20 eV) indicated enhanced impurity retention near the target in comparison to a high recycling divertor regime. A 1 1\\over2-D fluid modeling code suggested that impurities are impeded from transporting away from the target by friction with the neutral and ionized hydrogen. In recent experiments with a PISCES-A ``slot-type'' divertor configuration, we have implemented a spectroscopic detection system to measure the axial density profiles of several impurity charge states. Moreover, we envision adding two extended cylindrical baffles spanning a pumped vacuum section to achieve strong differential pumping. This arrangement will isolate the plasma source from the gas target region and allow us to seed the background hydrogen plasma with higher impurities concentrations and investigate a regime dominated by impurity radiation. In preliminary design experiments, PISCES-A was successfully operated with an electrically isolated, copper baffle (d=5 cm, l=33.5 cm) mounted to reduce the vacuum conductance between the source and target regions. This work supported by US-DoE contract DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  15. UEDGE Simulation of Triple-X Divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Pekker, M.; Rognlien, T.

    2006-04-01

    Novel magnetic divertors with additional X-points downstream from the main plasma X-point have been proposed to overcome reactor heat flux limitations. These divertor designs may allow a fully detached state at the divertor plate - without the poor confinement and disruptive tendencies by avoiding x-point MARFEs found in conventional divertor magnetic geometries. These new configurations are examined using UEDGE for existing machines that are considering experimental implementation of these divertors: PEGASUS, MAST, and EAST(China's new long-pulse, superconducting tokamak) as well as proposed reactor designs.

  16. Divertor plasma conditions and neutral dynamics in horizontal and vertical divertor configurations in JET-ILW low confinement mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Calabro, G.; Chankin, A.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Corrigan, G.; Drewelow, P.; Guillemaut, C.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Maviglia, F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Silva, C.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of the plasma conditions at the low field side target plate in JET ITER-like wall ohmic and low confinement mode plasmas show minor differences in divertor plasma configurations with horizontally and vertically inclined targets. Both the reduction of the electron temperature in the vicinity of the strike points and the rollover of the ion current to the plates follow the same functional dependence on the density at the low field side midplane. Configurations with vertically inclined target plates, however, produce twice as high sub-divertor pressures for the same upstream density. Simulations with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code package predict significantly lower plasma temperatures at the low field side target in vertical than in horizontal target configurations. Including cross-field drifts and imposing a pumping by-pass leak at the low-field side plate can still not recover the experimental observations.

  17. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  18. Ames Research Center cryogenics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs describe the Ames Research Center's cryogenics program. Diagrams are given of a fluid management system, a centrifugal pump, a flow meter, a liquid helium test facility, an extra-vehicular activity coupler concept, a dewar support with passive orbital disconnect, a pulse tube refrigerator, a dilution refrigerator, and an adiabatic demagnetization cooler.

  19. Compatibility of the Radiating Divertor with High Performance Plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T W; Wade, M R; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hyatt, A W; Isler, R C; Lasnier, C J; Leonard, A W; Mahdavi, M A; Porter, G D; Schaffer, M J; Watkins, J G; West, W P

    2006-05-18

    A radiating divertor approach was successfully applied to high performance 'hybrid' plasmas [M.R. Wade, et al., Proc. 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conf., Vilamoura, (2004)]. Our technique included: (1) injecting argon near the outer divertor target, (2) enhancing the plasma flow into the inner and outer divertors by a combination of particle pumping and deuterium gas puffing upstream of the divertor targets, and (3) isolating the inner divertor from the outer by a structure in the private flux region. Good hybrid conditions were maintained, as the peak heat flux at the outer divertor target was reduced by a factor of 2.5; the peak heat flux at the inner target decreased by 20%. This difference was caused by a higher concentration of argon at the outer target than at the inner target. Argon accumulation in the main plasma was modest (n{sub AR}/n{sub e} {le}0.004 on axis), although the argon profile was more peaked than the electron profile.

  20. Recent Progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U Lithium Program and Prospects for Reactor-Relevant Liquid-Lithium Based Divertor Development

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, et al.

    2012-10-27

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. While tungsten has been identified as the most attractive solid divertor material, the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium (Li) program is investigating the viability of liquid lithium (LL) as a potential reactor compatible divertor plasma facing component (PFC) . In the near term, operation in NSTX-U is projected to provide reactor-like divertor heat loads < 40 MW/m^2 for 5 s. During the most recent NSTX campaign, ~ 0.85 kg of Li was evaporated onto the NSTX PFCs where a ~50% reduction in heat load on the Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) was observed, attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. This reduced divertor heat flux through radiation observed in the NSTX LLD experiment is consistent with the results from other lithium experiments and calculations. These results motivate an LL-based closed radiative divertor concept proposed here for NSTX-U and fusion reactors. With an LL coating, the Li is evaporated from the divertor strike point surface due to the intense heat. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energies, and the ionized Li ions can radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. Due to the rapid plasma transport in divertor plasma, the radiation values can be significantly enhanced up to ~ 11 MJ/cc of LL. This radiative process has the desired function of spreading the focused divertor heat load to the entire divertor chamber facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL divertor surface can also provide a "sacrificial" surface to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the ELMs. The closed radiative LLD concept has the advantages of providing some degree of partition in terms of plasma disruption forces on the LL, Li particle divertor retention, and strong divertor pumping action from the

  1. Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake

    SciTech Connect

    Kotschenreuther, Mike; Valanju, Prashant; Covele, Brent; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2013-10-15

    Advanced divertors are magnetic geometries where a second X-point is added in the divertor region to address the serious challenges of burning plasma power exhaust. Invoking physical arguments, numerical work, and detailed model magnetic field analysis, we investigate the magnetic field structure of advanced divertors in the physically relevant region for power exhaust—the scrape-off layer. A primary result of our analysis is the emergence of a physical “metric,” the Divertor Index DI, which quantifies the flux expansion increase as one goes from the main X-point to the strike point. It clearly separates three geometries with distinct consequences for divertor physics—the Standard Divertor (DI = 1), and two advanced geometries—the X-Divertor (XD, DI > 1) and the Snowflake (DI < 1). The XD, therefore, cannot be classified as one variant of the Snowflake. By this measure, recent National Spherical Torus Experiment and DIIID experiments are X-Divertors, not Snowflakes.

  2. Kinetic Modeling of Divertor Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Pianpanit, Theerasarn

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation with the Monte Carlo collisions and the cumulative scattering angle coulomb collision can present kinetic dynamics of divertor plasmas. We are developing two types of PIC codes. The first one is the three dimensional bounded PIC code where three dimensional kinetic dynamics of blob is studied and current flow structures related to sheath formation are unveiled. The second one is the one spatial three velocity space dimensional (1D3V) PIC code with the Monte Carlo collisions where formation of detach plasma is studied. First target of our research is to construct self-consistent full kinetic simulation modeling of the linear divertor simulation experiments. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS15KNSS059, NIFS14KNXN279, and NIFS13KNSS038) and the Research Cooperation Program on Hierarchy and Holism in Natural Science at NINS.

  3. Design and operation of a novel divertor cryopumping system in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labombard, B.; Beck, B.; Bosco, J.; Childs, R.; Gwinn, D.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marazita, S.; Mucic, N.; Pierson, S.; Rokhman, Y.; Titus, P.; Vieira, R.; Zaks, J.; Zhukovsky, A.

    2007-11-01

    C-Mod's recently installed upper-divertor cryopump is unique among the world's tokamaks, employing an array of gas-pumping slots that penetrate the upper divertor target. This geometry enables the use of a single toroidal loop of liquid helium, operating in an efficient heat transfer regime with low or no helium flow. A system pumping speed of 9,600 l/sec for D2 gas has been achieved, matching that of a full-scale prototype system. Neutral pressures in the pumping slots during upper-null plasmas (USN) are found to meet or exceed pressures in the lower divertor's private flux region during lower-null (LSN) -- evidence that the pumping-slot geometry is performing as intended. Very high steady-state pumping throughputs (exceeding ˜140 torr-l/s) have been demonstrated in USN. Reliable and efficient operation of the pump has been established, synchronized with the C-Mod shot cycle and consuming 60 to 90 liters of liquid helium during a full day of operation.

  4. Crossed-field divertor for a plasma device

    DOEpatents

    Kerst, Donald W.; Strait, Edward J.

    1981-01-01

    A divertor for removal of unwanted materials from the interior of a magnetic plasma confinement device includes the division of the wall of the device into segments insulated from each other in order to apply an electric field having a component perpendicular to the confining magnetic field. The resulting crossed-field drift causes electrically charged particles to be removed from the outer part of the confinement chamber to a pumping chamber. This method moves the particles quickly past the saddle point in the poloidal magnetic field where they would otherwise tend to stall, and provides external control over the rate of removal by controlling the magnitude of the electric field.

  5. Cryogenic Propellant Scavenging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, B.; Kemp, N. J.; Daney, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed description of a computer model that has been developed for assessing the feasibility of low g cryogen propellant scavenging from the space shuttle External Tank (ET) is given. Either pump-assisted or pressure-induced propellant transfer may be selected. The program will accept a wide range of input variables, including the fuel to be transferred (LOX or LH2), heat leaks, tank temperatures, and piping and equipment specifications. The model has been parametrically analyzed to determine initial design specification for the system.

  6. Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoyama, Kenji

    2002-02-01

    In this lecture we discuss the principle of method of cooling to a very low temperature, i.e. cryogenic. The "gas molecular model" will be introduced to explain the mechanism cooling by the expansion engine and the Joule-Thomson expansion valve. These two expansion processes are normally used in helium refrigeration systems to cool the process gas to cryogenic temperature. The reverse Carnot cycle will be discussed in detail as an ideal refrigeration cycle. First the fundamental process of liquefaction and refrigeration cycles will be discussed, and then the practical helium refrigeration system. The process flow of the system and the key components; -compressor, expander, and heat exchanger- will be discussed. As an example of an actual refrigeration system, we will use the cryogenic system for the KEKB superconducting RF cavity. We will also discuss the liquid helium distribution system, which is very important, especially for the cryogenic systems used in accelerator applications. 1 Principles of Cooling and Fundamental Cooling Cycle 2 Expansion engine, Joule-Thomson expansion, kinetic molecular theory, and enthalpy 3 Liquefaction Systems 4 Refrigeration Systems 5 Practical helium liquefier/refrigeration system 6 Cryogenic System for TRISTAN Superconducting RF Cavity

  7. Recent progress in the NSTX/NSTX-U lithium programme and prospects for reactor-relevant liquid-lithium based divertor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Ahn, J.-W.; Allain, J. P.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Clayton, D. J.; Canik, J. M.; Ding, S.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; Kumar, D.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; McLean, A.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nygren, R.; Paul, S.; Podesta, M.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Sabbagh, S.; Scotti, F.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Surla, V.; Taylor, C. N.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L. E.; the NSTX Research Team

    2013-11-01

    Developing a reactor-compatible divertor has been identified as a particularly challenging technology problem for magnetic confinement fusion. Application of lithium (Li) in NSTX resulted in improved H-mode confinement, H-mode power threshold reduction, and other plasma performance benefits. During the 2010 NSTX campaign, application of a relatively modest amount of Li (300 mg prior to the discharge) resulted in a ˜50% reduction in heat load on the liquid lithium divertor (LLD) attributable to enhanced divertor bolometric radiation. These promising Li results in NSTX and related modelling calculations motivated the radiative LLD concept proposed here. Li is evaporated from the liquid lithium (LL) coated divertor strike-point surface due to the intense heat flux. The evaporated Li is readily ionized by the plasma due to its low ionization energy, and the poor Li particle confinement near the divertor plate enables ionized Li ions to radiate strongly, resulting in a significant reduction in the divertor heat flux. This radiative process has the desired effect of spreading the localized divertor heat load to the rest of the divertor chamber wall surfaces, facilitating the divertor heat removal. The LL coating of divertor surfaces can also provide a ‘sacrificial’ protective layer to protect the substrate solid material from transient high heat flux such as the ones caused by the edge localized modes. By operating at lower temperature than the first wall, the LL covered large divertor chamber wall surfaces can serve as an effective particle pump for the entire reactor chamber, as impurities generally migrate towards lower temperature LL divertor surfaces. To maintain the LL purity, a closed LL loop system with a modest circulating capacity (e.g., ˜1 l s-1 for ˜1% level ‘impurities’) is envisioned for a steady-state 1 GW-electric class fusion power plant.

  8. RHIC cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarocci, M. A.; Brown, D.; Sondericker, J.; Wu, K. C.; Benson, J.; Farah, Y.; Lac, C.; Morgillo, A.; Nicoletti, A.; Quimby, E.; Rank, J.; Rehak, M.; Werner, A.

    2003-03-01

    An integrated helium cryogenic system was designed with the specific performance goal of cooling and refrigerating the cryogenic magnets to below their nominal operating temperature. These magnets make up the steering and focusing elements for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In addition to meeting the accelerator demands, reliability, flexibility, safety, and ease of operation were key considerations during the design phase of the project. The refrigerator, with a capacity of 25 kW at about 4 K, was originally designed to match the load for the Colliding Beam Accelerator Project. The existing refrigerator, along with its complimentary warm compressor system was reconfigured slightly to meet the cooling process cycle design for RHIC. The original VAX based process control system was also adapted for RHIC, and later expanded upon to integrate a new programmable logic controller based ring resident control system, hence forming a common system to monitor and control all cryogenic components.

  9. Effect of Divertor Shaping on Divertor Plasma Behavior on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, T. W.; Leonard, A. W.; Luce, T. C.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Holcomb, C. T.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hill, D. N.; Lasnier, C. J.; Watkins, J. G.; Moyer, R. A.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2012-10-01

    Recent experiments examined the dependence of divertor density (nTAR), temperature (TTAR), and heat flux at the outer divertor separatrix target on changes in the divertor separatrix geometry. The responses of nTAR and TTAR to changes in the parallel connection length in the scrape-off layer (SOL) (L||) are consistent with the predictions of the Two Point Model (TPM). However, nTAR and TTAR display a more complex response to changes in the radial location of the outer divertor strike point (RTAR) than expected based on the TPM. SOLPS transport analysis indicates that small differences in divertor geometry can change neutral trapping sufficient to explain differences between experiment and TPM predictions. The response of the core and divertor plasmas to changes in L|| and RTAR, under both radiating and non-radiating divertor conditions, will be shown.

  10. Self-pumping inpurity control systems for INTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.; Smith, D.L.; Hassanein, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Two self-pumping systems have been examined for use as the INTOR impurity control system. The systems work by trapping helium in freshly deposited metal surface layers on or near the divertor plate. A slot divertor concept using vanadium or other trapping material appears to be both feasible and mechanically simple, and offers significant advantages in cost, reduced complexity, and helium pumping efficiency for the INTOR design.

  11. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  12. Cryogenic shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Richard D.; Magner, Thomas J.

    1992-07-01

    A magnetically operated shutter mechanism is provided that will function in cryogenic or cryogenic zero gravity environments to selectively block radiation such as light from passing through a window to a target object such as a mirror or detector located inside a cryogenic container such as a dewar. The mechanism includes a shutter paddle blade that is moved by an electromagnetically actuated torquing device between an open position where the target object is exposed to ambient radiation or light and a closed position where the shutter paddle blade shields the ambient radiation or light from the target object. The purpose of the shuttering device is to prevent the mirror or other target object from being directly exposed to radiation passing through the window located on the side wall of the dewar, thereby decreasing or eliminating any temperature gradient that would occur within the target object due to exposure to the radiation. A special nylon bearing system is utilized to prevent the device from binding during operation and the paddle blade is also thermally connected to a reservoir containing cryogen to further reduce the internal temperature.

  13. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  14. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  15. Dust divertor for a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X Z; Delzanno, G L

    2009-01-01

    Micron-size tungsten particulates find equilibrium position in the magnetized plasma sheath in the normal direction of the divertor surface, but are convected poloidally and toroidally by the sonic-ion-flow drag parallel to the divertor surface. The natural circulation of dust particles in the magnetized plasma sheath can be used to set up a flowing dust shield that absorbs and exhausts most of the tokamak heat flux to the divertor. The size of the particulates and the choice of materials offer substantial room for optimization.

  16. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  17. Cryogenic Technology Development For The MEG Liquid Xenon Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Haruyama, Tomiyoshi

    2008-02-21

    Cryogenic key technologies have been developed for the muon rare decay experiment (MEG) at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. These technologies are the high power pulse tube cryocooler for precise temperature and pressure control of liquid xenon in the calorimeter, a purification system with a cryogenic liquid pump and a cryogenic dewar with 1000 L storage capacity. The paper describes the general concepts and the first test results of each technology. All the results imply a promising performance for the coming MEG experiment.

  18. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 37A & 37B - Proceedings of the 1991 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, June 11-14, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Ronald W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advances in cryogenic engineering discusses heat and mass transfer in helium, heat transfer in cryogenic fluids, thermoacoustic oscillations, and insulation. Attention is given to applications of superconductivity with reference to magnetic stability and coil protection, cryogenic techniques, and refrigeration for electronics and superconducting systems. Topics addressed include compressors, expanders, and pumps for liquid helium, magnetic refrigerators, pulse tube refrigerators, and cryocoolers. Also examined are properties of cryogenic fluids, cryogenic applications in transportion and space science and technology, and cryogenic instrumentation.

  19. Cryogenic seal concept for static and dynamic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Gaetano, E. A.

    1968-01-01

    Seal rings reduce cryogenic pump seal leakage under static and dynamic conditions. The rings are fitted into annular diaphragms, which are affected by cryogenic pressure and temperature, to move against a mating ring, to increase seal-bearing loads under static conditions.

  20. Stochasticity about a poloidal divertor separatrix

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Prager, S.C.; Park, W.

    1986-10-01

    The stochasticization of the magnetic separatrix due to the presence of a helical perturbation in a poloidal divertor tokamak is illustrated by a numerical computation which traces magnetic field lines.

  1. Stochasticity about a poloidal divertor separatrix

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Prager, S.C.; Park, W.

    1987-04-01

    The stochasticization of the magnetic separatrix caused by the presence of a helical perturbation in a poloidal divertor tokamak is illustrated by a numerical computation that traces magnetic field lines.

  2. High flux expansion divertor studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Maqueda, R; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L

    2009-06-29

    Projections for high-performance H-mode scenarios in spherical torus (ST)-based devices assume low electron collisionality for increased efficiency of the neutral beam current drive. At lower collisionality (lower density), the mitigation techniques based on induced divertor volumetric power and momentum losses may not be capable of reducing heat and material erosion to acceptable levels in a compact ST divertor. Divertor geometry can also be used to reduce high peak heat and particle fluxes by flaring a scrape-off layer (SOL) flux tube at the divertor plate, and by optimizing the angle at which the flux tube intersects the divertor plate, or reduce heat flow to the divertor by increasing the length of the flux tube. The recently proposed advanced divertor concepts [1, 2] take advantage of these geometry effects. In a high triangularity ST plasma configuration, the magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point (SP) is inherently high, leading to a reduction of heat and particle fluxes and a facilitated access to the outer SP detachment, as has been demonstrated recently in NSTX [3]. The natural synergy of the highly-shaped high-performance ST plasmas with beneficial divertor properties motivated a further systematic study of the high flux expansion divertor. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a mid-sized device with the aspect ratio A = 1.3-1.5 [4]. In NSTX, the graphite tile divertor has an open horizontal plate geometry. The divertor magnetic configuration geometry was systematically changed in an experiment by either (1) changing the distance between the lower divertor X-point and the divertor plate (X-point height h{sub X}), or by (2) keeping the X-point height constant and increasing the outer SP radius. An initial analysis of the former experiment is presented below. Since in the divertor the poloidal field B{sub {theta}} strength is proportional to h{sub X}, the X-point height variation changed the divertor plasma wetted area due to

  3. Fabrication and installation of the DIII-D radiative divertor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, M.A.; Smith, J.P.

    1997-11-01

    Phase 1A of the Radiative Divertor Program (RDP) is now installed in the DIII-D tokamak located at General Atomics. This hardware was added to enhance both the Divertor and Advanced Tokamak research elements of the DIII-D program. This installation consists of a divertor baffle enveloping a cryocondensation pump at the upper outer divertor target of DIII-D. The divertor baffle consists of two toroidally continuous Inconel 625 water-cooled rings and a toroidal array of discontinuous radiatively-cooled plates. The water-cooled rings are each comprised of four quadrants, mechanically formed, chem.-milled, and resistance and TIG welded Inconel 625 panels. The supports attaching the panels to the vessel wall are designed to accommodate the differential thermal expansion between the rings and vessel during bake and to react the electromagnetic loads induced during disruptions. They are made from either Inconel 625 or Inconel 718 depending on the stress levels predicted in Finite Element Analysis. Gas seals are designed to limit the leakage from the baffle chamber back to the core plasma to 2,500 {ell}/s and incorporate plasma sprayed alumina to minimize currents flowing through them. The bulk of the water-cooled ring fabrication was performed by a vendor, however, the final machining of penetrations in the conical ring for diagnostic access was performed in-house using a unique machining configuration. This configuration, and the machining of the diagnostic cutouts is described. Graphite tiles were machined from ATJ graphite to form a smooth plasma-facing surface. The installation of all divertor components required only four weeks.

  4. Particle exhaust schemes in the DIII-D advanced divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    For density control in long-pulse operation, the open divertor on the DIII-D tokamak will be equipped with a baffled chamber and a pumping system. The throat of the baffle chamber is sized to provide optimal pumping for the typical plasma equilibrium configuration. Severe limitations on the toroidal conductance of this baffle chamber require the use of in-vessel pumping to achieve the desired particle exhaust of about 25 Torr{center dot}l/s. Two separate pumping schemes are considered: an array of titanium getter modules based on the design developed by the Tore Supra team and a cryocondensation pump. The merits and demerits of each scheme are analyzed, and the design considerations introduced by the tokamak environment are brought out. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  5. The effects of an open and closed divertor on particle exhaust during edge-localized mode suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberg, E. A.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.E.; Maingi, Rajesh; Brooks, N. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Orlov, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the effects of divertor geometry on particle exhaust characteristics during the suppression of ELM using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on DIII-D. The subject is timely, particularly for ITER, because the combination of techniques to control or mitigate ELMs and control particle exhaust can provide confidence in the ability of an external pumping system to fully remove the particle exhaust. The differences between an open and closed divertor magnetic topology show a strong coupling of the perturbed strikepoint to the pumping manifold in closed divertor configurations, which can increase the particle exhaust by a factor of four. There is also an observed dependence on q(95) in this configuration, which is a common feature of RMP ELM suppression. Neutral density in both the active and non-active divertors is seen to increase during the RMP in the ISS configuration, and edge plasma conditions (i.e. n(e,sep) and midplane profile of D(alpha)) are seen to increase in the closed divertor configuration. Finally, the pumping exhaust is also shown to have a strong dependence on local measurements of the recycling flux. These observations, when taken as a whole, point to a substantial change in the plasma edge conditions, i.e. near the LCFS, throughout the poloidal cross-section of the vacuum vessel. This is coincident with the application of the RMP affecting the pumping capability of the system.

  6. CRYOGENIC DEWAR

    DOEpatents

    Chamberlain, W.H.; Maseck, H.E.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a dewar for storing cryogenic gase and is of the type having aii inner flask surrounded by a vacuum jacket and having a vent spout through which evaporating gas escapes. Heretofore substantial gas loss has resulted from the radiation of heat towards the flask from the warmer outer elements of the dewar. In this invention, the mask is surrounded by a thermally conducting shield which is disposed in the vacuum space between the flask and the outer elements of the dewar. The shield contacts only the vent spout, which is cooled by the evaporating gas, and thus is maintained at a temperature very close to that of the flask itself. Accordingly, heat radiated toward the flask is intercepted and conducted to the evaporating gas rather than being re-radiated towards the hask. In a liquid helium dewar of typical configniration the mention reduces the boil-off rate by approximately one-half.(AEC)

  7. Divertor heat loads in RMP ELM controlled H-mode plasmas on DIII-D*

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, M; Lasnier, C; Schmitz, O; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Watkins, J; Eich, T; Moyer, R; Wolf, R; Baylor, L; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; Frerichs, H; deGrassie, J; Gohil, P; Joseph, I; Lehnen, M; Leonard, A; Petty, C; Pinsker, R; Reiter, D; Rhodes, T; Samm, U; Snyder, P; Stoschus, H; Osborne, T; Unterberg, B; West, W

    2008-10-13

    In this paper the manipulation of power deposition on divertor targets at DIII-D by application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is analyzed. It has been found that heat transport shows a different reaction to the applied RMP depending on the plasma pedestal collisionality. At pedestal electron collisionality above 0.5 the heat flux during the ELM suppressed phase is of the same order as the inter-ELM in the non-RMP phase. Below this collisionality value we observe a slight increase of the total power flux to the divertor. This can be caused by much more negative potential at the divertor surface due to hot electrons reaching the divertor surface from the pedestal area and/or so called pump out effect. In the second part we discuss modification of ELM behavior due to the RMP. It is shown, that the width of the deposition pattern in ELMy H-mode depends linearly on the ELM deposited energy, whereas in the RMP phase of the discharge those patterns seem to be controlled by the externally induced magnetic perturbation. D{sub 2} pellets injected into the plasma bulk during ELM-free RMP H-mode lead in some cases to a short term small transients, which have very similar properties to ELMs in the initial RMP-on phase.

  8. Poloidal divertor experiment with applied E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E J

    1980-05-01

    It has been proposed that the E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift arising from an externally applied electric field could be used in a tokamak or other toroidal device to remove plasma and impurities from the region near the wall and to reduce the amount of plasma striking the wall, either assisting or replacing a conventional magnetic field divertor. A poloidal magnetic divertor (without pumping chamber) was added to the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole, and the octupole was operated with a tokamak-like magnetic field configuration (q = 0.7). A radial electric field was applied in the scrape-off zone, causing an E vector x B vector/B/sup 2/ drift with a large poloidal component. This reduced plasma flux reaching the wall of the toroid by up to a factor of 5 beyond the effect of the magnetic divertor, for divertor configurations with both high and low magnetic mirror ratios, in good agreement with a simple theoretical model. Plasma density and density scale length were also reduced in the scrape-off zone, in qualitative agreement with the model. This was not accompanied by any new instabilities in the scrape-off zone, nor by any appreciable degradation of confinement of the central plasma.

  9. A helical hydrogen-MARFE-like phenomenon in the divertor of the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, U.; König, R.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; the W7-AS Team

    2015-01-01

    In the island divertor of the W7-AS stellarator a high-density zone (HDZ) near the divertor plates was discovered some years ago (Ramasubramanian et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 992-8) with electron densities up to 7 × 1020 m-3. We shed further light on this phenomenon by determining the poloidal and radial location of this zone and discussing potential implications of these findings. The HDZ is in the vicinity of, but clearly separated from the nearest X-point line. The carbon emission is clearly spatially separated, residing near or at the X-point lines. The HDZ shows many similarities with the hydrogen or wall MARFE in Textor-94 (Samm et al 1999 J. Nucl. Mater. 266-269 666). The structure is associated with a strongly increased neutral pressure, thus enabling efficient pumping. This offers the possibility for a very efficient exhaust regime in a stellarator with island divertor such as W7-X, simultaneously with significantly reduced convective heat loads onto the divertor itself. The spatial separation of the HDZ and the carbon radiation region may imply that such a state can be reached even in a non-carbon machine, and might therefore be DEMO-relevant.

  10. A "Snowflake" Divertor and its Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D

    2007-06-21

    Handling the power and particle exhaust in fusion reactors based on tokamaks is a challenging problem [1,2]. To bring the energy flux to the divertor plates to an acceptable level (< 10 MW/m2), it is desirable to significantly increase poloidal flux expansion in the divertor area. Some recent ideas include that of a so-called X divertor [3] and a 'snowflake' divertor [4]. We use an acronym SF to designate the latter. In this paper we concentrate on the SF divertor. The general idea behind this configuration is that, by a proper selection of divertor (poloidal field) coils, one can make the null point of the second, not of the first order as in the standard divertor. The separatrix in the vicinity of the X point then acquires a characteristic hexapole structure (Fig. 1), reminiscent of a snowflake, whence the name. The fact that the field has a second-order null, leads to a significant increase of the flux expansion. It was noted in Ref. [4] that the SF configuration is topologically unstable: if the current in the divertor coils is somewhat higher than the one that provides the SF configuration, it becomes a single-null X-point configuration. Conversely, if the coil current becomes somewhat lower, there appear two separate X-points. To solve this problem, one can operate the divertor at the current by roughly 5% higher than the value needed to create the second-order null. Then, configuration becomes robust enough and the shape of the separatrix does not change significantly if the coil current varies by 2-3%. At the same time, the flux expansion still remained by a factor of {approx}3 larger compared to a 'canonical' divertor. Following Ref. [4], we call this configuration a 'SF-plus' configuration. Specific examples in Ref. [4] were given for simple magnetic geometries The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the SF concept will also work for a strongly shaped plasma. The other set of issues considered in the present paper relates to the possible presence of

  11. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-07

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ionmore » transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. As a result, the implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.« less

  12. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  13. Electromagnetic dampers for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Dirusso, Eliseo

    1988-01-01

    Cryogenic turbomachinery of the type used to pump high-pressure liquid hydrogen at -423 F and liquid oxygen at -297 F to the main engines of the Space Shuttle are subjected to lateral rotor vibrations from unbalance forces and transient loads. Conventional dampers which utilize viscous fluids such as lubricating oil cannot be used in turbopumps because the bearing components are filled with either liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen, which have viscosity comparable to air and, therefore, are not effective in viscous dampers. Electromagentic dampers are currently being explored as a means of providing damping in cryogenic turbopumps because their damping effectiveness increases as temperature decreases and because they are compatible with the liquid hydrogen or liquid oxygen in the turbopumps.

  14. Impact of divertor geometry on radiative divertor performance in JET H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaervinen, A. E.; Brezinsek, S.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Guillemaut, C.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Corrigan, G.; Drewelow, P.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Lawson, K. D.; Lipschultz, B.; Maggi, C. F.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-04-01

    Radiative divertor operation in JET high confinement mode plasmas with the ITER-like wall has been experimentally investigated and simulated with EDGE2D-EIRENE in horizontal and vertical low field side (LFS) divertor configurations. The simulations show that the LFS divertor heat fluxes are reduced with N2-injection in similar fashion in both configurations, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. The simulations show no substantial difference between the two configurations in the reduction of the peak LFS heat flux as a function of divertor radiation, nitrogen concentration, or pedestal Zeff. Consistently, experiments show similar divertor radiation and nitrogen injection levels for similar LFS peak heat flux reduction in both configurations. Nevertheless, the LFS strike point is predicted to detach at 20% lower separatrix density in the vertical than in the horizontal configuration. However, since the peak LFS heat flux in partial detachment in the vertical configurations is shifted towards the far scrape-off layer (SOL), the simulations predict no benefit in the reduction of LFS peak heat flux for a given upstream density in the vertical configuration relative to a horizontal one. A factor of 2 reduction of deuterium ionization source inside the separatrix is observed in the simulations when changing to the vertical configuration. The simulations capture the experimentally observed particle and heat flux reduction at the LFS divertor plate in both configurations, when adjusting the impurity injection rate to reproduce the measured divertor radiation. However, the divertor D α -emissions are underestimated by a factor of 2-5, indicating a short-fall in radiation by the fuel species. In the vertical configuration, detachment is experimentally measured and predicted to start next to the strike point, extending towards the far SOL with increasing degree of detachment. In contrast, in the horizontal configuration, the entire divertor particle flux

  15. Liquid metal cooled divertor for ARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muraviev, E.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid metal, Ga-cooled divertor design was completed for the double null ARIES-II divertor design. The design analysis indicated a surface heat flux removal capability of up to 15 MW/m{sup 2}, and its relative easy maintenance. Design issues of configuration, thermal hydraulics, thermal stresses, liquid metal loop and safety effects were evaluated. For coolant flow control, it was found that it is necessary to use some part of the blanket cooling ducts for the draining of liquid metal from the top divertor. In order to minimize the inventory of Ga, it was recommended that the liquid metal loop equipment should be located as close to the torus as possible. More detailed analysis of transient conditions especially under accident conditions was identified as an issue that will need to be addressed.

  16. Designing divertor targets for uniform power load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekeyser, W.; Reiter, D.; Baelmans, M.

    2015-08-01

    Divertor design for next step fusion reactors heavily relies on 2D edge plasma modeling with codes as e.g. B2-EIRENE. While these codes are typically used in a design-by-analysis approach, in previous work we have shown that divertor design can alternatively be posed as a mathematical optimization problem, and solved very efficiently using adjoint methods adapted from computational aerodynamics. This approach has been applied successfully to divertor target shape design for more uniform power load. In this paper, the concept is further extended to include all contributions to the target power load, with particular focus on radiation. In a simplified test problem, we show the potential benefits of fully including the radiation load in the design cycle as compared to only assessing this load in a post-processing step.

  17. Characteristics of divertor detachment for ITER conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. S.; Pacher, H. D.; Pitts, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    The relative role of particle balance vs. momentum balance in the phenomenon of divertor plasma detachment in tokamaks is re-assessed. Ion removal from the plasma flow by volumetric recombination and/or cross-field transport is identified as the key element in the formation of the rollover of the ion saturation current on the targets, whereas "momentum removal" (friction) is responsible for maintaining high plasma pressure upstream. The deterioration of neutral particle confinement in the divertor as particle throughput increases is the primary cause of the solution collapse typically seen when deep detachment is modelled for present day experiments.

  18. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Millet, F.; Divoky, M.; Rus, B.

    2013-11-01

    Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers) as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz). The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K-170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m-2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  19. Utilization of vanadium alloys in the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.P.; Johnson, W.R.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Trester, P.W.; Smith, D.; Bloom, E.

    1995-10-01

    Vanadium alloys are attractive candidate structural materials for fusion power plants because of their potential for minimum environmental impact due to low neutron activation and rapid activation decay. They also possess favorable material properties for operation in a fusion environment. General Atomics (GA), in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has developed a plan for the utilization of vanadium alloys as part of the Radiative Divertor (RD) upgrade for the DIII-D tokamak. The plan will be carried out in conjunction with General Atomics and the Materials Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). This application of a vanadium alloy will provide a meaningful step in the development of advanced materials for fusion power devices by: (1) developing necessary materials processing technology for the fabrication of large vanadium alloy components, and (2) demonstrating the in-service behavior of a vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) in a tokamak environment. The program consists of three phases: first, small vanadium alloy coupon samples will be exposed in DIII-D at positions in the vessel floor and within the pumping plenum region of the existing divertor structure; second, a small vanadium alloy component will be installed in the existing divertor, and third, during the forthcoming Radiative Divertor modification, scheduled for completion in mid-1997, the upper section of the new double-null, slotted divertor will be fabricated from vanadium alloy product forms. This program also includes research and development (R and D) efforts to support fabrication development and to resolve key issues related to environmental effects.

  20. Energy Efficient Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, Barry J.; Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, works to provide practical solutions to low-temperature problems while focusing on long-term technology targets for the energy-efficient use of cryogenics on Earth and in space.

  1. Refrigeration for Cryogenic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, M. G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Research in cryogenically cooled refrigerators is discussed. Low-power Stirling cryocoolers; spacecraft-borne long-life units; heat exchangers; performance tests; split-stirling, linear-resonant, cryogenic refrigerators; and computer models are among the topics discussed.

  2. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  3. Heat Load on Divertors in NCSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, T. B.; Hill, D. N.; Maingi, R.; Monticello, D.; Zarnstorff, M.; Grossman, A.

    2006-10-01

    We have continued our study[1-3] of the effect of divertors in NCSX, using magnetic field data generated by both the PIES and VMEC/MFBE equilibrium codes. Results for comparable equilibria from the two codes agree to within statistical uncertainty. We follow field lines from a surface just outside and conformal with the LCMS until they strike a divertor plate or the first wall, or exceed 1000m in length, with effects of particle scattering mimicked by field-line diffusion. Current candidate divertor designs efficiently collect field lines, allowing fewer than 0.1% to reach the wall. The sensitivity of localized power deposition, assumed to be proportional to the density of field- line strike-points, to adjustments in the divertor configuration is under investigation.1. T.B. Kaiser, et al, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 48, paper RP1-20, 2003.2. T.B. Kaiser, et al, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 49, paper PP1-73, 2004.3. R. Maingi, et al, EPS Conf. Rome, Italy, paper P5.116, 2006.

  4. Divertor target for magnetic containment device

    DOEpatents

    Luzzi, Jr., Theodore E.

    1982-01-01

    In a plasma containment device of a type having superconducting field coils for magnetically shaping the plasma into approximately the form of a torus, an improved divertor target for removing impurities from a "scrape off" region of the plasma comprises an array of water cooled swirl tubes onto which the scrape off flux is impinged. Impurities reflected from the divertor target are removed from the target region by a conventional vacuum getter system. The swirl tubes are oriented and spaced apart within the divertor region relative to the incident angle of the scrape off flux to cause only one side of each tube to be exposed to the flux to increase the burnout rating of the target. The divertor target plane is oriented relative to the plane of the path of the scrape off flux such that the maximum heat flux onto a swirl tube is less than the tube design flux. The containment device is used to contain the plasma of a tokamak fusion reactor and is applicable to other long pulse plasma containment systems.

  5. An X-point ergodic divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, M.S.; Jensen, T.H.; La Haye, R.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Evans, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    A new ergodic divertor is proposed. It utilizes a system of external (n = 3) coils arranged to generate overlapping magnetic islands in the edge region of a diverted tokamak and connect the randomized field lines to the external (cold) divertor plate. The novel feature in the configuration is the placement of the external coils close to the X-point. A realistic design of the external coil set is studied by using the field line tracing method for a low aspect ratio (A {approx equal} 3) tokamak. Two types of effects are observed. First, by placing the coils close to the X-point, where the poloidal magnetic field is weak and the rational surfaces are closely packed only a moderate amount of current in the external coils is needed to ergodize the edge region. This ergodized edge enhances the edge transport in the X-point region and leads to the potential of edge profile control and the avoidance of edge localized modes (ELMs). Furthermore, the trajectories of the field lines close to the X-point are modified by the external coil set, causing the hit points on the external divertor plates to be randomized and spread out in the major radius direction. A time-dependent modulation of the currents in the external (n = 3) coils can potentially spread the heat flux more uniformly on the divertor plate avoiding high concentration of the heat flux. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  6. The tungsten divertor experiment at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, R.; Asmussen, K.; Krieger, K.; Thoma, A.; Bosch, H.-S.; Deschka, S.; Dux, R.; Engelhardt, W.; García-Rosales, C.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Mertens, V.; Ryter, F.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Sokoll, M.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Weinlich, M.; Zohm, H.; Alexander, M.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Behrisch, R.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Brambilla, M.; Brinkschulte, H.; Büchl, K.; Carlson, A.; Chodura, R.; Coster, D.; Cupido, L.; de Blank, H. J.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Drube, R.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Feist, J.-H.; Feneberg, W.; Fiedler, S.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fußmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Haas, G.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hirsch, S.; Hoek, M.; Hoenen, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Jacobi, D.; Junker, W.; Kardaun, O.; Kass, T.; Kollotzek, H.; Köppendörfer, W.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Manso, M. E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Merkel, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pasch, E.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pitcher, C. S.; Poschenrieder, W.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Röhr, H.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Speth, E.; Silva, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Verplancke, Ph; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wunderlich, R.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    1996-12-01

    Tungsten-coated tiles, manufactured by plasma spray on graphite, were mounted in the divertor of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and cover almost 90% of the surface facing the plasma in the strike zone. Over 600 plasma discharges have been performed to date, around 300 of which were auxiliary heated with heating powers up to 10 MW. The production of tungsten in the divertor was monitored by a W I line at 400.8 nm. In the plasma centre an array of spectral lines at 5 nm emitted by ionization states around W XXX was measured. From the intensity of these lines the W content was derived. Under normal discharge conditions W-concentrations around 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img12 or even lower were found. The influence on the main plasma parameters was found to be negligible. The maximum concentrations observed decrease with increasing heating power. In several low power discharges accumulation of tungsten occurred and the temperature profile was flattened. The concentrations of the intrinsic impurities carbon and oxygen were comparable to the discharges with the graphite divertor. Furthermore, the density and the 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img13 limits remained unchanged and no negative influence on the energy confinement or on the H-mode threshold was found. Discharges with neon radiative cooling showed the same behaviour as in the graphite divertor case.

  7. Divertor Coil Design and Implementation on Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriwise, P. C.; Bongard, M. W.; Cole, J. A.; Fonck, R. J.; Kujak-Ford, B. A.; Lewicki, B. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    An upgraded divertor coil system is being commissioned on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment in conjunction with power system upgrades in order to achieve higher β plasmas, reduce impurities, and possibly achieve H-mode operation. Design points for the divertor coil locations and estimates of their necessary current ratings were found using predictive equilibrium modeling based upon a 300 kA target plasma. This modeling represented existing Pegasus coil locations and current drive limits. The resultant design calls for 125 kA-turns from the divertor system to support the creation of a double null magnetic topology in plasmas with Ip<=300 kA. Initial experiments using this system will employ 900 V IGBT power supply modules to provide IDIV<=4 kA. The resulting 20 kA-turn capability of the existing divertor coil will be augmented by a new coil providing additional A-turns in series. Induced vessel wall current modeling indicates the time response of a 28 turn augmentation coil remains fast compared to the poloidal field penetration rate through the vessel. First results operating the augmented system are shown.

  8. Recent results from tokamak divertor plasma measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.

    1996-05-01

    New diagnostics have been developed to address key divertor physics questions, including: target plate heat flux reduction by radiation, basic edge transport issues, and plasma wall interactions (PWI) such as erosion. A system of diagnostics measures the target plate heat flux (imaging IR thermography) and particle flux (probes, pressure and Penning gauges, and visible emission arrays). Recently, T{sub e},n{sub e}, and P{sub e} (electron pressure) have been measured in 2-D with divertor Thomson Scattering. During radiative divertor operation T{sub e} is less than 2 eV, indicating that new atomic processes are important. Langmuir probes measure higher T{sub e} in some cases. In addition, the measured P{sub e} near the separatrix at the target plate is lower than the midplane pressure, implying radial momentum transport. Bolometer arrays, inverted with reconstruction algorithms, provide the 2-D core and divertor radiation profiles. Spectroscopic measurements identify the radiating species and provide information on impurity transport; both absolute chordal measurements and tomographic reconstructions of images are used. Either intrinsic carbon or an inert species (e.g., injected Ne) are usually observed, and absolute particle inventories are obtained. Computer codes are both benchmarked with the experimental data and provide important consistency checks. Several techniques are used to measure fundamental plasma transport and fluctuations, including probes and reflectometry. PWI issues are studied with in-situ coupons and insertable samples (DiMES). Representative divertor results from DIII-D with references to results on other tokamaks will be presented.

  9. Design and analysis of the cryopump for the D3-D advanced divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, E.; Almajan, I.; Baxi, C. B.; Schaffer, M. J.; Sevier, D. L.; Smith, J. P.; Menon, M. M.

    1992-09-01

    A cryocondensation pump for the DIII-D advanced divertor program is to be installed in the vacuum vessel in the fall of 1992. The purpose of the cryopump is to remove gas from the divertor, reduce recycling to the plasma, and to provide reduced density plasmas for experimental study. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 50,000 l/s at 0.4 mtorr. The major pump components are toroidally continuous to minimize inductive voltages, thereby greatly reducing the risk of any electrical breakdown during disruptions. The cryopump consists of a 25 mm Inconel tube, 10 m long, cooled by liquid helium. It is surrounded by liquid nitrogen-cooled shields and a segmented ambient temperature radiation/particle shield. The outer nitrogen shield has a toroidally discontinuous copper coating to enhance thermal conductivity while maintaining a high toroidal electrical resistance to minimize electromagnetic loads during disruptions. The pump is cooled by 10 g/s of liquid helium at an inlet pressure of 115 kPa and temperature of 4.35 K. The pump is subjected to a steady-state heat load of less than 10 W due to conduction and radiation heat transfer. The helium tube will be subjected to Joule heating of less than 182J due to induced current and a particle load of less than 20 W during plasma operation. Thermal analysis and tests show that the helium tube can absorb a transient heat load of up to 100 W for 10 s and still pump deuterium at 6.3 K.

  10. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Cryogenic wind tunnels. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Specific problems pertaining to cryogenic wind tunnels, including LN(2) injection, GN(2) exhaust, thermal insulation, and automatic control are discussed. Thermal and other physical properties of materials employed in these tunnels, properties of cryogenic fluids, storage and transfer of liquid nitrogen, strength and toughness of metals and nonmetals at low temperatures, and material procurement and qualify control are considered. Safety concerns with cryogenic tunnels are covered, and models for cryogenic wind tunnels are presented, along with descriptions of major cryogenic wind-tunnel facilities the United States, Europe, and Japan. Problems common to wind tunnels, such as low Reynolds number, wall and support interference, and flow unsteadiness are outlined.

  12. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  13. Evacuation time of cryogenic pipes for superconducting power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sun, Jian; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Hamabe, Makoto; Kawahara, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    2013-11-01

    The vacuum insulation has been used for the thermal insulation of cryogenic pipes for the superconducting power transmission to reduce the heat leak from the environment at the room temperature to the low temperature parts. Since the cryogenic pipes, in particular, those for long distance power transmission, are considered to be thin long pipes, it might take a long time for evacuation. To estimate the evacuation time of the long cryogenic pipes, model calculations have been performed. According to the calculations, it is found that there is an optimum condition between the pumping speed, the diameter of the outer pipe and the length of the cryogenic pipe for efficient evacuation. It is also found that, if the outgassing is suppressed enough, the evacuation can be possible within 1 week even for the long cryogenic pipe with the length of 10 km. The reduction of outgassing is particularly important for the efficient evacuation.

  14. High Specific Surface area Aerogel Cryoadsorber for Vacuum Pumping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    1998-12-22

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  15. High specific surface area aerogel cryoadsorber for vacuum pumping applications

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Randal M.; Fought, Eric R.; Biltoft, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    A cryogenic pumping system is provided, comprising a vacuum environment, an aerogel sorbent formed from a carbon aerogel disposed within the vacuum environment, and cooling means for cooling the aerogel sorbent sufficiently to adsorb molecules from the vacuum environment onto the aerogel sorbent. Embodiments of the invention include a liquid refrigerant cryosorption pump, a compressed helium cryogenic pump, a cryopanel and a Meissner coil, each of which uses carbon aerogel as a sorbent material.

  16. Pumped limiter development on ISX

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.K.; Edmonds, P.H.; Sheffield, J.

    1981-01-01

    Pumped limiter configurations are being suggested for FED and INTOR for helium ash exhaust and fuel particle control. The goal of the pump limiter studies in ISX is the selection of the most promising concept and its evaluation in the ISX-C device under the following conditions: (1) quasi steady state operation (less than or equal to 30s), (2) high edge power densities, and (3) particle control by means of mechanical devices. We are considering various options, including particle scraper and ballistic particle collection concepts as well as the current FED design. In ISX-B we will test a full-size pump limiter and directly compare the heat removal and particle control capabilities with a bundle divertor. In ISX-C the steady state operation characteristics of pump limiters will be explored.

  17. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  18. Flute mode fluctuations in the divertor mirror cell

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Yagi, K.; Nakashima, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2010-03-15

    The computer code by reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations were made which can simulate the flute interchange modes (similar to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability) and the instability associated with the presence of nonuniform plasma flows (similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability). This code is applied to a model divertor and the GAMMA10 [M. Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)] with divertor in order to investigate the flute modes in these divertor cells. The linear growth rate of the flute instability determined by the nonlocal linear analysis agrees with that in the linear phase of the simulations. There is a stable nonlinear steady state in both divertor cells, but the nonlinear steady state is different between the model divertor and the GAMMA10 with divertor.

  19. Physics Design Requirements for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, W.; Bell, M.; Berzak,L.; Brooks, A.; Ellis, R.; Gerhardt, S.; Harjes, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.; Menard, J.; Nygren,R. E.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stotler, D.; Wakeland, P.; Zakharov L. E.

    2008-09-26

    Recent NSTX high power divertor experiments have shown significant and recurring benefits of solid lithium coatings on PFC's to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) to achieve density control for inductionless current drive capability (e.g., about a 15-25% ne decrease from present highest non-inductionless fraction discharges which often evolve toward the density limit, ne/nGW~1), to enable ne scan capability (x2) in the H-mode, to test the ability to operate at significantly lower density for future ST-CTF reactor designs (e.g., ne/nGW = 0.25), and eventually to investigate high heat-flux power handling (10 MW/m2) with longpulse discharges (>1.5s). The first step (LLD-1) physics design encompasses the desired plasma requirements, the experimental capabilities and conditions, power handling, radial location, pumping capability, operating temperature, lithium filling, MHD forces, and diagnostics for control and characterization.

  20. High heat flux Langmuir probe array for the DIII-D divertor platesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Nygren, R. E.

    2008-10-01

    Two modular arrays of Langmuir probes designed to handle a heat flux of up to 25 MW/m2 for 10 s exposures have been installed in the lower divertor target plates of the DIII-D tokamak. The 20 pyrolytic graphite probe tips have more than three times higher thermal conductivity and 16 times larger mass than the original DIII-D isotropic graphite probes. The probe tips have a fixed 12.5° surface angle to distribute the heat flux more uniformly than the previous 6 mm diameter domed collectors and a symmetric "rooftop" design to allow operation with reversed toroidal magnetic field. A large spring-loaded contact area improves heat conduction from each probe tip through a ceramic insulator into a cooled graphite divertor floor tile. The probe tips, brazed to molybdenum foil to ensure good electrical contact, are mounted in a ceramic tray for electrical isolation and reliable cable connections. The new probes are located 1.5 cm radially apart in a staggered arrangement near the entrance to the lower divertor pumping baffle and are linearly spaced 3 cm apart on the shelf above the in-vessel cryopump. Typical target plate profiles of Jsat, Te, and Vf with 4 mm spatial resolution are shown.

  1. Divertor and scoop limiter experiments on PDX

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Boyd, D.; Buchenauer, D.; Budny, R.; Cavallo, A.; Couture, P.; Crowley, T.

    1985-01-01

    Routine operation in the enhanced energy confinement (or H-mode) regime during neutral beam injection was achieved by modifying the PDX divertor hardware to inhibit the influx of neutral gas from the divertor region to the main plasma chamber. A particle scoop limiter has been studied as a mechanical means of controlling particles at the plasma edge, and neutral beam heated discharges with this limiter show similar confinement times (normalized to tau/sub E//I/sub p/) to average H-mode plasmas. Two new instabilities are observed near the plasma edge in PDX during H-mode operation. The first, a quasicoherent fluctuation, occurred in bursts at well-defined frequencies (..delta omega../..omega.. less than or equal to 0.1) in the range 50 to 180 kHz, and had no obvious effects on confinement. The second instability, the edge relaxation phenomena (ERP), did cause deterioration in the global confinement time. The ERP's are characterized by sharp spikes in the divertor plasma density, H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission, and on the x-ray signals they appear as sawtoothlike relaxations at the plasma edge with an inversion radius near the separatrix. Attempts to obtain high ..beta../sub T/ in the H-mode discharges were hampered by a deterioration in the H-mode confinement and major disruptions which limited the achievable ..beta../sub T/. A study of the stability of both the limiter L-mode and divertor H-mode discharges close to the theoretical ..beta.. boundary, showed that the major disruptions observed there are sometimes caused by a fast growing m/n = 1/1 mode with no observable external precursor oscillations.

  2. JET divertor coils, manufacture, assembly and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgetta, N.; Bertolini, E.; D'Urzo, C.; Last, J. R.; Laurenti, A.; Presle, P.; Sannazzaro, G.; Tait, J.; Tesini, A.

    1994-07-01

    Four coils have been built and installed in the JET vacuum vessel to produce divertor plasmas. The coils are copper with glass epoxy insulation and are enclosed in vacuum tight Inconel cases. At the coil contractor's factory, the coil parts were manufactured and process techniques qualified. In the JET vacuum vessel the conductor bars were brazed to form the coils, which were inserted in the casings and impregnated and cured with epoxy resin.

  3. Front-end system for Yb : YAG cryogenic disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevezentsev, E. A.; Mukhin, I. B.; Kuznetsov, I. I.; Vadimova, O. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2015-05-01

    A new front-end system for a cryogenic Yb : YAG laser is designed. The system consists of a femtosecond source, a stretcher and a regenerative amplifier with an output energy of 25 μJ at a pulse repetition rate of 49 kHz, a pulse duration of ~2 ns and a bandwidth of ~1.5 nm. After increasing the pump power of the regenerative amplifier, it is expected to achieve a pulse energy of ~1 mJ at the input to cryogenic amplification stages, which will allow one to obtain laser pulses with a duration of several picoseconds at the output of the cryogenic laser after compression.

  4. Options for Cryogenic Load Cooling with Forced Flow Helium Circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Knudsen, Venkatarao Ganni, Roberto Than

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic pumps designed to circulate super-critical helium are commonly deemed necessary in many super-conducting magnet and other cooling applications. Acknowledging that these pumps are often located at the coldest temperature levels, their use introduces risks associated with the reliability of additional rotating machinery and an additional load on the refrigeration system. However, as it has been successfully demonstrated, this objective can be accomplished without using these pumps by the refrigeration system, resulting in lower system input power and improved reliability to the overall cryogenic system operations. In this paper we examine some trade-offs between using these pumps vs. using the refrigeration system directly with examples of processes that have used these concepts successfully and eliminated using such pumps

  5. Options for cryogenic load cooling with forced flow helium circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Peter; Ganni, Venkatarao; Than, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic pumps designed to circulate super-critical helium are commonly deemed necessary in many super-conducting magnet and other cooling applications. Acknowledging that these pumps are often located at the coldest temperature levels, their use introduces risks associated with the reliability of additional rotating machinery and an additional load on the refrigeration system. However, as it has been successfully demonstrated, this objective can be accomplished without using these pumps by the refrigeration system, resulting in lower system input power and improved reliability to the overall cryogenic system operations. In this paper we examine some trade-offs between using these pumps vs. using the refrigeration system directly with examples of processes that have used these concepts successfully and eliminated using such pumps

  6. Cryogenic system component development for fusion experimental reactor at JAERI

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, T.; Kamiya, S.; Tada, E.; Hiyama, T.; Kawano, K.; Shimamoto, S.

    1986-11-01

    A supercritical helium (SHE) circulation pump, a jet pump, and a cold compressor were designed and manufactured as the first step of cryogenic component development for a large-scale cryogenic system which is required for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER). The SHE circulation pump achieved 320-g/s flow rate with an 0.88-MPa pressure head at 4.6 K, making it the biggest cold pump in the world. The jet pump's mass flow ratio was about 1.0 with an 0.07-MPa pressure head at about 10 K. The cold compressor was successfully operated with an inlet vapor pressure of 0.053 MPa (3.7 K), and outlet pressure of 0.12 MPa, and a mass flow rate of 60 g/s. The designs and test results are described in this paper.

  7. Constrained ripple optimization of Tokamak bundle divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Rome, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Lyon, J.F.; Fowler, R.H.; Peng, Y-K.M.; Dory, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetic field ripple from a tokamak bundle divertor is localized to a small toroidal sector and must be treated differently from the usual (distributed) toroidal field (TF) coil ripple. Generally, in a tokamak with an unoptimized divertor design, all of the banana-trapped fast ions are quickly lost due to banana drift diffusion or to trapping between the 1/R variation in absolute value vector B ..xi.. B and local field maxima due to the divertor. A computer code has been written to optimize automatically on-axis ripple subject to these constraints, while varying up to nine design parameters. Optimum configurations have low on-axis ripple (<0.2%) so that, now, most banana-trapped fast ions are confined. Only those ions with banana tips near the outside region (absolute value theta < or equal to 45/sup 0/) are lost. However, because finite-sized TF coils have not been used in this study, the flux bundle is not expanded.

  8. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF FIRE DIVERTOR

    SciTech Connect

    C.B. bAXI; M.A. ULRICKSON; D.E. DRIMEYER; P. HEITZENROEDER

    2000-10-01

    The Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) is being designed as a next step in the US magnetic fusion program. The FIRE tokamak has a major radius of 2 m, a minor radius of 0.525 m, and liquid nitrogen cooled copper coils. The aim is to produce a pulse length of 20 s with a plasma current of 6.6 MA and with alpha dominated heating. The outer divertor and baffle of FIRE are water cooled. The worst thermal condition for the outer divertor and baffle is the baseline D-T operating mode (10 T, 6.6 MA, 20 s) with a plasma exhaust power of 67 MW and a peak heat flux of 20 MW/m{sup 2}. A swirl tape (ST) heat transfer enhancement method is used in the outer divertor cooling channels to increase the heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux (CHF). The plasma-facing surface consists of tungsten brush. The finite element (FE) analysis shows that for an inlet water temperature of 30 C, inlet pressure of 1.5 MPa and a flow velocity of 10 m/s, the incident critical heat flux is greater than 30 MW/m{sup 2}. The peak copper temperature is 490 C, peak tungsten temperature is 1560 C, and the pressure drop is less than 0.5 MPa. All these results fulfill the design requirements.

  9. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  10. Device applications of cryogenic optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgaard, Seth D.; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard I.; Alden, Jay V.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2014-02-01

    With the coldest solid-state temperatures (ΔT <185K from 300K) achievable by optical refrigeration, it is now timely to apply this technology to cryogenic devices. Along with thermal management and pump absorption, this work addresses the most key engineering challenge of transferring cooling power to the payload while efficiently rejecting optical waste-heat fluorescence. We discuss our optimized design of such a thermal link, which shows excellent performance in optical rejection and thermal properties.

  11. A cryogenic test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenendaal, Ian

    The next generation, space-borne instruments for far infrared spectroscopy will utilize large diameter, cryogenically cooled telescopes in order to achieve unprecedented sensitivities. Low background, ground-based cryogenic facilities are required for the cryogenic testing of materials, components and subsystems. The Test Facility Cryostat (TFC) at the University of Lethbridge is a large volume, closed cycle, 4K cryogenic facility, developed for this purpose. This thesis discusses the design and performance of the facility and associated external instrumentation. An apparatus for measuring the thermal properties of materials is presented, and measurements of the thermal expansion and conductivity of carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) at cryogenic temperatures are reported. Finally, I discuss the progress towards the design and fabrication of a demonstrator cryogenic, far infrared Fourier transform spectrometer.

  12. Divertor bypass in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, C. S.; LaBombard, B.; Danforth, R.; Pina, W.; Silveira, M.; Parkin, B.

    2001-01-01

    The Alcator C-Mod divertor bypass has for the first time allowed in situ variations to the mechanical baffle design in a tokamak. The design utilizes small coils which interact with the ambient magnetic field inside the vessel to provide the torque required to control small flaps of a Venetian blind geometry. Plasma physics experiments with the bypass have revealed the importance of the divertor baffling to maintain high divertor gas pressures. These experiments have also indicated that the divertor baffling has only a limited effect on the main chamber pressure in C-Mod.

  13. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  14. Divertor heat flux mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Maingi, R.; Gates, D.A.; Menard, J.E.; Bush, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono , Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m(-2) to 0.5-2 MW m(-2) in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of the outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  15. Fundamentals of Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley; Tomsik, Thomas; Moder, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the extreme conditions that are encountered in cryogenic systems requires the most effort out of analysts and engineers. Due to the costs and complexity associated with the extremely cold temperatures involved, testing is sometimes minimized and extra analysis is often relied upon. This short course is designed as an introduction to cryogenic engineering and analysis, and it is intended to introduce the basic concepts related to cryogenic analysis and testing as well as help the analyst understand the impacts of various requests on a test facility. Discussion will revolve around operational functions often found in cryogenic systems, hardware for both tests and facilities, and what design or modelling tools are available for performing the analysis. Emphasis will be placed on what scenarios to use what hardware or the analysis tools to get the desired results. The class will provide a review of first principles, engineering practices, and those relations directly applicable to this subject including such topics as cryogenic fluids, thermodynamics and heat transfer, material properties at low temperature, insulation, cryogenic equipment, instrumentation, refrigeration, testing of cryogenic systems, cryogenics safety and typical thermal and fluid analysis used by the engineer. The class will provide references for further learning on various topics in cryogenics for those who want to dive deeper into the subject or have encountered specific problems.

  16. A cryogenic slab CO laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kozlov, A Yu; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2009-03-31

    A compact capacitive transverse RF-discharge-pumped slab CO laser with cryogenically cooled electrodes, which operates both in the cw and repetitively pulsed regimes, is fabricated. The laser operation is studied in the free running multifrequency regime at the vibrational - rotational transitions of the fundamental (V + 1 {yields} V) vibrational bands of the CO molecule in the spectral region from 5.1 to 5.4 {mu}m. Optimal operation conditions (gas mixture composition and pressure, RF pump parameters) are determined. It is shown that only gas mixtures with a high content of oxygen (up to 20% with respect to the concentration of CO molecules) can be used as an active medium of this laser. It is demonstrated that repetitively pulsed pumping is more efficient compared to cw pumping. In this case, quasi-cw lasing regime can be obtained. The maximum average output power of {approx}12 W was obtained for this laser operating on fundamental bands and its efficiency achieved {approx}14 %. The frequency-selective operation regime of the slab RF-discharge-pumped CO laser was realised at {approx} 100 laser lines in the spectral region from 5.0 to 6.5 {mu}m with the average output power of up to several tens of milliwatts in each line. Lasing at the transitions of the first vibrational overtone (V + 2 {yields} V) of the CO molecule is obtained in the spectral region from 2.5 to 3.9 {mu}m. The average output power of the overtone laser achieved 0.3 W. All the results were obtained without the forced gas mixture exchange in the discharge chamber. Under fixed experimental conditions, repetitively pulsed lasing (with fluctuations of the output characteristics no more than {+-}10 %) was stable for more than an hour. (lasers)

  17. Sealing Mechanical Cryogenic Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1985-01-01

    Metal bellows used to seal Vuilleumier and Stirling-cycle cryogenic coolers, replacing sliding seals that failed after only 3,000 hours of service. Metal bellows, incorporated in displacer design provide nonrubbing dynamic seal. Lifetime of cryogenic cooler no longer limited by loss of sealing material and by deterioration of regenerators due to clogging by seal debris.

  18. Cryogenic storage devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pelloux-gervais, P.

    1982-02-09

    The present invention relates to a device for the cryogenic storing of products. In a tank, canisters are suspended via rods, and these rods rest on the rim of the tank via retaining heads. The invention is applicable to the cryogenic storage of seeds, semen, vegetable substances, etc.

  19. Cryogenic Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, Robert A.; Marquardt, Eric D.; Fusilier, Fred C.; Fesmire, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The Cryogenic Information Center (CIC) is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to preserving and distributing cryogenic information to government, industry, and academia. The heart of the CIC is a uniform source of cryogenic data including analyses, design, materials and processes, and test information traceable back to the Cryogenic Data Center of the former National Bureau of Standards. The electronic database is a national treasure containing over 146,000 specific bibliographic citations of cryogenic literature and thermophysical property data dating back to 1829. A new technical/bibliographic inquiry service can perform searches and technical analyses. The Cryogenic Material Properties (CMP) Program consists of computer codes using empirical equations to determine thermophysical material properties with emphasis on the 4-300K range. CMP's objective is to develop a user-friendly standard material property database using the best available data so government and industry can conduct more accurate analyses. The CIC serves to benefit researchers, engineers, and technologists in cryogenics and cryogenic engineering, whether they are new or experienced in the field.

  20. MOSFET's for Cryogenic Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehaye, R.; Ventrice, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Study seeks ways to build transistors that function effectively at liquid-helium temperatures. Report discusses physics of metaloxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) and performances of these devices at cryogenic temperatures. MOSFET's useful in highly sensitive cryogenic preamplifiers for infrared astronomy.

  1. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  2. Challenges for Cryogenics at Iter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, L.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear fusion of light nuclei is a promising option to provide clean, safe and cost competitive energy in the future. The ITER experimental reactor being designed by seven partners representing more than half of the world population will be assembled at Cadarache, South of France in the next decade. It is a thermonuclear fusion Tokamak that requires high magnetic fields to confine and stabilize the plasma. Cryogenic technology is extensively employed to achieve low-temperature conditions for the magnet and vacuum pumping systems. Efficient and reliable continuous operation shall be achieved despite unprecedented dynamic heat loads due to magnetic field variations and neutron production from the fusion reaction. Constraints and requirements of the largest superconducting Tokamak machine have been analyzed. Safety and technical risks have been initially assessed and proposals to mitigate the consequences analyzed. Industrial standards and components are being investigated to anticipate the requirements of reliable and efficient large scale energy production. After describing the basic features of ITER and its cryogenic system, we shall present the key design requirements, improvements, optimizations and challenges.

  3. Divertor for use in fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Uffe R.

    1979-01-01

    A poloidal divertor for a toroidal plasma column ring having a set of poloidal coils co-axial with the plasma ring for providing a space for a thick shielding blanket close to the plasma along the entire length of the plasma ring cross section and all the way around the axis of rotation of the plasma ring. The poloidal coils of this invention also provide a stagnation point on the inside of the toroidal plasma column ring, gently curving field lines for vertical stability, an initial plasma current, and the shaping of the field lines of a separatrix up and around the shielding blanket.

  4. Comparison of ELM heat loads in snowflake and standard divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T D; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D; Umansky, M V

    2012-05-08

    An analysis is given of the impact of the tokamak divertor magnetic structure on the temporal and spatial divertor heat flux from edge localized modes (ELMs). Two configurations are studied: the standard divertor where the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) varies linearly with distance (r) from the magnetic null and the snowflake where B{sub p} varies quadratrically with r. Both one and two-dimensional models are used to analyze the effect of the longer magnetic field length between the midplane and the divertor plate for the snowflake that causes a temporal dilation of the ELM divertor heat flux. A second effect discussed is the appearance of a broad region near the null point where the poloidal plasma beta can substantially exceed unity, especially for the snowflake configuration during the ELM; such a condition is likely to drive additional radial ELM transport.

  5. Super-X divertors and high power density fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Valanju, P. M.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S. M.; Canik, J.

    2009-05-15

    The Super-X Divertor (SXD), a robust axisymmetric redesign of the divertor magnetic geometry that can allow a fivefold increase in the core power density of toroidal fusion devices, is presented. With small changes in poloidal coils and currents for standard divertors, the SXD allows the largest divertor plate radius inside toroidal field coils. This increases the plasma-wetted area by 2-3 times over all flux-expansion-only methods (e.g., plate near main X point, plate tilting, X divertor, and snowflake), decreases parallel heat flux and hence plasma temperature at plate, and increases connection length by 2-5 times. Examples of high-power-density fusion devices enabled by SXD are discussed; the most promising near-term device is a 100 MW modular compact fusion neutron source 'battery' small enough to fit inside a conventional fission blanket.

  6. RELAP5 MODEL OF THE DIVERTOR PRIMARY HEAT TRANSFER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Emilian L; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the RELAP5 model that has been developed for the divertor primary heat transfer system (PHTS). The model is intended to be used to examine the transient performance of the divertor PHTS and evaluate control schemes necessary to maintain parameters within acceptable limits during transients. Some preliminary results are presented to show the maturity of the model and examine general divertor PHTS transient behavior. The model can be used as a starting point for developing transient modeling capability, including control system modeling, safety evaluations, etc., and is not intended to represent the final divertor PHTS design. Preliminary calculations using the models indicate that during normal pulsed operation, present pressurizer controls may not be sufficient to keep system pressures within their desired range. Additional divertor PHTS and control system design efforts may be required to ensure system pressure fluctuation during normal operation remains within specified limits.

  7. OEDGE Modeling of Divertor Fueling at DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, B. D.; Leonard, A. W.; Elder, J. D.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2015-11-01

    Onion-skin-modeling (OSM) is used to assess the affect of divertor closure on pedestal fueling sources. The OSM includes information from a wide range of diagnostic measurements at DIII-D to constrain the model background plasma for better simulation of neutrals and impurity ions and spectroscopy to compare to the results of the simulation. DIII-D has open lower divertor and closed upper divertor configurations which can be run with similar discharges. Progress toward modeling the pedestal fueling in low density plasmas for these cases will be presented as well as initial comparisons of recent lower single null discharges with the outer leg on the divertor shelf (fully open) and divertor floor (partially open). Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Advances in cryogenic engineering. Vols. 35A & 35B - Proceedings of the 1989 Cryogenic Engineering Conference, University of California, Los Angeles, July 24-28, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, R. W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The book presents a review of literature on superfluid helium, together with papers under the topics on heat and mass transfer in He II; applications of He II for cooling superconducting devices in space; heat transfer to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen; multilayer insulation; applications of superconductivity, including topics on magnets and other devices, magnet stability and coil protection, and cryogenic techniques; and refrigeration for electronics. Other topics discussed include refrigeration of superconducting systems; the expanders, cold compressors, and pumps for liquid helium; dilution refrigerators; magnetic refrigerators; pulse tube refrigerators; cryocoolers for space applications; properties of cryogenic fluids; cryogenic instrumentation; hyperconducting devices (cryogenic magnets); cryogenic applications in space science and technology and in transportation; and miscellaneous cryogenic techniques and applications.

  9. Cryogenic Pound Circuits for Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi

    2006-01-01

    Two modern cryogenic variants of the Pound circuit have been devised to increase the frequency stability of microwave oscillators that include cryogenic sapphire-filled cavity resonators. The original Pound circuit is a microwave frequency discriminator that provides feedback to stabilize a voltage-controlled microwave oscillator with respect to an associated cavity resonator. In the present cryogenic Pound circuits, the active microwave devices are implemented by use of state-of-the-art commercially available tunnel diodes that exhibit low flicker noise (required for high frequency stability) and function well at low temperatures and at frequencies up to several tens of gigahertz. While tunnel diodes are inherently operable as amplitude detectors and amplitude modulators, they cannot, by themselves, induce significant phase modulation. Therefore, each of the present cryogenic Pound circuits includes passive circuitry that transforms the AM into the required PM. Each circuit also contains an AM detector that is used to sample the microwave signal at the input terminal of the high-Q resonator for the purpose of verifying the desired AM null at this point. Finally, each circuit contains a Pound signal detector that puts out a signal, at the modulation frequency, having an amplitude proportional to the frequency error in the input signal. High frequency stability is obtained by processing this output signal into feedback to a voltage-controlled oscillator to continuously correct the frequency error in the input signal.

  10. Cryogenic activities at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, C. I.

    1989-05-01

    Although the main present cryogenic activity in ESTEC revolves around the preparation of ISO for launch in 1993, many other activities such as Meteosat second generation, FIRST, GRASP, QUASAT, and X-ray detection using bolometers all require some form of cooling to 80 K or less. ESTEC, in an effort to overcome the major constraint of lifetime when using the solution of cryogens is currently involved in the study and development of two mechanical coolers for work in the temperature ranges of 80 and 4 K are based on a Stirling cycle. This paper gives an overview of ESTEC cryogenic interests with an emphasis on the above mechanical coolers.

  11. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Casagranda, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  12. A super-cusp divertor configuration for tokamaks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryutov, D. D.

    2015-08-26

    Our study demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of advanced divertor configurations created with the remote poloidal field coils. The emphasis here is on the configurations with three poloidal field nulls in the divertor area. We are seeking the structures where all three nulls lie on the same separatrix, thereby creating two zones of a very strong flux expansion, as envisaged in the concept of Takase’s cusp divertor. It turns out that the set of remote coils can produce a cusp divertor, with additional advantages of: (i) a large stand-off distance between the divertor and the coils and (ii) a thorough controlmore » that these coils exert over the fine features of the configuration. In reference to these additional favourable properties acquired by the cusp divertor, the resulting configuration could be called ‘a super-cusp’. General geometrical features of the three-null configurations produced by remote coils are described. Furthermore, issues on the way to practical applications include the need for a more sophisticated control system and possible constraints related to excessively high currents in the divertor coils.« less

  13. A super-cusp divertor configuration for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.

    2015-08-26

    Our study demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of advanced divertor configurations created with the remote poloidal field coils. The emphasis here is on the configurations with three poloidal field nulls in the divertor area. We are seeking the structures where all three nulls lie on the same separatrix, thereby creating two zones of a very strong flux expansion, as envisaged in the concept of Takase’s cusp divertor. It turns out that the set of remote coils can produce a cusp divertor, with additional advantages of: (i) a large stand-off distance between the divertor and the coils and (ii) a thorough control that these coils exert over the fine features of the configuration. In reference to these additional favourable properties acquired by the cusp divertor, the resulting configuration could be called ‘a super-cusp’. General geometrical features of the three-null configurations produced by remote coils are described. Furthermore, issues on the way to practical applications include the need for a more sophisticated control system and possible constraints related to excessively high currents in the divertor coils.

  14. SOLPS Modeling of Slot Divertor Configuration on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, C. F.; Stangeby, P. C.; Guo, H. Y.; Lao, L. L.

    2015-11-01

    A major thrust of the DIII-D boundary/PMI initiative is to develop an advanced divertor configuration for next-step devices, such as FNSF and DEMO. We are adopting an integrated approach by optimizing both divertor structure and magnetic shape. Initial SOLPS modeling was carried out to optimize divertor structure shape to enhance divertor power dissipation, focusing on slot configurations. In particular, four different slot divertor structures, i.e., orthogonal-target slot, slanted-target slot, very narrow slot and v-shaped slot have been analyzed and comparisons made with an open divertor structure. It is found that the slot helps to trap recycling neutrals and impurities thus increasing radiative power dissipation in the divertor, reducing the electron temperature Te and the perpendicular heat flux q⊥ at the target plate. As expected, a narrower slot leads to lower Te and q⊥ than a less narrow one. The v-shaped slot appears to be especially effective at redirecting and concentrating recycling neutrals and impurities near the separatrix, thus promoting detachment at a lower upstream density than the other configurations. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. Current and Potential Distribution in a Divertor with Torioidally-Asymmetric Biasing of the Divertor Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D; Counsell, G F; Helander, P

    2006-06-06

    Toroidally-asymmetric biasing of the divertor plate may increase convective cross-field transport in SOL and thereby reduce the divertor heat load. Experiments performed with the MAST spherical tokamak generally agree with a simple theory of non-axisymmetric biasing. However, some of the experimental results have not yet received a theoretical explanation. In particular, existing theory seems to overestimate the asymmetry between the positive and the negative biasing. Also lacking a theoretical explanation is experimentally observed increase of the average floating potential in the main SOL in the presence of biasing. In this paper we attempt to solve these problems by accounting for the closing of the currents (driven by the biasing) in a strong-shear region near the X-point. We come up with the picture which, at least qualitatively, agrees with these experimental results.

  16. Liquid cryogenic lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1970-01-01

    Fluorinated polyethers are suitable lubricants for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic systems. Lubrication effectiveness is comparable to that of super-refined mineral oil lubricants operating at room temperature.

  17. CRYOGENICS IN BEPCII UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.; WANG,L.; LI,S.

    2002-07-22

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS A CRYOGENIC DESIGN FOR UPGRADING THE BEIJING ELECTRON POSITRON COLLIDER AT THE INSTITUTE OF HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS IN BEIJING. THE UPGRADE INVOLVES 3 NEW SUPERCONDUCTING FACILITIES, THE INTERACTION REGION QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS, THE DETECTOR SOLENOID MAGNETS AND THE SRF CAVITIES. FOR COOLING OF THESE DEVICES, A NEW CRYPLANT WITH A TOTAL CAPACITY OF 1.0KW AT 4.5K IS TO BE BUILT AT IHEP. AN INTEGRATED CRYOGENIC DESIGN TO FIT THE BEPCII CRYOGENIC LOADS WITH HIGH EFFICIENCY IS CARRIEDOUT USING COMPUTATIONAL PROCESS ANALYSIS SOFTWARE WITH THE EMPHASES ON ECONOMICS AND SAFETY IN BOTH CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE PLANT. THIS PAPER DESCRIBES THE CRYOGENIC CHARACTERISTICS OF EACH SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICE, THEIR COOLING SCHEMES AND THE OVERALL CRYOPLANT.

  18. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  19. Modeling impurities and tilted plates in the ITER divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Rensink, M.E.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1996-07-29

    The UEDGE 2-D edge transport code is used to model the effect of impurities and tilted divertor plates for the ITER SOL/divertor region. The impurities are modeled as individual charge states using either the FMOMBAL 21-moment description or parallel force balance. Both helium and neon impurities are used together with a majority hydrogenic species. A fluid description of the neutrals is used that includes parallel inertia and neutral-neutral collisions. Effects of geometry are analyzed by using the nonorthogonal mesh capability of UEDGE to obtain solutions with the divertor plate tilted at various angles.

  20. Optics design of the divertor infrared television of KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Oh, S; Lee, K; Lee, H H; Wi, H M; Kim, Y S; Kang, C S

    2014-11-01

    The divertor Infrared television (IR TV) system for monitoring the temperature of a divertor and localized hot spots will be installed on the upper port of the N-port in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The cassette of KSTAR makes a periscope inevitable for the divertor IR TV. In this article, 4 design concepts for the periscope were examined, and the design based on Keplerian was shown to have better stabilities in alignment and the vibration. The final optics design based on an f-theta lens, Keplerian, and telecentric lens was derived. PMID:25430316

  1. Cryogenic Feedthrough Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skaff, Antony

    2009-01-01

    The cryogenic feedthrough test rig (CFTR) allows testing of instrumentation feedthroughs at liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen temperature and pressure extremes (dangerous process fluid) without actually exposing the feedthrough to a combustible or explosive process fluid. In addition, the helium used (inert gas), with cryogenic heat exchangers, exposes the feedthrough to that environment that allows definitive leak rates of feedthrough by typical industry-standard helium mass spectrometers.

  2. Cryogenic helium 2 systems for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E.; Katz, L.; Hendricks, J.; Karr, G.

    1978-01-01

    Two cryogenic systems are described which will provide cooling for experiments to be flown on Spacelab 2 in the early 1980's. The first system cools a scanning infrared telescope by the transfer of cold helium gas from a separate superfluid helium storage dewar. The flexible design permits the helium storage dewar and transfer assembly to be designed independent of the infrared experiment. Where possible, modified commerical apparatus is used. The second cryogenic system utilizes a specially designed superfluid dewar in which a superfluid helium experiment chamber is immersed. Each dewar system employs a porous plug as a phase separator to hold the liquid helium within the dewar and provide cold gas to a vent line. To maintain the low vapor pressure of the superfluid, each system requires nearly continuous prelaunch vacuum pump service, and each will vent to space during the Spacelab 2 flight.

  3. Design concepts for the ASTROMAG cryogenic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.; Castles, S.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a proposed cryogenic system used to cool the superconducting magnet for the Space Station based ASTROMAG Particle Astrophysics Facility. This 2-meter diameter superconducting magnet will be cooled using stored helium II. The paper presents a liquid helium storage concept which would permit cryogenic lifetimes of up to 3 years between refills. It is proposed that the superconducting coil be cooled using superfluid helium pumped by the thermomechanical effect. It is also proposed that the storage tank be resupplied with helium in orbit. A method for charging and discharging the magnet with minimum helium loss using split gas-cooled leads is discussed. A proposal to use a Stirling cycle cryocooler to extend the storage life of the cryostat will also be presented.

  4. A review of ELMs in divertor tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.N.

    1996-05-23

    This paper reviews what is known about edge localized modes (ELMs), with an emphasis on their effect on the scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas. ELM effects have been measured in the ASDEX-U, C-Mod, COMPASS-D, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M,JT-60U, and TCV tokamaks and are reported here. At least three types of ELMs have been identified and their salient features determined. Type-1 giant ELMs can cause the sudden loss of up to 10-15% of the plasma stored energy but their amplitude ({Delta}W/W) does not increase with increasing power. Type- 3 ELMs are observed near the H-mode power threshold and produce small energy dumps (1-3% of the stored energy). All ELMs increase the scrape- off layer plasma and produce particle fluxes on the divertor targets which are as much as ten times larger that the quiescent phase between ELMs. The divertor heat pulse is largest on the inner target, unlike that of L-Mode or quiescent H-mode; some tokamaks report radial structure in the heat flux profile which is suggestive of islands or helical structures. The power scaling of Type-1 ELM amplitude and frequency have been measured in several tokamaks and has recently been applied to predictions of the ELM Size in ITER. Concern over the expected ELM amplitude has led to a number of experiments aimed at demonstrating active control of ELMs. Impurity gas injection with feedback control on the radiation loss in ASDEX-U suggests that a promising mode of operation (the CDH-mode) with a very small type-3 ELMs can be maintained with heating power sell above the H-mode threshold, where giant type-1 ELMs can be maintained with heating power well above the H-mode threshold, where Giant type-1 ELMs are normally observed. While ELMs have many potential negative effects, the beneficial effect of ELMs in providing density control and limiting the core plasma impurity content in high confinement H- mode discharges should not be overlooked.

  5. Potential collector surface materials for divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prebble, H. E.; Forty, C. B. A.; Butterworth, G. J.

    1992-09-01

    Twelve refractory materials have been investigated to assess their suitability for use as collector target materials for divertors. The steady state limiting heat flux to avoid melting of the collector material has been calculated as a function of thickness using a simple one-dimensional thermal-hydraulics model. Similarly, the limiting heat flux to avoid melting following a plasma disruption has been calculated as a function of collector surface temperature just prior to the disruption event. Finally, the resistance of each collector material to thermal shock was estimated. The calculations indicate diamond, graphite and tungsten as favourable materials, BN, AlN, TiN, V 2C and beryllium as unsuitable and BeO, SiC, TiC and TIB 2 as exhibiting combinations of favourable and unfavourable properties.

  6. Space Cryogenics Workshop, 10th, Cleveland, OH, June 18-20, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The present workshop on cryogenics discusses the anomalous on-orbit behavior of the Cosmic Background Explorer Dewar, the SHOOT orbital operations, cooling options for Astromag, and space IR telescope facility mission and cryogenic design. Attention is given to the design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, the evaluation of metal hydride compressors for applications in Joule-Thomson cryocoolers, diaphragm Stirling cryocooler developments, and a computer simulation model for Stirling refrigerators. Topics addressed include low-gravity thermal stratification of liquid helium on SHOOT, a screening program to select a resin for gravity probe-B composites, a simplified generic cryostat thermal model for predicting cryogen mass and lifetime, and the effect of gas mass flux on cryogenic liquid jet breakup. Also discussed are damping criteria for thermal acoustic oscillations in slush and liquid hydrogen systems, an STS-based cryogenic fluid management experiment, and the design and testing of a cryogenic mixer pump.

  7. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  8. Spacecraft cryogenic gas storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenic gas storage systems were developed for the liquid storage of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium. Cryogenic storage is attractive because of the high liquid density and low storage pressure of cryogens. This situation results in smaller container sizes, reduced container-strength levels, and lower tankage weights. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used cryogenic gas storage systems as standard spacecraft equipment. In addition to the Gemini and Apollo cryogenic gas storage systems, other systems were developed and tested in the course of advancing the state of the art. All of the cryogenic storage systems used, developed, and tested to date for manned-spacecraft applications are described.

  9. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Payne, J.; Wurden, G. A.

    2010-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6° toroidal sector has been given a 2° toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings.

  10. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Terry, J L; LaBombard, B; Brunner, D; Payne, J; Wurden, G A

    2010-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6° toroidal sector has been given a 2° toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings. PMID:21034041

  11. Divertor IR thermography on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Payne, J.; Wurden, G. A.

    2010-10-15

    Alcator C-Mod is a particularly challenging environment for thermography. It presents issues that will similarly face ITER, including low-emissivity metal targets, low-Z surface films, and closed divertor geometry. In order to make measurements of the incident divertor heat flux using IR thermography, the C-Mod divertor has been modified and instrumented. A 6 deg. toroidal sector has been given a 2 deg. toroidal ramp in order to eliminate magnetic field-line shadowing by imperfectly aligned divertor tiles. This sector is viewed from above by a toroidally displaced IR camera and is instrumented with thermocouples and calorimeters. The camera provides time histories of surface temperatures that are used to compute incident heat-flux profiles. The camera sensitivity is calibrated in situ using the embedded thermocouples, thus correcting for changes and nonuniformities in surface emissivity due to surface coatings.

  12. Local Effects of Biased Electrodes in the Divertor of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.; Campanell, M. D.; Lyons, B. C.; Maqueda, R. J.; Raitses, Y.; Roquemore, A. L.; Scotti, F.

    2012-05-07

    The goal of this paper is to characterize the effects of small non-axisymmetric divertor plate electrodes on the local scrape-off layer plasma. Four small rectangular electrodes were installed into the outer divertor plates of NSTX. When the electrodes were located near the outer divertor strike point and biased positively, there was an increase in the nearby probe currents and probe potentials and an increase in the LiI light emission at the large major radius end of these electrodes. When an electrode located farther outward from the outer divertor strike point was biased positively, there was sometimes a significant decrease in the LiI light emission at the small major radius end of this electrode, but there were no clear effects on the nearby probes. No non-local effects were observed with the biasing of these electrodes.

  13. Compatibility of detached divertor operation with robust edge pedestal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, A. W.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A. G.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.

    2015-08-01

    The compatibility of detached radiative divertor operation with a robust H-mode pedestal is examined in DIII-D. A density scan produced low temperature plasmas at the divertor target, Te ⩽ 2 eV, with high radiation leading to a factor of ⩾4 drop in peak divertor heat flux. The cold radiative plasma was confined to the divertor and did not extend across the separatrix in X-point region. A robust H-mode pedestal was maintained with a small degradation in pedestal pressure at the highest densities. The response of the pedestal pressure to increasing density is reproduced by the EPED pedestal model. However, agreement of the EPED model with experiment at high density requires an assumption of reduced diamagnetic stabilization of edge Peeling-Ballooning modes.

  14. Cryogenic Infrastructure for Fermilab's Ilc Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  15. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-16

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  16. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  17. Development of a radiative divertor for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Brooks, N.H.; Campbell, R.B.

    1994-07-01

    We have used experiments and modeling to develop a new radiative divertor configuration for DIII-D. Gas puffing experiments with the existing open divertor have shown the creation of a localized ({approximately}10 cm diameter) radiation zone which results in substantial reduction (3--10) in the divertor heat flux while {delta}{sub E} remains {approximately}2 times ITER-89P scaling. However, ne increases with D{sub 2} puffing, and Z{sub eff} increases with neon puffing. Divertor structures are required to minimize the effects on the core plasma. The UEDGE fluid code, benchmarked with DIII-D data, and the DEGAS neutrals transport code are used to estimate the effectiveness of divertor configurations; slots reduce the core ionization more than baffles. The overall divertor shape is set by confinement studies which indicate that high triangularity ({delta} {approximately}0.8) is important for high {tau}{sub E} VH-modes. Results from engineering feasibility studies, including diagnostic access, will be presented.

  18. Turbulent Simulations of Divertor Detachment Based On BOUT + + Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Xu, Xueqiao; Xia, Tianyang; Ye, Minyou

    2015-11-01

    China Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor is under conceptual design, acting as a bridge between ITER and DEMO. The detached divertor operation offers great promise for a reduction of heat flux onto divertor target plates for acceptable erosion. Therefore, a density scan is performed via an increase of D2 gas puffing rates in the range of 0 . 0 ~ 5 . 0 ×1023s-1 by using the B2-Eirene/SOLPS 5.0 code package to study the heat flux control and impurity screening property. As the density increases, it shows a gradually change of the divertor operation status, from low-recycling regime to high-recycling regime and finally to detachment. Significant radiation loss inside the confined plasma in the divertor region during detachment leads to strong parallel density and temperature gradients. Based on the SOLPS simulations, BOUT + + simulations will be presented to investigate the stability and turbulent transport under divertor plasma detachment, particularly the strong parallel gradient driven instabilities and enhanced plasma turbulence to spread heat flux over larger surface areas. The correlation between outer mid-plane and divertor turbulence and the related transport will be analyzed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675075.

  19. TPC magnet cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.W.

    1980-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) magnet at LBL and its compensation solenoids are adiabatically stable superconducting solenoid magnets. The cryogenic system developed for the TPC magnet is discussed. This system uses forced two-phase tubular cooling with the two cryogens in the system. The liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are delivered through the cooled load by forced tubular flow. The only reservoirs of liquid cryogen exist in the control dewar (for liquid helium) and the conditioner dewar (for liquid nitrogen). The operation o these systems during virtually all phases of system operation are described. Photographs and diagrams of various system components are shown, and cryogenic system data are presented in the following sections: (1) heat leaks into the TPC coil package and the compensation solenoids; (2) heat leaks to various components of the TPC magnet cryogenics system besides the magnets and control dewar; (3) the control dewar and its relationship to the rest of the system; (4) the conditioner system and its role in cooling down the TPC magnet; (5) gas-cooled electrical leads and charging losses; and (6) a summation of the liquid helium and liquid nitrogen requirements for the TPC superconducting magnet system.

  20. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1990-06-29

    A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N{sub 2} is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

  1. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-06-23

    A method is disclosed for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N[sub 2] is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation. 7 figs.

  2. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1992-01-01

    A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N.sub.2 is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

  3. Cryogenic process simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, J.; Johnson, S.

    1994-01-01

    Combining accurate fluid property databases with a commercial equation-solving software package running on a desktop computer allows simulation of cryogenic processes without extensive computer programming. Computer simulation can be a powerful tool for process development or optimization. Most engineering simulations to date have required extensive programming skills in languages such as Fortran, Pascal, etc. Authors of simulation code have also usually been responsible for choosing and writing the particular solution algorithm. This paper describes a method of simulating cryogenic processes with a commercial software package on a desktop personal computer that does not require these traditional programming tasks. Applications include modeling of cryogenic refrigerators, heat exchangers, vapor-cooled power leads, vapor pressure thermometers, and various other engineering problems.

  4. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  5. Ball Aerospace Actuator Cryogenic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Lana; Lightsey, Paul; Quigley, Phil; Rutkowski, Joel; Russell, J. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ambient testing characterizing step size and repeatability for the Ball Aerospace Cryogenic Nano-Positioner actuators for the AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program has been completed and are presented. Current cryogenic testing is underway. Earlier cryogenic test results for a pre-cursor engineering model are presented.

  6. Cryogenic Model Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, W. M.; Kuhn, N. S.; Berry, R. F.; Newman, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    An overview and status of current activities seeking alternatives to 200 grade 18Ni Steel CVM alloy for cryogenic wind tunnel models is presented. Specific improvements in material selection have been researched including availability, strength, fracture toughness and potential for use in transonic wind tunnel testing. Potential benefits from utilizing damage tolerant life-prediction methods, recently developed fatigue crack growth codes and upgraded NDE methods are also investigated. Two candidate alloys are identified and accepted for cryogenic/transonic wind tunnel models and hardware.

  7. Unique Cryogenic Welded Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, K. A.; Monko, G. G.

    2004-06-01

    For the last few decades, the E. O. Paton Electric Welding Institute has been active in the field of cryogenic materials science. Integrated research on development of new grades of steels and alloys for cryogenic engineering was carried out in collaboration with the leading institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Commercially applied welding technologies and consumables were developed. They include large, spherical tanks for storage of liquefied gases (from oxygen to helium) under high pressures; space simulators with a capacity of 10 000 m3 and more; and load-carrying elements of superconducting fusion magnetic systems for the TOKAMAK, MGD, and ITER series.

  8. Unique Cryogenic Welded Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yushchenko, K.A.; Monko, G.G.

    2004-06-28

    For the last few decades, the E. O. Paton Electric Welding Institute has been active in the field of cryogenic materials science. Integrated research on development of new grades of steels and alloys for cryogenic engineering was carried out in collaboration with the leading institutions of Russia, Ukraine, and Georgia. Commercially applied welding technologies and consumables were developed. They include large, spherical tanks for storage of liquefied gases (from oxygen to helium) under high pressures; space simulators with a capacity of 10 000 m3 and more; and load-carrying elements of superconducting fusion magnetic systems for the TOKAMAK, MGD, and ITER series.

  9. Cryogenic Propellant Densification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewart, R. O.; Dergance, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ground and vehicle system requirements are evaluated for the use of densified cryogenic propellants in advanced space transportation systems. Propellants studied were slush and triple point liquid hydrogen, triple point liquid oxygen, and slush and triple point liquid methane. Areas of study included propellant production, storage, transfer, vehicle loading and system requirements definition. A savings of approximately 8.2 x 100,000 Kg can be achieved in single stage to orbit gross liftoff weight for a payload of 29,484 Kg by utilizing densified cryogens in place of normal boiling point propellants.

  10. Spectroscopic Measurement System for ITER Divertor Plasma: Impurity Influx Monitor (divertor)

    SciTech Connect

    Sugie, Tatsuo; Ogawa, Hiroaki; Kusama, Yoshinori; Kasai, Satoshi

    2008-03-12

    The detailed design of the Impurity Influx Monitor (divertor) has been carried out to provide the measurement capability in the harsh environment such as higher irradiation levels of neutron, gamma-ray and particles than in present devices. The in-situ calibration system using a micro retro-reflector array has been developed to monitor the sensitivity change of the optical system due to the environmental effects. The optical alignment system for the Monitor has been developed by using a dedicated optics for alignment in the collection optics for measurement.

  11. Comment on “Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D. Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Umansky, M. V.

    2014-05-15

    In the recently published paper “Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)], the authors raise interesting and important issues concerning divertor physics and design. However, the paper contains significant errors: (a) The conceptual framework used in it for the evaluation of divertor “quality” is reduced to the assessment of the magnetic field structure in the outer Scrape-Off Layer. This framework is incorrect because processes affecting the pedestal, the private flux region and all of the divertor legs (four, in the case of a snowflake) are an inseparable part of divertor operation. (b) The concept of the divertor index focuses on only one feature of the magnetic field structure and can be quite misleading when applied to divertor design. (c) The suggestion to rename the divertor configurations experimentally realized on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) and DIII-D (Doublet III-D) from snowflakes to X-divertors is not justified: it is not based on comparison of these configurations with the prototypical X-divertor, and it ignores the fact that the NSTX and DIII-D poloidal magnetic field geometries fit very well into the snowflake “two-null” prescription.

  12. Comment on "Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Umansky, M. V.

    2014-05-01

    In the recently published paper "Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake" [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102507 (2013)], the authors raise interesting and important issues concerning divertor physics and design. However, the paper contains significant errors: (a) The conceptual framework used in it for the evaluation of divertor "quality" is reduced to the assessment of the magnetic field structure in the outer Scrape-Off Layer. This framework is incorrect because processes affecting the pedestal, the private flux region and all of the divertor legs (four, in the case of a snowflake) are an inseparable part of divertor operation. (b) The concept of the divertor index focuses on only one feature of the magnetic field structure and can be quite misleading when applied to divertor design. (c) The suggestion to rename the divertor configurations experimentally realized on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) and DIII-D (Doublet III-D) from snowflakes to X-divertors is not justified: it is not based on comparison of these configurations with the prototypical X-divertor, and it ignores the fact that the NSTX and DIII-D poloidal magnetic field geometries fit very well into the snowflake "two-null" prescription.

  13. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.; Smits, R. G.; Taylor, J. D.; Vanslyke, V.; Barrera, F.; Petersen, H.; Rago, C. E.; Rinta, R. I.; Talaska, D.; Watt, R. D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin.

  14. Design, R&D and commissioning of EAST tungsten divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, D. M.; Luo, G. N.; Zhou, Z. B.; Cao, L.; Li, Q.; Wang, W. J.; Li, L.; Qin, S. G.; Shi, Y. L.; Liu, G. H.; Li, J. G.

    2016-02-01

    After commissioning in 2005, the EAST superconducting tokamak had been operated with its water cooled divertors for eight campaigns up to 2012, employing graphite as plasma facing material. With increase in heating power over 20 MW in recent years, the heat flux going to the divertors rises rapidly over 10 MW m-2 for steady state operation. To accommodate the rapid increasing heat load in EAST, the bolting graphite tile divertor must be upgraded. An ITER-like tungsten (W) divertor has been designed and developed; and firstly used for the upper divertor of EAST. The EAST upper W divertor is modular structure with 80 modules in total. Eighty sets of W/Cu plasma-facing components (PFC) with each set consisting of an outer vertical target (OVT), an inner vertical target (IVT) and a DOME, are attached to 80 stainless steel cassette bodies (CB) by pins. The monoblock W/Cu-PFCs have been developed for the strike points of both OVT and IVT, and the flat type W/Cu-PFCs for the DOME and the baffle parts of both OVT and IVT, employing so-called hot isostatic pressing (HIP) technology for tungsten to CuCrZr heat sink bonding, and electron beam welding for CuCrZr to CuCrZr and CuCrZr to other material bonding. Both monoblock and flat type PFC mockups passed high heat flux (HHF) testing by means of electron beam facilities. The 80 divertor modules were installed in EAST in 2014 and results of the first commissioning are presented in this paper.

  15. BBQ Modeling of Recycling from the Tore Supra Ergodic Divertor Neutraliser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannella, R.; Guirlet, R.; Demichelis, C.; Hogan, J.; Cherigier, L.

    1998-11-01

    Generation and recycling of carbon and hydrocarbon impurities, and recycling of neon at the Tore Supra pumped ergodic divertor have been analyzed using the BBQ 3-D scrape-off layer transport code. Code results are compared with spectroscopic observations from fibres located on the neutralizer plates, and background plasma conditions used in the code are constrained with data from langmuir probes embedded in the plates. The sensitivity of neon recycling to assumed reflection coefficients has been studied. A detailed 3-D geometry model for the neutralizer, including all 4 plates, and recycling from the notches between plates, has been prepared. A version of the code describing deuterium processes is being developed to study conditions during the onset of detachment at high density

  16. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  17. Carbon flows in attached divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Isler, R.C.; Brooks, N.H.; West, W.P.; Porter, G.D. |; The DIII-D Divertor Team

    1999-05-01

    Parallel flow velocities of carbon ions in the DIII-D divertor [J. Luxon {ital et al.}, {ital Plasma Physics Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research}, 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159; S. L. Allen {ital et al.}, {ital Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics}, 1987 (Proc. 24th European Conf. Berchtesgaden, 1997), Vol. 21 A, Part III, p. 1129] have been studied under various operating conditions: L-mode (low-confinement mode), H-mode (high-confinement mode) with low-frequency ELMs (edge-localized modes), and H-mode with high-frequency ELMs. Both normal and reversed flows (toward the target plate and away from the target plate, respectively) are observed under all conditions, with the reversed speeds being as much as a factor of four greater than normal speeds. Magnitudes are approximately the same for L-mode and H-mode operation with high-frequency ELMs. In H-mode conditions with low-frequency ELMs, normal velocities are frequently observed to decline while reversed velocities increase in comparison to the other two conditions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  19. Valve for cryogenic service

    DOEpatents

    Worwetz, H.A.

    1975-09-02

    This patent relates to a valve for use with a liquefied gas at cryogenic temperatures in which a pair of joined knife edges are bellows controlled to contact an indium alloy seat in an annular slot when flow is to be stopped. The sealing alloy may be renewed by heating in situ. (auth)

  20. Compact cryogenic inductors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Carr, W.J. Jr.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Hordubay, T.D.; Chuboy, H.L. . Science and Technology Center)

    1994-07-01

    Power systems requiring power levels as high as a few megawatts to a few gigawatts for periods of several microseconds to several milliseconds with repetitive frequencies of a few hertz to a few kilohertz are being considered for potential space applications. The impulsive nature of the power presents the opportunity to use inductive energy storage techniques for pulse duty to enhance economic and practical considerations. An inductors must be efficient, lightweight, and reliable, and it must have high energy density if it is to be used in space based power systems. Cryogenic inductors are best studied for such an application. Parametric analyses of the two potential types of cryogenic inductors (superconducting and hyperconducting reveal that the hyperconducting (high purity aluminum)) inductor would be significantly lighter and achieve higher energy densities without the added penalty of a helium refrigeration system, thus resulting in improved overall system reliability. The lightweight hyperconducting cryogenic inductor technology is, however, in its infancy. This paper describes the required technology base which would allow the eventual application of the lightweight cryogenic inductor in space power systems, and also conclusively demonstrates the underlying principles.

  1. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  2. Initial Development of the NSTX-U Snowflake Divertor Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vail, Patrick; Kolemen, Egemen; Welander, Anders; Lanctot, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    A feedback control system has been implemented at NSTX-U for real-time detection and manipulation of snowflake divertor (SFD) magnetic configurations. The SFD is an alternative magnetic divertor concept that is characterized by a second-order null formed by two x-points in close proximity. The SFD is an attractive option for heat flux mitigation for NSTX-U in which unmitigated peak heat fluxes in standard divertor operation near 20 MW/m2 may compromise plasma-facing components. The real-time control system at NSTX-U is capable of simultaneous control of multiple SFD parameters, such as the separation between the two x-points in the divertor region and their orientation. Control of SFD configurations in NSTX-U has been simulated in TOKSYS using the upgraded sets of poloidal field coils in both the upper and lower divertor regions. Performance of the real-time control system and its effect on plasma performance will be assessed experimentally as an initial step toward the development of the SFD concept at NSTX-U. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Radiative snowflake divertor studies in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Allen, S. L.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hill, D. N.; Lasnier, C. J.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Kolemen, E.; Groebner, R. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Petrie, T. W.

    2015-08-01

    Recent DIII-D experiments assessed the snowflake divertor (SF) configuration in a radiative regime in H-mode discharges with D2 seeding. The SF configuration was maintained for many energy confinement times (2-3 s) in H-mode discharges (Ip = 1.2 MA, PNBI = 4- 5 MW, and B × ∇B down (favorable direction toward the divertor)), and found to be compatible with high performance operation (H98y2 ⩾ 1). The two studied SF configurations, the SF-plus and the SF-minus, have a small finite distance between the primary X-point and the secondary Bp null located in the private flux region or the common flux region, respectively. In H-mode discharges with the SF configurations (cf. H-mode discharges with the standard divertor with similar conditions) the stored energy lost per the edge localized mode (ELM) was reduced, and significant divertor heat flux reduction between and during ELMs was observed over a range of collisionalities, from lower density conditions toward a higher density H-modes with the radiative SF divertor.

  4. R&D ERL: Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Than, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

  5. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  6. Evaluation of pumping and fueling requirements for the ITER EDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlberg, W. A.; Attenberger, S. E.

    1994-06-01

    The relationships between fueling (gas injection and pellets of various sizes and velocities), pumping in the divertor chamber (constrained by fuel processing and divertor design), core density (constrained by the desired fusion power and helium ash accumulation), separatrix density (constrained by divertor operation and density limits) and plasma confinement models are examined for the International Engineering Tokamak Reactor (ITER) Engineering Design Activity (EDA) for guidance in the definition of design requirements for the pumping and fueling systems. Various combinations of gas and pellet injection are found to meet the constraints for operation at 1,500 MW of fusion power and 1 bar(center dot)l/s (5.3 x 10(exp 22) atoms/s) of DT pumping. Very low pumping reduces fuel processing requirements, but can lead to excessive helium accumulation depending on the particle transport properties. Isotopic tailoring of the fuel sources, e.g., 20-30% of the input fuel stream as tritium pellets and the rest as deuterium gas, can maintain the core fuel species mixture in the optimum range for fusion production (at least a 40-60 mixture) while reducing the tritium concentration in the edge region to 20-30%. This should reduce the tritium inventory in the plasma facing components, since that is typically governed by the fuel density mix near the plasma edge. A high density, low temperature ignited regime supported by deep pellet injection is shown to exist under some low confinement conditions.

  7. Stirling-Cycle Refrigerator Containing Piezoelectric Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr.; Hellbaum, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced Stirling-cycle cryogenic apparatus suitable for cooling sensitive infrared detectors to very low temperatures. Working fluid in refrigerator helium. Working fluid compressed and circulated by three piezoelectrically actuated diaphragm pumps offering advantages of greater reliability, relative simplicity, and lower cost.

  8. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  9. Industrial Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A flow inducer is a device that increases the pump intake capacity of a Worthington Centrifugal pump. It lifts the suction pressure sufficiently for the rotating main impeller of the centrifugal pump to operate efficiently at higher fluid intake levels. The concept derives from 1960's NASA technology which was advanced by Worthington Pump Division. The pumps are used to recirculate wood molasses, a highly viscous substance.

  10. Cryogenic, high power, near diffraction limited, Yb:YAG slab laser.

    PubMed

    Ganija, Miftar; Ottaway, David; Veitch, Peter; Munch, Jesper

    2013-03-25

    A cryogenic slab laser that is suitable for scaling to high power, while taking full advantage of the improved thermo-optical and thermo-mechanical properties of Yb:YAG at cryogenic temperatures is described. The laser uses a conduction cooled, end pumped, zigzag slab geometry resulting in a near diffraction limited, robust, power scalable design. The design and the initial characterization of the laser up to 200W are presented. PMID:23546080

  11. Cryogenic magnetostrictive transducers and devices for commercial, military, and space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisensel, G. N.; McMasters, O. D.; Chave, Robert G.

    1998-06-01

    The unique attributes of magnetostrictive materials have been used to develop a wide variety of electromechanical transducers and devices. Most of these applications have been at or above room temperature. However, many applications at cryogenic temperatures also require high authority, high precision, efficient actuation. Other technologies, including all piezoelectric systems, tend to be inoperable or impractical and unreliable at cryogenic temperatures. Magnetostrictive materials have already demonstrated improved performance at low temperature down to near absolute zero with strains as high as 1% possible. These unique material attributes combine with novel magnetic field generation, transducer and mechanism concepts to meet the challenges of resolution, size, weight, power, thermal and reliability requirements of actuators for many cryogenic applications. Positioning and shaping optics in space, cryogen valving and pumping, heat switches, industrial processing, and active vibration control are just some examples of the many commercial, military and space applications where cryogenic magnetostrictive technologies are overcoming barriers to provide solutions.

  12. Radiative divertor plasmas with convection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Leornard, A.W.; Porter, G.D.; Wood, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation of divertor heat flux on DIII-D is shown to greatly exceed the limits imposed by assumptions of energy transport dominated by electron thermal conduction parallel to the magnetic field. Approximately 90% of the power flowing into the divertor is dissipated through low Z radiation and plasma recombination. The dissipation is made possible by an extended region of low electron temperature in the divertor. A one-dimensional analysis of the parallel heat flux finds that the electron temperature profile is incompatible with conduction dominated parallel transport. Plasma flow at up to the ion acoustic speed, produced by upstream ionization, can account for the parallel heat flux. Modeling with the two-dimensional fluid code UEDGE has reproduced many of the observed experimental features.

  13. A survey of problems in divertor and edge plasma theory

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A. ); Braams, B.; Weitzner, H. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Cohen, R. ); Hazeltine, R. . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Hinton, F. ); Houlberg, W. (Oak

    1992-12-22

    Theoretical physics problems related to divertor design are presented, organized by the region in which they occur. Some of the open questions in edge physics are presented from a theoretician's point of view. After a cursory sketch of the fluid models of the edge plasma and their numerical realization, the following topics are taken up: time-dependent problems, non-axisymmetric effects, anomalous transport in the scrape-off layer, edge kinetic theory, sheath effects and boundary conditions in divertors, electric field effects, atomic and molecular data issues, impurity transport in the divertor region, poloidally localized power dissipation (MARFEs and dense gas targets), helium ash removal, and neutral transport. The report ends with a summary of selected problems of particular significance and a brief bibliography of survey articles and related conference proceedings.

  14. A survey of problems in divertor and edge plasma theory

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.; Braams, B.; Weitzner, H.; Cohen, R.; Hazeltine, R.; Hinton, F.; Houlberg, W.; Oktay, E.; Sadowski, W.; Post, D.; Sigmar, D.; Wootton, A.

    1992-12-22

    Theoretical physics problems related to divertor design are presented, organized by the region in which they occur. Some of the open questions in edge physics are presented from a theoretician`s point of view. After a cursory sketch of the fluid models of the edge plasma and their numerical realization, the following topics are taken up: time-dependent problems, non-axisymmetric effects, anomalous transport in the scrape-off layer, edge kinetic theory, sheath effects and boundary conditions in divertors, electric field effects, atomic and molecular data issues, impurity transport in the divertor region, poloidally localized power dissipation (MARFEs and dense gas targets), helium ash removal, and neutral transport. The report ends with a summary of selected problems of particular significance and a brief bibliography of survey articles and related conference proceedings.

  15. A novel approach to magnetic divertor configuration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blommaert, M.; Baelmans, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Gauger, N. R.; Reiter, D.

    2015-08-01

    Divertor exhaust system design and analysis tools are crucial to evolve from experimental fusion reactors towards commercial power plants. In addition to material research and dedicated vessel geometry design, improved magnetic configurations can contribute to sustaining the diverted heat loads. Yet, computational design of the magnetic divertor is a challenging process involving a magnetic equilibrium solver, a plasma edge grid generator and a computationally demanding plasma edge simulation. In this paper, an integrated approach to efficient sensitivity calculations is discussed and applied to a set of slightly reduced divertor models. Sensitivities of target heat load performance to the shaping coil currents are directly evaluated. Using adjoint methods, the cost for a sensitivity evaluation is reduced to about two times the simulation cost of one specific configuration. Further, the use of these sensitivities in an optimal design framework is illustrated by a case with realistic Joint European Torus (JET) configurational parameters.

  16. Plasma transport in a simulated magnetic-divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Strawitch, C. M.

    1981-03-01

    The transport properties of plasma on magnetic field lines that intersect a conducting plate are studied experimentally in the Wisconsin internal ring D.C. machine. The magnetic geometry is intended to simulate certain aspects of plasma phenomena that may take place in a tokamak divertor. It is found by a variety of measurements that the cross field transport is non-ambipolar; this may have important implications in heat loading considerations in tokamak divertors. The undesirable effects of nonambipolar flow make it preferable to be able to eliminate it. However, we find that though the non-ambipolarity may be reduced, it is difficult to eliminate entirely. The plasma flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is found to be near the ion acoustic velocity in all cases. The experimental density and electron temperature profiles are compared to the solutions to a one dimensional transport model that is commonly used in divertor theory.

  17. The cryogenic cooling program at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.S.; Mills, D.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical program in cryogenic cooling of high-heat-load optics at the Advanced-Photon Source. A prototype liquid nitrogen pumping system has been procured. This pump provides a variable flow rate of 1 to 10 gpm of pressurized liquid nitrogen and is sized to handle up to 5 kW of optic heat load. Also, a high-vacuum, double-crystal monochromator testing tank has been fabricated. This system will be used to test cryogenic crystals at existing synchrotron sources. A finite element analysis has been performed for a cryogenically cooled Si crystal in the inclined geometry for Undulator A at 100 mA. The inclination angle was 80{degrees}. It was set to diffract from the (111) planes at the first harmonic energy of 4.2 keV. The maximum slope error in the diffraction plane was calculated to be about 1 {mu}rad with a peak temperature of 94 K. An analysis has also been performed for a cryogenically-cooled ``thin`` crystal oriented in the Bragg geometry which accepts 87% of the lst harmonic photons at 3.866 keV. The total absorbed power was 131 W at 100 mA current and the peak temperature was 124 K.

  18. Toroidally symmetric plasma vortex at tokamak divertor null point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umansky, M. V.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2016-03-01

    Reduced MHD equations are used for studying toroidally symmetric plasma dynamics near the divertor null point. Numerical solution of these equations exhibits a plasma vortex localized at the null point with the time-evolution defined by interplay of the curvature drive, magnetic restoring force, and dissipation. Convective motion is easier to achieve for a second-order null (snowflake) divertor than for a regular x-point configuration, and the size of the convection zone in a snowflake configuration grows with plasma pressure at the null point. The trends in simulations are consistent with tokamak experiments which indicate the presence of enhanced transport at the null point.

  19. Turbulence studies in Tokamak boundary plasmas with realistic divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.

    1998-10-14

    Results are presented from the 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT [1] and the linearized shooting code BAL[2] to study turbulence in tokamak boundary plasmas and its relationship to the L-H transition, in a realistic divertor plasma geometry. The key results include: (1) the identification of the dominant, resistive X-point mode in divertor geometry and (2) turbulence suppression in the L-H transition by shear in the ExB drift speed, ion diamagnetism and finite polarization. Based on the simulation results, a parameterization of the transport is given that includes the dependence on the relevant physical parameters.

  20. Non-ambipolar transport in a magnetic divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Strawitch, C M; Emmert, G A

    1980-02-01

    Plasma transport is studied in a simulated magnetic divertor in the Wisconsin single ring DC machine. The transport perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field is shown to be non-ambipolar by a variety of measurements, but can be forced to be ambipolar by an appropriately designed divertor target plate. The density profile in the scrape-off zone agrees with the predictions of a one-dimensional diffusion equation that assumes classical cross-field transport and plasma flow parallel to the field at the local ion acoustic velocity.

  1. Cryogenic thermal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Brandon R.; Batty, J. C.; Agren, John

    2000-01-01

    Space based cryogenic thermal management systems for advanced infrared sensor platforms are a critical failure mode to the spacecraft missions they are supporting. Recent advances in cryocooler technologies have increased the achievable cooling capacities and decreased the operating temperatures of these systems, but there is still a fundamental need for redundancy in these systems. Cryogenic thermal diodes act as thermal switches, allowing heat to flow through them when in a conduction mode and restricting the flow of heat when in an isolation mode. These diodes will allow multiple cryocoolers to cool a single infrared focal plane array. The Space Dynamics Laboratory has undertaken an internal research and development effort to develop this innovative technology. This paper briefly describes the design parameters of several prototype thermal diodes that were developed and tested. .

  2. Cryogenic mirror analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, S.

    1988-01-01

    Due to extraordinary distances scanned by modern telescopes, optical surfaces in such telescopes must be manufactured to unimaginable standards of perfection of a few thousandths of a centimeter. The detection of imperfections of less than 1/20 of a wavelength of light, for application in the building of the mirror for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, was undertaken. Because the mirror must be kept very cold while in space, another factor comes into effect: cryogenics. The process to test a specific morror under cryogenic conditions is described; including the follow-up analysis accomplished through computer work. To better illustrate the process and analysis, a Pyrex Hex-Core mirror is followed through the process from the laser interferometry in the lab, to computer analysis via a computer program called FRINGE. This analysis via FRINGE is detailed.

  3. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  4. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Wines, Robin Renee; Takacs, James Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.

  5. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1988-11-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member. 7 figs.

  6. Cryogenic support system

    DOEpatents

    Nicol, Thomas H.; Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.

    1988-01-01

    A support system is disclosed for restraining large masses at very low or cryogenic temperatures. The support system employs a tie bar that is pivotally connected at opposite ends to an anchoring support member and a sliding support member. The tie bar extends substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the cold mass assembly, and comprises a rod that lengthens when cooled and a pair of end attachments that contract when cooled. The rod and end attachments are sized so that when the tie bar is cooled to cryogenic temperature, the net change in tie bar length is approximately zero. Longitudinal force directed against the cold mass assembly is distributed by the tie bar between the anchoring support member and the sliding support member.

  7. Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, M. G.; Sherman, A.; Studer, P. A.; Daniels, A.; Goldowsky, M. P.

    1983-06-01

    A long lifetime Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler particularly adapted for space applications is described. It consists of a compressor section centrally aligned end to end with an expansion section, and respectively includes a reciprocating compressor piston and displacer radially suspended in interconnecting cylindrical housings by active magnetic bearings and has adjacent reduced clearance regions so as to be in noncontacting relationship therewith and wherein one or more of these regions operate as clearance seals. The piston and displacer are reciprocated in their housings by linear drive motors to vary the volume of respectively adjacent compression and expansion spaces which contain a gaseous working fluid and a thermal regenerator to effect Stirling cycle cryogenic cooling.

  8. Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, M. G.; Sherman, A.; Studer, P. A.; Daniels, A.; Goldowsky, M. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A long lifetime Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler particularly adapted for space applications is described. It consists of a compressor section centrally aligned end to end with an expansion section, and respectively includes a reciprocating compressor piston and displacer radially suspended in interconnecting cylindrical housings by active magnetic bearings and has adjacent reduced clearance regions so as to be in noncontacting relationship therewith and wherein one or more of these regions operate as clearance seals. The piston and displacer are reciprocated in their housings by linear drive motors to vary the volume of respectively adjacent compression and expansion spaces which contain a gaseous working fluid and a thermal regenerator to effect Stirling cycle cryogenic cooling.

  9. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOEpatents

    Bravo, Jose Luis; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  10. Flexible cryogenic conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, P.D.; Wines, R.R.; Takacs, J.J.

    1999-12-21

    A flexible and relatively low cost cryogenic conduit is described. The flexible cryogenic conduit of the present invention comprises a first inner corrugated tube with single braided serving, a second outer corrugated tube with single braided serving concentric with the inner corrugated tube, and arranged outwardly about the periphery of the inner corrugated tube and between the inner and outer corrugated tubes: a superinsulation layer; a one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a spirally wound refrigeration tube; a second one half lap layer of copper ribbon; a second one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; a second superinsulation layer; a third one half lap layer of polyester ribbon; and a spirally wound stretchable and compressible filament.