Science.gov

Sample records for dmp1 localize differently

  1. Nuclear localization of DMP1 proteins suggests a role in intracellular signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Siyam, Arwa; Wang, Suzhen; Qin, Chunlin; Mues, Gabriele; Stevens, Roy; D'Souza, Rena N.; Lu, Yongbo

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of DMP1 in various cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-synchronized cells show either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of DMP1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear DMP1 is restricted to the nucleoplasm but absent in the nucleolus. -- Abstract: Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts/osteocytes and plays an essential role in tooth and bone mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. It is debatable whether DMP1, in addition to its function in the extracellular matrix, can enter the nucleus and function as a transcription factor. To better understand its function, we examined the nuclear localization of endogenous and exogenous DMP1 in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and 17IIA11 odontoblast-like cells. RT-PCR analyses showed the expression of endogenous Dmp1 in all three cell lines, while Western-blot analysis detected a major DMP1 protein band corresponding to the 57 kDa C-terminal fragment generated by proteolytic processing of the secreted full-length DMP1. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that non-synchronized cells presented two subpopulations with either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of endogenous DMP1. In addition, cells transfected with a construct expressing HA-tagged full-length DMP1 also showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of the exogenous DMP1 when examined with an antibody against the HA tag. Furthermore, nuclear DMP1 was restricted to the nucleoplasm but was absent in the nucleolus. In conclusion, these findings suggest that, apart from its role as a constituent of dentin and bone matrix, DMP1 might play a regulatory role in the nucleus.

  2. Transgenic expression of Dspp partially rescued the long bone defects of Dmp1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Jani, Priyam H; Gibson, Monica P; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xiaofang; Lu, Yongbo; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) belong to the Small Integrin-Binding Ligand N-linked Glycoprotein (SIBLING) family. In addition to the features common to all SIBLING members, DMP1 and DSPP share several unique similarities in chemical structure, proteolytic activation and tissue localization. Mutations in, or deletion of DMP1, cause autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets along with dental defects; DSPP mutations or its ablation are associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta. While the roles and functional mechanisms of DMP1 in osteogenesis have been extensively studied, those of DSPP in long bones have been studied only to a limited extent. Previous studies by our group revealed that transgenic expression of Dspp completely rescued the dentin defects of Dmp1-null (Dmp1(-/-)) mice. In this investigation, we assessed the effects of transgenic Dspp on osteogenesis by analyzing the formation and mineralization of the long bones in Dmp1(-/-) mice that expresses a transgene encoding full-length DSPP driven by a 3.6-kb rat Col1a1 promoter (referred as "Dmp1(-/-);Dspp-Tg mice"). We characterized the long bones of the Dmp1(-/-);Dspp-Tg mice at different ages and compared them with those from Dmp1(-/-) and Dmp1(+/-) (normal control) mice. Our analyses showed that the long bones of Dmp1(-/-);Dspp-Tg mice had a significant increase in cortical bone thickness, bone volume and mineral density along with a remarkable restoration of trabecular thickness compared to those of the Dmp1(-/-) mice. The long bones of Dmp1(-/-);Dspp-Tg mice underwent a dramatic reduction in the amount of osteoid, significant improvement of the collagen fibrillar network, and better organization of the lacunocanalicular system, compared to the Dmp1(-/-) mice. The elevated levels of biglycan, bone sialoprotein and osteopontin in Dmp1(-/-) mice were also noticeably corrected by the transgenic expression of Dspp. These findings suggest that DSPP and DMP1 may function

  3. Constitutive Nuclear Expression of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Fails to Rescue the Dmp1-null Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuxian; Zhang, Qi; Cao, Zhengguo; Lu, Yongbo; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Liu, Ying; McKee, Marc D.; Qin, Chunlin; Chen, Zhi; Feng, Jian Q.

    2014-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) plays multiple roles in bone, tooth, phosphate homeostasis, kidney, salivary gland, reproductive cycles, and the development of cancer. In vitro studies have indicated two different biological mechanisms: 1) as a matrix protein, DMP1 interacts with αvβ3 integrin and activates MAP kinase signaling; and 2) DMP1 serves as a transcription co-factor. In vivo studies have demonstrated its key role in osteocytes. This study attempted to determine whether DMP1 functions as a transcription co-factor and regulates osteoblast functions. For gene expression comparisons using adenovirus constructs, we targeted the expression of DMP1 either to the nucleus only by replacing the endogenous signal peptide with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence (referred to as NLSDMP1) or to the extracellular matrix as the WT type (referred to as SPDMP1) in MC3T3 osteoblasts. High levels of DMP1 in either form greatly increased osteogenic gene expression in an identical manner. However, the targeted NLSDMP1 transgene driven by a 3.6-kb rat Col 1α1 promoter in the nucleus of osteoblasts and osteocytes failed to rescue the phenotyope of Dmp1-null mice, whereas the SPDMP1 transgene rescued the rickets defect. These studies support the notion that DMP1 functions as an extracellular matrix protein, rather than as a transcription co-factor in vivo. We also show that DMP1 continues its expression in osteoblasts during postnatal development and that the deletion of Dmp1 leads to an increase in osteoblast proliferation. However, poor mineralization in the metaphysis indicates a critical role for DMP1 in both osteoblasts and osteocytes. PMID:24917674

  4. Aberrant splicing of the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway in cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of mRNA precursors is a ubiquitous mechanism for generating numerous transcripts with different activities from one genomic locus in mammalian cells. The gene products from a single locus can thus have similar, dominant-negative or even opposing functions. Aberrant AS has been found in cancer to express proteins that promote cell growth, local invasion and metastasis. This review will focus on the aberrant splicing of tumor suppressor/oncogenes that belong to the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. Our recent study shows that the DMP1 locus generates both tumor-suppressive DMP1α (p53-dependent) and oncogenic DMP1β (p53-independent) splice variants, and the DMP1β/α ratio increases with neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells. This process is associated with high DMP1β protein expression and shorter survival of breast cancer (BC) patients. Accumulating pieces of evidence show that ARF is frequently inactivated by aberrant splicing in human cancers, demonstrating its involvement in human malignancies. Splice variants from the MDM2 locus promote cell growth in culture and accelerate tumorigenesis in vivo. Human cancers expressing these splice variants are associated with advanced stage/metastasis, and thus have negative clinical impacts. Although they lack most of the p53-binding domain, their activities are mostly dependent on p53 since they bind to wild-type MDM2. The p53 locus produces splice isoforms that have either favorable (β/γ at the C-terminus) or negative impact (Δ40, Δ133 at the N-terminus) on patients' survival. As the oncogenic AS products from these loci are expressed only in cancer cells, they may eventually become targets for molecular therapies. PMID:26802432

  5. PTH and Vitamin D Repress DMP1 in Cementoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Tran, A B; Nociti, F H; Thumbigere-Math, V; Foster, B L; Krieger, C C; Kantovitz, K R; Novince, C M; Koh, A J; McCauley, L K; Somerman, M J

    2015-10-01

    A complex feedback mechanism between parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25(OH)2D3 (1,25D), and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) maintains mineral homeostasis, in part by regulating calcium and phosphate absorption/reabsorption. Previously, we showed that 1,25D regulates mineral homeostasis by repressing dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) via the vitamin D receptor pathway. Similar to 1,25D, PTH may modulate DMP1, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Immortalized murine cementoblasts (OCCM.30), similar to osteoblasts and known to express DMP1, were treated with PTH (1-34). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot revealed that PTH decreased DMP1 gene transcription (85%) and protein expression (30%), respectively. PTH mediated the downregulation of DMP1 via the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the decreased localization of DMP1 in vivo in cellular cementum and alveolar bone of mice treated with a single dose (50 µg/kg) of PTH (1-34). RNA-seq was employed to further identify patterns of gene expression shared by PTH and 1,25D in regulating DMP1, as well as other factors involved in mineral homeostasis. PTH and 1,25D mutually upregulated 36 genes and mutually downregulated 27 genes by ≥2-fold expression (P ≤ 0.05). Many identified genes were linked with the regulation of bone/tooth homeostasis, cell growth and differentiation, calcium signaling, and DMP1 transcription. Validation of RNA-seq results via PCR array confirmed a similar gene expression pattern in response to PTH and 1,25D treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that PTH and 1,25D share complementary effects in maintaining mineral homeostasis by mutual regulation of genes/proteins associated with calcium and phosphate metabolism while also exerting distinct roles on factors modulating mineral metabolism. Furthermore, PTH may modulate phosphate homeostasis by downregulating DMP1 expression via the cAMP/PKA pathway. Targeting

  6. The LPV Motif Is Essential for the Efficient Export of Secretory DMP1 From the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tian; Meng, Tian; Wang, Suzhen; Qin, Chunlin; Lu, Yongbo

    2016-07-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is found abundantly in the extracellular matrices of bone and dentin. Secretory DMP1 begins with a tripeptide of leucine-proline-valine (LPV) after the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-entry signal peptide is cleaved. The goal of this study was to determine the role of the LPV motif in the secretion of DMP1. A series of DNA constructs was generated to express various forms of DMP1 with or without the LPV motif. These constructs were transfected into a preosteoblast cell line, the MC3T3-E1 cells, and the subcellular localization and secretion of various forms of DMP1 were examined by immunofluorescent staining and Western-blotting analyses. Immunofluorescent staining showed that the LPV-containing DMP1 variants were primarily localized in the Golgi complex, whereas the LPV-lacking DMP1 variants were found abundantly within the ER. Western-blotting analyses demonstrated that the LPV-containing DMP1 variants were rapidly secreted from the transfected cells, as they did not accumulate within the cells, and the amounts increased in the conditioned media over time. In contrast, the LPV-lacking DMP1 variants were predominantly retained within the cells, and only small amounts were secreted out of the cells over time. These results suggest that the LPV motif is essential for the efficient export of secretory DMP1 from the ER to the Golgi complex. PMID:26595451

  7. The Dmp1-SOST Transgene Interacts With and Downregulates the Dmp1-Cre Transgene and the Rosa(Notch) Allele.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2016-05-01

    Activation of Notch1 in osteocytes of Rosa(Notch) mice, where a loxP-flanked STOP cassette and the Nicd coding sequence were targeted to the reverse orientation splice acceptor (Rosa)26 locus, causes osteopetrosis associated with suppressed Sost expression and enhanced Wnt signaling. To determine whether Sost downregulation mediates the effects of Notch activation in osteocytes, Rosa(Notch) mice were crossed with transgenics expressing Cre recombinase or SOST under the control of the dentin matrix protein (Dmp)1 promoter. Dmp1-SOST transgenics displayed vertebral osteopenia and a modest femoral cancellous and cortical bone phenotype, whereas hemizygous Dmp1-Cre transgenics heterozygous for the Rosa(Notch) allele (Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch)) exhibited osteopetrosis. The phenotype of Notch activation in osteocytes was prevented in Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch) mice hemizygous for the Dmp1-SOST transgene. The effect was associated with downregulated Notch signaling and suppressed Dmp1 and Rosa26 expression. To test whether SOST regulates Notch expression in osteocytes, cortical bone cultures from Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch) mice or from Rosa(Notch) control littermates were exposed to recombinant human SOST. The addition of SOST had only modest effects on Notch target gene mRNA levels and suppressed Dmp1, but not Cre or Rosa26, expression. These findings suggest that prevention of the Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch) skeletal phenotype by Dmp1-SOST is not secondary to SOST expression but to interactions among the Dmp1-SOST and Dmp1-Cre transgenes and the Rosa26 locus. In conclusion, the Dmp1-SOST transgene suppresses the expression of the Dmp1-Cre transgene and of Rosa26. PMID:26456319

  8. Chemical changes in DMP1-null murine bone & silica based pecvd coatings for titanium implant osseoapplications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maginot, Megen

    In order to improve clinical outcomes in bone-implant systems, a thorough understanding of both local bone chemistry and implant surface chemistry is necessary. This study consists, therefore, of two main parts: one focused on determining the nature of the changes in bone chemistry in a DMP1-null transgenic disease model and the other on the development of amorphous silica-based coatings for potential use as titanium bone implant coatings. For the study of bone mineral in the DMP1 transgenic model, which is known to have low serum phosphate levels, transgenic DMP1-null and wild type mice were fed a high phosphate diet, sacrificed, and had their long bone harvested. This bone was characterized using SEM, FTIR, microCT and XANES and compared to DMP1-null and wild type control groups to assess the therapeutic effect of high Pi levels on the phenotype and the role of DMP1 in mineralization in vivo. Findings suggest that though the high phosphate diet results in restoring serum phosphate levels, it does not completely rescue the bone mineral phenotype at an ultrastructural level and implicates DMP1 in phosphate nucleation. Since plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silica like coatings have not previously been fabricated for use in oessoapplications, the second part of this study initially focused on the characterization of novel SiOx chemistries fabricated via a chemical vapor deposition process that were designed specifically to act as bioactive coatings with a loose, hydrogenated structure. These coatings were then investigated for their potential initial stage response to bone tissue through immersion in a simulated body fluid and through the culture of MC3T3 cells on the coating surfaces. Coating surfaces were characterized by SEM, FTIR, contact angle measurements, and XANES. Coating dissolution and ionic release were also investigated by ICP-OES. Findings suggest that some SiOx chemistries may form a bioactive coating while more highly substituted

  9. Cooperation between Dmp1 Loss and Cyclin D1 Overexpression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sinan; Mott, Ryan T.; Fry, Elizabeth A.; Taneja, Pankaj; Kulik, George; Sui, Guangchao; Inoue, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a component of the core cell-cycle machinery and is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer. It physically interacts with the tumor suppressor Dmp1 that attenuates the oncogenic signals from Ras and HER2 by inducing Arf/p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Currently, the biological significance of Dmp1–cyclin D1 interplay in breast cancer has not been determined. Here, we show that cyclin D1 bound to Dmp1 to activate both Arf and Ink4a promoters and, consequently, induced apoptosis or G2/M cell-cycle delay in normal cells to protect them from neoplastic transformation. The cyclin D1–induced Ink4a/Arf gene expression was dependent on Dmp1 because the induction was not detected in Dmp1-deficient or DMP1-depleted cells. Arf/Ink4a expression was increased in pre-malignant mammary glands from Dmp1+/+;MMTV-cyclin D1 and Dmp1+/+;MMTV-D1T286A mice but significantly down-regulated in those from Dmp1-deficient mice. Selective Dmp1 deletion was found in 21% of the MMTV-D1 and D1T286A mammary carcinomas, and the Dmp1 heterozygous status significantly accelerated mouse mammary tumorigenesis with reduced apoptosis and increased metastasis. Overall, our study reveals a pivotal role of combined Dmp1 loss and cyclin D1 overexpression in breast cancer. PMID:23938323

  10. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  11. Dmp1α Inhibits HER2/neu-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Elizabeth A.; Taneja, Pankaj; Maglic, Dejan; Zhu, Sinan; Sui, Guangchao; Inoue, Kazushi

    2013-01-01

    Our recent study shows a pivotal role of Dmp1 in quenching hyperproliferative signals from HER2 to the Arf-p53 pathway as a safety mechanism to prevent breast carcinogenesis. To directly demonstrate the role of Dmp1 in preventing HER2/neu-driven oncogenic transformation, we established Flag-Dmp1α transgenic mice (MDTG) under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. The mice were viable but exhibited poorly developed mammary glands with markedly reduced milk production; thus more than half of parous females were unable to support the lives of new born pups. The mammary glands of the MDTG mice had very low Ki-67 expression but high levels of Arf, Ink4a, p53, and p21Cip1, markers of senescence and accelerated aging. In all strains of generated MDTG;neu mice, tumor development was significantly delayed with decreased tumor weight. Tumors from MDTG;neu mice expressed Flag-Dmp1α and Ki-67 in a mutually exclusive fashion indicating that transgenic Dmp1α prevented tumor growth in vivo. Genomic DNA analyses showed that the Dmp1α transgene was partially lost in half of the MDTG;neu tumors, and Western blot analyses showed Dmp1α protein downregulation in 80% of the cases. Our data demonstrate critical roles of Dmp1 in preventing mammary tumorigenesis and raise the possibility of treating breast cancer by restoring Dmp1α expression. PMID:24205004

  12. Dmp1α inhibits HER2/neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Fry, Elizabeth A; Taneja, Pankaj; Maglic, Dejan; Zhu, Sinan; Sui, Guangchao; Inoue, Kazushi

    2013-01-01

    Our recent study shows a pivotal role of Dmp1 in quenching hyperproliferative signals from HER2 to the Arf-p53 pathway as a safety mechanism to prevent breast carcinogenesis. To directly demonstrate the role of Dmp1 in preventing HER2/neu-driven oncogenic transformation, we established Flag-Dmp1α transgenic mice (MDTG) under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. The mice were viable but exhibited poorly developed mammary glands with markedly reduced milk production; thus more than half of parous females were unable to support the lives of new born pups. The mammary glands of the MDTG mice had very low Ki-67 expression but high levels of Arf, Ink4a, p53, and p21(Cip1), markers of senescence and accelerated aging. In all strains of generated MDTG;neu mice, tumor development was significantly delayed with decreased tumor weight. Tumors from MDTG;neu mice expressed Flag-Dmp1α and Ki-67 in a mutually exclusive fashion indicating that transgenic Dmp1α prevented tumor growth in vivo. Genomic DNA analyses showed that the Dmp1α transgene was partially lost in half of the MDTG;neu tumors, and Western blot analyses showed Dmp1α protein downregulation in 80% of the cases. Our data demonstrate critical roles of Dmp1 in preventing mammary tumorigenesis and raise the possibility of treating breast cancer by restoring Dmp1α expression. PMID:24205004

  13. Critical roles of DMP1 in HER2/neu-Arf-p53 signaling and breast cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Pankaj; Maglic, Dejan; Kai, Fumitake; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Kendig, Robert D.; Frazier, Donna P.; Willingham, Mark C.; Inoue, Kazushi

    2010-01-01

    HER2 overexpression stimulates cell growth in p53-mutated cells while it inhibits cell proliferation in those with wild-type p53, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. The Dmp1 promoter was activated by HER2/neu through the PI3K-Akt-NF-κB pathway, which in turn stimulated Arf transcription. Binding of p65 and p52 subunits of NF-κB was demonstrated to the Dmp1 promoter and that of Dmp1 to the Arf promoter upon HER2/neu overexpression. Both Dmp1 and p53 were induced in pre-malignant lesions from MMTV-neu mice and mammary tumorigenesis was significantly accelerated in both Dmp1+/− and Dmp1−/− mice. Selective deletion of Dmp1 and/or overexpression of Tbx2/Pokemon was found in >50 % of wild-type HER2/neu carcinomas while the involvement of Arf, Mdm2, or p53 was rare. Tumors from Dmp1+/−, Dmp1−/−, and wild-type neu mice with hemizygous Dmp1 deletion showed significant downregulation of Arf and p21Cip1/WAF1, showing p53 inactivity and more aggressive phenotypes than tumors without Dmp1 deletion. Notably, endogenous hDMP1 mRNA decreased when HER2 was depleted in human breast cancer cells. Our study demonstrates the pivotal roles of Dmp1 in HER2/neu-p53 signaling and breast carcinogenesis. PMID:21062982

  14. Disruption of the ARF transcriptional activator DMP1 facilitates cell immortalization, Ras transformation, and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Wen, Renren; Rehg, Jerold E.; Adachi, Masashi; Cleveland, John L.; Roussel, Martine F.; Sherr, Charles J.

    2000-01-01

    The DMP1 transcription factor induces the ARF tumor suppressor gene in mouse fibroblasts, leading to cell cycle arrest in a p53-dependent manner. We disrupted sequences encoding the DNA-binding domain of DMP1 in mouse embryonic stem cells and derived animals lacking the functional protein. DMP1-null animals are small at birth, and males develop more slowly than their wild-type littermates. Some adult animals exhibit seizures and/or obstuctive uropathy, each of unknown cause. The growth of explanted DMP1-null mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) is progressively retarded as cells are passaged in culture on defined transfer protocols; but, unlike the behavior of normal cells, p19ARF, Mdm2, and p53 levels remain relatively low and DMP1-null MEFs do not senesce. Whereas the establishment of cell lines from MEFs is usually always accompanied by either p53 or ARF loss of function, continuously passaged DMP1-null cells readily give rise to established 3T3 and 3T9 cell lines that retain wild-type ARF and functional p53 genes. Early-passage DMP1-null cells, like MEFs from either ARF-null or p53-null mice, can be morphologically transformed by oncogenic Ha-Ras (Val-12) alone. Splenic lymphocytes harvested from both DMP1-null and ARF-null mice exhibit enhanced proliferative responses in long-term cultures when stimulated to divide with antibody to CD3 and interleukin-2. Although only 1 of 40 DMP1-null animals spontaneously developed a tumor in the first year of life, neonatal treatment with dimethylbenzanthracene or ionizing radiation induced tumors of various histologic types that were not observed in similarly treated DMP1+/+ animals. Karyotypic analyses of MEFs and lymphomas from DMP1-null animals revealed pseudodiploid chromosome numbers, consistent with the retention of wild-type p53. Together, these data suggest that ARF function is compromised, but not eliminated, in animals lacking functional DMP1. PMID:10898794

  15. Critical roles of DMP1 in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu-Arf-p53 signaling and breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Pankaj; Maglic, Dejan; Kai, Fumitake; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Kendig, Robert D; Frazier, Donna P; Willingham, Mark C; Inoue, Kazushi

    2010-11-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression stimulates cell growth in p53-mutated cells while it inhibits cell proliferation in those with wild-type p53, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. The Dmp1 promoter was activated by HER2/neu through the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase-Akt-NF-κB pathway, which in turn stimulated Arf transcription. Binding of p65 and p52 subunits of NF-κB was shown to the Dmp1 promoter and that of Dmp1 to the Arf promoter on HER2/neu overexpression. Both Dmp1 and p53 were induced in premalignant lesions from mouse mammary tumor virus-neu mice, and mammary tumorigenesis was significantly accelerated in both Dmp1+/- and Dmp1-/- mice. Selective deletion of Dmp1 and/or overexpression of Tbx2/Pokemon was found in >50% of wild-type HER2/neu carcinomas, although the involvement of Arf, Mdm2, or p53 was rare. Tumors from Dmp1+/-, Dmp1-/-, and wild-type neu mice with hemizygous Dmp1 deletion showed significant downregulation of Arf and p21Cip1/WAF1, showing p53 inactivity and more aggressive phenotypes than tumors without Dmp1 deletion. Notably, endogenous hDMP1 mRNA decreased when HER2 was depleted in human breast cancer cells. Our study shows the pivotal roles of Dmp1 in HER2/neu-p53 signaling and breast carcinogenesis. PMID:21062982

  16. Overexpression of DMP1 Accelerates Mineralization and Alters Cortical Bone Biomechanical Properties in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ankush; Albazzaz, Michael; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A.; Inoue, Nozomu; Miller, Lisa M.; Acerbo, Alvin; George, Anne; Sumner, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1) is a key regulator of biomineralization. Here, we examine changes in structural, geometric, and material properties of cortical bone in a transgenic mouse model overexpressing DMP1. Micro-computed tomography and three-point bending were performed on 90 femora of wild type and transgenic mice at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months. Fourier transform infrared imaging was performed at 2 months. We found that the transgenic femurs were longer (p<0.01), more robust in cross-section (p<0.05), stronger (p<0.05), but had less post-yield strain and displacement (p<0.01), and higher tissue mineral density (p<0.01) than the wild type femurs at 1 and 2 months. At 2 months, the transgenic femurs also had a higher mineral-to-matrix ratio (p<0.05) and lower carbonate substitution (p<0.05) compared to wild type femurs. These findings indicate that increased mineralization caused by overexpressing DMP1 led to increased structural cortical bone properties associated with decreased ductility during the early post-natal period. PMID:22100074

  17. Expression of DMP-1 in the human pulp tissue using low level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Teixeira Marques, Nádia Carolina; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Oliveira Rodini, Camila; Cruvinel Silva, Thiago; Moreira Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade; Marchini Oliveira, Thais

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on DMP-1 expression in pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. Twenty mandibular primary molars were randomly assigned into the following groups: Group I—Buckley’s Formocresol (FC); Group II—Calcium Hydroxide (CH); Group III—LLLT + CH and Group IV—LLLT + Zinc oxide/Eugenol. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Descriptive analysis was performed on the dentin pulp complex. Histopathological assessment showed internal resorption in group FC. Groups CH and LLLT + CH provided better pulpal repair due to the absence of inflammation and the formation of hard tissue barrier. These two groups presented odontoblastic layer expressing DMP-1. According to this study, low level laser therapy preceding the use of calcium hydroxide exhibited satisfactory bio-inductive activity on pulp tissue repair of human primary teeth. However, other histological and cellular studies are needed to confirm the laser tissue action and efficacy.

  18. Regulation of bone-renal mineral and energy metabolism: the PHEX, FGF23, DMP1, MEPE ASARM pathway.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Peter S N

    2012-01-01

    More than 300 million years ago, vertebrates emerged from the vast oceans to conquer gravity and the dry land. With this transition, new adaptations occurred that included ingenious changes in reproduction, waste secretion, and bone physiology. One new innovation, the egg shell, contained an ancestral protein (ovocleidin-116) that likely first appeared with the dinosaurs and was preserved through the theropod lineage in modern birds and reptiles. Ovocleidin-116 is an avian homolog of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and belongs to a group of proteins called short integrin-binding ligand-interacting glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). These proteins are all localized to a defined region on chromosome 5q in mice and chromosome 4q in humans. A unifying feature of SIBLING proteins is an acidic serine aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM). Recent research has shown that the ASARM motif and the released ASARM peptide have regulatory roles in mineralization (bone and teeth), phosphate regulation, vascularization, soft-tissue calcification, osteoclastogenesis, mechanotransduction, and fat energy metabolism. The MEPE ASARM motif and peptide are physiological substrates for PHEX, a zinc metalloendopeptidase. Defects in PHEX are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). There is evidence that PHEX interacts with another ASARM motif containing SIBLING protein, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1). DMP1 mutations cause bone and renal defects that are identical with the defects caused by a loss of PHEX function. This results in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). In both HYP and ARHR, increased FGF23 expression plays a major role in the disease and in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), FGF23 half-life is increased by activating mutations. ASARM peptide administration in vitro and in vivo also induces increased FGF23 expression. FGF23 is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of cytokines, which surfaced 500

  19. Regulation of Bone–Renal Mineral and Energy Metabolism: The PHEX, FGF23, DMP1, MEPE ASARM Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2012-01-01

    More than 300 million years ago, vertebrates emerged from the vast oceans to conquer gravity and the dry land. With this transition, new adaptations occurred that included ingenious changes in reproduction, waste secretion, and bone physiology. One new innovation, the egg shell, contained an ancestral protein (ovocleidin-116) that likely first appeared with the dinosaurs and was preserved through the theropod lineage in modern birds and reptiles. Ovocleidin-116 is an avian homolog of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and belongs to a group of proteins called short integrin-binding ligand-interacting glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). These proteins are all localized to a defined region on chromosome 5q in mice and chromosome 4q in humans. A unifying feature of SIBLING proteins is an acidic serine aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM). Recent research has shown that the ASARM motif and the released ASARM peptide have regulatory roles in mineralization (bone and teeth), phosphate regulation, vascularization, soft-tissue calcification, osteoclastogenesis, mechanotransduction, and fat energy metabolism. The MEPE ASARM motif and peptide are physiological substrates for PHEX, a zinc metalloendopeptidase. Defects in PHEX are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). There is evidence that PHEX interacts with another ASARM motif containing the SIBLING protein, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1). DMP1 mutations cause bone and renal defects that are identical with the defects caused by a loss of PHEX function. This results in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). In both HYP and ARHR, increased FGF23 expression plays a major role in the disease and in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), FGF23 half-life is increased by activating mutations. ASARM peptide administration in vitro and in vivo also induces increased FGF23 expression. FGF23 is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of cytokines, which surfaced

  20. MMP2-CLEAVAGE OF DMP1 GENERATES A BIOACTIVE PEPTIDE PROMOTING DIFFERENTIATION OF DENTAL PULP STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Chaussain, Catherine; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Huet, Eric; Floris, Caroline; Ravindran, Sriram; Hao, Jianjun; Menashi, Suzanne; George, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) plays a regulatory role in dentin mineralization and can also function as a signaling molecule. MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) is a predominant protease in the dentin matrix that plays a prominent role in tooth formation and a potential role during the carious process. The possibility that MMP-2 can cleave DMP1 to release biologically active peptides was investigated in this study. DMP1, both in the recombinant form and in its native state within the dentin matrix, was shown to be a substrate for MMP-2. Proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 produced two major peptides, one that contains the C-terminal region of the protein known to carry both the ASARM (aspartic acid and serine rich domain) domain involved in biomineralization and the DNA binding site of DMP1. In vitro experiments with recombinant N- and C-terminal polypeptides mimicking the MMP-2 cleavage products of DMP1 demonstrated an effect of the C-polypeptide on the differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells to a putative odontoblast phenotype. In vivo implantation of this peptide in a rat injured pulp model induced a rapid formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge covered by a palisade of orientated cells expressing dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and DMP1, attesting an efficient repair process. These data suggest that a peptide generated through the proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 can regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cells during dentinogenesis and thus sustain reparative dentin formation in pathological situations such as carious decay. In addition, these data open a new therapeutic possibility of using this peptide to regenerate dentin after an injury. PMID:19908197

  1. MMP2-cleavage of DMP1 generates a bioactive peptide promoting differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cell.

    PubMed

    Chaussain, Catherine; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Huet, Eric; Floris, Caroline; Ravindran, Sriram; Hao, Jianjun; Menashi, Suzanne; George, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) plays a regulatory role in dentin mineralization and can also function as a signaling molecule. MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) is a predominant protease in the dentin matrix that plays a prominent role in tooth formation and a potential role during the carious process. The possibility that MMP-2 can cleave DMP1 to release biologically active peptides was investigated in this study. DMP1, both in the recombinant form and in its native state within the dentin matrix, was shown to be a substrate for MMP-2. Proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 produced two major peptides, one that contains the C-terminal region of the protein known to carry both the ASARM (aspartic acid and serine rich domain) domain involved in biomineralization and the DNA binding site of DMP1. In vitro experiments with recombinant N- and C-terminal polypeptides mimicking the MMP-2 cleavage products of DMP1 demonstrated an effect of the C-polypeptide on the differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells to a putative odontoblast phenotype. In vivo implantation of this peptide in a rat injured pulp model induced a rapid formation of a homogeneous dentin bridge covered by a palisade of orientated cells expressing dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and DMP1, attesting an efficient repair process. These data suggest that a peptide generated through the proteolytic processing of DMP1 by MMP-2 can regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cells during dentinogenesis and thus sustain reparative dentin formation in pathological situations such as carious decay. In addition, these data open a new therapeutic possibility of using this peptide to regenerate dentin after an injury. PMID:19908197

  2. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) improves osteomalacia phenotype in dentin matrix protein 1(Dmp1) knockout mice with little impact on serum levels of phosphorus and FGF23.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yinshi; Han, Xianglong; Jing, Yan; Yuan, Baozhi; Ke, Huazhu; Liu, Min; Feng, Jian Q

    2016-01-01

    Unlike treatments for most rickets, the treatment using 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D3 has little efficacy on patients with hypophosphatemic rickets, a set of rare genetic diseases. Thus, understanding the local cause for osteomalacia in hypophosphatemic rickets and developing an effective treatment to restore mineralization in this rare disease has been a longstanding goal in medicine. Here, we used Dmp1 knockout (KO) mice (whose mutations led to the same type of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets in humans) as the model in which the monoclonal antibody of sclerostin (Scl-Ab) was tested in two age groups for 8weeks: the prevention group (starting at age 4weeks) and the treatment group (starting at age 12weeks). Applications of Scl-Ab greatly improved the osteomalacia phenotype (>15%) and the biomechanical properties (3-point bending, ~60%) in the treated long-bone group. Our studies not only showed improvement of the osteomalacia in the alveolar bone, which has the highest bone metabolism rate, as well as the long bone phenotypes in treated mice. All these improvements attributed to the use of Scl-Ab are independent of the change in serum levels of phosphorus and FGF23, since Scl-Ab had little efficacy on those parameters. Finally, we propose a model to explain how Scl-Ab can improve the Dmp1 KO osteomalacia phenotype, in which the sclerostin level is already low. PMID:26721590

  3. Bone proteins PHEX and DMP1 regulate fibroblastic growth factor Fgf23 expression in osteocytes through a common pathway involving FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aline; Liu, Shiguang; David, Valentin; Li, Hua; Karydis, Anastasios; Feng, Jian Q.; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblastic growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating phosphaturic hormone. Inactivating mutations of the endopeptidase PHEX or the SIBLING protein DMP1 result in equivalent intrinsic bone mineralization defects and increased Fgf23 expression in osteocytes. The mechanisms whereby PHEX and DMP1 regulate Fgf23 expression are unknown. We examined the possibility that PHEX and DMP1 regulate Fgf23 through a common pathway by analyzing the phenotype of compound Phex and Dmp1 mutant mice (Hyp/Dmp1−/−). Compared to single-mutant littermates, compound-mutant Hyp/Dmp1−/− mice displayed nonadditive elevations of serum FGF23 (1912 ± 183, 1715 ± 178, and 1799 ± 181 pg/ml), hypophosphatemia (Pi: 6.0 ± 0.3, 5.8 ± 0.2, and 5.4 ± 0.1 mg/dl), and severity of rickets/osteomalacia (bone mineral density: −36, −36, and −30%). Microarray analysis of long bones identified gene expression profiles implicating common activation of the FGFR pathway in all the mutant groups. Furthermore, inhibiting FGFR signaling using SU5402 in Hyp- and Dmp1−/−-derived bone marrow stromal cells prevented the increase in Fgf23 mRNA expression (129- and 124-fold increase in Hyp and Dmp1−/− vs. 1.3-fold in Hyp+SU5402 and 2.5-fold in Dmp1−/−+SU5402, P<0.05). For all analyses, samples collected from nonmutant wild-type littermates served as controls. These findings indicate that PHEX and DMP1 control a common pathway regulating bone mineralization and FGF23 production, the latter involving activation of the FGFR signaling in osteocytes.—Martin, A., Liu, S., David, V., Li, H., Karydis, A., Feng, J. Q., Quarles, L. D. Bone proteins PHEX and DMP1 regulate fibroblastic growth factor Fgf23 expression in osteocytes through a common pathway. PMID:21507898

  4. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  5. Mapping of the human dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein gene (DMP1) to the dentinogenesis imperfecta type II critical region at chromosome 4q21

    SciTech Connect

    Aplin, H.M.; Hirst, K.L.; Crosby, A.H.; Dixon, M.J.

    1995-11-20

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of dentin formation, which has been mapped to human chromosome 4q12-q21. The region most likely to contain the DGI1 locus is a 3.2-cM region surrounding the osteopontin (SPP1) locus. Recently, a novel dentin-specific acidic phosphoprotein (dmp1) has been cloned in the rat and mapped to mouse chromosome 5q21. In the current investigation, we have isolated a cosmid containing the human DMP1 gene. The isolation of a short tandem repeat polymorphism at this locus has allowed us to map the DMP1 locus to human chromosome 4q21 and demonstrate that it is tightly linked to DGI1 in two families (Z{sub max} = 11.01, {theta} = 0.001). The creation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig around SPP1 has further allowed us to demonstrate that DMP1 is located within 150 kb of the bone sialoprotein and 490 kb of the SPP1 loci, respectively. DMP1 is therefore a strong candidate for the DGI1 locus. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Simultaneous chromium reduction and phenol degradation in a coculture of Escherichia coli ATCC 33456 and Pseudomonas putida DMP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Hai; Wang, Yi-Tin

    1995-07-01

    In a defined coculture of a Cr(VI) reducer, Escherichia coli ATCC 33456, and a phenol degrader, Pseudomonas putida DMP-1, simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and degradation of phenol was observed. When Cr(VI) was present in the coculture, quantitative transformation of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) proceeded with simultaneous degradation of phenol. Cr(VI) reduction was correlated to phenol degradation in the coculture as demonstrated by a regression analysis of the cumulative Cr(VI) reduction and the cumulative phenol degradation. Both the rate and extent of Cr(VI) reduction and phenol degradation were significantly influenced by the population composition of the coculture. Although Cr(VI) reduction occurred as a result of E. coli metabolism, the rate of phenol degradation by P. putida may become a rate-limiting factor for Cr(VI) reduction at a low population ratio of P. putida to E. coli. Phenol degradation by P. putida was very susceptible to the presence of Cr(VI), whereas Cr(VI) reduction by E. coli was significantly influenced by phenol only when phenol was present at high concentrations (>9 mM). 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. An in situ hybridization study of perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE in developing condylar cartilage of the fetal mouse mandible and limb bud cartilage.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, K; Yokohama-Tamaki, T; Morita, T; Baba, O; Qin, C; Shibata, S

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this in situ hybridization study was to investigate mRNA expression of three bone/cartilage matrix components (perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE) in developing primary (tibial) and secondary (condylar) cartilage. Perlecan mRNA expression was first detected in newly formed chondrocytes in tibial cartilage at E13.0, but this expression decreased in hypertrophic chondrocytes at E14.0. In contrast, at E15.0, perlecan mRNA was first detected in the newly formed chondrocytes of condylar cartilage; these chondrocytes had characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes, which confirmed the previous observation that progenitor cells of developing secondary cartilage rapidly differentiate into hypertrophic chondrocytes. DMP1 mRNA was detected in many chondrocytes within the lower hypertrophic cell zone in tibial cartilage at E14.0. In contrast, DMP1 mRNA expression was only transiently detected in a few chondrocytes of condylar cartilage at E15.0. Thus, DMP1 may be less important in the developing condylar cartilage than in the tibial cartilage. Another purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that MEPE may be a useful marker molecule for cartilage. MEPE mRNA was not detected in any chondrocytes in either tibial or condylar cartilage; however, MEPE immunoreactivity was detected throughout the cartilage matrix. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that MEPE antibody recognized two bands, one of 67 kDa and another of 59 kDa, in cartilage-derived samples. Thus MEPE protein may gradually accumulate in the cartilage, even though mRNA expression levels were below the limits of detection of in situ hybridization. Ultimately, we could not designate MEPE as a marker molecule for cartilage, and would modify our original hypothesis. PMID:26428891

  8. An In Situ Hybridization Study of Perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE in Developing Condylar Cartilage of the Fetal Mouse Mandible and Limb Bud Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, K.; Yokohama-Tamaki, T.; Morita, T.; Baba, O.; Qin, C.; Shibata, S.

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this in situ hybridization study was to investigate mRNA expression of three bone/cartilage matrix components (perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE) in developing primary (tibial) and secondary (condylar) cartilage. Perlecan mRNA expression was first detected in newly formed chondrocytes in tibial cartilage at E13.0, but this expression decreased in hypertrophic chondrocytes at E14.0. In contrast, at E15.0, perlecan mRNA was first detected in the newly formed chondrocytes of condylar cartilage; these chondrocytes had characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes, which confirmed the previous observation that progenitor cells of developing secondary cartilage rapidly differentiate into hypertrophic chondrocytes. DMP1 mRNA was detected in many chondrocytes within the lower hypertrophic cell zone in tibial cartilage at E14.0. In contrast, DMP1 mRNA expression was only transiently detected in a few chondrocytes of condylar cartilage at E15.0. Thus, DMP1 may be less important in the developing condylar cartilage than in the tibial cartilage. Another purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that MEPE may be a useful marker molecule for cartilage. MEPE mRNA was not detected in any chondrocytes in either tibial or condylar cartilage; however, MEPE immunoreactivity was detected throughout the cartilage matrix. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that MEPE antibody recognized two bands, one of 67 kDa and another of 59 kDa, in cartilage-derived samples. Thus MEPE protein may gradually accumulate in the cartilage, even though mRNA expression levels were below the limits of detection of in situ hybridization. Ultimately, we could not designate MEPE as a marker molecule for cartilage, and would modify our original hypothesis. PMID:26428891

  9. Postnatal β-catenin deletion from Dmp1-expressing osteocytes/osteoblasts reduces structural adaptation to loading, but not periosteal load-induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Robling, Alexander G

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical signal transduction in bone tissue begins with load-induced activation of several cellular pathways in the osteocyte population. A key pathway that participates in mechanotransduction is Wnt/Lrp5 signaling. A putative downstream mediator of activated Lrp5 is the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein β-catenin (βcat), which migrates to the nucleus where it functions as a transcriptional co-activator. We investigated whether osteocytic βcat participates in Wnt/Lrp5-mediated mechanotransduction by conducting ulnar loading experiments in mice with or without chemically induced βcat deletion in osteocytes. Mice harboring βcat floxed loss-of-function alleles (βcat(f/f)) were bred to the inducible osteocyte Cre transgenic (10)(kb)Dmp1-CreERt2. Adult male mice were induced to recombine the βcat alleles using tamoxifen, and intermittent ulnar loading sessions were applied over the following week. Although adult-onset deletion of βcat from Dmp1-expressing cells reduced skeletal mass, the bone tissue was responsive to mechanical stimulation as indicated by increased relative periosteal bone formation rates in recombined mice. However, load-induced improvements in cross sectional geometric properties were compromised in recombined mice. The collective results indicate that the osteoanabolic response to loading can occur on the periosteal surface when β-cat levels are significantly reduced in Dmp1-expressing cells, suggesting that either (i) only low levels of β-cat are required for mechanically induced bone formation on the periosteal surface, or (ii) other additional downstream mediators of Lrp5 might participate in transducing load-induced Wnt signaling. PMID:27143110

  10. Adult-Onset Deletion of β-Catenin in (10kb)Dmp1-Expressing Cells Prevents Intermittent PTH-Induced Bone Gain.

    PubMed

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Bettagere, Vidya; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Horan, Daniel; Divieti-Pajevic, Paola; Robling, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    β-Catenin (βcat) is a major downstream signaling node in canonical Wingless-related integration site (Wnt) signaling pathway, and its activity is crucial for canonical Wnt signal transduction. Wnt signaling has recently been implicated in the osteo-anabolic response to PTH, a potent calcium-regulating factor. We investigated whether βcat is essential for the anabolic action of intermittent PTH by generating male mice with adult-onset deletion of βcat in a subpopulation of bone cells (osteocytes and late-stage osteoblasts), treating them with an anabolic regimen of PTH, and measuring the skeletal responses. Male (10kb)Dmp1-CreERt2 transgenic mice that also harbored floxed loss-of-function βcat alleles (βcat(f/f)) were induced for Cre activity using tamoxifen, then injected daily with human PTH 1-34 (30 μg/kg) or vehicle for 5 weeks. Mice in which βcat was deleted showed either total lack of bone mineral density (BMD) gain, or BMD loss, and did not respond to PTH treatment. However, bone mass measurements in the trabecular compartment of the femur and spine revealed PTH-induced bone gain whether βcat was deleted or not. PTH-stimulated increases in periosteal and cancellous bone formation rates were not impaired by βcat deletion, but resorption markers and cortical porosity were significantly increased in induced mice, particularly induced mice treated with PTH. These results suggest that βcat is required for net-positive BMD effects of PTH therapy but that the anabolic effects per se of PTH treatment might not require osteocytic/osteoblastic βcat. PMID:27253995

  11. Different localization of Hsp105 family proteins in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Youhei; Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Hatayama, Takumi

    2007-10-15

    Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} of the HSP105 family are alternatively spliced products derived from an hsp 105 gene transcript. Hsp105{alpha} is constitutively expressed and also induced by various stress, whereas Hsp105{beta}, lacking 44 amino acids from Hsp105{alpha}, is specifically expressed during mild heat shock. Although Hsp105{alpha} is shown to localize in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells, cellular localization of Hsp105{beta} is not known. In this study, we showed that Hsp105{beta} localized in the nucleus of cells in contrast to cytoplasmic Hsp105{alpha}, suggesting that these proteins function in different cellular compartments of cells. Using deletion and substitution mutants of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta}, we revealed that these proteins had a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a nuclear export signal (NES). Furthermore, Hsp105{alpha} accumulated in the nucleus of cells when treated with leptomycin B, a specific inhibitor of NES-dependent nuclear export. siRNA for importin {beta}, an essential component for NLS-dependent nuclear transport, inhibited the nuclear localization of Hsp105{beta}. Furthermore, the 44 amino acids sequence found in Hsp105{alpha} but not in Hsp105{beta} suppressed the NLS activity. Thus, the different localization of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} is suggested to be due to the suppressed NLS activity in Hsp105{alpha}.

  12. LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY. AE Lavers*1, GR Klinefelter2, DW Hamilton1, KP Roberts1, 1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN and 2US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.
    SP22 is a sperm membrane protein that has been implicated in sperm function d...

  13. A class of difference schemes with flexible local approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukerman, Igor . E-mail: igor@uakron.edu

    2006-01-20

    Solutions of many physical problems have salient local features that are qualitatively known a priori (for example, singularities at point sources, edge and corners; boundary layers; derivative jumps at material interfaces; strong dipole field components near polarized spherical particles; cusps of electronic wavefunctions at the nuclei; electrostatic double layers around colloidal particles, etc.) The known methods capable of providing flexible local approximation of such features include the generalized finite element - partition of unity method, special variational-difference schemes in broken Sobolev spaces, and a few other specialized techniques. In the proposed new class of Flexible Local Approximation MEthods (FLAME), a desirable set of local approximating functions (such as cylindrical or spherical harmonics, plane waves, harmonic polynomials, etc.) defines a finite difference scheme on a chosen grid stencil. One motivation is to minimize the notorious 'staircase' effect at curved and slanted interface boundaries. However, the new approach has much broader applications. As illustrative examples, the paper presents arbitrarily high order 3-point schemes for the 1D Schroedinger equation and a 1D singular equation, schemes for electrostatic interactions of colloidal particles, electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, plasmon resonances. Moreover, many classical finite difference schemes, including the Collatz 'Mehrstellen' schemes, are direct particular cases of FLAME.

  14. Reconstruction of the local inflationary potential with different correlation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, A.; Cabella, P.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-02-01

    We review the puzzles of the standard Big Bang model and cosmic inflation as their possible solutions. The relation between inflation and the spectra of the cosmological perturbations is emphasized. In particular we focus on the local reconstruction of the shape of the inflationary potential from observations and the consequences of a direct detection of cosmological gravitational waves, exploring different correlation levels between the spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r of the primordial perturbations.

  15. Immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials.

    PubMed

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Sakai, Vivien T; Abdo, Ruy Cesar C; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M; Santos, Carlos F; Oliveira, Thais M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials. Twenty-five primary molars were divided into the following groups: formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide (CH), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), corticosteroid/antibiotic solution + CH (O + CH), and Portland cement (PC), and all received conventional pulpotomy treatment. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ(2) test (p < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the comparison among the groups through the use of a score system regarding the presence of hard tissue barrier, odontoblastic layer, and internal resorption, but not regarding pulp calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis showed immunostaining for DMP-1 in groups CH, MTA, O + CH, and PC. Internal resorption was observed in the groups FC and CH. MTA and PC showed pulp repair without inflammation and with the presence of hard tissue barrier. DMP-1 immunostaining was higher for MTA and PC, confirming the reparative and bioinductive capacity of these materials. PMID:25678029

  16. Gene flow in maize fields with different local pollen densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goggi, A. Susana; Lopez-Sanchez, Higinio; Caragea, Petrutza; Westgate, Mark; Arritt, Raymond; Clark, Craig A.

    2007-08-01

    The development of maize ( Zea mays L.) varieties as factories of pharmaceutical and industrial compounds has renewed interest in controlling pollen dispersal. The objective of this study was to compare gene flow into maize fields of different local pollen densities under the same environmental conditions. Two fields of approximately 36 ha were planted with a nontransgenic, white hybrid, in Ankeny, Iowa, USA. In the center of both fields, a 1-ha plot of a yellow-seeded stacked RR/Bt transgenic hybrid was planted as a pollen source. Before flowering, the white receiver maize of one field was detasseled in a 4:1 ratio to reduce the local pollen density (RPD). The percentage of outcross in the field with RPD was 42.2%, 6.3%, and 1.3% at 1, 10, and 35 m from the central plot, respectively. The percentage of outcross in the white maize with normal pollen density (NPD) was 30.1%, 2.7%, and 0.4%, respectively, at these distances. At distances greater than 100 m, the outcross frequency decreased below 0.1 and 0.03% in the field with RPD and NPD, respectively. A statistical model was used to compare pollen dispersal based on observed outcross percentages. The likelihood ratio test confirmed that the models of outcrossing in the two fields were significantly different ( P is practically 0). Results indicated that when local pollen is low, the incoming pollen has a competitive advantage and the level of outcross is significantly greater than when the local pollen is abundant.

  17. Error localization in RHIC by fitting difference orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Liu C.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2012-05-20

    The presence of realistic errors in an accelerator or in the model used to describe the accelerator are such that a measurement of the beam trajectory may deviate from prediction. Comparison of measurements to model can be used to detect such errors. To do so the initial conditions (phase space parameters at any point) must be determined which can be achieved by fitting the difference orbit compared to model prediction using only a few beam position measurements. Using these initial conditions, the fitted orbit can be propagated along the beam line based on the optics model. Measurement and model will agree up to the point of an error. The error source can be better localized by additionally fitting the difference orbit using downstream BPMs and back-propagating the solution. If one dominating error source exist in the machine, the fitted orbit will deviate from the difference orbit at the same point.

  18. Different subcellular localizations and functions of Arabidopsis myosin VIII

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Lior; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Belausov, Eduard; Sadot, Einat

    2008-01-01

    Background Myosins are actin-activated ATPases that use energy to generate force and move along actin filaments, dragging with their tails different cargos. Plant myosins belong to the group of unconventional myosins and Arabidopsis myosin VIII gene family contains four members: ATM1, ATM2, myosin VIIIA and myosin VIIIB. Results In transgenic plants expressing GFP fusions with ATM1 (IQ-tail truncation, lacking the head domain), fluorescence was differentially distributed: while in epidermis cells at the root cap GFP-ATM1 equally distributed all over the cell, in epidermal cells right above this region it accumulated in dots. Further up, in cells of the elongation zone, GFP-ATM1 was preferentially positioned at the sides of transversal cell walls. Interestingly, the punctate pattern was insensitive to brefeldin A (BFA) while in some cells closer to the root cap, ATM1 was found in BFA bodies. With the use of different markers and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, it was found that myosin VIII co-localized to the plasmodesmata and ER, colocalized with internalized FM4-64, and partially overlapped with the endosomal markers ARA6, and rarely with ARA7 and FYVE. Motility of ARA6 labeled organelles was inhibited whenever associated with truncated ATM1 but motility of FYVE labeled organelles was inhibited only when associated with large excess of ATM1. Furthermore, GFP-ATM1 and RFP-ATM2 (IQ-tail domain) co-localized to the same spots on the plasma membrane, indicating a specific composition at these sites for myosin binding. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that myosin VIII functions differently in different root cells and can be involved in different steps of endocytosis, BFA-sensitive and insensitive pathways, ER tethering and plasmodesmatal activity. PMID:18179725

  19. Developmental differences in auditory detection and localization of approaching vehicles.

    PubMed

    Barton, Benjamin K; Lew, Roger; Kovesdi, Casey; Cottrell, Nicholas D; Ulrich, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Pedestrian safety is a significant problem in the United States, with thousands being injured each year. Multiple risk factors exist, but one poorly understood factor is pedestrians' ability to attend to vehicles using auditory cues. Auditory information in the pedestrian setting is increasing in importance with the growing number of quieter hybrid and all-electric vehicles on America's roadways that do not emit sound cues pedestrians expect from an approaching vehicle. Our study explored developmental differences in pedestrians' detection and localization of approaching vehicles. Fifty children ages 6-9 years, and 35 adults participated. Participants' performance varied significantly by age, and with increasing speed and direction of the vehicle's approach. Results underscore the importance of understanding children's and adults' use of auditory cues for pedestrian safety and highlight the need for further research. PMID:23357030

  20. Comparison of pistachio hull essential oils from different Tunisian localities.

    PubMed

    Chahed, Thouraya; Dhifi, Wissal; Hamrouni, Ibtissem; Msaada, Kamel; Bellila, Amor; Kchouk, Mohamed E; Marzouk, Brahim

    2007-03-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) fruit is well known for its oleaginous and edible seed. Less information is available about the hull constituted by the epicarp and the mesocarp. This part of the fruit contains an essential oil that can be valorized. Tunisia is one of the countries cultivating pistachio trees. This work presents essential oil composition of pistachio hulls (Mateur variety) from different geographical localities: Grombalia (North-East), Kairouan (Middle) and Sfax (Middle-East). Yields were more important in Sfax samples (0.53% on a dry weight basis). Alpha-terpinolene was the major compound for Grombalia fruits (35.7%), whereas Kairouan and Sfax samples where characterized by alpha-pinene (42.5 and 43.8% respectively). For all samples, monoterpene hydrocarbons predominated (more than 79.8% of the essential oil). PMID:17511352

  1. Interactions of different types of localized corrosion in surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Mori, G; Dösinger, H

    2004-03-01

    Surgical implants often show different types of localized corrosion such as corrosion fatigue cracking, pitting and crevice corrosion on the same part. Interactions of these different corrosion phenomena were investigated. This was done by cyclic loading of electropolished tensile specimens at different constant and changing potentials. Material investigated was a surgical implant steel X2CrNiMo18-15-3 which was immersed in physiological NaCl solution. Pitting and repassivation potentials were determined. Samples with and without artificial cracks as well as masked specimens were tested. Incubation period for first damage, density and size of pits by coulometric and volumetric method were determined. The fracture surfaces were then investigated by SEM. Results show that not in all cases pitting corrosion was the cause for corrosion fatigue cracking. Also pitting is favoured by crack formation. Density of pits increases by a factor of 5 without any change to pitting potential. There are primary pits formed prior to crack initiation and secondary pits formed after crack initiation. At samples without crack there is almost no difference between the optically measured value of total pit volume and the coulometrically determined value. At samples with cracks coulometric volume of pits is much larger than optical one. This proves that there is a significant amount of crevice corrosion in the crack. The corrosion current density in the crack increases by two orders of magnitude when comparing it to electropolished surface of the sample. Results of laboratory experiments are confirmed by failure of a real implant. PMID:15334996

  2. Differences in local genomic context of bound and unbound motifs

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Loren; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Landsman, David

    2012-01-01

    Understanding gene regulation is a major objective in molecular biology research. Frequently, transcription is driven by transcription factors (TFs) that bind to specific DNA sequences. These motifs are usually short and degenerate, rendering the likelihood of multiple copies occurring throughout the genome due to random chance as high. Despite this, TFs only bind to a small subset of sites, thus prompting our investigation into the differences between motifs that are bound by TFs and those that remain unbound. Here we constructed vectors representing various chromatin- and sequence-based features for a published set of bound and unbound motifs representing nine TFs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a machine learning approach, we identified a set of features that can be used to discriminate between bound and unbound motifs. We also discovered that some TFs bind most or all of their strong motifs in intergenic regions. Our data demonstrate that local sequence context can be strikingly different around motifs that are bound compared to motifs that are unbound. We concluded that there are multiple combinations of genomic features that characterize bound or unbound motifs. PMID:22692006

  3. Local structural differences in homologous proteins: specificities in different SCOP classes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Valadié, Hélène; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2012-01-01

    The constant increase in the number of solved protein structures is of great help in understanding the basic principles behind protein folding and evolution. 3-D structural knowledge is valuable in designing and developing methods for comparison, modelling and prediction of protein structures. These approaches for structure analysis can be directly implicated in studying protein function and for drug design. The backbone of a protein structure favours certain local conformations which include α-helices, β-strands and turns. Libraries of limited number of local conformations (Structural Alphabets) were developed in the past to obtain a useful categorization of backbone conformation. Protein Block (PB) is one such Structural Alphabet that gave a reasonable structure approximation of 0.42 Å. In this study, we use PB description of local structures to analyse conformations that are preferred sites for structural variations and insertions, among group of related folds. This knowledge can be utilized in improving tools for structure comparison that work by analysing local structure similarities. Conformational differences between homologous proteins are known to occur often in the regions comprising turns and loops. Interestingly, these differences are found to have specific preferences depending upon the structural classes of proteins. Such class-specific preferences are mainly seen in the all-β class with changes involving short helical conformations and hairpin turns. A test carried out on a benchmark dataset also indicates that the use of knowledge on the class specific variations can improve the performance of a PB based structure comparison approach. The preference for the indel sites also seem to be confined to a few backbone conformations involving β-turns and helix C-caps. These are mainly associated with short loops joining the regular secondary structures that mediate a reversal in the chain direction. Rare β-turns of type I' and II' are also identified

  4. Local Structural Differences in Homologous Proteins: Specificities in Different SCOP Classes

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Valadié, Hélène; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2012-01-01

    The constant increase in the number of solved protein structures is of great help in understanding the basic principles behind protein folding and evolution. 3-D structural knowledge is valuable in designing and developing methods for comparison, modelling and prediction of protein structures. These approaches for structure analysis can be directly implicated in studying protein function and for drug design. The backbone of a protein structure favours certain local conformations which include α-helices, β-strands and turns. Libraries of limited number of local conformations (Structural Alphabets) were developed in the past to obtain a useful categorization of backbone conformation. Protein Block (PB) is one such Structural Alphabet that gave a reasonable structure approximation of 0.42 Å. In this study, we use PB description of local structures to analyse conformations that are preferred sites for structural variations and insertions, among group of related folds. This knowledge can be utilized in improving tools for structure comparison that work by analysing local structure similarities. Conformational differences between homologous proteins are known to occur often in the regions comprising turns and loops. Interestingly, these differences are found to have specific preferences depending upon the structural classes of proteins. Such class-specific preferences are mainly seen in the all-β class with changes involving short helical conformations and hairpin turns. A test carried out on a benchmark dataset also indicates that the use of knowledge on the class specific variations can improve the performance of a PB based structure comparison approach. The preference for the indel sites also seem to be confined to a few backbone conformations involving β-turns and helix C-caps. These are mainly associated with short loops joining the regular secondary structures that mediate a reversal in the chain direction. Rare β-turns of type I’ and II’ are also

  5. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design. PMID:26879106

  6. Localizing Age-Related Individual Differences in a Hierarchical Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Data from 33 separate studies were combined to create an aggregate data set consisting of 16 cognitive variables and 6832 different individuals who ranged between 18 and 95 years of age. Analyses were conducted to determine where in a hierarchical structure of cognitive abilities individual differences associated with age, gender, education, and…

  7. Sustained Attention to Local and Global Target Features Is Different: Performance and Tympanic Membrane Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helton, William S.; Hayrynen, Lauren; Schaeffer, David

    2009-01-01

    Vision researchers have investigated the differences between global and local feature perception. No one has, however, examined the role of global and local feature discrimination in sustained attention tasks. In this experiment participants performed a sustained attention task requiring either global or local letter target discriminations or…

  8. Mountain chickadees from different elevations sing different songs: acoustic adaptation, temporal drift or signal of local adaptation?

    PubMed

    Branch, Carrie L; Pravosudov, Vladimir V

    2015-04-01

    Song in songbirds is widely thought to function in mate choice and male-male competition. Song is also phenotypically plastic and typically learned from local adults; therefore, it varies across geographical space and can serve as a cue for an individual's location of origin, with females commonly preferring males from their respective location. Geographical variation in song dialect may reflect acoustic adaptation to different environments and/or serve as a signal of local adaptation. In montane environments, environmental differences can occur over an elevation gradient, favouring local adaptations across small spatial scales. We tested whether food caching mountain chickadees, known to exhibit elevation-related differences in food caching intensity, spatial memory and the hippocampus, also sing different dialects despite continuous distribution and close proximity. Male songs were collected from high and low elevations at two different mountains (separated by 35 km) to test whether song differs between elevations and/or between adjacent populations at each mountain. Song structure varied significantly between high and low elevation adjacent populations from the same mountain and between populations from different mountains at the same elevations, despite a continuous distribution across each mountain slope. These results suggest that elevation-related differences in song structure in chickadees might serve as a signal for local adaptation. PMID:26064641

  9. Mountain chickadees from different elevations sing different songs: acoustic adaptation, temporal drift or signal of local adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Carrie L.; Pravosudov, Vladimir V.

    2015-01-01

    Song in songbirds is widely thought to function in mate choice and male–male competition. Song is also phenotypically plastic and typically learned from local adults; therefore, it varies across geographical space and can serve as a cue for an individual's location of origin, with females commonly preferring males from their respective location. Geographical variation in song dialect may reflect acoustic adaptation to different environments and/or serve as a signal of local adaptation. In montane environments, environmental differences can occur over an elevation gradient, favouring local adaptations across small spatial scales. We tested whether food caching mountain chickadees, known to exhibit elevation-related differences in food caching intensity, spatial memory and the hippocampus, also sing different dialects despite continuous distribution and close proximity. Male songs were collected from high and low elevations at two different mountains (separated by 35 km) to test whether song differs between elevations and/or between adjacent populations at each mountain. Song structure varied significantly between high and low elevation adjacent populations from the same mountain and between populations from different mountains at the same elevations, despite a continuous distribution across each mountain slope. These results suggest that elevation-related differences in song structure in chickadees might serve as a signal for local adaptation. PMID:26064641

  10. Prediction of compounds in different local structure-activity relationship environments using emerging chemical patterns.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Balfer, Jenny; Heikamp, Kathrin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-05-27

    Active compounds can participate in different local structure-activity relationship (SAR) environments and introduce different degrees of local SAR discontinuity, depending on their structural and potency relationships in data sets. Such SAR features have thus far mostly been analyzed using descriptive approaches, in particular, on the basis of activity landscape modeling. However, compounds in different local SAR environments have not yet been predicted. Herein, we adapt the emerging chemical patterns (ECP) method, a machine learning approach for compound classification, to systematically predict compounds with different local SAR characteristics. ECP analysis is shown to accurately assign many compounds to different local SAR environments across a variety of activity classes covering the entire range of observed local SARs. Control calculations using random forests and multiclass support vector machines were carried out and a variety of statistical performance measures were applied. In all instances, ECP calculations yielded comparable or better performance than controls. The approach presented herein can be applied to predict compounds that complement local SARs or prioritize compounds with different SAR characteristics. PMID:24803014

  11. Local participation in biodiversity conservation initiatives: a comparative analysis of different models in South East Mexico.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, María Elena; García-Frapolli, Eduardo; Pritchard, Diana J; Sánchez González, María Consuelo; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel; Porter-Bolland, Luciana; Reyes-Garcia, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    In Mexico, biodiversity conservation is primarily implemented through three schemes: 1) protected areas, 2) payment-based schemes for environmental services, and 3) community-based conservation, officially recognized in some cases as Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas. In this paper we compare levels of local participation across conservation schemes. Through a survey applied to 670 households across six communities in Southeast Mexico, we document local participation during the creation, design, and implementation of the management plan of different conservation schemes. To analyze the data, we first calculated the frequency of participation at the three different stages mentioned, then created a participation index that characterizes the presence and relative intensity of local participation for each conservation scheme. Results showed that there is a low level of local participation across all the conservation schemes explored in this study. Nonetheless, the payment for environmental services had the highest local participation while the protected areas had the least. Our findings suggest that local participation in biodiversity conservation schemes is not a predictable outcome of a specific (community-based) model, thus implying that other factors might be important in determining local participation. This has implications on future strategies that seek to encourage local involvement in conservation. PMID:25105990

  12. Improving spatial localization in MEG inverse imaging by leveraging intersubject anatomical differences

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric; Maddox, Ross K.; Lee, Adrian K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques enable non-invasive observation of ongoing neural processing, with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in particular providing direct measurement of neural activity with millisecond time resolution. However, accurately mapping measured MEG sensor readings onto the underlying source neural structures remains an active area of research. This so-called “inverse problem” is ill posed, and poses a challenge for source estimation that is often cited as a drawback limiting MEG data interpretation. However, anatomically constrained MEG localization estimates may be more accurate than commonly believed. Here we hypothesize that, by combining anatomically constrained inverse estimates across subjects, the spatial uncertainty of MEG source localization can be mitigated. Specifically, we argue that differences in subject brain geometry yield differences in point-spread functions, resulting in improved spatial localization across subjects. To test this, we use standard methods to combine subject anatomical MRI scans with coregistration information to obtain an accurate forward (physical) solution, modeling the MEG sensor data resulting from brain activity originating from different cortical locations. Using a linear minimum-norm inverse to localize this brain activity, we demonstrate that a substantial increase in the spatial accuracy of MEG source localization can result from combining data from subjects with differing brain geometry. This improvement may be enabled by an increase in the amount of available spatial information in MEG data as measurements from different subjects are combined. This approach becomes more important in the face of practical issues of coregistration errors and potential noise sources, where we observe even larger improvements in localization when combining data across subjects. Finally, we use a simple auditory N100(m) localization task to show how this effect can influence localization using a recorded neural dataset

  13. Inequality measures perform differently in global and local assessments: An exploratory computational experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yen-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Inequality measures are widely used in both the academia and public media to help us understand how incomes and wealth are distributed. They can be used to assess the distribution of a whole society-global inequality-as well as inequality of actors' referent networks-local inequality. How different is local inequality from global inequality? Formalizing the structure of reference groups as a network, the paper conducted a computational experiment to see how the structure of complex networks influences the difference between global and local inequality assessed by a selection of inequality measures. It was found that local inequality tends to be higher than global inequality when population size is large; network is dense and heterophilously assorted, and income distribution is less dispersed. The implications of the simulation findings are discussed.

  14. The Language of Fund-Raising Direct Mail: Differences between Letters for National and Local Constituencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringer, R. Jeffrey

    A study examined differences in the language of direct mail advertising used by political campaigns at different levels--national state, and local. Seventeen direct mail fund-raising political campaign letters were content analyzed with Wiseman and Schenck-Hamlin's typology of compliance-gaining techniques, language style and readability. The…

  15. Local cerebral blood flow and partition coefficients measured in cerebral astrocytomas of different grades of malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Rose, J.E.; Kandula, P.

    1984-02-01

    Local cerebral blood flow and local partition coefficients were measured in patients with different grades of malignant cerebral astrocytomas (n . 5) who inhaled 35% stable xenon during computed tomography scanning. Results were compared with those in age-matched normal subjects (n . 5. Mean values for local cerebral blood flow in the gray matter in patients with astrocytomas were decreased throughout the tumor mass and surrounding brain that was apparently free of tumor. Patients with highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme (astrocytoma grade IV; n . 2) showed more variable values for local cerebral blood flow and local partition coefficients compared to those with astrocytomas of lower grades (grades I-II; n . 3). Local partition coefficients in gray matter invaded by grade IV astrocytoma were significantly higher than those in gray matter invaded by grade I-III astrocytomas. Local cerebral blood flow and local partition coefficients in the brain tissue surrounding grade IV astrocytomas were reduced to a greater extent than those in more benign tumors.

  16. Intracultural Differences in Local Botanical Knowledge and Knowledge Loss among the Mexican Isthmus Zapotecs

    PubMed Central

    Saynes-Vásquez, Alfredo; Vibrans, Heike; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Caballero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the socio-demographic and locality factors that influence ethnobiological knowledge in three communities of Zapotec indigenous people of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico. It uses local botanical nomenclature as a proxy for general ethnobiological knowledge. In each of these communities (one urban and two rural), 100 adult men were interviewed aided with a field herbarium. Fifty had a background in farming, and 50 worked in the secondary or tertiary sector as their main economic activity, totaling 300 interviews. Using a field herbarium with samples of 30 common and rare wild regional species, we documented visual recognition, knowledge of the local life form, generic and specific names and uses (five knowledge levels measuring knowledge depth). The relationship between sociodemographic variables and knowledge was analyzed with simple correlations. Differences between the three communities and the five knowledge levels were then evaluated with a discriminant analysis. A general linear analysis identified factors and covariables that influenced the observed differences. Differences between the groups with different economic activities were estimated with a t-test for independent samples. Most of the relationships found between sociodemographic variables and plant knowledge were expected: age and rurality were positively related with knowledge and years of formal schooling was negatively related. However, the somewhat less rural site had more traditional knowledge due to local circumstances. The general linear model explained 70–77% of the variation, a high value. It showed that economic activity was by far the most important factor influencing knowledge, by a factor of five. The interaction of locality and economic activity followed. The discriminant analysis assigned interviewees correctly to their localities in 94% of the cases, strengthening the evidence for intracultural variation. Both sociodemographic and historic intracultural

  17. Processing advances for localization of beaked whales using time difference of arrival.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the localization of clicking Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) using an array of widely spaced bottom-mounted hydrophones. A set of signal and data processing advances are presented that together make reliable tracking a possibility. These advances include a species-specific detector, elimination of spurious time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) estimates, improved tracking of TDOA estimates, positive association of TDOA estimates using different hydrophone pairs, and joint localization of multiple whales. A key innovation in three of these advances is the principle of click-matching. The methods are demonstrated using real data. PMID:23742359

  18. Content based Image Retrieval based on Different Global and Local Color Histogram Methods: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhasini, Pallikonda Sarah; Sri Rama Krishna, K.; Murali Krishna, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    Different global and local color histogram methods for content based image retrieval (CBIR) are investigated in this paper. Color histogram is a widely used descriptor for CBIR. Conventional method of extracting color histogram is global, which misses the spatial content, is less invariant to deformation and viewpoint changes, and results in a very large three dimensional histogram corresponding to the color space used. To address the above deficiencies, different global and local histogram methods are proposed in recent research. Different ways of extracting local histograms to have spatial correspondence, invariant colour histogram to add deformation and viewpoint invariance and fuzzy linking method to reduce the size of the histogram are found in recent papers. The color space and the distance metric used are vital in obtaining color histogram. In this paper the performance of CBIR based on different global and local color histograms in three different color spaces, namely, RGB, HSV, L*a*b* and also with three distance measures Euclidean, Quadratic and Histogram intersection are surveyed, to choose appropriate method for future research.

  19. A Study of Locale-Wise Differences in Certain Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puar, Surjit Singh

    2012-01-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the locale-wise differences among high school students on the basis of certain cognitive variables like general mental ability and academic achievement and non-cognitive variables such as anxiety, emotional maturity and social maturity. The study was conducted over a sample of 400 (200 boys and…

  20. Differences in spawning date between populations of common frog reveal local adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Phillimore, Albert B.; Hadfield, Jarrod D.; Jones, Owen R.; Smithers, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Phenotypic differences between populations often correlate with climate variables, resulting from a combination of environment-induced plasticity and local adaptation. Species comprising populations that are genetically adapted to local climatic conditions should be more vulnerable to climate change than those comprising phenotypically plastic populations. Assessment of local adaptation generally requires logistically challenging experiments. Here, using a unique approach and a large dataset (>50,000 observations from across Britain), we compare the covariation in temperature and first spawning dates of the common frog (Rana temporaria) across space with that across time. We show that although all populations exhibit a plastic response to temperature, spawning earlier in warmer years, between-population differences in first spawning dates are dominated by local adaptation. Given climate change projections for Britain in 2050–2070, we project that for populations to remain as locally adapted as contemporary populations will require first spawning date to advance by ∼21–39 days but that plasticity alone will only enable an advance of ∼5–9 days. Populations may thus face a microevolutionary and gene flow challenge to advance first spawning date by a further ∼16–30 days over the next 50 years. PMID:20404185

  1. Local but not long-range microstructural differences of the ventral temporal cortex in developmental prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sunbin; Garrido, Lúcia; Nagy, Zoltan; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Steel, Adam; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Ray J.; Duchaine, Bradley; Furl, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) experience face recognition impairments despite normal intellect and low-level vision and no history of brain damage. Prior studies using diffusion tensor imaging in small samples of subjects with DP (n=6 or n=8) offer conflicting views on the neurobiological bases for DP, with one suggesting white matter differences in two major long-range tracts running through the temporal cortex, and another suggesting white matter differences confined to fibers local to ventral temporal face-specific functional regions of interest (fROIs) in the fusiform gyrus. Here, we address these inconsistent findings using a comprehensive set of analyzes in a sample of DP subjects larger than both prior studies combined (n=16). While we found no microstructural differences in long-range tracts between DP and age-matched control participants, we found differences local to face-specific fROIs, and relationships between these microstructural measures with face recognition ability. We conclude that subtle differences in local rather than long-range tracts in the ventral temporal lobe are more likely associated with developmental prosopagnosia. PMID:26456436

  2. Brain parcellation choice affects disease-related topology differences increasingly from global to local network levels.

    PubMed

    Lord, Anton; Ehrlich, Stefan; Borchardt, Viola; Geisler, Daniel; Seidel, Maria; Huber, Stefanie; Murr, Julia; Walter, Martin

    2016-03-30

    Network-based analyses of deviant brain function have become extremely popular in psychiatric neuroimaging. Underpinning brain network analyses is the selection of appropriate regions of interest (ROIs). Although ROI selection is fundamental in network analysis, its impact on detecting disease effects remains unclear. We investigated the impact of parcellation choice when comparing results from different studies. We investigated the effects of anatomical (AAL) and literature-based (Dosenbach) parcellation schemes on comparability of group differences in 35 female patients with anorexia nervosa and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Global and local network properties, including network-based statistics (NBS), were assessed on resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained at 3T. Parcellation schemes were comparably consistent on global network properties, while NBS and local metrics differed in location, but not metric type. Location of local metric alterations varied for AAL (parietal and cingulate cortices) versus Dosenbach (insula, thalamus) parcellation approaches. However, consistency was observed for the occipital cortex. Patient-specific global network properties can be robustly observed using different parcellation schemes, while graph metrics characterizing impairments of individual nodes vary considerably. Therefore, the impact of parcellation choice on specific group differences varies depending on the level of network organization. PMID:27000302

  3. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator and repressor proteins use different nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1996-02-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 encodes at least three nuclear phosphoproteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication. All three proteins have a common C-terminal domain that has DNA-binding and dimerization activities. A basic region in this domain forms an alpha helix which makes direct contact with the DNA target. In this study, it is shown that in addition to its role in DNA binding, this basic region functions as a nuclear localization signal both in the E2 DNA-binding domain and in a heterologous protein. Deletion of this signal sequence resulted in increased accumulation of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins in the cytoplasm, but nuclear localization was not eliminated. In the full-length transactivator protein, another signal, present in the N-terminal transactivation domain, is used for transport to the nucleus, and the C-terminal nuclear localization signal(s) are masked. The use of different nuclear localization signals could potentially allow differential regulation of the subcellular localization of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins at some stage in the viral life cycle. PMID:8551571

  4. International-local remuneration differences across six countries: do they undermine poverty reduction work?

    PubMed

    Carr, Stuart C; McWha, Ishbel; Maclachlan, Malcolm; Furnham, Adrian

    2010-10-01

    Despite the rhetoric of a single global economy, professionals in poorer countries continue to be remunerated differently depending on whether they are compensated at a local vs. international rate. Project ADDUP (Are Development Discrepancies Undermining Performance?) surveyed 1290 expatriate and local professionals (response rate = 47%) from aid, education, government, and business sectors in (1) Island Nations (Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands), (2) landlocked economies (Malaŵi, Uganda), and (3) emerging economies (India, China). Difference in pay was estimated using purchasing power parity, from the World Bank's World Development Indicators 2007. Psychological measures included self-reported pay and benefits (remuneration), self-attributed ability, remuneration comparison, sense of justice in remuneration, remuneration-related motivation, thoughts of turnover and thoughts about international mobility. We included control measures of candour, culture shock, cultural values (horizontal/vertical individualism/collectivism), personality (from the "big five"), job satisfaction and work engagement. Controlling for these and country (small effects) and organization effects (medium), (a) pay ratios between international and local workers exceeded what were perceived to be acceptable pay thresholds among respondents remunerated locally; who also reported a combination of a sense of relative (b) injustice and demotivation; which (c) together with job satisfaction/work engagement predicted turnover and international mobility. These findings question the wisdom of dual salary systems in general, expose and challenge a major contradiction between contemporary development policy and practice, and have a range of practical, organizational, and theoretical implications for poverty reduction work. PMID:22044054

  5. The effect of using different regions of interest on local and mean skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Maniar, Nirav; Bach, Aaron J E; Stewart, Ian B; Costello, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic nature of tissue temperature and the subcutaneous properties, such as blood flow, fatness, and metabolic rate, leads to variation in local skin temperature. Therefore, we investigated the effects of using multiple regions of interest when calculating weighted mean skin temperature from four local sites. Twenty-six healthy males completed a single trial in a thermonetural laboratory (mean ± SD): 24.0 (1.2)°C; 56 (8%) relative humidity; <0.1 m/s air speed). Mean skin temperature was calculated from four local sites (neck, scapula, hand and shin) in accordance with International Standards using digital infrared thermography. A 50 mm × 50 mm, defined by strips of aluminium tape, created six unique regions of interest, top left quadrant, top right quadrant, bottom left quadrant, bottom right quadrant, centre quadrant and the entire region of interest, at each of the local sites. The largest potential error in weighted mean skin temperature was calculated using a combination of a) the coolest and b) the warmest regions of interest at each of the local sites. Significant differences between the six regions interest were observed at the neck (P<0.01), scapula (P<0.001) and shin (P<0.05); but not at the hand (P = 0.482). The largest difference (± SEM) at each site was as follows: neck 0.2 (0.1)°C; scapula 0.2 (0.0)°C; shin 0.1 (0.0)°C and hand 0.1 (0.1)°C. The largest potential error (mean ± SD) in weighted mean skin temperature was 0.4 (0.1)°C (P<0.001) and the associated 95% limits of agreement for these differences was 0.2-0.5 °C. Although we observed differences in local and mean skin temperature based on the region of interest employed, these differences were minimal and are not considered physiologically meaningful. PMID:25774024

  6. Differences in Spending in School Districts across Geographic Locales in Minnesota. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 124

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Yinmei; Norbury, Heather; Molefe, Ayrin C.; Gerdeman, R. Dean; Meyers, Coby V.; Burke, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in spending in school districts across geographic locales in Minnesota and factors that might contribute to these differences. The study finds that district spending per student in 2008/09 varied across locale types in Minnesota. These differences are largely accounted for by differences in regional characteristics…

  7. Local electromechanical properties of different phenotype models of vascular smooth muscle cells using force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary; Reukov, Vladimir; Nikiforov, Maxim; Guo, Senli; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei; Vertegel, Alexey

    2010-03-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exist as a spectrum of diverse phenotypes raning between contractile and synthetic, the latter being associated with disease states. Different VSMC phenotypes, modeled using serum-starvation, exhibit characteristic electromechanical responses that can be distinguished using band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (BEPFM), which maps information at the same rate as the atomic force microscope (AFM) scan performed simultaneously. BEPFM image formation mechanism in the culture medium is determined using excitation steps from 1 mV to 100 V. High voltage improves contrast between cells and collagen-coated substrates. Viscoelasticity from AFM stress relaxation experiments and local elasticity from force maps correlate to BEPFM data providing a map of local mechanical properties on different VSMCs.

  8. Wolbachia Has Two Different Localization Patterns in Whitefly Bemisia tabaci AsiaII7 Species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peiqiong; He, Zhan; Li, Shaojian; An, Xuan; Lv, Ning; Ghanim, Murad; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Ren, Shun-Xiang; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a cosmopolitan insect species complex that harbors the obligate primary symbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum and several facultative secondary symbionts including Wolbachia, which have diverse influences on the host biology. Here, for the first time, we revealed two different localization patterns of Wolbachia present in the immature and adult stages of B. tabaci AsiaII7 cryptic species. In the confined pattern, Wolbachia was restricted to the bacteriocytes, while in the scattered pattern Wolbachia localized in the bacteriocytes, haemolymph and other organs simultaneously. Our results further indicated that, the proportion of B. tabaci AsiaII7 individuals with scattered Wolbachia were significantly lower than that of confined Wolbachia, and the distribution patterns of Wolbachia were not associated with the developmental stage or sex of whitefly host. This study will provide a new insight into the various transmission routes of Wolbachia in different whitefly species. PMID:27611575

  9. Time difference of arrival blast localization using a network of disposable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobler, Ronald A.; Plummer, Thomas J.

    2007-04-01

    Determining the location of an explosive event using a networked sensor system within an acceptable accuracy is a challenging problem. McQ has developed such a system, using a mesh network of inexpensive acoustic sensors. The system performs a three-dimensional, time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) localization of blasts of various yields in several different environments. Localization information of the blast is provided to the end user by exfiltration over satellite communications. The system is able to perform accurately in the presence of various sources of error including GPS position, propagation effects, temperature, and error in determining the time of arrival (TOA). The system design as well as its performance are presented.

  10. Combined implementation of holographic and speckle interferometry for comparative local stress analysis at different vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Sergey A.; Pisarev, Vladimir S.; Dzuba, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Vladimir D.

    1998-09-01

    New capability of combined application of time-averaged holographic interferometry and defocused speckle photography, allowing us a comparative analysis of local stresses corresponding to different vibration modes, is considered. The main aspects of the technique developed are illustrated by using as an example bending oscillations of thin square plate with a large central circular hole. Experimental results are compared with corresponding numerical data obtained by means of the MSC/NASTRAN software.

  11. Recognizing the bank robber and spotting the difference: emotional state and global vs. local attentional set.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Unguetti, Antonia Pilar; Acosta, Alberto; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In two experiments (161 participants in total), we investigated how current mood influences processing styles (global vs. local). Participants watched a video of a bank robbery before receiving a positive, negative or neutral induction, and they performed two tasks: a face-recognition task about the bank robber as global processing measure, and a spot-the-difference task using neutral pictures (Experiment-1) or emotional scenes (Experiment-2) as local processing measure. Results showed that positive mood induction favoured a global processing style, enhancing participants' ability to correctly identify a face even when they watched the video before the mood-induction. This shows that, besides influencing encoding processes, mood state can be also related to retrieval processes. On the contrary, negative mood induction enhanced a local processing style, making easier and faster the detection of differences between nearly identical pictures, independently of their valence. This dissociation supports the hypothesis that current mood modulates processing through activation of different cognitive styles. PMID:25012231

  12. High frequency source localization in a shallow ocean sound channel using frequency difference matched field processing.

    PubMed

    Worthmann, Brian M; Song, H C; Dowling, David R

    2015-12-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an established technique for source localization in known multipath acoustic environments. Unfortunately, in many situations, particularly those involving high frequency signals, imperfect knowledge of the actual propagation environment prevents accurate propagation modeling and source localization via MFP fails. For beamforming applications, this actual-to-model mismatch problem was mitigated through a frequency downshift, made possible by a nonlinear array-signal-processing technique called frequency difference beamforming [Abadi, Song, and Dowling (2012). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3018-3029]. Here, this technique is extended to conventional (Bartlett) MFP using simulations and measurements from the 2011 Kauai Acoustic Communications MURI experiment (KAM11) to produce ambiguity surfaces at frequencies well below the signal bandwidth where the detrimental effects of mismatch are reduced. Both the simulation and experimental results suggest that frequency difference MFP can be more robust against environmental mismatch than conventional MFP. In particular, signals of frequency 11.2 kHz-32.8 kHz were broadcast 3 km through a 106-m-deep shallow ocean sound channel to a sparse 16-element vertical receiving array. Frequency difference MFP unambiguously localized the source in several experimental data sets with average peak-to-side-lobe ratio of 0.9 dB, average absolute-value range error of 170 m, and average absolute-value depth error of 10 m. PMID:26723312

  13. Isolation and characterization of chitosan from different local insects in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Marei, Narguess H; El-Samie, Emtithal Abd; Salah, Taher; Saad, Gamal R; Elwahy, Ahmed H M

    2016-01-01

    Chitin was extracted from four different local sources: the shrimp (Penaeus monodon), the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria), the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the beetles (Calosoma rugosa). Chitosan was then obtained by deacetylation of chitin and physicochemically characterized using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction. The moisture content, water binding capacity, fats binding capacity, ash content were determined and chitosans morphology was visualized using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The difference between the obtained chitosans from three insect sources and α-chitosan from shrimp in terms of crystallinity, fibrous structure was discussed. PMID:26459168

  14. A finite difference method with reciprocity used to incorporate anisotropy in electroencephalogram dipole source localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallez, Hans; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Hese, Peter; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Van de Walle, Rik

    2005-08-01

    Many implementations of electroencephalogram (EEG) dipole source localization neglect the anisotropical conductivities inherent to brain tissues, such as the skull and white matter anisotropy. An examination of dipole localization errors is made in EEG source analysis, due to not incorporating the anisotropic properties of the conductivity of the skull and white matter. First, simulations were performed in a 5 shell spherical head model using the analytical formula. Test dipoles were placed in three orthogonal planes in the spherical head model. Neglecting the skull anisotropy results in a dipole localization error of, on average, 13.73 mm with a maximum of 24.51 mm. For white matter anisotropy these values are 11.21 mm and 26.3 mm, respectively. Next, a finite difference method (FDM), presented by Saleheen and Kwong (1997 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 44 800-9), is used to incorporate the anisotropy of the skull and white matter. The FDM method has been validated for EEG dipole source localization in head models with all compartments isotropic as well as in a head model with white matter anisotropy. In a head model with skull anisotropy the numerical method could only be validated if the 3D lattice was chosen very fine (grid size <=2 mm).

  15. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  16. An impact source localization technique for a nuclear power plant by using sensors of different types.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Chul; Park, Jin-Ho; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, a loose part monitoring system (LPMS) provides information on the location and the mass of a loosened or detached metal impacted onto the inner surface of the primary pressure boundary. Typically, accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a reactor vessel to localize the impact location caused by the impact of metallic substances on the reactor system. However, in some cases, the number of accelerometers is not sufficient to estimate the impact location precisely. In such a case, one of useful methods is to utilize other types of sensor that can measure the vibration of the reactor structure. For example, acoustic emission (AE) sensors are installed on the reactor structure to detect leakage or cracks on the primary pressure boundary. However, accelerometers and AE sensors have a different frequency range. The frequency of interest of AE sensors is higher than that of accelerometers. In this paper, we propose a method of impact source localization by using both accelerometer signals and AE signals, simultaneously. The main concept of impact location estimation is based on the arrival time difference of the impact stress wave between different sensor locations. However, it is difficult to find the arrival time difference between sensors, because the primary frequency ranges of accelerometers and AE sensors are different. To overcome the problem, we used phase delays of an envelope of impact signals. This is because the impact signals from the accelerometer and the AE sensor are similar in the whole shape (envelope). To verify the proposed method, we have performed experiments for a reactor mock-up model and a real nuclear power plant. The experimental results demonstrate that we can enhance the reliability and precision of the impact source localization. Therefore, if the proposed method is applied to a nuclear power plant, we can obtain the effect of additional installed sensors. PMID:20851393

  17. Overview about the localization of nanoparticles in tissue and cellular context by different imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Anja; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Boreham, Alexander; Holzhausen, Cornelia; Mundhenk, Lars; Graf, Christina; Meinke, Martina C; Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Lademann, Jürgen; Rühl, Eckart; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Summary The increasing interest and recent developments in nanotechnology pose previously unparalleled challenges in understanding the effects of nanoparticles on living tissues. Despite significant progress in in vitro cell and tissue culture technologies, observations on particle distribution and tissue responses in whole organisms are still indispensable. In addition to a thorough understanding of complex tissue responses which is the domain of expert pathologists, the localization of particles at their sites of interaction with living structures is essential to complete the picture. In this review we will describe and compare different imaging techniques for localizing inorganic as well as organic nanoparticles in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments. The visualization techniques include well-established methods, such as standard light, fluorescence, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy as well as more recent developments, such as light and electron microscopic autoradiography, fluorescence lifetime imaging, spectral imaging and linear unmixing, superresolution structured illumination, Raman microspectroscopy and X-ray microscopy. Importantly, all methodologies described allow for the simultaneous visualization of nanoparticles and evaluation of cell and tissue changes that are of prime interest for toxicopathologic studies. However, the different approaches vary in terms of applicability for specific particles, sensitivity, optical resolution, technical requirements and thus availability, and effects of labeling on particle properties. Specific bottle necks of each technology are discussed in detail. Interpretation of particle localization data from any of these techniques should therefore respect their specific merits and limitations as no single approach combines all desired properties. PMID:25671170

  18. Overview about the localization of nanoparticles in tissue and cellular context by different imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Anja; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Boreham, Alexander; Holzhausen, Cornelia; Mundhenk, Lars; Graf, Christina; Meinke, Martina C; Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Lademann, Jürgen; Rühl, Eckart; Alexiev, Ulrike; Gruber, Achim D

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest and recent developments in nanotechnology pose previously unparalleled challenges in understanding the effects of nanoparticles on living tissues. Despite significant progress in in vitro cell and tissue culture technologies, observations on particle distribution and tissue responses in whole organisms are still indispensable. In addition to a thorough understanding of complex tissue responses which is the domain of expert pathologists, the localization of particles at their sites of interaction with living structures is essential to complete the picture. In this review we will describe and compare different imaging techniques for localizing inorganic as well as organic nanoparticles in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments. The visualization techniques include well-established methods, such as standard light, fluorescence, transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy as well as more recent developments, such as light and electron microscopic autoradiography, fluorescence lifetime imaging, spectral imaging and linear unmixing, superresolution structured illumination, Raman microspectroscopy and X-ray microscopy. Importantly, all methodologies described allow for the simultaneous visualization of nanoparticles and evaluation of cell and tissue changes that are of prime interest for toxicopathologic studies. However, the different approaches vary in terms of applicability for specific particles, sensitivity, optical resolution, technical requirements and thus availability, and effects of labeling on particle properties. Specific bottle necks of each technology are discussed in detail. Interpretation of particle localization data from any of these techniques should therefore respect their specific merits and limitations as no single approach combines all desired properties. PMID:25671170

  19. Plasticity in variation of xylem and phloem cell characteristics of Norway spruce under different local conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gričar, Jožica; Prislan, Peter; de Luis, Martin; Gryc, Vladimír; Hacurová, Jana; Vavrčík, Hanuš; Čufar, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on intra-annual plasticity of secondary tissues of tree species growing under different environmental conditions. To increase the knowledge about the plasticity of secondary growth, which allows trees to adapt to specific local climatic regimes, we examined climate–radial growth relationships of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.] from three contrasting locations in the temperate climatic zone by analyzing tree-ring widths for the period 1932–2010, and cell characteristics in xylem and phloem increments formed in the years 2009–2011. Variation in the structure of xylem and phloem increments clearly shows that plasticity in seasonal dynamics of cambial cell production and cell differentiation exists on xylem and phloem sides. Anatomical characteristics of xylem and phloem cells are predominantly site-specific characteristics, because they varied among sites but were fairly uniform among years in trees from the same site. Xylem and phloem tissues formed in the first part of the growing season seemed to be more stable in structure, indicating their priority over latewood and late phloem for tree performance. Long-term climate and radial growth analyses revealed that growth was in general less dependent on precipitation than on temperature; however, growth sensitivity to local conditions differed among the sites. Only partial dependence of radial growth of spruce on climatic factors on the selected sites confirms its strategy to adapt the structure of wood and phloem increments to function optimally in local conditions. PMID:26442044

  20. Sub-plastidial localization of two different phage-type RNA polymerases in spinach chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Jacinthe; Courtois, Florence; Lerbs-Mache, Silva

    2006-01-01

    Plant plastids contain a circular genome of ∼150 kb organized into ∼35 transcription units. The plastid genome is organized into nucleoids and attached to plastid membranes. This relatively small genome is transcribed by at least two different RNA polymerases, one being of the prokaryotic type and plastid-encoded (PEP), the other one being of the phage-type and nucleus-encoded (NEP). The presumed localization of a second phage-type RNA polymerase in plastids is still questionable. There is strong evidence for a sequential action of NEP and PEP enzymes during plant development attributing a prevailing role of NEP during early plant and plastid development, although NEP is present in mature chloroplasts. In the present paper, we have analysed two different NEP enzymes from spinach with respect to subcellular and intra-plastidial localization in mature chloroplasts with the help of specific antibodies. Results show the presence of the two different NEP enzymes in mature chloroplasts. Both enzymes are entirely membrane bound but, unlike previously thought, this membrane binding is not mediated via DNA. This finding indicates that NEP enzymes are not found as elongating transcription complexes on the template DNA in mature chloroplasts and raises the question of their function in mature chloroplasts. PMID:16421271

  1. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of (125I)cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species.

  2. Constrained Simulations of the Local Universe in Different Dark Matter Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Yepes, G.; Martinez-Vaquero, L. A.; Gottloeber, S.; Hoffman, Y.

    2009-04-17

    Constrained simulations of the Local Universe are an invaluable tool to investigate in detail the nature of dark matter particles. Thanks to them, we can simulate the formation of dark halos in environments pretty much like the one our Milky Way happened to live. A direct comparison with observations of our Local Universe can be made in this way, minimizing the effects of cosmic variance in the simulations. In this paper we present the results of a comparison of high-resolution simulated Local Group (LG) objects done in 3 different dark matter scenarios: The standard Cold Dark Matter and two Warm Dark Matter models with particles masses ranging from 3 to 1 keV, that are still compatible with high-redshift observations. We focus here on the study of substructures and mass profiles for the CDM and WDM LG objects and draw some conclusions about the limits on the mass of warm dark matter particles to be compatible with the most recently discovered Milky Way ultra-faint satellites.

  3. Sound Source Localization for HRI Using FOC-Based Time Difference Feature and Spatial Grid Matching.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Hong

    2013-08-01

    In human-robot interaction (HRI), speech sound source localization (SSL) is a convenient and efficient way to obtain the relative position between a speaker and a robot. However, implementing a SSL system based on TDOA method encounters many problems, such as noise of real environments, the solution of nonlinear equations, switch between far field and near field. In this paper, fourth-order cumulant spectrum is derived, based on which a time delay estimation (TDE) algorithm that is available for speech signal and immune to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is proposed. Furthermore, time difference feature of sound source and its spatial distribution are analyzed, and a spatial grid matching (SGM) algorithm is proposed for localization step, which handles some problems that geometric positioning method faces effectively. Valid feature detection algorithm and a decision tree method are also suggested to improve localization performance and reduce computational complexity. Experiments are carried out in real environments on a mobile robot platform, in which thousands of sets of speech data with noise collected by four microphones are tested in 3D space. The effectiveness of our TDE method and SGM algorithm is verified. PMID:26502430

  4. Cold perception and cutaneous microvascular response to local cooling at different cooling temperatures.

    PubMed

    Music, Mark; Finderle, Zarko; Cankar, Ksenija

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of quantitatively measured cold perception (CP) thresholds on microcirculatory response to local cooling as measured by direct and indirect response of laser-Doppler (LD) flux during local cooling at different temperatures. The CP thresholds were measured in 18 healthy males using the Marstock method (thermode placed on the thenar). The direct (at the cooling site) and indirect (on contralateral hand) LD flux responses were recorded during immersion of the hand in a water bath at 20°C, 15°C, and 10°C. The cold perception threshold correlated (linear regression analysis, Pearson correlation) with the indirect LD flux response at cooling temperatures 20°C (r=0.782, p<0.01) and 15°C (r=0.605, p<0.01). In contrast, there was no correlation between the CP threshold and the indirect LD flux response during cooling in water at 10°C. The results demonstrate that during local cooling, depending on the cooling temperature used, cold perception threshold influences indirect LD flux response. PMID:21256855

  5. Drug localization in different lung cancer phenotypes by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Marko-Varga, György; Fehniger, Thomas E; Rezeli, Melinda; Döme, Balázs; Laurell, Thomas; Végvári, Akos

    2011-06-10

    Lung cancer is a common cause of cancer mortality in the world, largely due to the risk factor of tobacco smoking. The drug therapy at the molecular level includes targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activity by using inhibitors, such as erlotinib (Tarceva) and gefitinib (Iressa). The heterogeneity of disease phenotypes and the somatic mutations presented in patient populations have a great impact on the efficacy of treatments using targeted personalized medicine. In this study, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of erlotinib and gefitinib in three different lung cancer tumor phenotypes, using MALDI instrumentation in imaging mode, providing spatial localization of drugs without chemical labeling. Erlotinib and gefitinib were analyzed in i) planocellular lung carcinoma, ii) adenocarcinoma and iii) large cell lung carcinoma following their deposition on the tissue surfaces by piezo-dispensing, using a controlled procedure. The importance of high-resolution sampling was crucial in order to accurately localize the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors deposited in heterogeneous cancer tissue compartments. This is the first report on personalized drug characterization with localizations at a lateral resolution of 30μm, which allowed us to map these compounds at attomolar concentrations within the lung tumor tissue microenvironments. PMID:21440690

  6. Spatiotemporal Pattern of Root Water Uptake for Locally Differing Soil Water Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dara, Abbas; Moradi, Ahmad B.; Oswald, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    replaces each, were applied as: no stress (control), %50 stress (water available for 50% of the lateral roots) and 75% stress (water available for 25% of lateral roots in old and young parts in two individual treatments). Two levels of transpiration demand in 5-day periods each were also applied, interrupted by five days of recovering in between. Daily changes in soil water content and root water uptake rate in each compartment have been monitored by neutron radiography four times a day as well as daily transpiration rates. The results show a high compensatory water uptake by the root segments in the wet parts under water stress. This root compensation increases significantly with increasing portion of the root system suffering water scarcity. ; While for low transpiration demand, there was not a significant difference in transpiration rate between 50% and 25% local water availability, for higher transpiration demand transpiration demand cannot be fully compensated when water is provided for the root system locally. In respect to root topology , root segments in the top with less distance to the shoot show higher rates of water uptake then those in the lower position while the difference in local root water uptake between old and young roots is not that high.

  7. Accumulation and localization of cadmium in potato (Solanum tuberosum) under different soil Cd levels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifan; Zhao, Ye; Gu, Lei; Wang, Shuifeng; Li, Yongliang; Dong, Fangli

    2014-06-01

    Phytoavailability and uptake mechanism of Cd in edible plant tissues grown on metal polluted agricultural soils has become a growing concern worldwide. Uptake, transport, accumulation and localization of cadmium in potato organs under different soil Cd levels were investigated using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Results indicated that Cd contents in potato organs increased with increasing soil Cd concentrations, and the order of Cd contents in different organs was leaves > stems/roots > tubers. Root-to-stem Cd translocation coefficients ranged from 0.89 to 1.81. Cd localization in potato tissues suggested that leaves and stems should be the main compartment of Cd storage and uptake. Although low concentrations of Cd migrated from the root to tuber, Cd accumulation in the tuber exceeded the standard for food security. Therefore, the planting of potato plants in farmland containing Cd should be closely evaluated due to its potential to present health risks. PMID:24682567

  8. Racial Differences in Diffusion of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cobran, Ewan K; Chen, Ronald C; Overman, Robert; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; O'Brien, Jonathon; Sturmer, Til; Sheets, Nathan C; Goldin, Gregg H; Penn, Dolly C; Godley, Paul A; Carpenter, William R

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), an innovative treatment option for prostate cancer, has rapidly diffused over the past decade. To inform our understanding of racial disparities in prostate cancer treatment and outcomes, this study compared diffusion of IMRT in African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) prostate cancer patients during the early years of IMRT diffusion using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. A retrospective cohort of 947 AA and 10,028 CA patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer from 2002 through 2006, who were treated with either IMRT or non-IMRT as primary treatment within 1 year of diagnoses was constructed. Logistic regression was used to examine potential differences in diffusion of IMRT in AA and CA patients, while adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical covariates. A significantly smaller proportion of AA compared with CA patients received IMRT for localized prostate cancer (45% vs. 53%, p < .0001). Racial differences were apparent in multivariable analysis though did not achieve statistical significance, as time and factors associated with race (socioeconomic, geographic, and tumor related factors) explained the preponderance of variance in use of IMRT. Further research examining improved access to innovative cancer treatment and technologies is essential to reducing racial disparities in cancer care. PMID:25657192

  9. Local differences in parasitism and competition shape defensive investment in a polymorphic eusocial bee.

    PubMed

    Segers, Francisca H I D; von Zuben, Lucas; Grüter, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Many colonial animals rely for their defense on a soldier caste. Adaptive colony demography theory predicts that colonies should flexibly adjust the investment in different worker castes depending on the colony needs. For example, colonies should invest more in defensive workers (e.g., soldiers) in dangerous environments. However, evidence for this prediction has been mixed. We combined descriptive and experimental approaches to examine whether defensive investment and worker size are adjusted to local ecology in the only known bee with polymorphic workers, Tetragonisca angustula. Colonies of this species are defended by a morphologically specialized soldier caste. Our study included three populations that differed in the density of food competition and the occurrence of a parasitic robber bee. We found that colonies coexisting with robber bees had on average 43% more soldiers defending the nest entrance, while colonies facing stronger foraging competition had soldiers that were -6-7% smaller. We then experimentally relocated colonies to areas with different levels of competition. When released from intense food competition, body sizes of guards and foragers increased. After introducing chemical robber bee cues at nest entrances, we found both a short-term and a long-term up-regulation of the number of soldiers defending the colony. Active soldier numbers remained high after the experiment for a duration equivalent to 2-3 worker life spans. How information about past parasite threat is stored in the colony is currently unknown. In summary, T. angustula adjusts both the number and the body size of active soldiers to local ecological conditions. Competitor density also affects forager (or minor) size, an important colony trait with potential community ecological consequences. Our study supports adaptive colony demography theory in a eusocial bee and highlights the importance of colony threats and competition as selective forces shaping colony phenotype. PMID:27145616

  10. Responses of different ion species to fast plasma flows and local dipolarization in the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, S.; Nosé, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    2015-01-01

    investigate the responses of different ion species (H+, He+, He++, and O+) to fast plasma flows and local dipolarization in the plasma sheet in terms of energy density. We use energetic (9-210 keV) ion composition measurements made by the Geotail satellite at r = 10~31 RE. The results are summarized as follows: (1) whereas the O+-to-H+ ratio decreases with earthward flow velocity, it increases with tailward flow velocity with steeper Vx dependence for perpendicular flows than for parallel flows; (2) for fast earthward flows, the energy density of each ion species increases without any clear preference for heavy ions; (3) for fast tailward flows, the ion energy density initially increases, then it decreases to below the preceding levels except for O+; (4) the O+-to-H+ ratio does not increase through local dipolarization irrespective of dipolarization amplitude, background Bz, X distance, and Vx; (5) in general, the H+ and He++ ions behave similarly. Result (1) can be attributed to radial transport in the presence of the earthward gradient of the background O+-to-H+ ratio. Results (2) and (4) suggest that ion energization at local dipolarization is not mass dependent in the energy range of our interest because the ions are not magnetized irrespective of species. Result (3) can be attributed to the thinning of the plasma sheet and the preferable field-aligned escape of the H+ ions on the tailward side of the reconnection site. Result (5) suggests that the solar wind is the primary source of the high-energy H+ ions.

  11. Silicon and boron differ in their localization and loading in bone☆

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Pedro, Liliana D.; Watson, Abigail; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon and boron share many similarities, both chemically and biochemically, including having similar effects on bone, although their mechanisms of action are not known. Here we compared the loading of silicon and boron into bone, their localization and how they are influenced by age (growth & development), to obtain further clues as to the biological effects of these elements and, especially, to see if they behave the same or not. Bone samples were obtained from two different studies where female Sprague Dawley rats had been maintained on a normal maintenance diet for up to 43 weeks. Total bone elemental levels were determined by ICP-OES following microwave assisted acid digestion. Silicon and boron levels in the decalcified bones (i.e. the collagen fraction) were also investigated. Silicon and boron showed marked differences in loading and in their localization in bone. Highest silicon and lowest boron concentrations were found in the under-mineralized bone of younger rats and lowest silicon and highest boron concentrations were found in the fully mineralized bone of the adult rat. Overall, however total bone silicon content increased with age, as did boron content, the latter mirroring the increase in calcium (mineral) content of bone. However, whereas silicon showed equal distribution in the collagen and mineral fractions of bone, boron was exclusively localized in the mineral fraction. These findings confirm the reported association between silicon and collagen, especially at the early stages of bone mineralization, and show that boron is associated with the bone mineral but not connective tissues. These data suggest that silicon and boron have different biological roles and that one is unlikely, therefore, to substitute for the other, or at least boron would not substitute for Si in the connective tissues. Finally, we noted that silicon levels in the mineral fraction varied greatly between the two studies, suggesting that one or more nutritional factor

  12. Evaluation of the antimicrobial properties of different parts of Citrus aurantifolia (lime fruit) as used locally.

    PubMed

    Aibinu, Ibukun; Adenipekun, Tayo; Adelowotan, Toyin; Ogunsanya, Tolu; Odugbemi, Tolu

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the potency of Citrus aurantifolia (Lime fruit), against pathogens, in the different forms in which this fruit plant is used locally (juice of the fruit, burnt rind of the fruit commonly known as "epa-ijebu" in the Yoruba dialect) and the oil obtained from steam distillation of the fruit. The antimicrobial activity of "epa-ijebu" in different solvents was also compared. The solvents include palm-wine (a local alcoholic drink tapped from palm trees), Seaman's Schnapps 40% alcoholic drink, water, ethanol and fermented water from 3 days soaked milled maize known as "ekan-ogi" or "omidun" in the Yoruba dialect. Antimicrobial activity was carried out by the agar well diffusion. The clinical isolates used included Anaerobic facultative bacteria, namely: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25213, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella paratyphi, Shigella flexnerii, Streptococcus faecalis, Citrobacter spp, Serratia spp, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Escherichia coli; Fungi such as Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans; and Anaerobes which includes Bacteroides spp, Porphyromonas spp, and Clostridium spp. Crude extracts of all solvents used varied in zones of inhibition. The anaerobes and the gram-positive bacteria were susceptible to all the extracts with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 32 mg/ml-128 g/ml. The activity against the fungi showed only the oil extract potent for A. niger, while Candida albicans was susceptible to all the extracts with MIC ranging from 256 mg/ml-512 mg/ml. The gram-negatives have MIC ranging from 64 mg/ml-512 mg/ml. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) ranged between 32 mg/ml to 512 mg/ml depending on isolates and extracting solvent. The oil and palm-wine extract of "epa-ijebu" showed greater activity than the other extracts. The killing rate of the schnapps extract on S. aureus and E. coli was 1 and 3.5 hours respectively. PMID:20162090

  13. Targeting capacity and conservation of PreP homologues localization in mitochondria of different species.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Nyosha; Berglund, Anna-Karin; Engmann, Tanja; Spånning, Erika; Vögtle, F-Nora; Pavlov, Pavel; Meisinger, Chris; Langer, Thomas; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2011-07-15

    Mitochondrial presequences and other unstructured peptides are degraded inside mitochondria by presequence proteases (PrePs) identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPreP), humans (hPreP), and yeast (Cym1/Mop112). The presequences of A. thaliana and human PreP are predicted to consist of 85 and 29 amino acids, respectively, whereas the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cym1/Mop112 presequence contains only 7 residues. These differences may explain the reported targeting of homologous proteins to different mitochondrial subcompartments. Here we have investigated the targeting capacity of the PreP homologues' presequences. We have produced fusion constructs containing N-terminal portions of AtPreP(1-125), hPreP(1-69), and Cym1(1-40) coupled to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and studied their import into isolated plant, mammalian, and yeast mitochondria, followed by mitochondrial subfractionation. Whereas the AtPreP presequence has the capacity to target GFP into the mitochondrial matrix of all three species, the hPreP presequence only targets GFP to the matrix of mammalian and yeast mitochondria. The Cym1/Mop112 presequence has an overall much weaker targeting capacity and only ensures mitochondrial sorting in its host species yeast. Revisiting the submitochondrial localization of Cym1 revealed that endogenous Cym1/Mop112 is localized to the matrix space, as has been previously reported for the plant and human homologues. Moreover, complementation studies in yeast show that native AtPreP restores the growth phenotype of yeast cells lacking Cym1, demonstrating functional conservation. PMID:21621546

  14. Tolerance for local and global differences in the integration of shape information.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, J Edwin; Cribb, Serena J; Riddell, Hugh; Badcock, David R

    2015-01-01

    Shape is a critical cue to object identity. In psychophysical studies, radial frequency (RF) patterns, paths deformed from circular by a sinusoidal modulation of radius, have proved valuable stimuli for the demonstration of global integration of local shape information. Models of the mechanism of integration have focused on the periodicity in measures of curvature on the pattern, despite the fact that other properties covary. We show that patterns defined by rectified sinusoidal modulation also exhibit global integration and are indistinguishable from conventional RF patterns at their thresholds for detection, demonstrating some indifference to the modulating function. Further, irregular patterns incorporating four different frequencies of modulation are globally integrated, indicating that uniform periodicity is not critical. Irregular patterns can be handed in the sense that mirror images cannot be superimposed. We show that mirror images of the same irregular pattern could not be discriminated near their thresholds for detection. The same irregular pattern and a pattern with four cycles of a constant frequency of modulation completing 2π radians were, however, perfectly discriminated, demonstrating the existence of discrete representations of these patterns by which they are discriminated. It has previously been shown that RF patterns of different frequencies are perfectly discriminated but that patterns with the same frequency but different numbers of cycles of modulation were not. We conclude that such patterns are identified, near threshold, by the set of angles subtended at the center of the pattern by adjacent points of maximum convex curvature. PMID:25814547

  15. Sequence variation in ROP8 gene among Toxoplasma gondii isolates from different hosts and geographical localities.

    PubMed

    Li, Z Y; Chen, J; Lu, J; Wang, C R; Zhu, X Q

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii has a worldwide distribution; it can cause serious diseases in humans and almost all other warm-blooded animals. Different genotypes of T. gondii result in different lesions in the same host. T. gondii rhoptry protein 8 (TgROP8) is a major factor of T. gondii acute virulence. We examined sequence variation in the TgROP8 gene among T. gondii isolates from different hosts and geographical localities. The TgROP8 gene was amplified from individual isolates and sequenced. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood based on the sequences obtained plus TgME49 from the ToxoDB database. The TgROP8 gene was 1728 bp in length for all the examined T. gondii strains, and their A+T contents were 45.37-45.95%. Sequence analysis detected 140 (0.06-5.56%) variable nucleotide positions resulting in 96 (0-10.78%) amino acid substitutions. Sequence variations in the TgROP8 gene resulted in polymorphic restriction sites for endonucleases BstBI, BsaI, and XhoI, which allowed the differentiation of the three classical genotype strains (types I, II, and III) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). However, phylogenetic analyses indicated that the TgROP8 gene is not a suitable genetic marker for population studies of T. gondii. PMID:26436382

  16. Investigation of in-body path loss in different human subjects for localization of capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Ara, Perzila; Cheng, Shaokoon; Heimlich, Michael; Dutkiewicz, Eryk

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in capsule endoscopy have highlighted the need for accurate techniques to estimate the location of a capsule endoscope. A highly accurate location estimation of a capsule endoscope in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in the range of several millimeters is a challenging task. This is mainly because the radio-frequency signals encounter high loss and a highly dynamic channel propagation environment. Therefore, an accurate path-loss model is required for the development of accurate localization algorithms. This paper presents an in-body path-loss model for the human abdomen region at 2.4 GHz frequency. To develop the path-loss model, electromagnetic simulations using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method were carried out on two different anatomical human models. A mathematical expression for the path-loss model was proposed based on analysis of the measured loss at different capsule locations inside the small intestine. The proposed path-loss model is a good approximation to model in-body RF propagation, since the real measurements are quite infeasible for the capsule endoscopy subject. PMID:26737527

  17. Factors Influencing Local Communities' Satisfaction Levels with Different Forest Management Approaches of Kakamega Forest, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthiga, Paul M.; Mburu, John; Holm-Mueller, Karin

    2008-05-01

    Satisfaction of communities living close to forests with forest management authorities is essential for ensuring continued support for conservation efforts. However, more often than not, community satisfaction is not systematically elicited, analyzed, and incorporated in conservation decisions. This study attempts to elicit levels of community satisfaction with three management approaches of Kakamega forest in Kenya and analyze factors influencing them. Three distinct management approaches are applied by three different authorities: an incentive-based approach of the Forest Department (FD), a protectionist approach of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), and a quasi-private incentive-based approach of Quakers Church Mission (QCM). Data was obtained from a random sample of about 360 households living within a 10-km radius around the forest margin. The protectionist approach was ranked highest overall for its performance in forest management. Results indicate that households are influenced by different factors in their ranking of management approaches. Educated households and those located far from market centers are likely to be dissatisfied with all the three management approaches. The location of the households from the forest margin influences negatively the satisfaction with the protectionist approach, whereas land size, a proxy for durable assets, has a similar effect on the private incentive based approach of the QCM. In conclusion, this article indicates a number of policy implications that can enable the different authorities and their management approaches to gain approval of the local communities.

  18. Local difference measures between complex networks for dynamical system model evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F; Volkholz, Jan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A faithful modeling of real-world dynamical systems necessitates model evaluation. A recent promising methodological approach to this problem has been based on complex networks, which in turn have proven useful for the characterization of dynamical systems. In this context, we introduce three local network difference measures and demonstrate their capabilities in the field of climate modeling, where these measures facilitate a spatially explicit model evaluation.Building on a recent study by Feldhoff et al. [8] we comparatively analyze statistical and dynamical regional climate simulations of the South American monsoon system [corrected]. types of climate networks representing different aspects of rainfall dynamics are constructed from the modeled precipitation space-time series. Specifically, we define simple graphs based on positive as well as negative rank correlations between rainfall anomaly time series at different locations, and such based on spatial synchronizations of extreme rain events. An evaluation against respective networks built from daily satellite data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V7 reveals far greater differences in model performance between network types for a fixed but arbitrary climate model than between climate models for a fixed but arbitrary network type. We identify two sources of uncertainty in this respect. Firstly, climate variability limits fidelity, particularly in the case of the extreme event network; and secondly, larger geographical link lengths render link misplacements more likely, most notably in the case of the anticorrelation network; both contributions are quantified using suitable ensembles of surrogate networks. Our model evaluation approach is applicable to any multidimensional dynamical system and especially our simple graph difference measures are highly versatile as the graphs to be compared may be constructed in whatever way required. Generalizations to directed as well as edge- and node

  19. Local Difference Measures between Complex Networks for Dynamical System Model Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F.; Volkholz, Jan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A faithful modeling of real-world dynamical systems necessitates model evaluation. A recent promising methodological approach to this problem has been based on complex networks, which in turn have proven useful for the characterization of dynamical systems. In this context, we introduce three local network difference measures and demonstrate their capabilities in the field of climate modeling, where these measures facilitate a spatially explicit model evaluation. Building on a recent study by Feldhoff et al. [1] we comparatively analyze statistical and dynamical regional climate simulations of the South American monsoon system. Three types of climate networks representing different aspects of rainfall dynamics are constructed from the modeled precipitation space-time series. Specifically, we define simple graphs based on positive as well as negative rank correlations between rainfall anomaly time series at different locations, and such based on spatial synchronizations of extreme rain events. An evaluation against respective networks built from daily satellite data provided by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 V7 reveals far greater differences in model performance between network types for a fixed but arbitrary climate model than between climate models for a fixed but arbitrary network type. We identify two sources of uncertainty in this respect. Firstly, climate variability limits fidelity, particularly in the case of the extreme event network; and secondly, larger geographical link lengths render link misplacements more likely, most notably in the case of the anticorrelation network; both contributions are quantified using suitable ensembles of surrogate networks. Our model evaluation approach is applicable to any multidimensional dynamical system and especially our simple graph difference measures are highly versatile as the graphs to be compared may be constructed in whatever way required. Generalizations to directed as well as edge- and node

  20. Composite scheme using localized relaxation with non-standard finite difference method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vivek; Raghurama Rao, S. V.

    2008-04-01

    Non-standard finite difference methods (NSFDM) introduced by Mickens [ Non-standard Finite Difference Models of Differential Equations, World Scientific, Singapore, 1994] are interesting alternatives to the traditional finite difference and finite volume methods. When applied to linear hyperbolic conservation laws, these methods reproduce exact solutions. In this paper, the NSFDM is first extended to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, by a novel utilization of the decoupled equations using characteristic variables. In the second part of this paper, the NSFDM is studied for its efficacy in application to nonlinear scalar hyperbolic conservation laws. The original NSFDMs introduced by Mickens (1994) were not in conservation form, which is an important feature in capturing discontinuities at the right locations. Mickens [Construction and analysis of a non-standard finite difference scheme for the Burgers-Fisher equations, Journal of Sound and Vibration 257 (4) (2002) 791-797] recently introduced a NSFDM in conservative form. This method captures the shock waves exactly, without any numerical dissipation. In this paper, this algorithm is tested for the case of expansion waves with sonic points and is found to generate unphysical expansion shocks. As a remedy to this defect, we use the strategy of composite schemes [R. Liska, B. Wendroff, Composite schemes for conservation laws, SIAM Journal of Numerical Analysis 35 (6) (1998) 2250-2271] in which the accurate NSFDM is used as the basic scheme and localized relaxation NSFDM is used as the supporting scheme which acts like a filter. Relaxation schemes introduced by Jin and Xin [The relaxation schemes for systems of conservation laws in arbitrary space dimensions, Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics 48 (1995) 235-276] are based on relaxation systems which replace the nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws by a semi-linear system with a stiff relaxation term. The relaxation parameter ( λ) is chosen locally

  1. Measurement of mechanical characteristics of tibial periosteum and evaluation of local differences.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, E; Yamakoshi, K; Sasaki, T

    1998-02-01

    Stress-strain relationships of bovine tibial periosteum, harvested from anterior, medial, lateral, and posterior aspects of tibia, were successfully measured using a newly developed experimental system. Results showed a curvilinear stress-strain pattern having three regions, i.e., toe, almost linear, and rupture regions, which resembled those of biological soft tissues like ligaments, skin, etc. Tensile moduli in the toe region (Ee) and in the linear region (Ec) were obtained by linear regressional analyses. These values and the tensile strength (sigma t) showed clear local differences. The values of Ee, Ec, and sigma t in the longitudinal direction in the metaphyseal regions where ligaments or connective tissues attach were approximately two times larger than those in the diaphysis, where muscles or connective tissues attach. However, these properties in the metaphyseal and diaphyseal regions with muscle attachments were almost the same. In the transverse direction, these properties in the anterior proximal metaphysis were approximately two times larger than those in the diaphysis and in the distal metaphysis. In the other regions, these properties appeared not to be significantly different. These results clearly demonstrate that the mechanical properties of periosteum are strongly influenced by the ligament and muscle attachments. PMID:9675685

  2. GLOBAL AND LOCAL MORPHOMETRIC DIFFERENCES IN RECENTLY ABSTINENT METHAMPHETAMINE-DEPENDENT INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel L.; Mitchell, Alex D.; Lahna, David L.; Luber, Hannah S.; Huckans, Marilyn S.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.; Hoffman, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is associated with behavioral and cognitive deficits that may be related to macrostructural abnormalities. Quantitative anatomical comparisons between controls and methamphetamine-dependent individuals have produced conflicting results. We examined local and global differences in brain structure in 61 abstinent methamphetamine-dependent individuals and 44 controls with voxel-based morphometry and tissue segmentation. We related regional differences in gray matter density and whole brain segmentation volumes to performance on a behavioral measure of impulsivity and group membership using multiple linear regression. Within the MA group, we related cortical and subcortical gray matter density to MA use history, length of abstinence and age of first use. Controls had greater density relative to MA in bilateral insula and left middle frontal gyrus. Impulsivity was higher in the MA group and, within all subjects, impulsivity was positively correlated with gray matter density in posterior cingulate cortex and ventral striatum and negatively correlated in left superior frontal gyrus. Length of abstinence from MA was associated with greater amygdalar density. Earlier age of first use of MA (in subjects who initiated use before age 21) was associated with smaller intracranial volume. The findings are consistent with multiple possible mechanisms including neuroadaptations due to addictive behavior, neuroinflammation as well as dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity. PMID:20096794

  3. Far-field DOA estimation and source localization for different scenarios in a distributed sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz

    Recent developments in the integrated circuits and wireless communications not only open up many possibilities but also introduce challenging issues for the collaborative processing of signals for source localization and beamforming in an energy-constrained distributed sensor network. In signal processing, various sensor array processing algorithms and concepts have been adopted, but must be further tailored to match the communication and computational constraints. Sometimes the constraints are such that none of the existing algorithms would be an efficient option for the defined problem and as the result; the necessity of developing a new algorithm becomes undeniable. In this dissertation, we present the theoretical and the practical issues of Direction-Of-Arrival (DOA) estimation and source localization using the Approximate-Maximum-Likelihood (AML) algorithm for different scenarios. We first investigate a robust algorithm design for coherent source DOA estimation in a limited reverberant environment. Then, we provide a least-square (LS) solution for source localization based on our newly proposed virtual array model. In another scenario, we consider the determination of the location of a disturbance source which emits both wideband acoustic and seismic signals. We devise an enhanced AML algorithm to process the data collected at the acoustic sensors. For processing the seismic signals, two distinct algorithms are investigated to determine the DOAs. Then, we consider a basic algorithm for fusion of the results yielded by the acoustic and seismic arrays. We also investigate the theoretical and practical issues of DOA estimation in a three-dimensional (3D) scenario. We show that the performance of the proposed 3D AML algorithm converges to the Cramer-Rao Bound. We use the concept of an isotropic array to reduce the complexity of the proposed algorithm by advocating a decoupled 3D version. We also explore a modified version of the decoupled 3D AML algorithm which

  4. Differences among Teachers' Perceptions of School Climate: Does Support for the Local Teacher Union Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Jason S.

    2009-01-01

    Although some school improvement literature has suggested that schools will improve when unions are removed from the school system, unions have rarely been isolated in the research. This study involved a mixed method case study approach to explore whether support of the local teacher union affected perceptions of school climate, as measured by the…

  5. Differences in hypothalamic type 2 deiodinase ubiquitination explain localized sensitivity to thyroxine

    PubMed Central

    Werneck de Castro, Joao Pedro; Fonseca, Tatiana L.; Ueta, Cintia B.; McAninch, Elizabeth A.; Abdalla, Sherine; Wittmann, Gabor; Lechan, Ronald M.; Gereben, Balazs; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    The current treatment for patients with hypothyroidism is levothyroxine (L-T4) along with normalization of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). However, normalization of serum TSH with L-T4 monotherapy results in relatively low serum 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) and high serum thyroxine/T3 (T4/T3) ratio. In the hypothalamus-pituitary dyad as well as the rest of the brain, the majority of T3 present is generated locally by T4 deiodination via the type 2 deiodinase (D2); this pathway is self-limited by ubiquitination of D2 by the ubiquitin ligase WSB-1. Here, we determined that tissue-specific differences in D2 ubiquitination account for the high T4/T3 serum ratio in adult thyroidectomized (Tx) rats chronically implanted with subcutaneous L-T4 pellets. While L-T4 administration decreased whole-body D2-dependent T4 conversion to T3, D2 activity in the hypothalamus was only minimally affected by L-T4. In vivo studies in mice harboring an astrocyte-specific Wsb1 deletion as well as in vitro analysis of D2 ubiquitination driven by different tissue extracts indicated that D2 ubiquitination in the hypothalamus is relatively less. As a result, in contrast to other D2-expressing tissues, the hypothalamus is wired to have increased sensitivity to T4. These studies reveal that tissue-specific differences in D2 ubiquitination are an inherent property of the TRH/TSH feedback mechanism and indicate that only constant delivery of L-T4 and L-T3 fully normalizes T3-dependent metabolic markers and gene expression profiles in Tx rats. PMID:25555216

  6. A comparison of the morphological properties between local and z ∼ 1 infrared luminous galaxies: Are local and high-z (U)LIRGs different?

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Sanders, D. B.; Larson, Kirsten L.; Lee, Nicholas; Li, Yanxia; Lockhart, Kelly; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Barnes, Joshua E.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Koss, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Smith, Howard A.

    2014-08-10

    Ultraluminous and luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs and LIRGs) are the most extreme star-forming galaxies in the universe and dominate the total star formation rate density at z > 1. In the local universe (z < 0.3), the majority of ULIRGs and a significant portion of LIRGs are triggered by interactions between gas-rich spiral galaxies, yet it is unclear if this is still the case at high z. To investigate the relative importance of galaxy interactions in infrared luminous galaxies, we carry out a comparison of optical morphological properties between local (U)LIRGs and (U)LIRGs at z = 0.5-1.5 based on the same sample selection, morphology classification scheme, and optical morphology at similar rest-frame wavelengths. In addition, we quantify the systematics in comparing local and high-z data sets by constructing a redshifted data set from local (U)LIRGs, in which its data quality mimics the high-z data set. Based on the Gini-M{sub 20} classification scheme, we find that the fraction of interacting systems decreases by ∼8% from local to z ≲ 1, and it is consistent with the reduction between local and redshifted data sets (6{sub −6}{sup +14}%). Based on visual classifications, the merger fraction of local ULIRGs is found to be ∼20% lower compared to published results, and the reduction due to redshifting is 15{sub −8}{sup +10}%. Consequently, the differences of merger fractions between local and z ≲ 1 (U)LIRGs is only ∼17%. These results demonstrate that there is no strong evolution in the fraction of (U)LIRGs classified as mergers at least out to z ∼ 1. At z > 1, the morphology types of ∼30% of (U)LIRGs cannot be determined due to their faintness in the F814W band; thus, the merger fraction measured at z > 1 suffers from large uncertainties.

  7. Evaluation of clip localization for different kilovoltage imaging modalities as applied to partial breast irradiation setup

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Andreas; Ng, Sook-Kien; Lyatskaya, Yulia; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Hesser, Jurgen; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2009-03-15

    Surgical clip localization and image quality were evaluated for different types of kilovoltage cone beam imaging modalities as applied to partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup. These modalities included (i) clinically available radiographs and cone beam CT (CB-CT) and (ii) various alternative modalities based on partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT. An anthropomorphic torso-breast phantom with surgical clips was used for the imaging studies. The torso phantom had artificial lungs, and the attached breast phantom was a mammographic phantom with realistic shape and tissue inhomogeneities. Three types of clips of variable size were used in two orthogonal orientations to assess their in-/cross-plane characteristics for image-guided setup of the torso-breast phantom in supine position. All studies were performed with the Varian on-board imaging (OBI, Varian) system. CT reconstructions were calculated with the standard Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm. First, the radiographs were studied for a wide range of viewing angles to characterize image quality for various types of body anatomy in the foreground/background of the clips. Next, image reconstruction quality was evaluated for partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT. Since these modalities led to reconstructions with strong artifacts due to insufficient input data, a knowledge-based CT reconstruction method was also tested. In this method, the input data to the reconstruction algorithm were modified by combining complementary data sets selected from the treatment and reference projections. Different partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT scan types were studied depending on the total arc angle, angular increment between the consequent views (CT projections), orientation of the arc center with respect to the imaged breast and chest wall, and imaging field size. The central angles of the viewing arcs were either tangential or orthogonal to the chest wall. Several offset positions of the phantom with respect to the reference position were

  8. A Pulse-type Hardware Level Difference Detection Model Based on Sound Source Localization Mechanism in Barn Owl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Tsubasa; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    Auditory information processing is very important in the darkness where vision information is extremely limited. Barn owls have excellent hearing information processing function. Barn owls can detect a sound source in the high accuracy of less than two degrees in both of the vertical and horizontal directions. When they perform the sound source localization, the barn owls use the interaural time difference for localization in the horizontal plane, and the interaural level difference for localization in the vertical plane. We are constructing the two-dimensional sound source localization model using pulse-type hardware neuron models based on sound source localization mechanism of barn owl for the purpose of the engineering application. In this paper, we propose a pulse-type hardware model for level difference detection based on sound source localization mechanism of barn owl. Firstly, we discuss the response characteristics of the mathematical model for level difference detection. Next we discuss the response characteristics of the hardware mode. As a result, we show clearly that this proposal model can be used as a sound source localization model of vertical direction.

  9. Seasonal and Local Differences in Leaf Litter Flammability of Six Mediterranean Tree Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauf, Zorica; Fangmeier, Andreas; Rosavec, Roman; Španjol, Željko

    2015-03-01

    One of the suggested management options for reducing fire danger is the selection of less flammable plant species. Nevertheless, vegetation flammability is both complex and dynamic, making identification of such species challenging. While large efforts have been made to connect plant traits to fire behavior, seasonal changes and within species variability of traits are often neglected. Currently, even the most sophisticated fire danger systems presume that intrinsic characteristics of leaf litter stay unchanged, and plant species flammability lists are often transferred from one area to another. In order to assess if these practices can be improved, we performed a study examining the relationship between morphological characteristics and flammability parameters of leaf litter, thereby taking into account seasonal and local variability. Litter from six Mediterranean tree species was sampled throughout the fire season from three different locations along a climate gradient. Samples were subjected to flammability testing involving an epiradiator operated at 400 °C surface temperature with 3 g sample weight. Specific leaf area, fuel moisture content, average area, and average mass of a single particle had significant influences on flammability parameters. Effects of sampling time and location were significant as well. Due to the standardized testing conditions, these effects could be attributed to changes in intrinsic characteristics of the material. As the aforementioned effects were inconsistent and species specific, these results may potentially limit the generalization of species flammability rankings. Further research is necessary in order to evaluate the importance of our findings for fire danger modeling.

  10. Different subcellular localization of muscarinic and serotonin (S2) receptors in human, dog, and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luabeya, M K; Maloteaux, J M; De Roe, C; Trouet, A; Laduron, P M

    1986-02-01

    Cortex from rat, dog, and human brain was submitted to subcellular fractionation using an analytical approach consisting of a two-step procedure. First, fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation and were analyzed for their content of serotonin S2 and muscarinic receptors, serotonin uptake, and marker enzymes. Second, the cytoplasmic extracts were subfractionated by equilibration in sucrose density gradient. In human brain, serotonin and muscarinic receptors were found associated mostly with mitochondrial fractions which contain synaptosomes, whereas in rat brain they were concentrated mainly in the microsomal fractions. Density gradient centrifugation confirmed a more marked synaptosomal localization of receptors in human than in rat brain, the dog displaying an intermediate profile. In human brain, indeed, more receptor sites were found to be associated with the second peak characterized in electron microscopy by the largest number of nerve terminals. In addition, synaptosomes from human brain are denser than those from rat brain and some marker enzymes reveal different subcellular distribution in the three species. These data indicate that more receptors are of synaptosomal nature in human brain than in other species and this finding is compatible with a larger amount of synaptic contacts in human brain. PMID:2934515

  11. Cs diffusion in local Taiwan laterite with different solution concentration, pH and packing density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    In this work we used an "in-diffusion" method to study the effects of pH, solution concentration and packing density on Cs diffusion by packing local Taiwan laterite (LTL) into modified capillary columns with 5mm diameter. These packed columns were first pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater (GW) for 3 weeks. The diffusion experiments were then carried out at ambient condition for 2 weeks. Our experimental results showed that the Cs diffusion profile fits Fick's second law very well in given experimental conditions, indicating the validity of modified capillary column method. Generally speaking, Cs diffusion in LTL decreases as the pH increases and as Cs concentration decreases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(a)) increases from 5.52 x 10(-12) (10(-7)M) to 2.18 x 10(-11) (10(-3)M)m(2)/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient (D(e)) shows slight variation as the Cs concentration changes. Both the derived D(a) and D(e) values decrease as the pH increases, implying that the diffusion mechanisms of Cs nuclide in alkaline and acid environment are different. In addition, our results show that Cs diffusion is unaffected by the given packing density, indicating the interlaminary space is not the major determinant of Cs adsorption and diffusion in LTL. PMID:18321721

  12. Local Dynamics of Chemical Kinetics at Different Phases of Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, İ. Bedii; Akar, Firat

    2015-08-01

    The local dynamics of chemical kinetics at different phases of the nitriding process have been studied. The calculations are performed under the conditions where the temperature and composition data are provided experimentally from an in-service furnace. Results are presented in temporal variations of gas concentrations and the nitrogen coverage on the surface. It is shown that if it is available in the furnace, the adsorption of the N2 gas can seemingly start at temperatures as low as 200 °C. However, at such low temperatures, as the diffusion into the material is very unlikely, this results in the surface poisoning. It becomes clear that, contrary to common knowledge, the nitriding heat treatment with ammonia as a nitrogen-providing medium is possible at temperatures like 400 °C. Under these conditions, however, the presence of excess amounts of product gas N2 in the furnace atmosphere suppresses the forward kinetics in the nitriding process. It seems that the best operating point in the nitriding heat treatment is achieved with a mixture of 6% N2. When the major nitriding species NH3 is substituted by N2 and the N2 fraction increases above 30%, the rate of the forward reaction decreases drastically, so that there is no point to continue the furnace operation any further. Hence, during the initial heating phase, the N2 gas must be purged from the furnace to keep its fraction less than 30% before the furnace reaches the temperature where the reaction starts.

  13. Intercomparison of Different Types of Locally Prepared Concretes and Its Usability for Reactor Neutron Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kolaly, M. A.; Makarious, A. S.; Bashter, I. I.; Kansouh, W. A.

    Measurements have been carried out to study the attenuation of neutron from a horizontal channel of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The assessments of neutron distribution inside three different types of locally prepared concretes have been evaluated.Neutron intensities in ilmenite-limonite concrete shield show an exponential decrease with increasing concrete thickness. Ilmenite concrete is a good attenuator for thermal and intermediate neutrons. However, ordinary and ilmenite-limonite concretes show efficient shielding for fast neutrons.Translated AbstractVergleich verschiedener Zementarten hinsichtlich ihrer Brauchbarkeit zur Neutronenabschirmung von ReaktorenMessungen zur Untersuchung der Neutronenabschwächung in einem horizontalen Kanal eines ET-RR-1-Reaktors wurden durchgeführt. Die Charakteristika der Neutronenverteilung innerhalb dreier unterschiedlich zusammengesetzter Zemente wurden bestimmt. Die Neutronenintensität in einem Schild aus Ilmenite-Limonitezement zeigt einen exponentiellen Abfall mit wachsender Dicke. Ilmenitezement ist ein guter Schild für thermale und mittlere Neutronen. Normaler und Ilmenite-Limonitezement zeigen effektive Abschirmung bei schnellen Neutronen.

  14. Calcium current diversity in physiologically different local interneuron types of the antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Husch, Andreas; Paehler, Moritz; Fusca, Debora; Paeger, Lars; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2009-01-21

    Behavioral and physiological studies show that neuronal interactions among the glomeruli in the insect antennal lobe (AL) take place during the processing of odor information. These interactions are mediated by a complex network of inhibitory and excitatory local interneurons (LNs) that restructure the olfactory representation in the AL, thereby regulating the tuning profile of projection neurons. In Periplaneta americana, we characterized two LN types with distinctive physiological properties: (1) type I LNs that generated Na(+)-driven action potentials on odor stimulation and exhibited GABA-like immunoreactivity (GLIR) and (2) type II LNs, in which odor stimulation evoked depolarizations, but no Na(+)-driven action potentials (APs). Type II LNs did not express voltage-dependent transient Na(+) currents and accordingly would not trigger transmitter release by Na(+)-driven APs. Ninety percent of type II LNs did not exhibit GLIR. The distinct intrinsic firing properties were reflected in functional parameters of their voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca)). Consistent with graded synaptic release, we found a shift in the voltage for half-maximal activation of I(Ca) to more hyperpolarized membrane potentials in the type II LNs. These marked physiological differences between the two LN types imply consequences for their computational capacity, synaptic output kinetics, and thus their function in the olfactory circuit. PMID:19158298

  15. Isolation and characterization of glutaminyl cyclases from Drosophila: evidence for enzyme forms with different subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Stephan; Lindner, Christiane; Koch, Birgit; Wermann, Michael; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; von Bohlen, Alex; Rudolph, Thomas; Reuter, Gunter; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-09-25

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) present in plants and vertebrates catalyze the formation of pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) from N-terminal glutamine. Pyroglutamyl hormones also identified in invertebrates imply the involvement of QC activity during their posttranslational maturation. Database mining led to the identification of two genes in Drosophila, which putatively encode QCs, CG32412 (DromeQC) and CG5976 (isoDromeQC). Analysis of their primary structure suggests different subcellular localizations. While DromeQC appeared to be secreted due to an N-terminal signal peptide, isoDromeQC contains either an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting or a secretion signal due to generation of different transcripts from gene CG5976. According to the prediction, homologous expression of the corresponding cDNAs in S2 cells revealed either secreted protein in the medium or intracellular QC activity. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemistry support export of isoDromeQC into the mitochondrion. For enzymatic characterization, DromeQC and isoDromeQC were expressed heterologously in Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli, respectively. Compared to mammalian QCs, the specificity constants were about 1 order of magnitude lower for most of the analyzed substrates. The pH dependence of the specificity constant was similar for both enzymes, indicating the necessity of an unprotonated substrate amino group and two protonated groups of the enzyme, resulting in an asymmetric bell-shaped characteristic. The determination of the metal content of DromeQC revealed equimolar protein-bound zinc. These results prove conserved enzymatic mechanisms between QCs from invertebrates and mammals. Drosophila is the first organism for which isoenzymes of glutaminyl cyclase have been isolated. The identification of a mitochondrial QC points toward yet undiscovered physiological functions of these enzymes. PMID:17722885

  16. Evaluation of the thermal behaviour of different 'local climate zones' in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdonck, Marie-Leen; Demuzere, Matthias; Hooyberghs, Hans; Van Coillie, Frieke

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are one of the most important human habitats; already 50% of the world's population is living there and this percentage is expected to rise to 70% by 2050. Global warming and the increasing world population will only put more pressure on the living conditions in these habitats. From a thermal comfort point of view it is clear that there is a need for sustainable urban planning that integrates the thermal behaviour of these new developments. To develop sustainable urban planning it is key to know what the influence of a new development will be on the thermal behaviour of the city. Classifying the city according to the local climate zone (LCZ) scheme can provide insights in the thermal behaviour of a city. The WUDAPT LCZ classification framework makes it possible to do so in a spatially explicit manner. This study presents an evaluation of the thermal behaviour of LCZ in three different Belgian cities (Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent) based on modelled air and surface temperature. First LCZ maps were delineated for the three cities. The maps were built based on Landsat and high resolution LiDAR images conform to the WUDAPT LCZ classification framework. Meter- resolution LiDAR images provide useful information on building height and were used to improve the LCZ maps. An accuracy assessment stage was added to confirm the validity of the maps. Secondly, the LCZ maps were used as input data for the URBCLIM model to model air and surface temperature. With the modelling results we characterized the thermal behaviour of every LCZ. In a next step the results for the different cities are compared and the generic character of the WUDAPT LCZ classification framework is evaluated. The main incentive for this study is to investigate whether LCZ maps can be used to foresee the influence of future urban growth scenario's on the thermal comfort in cities in Belgium.

  17. Comparison of the microbial community structures of untreated wastewaters from different geographic locales.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; Newton, Ryan J; Kelty, Catherine A; Huse, Susan M; Sogin, Mitchell L; McLellan, Sandra L

    2013-05-01

    Microbial sewage communities consist of a combination of human fecal microorganisms and nonfecal microorganisms, which may be residents of urban sewer infrastructure or flowthrough originating from gray water or rainwater inputs. Together, these different microorganism sources form an identifiable community structure that may serve as a signature for sewage discharges and as candidates for alternative indicators specific for human fecal pollution. However, the structure and variability of this community across geographic space remains uncharacterized. We used massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing of the V6 region in 16S rRNA genes to profile microbial communities from 13 untreated sewage influent samples collected from a wide range of geographic locations in the United States. We obtained a total of 380,175 high-quality sequences for sequence-based clustering, taxonomic analyses, and profile comparisons. The sewage profile included a discernible core human fecal signature made up of several abundant taxonomic groups within Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria. DNA sequences were also classified into fecal, sewage infrastructure (i.e., nonfecal), and transient groups based on data comparisons with fecal samples. Across all sewage samples, an estimated 12.1% of sequences were fecal in origin, while 81.4% were consistently associated with the sewage infrastructure. The composition of feces-derived operational taxonomic units remained congruent across all sewage samples regardless of geographic locale; however, the sewage infrastructure community composition varied among cities, with city latitude best explaining this variation. Together, these results suggest that untreated sewage microbial communities harbor a core group of fecal bacteria across geographically dispersed wastewater sewage lines and that ambient water quality indicators targeting these select core microorganisms may perform well across the United States. PMID:23435885

  18. Zooming into creativity: individual differences in attentional global-local biases are linked to creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Zmigrod, Sharon; Zmigrod, Leor; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    While recent studies have investigated how processes underlying human creativity are affected by particular visual-attentional states, we tested the impact of more stable attention-related preferences. These were assessed by means of Navon's global-local task, in which participants respond to the global or local features of large letters constructed from smaller letters. Three standard measures were derived from this task: the sizes of the global precedence effect, the global interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the global level on local processing), and the local interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the local level on global processing). These measures were correlated with performance in a convergent-thinking creativity task (the Remote Associates Task), a divergent-thinking creativity task (the Alternate Uses Task), and a measure of fluid intelligence (Raven's matrices). Flexibility in divergent thinking was predicted by the local interference effect while convergent thinking was predicted by intelligence only. We conclude that a stronger attentional bias to visual information about the "bigger picture" promotes cognitive flexibility in searching for multiple solutions. PMID:26579030

  19. Zooming into creativity: individual differences in attentional global-local biases are linked to creative thinking

    PubMed Central

    Zmigrod, Sharon; Zmigrod, Leor; Hommel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    While recent studies have investigated how processes underlying human creativity are affected by particular visual-attentional states, we tested the impact of more stable attention-related preferences. These were assessed by means of Navon’s global-local task, in which participants respond to the global or local features of large letters constructed from smaller letters. Three standard measures were derived from this task: the sizes of the global precedence effect, the global interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the global level on local processing), and the local interference effect (i.e., the impact of incongruent letters at the local level on global processing). These measures were correlated with performance in a convergent-thinking creativity task (the Remote Associates Task), a divergent-thinking creativity task (the Alternate Uses Task), and a measure of fluid intelligence (Raven’s matrices). Flexibility in divergent thinking was predicted by the local interference effect while convergent thinking was predicted by intelligence only. We conclude that a stronger attentional bias to visual information about the “bigger picture” promotes cognitive flexibility in searching for multiple solutions. PMID:26579030

  20. Sustainability and Local People's Participation in Coastal Aquaculture: Regional Differences and Historical Experiences in Sri Lanka and the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergquist, Daniel A.

    2007-11-01

    This article discusses environmental sustainability in aquaculture and its contribution to poverty alleviation, based on field studies in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. The aquaculture practices studied are the monoculture of the black tiger prawn ( Penneaus monodon) and milkfish ( Chanos chanos) and the polyculture of the two species together with the mud crab ( Scylla serrata). Factors affecting economic viability, social equity and environmental impacts in aquaculture are discussed and used to illuminate local and regional differences between aquaculture in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. Findings indicate that the most significant difference is the level of participation by local people (i.e., people originating ≤10 km away from the farm location). In the Philippines, 84 % of the people involved in aquaculture are locals, whereas in Sri Lanka, 55% are outsiders. Whether differences between the two areas can be explained by analyzing regional conditions, which might have resulted in different aquaculture practices, is discussed. In Sri Lanka, semi-intensive shrimp monoculture is currently the most common practice, whereas in the Philippines, extensive shrimp/fish polyculture is more common. Previous studies, as well as fieldwork, indicate that extensive culture practices reduce environmental impacts and benefit local people more. Sustainability in aquaculture is, however, also dependent on the extent of mangrove conversion into ponds. As such, extensive and locally owned farms do not necessarily result in an all but sustainable situation. Keeping this in mind, it is discussed if extensive polyculture practices might result in a more sustainable aquaculture, both environmentally and socioeconomically.

  1. Sustainability and local people's participation in coastal aquaculture: regional differences and historical experiences in Sri Lanka and the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, Daniel A

    2007-11-01

    This article discusses environmental sustainability in aquaculture and its contribution to poverty alleviation, based on field studies in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. The aquaculture practices studied are the monoculture of the black tiger prawn (Penneaus monodon) and milkfish (Chanos chanos) and the polyculture of the two species together with the mud crab (Scylla serrata). Factors affecting economic viability, social equity and environmental impacts in aquaculture are discussed and used to illuminate local and regional differences between aquaculture in Sri Lanka and the Philippines. Findings indicate that the most significant difference is the level of participation by local people (i.e., people originating < or =10 km away from the farm location). In the Philippines, 84 % of the people involved in aquaculture are locals, whereas in Sri Lanka, 55% are outsiders. Whether differences between the two areas can be explained by analyzing regional conditions, which might have resulted in different aquaculture practices, is discussed. In Sri Lanka, semi-intensive shrimp monoculture is currently the most common practice, whereas in the Philippines, extensive shrimp/fish polyculture is more common. Previous studies, as well as fieldwork, indicate that extensive culture practices reduce environmental impacts and benefit local people more. Sustainability in aquaculture is, however, also dependent on the extent of mangrove conversion into ponds. As such, extensive and locally owned farms do not necessarily result in an all but sustainable situation. Keeping this in mind, it is discussed if extensive polyculture practices might result in a more sustainable aquaculture, both environmentally and socioeconomically. PMID:17929084

  2. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process. PMID:25611867

  3. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  4. Enterotoxemia in the goat: the humoral response and local tissue reaction following vaccination with two different bacterin-toxoids.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T E; Butler, D G; Bell, J A

    1983-04-01

    A vaccination trial involving 72 goats was designed to compare the epsilon antitoxin titres and local reactions at the injection sites, of two commercial enterotoxemia vaccines. Three dosage regimens were used for each vaccine (12 goats per group). Although no significant differences were noted in humoral immune response between the two vaccines (P = 0.05), one vaccine regime resulted in low titres (P = 0.05) on two occasions. Local tissue reactions at injection sites persisted for six months in 53% of the goats regardless of vaccine used or dosage administered. No immunological basis for the reported differences in vaccine efficacy between sheep and goats was observed in this trial. PMID:6309346

  5. AIRWAY RETENTION OF MATERIALS OF DIFFERENT SOLUBILITY FOLLOWING LOCAL INTRABRONCHIAL DEPOSITION IN DOGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used a gamma camera to monitor the retention and clearance of radiolabeled human serum albumin (HSA), a water-soluble material with molecular weight of 66,000 Daltons, and radiolabeled sulfur colloid (SC), an insoluble submicron (0.22 microm) particle, following localized depo...

  6. Functional Hemispheric Differences for the Categorization of Global and Local Information in Naturalistic Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubner, Ronald; Studer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Up to now functional hemispheric asymmetries for global/local processing have mainly been investigated with hierarchical letters as stimuli. In the present study, three experiments were conducted to examine whether corresponding visual-field (VF) effects can also be obtained with more naturalistic stimuli. To this end, images of animals with a…

  7. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  8. What Difference Do Local Schools Make? A Literature Review and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salant, Priscilla; Waller, Anita

    This paper reviews the literature on the noneducational impacts of rural schools on their communities and provides an annotated bibliography of sources. Taken as a whole, the literature suggests that the school-community relationship is multifaceted. Community schools have positive economic impacts related to local employment, retail sales, and…

  9. Ecological drift and local exposures drive enteric bacterial community differences within species of Galápagos iguanas.

    PubMed

    Lankau, Emily W; Hong, Pei-Ying; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-04-01

    Diet strongly influences the intestinal microbial communities through species sorting. Alternatively, these communicates may differ because of chance variation in local microbial exposures or species losses among allopatric host populations (i.e. ecological drift). We investigated how these forces shape enteric communities of Galápagos marine and land iguanas. Geographically proximate populations shared more similar communities within a host ecotype, suggesting a role for ecological drift during host colonization of the islands. Additionally, evidence of taxa sharing between proximate heterospecific host populations suggests that contemporary local exposures also influence the gut community assembly. While selective forces such as host-bacterial interactions or dietary differences are dominant drivers of intestinal community differences among hosts, historical and contemporary processes of ecological drift may lead to differences in bacterial composition within a host species. Whether such differences in community structure translate into geographic variation in benefits derived from these intimate microbial communities remains to be explored. PMID:22369350

  10. Spatial repartition of local plastic processes in different creep regimes in a granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, A.; Darnige, T.; Crassous, J.; Clément, E.; Amon, A.

    2016-01-01

    Granular packings under constant shear stress display below the Coulomb limit a logarithmic creep dynamics. However, the addition of small stress modulations induces a linear creep regime characterized by an effective viscous response. Using Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy, we investigate the relation between creep and local plastic events spatial distribution (“hot spots”) contributing to the plastic yield. The study is done in the two regimes, i.e. with and without mechanical activation. The hot-spot dynamics is related to the material effective fluidity. We show that far from the threshold, a local visco-elastic rheology coupled to an ageing of the fluidity parameter, is able to render the essential spatio-temporal features of the observed creep dynamics.

  11. Spatial covariation of local abundance among different parasite species: the effect of shared hosts.

    PubMed

    Lagrue, C; Poulin, R

    2015-10-01

    Within any parasite species, abundance varies spatially, reaching higher values in certain localities than in others, presumably reflecting the local availability of host resources or the local suitability of habitat characteristics for free-living stages. In the absence of strong interactions between two species of helminths with complex life cycles, we might predict that the degree to which their abundances covary spatially is determined by their common resource requirements, i.e. how many host species they share throughout their life cycles. We test this prediction using five trematode species, all with a typical three-host cycle, from multiple lake sampling sites in New Zealand's South Island: Stegodexamene anguillae, Telogaster opisthorchis, Coitocaecum parvum, Maritrema poulini, and an Apatemon sp. Pairs of species from this set of five share the same host species at either one, two, or all three life cycle stages. Our results show that when two trematode species share the same host species at all three life stages, they show positive spatial covariation in abundance (of metacercarial and adult stages) across localities. When they share hosts at two life stages, they show positive spatial covariation in abundance in some cases but not others. Finally, if two trematode species share only one host species, at a single life stage, their abundances do not covary spatially. These findings indicate that the extent of resource sharing between parasite species can drive the spatial match-mismatch between their abundances, and thus influence their coevolutionary dynamics and the degree to which host populations suffer from additive or synergistic effects of multiple infections. PMID:26113509

  12. Sex-specific strategy use and global-local processing: a perspective toward integrating sex differences in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Pletzer, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on sex-specific strategy use in cognitive tasks with the aim to carve out a link between sex differences in different cognitive tasks. I conclude that male strategies are commonly holistic and oriented toward global stimulus aspects, while female strategies are commonly decomposed and oriented toward local stimulus aspects. Thus, the strategies observed in different tasks, may depend on sex differences in attentional focus and hence sex differences in global-local processing. I hypothesize that strategy use may be sex hormone dependent and hence subject to change over the menstrual cycle as evidenced by findings in global-local processing and emotional memory. Furthermore, I propose sex hormonal modulation of hemispheric asymmetries as one possible neural substrate for this theory, thereby building on older theories, emphasizing the importance of sex differences in brain lateralization. The ideas described in the current article represent a perspective toward a unifying approach to the study of sex differences in cognition and their neural correlates. PMID:25565953

  13. A safety and tolerability study of differently-charged nanoparticles for local pulmonary drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harush-Frenkel, Oshrat; Bivas-Benita, Maytal; Nassar, Taher; Springer, Chaim; Sherman, Yoav; Avital, Avraham; Altschuler, Yoram; Borlak, Jurgen; Benita, Simon

    2010-07-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) based drug delivery systems provide promising opportunities in the treatment of lung diseases. Here we examined the safety and tolerability of pulmonary delivered NPs consisting of PEG-PLA as a function of particle surface charge. The rationale for such a comparison should be attributed to the differential pulmonary toxicity of positively and negatively charged PEG-PLA NP. Thus, the local and systemic effects of pulmonary administered NPs were investigated following 5 days of daily endotracheal instillation to BALB/c mice that were euthanized on the eighth or nineteenth day of the experiment. We collected bronchoalveolar lavages and studied hematological as well as histochemistry parameters. Notably, the cationic stearylamine based PEG-PLA NPs elicited increased local and systemic toxic effects both on the eighth and nineteenth day. In contrast, anionic NPs of similar size were much better tolerated with local inflammatory effects observed only on the eighth experimental day after pulmonary instillation. No systemic toxicity effect was observed although a moderate change was noted in the platelet count that was not considered to be of clinical significance. No pathological observations were detected in the internal organs following instillation of anionic NPs. Overall these observations suggest that anionic PEG-PLA NPs are useful pulmonary drug carriers that should be considered as a promising therapeutic drug delivery system.

  14. (Ir)reconcilable differences? Local reactions to provincial neoliberal educational reform.

    PubMed

    Shoveller, Jean; Elliott, Danielle; Johnson, Joy

    2005-01-01

    In this case study, we explore the intersections of neoliberal educational reform and the everyday experiences of people living in a rural region in northern British Columbia, Canada. Reflecting on the provincial Ministry of Education's Strategic Plan, we explore one region's responses to a set of provincial promises, which include providing regional school districts with more autonomy and control over the delivery of education services and a mandate for a balanced budget. The region faced declining student enrolments and funding shortfalls. As a cost-saving measure, the local school district in the region launched a four-day school week. We used ethnographic fieldwork techniques to examine a set of local practices and consequences that arose following the implementation of this measure. The findings demonstrate how provincial promises of educational reform can conflict with local educational needs and create a set of problematic everyday realities with repercussions on youth health, amplifying health inequalities that are irreconcilable with the purported goals of advancing the interests of students and society. PMID:16161848

  15. From Paper to Forest: Local Motives for Participation in Different Conservation Initiatives. Case Studies in Southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Méndez-López, María Elena; García-Frapolli, Eduardo; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel; Porter-Bolland, Luciana; Reyes-Garcia, Victoria

    2015-09-01

    Under the assumption that local participation can contribute toward conservation, various policies have sought to increase the participation of local communities in conservation, but not always with success. Despite this failure, the drivers that explain local participation remain unclear and few studies have attempted to understand the motivations behind involvement (or lack of it) in different conservation initiatives and adopting the perspective of the local stakeholder. In this study, we analyze the motives behind the participation (or lack thereof) of local populations in three conservation schemes: Protected Areas, Areas Voluntary Devoted to Conservation, and areas under Payment for Environmental Services. The study, conducted in 6 communities of southeastern Mexico, comprises an ethnographic stage and the application of a survey exploring the motives for participation. Our results show similarities among the motives for participation in these three initiatives, predominantly the obligation to comply with acquired commitments and a desire to "care for the land". Results also show that 77 % of the people interviewed did not participate in any conservation initiatives, often due to the lack of mechanisms by which to participate. We conclude by questioning the feasibility of achieving local participation in conservation as currently proposed and for the aims that are outlined. PMID:25931299

  16. From Paper to Forest: Local Motives for Participation in Different Conservation Initiatives. Case Studies in Southeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-López, María Elena; García-Frapolli, Eduardo; Ruiz-Mallén, Isabel; Porter-Bolland, Luciana; Reyes-Garcia, Victoria

    2015-09-01

    Under the assumption that local participation can contribute toward conservation, various policies have sought to increase the participation of local communities in conservation, but not always with success. Despite this failure, the drivers that explain local participation remain unclear and few studies have attempted to understand the motivations behind involvement (or lack of it) in different conservation initiatives and adopting the perspective of the local stakeholder. In this study, we analyze the motives behind the participation (or lack thereof) of local populations in three conservation schemes: Protected Areas, Areas Voluntary Devoted to Conservation, and areas under Payment for Environmental Services. The study, conducted in 6 communities of southeastern Mexico, comprises an ethnographic stage and the application of a survey exploring the motives for participation. Our results show similarities among the motives for participation in these three initiatives, predominantly the obligation to comply with acquired commitments and a desire to "care for the land". Results also show that 77 % of the people interviewed did not participate in any conservation initiatives, often due to the lack of mechanisms by which to participate. We conclude by questioning the feasibility of achieving local participation in conservation as currently proposed and for the aims that are outlined.

  17. Similar local, but different systemic, metabolomic responses of closely related pine subspecies to folivory by caterpillars of the processionary moth.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Ubach, A; Sardans, J; Hódar, J A; Garcia-Porta, J; Guenther, A; Oravec, M; Urban, O; Peñuelas, J

    2016-05-01

    Plants respond locally and systemically to herbivore attack. Most of the research conducted on plant-herbivore relationships at element and molecular levels have focused on the elemental composition or/and certain molecular compounds or specific families of defence metabolites showing that herbivores tend to select plant individuals or species with higher nutrient concentrations and avoid those with higher levels of defence compounds. We performed stoichiometric and metabolomics, both local and systemic, analyses in two subspecies of Pinus sylvestris under attack from caterpillars of the pine processionary moth, an important pest in the Mediterranean Basin. Both pine subspecies responded locally to folivory mainly by increasing relative concentrations of terpenes and some phenolics. Systemic responses differed between pine subspecies, and most of the metabolites presented intermediate concentrations between those of the affected parts and unattacked trees. Our results support the hypothesis that foliar nutrient concentrations are not a key factor for plant selection by adult female processionary moths for oviposition, since folivory was not associated with any of the elements analysed. Phenolic compounds generally did not increase in the attacked trees, questioning the suggestion of induction of phenolics following folivory attack and the anti-feeding properties of phenolics. Herbivory attack produced a general systemic shift in pines, in both primary and secondary metabolism, which was less intense and chemically different from the local responses. Local pine responses were similar between pine subspecies, while systemic responses were more distant. PMID:26642818

  18. Robust and low complexity localization algorithm based on head-related impulse responses and interaural time difference.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinwang; Liang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a biologically inspired localization algorithm using two microphones, for a mobile robot. The proposed algorithm has two steps. First, the coarse azimuth angle of the sound source is estimated by cross-correlation algorithm based on interaural time difference. Then, the accurate azimuth angle is obtained by cross-channel algorithm based on head-related impulse responses. The proposed algorithm has lower computational complexity compared to the cross-channel algorithm. Experimental results illustrate that the localization performance of the proposed algorithm is better than those of the cross-correlation and cross-channel algorithms. PMID:23298016

  19. Comparisons of AM fungal spore communities with the same hosts but different soil chemistries over local and geographic scales.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baoming; Bentivenga, Stephen P; Casper, Brenda B

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous and ecologically important microbes in grasslands. Both the host plant species and soil properties have been suggested as potentially important factors structuring AM fungal communities based on studies within local field sites. However, characterizations of the communities in relation to both host plant identity and soil properties in natural plant communities across both local and broader geographic scales are rare. We examined the AM fungal spore communities associated with the same C(4) grasses in two Eastern serpentine grasslands, where soils have elevated heavy metals, and two Iowa tallgrass prairie sites. We compared AM fungal spore communities among host plants within each site, looked for correlations between fungal communities and local soil properties, and then compared communities among sites. Spore communities did not vary with host plant species or correlate with local soil chemical properties at any site. They did not differ between the two serpentine sites or between the two prairie sites, despite geographic separation, but they did differ between serpentine and prairie. Soil characteristics are suggested as a driving force because spore communities were strongly correlated with soil properties when data from all four sites are considered, but climatic differences might also play a role. PMID:21769630

  20. Chromosomal localization and molecular characterization of three different 5S ribosomal DNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Clemente, Ann Maria; Sisino, Giorgia; Barbieri, Rainer

    2007-09-01

    In this paper the chromosomal localization and molecular cloning and characterization of three 5S rDNA clusters of 700 bp (base pairs), 900 bp, and 950 bp in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus are reported. Southern blot hybridization demonstrated the existence of three 5S rDNA repeats of differing length in the P. lividus genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, performed in parallel on both haploid and diploid metaphases and interphase nuclei using different 5S rDNA units as probes, localized these 5S rDNA clusters in 3 different pairs of P. lividus chromosomes. This is the first complete gene mapping not only in a sea urchin but also in the phylum of echinoderms as a whole. PMID:17893727

  1. Coral Reef Disturbance and Recovery Dynamics Differ across Gradients of Localized Stressors in the Mariana Islands

    PubMed Central

    Houk, Peter; Benavente, David; Iguel, John; Johnson, Steven; Okano, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The individual contribution of natural disturbances, localized stressors, and environmental regimes upon longer-term reef dynamics remains poorly resolved for many locales despite its significance for management. This study examined coral reefs in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands across a 12-year period that included elevated Crown-of-Thorns Starfish densities (COTS) and tropical storms that were drivers of spatially-inconsistent disturbance and recovery patterns. At the island scale, disturbance impacts were highest on Saipan with reduced fish sizes, grazing urchins, and water quality, despite having a more favorable geological foundation for coral growth compared with Rota. However, individual drivers of reef dynamics were better quantified through site-level investigations that built upon island generalizations. While COTS densities were the strongest predictors of coral decline as expected, interactive terms that included wave exposure and size of the overall fish assemblages improved models (R2 and AIC values). Both wave exposure and fish size diminished disturbance impacts and had negative associations with COTS. However, contrasting findings emerged when examining net ecological change across the 12-year period. Wave exposure had a ubiquitous, positive influence upon the net change in favorable benthic substrates (i.e. corals and other heavily calcifying substrates, R2 = 0.17 for all reeftypes grouped), yet including interactive terms for herbivore size and grazing urchin densities, as well as stratifying by major reeftypes, substantially improved models (R2 = 0.21 to 0.89, lower AIC scores). Net changes in coral assemblages (i.e., coral ordination scores) were more sensitive to herbivore size or the water quality proxy acting independently (R2 = 0.28 to 0.44). We conclude that COTS densities were the strongest drivers of coral decline, however, net ecological change was most influenced by localized stressors, especially herbivore

  2. Protecting children from harmful food marketing: options for local government to make a difference.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jennifer L; Graff, Samantha K

    2011-09-01

    The obesity epidemic cannot be reversed without substantial improvements in the food marketing environment that surrounds children. Food marketing targeted to children almost exclusively promotes calorie-dense, nutrient-poor foods and takes advantage of children's vulnerability to persuasive messages. Increasing scientific evidence reveals potentially profound effects of food marketing on children's lifelong eating behaviors and health. Much of this marketing occurs in nationwide media (eg, television, the Internet), but companies also directly target children in their own communities through the use of billboards and through local environments such as stores, restaurants, and schools. Given the harmful effect of this marketing environment on children's health and the industry's reluctance to make necessary changes to its food marketing practices, government at all levels has an obligation to act. This article focuses on policy options for municipalities that are seeking ways to limit harmful food marketing at the community level. PMID:21843422

  3. Adjustment of interaural time difference in head related transfer functions based on listeners' anthropometry and its effect on sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yôiti; Watanabe, Kanji; Iwaya, Yukio; Gyoba, Jiro; Takane, Shouichi

    2005-04-01

    Because the transfer functions governing subjective sound localization (HRTFs) show strong individuality, sound localization systems based on synthesis of HRTFs require suitable HRTFs for individual listeners. However, it is impractical to obtain HRTFs for all listeners based on measurements. Improving sound localization by adjusting non-individualized HRTFs to a specific listener based on that listener's anthropometry might be a practical method. This study first developed a new method to estimate interaural time differences (ITDs) using HRTFs. Then correlations between ITDs and anthropometric parameters were analyzed using the canonical correlation method. Results indicated that parameters relating to head size, and shoulder and ear positions are significant. Consequently, it was attempted to express ITDs based on listener's anthropometric data. In this process, the change of ITDs as a function of azimuth angle was parameterized as a sum of sine functions. Then the parameters were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, in which the anthropometric parameters were used as explanatory variables. The predicted or individualized ITDs were installed in the nonindividualized HRTFs to evaluate sound localization performance. Results showed that individualization of ITDs improved horizontal sound localization.

  4. Comparison of the Microbial Community Structures of Untreated Wastewaters from Different Geographic Locales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial sewage communities consist of a combination of human fecal microorganisms and nonfecal microorganisms, which may be residents of urban sewer infrastructure or flowthrough originating from gray water or rainwater inputs. Together, these different microorganism sources f...

  5. DETERMINATION OF MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE IN UNTREATED WASTEWATER FROM DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC LOCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial sewage communities consist of a combination of human faecal microorganisms and urban infrastructure-derived microbes originating from infiltration of rainwater and stormwater inputs. Together these different sources of microbial diversity form a unique population struc...

  6. Texton segregation by associated differences in global and local luminance distribution.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, H C

    1990-04-23

    Perceptual segregation of visual textures has been attributed to certain features ('textons') such as (elongated) blobs of given size and orientation, line crossings, and line ends. Differences in the spatial distribution of these features were assumed to be detected pre-attentively and to provide the instantaneous impression of segregating texture areas and of borders between them. This paper questions the validity of this general view and, in particular, the role of some of these features in texture discrimination. It is demonstrated that for some textons, perceptual segregation is independent of detection and discrimination of the texton itself. In addition, segregation can be strongly affected by positional or luminance jitter of texture elements or by other modifications that change the luminance distribution in the pattern but do not affect the supposed texton differences. From the textons reported in the literature, only differences in orientation were found to be fairly robust against such modifications. PMID:2163056

  7. Differences in peroxidase localization of rabbit peritoneal macrophages after surface adherence.

    PubMed Central

    Bodel, P. T.; Nichols, B. A.; Bainton, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Unlike resident peritoneal macrophages, which contain peroxidase in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and perinuclear cisternae (PN), macrophages elicited into the rabbit peritoneal cavity by various stimulants lack the enzyme. Since we had previously found that such peroxidase reactivity rapidly appears in the RER and PN of blood monocytes after surface adherence in vitro, we wondered whether the enzyme could be similarly produced in elicited macrophages by adherence. Cells from peritoneal exudates (96 hours after endotoxin injection) were harvested, suspended in culture medium, and allowed to adhere to fibrin-coated or plastic surfaces. Following culture for various intervals, they were fixed, incubated for peroxidase, and examined by electron microscopy. We observed that these elicited cells, which initially contained no cytochemically detectable peroxidase, acquired peroxidatic activity in the RER and PN within 2 hours after adherence in culture. Thus macrophages, like blood monocytes, may rapidly acquire peroxidase reactivity as a consequence of plasma membrane: external surface interaction. In view of this finding, it would seem unwise to use peroxidase localization as the basis for advocating the existence of two separate lines of peritoneal macrophages, as has been proposed by previous investigators. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 PMID:645814

  8. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzoni, Umberto; Turci, Marco; Avesani, Francesca; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Bidoia, Carlo; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity. PMID:21994745

  9. Attention, Awareness of Contingencies, and Control in Spatial Localization: A Qualitative Difference Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaquero, Joaquin M. M.; Fiacconi, Chris; Milliken, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The qualitative difference method for distinguishing between aware and unaware processes was applied here to a spatial priming task. Participants were asked simply to locate a target stimulus that appeared in one of four locations, and this target stimulus was preceded by a prime in one of the same four locations. The prime location predicted the…

  10. Postoperative Radiotherapy After Surgical Resection of Thymoma: Differing Roles in Localized and Regional Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Forquer, Jeffrey A.; Rong Nan; Fakiris, Achilles J.; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Johnstone, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry data to determine the impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for thymoma and thymic carcinoma (T/TC). Methods and Materials: Patients with surgically resected localized (LOC) or regional (REG) malignant T/TC with or without PORT were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) by querying the SEER database from 1973-2005. Patients dying within the first 3 months after surgery were excluded. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses with Cox proportional hazards were performed. Results: A total of 901 T/TC patients were identified (275 with LOC disease and 626 with REG disease). For all patients with LOC disease, PORT had no benefit and may adversely impact the 5-year CSS rate (91% vs. 98%, p = 0.03). For patients with REG disease, the 5-year OS rate was significantly improved by adding PORT (76% vs. 66% for surgery alone, p = 0.01), but the 5-year CSS rate was no better (91% vs. 86%, p = 0.12). No benefit was noted for PORT in REG disease after extirpative surgery (defined as radical or total thymectomy). On multivariate OS and CSS analysis, stage and age were independently correlated with survival. For multivariate CSS analysis, the outcome of PORT is significantly better for REG disease than for LOC disease (hazard ratio, 0.167; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results from SEER show that PORT for T/TC had no advantage in patients with LOC disease (Masaoka Stage I), but a possible OS benefit of PORT in patients with REG disease (Masaoka Stage II-III) was found, especially after non-extirpative surgery. The role of PORT in T/TC needs further evaluation.

  11. Uterine Artery Embolization Combined with Local Methotrexate and Systemic Methotrexate for Treatment of Cesarean Scar Pregnancy with Different Ultrasonographic Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Fan; Wang Yu Chen Wei; Li Jiaping; Zhan Zhongping; Ye Yujin; Zhu, Yunxiao; Huang Jia; Xu Hanshi; Yang Xiuyan; Liang Liuqin; Yang Jianyong

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of systemic methotrexate (MTX) with uterine artery embolization (UAE) combined with local MTX for the treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) with different ultrasonographic pattern, and to indicate the preferable therapy in CSP patients. Methods: The results of 21 CSP cases were reviewed. All subjects were initially administrated with systemic MTX (50 mg/m{sup 2} body surface area). UAE combined with local MTX was added to the patients who had failed systemic MTX. The transvaginal ultrasonography data were retrospectively assessed, and two different ultrasonographic patterns were found: surface implantation and deep implantation of amniotic sac. The management and its effectiveness for patients with the two ultrasonographic patterns were studied retrospectively. Ultrasound scan and serum {beta}-hCG were monitored during follow-up. Data were analyzed with the Student's t test. Results: Nine patients were successfully treated with systemic MTX. The remaining 12 cases were successfully treated with additional UAE combined with local MTX. According to the classification by Vial et al. of CSP on ultrasonography, most surface implanted CSPs (8/11, 72.7%) could be successfully treated with systemic MTX, whereas most deeply implanted CSPs (9/10, 90%) had failed systemic MTX but still could be successfully treated with additional UAE combined with local MTX. All patients recovered without severe side effects. Most patients with a future desire for reproduction achieved subsequent pregnancy. Conclusions: For CSP patients suitable for nonsurgical treatment, UAE combined with local MTX would be the superior option compared with systemic MTX in the cases with deep implantation of amniotic sac.

  12. Prediction of individual differences in risky behavior in young adults via variations in local brain structure

    PubMed Central

    Nasiriavanaki, Zahra; ArianNik, Mohsen; Abbassian, Abdolhosein; Mahmoudi, Elham; Roufigari, Neda; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Bahrami, Bahador

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the problem of how inter-individual differences play a role in risk-taking behavior has become a much debated issue. We investigated this problem based on the well-known balloon analog risk task (BART) in 48 healthy subjects in which participants inflate a virtual balloon opting for a higher score in the face of a riskier chance of the balloon explosion. In this study, based on a structural Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) technique we demonstrate a significant positive correlation between BART score and size of the gray matter volume in the anterior insula in riskier subjects. Although the anterior insula is among the candidate brain areas that were involved in the risk taking behavior in fMRI studies, here based on our structural data it is the only area that was significantly related to structural variation among different subjects. PMID:26500482

  13. Comparison of metal accumulation in mussels at different local and global scales.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Graham; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2003-02-01

    Cadmium and zinc uptake from the dissolved phase, assimilation efficiency (AE) from the dietary phase, and body burden as well as clearance rate were measured in green mussels, Perna viridis, and blue mussels Mytilus edulis, M. galloprovincialis and Mytilus trossulus. Perna viridis was collected from four sites differentially enriched with trace metals in Hong Kong and blue mussels were collected from different climatic zones, i.e., subarctic and temperate, to allow comparisons with the more tropical green mussels. Despite similar shell length, the dry weight of mussels varied significantly between sites and species and this had a large effect on Cd and Zn accumulation, clearance rate, and metal body burden. All data were, therefore, weight adjusted to allow comparison without this confounding factor. Trace-metal body concentrations were significantly different between sites, and P. viridis collected from Tsing Yi, Hong Kong, had the highest levels of all measured metals when compared with other Hong Kong sites. There was, however, no relationship between the degree of metal enrichment and the Cd and Zn uptake (both from dissolved and particulate sources) and clearance rates. Furthermore, Cd and Zn uptake (dissolved and particulate) and clearance rate varied little between species or climatic zones of collection. Thus, over the range of body trace-metal concentrations measured and between mussel species over large geographical distances and climatic zones, the uptake rates, AEs, and clearance rates are similar when measured under the same laboratory conditions after body-size correction. When other factors such as salinity are also corrected, biomonitoring data from different areas and even utilizing different mussel species may be directly comparable. This study therefore provides important evidence in support of Mussel Watch Programs. PMID:12558172

  14. Wenchuan Event Detection And Localization Using Waveform Correlation Coupled With Double Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinkard, M.; Heck, S.; Schaff, D. P.; Young, C. J.; Richards, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The well-studied Wenchuan aftershock sequence triggered by the May 12, 2008, Ms 8.0, mainshock offers an ideal test case for evaluating the effectiveness of using waveform correlation coupled with double difference relocation to detect and locate events in a large aftershock sequence. We use Sandia's SeisCorr detector to process 3 months of data recorded by permanent IRIS and temporary ASCENT stations using templates from events listed in a global catalog to find similar events in the raw data stream. Then we take the detections and relocate them using the double difference method. We explore both the performance that can be expected with using just a small number of stations, and, the benefits of reprocessing a well-studied sequence such as this one using waveform correlation to find even more events. We benchmark our results against previously published results describing relocations of regional catalog data. Before starting this project, we had examples where with just a few stations at far-regional distances, waveform correlation combined with double difference did and impressive job of detection and location events with precision at the few hundred and even tens of meters level.

  15. Localization by interaural time difference (ITD): Effects of interaural frequency mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Bonham, B.H.; Lewis, E.R.

    1999-07-01

    A commonly accepted physiological model for lateralization of low-frequency sounds by interaural time delay (ITD) stipulates that binaural comparison neurons receive input from frequency-matched channels from each ear. Here, the effects of hypothetical interaural frequency mismatches on this model are reported. For this study, the cat{close_quote}s auditory system peripheral to the binaural comparison neurons was represented by a neurophysiologically derived model, and binaural comparison neurons were represented by cross-correlators. The results of the study indicate that, for binaural comparison neurons receiving input from one cochlear channel from each ear, interaural CF mismatches may serve to either augment or diminish the effective difference in ipsilateral and contralateral axonal time delays from the periphery to the binaural comparison neuron. The magnitude of this increase or decrease in the effective time delay difference can be up to 400 {mu}s for CF mismatches of 0.2 octaves or less for binaural neurons with CFs between 250 Hz and 2.5 kHz. For binaural comparison neurons with nominal CFs near 500 Hz, the 25-{mu}s effective time delay difference caused by a 0.012-octave CF mismatch is equal to the ITD previously shown to be behaviorally sufficient for the cat to lateralize a low-frequency sound source. {copyright} {ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.}

  16. Putative Excitatory and Putative Inhibitory Inputs Localize to Different Dendritic Domains in a Drosophila Flight Motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Claudia; Duch, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Input-output computations of individual neurons may be affected by the three-dimensional structure of their dendrites and by the targeting of input synapses to specific parts of their dendrites. However, only few examples exist where dendritic architecture can be related to behaviorally relevant computations of a neuron. By combining genetic, immunohistochemical, and confocal laser scanning methods this study estimates the location of the spike initiating zone and the dendritic distribution patterns of putative synaptic inputs on an individually identified Drosophila flight motorneuron, MN5. MN5 is a monopolar neuron with more than 4000 dendritic branches. The site of spike initiation was estimated by mapping sodium channel immunolabel onto geometric reconstructions of MN5. Maps of putative excitatory cholinergic and of putative inhibitory GABAergic inputs on MN5 dendrites were created by charting tagged Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Rdl GABAA receptors onto MN5 dendritic surface reconstructions. Although these methods provided only an estimate of putative input synapse distributions, the data indicated that inhibitory and excitatory synapses were targeted preferentially to different dendritic domains of MN5, and thus, computed mostly separately. Most putative inhibitory inputs were close to spike initiation, which was consistent with sharp inhibition, as predicted previously based on recordings of motoneuron firing patterns during flight. By contrast, highest densities of putative excitatory inputs at more distant dendritic regions were consistent with the prediction that in response to different power demands during flight, tonic excitatory drive to flight motoneuron dendrites must be smoothly translated into different tonic firing frequencies. PMID:23279094

  17. Localization of calmodulin in epidermis and skin glands: a comparative immunohistological investigation in different vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Wevers, A; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The study deals with the immunolocalization of calmodulin-reactive epithelial cells in different vertebrates (Tinca tinca, Ambystoma mexicanum, Xenopus laevis, Rana ridibunda, Columba domestica, Sus scrofa domestica, Homo sapiens sapiens). The immunoperoxidase technique was performed on acetone fixed frozen sections using monoclonal (BF8) and polyclonal (ACAM) anti-calmodulin antibodies. We were able to differentiate 2 major types of staining patterns: 1. A more superficial epidermal staining in species adapted to an aqueous environment and 2. a staining along the epidermal-dermal junction in species adapted to a terrestrial environment. It seems most likely that epithelial cells immunoreactive for calmodulin are involved in skin permeability control. PMID:1718122

  18. Anderson localization for one-dimensional difference Schrödinger operator with quasiperiodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinai, Ya. G.

    1987-03-01

    The Schrödinger difference operator considered here has the form (H_\\varepsilon (α )ψ )(n) = - (ψ (n + 1) + ψ (n - 1)) + V(nω + α )ψ (n) where V is a C 2-periodic Morse function taking each value at not more than two points. It is shown that for sufficiently small ɛ the operator H ɛ(α) has for a.e. α a pure point spectrum. The corresponding eigenfunctions decay exponentially outside a finite set. The integrated density of states is an incomplete devil's staircase with infinitely many flat pieces.

  19. Chagas disease vector control through different intervention modalities in endemic localities of Paraguay.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas de Arias, A.; Ferro, E. A.; Ferreira, M. E.; Simancas, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    In a field study carried out in three rural communities in Paraguay in a zone endemic for Chagas disease, we implemented three different vector control interventions--spraying, housing improvement, and a combination of spraying plus housing improvement--which effectively reduced the triatomine infestation. The reduction of triatomine infestation was 100% (47/47) in the combined intervention community, whereas in the community where housing improvement was carried out it was 96.4% (53/55). In the community where fumigation alone was used, the impact was 97.6% (40/41) in terms of domiciliary infestation. In all the houses where an intervention was made, an 18-month follow-up showed reinfestation rates of less than 10%. A serological survey of the population in the pre- and post-intervention periods revealed a shift in positive cases towards older age groups, but no significant differences were observed. The rate of seroconversion was 1.3% (three new cases) in the community with housing improvement only, but none of these cases could have resulted from vector transmission. The most cost-effective intervention was insecticide spraying, which during a 21-month follow-up period had a high impact on triatomine infestation and cost US$ 29 per house as opposed to US$ 700 per house for housing improvement. PMID:10327712

  20. Effect of Different Levels of Localized Muscle Fatigue on Knee Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    Gear, William S.

    2011-01-01

    There is little information available regarding how proprioceptive abilities decline as the amount of exertion increases during exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of different levels of fatigue on knee joint position sense. A repeated measures design was used to examine changes in active joint reposition sense (AJRS) prior to and following three levels of fatigue. Eighteen participants performed knee extension and flexion isokinetic exercise until torque output was 90%, 70%, or 50% of the peak hamstring torque for three consecutive repetitions. Active joint reposition sense at 15, 30, or 45 degrees was tested following the isokinetic exercise session. Following testing of the first independent measure, participants were given a 20 minute rest period. Testing procedures were repeated for two more exercise sessions following the other levels of fatigue. Testing of each AJRS test angle was conducted on three separate days with 48 hours between test days. Significant main effect for fatigue was indicated (p = 0.001). Pairwise comparisons indicated a significant difference between the pre-test and following 90% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02) and between the pre-test and following 50% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02). Fatigue has long been theorized to be a contributing factor in decreased proprioceptive acuity, and therefore a contributing factor to joint injury. The findings of the present study indicate that fatigue may have an effect on proprioception following mild and maximum fatigue. Key points A repeated measures design was used to examine the effect of different levels of fatigue on active joint reposition sense (AJRS) of the knee at joint angles of 15°, 30° and 45° of flexion. A statistically significant main effect for fatigue was found, specifically between no fatigue and mild fatigue and no fatigue and maximum fatigue. A statistically significant interaction effect between AJRS and fatigue was not found. Secondary

  1. [EFFICACY OF DIFFERENT FORMS OF LOCAL HEMOSTATIC MATERIALS BASED ON OXIDIZE CELLULOSE IN THE EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Tarkova, A R; Chernyavskiy, A M; Grigor'ev, I A; Morozov, S V; Rodionov, V I; Kravchenko, N I

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding of intraoperative period is one of the actual problem in surgery. There aren't any universal hemostatic means in spite of large variety of modern hemostatic methods. An experimental research studied the results of hemostatic activity of different forms of materials on the basis of oxidize cellulose (a gauze, a powder) as compared with their foreign analog (a hemostatic gauze "SurgiceI"). Median of hemostasis time consisted of (120 ± 59.9) and (73 ± 46.8) s, in case of application of gauze and powder preparations, respectively. The rate of group using the hemostatic gauze "Surgicel" was (142 ± 77.4) s. The authors made a conclusion on the basis of given research, that the hemostatic material based on oxidize cellulose (the powder form) showed a more expressed hemostatic activity and reliably twice reduced the time of hemostasis as compared with their analog forms of gauze (p < 0.05). PMID:27066660

  2. Localization and interaural time difference (ITD) thresholds for cochlear implant recipients with preserved acoustic hearing in the implanted ear.

    PubMed

    Gifford, René H; Grantham, D Wesley; Sheffield, Sterling W; Davis, Timothy J; Dwyer, Robert; Dorman, Michael F

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate horizontal plane localization and interaural time difference (ITD) thresholds for 14 adult cochlear implant recipients with hearing preservation in the implanted ear. Localization to broadband noise was assessed in an anechoic chamber with a 33-loudspeaker array extending from -90 to +90°. Three listening conditions were tested including bilateral hearing aids, bimodal (implant + contralateral hearing aid) and best aided (implant + bilateral hearing aids). ITD thresholds were assessed, under headphones, for low-frequency stimuli including a 250-Hz tone and bandpass noise (100-900 Hz). Localization, in overall rms error, was significantly poorer in the bimodal condition (mean: 60.2°) as compared to both bilateral hearing aids (mean: 46.1°) and the best-aided condition (mean: 43.4°). ITD thresholds were assessed for the same 14 adult implant recipients as well as 5 normal-hearing adults. ITD thresholds were highly variable across the implant recipients ranging from the range of normal to ITDs not present in real-world listening environments (range: 43 to over 1600 μs). ITD thresholds were significantly correlated with localization, the degree of interaural asymmetry in low-frequency hearing, and the degree of hearing preservation related benefit in the speech reception threshold (SRT). These data suggest that implant recipients with hearing preservation in the implanted ear have access to binaural cues and that the sensitivity to ITDs is significantly correlated with localization and degree of preserved hearing in the implanted ear. PMID:24607490

  3. Ways of making-sense: Local gamma synchronization reveals differences between semantic processing induced by music and language.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Paulo; Chavez, Mario; Rodríguez, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Similar to linguistic stimuli, music can also prime the meaning of a subsequent word. However, it is so far unknown what is the brain dynamics underlying the semantic priming effect induced by music, and its relation to language. To elucidate these issues, we compare the brain oscillatory response to visual words that have been semantically primed either by a musical excerpt or by an auditory sentence. We found that semantic violation between music-word pairs triggers a classical ERP N400, and induces a sustained increase of long-distance theta phase synchrony, along with a transient increase of local gamma activity. Similar results were observed after linguistic semantic violation except for gamma activity, which increased after semantic congruence between sentence-word pairs. Our findings indicate that local gamma activity is a neural marker that signals different ways of semantic processing between music and language, revealing the dynamic and self-organized nature of the semantic processing. PMID:26734990

  4. Integrating age information from different localities for stratigraphic marker beds: discussion of the Eltville Tephra age (Western Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeden, Christian; Zens, Joerg; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Stratigraphic marker beds are often used in geosciences for regional and global correlation. For various reasons dating those layers directly proves to be difficult sometimes. In such cases ages from above and below such a horizon represent minimum- and maximum-ages. If these ages are determined from more than one location, it is possible to combine these ages, test their consistency and finally derive an age in agreement with the findings from most localities. Several approaches to integrate the age information from different localities are discussed, resulting in combined ages consistent with both stratigraphy and most of the dating results. All approach rely on assumptions, most importantly the correctness of ages and their reported uncertainty. The Eltville Tephra originates from an unknown eruption in the Eifel volcanic field is an important maker bed in Rhine-Meuse Area nearby the boundary between the deposition of reworked and primary loess during the LGM (ca. 20 ka). The Eltville Tephra is usually imbedded in loess; dates from directly above and below come almost exclusively from luminescence dating. As different luminescence dating techniques were applied to samples over- and underlying the Eltville Tephra a systematic bias of the sum of these techniques seems unlikely, but may be present due to the fact that most ages are feldspar ages uncorrected for fading. The results of several statistical approaches to deal with ages from various localities are compared, and their chances and shortcomings using well understood artificial data are discussed. These are also used to obtain an integrated datum for the Eltville Tephra including a reproducible uncertainty. This has the potential to improve on existing dates for various other stratigraphic marker beds especially in the terrestrial realm, where often dates for (or around) correlative sediments are obtained from various localities.

  5. Factors affecting characterization and localization of interindividual differences in functional connectivity using MRI.

    PubMed

    Airan, Raag D; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Pillai, Jay J; Caffo, Brian; Pekar, James J; Sair, Haris I

    2016-05-01

    Much recent attention has been paid to quantifying anatomic and functional neuroimaging on the individual subject level. For optimal individual subject characterization, specific acquisition and analysis features need to be identified that maximize interindividual variability while concomitantly minimizing intra-subject variability. We delineate the effect of various acquisition parameters (length of acquisition, sampling frequency) and analysis methods (time course extraction, region of interest parcellation, and thresholding of connectivity-derived network graphs) on characterizing individual subject differentiation. We utilize a non-parametric statistical metric that quantifies the degree to which a parameter set allows this individual subject differentiation by both maximizing interindividual variance and minimizing intra-individual variance. We apply this metric to analysis of four publicly available test-retest resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data sets. We find that for the question of maximizing individual differentiation, (i) for increasing sampling, there is a relative tradeoff between increased sampling frequency and increased acquisition time; (ii) for the sizes of the interrogated data sets, only 3-4 min of acquisition time was sufficient to maximally differentiate each subject with an algorithm that utilized no a priori information regarding subject identification; and (iii) brain regions that most contribute to this individual subject characterization lie in the default mode, attention, and executive control networks. These findings may guide optimal rs-fMRI experiment design and may elucidate the neural bases for subject-to-subject differences. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1986-1997, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27012314

  6. Robust Huber-Based Iterated Divided Difference Filtering with Application to Cooperative Localization of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Liu, Yalong; Xu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A new algorithm called Huber-based iterated divided difference filtering (HIDDF) is derived and applied to cooperative localization of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) supported by a single surface leader. The position states are estimated using acoustic range measurements relative to the leader, in which some disadvantages such as weak observability, large initial error and contaminated measurements with outliers are inherent. By integrating both merits of iterated divided difference filtering (IDDF) and Huber's M-estimation methodology, the new filtering method could not only achieve more accurate estimation and faster convergence contrast to standard divided difference filtering (DDF) in conditions of weak observability and large initial error, but also exhibit robustness with respect to outlier measurements, for which the standard IDDF would exhibit severe degradation in estimation accuracy. The correctness as well as validity of the algorithm is demonstrated through experiment results. PMID:25536004

  7. Robust Huber-based iterated divided difference filtering with application to cooperative localization of autonomous underwater vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Liu, Yalong; Xu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A new algorithm called Huber-based iterated divided difference filtering (HIDDF) is derived and applied to cooperative localization of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) supported by a single surface leader. The position states are estimated using acoustic range measurements relative to the leader, in which some disadvantages such as weak observability, large initial error and contaminated measurements with outliers are inherent. By integrating both merits of iterated divided difference filtering (IDDF) and Huber's M-estimation methodology, the new filtering method could not only achieve more accurate estimation and faster convergence contrast to standard divided difference filtering (DDF) in conditions of weak observability and large initial error, but also exhibit robustness with respect to outlier measurements, for which the standard IDDF would exhibit severe degradation in estimation accuracy. The correctness as well as validity of the algorithm is demonstrated through experiment results. PMID:25536004

  8. No difference in local structure about a Zn dopant for congruent and stoichiometric LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, F.; Mackeen, C.; Kovács, L.

    2016-07-01

    We compare extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data at the Zn K edge for a low concentration of Zn (0.7 mol%) in a stoichiometric crystal with that for higher Zn concentrations (nominally 5 and 9 mol%) in congruent LiNbO3 (LNO). Note that stoichiometric and congruent LNO have significantly different optical properties. We find no significant difference in the local structure about Zn out to 4 Å for the two types of crystals and different dopant levels. Although some earlier theoretical models suggest a self-compensation model with 75% of Zn on a Li site and 25% Zn on Nb, we find no clear evidence for a significant fraction of Zn on the Nb site, and estimate at most 2%-3% of Zn might be ZnN b.

  9. Lower Arm Muscle Activation during Indirect-Localized Vibration: The Influence of Skill Levels When Applying Different Acceleration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Padulo, Johnny; Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Zagatto, Alessandro M.; Migliaccio, Gian M.; Grgantov, Zoran; Ardigò, Luca P.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the electromyographic response to synchronous indirect-localized vibration interventions in international and national table tennis players. Twenty-six male table tennis players, in a standing position, underwent firstly an upper arms maximal voluntary contraction and thereafter two different 30-s vibration interventions in random order: high acceleration load (peak acceleration = 12.8 g, frequency = 40 Hz; peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm), and low acceleration load (peak acceleration = 7.2 g, frequency = 30 Hz, peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm). Surface electromyography root mean square from brachioradialis, extensor digitorum, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor digitorum superficialis recorded during the two vibration interventions was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction recording. Normalized surface electromyography root mean square was higher in international table tennis players with respect to national ones in all the interactions between muscles and vibration conditions (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor carpi radialis (at low acceleration load, P > 0.05). The difference in normalized surface electromyography root mean square between international table tennis players and national ones increased in all the muscles with high acceleration load (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor digitorum superficialis (P > 0.05). The muscle activation during indirect-localized vibration seems to be both skill level and muscle dependent. These results can optimize the training intervention in table tennis players when applying indirect-localized vibration to lower arm muscles. Future investigations should discriminate between middle- and long-term adaptations in response to specific vibration loads. PMID:27378948

  10. Lower Arm Muscle Activation during Indirect-Localized Vibration: The Influence of Skill Levels When Applying Different Acceleration Loads.

    PubMed

    Padulo, Johnny; Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Zagatto, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Gian M; Grgantov, Zoran; Ardigò, Luca P

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the electromyographic response to synchronous indirect-localized vibration interventions in international and national table tennis players. Twenty-six male table tennis players, in a standing position, underwent firstly an upper arms maximal voluntary contraction and thereafter two different 30-s vibration interventions in random order: high acceleration load (peak acceleration = 12.8 g, frequency = 40 Hz; peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm), and low acceleration load (peak acceleration = 7.2 g, frequency = 30 Hz, peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm). Surface electromyography root mean square from brachioradialis, extensor digitorum, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor digitorum superficialis recorded during the two vibration interventions was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction recording. Normalized surface electromyography root mean square was higher in international table tennis players with respect to national ones in all the interactions between muscles and vibration conditions (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor carpi radialis (at low acceleration load, P > 0.05). The difference in normalized surface electromyography root mean square between international table tennis players and national ones increased in all the muscles with high acceleration load (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor digitorum superficialis (P > 0.05). The muscle activation during indirect-localized vibration seems to be both skill level and muscle dependent. These results can optimize the training intervention in table tennis players when applying indirect-localized vibration to lower arm muscles. Future investigations should discriminate between middle- and long-term adaptations in response to specific vibration loads. PMID:27378948

  11. Characterization of two different Asf1 histone chaperones with distinct cellular localizations and functions in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Pascoalino, Bruno; Dindar, Gülcin; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P.; Machado, Carlos Renato; Janzen, Christian J.; Schenkman, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The anti-silencing function protein 1 (Asf1) is a chaperone that forms a complex with histones H3 and H4 facilitating dimer deposition and removal from chromatin. Most eukaryotes possess two different Asf1 chaperones but their specific functions are still unknown. Trypanosomes, a group of early-diverged eukaryotes, also have two, but more divergent Asf1 paralogs than Asf1 of higher eukaryotes. To unravel possible different functions, we characterized the two Asf1 proteins in Trypanosoma brucei. Asf1A is mainly localized in the cytosol but translocates to the nucleus in S phase. In contrast, Asf1B is predominantly localized in the nucleus, as described for other organisms. Cytosolic Asf1 knockdown results in accumulation of cells in early S phase of the cell cycle, whereas nuclear Asf1 knockdown arrests cells in S/G2 phase. Overexpression of cytosolic Asf1 increases the levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation. In contrast to cytosolic Asf1, overexpression of nuclear Asf1 causes less pronounced growth defects in parasites exposed to genotoxic agents, prompting a function in chromatin remodeling in response to DNA damage. Only the cytosolic Asf1 interacts with recombinant H3/H4 dimers in vitro. These findings denote the early appearance in evolution of distinguishable functions for the two Asf1 chaperons in trypanosomes. PMID:24322299

  12. Responses of toad tadpoles to ammonium nitrate fertilizer and predatory stress: differences between populations on a local scale.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Fernández-Benéitez, María José; Lizana, Miguel; Marco, Adolfo

    2011-06-01

    Agriculture-related pollution is among the major causes of global amphibian population declines. The multiple stressors to which amphibians are exposed in the field, such as predation pressure, can make agrochemicals far more deadly than when they act in isolation. Even within a small area, diffuse agricultural pollution does not affect all aquatic environments equally, which could account for local differences in amphibian sensitivity to agrochemicals. We examined the combined effects of ammonium nitrate fertilizer (0 to 45.2 mg N-NH 4(+)/L) and predator stress on larval Western spadefoot toad (Pelobates cultripes), using adult caged male marbled newts (Triturus marmoratus) as predators. We compared the interaction between both stressors in tadpoles from two ponds separated by 3 km. No significant mortality was observed (survival > 80% in all cases). Local differences were detected when analyzing larval growth, with a significant interaction between factors for one of the two populations tested (Fornillos de Fermoselle). Although tadpoles exposed to 45.2 mg N-NH 4(+)/L were 7% smaller than controls, the presence of predators from a foreign community resulted in animals 15% larger than those raised without predators after 15 d of experiment. Interestingly, predators from the same community as the tadpoles did not affect larval growth. The length of the tadpoles from a nearby location (Mámoles) was unaffected after exposure to ammonium nitrate and predatory stress. PMID:21384420

  13. Comparison of transmission parameters between Anopheles argyritarsis and Anopheles pseudopunctipennis in two ecologically different localities of Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anopheles (Anopheles) pseudopunctipennis is a recognized malaria vector in the slopes of the Andes of Bolivia. There, other species might be involved in malaria transmission and one candidate could be Anopheles argyritarsis. Although it is generally admitted that this species is not a malaria vector in the neotropical region, its potential role in transmission is still controversial and this situation has to be cleared, at least for Bolivia. Comparing the vectorial efficiency of An. pseudopunctipennis with that of An. argyritarsis could solve the question. Methods The two species were sampled throughout Bolivia to estimate their degree of co-existence in their distribution range. Vectorial efficiencies of the two species were compared in two ecologically different localities where the species were sympatric by analysing their vectorial capacities and components (i e, human biting rates, human biting index, survival, durations of the gonotrophic cycle and extrinsic cycle), and the entomological inoculation rates (EIR). Mosquitoes were sampled monthly during more than one year in the two localities. A monthly sample consisted in hourly captures in four houses (inside and outside) in each locality, during four consecutive nights. Climatic variables (temperature, humidity, potential evapo-transpiration and precipitations) were recorded to better understand variability in the entomological parameters. Relationships were analysed using multivariate methods. Results Anopheles pseudopunctipennis and An. argyritarsis are “altitude” species, sharing the same geographical distribution range in the Andes of Bolivia. No Plasmodium parasite was identified in An. argyritarsis and estimates of the vectorial capacity indicated that it is not a malaria vector in the two studied localities, unlike An. pseudopunctipennis which showed positive EIRs. This latter species, although not a very good malaria vector, exhibited better life traits values and better behavioural

  14. Large-Scale, Complex Shaped Coastline Responses to Different Forms of Local Shoreline Stabilization and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ells, K.; Murray, A. B.; Slott, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Nowhere is the importance of research addressing the dynamics of coupled human-landscape processes more pronounced than on the world’s coasts, where human shoreline stabilization alters the natural evolution of the coastline on large spatial and temporal scales. Slott et al. (2010) extended a recently developed large-scale coastline evolution model to include the effects of beach ‘nourishment’ (importing sand into the nearshore system at a long term rate sufficient to counteract shoreline erosion) on a complex-shaped coastline, finding a surprising human signal over large (100s km) distances (Figure 1); even localized shoreline stabilization efforts, when maintained over decadal time scales, can significantly affect the regional pattern of coastline morphological adjustment in response to changing storm behaviors (Slott, et al., 2010). In this work, we examine the effects of shoreline-stabilization method that involve hard structures, such as sea walls and groyne fields. These methods differ significantly from beach nourishment in terms of large-scale impacts; they hold the shoreline location fixed without adding a flux of sediment into the system. Like beach nourishment, these human manipulations have widespread, significant effects on shoreline change rates, even when the manipulations only occur locally. However, the effects on large-scale coastline morphodynamics also exhibit interesting differences when compared to the beach nourishment case. References Slott, Jordan, A. B. Murray, Andrew Ashton, 2010. Large-Scale Responses of Complex-Shaped Coastlines to Local Shoreline Stabilization and Climate Change, Journal of Geophysical Research—Earth Surface. Figure 1. Evolution of a cuspate-cape shoreline in response to ongoing beach nourishment over 200 years, for six different site selections. a. Initial model shoreline, developed in response to a wave climate approximating recent conditions off of the Carolina coast, USA. b. The influence that beach

  15. Understanding differences in the local food environment across countries: A case study in Madrid (Spain) and Baltimore (USA).

    PubMed

    Díez, Julia; Bilal, Usama; Cebrecos, Alba; Buczynski, Amanda; Lawrence, Robert S; Glass, Thomas; Escobar, Francisco; Gittelsohn, Joel; Franco, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Places where we buy food influence dietary patterns, making local food environments a good example of a mass influence on population diets. Cross-cultural studies, using reliable methods, may help understanding the relationship between food environments and diet-related health outcomes. We aimed to understand cross-national differences in the local food environment between Madrid and Baltimore by comparing an average neighborhood in each city in terms of food store types, healthy food availability, and residents' pedestrian access. During 2012-2013, we assessed one neighborhood (~15,000 residents) in each city selecting median areas in terms of socio-demographic characteristics (segregation, education, aging, and population density). We collected on-field data on (a) number and types of all food stores, (b) overall healthy food availability and (c) specific availability of fruits & vegetables. Throughout a street network analysis (200m, 400m and 800m) of food stores with high healthy food availability, we estimated residents' pedestrian accessibility. We found 40 stores in Madrid and 14 in Baltimore. Small food stores carrying fresh foods in Madrid contrasted with the high presence of corner and chain convenience stores in Baltimore. In Madrid, 77% of the residents lived within less than 200m from a food store with high healthy food availability. In contrast, 95% of Baltimore's residents lived further than 400m from these stores. Our results may help promoting interventions from local city agencies to allocate resources to existing small-sized food stores, and to improve walkable urban environments. These actions may influence food choices, especially for those residents lacking access to private vehicles. PMID:27311334

  16. Stable Collocated-grid Finite Difference Seismic Wave Modeling Using Discontinuous Grids with Locally Variable Time Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    It is widely accepted that they are oversampled in spatial grid spacing and temporal time step in the high speed medium if uniform grids are used for the numerical simulation. This oversampled grid spacing and time step will lower the efficiency of the calculation, especially high velocity contrast exists. Based on the collocated-grid finite-difference method (FDM), we present an algorithm of spatial discontinuous grid, with localized grid blocks and locally varying time steps, which will increase the efficiency of simulation of seismic wave propagation and earthquake strong ground motion. According to the velocity structure, we discretize the model into discontinuous grid blocks, and the time step of each block is determined according to the local stability. The key problem of the discontinuous grid method is the connection between grid blocks with different grid spacing. We use a transitional area overlapped by both of the finer and the coarser grids to deal with the problem. In the transitional area, the values of finer ghost points are obtained by interpolation from the coarser grid in space and time domain, while the values of coarser ghost points are obtained by downsampling from the finer grid. How to deal with coarser ghost points can influent the stability of long time simulation. After testing different downsampling methods and finally we choose the Gaussian filtering. Basically, 4th order Rung-Kutta scheme will be used for the time integral for our numerical method. For our discontinuous grid FDM, discontinuous time steps for the coarser and the finer grids will be used to increase the simulation efficiency. Numerical tests indicate that our method can provide a stable solution even for the long time simulation without any additional filtration for grid spacing ratio n=2. And for larger grid spacing ratio, Gaussian filtration could be used to preserve the stability. With the collocated-grid FDM, which is flexible and accurate in implementation of free

  17. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Zahid, N Idayu; Khyasudeen, M Faisal; Giera, David S; Thimm, Julian C; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism. PMID:25731606

  18. Locally non-uniform finite-difference time domain with application to stealth, crosstalk, and narrow apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, D. J.

    1993-04-01

    A technique to integrate a dense, locally non-uniform mesh into finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) codes is presented. The method is designed for the full-wave analysis of multi-material layers that are physically thin, but perhaps electrically thick. Such layers are often used for the purpose of suppressing electromagnetic reflections from conducting surfaces. Throughout the non-uniform local mesh, average values for the conductivity and permittivity are used, where as variations in permeability are accommodated by splitting H-field line integrals and enforcing continuity of the normal B field. A unique interpolation scheme provides accuracy and late-time stability for mesh discontinuities as large as 1000 to 1. Application is made to resistive sheets, the absorbing Salisbury screen, crosstalk on printed circuit boards, and apertures that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to a uniform cell. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with the MoM code CARLOS and transmission-line theory. The hybrid mesh formulation has been highly optimized for both vector and parallel-processing on Cray Y-MP architectures.

  19. Determination of the local contact potential difference of PTCDA on NaCl: a comparison of techniques.

    PubMed

    Burke, S A; LeDue, J M; Miyahara, Y; Topple, J M; Fostner, S; Grütter, P

    2009-07-01

    There has been increasing focus on the use of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) for the determination of local electronic structure in recent years, especially in systems where other methods, such as scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy, may be intractable. We have examined three methods for determining the local apparent contact potential difference (CPD): frequency modulation KPFM (FM-KPFM), amplitude modulation KPFM (AM-KPFM), and frequency shift-bias spectroscopy, on a test system of 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) on NaCl, an example of an organic semiconductor on a bulk insulating substrate. We will discuss the influence of the bias modulation on the apparent CPD measurement by FM-KPFM compared to the DC-bias spectroscopy method, and provide a comparison of AM-KPFM, AM-slope detection KPFM and FM-KPFM imaging resolution and accuracy. We will also discuss the distance dependence of the CPD as measured by FM-KPFM for both the PTCDA organic deposit and the NaCl substrate. PMID:19509452

  20. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; Zahid, N. Idayu; Khyasudeen, M. Faisal; Giera, David S.; Thimm, Julian C.; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-03-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism.

  1. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; Zahid, N. Idayu; Khyasudeen, M. Faisal; Giera, David S.; Thimm, Julian C.; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism. PMID:25731606

  2. Locally non-uniform finite-difference time domain with application to stealth, crosstalk, and narrow apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    A technique to integrate a dense, locally non-uniform mesh into finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) codes is presented. The method is designed for the full-wave analysis of multi-material layers that are physically thin, but perhaps electrically thick. Such layers are often used for the purpose of suppressing electromagnetic reflections from conducting surfaces. Throughout the non-uniform local mesh, average values for the conductivity and permittivity are used, where as variations in permeability are accommodated by splitting H-field line integrals and enforcing continuity of the normal B field. A unique interpolation scheme provides accuracy and late-time stability for mesh discontinuities as large as 1000 to 1. Application is made to resistive sheets, the absorbing Salisbury screen, crosstalk on printed circuit boards, and apertures that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to a uniform cell. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with the MoM code CARLOS and transmission-line theory. The hybrid mesh formulation has been highly optimized for both vector and parallel-processing on Cray YMP architectures.

  3. Local host response following an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus fleurettii and different strains of Staphylococcus chromogenes in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Piccart, Kristine; Verbeke, Joren; De Visscher, Anneleen; Piepers, Sofie; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Vliegher, Sarne

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a common cause of subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle. The CNS inhabit various ecological habitats, ranging between the environment and the host. In order to obtain a better insight into the host response, an experimental infection was carried out in eight healthy heifers in mid-lactation with three different CNS strains: a Staphylococcus fleurettii strain originating from sawdust bedding, an intramammary Staphylococcus chromogenes strain originating from a persistent intramammary infection (S. chromogenes IM) and a S. chromogenes strain isolated from a heifer's teat apex (S. chromogenes TA). Each heifer was inoculated in the mammary gland with 1.0 × 10(6) colony forming units of each bacterial strain (one strain per udder quarter), whereas the remaining quarter was infused with phosphate-buffered saline. Overall, the CNS evoked a mild local host response. The somatic cell count increased in all S. fleurettii-inoculated quarters, although the strain was eliminated within 12 h. The two S. chromogenes strains were shed in larger numbers for a longer period. Bacterial and somatic cell counts, as well as neutrophil responses, were higher after inoculation with S. chromogenes IM than with S. chromogenes TA. In conclusion, these results suggest that S. chromogenes might be better adapted to the mammary gland than S. fleurettii. Furthermore, not all S. chromogenes strains induce the same local host response. PMID:27176792

  4. Local Outer Radiating Boundary Conditions for the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method Applied to Maxwell's Equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steich, David James

    1995-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is a simple yet powerful method for numerically solving electromagnetic wave phenomenon on computers. The FDTD technique discretizes Maxwell's equations with finite difference equations. These finite difference equations, which approximate local field behavior, are applied to large spatial lattices allowing calculation of a vast array of electromagnetical phenomenon. The greatest strengths of the FDTD method are in its simplicity, efficiency, and diversity. FDTD is capable of modeling the scattering and coupling to lossy dielectrics, lossy magnetics, anisotropic media, dispersive media, and nonlinear materials for general geometric shapes. Wideband frequency information can be obtained using FDTD for both near and far field observation points in a single computational run. However, along with all of its benefits, the FDTD algorithm has some deficiencies. For most problems of interest, poor accuracy at geometry interfaces of differing media and at outer problem space boundarys where the spatial lattice must be truncated are the two largest error sources of the FDTD algorithm. Although most accuracy issues can be circumvented by expending large amounts of computer memory and cpu time, using excessive computer resources is not always possible and is never appealing. The purpose of this thesis is to generalize, analyze, and test various mainstream local Outer Radiating Boundary Conditions (ORBCs) for the FDTD method applied to Maxwell's equations in order to help gain a better understanding of present ORBC limitations. A common mathematical model is presented for the boundary conditions. Boundary conditions shown to fit the model include Mur, Superabsorption, Liao, Higdon, and Lindman ORBCs of varying orders. Simple operators are defined and then used to generate the final discretized equations for each of the boundary conditions, automatically, without requiring complicated high order equations. The procedure also allows

  5. Field-induced detrapping in doped organic semiconductors with Gaussian disorder and different carrier localizations on host and guest sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheb, M.; Zimmermann, C.; Jungemann, C.

    2015-09-01

    For organic host-guest systems with a low fraction of guest sites, i.e., the trap-limited case, field-induced detrapping of charge carriers is studied via master equation calculations under the assumption of Miller-Abrahams rates and two Gaussian distributions of uncorrelated energy levels. Among existing descriptions of carrier redistributions in the presence of an electric field, the effective temperature derived by F. Jansson, S. D. Baranovskii, F. Gebhard, and R. Österbacka [Phys. Rev. B 77, 195211 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevB.77.195211] for pure host materials shows the best agreement with the simulation results. The detrapping description based on carrier heating is extended to the case that the two material-specific hopping rate parameters ν0 (attempt frequency) and α (decay constant or inverse localization length of charge carriers) are different for host and guest sites.

  6. Vector analysis of bending waveguides by using a modified finite-difference method in a local cylindrical coordinate system.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jinbiao; Sun, Xiaohan

    2012-09-10

    A vector mode solver for bending waveguides by using a modified finite-difference (FD) method is developed in a local cylindrical coordinate system, where the perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary conditions are incorporated. Utilizing Taylor series expansion technique and continuity condition of the longitudinal field components, a standard matrix eigenvalue equation without the averaged index approximation approach for dealing with the discrete points neighboring the dielectric interfaces is obtained. Complex effective indexes and field distributions of leaky modes for a typical rib bending waveguide and a silicon wire bend are presented, and solutions accord well with those from the film mode matching method, which shows the validity and utility of the established method. PMID:23037277

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Protein GRP-78 Mediates Endocytosis of Dentin Matrix Protein 1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Eapen, Asha Sarah; Hao, Jianjun; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Blond, Sylvie; George, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), a phosphorylated protein present in the mineral phase of both vertebrates and invertebrates, is a key regulatory protein during biogenic formation of mineral deposits. Previously we showed that DMP1 is localized in the nuclear compartment of preosteoblasts and preodontoblasts. In the nucleus DMP1 might play an important role in the regulation of genes that control osteoblast or odontoblast differentiation. Here, we show that cellular uptake of DMP1 occurs through endocytosis. Interestingly, this process is initiated by DMP1 binding to the glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP-78) localized on the plasma membrane of preodontoblast cells. Binding of DMP1 to GRP-78 receptor was determined to be specific and saturable with a binding dissociation constant KD = 85 nm. We further depict a road map for the endocytosed DMP1 and demonstrate that the internalization is mediated primarily by caveolae and that the vesicles containing DMP1 are routed to the nucleus along microtubules. Immunohistochemical analysis and binding studies performed with biotin-labeled DMP1 confirm spatial co-localization of DMP1 and GRP-78 in the preodontoblasts of a developing mouse molar. Co-localization of DMP1 with GRP-78 was also observed in T4-4 preodontoblast cells, dental pulp stem cells, and primary preodontoblasts. By small interfering RNA techniques, we demonstrate that the receptor for DMP1 is GRP-78. Therefore, binding of DMP1 with GRP-78 receptor might be an important mechanism by which DMP1 is internalized and transported to the nucleus during bone and tooth development. PMID:18757373

  8. Field calibration of PADC track etch detectors for local neutron dosimetry in man using different radiation qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Boschung, Markus; Mayer, Sabine; Clasie, Benjamin; Kry, Stephen F.; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    In order to quantify the dose from neutrons to a patient for contemporary radiation treatment techniques, measurements inside phantoms, representing the patient, are necessary. Published reports on neutron dose measurements cover measurements performed free in air or on the surface of phantoms and the doses are expressed in terms of personal dose equivalent or ambient dose equivalent. This study focuses on measurements of local neutron doses inside a radiotherapy phantom and presents a field calibration procedure for PADC track etch detectors. An initial absolute calibration factor in terms of Hp(10) for personal dosimetry is converted into neutron dose equivalent and additional calibration factors are derived to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence for different radiation therapy beam qualities and depths in the phantom. The neutron spectra used for the calculation of the calibration factors are determined in different depths by Monte Carlo simulations for the investigated radiation qualities. These spectra are used together with the energy dependent response function of the PADC detectors to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence. The resulting total calibration factors are 0.76 for a photon beam (in- and out-of-field), 1.00 (in-field) and 0.84 (out-of-field) for an active proton beam and 1.05 (in-field) and 0.91 (out-of-field) for a passive proton beam, respectively. The uncertainty for neutron dose measurements using this field calibration method is less than 40%. The extended calibration procedure presented in this work showed that it is possible to use PADC track etch detectors for measurements of local neutron dose equivalent inside anthropomorphic phantoms by accounting for spectral changes in the neutron fluence.

  9. Subjective and objective observation of skin graft recovery on Indonesian local cat with different periods of transplantation time

    PubMed Central

    Erwin; Gunanti; Handharyani, Ekowati; Noviana, Deni

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The success of a skin graft in a cat is highly dependent on the granulation formed by the base of recipient bed. Granulation by the base of recipient bed will form after several days after injury. This research aimed to observe subjective and objective profile of skin graft recovery on forelimb of cats with different periods of donor skin placement. Materials and Methods: Nine male Indonesian local cats aged 1-2 years old, weighing 3-4 kg were divided into three groups. The first surgery for creating defect wound of 2 cm×2 cm in size was performed in the whole group. The wound was left for several days with the respective interval for each group, respectively: Group I (for 2 days), Group II (for 4 days), and Group III (for 6 days). In the whole group, the second surgery was done by the harvesting skin of thoracic area which then applied on recipient bed of respective groups. Result: The donor skin on Group II was accepted faster compared to Group I and Group III. The donor skin did not show color differences compared to surrounding skin, painless, bright red in bleeding test had faster both hair growth and drug absorption. Test toward the size of donor skin and the effect of drugs did not show a significant difference between each group. Conclusion: The observe subjective and objective profile of skin graft recovery on forelimb of cats on Group II were accepted faster compared to Group I and III. PMID:27284224

  10. Analysis of Efficacy Differences between Caudal and Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in Chronic Lumbar Axial Discogenic Pain: Local Anesthetic Alone vs. Local Combined with Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Boswell, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Comparative assessment of randomized controlled trials of caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in chronic lumbar discogenic pain. Objective: To assess the comparative efficacy of caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches of epidural injections in managing axial or discogenic low back pain. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections are commonly performed utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach to treat chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain, which is pain exclusive of that associated with a herniated intervertebral disc, or that is due to degeneration of the zygapophyseal joints, or due to dysfunction of the sacroiliac joints, respectively. The literature on the efficacy of epidural injections in managing chronic axial lumbar pain of presumed discogenic origin is limited. Methods: The present analysis is based on 2 randomized controlled trials of chronic axial low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain, utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach, with a total of 240 patients studied, and a 24-month follow-up. Patients were assigned to receive either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic with a steroid in each 60 patient group. Results: The primary outcome measure was significant improvement, defined as pain relief and functional status improvement of at least 50% from baseline, which was reported at 24-month follow-ups in 72% who received local anesthetic only with a lumbar interlaminar approach and 54% who received local anesthetic only with a caudal approach. In patients receiving local anesthetic with a steroid, the response rate was 67% for those who had a lumbar interlaminar approach and 68% for those who had a caudal approach at 12 months. The response was significantly better in the lumbar interlaminar group who received local anesthetic only, 77% versus 56% at 12 months and 72% versus 54% at 24 months. Conclusion: This assessment shows that in patients

  11. Mycobiota of biological soil crusts in the Negev desert, Israel - differences on a regional and local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkan, I.; Zaady, E.; Kidron, G.

    2012-04-01

    On a regional scale, we examined variations in microfungal communities inhabiting the biological soil crusts (BSC) and non-crusted soil of the northern and central Negev desert in 10 locations along a southward rainfall gradient (from 325 mm to 81 mm of annual rainfall). A total of 87 species from 49 genera were isolated using the soil dilution plate method. The mycobiota of BSC (80 species) was characterized by dominance of melanin-containing fungi, remarkable contribution of sexual Ascomycota, and low abundance of the typical soil genera Penicillium and Aspergillus. Morphological adaptations to the stressful desert environment were expressed in the prevalence of dark-colored microfungi with large, many-celled spores in the localities of the "drier" part of the rainfall gradient and in dark thick-walled fruit bodies of sexual ascomycetes. The abundance of melanin-containing species with multicellular spores was the only characteristic showed a highly significant (negative) correlation with the rainfall amount. We assume that the main factor influencing the content of these species was the latitudinal position of the locations, determining also the intensity of solar (UV) radiation. In the BSC communities, the xeric "desert" component (melanics, slow-reproducing fungi with large, thick-walled spores) was significantly more pronounced and the mesic "forest" component (Penicillium, fast-reproducing fungi with small, light-colored, and thin-walled spores) was much less represented than in the non-crusted shrub communities. In BSC, density of fungal isolates which can be considered an indirect characteristic of fungal biomass was significantly lower than in the non-crusted soil. Cluster analysis indicated that in most cases, the BSC and shrub localities, separated only by a few meters or less, differed on microfungal community structure much more significantly than BSC or shrub localities in the distance of tens of kilometers. The results of this analysis, together

  12. Visual Search Targeting Either Local or Global Perceptual Processes Differs as a Function of Autistic-Like Traits in the Typically Developing Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Renita A.; Dickinson, J. Edwin; Maybery, Murray T.; Badcock, Johanna C.; Badcock, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Relative to low scorers, high scorers on the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) show enhanced performance on the Embedded Figures Test and the Radial Frequency search task (RFST), which has been attributed to both enhanced local processing and differences in combining global percepts. We investigate the role of local and global processing further using…

  13. Persistent organochlorine pesticides detected in blood and tissue samples of vultures from different localities in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, E; Bouwman, H; van der Bank, H; Verdoorn, G H; Hofmann, D

    2001-07-01

    Gas chromatography was used to establish the presence of quantifiable residues of 14 persistent chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutants in whole blood, clotted blood, heart, kidney, liver and muscle samples obtained from individual African whitebacked (Pseudogyps africanus), Cape griffon (Gyps coprotheres) and Lappetfaced (Torgos tracheliotos) vultures from different localities in South Africa. The levels of pesticides measured in whole blood samples of live specimens were compared between nestlings from two natural breeding colonies, adults from a wildlife area and birds held in captivity. Statistically significant (P<0.05) differences between populations were detected in geometric means calculated for gamma-BHC (lindane), alpha(cis)-chlordane and alpha-endosulfan. Five of the organochlorine contaminants displayed significant variations between concentrations detected in the clotted blood, organs and muscles excised from vulture carcasses. This includes residues of gamma-BHC, alpha-chlordane, dieldrin, beta-endosulfan and heptachlor epoxide. Values of the respective biocides measured in vulture samples were generally low in comparison to results documented for a number of avian species. Although no threat is posed by any of the organochloride pesticides, continual monitoring of especially breeding colonies is recommended. Furthermore, the suitability of African whitebacked vulture nestlings as basic bioindicators is highly advocated. PMID:11461840

  14. Correlation between International Normalized Ratio values and sufficiency of two different local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Mohamed Zaghlool; Mourad, Samah I.; Salem, Ahmed S.; Abdelfadil, Ehab

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) undergoing minor oral surgeries is controversial. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between International Normalized Ratio (INR) values and the sufficiency of two different local hemostatic measures in controlling postextraction bleeding in anticoagulated patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty patients receiving Warfarin OAT were included in this study. Patients were selected so that 80 patients have INR values of ≤2, whereas the remaining patients have the INR values ranging from 2 to 3. Forty patients were then randomly selected from each category to form two equal groups. Forty-five patients who had never been on OAT were selected as a negative control group (group 1). Failure to achieve hemostasis using a pressure pack was managed using either tranexamic acid (group 2) or Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) (group 3). Results: The INR values of patients included in group 2 and 3 ranged from 1.5 to 3, with a mean of 2.2. No significant difference was recorded between the use of either tranexamic acid or ABS in achieving hemostasis in anticoagulated patients with INR values ranging between 2 and 3 (P = 0.93). Conclusion: Based on our findings, ABS is a hemostatic agent of good efficacy. The effect of ABS in controlling post-extraction bleeding in anticoagulated patients with INR values ≤3 is comparable to tranexamic acid with no evidence to support the superiority of tranexamic acid over ABS. PMID:25512727

  15. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster – a case series

    PubMed Central

    Likar, Rudolf; Demschar, Susanne; Kager, Ingo; Neuwersch, Stefan; Pipam, Wolfgang; Sittl, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Study design This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Patients and methods Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Results Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years) presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients) or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients); one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients). During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98) to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline) and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1). Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Conclusion Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated. PMID:25565882

  16. Implant based differences in adverse local tissue reaction in failed total hip arthroplasties: a morphological and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) is characterized by periprosthetic soft tissue inflammation composed of a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, extensive soft tissue necrosis, and vascular changes. Multiple hip implant classes have been reported to result in ALTR, and clinical differences may represent variation in the soft tissue response at the cellular and tissue levels. The purpose of this study was to describe similarities and differences in periprosthetic tissue structure, organization, and cellular composition by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry in ALTR resulting from two common total hip arthroplasty (THA) implant classes. Methods Consecutive patients presenting with ALTR from two major hip implant classes (N = 54 patients with Dual-Modular Neck implant; N = 14 patients with Metal-on-Metal implant) were identified from our prospective Osteolysis Tissue Database and Repository. Clinical characteristics including age, sex, BMI, length of implantation, and serum metal ion levels were recorded. Retrieved synovial tissue morphology was graded using light microscopy and cellular composition was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results Length of implantation was shorter in the DMN group versus MoM THA group (21.3 [8.4] months versus 43.6 [13.8] months respectively; p < 0.005) suggesting differences in implant performance. Morphologic examination revealed a common spectrum of neo-synovial proliferation and necrosis in both groups. Macrophages were more commonly present in diffuse sheets (Grade 3) in the MoM relative to DMN group (p = 0.016). Perivascular lymphocytes with germinal centers (Grade 4) were more common in the DMN group, which trended towards significance (p = 0.066). Qualitative differences in corrosion product morphology were seen between the two groups. Immunohistochemistry showed features of a CD4 and GATA-3 rich lymphocyte reaction in both implants, with increased ratios of perivascular T

  17. Localized structures of the (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with different diffractions and power-law nonlinearities in PT-symmetric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Hua; Li, Ji-Tao; Li, Shao-Feng; Liu, Quan-Tao

    2016-06-01

    We study a (3+1)-dimensional variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation with different diffractions and power-law nonlinearity in PT-symmetric potentials. Considering different PT-symmetric potentials, we obtain two kinds of analytical sech-type localized soliton solutions. From these solutions, we analytically discuss the powers and power-flow densities. Moreover, we study compression and expansion of localized structures in the periodic distributed amplification system.

  18. Spastin subcellular localization is regulated through usage of different translation start sites and active export from the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Claudiani, Pamela; Riano, Elena; Errico, Alessia; Andolfi, Gennaro; Rugarli, Elena I. . E-mail: rugarli@tigem.it

    2005-10-01

    Most cases of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia are linked to mutations in SPG4 encoding spastin, a protein involved in microtubule dynamics and membrane trafficking. In pyramidal neurons of the motor cortex and in immortalized motor neurons, spastin is localized to the synaptic terminals and growth cones. However, in other neurons and in proliferating cells spastin is prevalently nuclear. The mechanisms that determine targeting of spastin to the nucleus or the cytoplasm are unknown. We show here that the SPG4 mRNA is able to direct synthesis of two spastin isoforms, 68 and 60 kDa, respectively, through usage of two different translational start sites. Both isoforms are imported into the nucleus, but the 68-kDa isoform contains two nuclear export signals that efficiently drive export to the cytoplasm. Nuclear export is leptomycin-B sensitive. The cytoplasmic 68-kDa spastin isoform is more abundant in the brain and the spinal cord than in other tissues. Our data indicate that spastin function is modulated through usage of alternative translational start sites and active nuclear import and export, and open new perspectives for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  19. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  20. An efficient locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method based on the conformal scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Shao, Wei; Shi, Sheng-Bing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bing-Zhong

    2015-07-01

    An efficient conformal locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (LOD-CFDTD) method is presented for solving two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic (EM) scattering problems. The formulation for the 2D transverse-electric (TE) case is presented and its stability property and numerical dispersion relationship are theoretically investigated. It is shown that the introduction of irregular grids will not damage the numerical stability. Instead of the staircasing approximation, the conformal scheme is only employed to model the curve boundaries, whereas the standard Yee grids are used for the remaining regions. As the irregular grids account for a very small percentage of the total space grids, the conformal scheme has little effect on the numerical dispersion. Moreover, the proposed method, which requires fewer arithmetic operations than the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) CFDTD method, leads to a further reduction of the CPU time. With the total-field/scattered-field (TF/SF) boundary and the perfectly matched layer (PML), the radar cross section (RCS) of two 2D structures is calculated. The numerical examples verify the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331007 and 61471105).

  1. HIV Testing and Counselling in Colombia: Local Experience on Two Different Recruitment Strategies to Better Reach Low Socioeconomic Status Communities

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Quintero, Jaime; Mueses-Marin, Hector Fabio; Montaño-Agudelo, David; Pinzón-Fernández, María Virginia; Tello-Bolívar, Inés Constanza; Alvarado-Llano, Beatriz Eugenia; Martinez-Cajas, Jorge Luis

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing rates remain very low in Colombia, with only 20% of individuals at risk ever tested. In order to tackle this issue, the Corporacion de Lucha Contra el Sida (CLS) has implemented a multidisciplinary, provider-initiated, population-based HIV testing/counselling strategy named BAFI. In this report, we describe the experience of CLS at reaching populations from low socioeconomic backgrounds in 2008-2009. Two different approaches were used: one led by CLS and local health care providers (BAFI-1) and the other by CLS and community leaders (BAFI-2). Both approaches included the following: consented HIV screening test, a demographic questionnaire, self-reported HIV knowledge and behaviour questionnaires, pre- and posttest counselling, confirmatory HIV tests, clinical follow-up, access to comprehensive care and antiretroviral treatment. A total of 2085 individuals were enrolled in BAFI-1 and 363 in BAFI-2. The effectiveness indicators for BAFI-1 and BAFI-2, respectively, were HIV positive-confirmed prevalence = 0.29% and 3.86%, return rate for confirmatory results = 62.5% and 93.7%, return rate for comprehensive care = 83.3% and 92.8%, and ART initiation rate = 20% and 76.9%. Although more people were reached with BAFI-1, the community-led BAFI-2 was more effective at reaching individuals with a higher prevalence of behavioural risk factors for HIV infection. PMID:24592330

  2. Differences in influence between pitched-from-vertical lines and slanted-from-frontal horizontal lines on egocentric localization.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Matin, L

    1995-01-01

    The visual field exerts powerful effects on egocentric spatial localization along both horizontal and vertical dimensions. Thus, (1) prism-produced visual pitch and visual slant generate similar mislocalizations of visually perceived eye level (VPEL) and visually perceived straight ahead (VPSA) and (2) in darkness curare-produced extraocular muscle paresis under eccentric gaze generates similar mislocalizations in VPEL and VPSA that are essentially eliminated by introducing a normal visual field. In the present experiments, however, a search for influences of real visual slant on VPSA to correspond to the influences of visual pitch on VPEL failed to find one. Although the elevation corresponding to VPEL changes linearly with the pitch of a visual field consisting of two isolated 66.5 degrees-long pitched-from-vertical lines, the corresponding manipulation of change in the slant of either a horizontal two-line or a horizontal four-line visual field on VPSA did not occur. The average slope of the VPEL-versus-pitch function across 5 subjects was +0.40 over a +/- 30 degrees pitch range, but was indistinguishable from 0.00 for the VPSA-versus-slant function over a +/- 30 degrees slant range. Possible contributions to the difference between susceptibility of VPEL and VPSA to visual influence from extraretinal eye position information, gravity, and several retinal gradients are discussed. PMID:7885809

  3. Comparative two- and three-dimensional analysis of nanoparticle localization in different cell types by Raman spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräutigam, Katharina; Bocklitz, Thomas; Silge, Anja; Dierker, Christian; Ossig, Rainer; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Cialla, Dana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    The increasing production and application of engineered nanomaterials requires a detailed understanding of the potential toxicity of nanoparticles and their uptake in living cells and tissue. For that purpose, a highly sensitive and selective method for detecting single nonlabeled nanoparticles and nanoparticle agglomerations in cells and animal tissue is required. Here, we show that Raman microspectroscopy allows for the specific detection of TiO2 nanoparticles inside cultured NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages. The spatial position of TiO2 nanoparticles and in parallel the relative intracellular concentration and distribution of cellular constituents such as proteins or DNA residues were identified and displayed by construction of two- and three-dimensional Raman maps. The resulting Raman images reflected the significant differences in nanoparticle uptake and intracellular storage of fibroblasts and macrophages. Furthermore, TiO2 nanomaterials could be characterized and the presence of rutile- and anatase-phase TiO2 were determined inside cells. Together, the data shown here prove that Raman spectroscopic imaging is a promising technique for studying the interaction of nanomaterials with living cells and for differentiating intracellular nanoparticles from those localized on the cell membrane. The technology provides a label-free, non-destructive, material-specific analysis of whole cells with high spatial resolution, along with additional information on the current status of the material properties.

  4. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T; Carlson, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia. PMID:27131647

  5. Sucrose transport and phloem unloading in peach fruit: potential role of two transporters localized in different cell types.

    PubMed

    Zanon, Laura; Falchi, Rachele; Santi, Simonetta; Vizzotto, Giannina

    2015-06-01

    Several complex physiological processes, which include long-distance translocation in the phloem and unloading in sink tissues, govern the partitioning of sugars in economically important organs, such as peach fruit. In this study, we took advantage of a symplastic tracer, carboxyfluorescein (CF), providing evidence for an apoplastic sucrose transfer in the early (SI) and middle (SIII) phases of peach fruit development. Moreover, using a combination of in situ hybridization and laser microdissection-assisted expression analysis, three putative sucrose transporters encoding genes (PpSUT1, PpSUT2, PpSUT4) were transcriptionally analyzed to relate their expression with sucrose storage in this organ. Our study revealed that PpSUT2 and PpSUT4 are the genes predominantly expressed in fruit flesh, and the detailed analysis of their expression pattern in the different cell types enabled us to suggest a specialized role in sucrose distribution. Both PpSUTs transporters could be involved in the retrieval of sucrose lost from the symplastic continuum of the phloem and, when expressed in parenchyma cells, they could be active in the import of sucrose into sink tissues, via symport from the apoplast. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed and discussed for PpSUT4 because of its putative tonoplastic localization. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underpinning sucrose unloading and accumulation in peach fruit. PMID:25348206

  6. Cloning, expression and localization of the Daphnia carinata transformer gene DcarTra during different reproductive stages.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling; Lv, Weiwei; Huang, Youhui; Liu, Zhiquan; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Yunlong

    2015-07-25

    In this study, the full-length cDNA of the Transformer (Tra) gene from the common freshwater species Daphnia carinata (DcarTra; GenBank accession no. KJ735445) was cloned using primers based on homologous sequences and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The relative expression and localization of DcarTra and the cellular abundance of the DcarTra protein during different sexual phases were subsequently investigated. The full-length DcarTra cDNA was 1620 bp with an ORF of 1143 bp encoding a 380 amino acid polypeptide. Phylogenetic analysis identified closely related genes in Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex, and more distantly related genes in other insects. Quantitative PCR showed that DcarTra expression was highest in males, followed by sexual females, and lowest in parthenogenetic females. Whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that DcarTra was mainly expressed in the thoracic limbs, ovaries and rectum in parthenogenetic females, and in the joints of second antennae, ovaries, rectum and ventral processes in sexual females. Western blotting showed two differently phosphorylated forms of the Tra protein. When Tra is phosphorylated, DcarTra protein levels were much higher in males than in two females. Otherwise, when Tra is dephosphorylated, the highest Tra protein levels were in sexual females, which revealed that D. carinata can control the sexual transition via these two forms. Together these results suggest that DcarTra plays significant roles in the reproductive transformation of D. carinata and dephosphorylation of DcarTra may be the trigger for females to transform into males. PMID:25917617

  7. On the integral inversion of satellite-to-satellite velocity differences for local gravity field recovery: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshagh, Mehdi; Šprlák, Michal

    2016-02-01

    The gravity field can be recovered locally from the satellite-to-satellite velocity differences (VDs) between twin-satellites moving in the same orbit. To do so, three different integral formulae are derived in this paper to recover geoid height, radial component of gravity anomaly and gravity disturbance at sea level. Their kernel functions contain the product of two Legendre polynomials with different arguments. Such kernels are relatively complicated and it may be impossible to find their closed-forms. However, we could find the one related to recovering the geoid height from the VD data. The use of spectral forms of the kernels is possible and one does not have to generate them to very high degrees. The kernel functions are well-behaving meaning that they reduce the contribution of far-zone data and for example a cap margin of 7° is enough for recovering gravity anomalies. This means that the inversion area should be larger by 7° from all directions than the desired area to reduce the effect of spatial truncation error of the integral formula. Numerical studies using simulated data over Fennoscandia showed that when the distance between the twin-satellites is small, higher frequencies of the anomalies can be recovered from the VD data. In the ideal case of having short distance between the satellites flying at 250 km level, recovering radial component of gravity anomaly with an accuracy of 7 mGal is possible over Fennoscandia, if the VD data is contaminated only with the spatial truncation error, which is an ideal assumption. However, the problem is that the power of VD signal is very low when the satellites are close and it is very difficult to recognise the signal amongst the noise of the VD data. We also show that for a successful determination of gravity anomalies at sea level from an altitude of 250 km mean VDs with better accuracy than 0.01 mm/s are required. When coloured noise at this level is used for the VDs at 250 km with separation of 300 km, the

  8. A Monoclonal Antibody Specific for Candida albicans Als4 Demonstrates Overlapping Localization of Als Family Proteins on the Fungal Cell Surface and Highlights Differences between Als Localization in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, David A.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Manfra-Maretta, Sandra L.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2011-01-01

    The Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) family encodes large cell-surface glycoproteins that function in adhesion of the fungus to host and abiotic surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for each Als protein were developed to study Als localization on the C. albicans surface. An anti-Als4 mAb demonstrated that Als4 covers the surface of yeast cells, with a greater abundance of Als4 on cells grown at 30°C compared to 37°C. On germ tubes, Als4 is localized in a restricted area proximal to the mother yeast. Immunolabeling with several anti-Als mAbs showed overlapping localization of Als1 and Als4 on yeast cells and Als1, Als3 and Als4 on germ tubes. Overlapping localization of Als proteins was also observed on yeast and hyphae recovered from mouse models of disseminated and oral candidiasis. Differences between Als localization in vivo and in vitro suggested changes in regulation of Als production in the host compared to the culture flask. Characterization with the anti-Als mAbs reveals the simultaneous presence and differences in relative abundance of Als proteins, creating an accurate image of Als representation and localization that can be used to guide conclusions regarding individual and collective Als protein function. PMID:22106872

  9. Achievement of local thermodynamic equilibrium for ns laser-induced plasmas on aluminium sample at different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud

    2014-11-01

    The Collisional-Radiative model CoRaM-Al is elaborated and implemented in a 0D numerical approach in the purpose of describing the formation of the plasma resulting from the interaction between a τ = 4 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse and an aluminium sample in vacuum. The influence of the four harmonics at 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm on the behavior of the nascent plasma is studied. In each case, the fluence is set equal to the threshold above which a phase explosion takes place (fluence of 7.7, 7.4, 6.8, 5.1 J cm-2 in order of increasing wavelength). The model takes into account free electrons and excited states of Al, Al+, Al2+ and Al3+. Both groups of particles are characterized by their translation temperature in thermal non-equilibrium. Besides, each population density is assumed to be in chemical non-equilibrium and to behave freely through the involved seven elementary processes (electron impact induced excitation and ionization, elastic collisions, multiphoton ionization, inverse laser Bremsstrahlung, direct thermal Bremsstrahlung and spontaneous emission). Atoms passing from the sample to the gas are described by considering classical vaporization phenomena (governed by the Hertz-Knudsen law) so that the surface temperature is limited to values less than the critical point (Tc = 6700 K). The relative role of the elementary processes is discussed and the time-evolution of the excitation of the species is analyzed for the four considered wavelengths. This study allows to determine the different excitation temperatures as well as their evolution in time. Thus the conditions required for the achievement of the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium can be precisely described.

  10. SIGNAL : Water vapour flux variability and local wind field investigations within five differently managed agroforestry sites across Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwitz, Christian; Siebicke, Lukas; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Optimising soil water uptake and ground water consumption in mono-specific agricultural systems plays an important role for sustainable land management. By including tree alleys into the agricultural landscape, called agroforestry (AF), the wind flow is modified leading to a presumably favourable microclimate behind the tree alleys. We expect that this zone is characterized by increased air temperature and atmospheric water vapour content, compared to mono-specific fields. This would extend the growing season and increase the yield production behind the tree alleys. Within the SIGNAL (Sustainable Intensification of Agriculture through Agroforestry) project the evapotranspiration (ET) variability and the local wind field of agroforestry sites compared to mono-specific agricultural systems is investigated. Our study is based on the comparison of five differently managed agroforestry sites across Germany. All site feature one agroforestry plot and one reference plot, which represents a mono-specific cropped system. Each plot is equipped with an eddy-covariance tower, including a high frequency 3D SONIC anemometer and instruments gathering standard meteorological parameter as pressure, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, ground heat flux, net- and global radiation. The Surface Energy Budget (SEB) method will be used to calculate evapotranspiration QE as QE = ‑ QN ‑ QH ‑ QG ‑ Res by measuring the sensible heat flux, QH, with the eddy covariance method, the radiation balance, QN and the ground heat flux, QG. QH and QN will be measured continuously long-term. We will quantify site specific energy balance non-closure, Res, by temporarily measuring QE, using eddy covariance and a roving tower and then solving the SEB equation for Res. The short term Res will be used to then continuously derive QE from the SEB method. We will compare measured evapotranspiration rates from the SEB method to modelled evapotranspiration of the agroforestry systems through

  11. Local Muscle Metabolic Demand Induced by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Voluntary Contractions at Different Force Levels: A NIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Muthalib, Makii; Kerr, Graham; Nosaka, Kazunori; Perrey, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Functional Muscle metabolic demand during contractions evoked by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been consistently documented to be greater than voluntary contractions (VOL) at the same force level (10-50% maximal voluntary contraction-MVC). However, we have shown using a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that local muscle metabolic demand is similar between NMES and VOL performed at MVC levels, thus controversy exists. This study therefore compared biceps brachii muscle metabolic demand (tissue oxygenation index-TOI and total hemoglobin volume-tHb) during a 10s isometric contraction of the elbow flexors between NMES (stimulation frequency of 30Hz and current level to evoke 30% MVC) and VOL at 30% MVC (VOL-30%MVC) and MVC (VOL-MVC) level in 8 healthy men (23-33-y). Greater changes in TOI and tHb induced by NMES than VOL-30%MVC confirm previous studies of a greater local metabolic demand for NMES than VOL at the same force level. The same TOI and tHb changes for NMES and VOL-MVC suggest that local muscle metabolic demand and intramuscular pressure were similar between conditions. In conclusion, these findings indicate that NMES induce a similar local muscle metabolic demand as that of maximal VOL. PMID:27478574

  12. Beliefs, Attitudes, Intentions and Locality: The Impact of Different Teaching Approaches on the Ecological Affinity of Indonesian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusmawan, Udan; O'Toole, John Mitchell; Reynolds, Ruth; Bourke, Sid

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the interaction between teaching method and school locality in aligning student environmental beliefs, attitudes and intentions. Data for this study were collected from 236 adolescent upper secondary school students and chemistry teachers in Indonesia who were completing environmental topics from the local…

  13. Locally refined block-centred finite-difference groundwater models: Evaluation of parameter sensitivity and the consequences for inverse modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Models with local grid refinement, as often required in groundwater models, pose special problems for model calibration. This work investigates the calculation of sensitivities and the performance of regression methods using two existing and one new method of grid refinement. The existing local grid refinement methods considered are: (a) a variably spaced grid in which the grid spacing becomes smaller near the area of interest and larger where such detail is not needed, and (b) telescopic mesh refinement (TMR), which uses the hydraulic heads or fluxes of a regional model to provide the boundary conditions for a locally refined model. The new method has a feedback between the regional and local grids using shared nodes, and thereby, unlike the TMR methods, balances heads and fluxes at the interfacing boundary. Results for sensitivities are compared for the three methods and the effect of the accuracy of sensitivity calculations are evaluated by comparing inverse modelling results. For the cases tested, results indicate that the inaccuracies of the sensitivities calculated using the TMR approach can cause the inverse model to converge to an incorrect solution.

  14. Preliminary comparison of different immune and production components in local and imported Saanen goats reared under a sub-tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Itani, Houssam H; Sleiman, Fawwak T; Saade, Maya F; Harakeh, Steve; Nour, Afif M Abdel; Shaib, Houssam A

    2012-01-01

    Three objectives were included in this research work. The first objective compared different immune components in healthy mature males, mature females, and female kids of local and imported Saanen goats, reared under a sub-tropical environment. The significantly differing immune components were the blood monocyte percent, blood CD8 count, and the total white blood cell count. The second objective compared the performance of Saanen versus local does. The means of the milk yield and prolificacy of the imported Saanen does were significantly higher than those of the local does (p<0.05). The third objective compared the immune responses (hemagglutination-HA titers) and complement fixation (CF) titers in mature does of the two breeds to chicken red blood cells (c-RBC). The HA titers showed a significant seroconversion only in imported Saanen (p<0.05) but not in local does; however, the CF titers increased significantly at 4 weeks following priming with c-RBC in local (p<0.05) but not in the imported Saanen does. The impact of the differences in blood immune components and responses to antigens in the compared goats on protection potential against prevalent diseases in the sub-tropical zone of the eastern Mediterranean countries is discussed. PMID:21720787

  15. Rickettsia ‘In’ and ‘Out’: Two Different Localization Patterns of a Bacterial Symbiont in the Same Insect Species

    PubMed Central

    Caspi-Fluger, Ayelet; Inbar, Moshe; Mozes-Daube, Netta; Mouton, Laurence; Hunter, Martha S.; Zchori-Fein, Einat

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular symbionts of arthropods have diverse influences on their hosts, and their functions generally appear to be associated with their localization within the host. The effect of localization pattern on the role of a particular symbiont cannot normally be tested since the localization pattern within hosts is generally invariant. However, in Israel, the secondary symbiont Rickettsia is unusual in that it presents two distinct localization patterns throughout development and adulthood in its whitefly host, Bemisia tabaci (B biotype). In the “scattered” pattern, Rickettsia is localized throughout the whitefly hemocoel, excluding the bacteriocytes, where the obligate symbiont Portiera aleyrodidarum and some other secondary symbionts are housed. In the “confined” pattern, Rickettsia is restricted to the bacteriocytes. We examined the effects of these patterns on Rickettsia densities, association with other symbionts (Portiera and Hamiltonella defensa inside the bacteriocytes) and on the potential for horizontal transmission to the parasitoid wasp, Eretmocerus mundus, while the wasp larvae are developing within the whitefly nymph. Sequences of four Rickettsia genes were found to be identical for both localization patterns, suggesting that they are closely related strains. However, real-time PCR analysis showed very different dynamics for the two localization types. On the first day post-adult emergence, Rickettsia densities were 21 times higher in the “confined” pattern vs. “scattered” pattern whiteflies. During adulthood, Rickettsia increased in density in the “scattered” pattern whiteflies until it reached the “confined” pattern Rickettsia density on day 21. No correlation between Rickettsia densities and Hamiltonella or Portiera densities were found for either localization pattern. Using FISH technique, we found Rickettsia in the gut of the parasitoid wasps only when they developed on whiteflies with the “scattered” pattern. The

  16. An implicit difference scheme for the long-time evolution of localized solutions of a generalized Boussinesq system

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, C.I.; Maugin, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear system of equations built up from a generalized Boussinesq equation coupled with a wave equation which is a model for the one-dimensional dynamics of phases in martensitic alloys. The strongly implicit scheme employing Newton`s quasilinearisation allows us to track the long time evolution of the localized solutions of the system. Two distinct classes of solutions are encountered for the pure Boussinesq equation. The first class consists of oscillatory pulses whose envelopes are localized waves. The second class consists of smoother solutions whose shapes are either heteroclinic (kinks) or homoclinic (bumps). The homoclinics decrease in amplitude with time while their support increases. An appropriate self-similar scaling is found analytically and confirmed by the direct numerical simulations to high accuracy. The rich phenomenology resulting from the coupling with the wave equation is also investigated. 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Adaptation of Locally Available Portion Sizes for Food Frequency Questionnaires in Nutritional Epidemiological Studies: How Much Difference does it Make?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neha; Verma, Sonika; Singh, Abhishek; Tandon, Nikhil; Puri, Seema; Arora, Narendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is need for employing strategies to minimize measurement errors while administering semi-quantitative FFQ. The current study was planned to adapt and standardize locally available portion sizes for semi-quantitative FFQ to improve its validity and document the process of standardization of portion sizes. Methodology: The study was conducted in 9 villages of the INCLEN-SOMAARTH DDESS (Demographic, Development and Environmental Surveillance Site), Palwal district, Haryana, India. The subjects in these nine villages are part of a cohort study to assess the interaction between societal and household factors with food intake and physical activity of children. Systematic utensil survey was undertaken in 3 randomly chosen households per village i.e. 27 households and the portion sizes were derived from a total of 74 serving utensils. The derived sizes were classified as small (240 ml), medium (320 ml) and large (600 ml). The semi-quantitative FFQ with locally derived portion sizes was then administered to 63 children in 6-12 year age group. Results: The volume of food measured by the reference portion sizes generally being employed in the national surveys, would have been underestimated the food consumed by the child by 55-60% as compared to what was being consumed by the children in the study area. The correlation between food intake assessed by 24-hr recall method and FFQ using derived (local) portion sizes was better as compared to that obtained with the semi-quantitative FFQ done with reference portions. Conclusion: In conclusion, local portion size adaptation of FFQ for semi-quantification is useful to mitigate measurement errors associated with this technique. PMID:27385878

  18. A study of optical reflectance and localization modes of 1-D Fibonacci photonic quasicrystals using different graded dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin K.; Pandey, Praveen C.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present an analytical study on the reflection properties of light through one-dimensional (1-D) quasi-periodic multilayer structures. The considered structures are as follows: F7, F8, F9, (F2)10, (F3)10 and some combinations such as: [(F2)10 (F7) (F2)10], [(F2)10 (F8) (F2)10], [(F3)10 (F7) (F3)10], [(F3)10 (F8) (F3)10], [(F2)10(F3)10], [(F2)10 (F7) (F3)10] and [(F2)10 (F8) (F3)10], where (Fj)n represents n period of the Fibonacci sequence of jth generation. These multilayer structures are considered of two types of layers. One type of layer is considered of graded material like normal, linear or exponential graded material, and the second type of layer is considered of constant refractive index material. Transfer matrix method is utilized to calculate the reflection spectra and localization modes of such structures in the frequency range 150-450 THz. This work would provide the basis of understanding of the effect of graded materials on the reflection and localization modes in Fibonacci photonic quasicrystal structures and obtained spectra can be used in the recognition of grading of materials. The considered heterostructures provide the broad reflection band and some localization modes in the calculated region.

  19. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore » readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  20. Are There Differences in Antibiotic Use Between the Recent-Immigrants from Mainland China and the Local-Born in Hong Kong?

    PubMed

    Wun, Yuk Tsan; Lam, Tai Pong; Lam, Kwok Fai; Ho, Pak Leung; Yung, Wai Hung Raymond

    2015-08-01

    Immigrants, especially the first-generation, were thought to have different knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) with antibiotics. Doctors often perceived extra pressure from them to prescribe antibiotics. To test these perceptions, we studied the difference in KAP with antibiotics between the recent-immigrants from mainland China and the local-born of Hong Kong-places with significantly different healthcare and socio-economic systems. Focus groups (including one specific group of recent-immigrants) with 56 participants and territory-wide telephone questionnaire survey with 2,471 randomly selected respondents. Recent-immigrants shared similar KAP with the local-born. After adjustment for age, sex and education, the main significant difference was the new-immigrants' behaviour of acquiring antibiotics without prescription and keeping the leftover. They, like the local-born, preferred doctors who prescribed antibiotics cautiously. Immigration status could be the surrogate for age, sex and education in the KAP with antibiotics. For antibiotic use, health education and patient care could be similar between the recent-immigrants and the local-born. PMID:24969039

  1. Educational Psychology in Scotland: Making a Difference. An Aspect Report on the Findings of Inspections of Local Authority Educational Psychology Services 2006-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report provides, for the first time, an overview based on inspections of all 32 local authority educational psychology services. The picture it presents is broadly a very positive one although it also points to areas in which there is certainly scope for further improvement. The report shows that services are making a positive difference to…

  2. Same, same—but different: on the use of Navon derived measures of global/local processing in studies of face processing.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Christian; Krumborg, Julie R

    2014-11-01

    Some studies have reported a significant correlation between face discrimination/recognition ability and indexes of global/local processing derived from the Navon paradigm. Other studies, however, have failed to find such a relationship. In this paper we examine three aspects related to the Navon paradigm that may have contributed to this discrepancy but which have been largely neglected: (i) the use of different types of compound stimuli across studies, (ii) differences between studies in the type of index derived from the Navon paradigm, and (iii) the reliability of these indexes. In a Navon experiment comparing performance with compound letters and compound shapes in normal participants, we find little consistency both within and across participants in how they perform with these stimulus types, despite the fact that both stimulus types give rise to the typical effects. In addition we find that many of the Navon derived indexes of global/local effects used in studies examining face processing have low reliability and do not measure the same aspects of global/local processing. Echoing the results from the normal participants, we also find little consistency in how a congenital prosopagnosic performs in the Navon paradigm. With compound letters, she responds much faster to local than to global aspects of the stimuli; a pattern not seen in a single of the normal participants. With compound shapes, however, she exhibits no such abnormality. These findings question the validity of the conclusions in studies relating Navon derived indexes of global/local processing to face processing. PMID:25282198

  3. Interaction of colloidal nanoparticles with their local environment: the (ionic) nanoenvironment around nanoparticles is different from bulk and determines the physico-chemical properties of the nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Rehbock, Christoph; Hühn, Dominik; Carrillo-Carrion, Carolina; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Merk, Vivian; Barcikowski, Stephan; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2014-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) are influenced by their local environment, as, in turn, the local environment influences the physico-chemical properties of the NPs. In other words, the local environment around NPs has a profound impact on the NPs, and it is different from bulk due to interaction with the NP surface. So far, this important effect has not been addressed in a comprehensive way in the literature. The vicinity of NPs can be sensitively influenced by local ions and ligands, with effects already occurring at extremely low concentrations. NPs in the Hückel regime are more sensitive to fluctuations in the ionic environment, because of a larger Debye length. The local ion concentration hereby affects the colloidal stability of the NPs, as it is different from bulk owing to Debye Hückel screening caused by the charge of the NPs. This can have subtle effects, now caused by the environment to the performance of the NP, such as for example a buffering effect caused by surface reaction on ultrapure ligand-free nanogold, a size quenching effect in the presence of specific ions and a significant impact on fluorophore-labelled NPs acting as ion sensors. Thus, the aim of this review is to clarify and give an unifying view of the complex interplay between the NP's surface with their nanoenvironment. PMID:24759541

  4. Infections with cardiopulmonary and intestinal helminths and sarcoptic mange in red foxes from two different localities in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad N S; Halasa, Tariq; Kapel, Christian M O

    2014-03-01

    Monitoring parasitic infections in the red fox is essential for obtaining baseline knowledge on the spread of diseases of veterinary and medical importance. In this study, screening for cardiopulmonary and intestinal helminths and sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) was done on 118 foxes originating from two distinct localities in Denmark, (Copenhagen) greater area and southern Jutland. Fifteen parasite species were recorded in 116 foxes (98.3%), nine parasitic species are of zoonotic potential. Parasite diversity was greater in foxes of Copenhagen in terms of overall parasite species richness and species richness of all helminth groups individually: trematodes; cestodes; and nematodes. Six parasite species were recovered from foxes of Copenhagen, but not from foxes of Southern Jutland: Echinochasmus perfoliatus; Echinostoma sp.; Pseudamphistomum truncatum; Dipylidium caninum; Angiostrongylus vasorum; and Sarcoptes scabiei, but Toxascaris leonina was only recorded in foxes of southern Jutland. A high prevalence and abundance of A. vasorum in foxes of Copenhagen was observed. The prevalence of four nematode species; Eucoleus (Capillaria) aerophilus, Uncinaria stenocephala, Toxocara canis, and Crenosoma vulpis, in foxes of both localities were comparable and ranging from 22.9% to 89%. The prevalence of Mesocestoides sp. was significantly higher in foxes of Copenhagen. Taenia spp. were detected using morphological and molecular analysis, which revealed the dominance of T. polyacantha in foxes of both localities. Infections with sarcoptic mange were evident only among foxes of Copenhagen (44.9%), which significantly affected the average weight of the infected animals. Further remarks on the zoonotic and veterinary implications of the parasites recovered are given. PMID:24570055

  5. Studies of impurity occupation and local angular distortions for Cu2+ in CdS films at different concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo-Liang; Wu, Shao-Yi; Zhang, Li-Juan; Xu, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-02-01

    In order to clarify impurity occupation and local structures for Cu2+ in the CdS films, the g factors and hyperfine structure constants (HSCs) and their concentration dependences are theoretically studied from the perturbation calculations for both the cases of tetragonally compressed tetrahedral (TCT) and tetragonally elongated octahedral (TEO) 3d9 clusters. Despite similar g anisotropies g // > g ⊥ > 2, the calculated g factors and HSCs and their concentration dependences based on the TCT [CuS4]6- cluster show much better agreement with the experimental data than those based on the previously assigned TEO [CuS6]10- cluster. So, the g factors and HSCs can be ascribed to the substitutional TCT [CuS4]6- cluster on Cd2+ site, and the possibility of the previous assignment of interstitial TEO [CuS6]10- cluster may be tentatively excluded. In the TCT [CuS4]6- clusters, the local Cu2+-S2- bond angles θ related to C4 axis are found to be about 1.54° larger than the ideal value θ 0 (≈54.736°) of a regular tetrahedron owing to the Jahn-Teller effect. The magnitudes of g factors and HSCs demonstrate the overall increasing trends with increasing Cu2+ concentration, attributable to the decrease of covalency (increase of covalency factor N) and the increases of the angular deviation Δθ (=θ - θ 0) and the core polarization constant κ.

  6. Effect of local energy supply to a hypersonic flow on the drag of bodies with different nose bluntness

    SciTech Connect

    Borzov, V.Yu.; Rybka, I.V.; Yur`ev, A.S.

    1995-06-01

    Parameters of the axisymmetric flow around bodies with different bluntness are compared in the case of constant energy supply to the main hypersonic flow. Flow structures, drag coefficients, and expenditure of energy on overcoming drag are analyzed with the effect of thermal energy on the flow taken into account for different bodies with equal volume.

  7. Morphological variation of freshwater crabs Zilchiopsis collastinensis and Trichodactylus borellianus (Decapoda, Trichodactylidae) among localities from the middle Paraná River basin during different hydrological periods

    PubMed Central

    Torres, María Victoria; Collins, Pablo Agustín; Giri, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Measures of hydrologic connectivity have been used extensively to describe spatial connections in riverine landscapes. Hydrologic fluctuations constitute an important macrofactor that regulates other environmental variables and can explain the distribution and abundance of organisms. We analysed morphological variations among individuals of two freshwater crab species, Zilchiopsis collastinensis and Trichodactylus borellianus, from localities of the middle Paraná River basin during two phases of the local hydrological regime. Specimens were sampled at sites (localities) of Paraná River, Saladillo Stream, Salado River and Coronda River when water levels were falling and rising. The conductivity, pH, temperature and geographical coordinates were recorded at each site. The dorsal cephalothorax of each crab was represented using 16 landmarks for Zilchiopsis collastinensis and 14 landmarks for Trichodactylus borellianus. The Canonical Variate Analyses showed differences in shape (for both species) among the crabs collected from the Paraná and Salado Rivers during the two hydrologic phases. We did not find a general distribution pattern for shape among the crab localities. During falling water, the shapes of Zilchiopsis collastinensis were not related to latitude-longitude gradient (i.e., showing greater overlap in shape), while during rising water the shapes were ordered along a distributional gradient according to geographical location. Contrary, shapes of Trichodactylus borellianus were related to latitude-longitude during falling water and were not related to distributional gradient during rising water. The cephalothorax shape showed, in general, no statistically significant covariations with environmental variables for either species. These results show that each freshwater crab species, from different localities of the middle Paraná River, remain connected; however, these connections change throughout the hydrologic regime of the floodplain system

  8. Distinct tissue distributions and subcellular localizations of differently phosphorylated forms of the myosin regulatory light chain in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Ward, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II (myosin hereafter) has well-established roles in generating contractile force on actin filaments during morphogenetic processes in all metazoans. Myosin activation is regulated by phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC, encoded by spaghettisquash or sqh in Drosophila) first on Ser21 and subsequently on Thr20. These phosphorylation events are positively controlled by a variety of kinases including myosin light chain kinase, Rho kinase, citron kinase, and AMP kinase and are negatively regulated by myosin phosphatase. The activation of myosin is thus highly regulated and likely developmentally controlled. In order to monitor the activity of myosin during development, we have generated antibodies against the monophosphorylated (Sqh1P) and diphosphorylated (Sqh2P) forms of Sqh. We first show that the antibodies are highly specific. We then used these antibodies to monitor myosin activation in wild type Drosophila tissues. Interestingly, Sqh1P and Sqh2P show distinct patterns of expression in embryos. Sqh1P is expressed nearly ubiquitously and outlines cells consistent with a junctional localization, whereas Sqh2P is strongly expressed on the apical surfaces and in filopodia of tissues undergoing extensive cell shape change or cell movements including the invaginating fore- and hindgut, the invaginating tracheal system, the dorsal pouch and the dorsal most row of epidermal (DME) cells during dorsal closure. In imaginal discs, Sqh1P predominantly localizes in the adherens junction, whereas Sqh2P locates to the apical domain. These antibodies thus have the potential to be very useful in monitoring myosin activation for functional studies of morphogenesis in Drosophila. PMID:20920606

  9. Gender differences in the expression and cellular localization of lipin 1 in the hearts of fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Romić, Snježana; Tepavčević, Snežana; Žakula, Zorica; Milosavljević, Tijana; Kostić, Milan; Petković, Marijana; Korićanac, Goran

    2014-07-01

    To give new insight to alterations of cardiac lipid metabolism accompanied by a fructose-rich diet (FRD), rats of both sexes were exposed to 10 % fructose in drinking water during 9 weeks. The protein level and subcellular localization of the main regulators of cardiac lipid metabolism, such as lipin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 α (PGC-1α), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI), and CD36 were studied. Caloric intake in fructose-fed rats (FFR) of both sexes was increased. Circulating triacylglyceroles (TAG) and non-esterified fatty acids were increased in male FFR, while females increased visceral adiposity and blood TAG. Total expression of lipin 1 in cardiac cell lysate and its cytosolic and microsomal level were increased in the hearts of male FFR. PPARα and PGC-1α content were decreased in the nuclear extract. In addition, cardiac deposition of TAG in male FFR was elevated, as well as inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). In contrast, in female FFR, lipin 1 level was increased in nuclear extract only, while overall CPTI expression and phosphorylation of IRS-1 at serine 307 were decreased. The results of our study suggest that fructose diet causes gender-dependent alterations in cardiac lipid metabolism. Potentially detrimental effects of FRD seem to be limited to male rats. Most of the observed changes might be a consequence of elevated expression and altered localization of lipin 1. Increased inhibitory phosphorylation of IRS-1 is possible link between cardiac lipid metabolism and insulin resistance in FFR. PMID:24788483

  10. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean. PMID:26503705

  11. Modeling the Quality of Videos Displayed With Local Dimming Backlight at Different Peak White and Ambient Light Levels.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Claire; Sogaard, Jacob; Bech, Soren; Korhonen, Jari; Pedersen, Jesper Melgaard; Forchhammer, Soren

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the impact of ambient light and peak white (maximum brightness of a display) on the perceived quality of videos displayed using local backlight dimming. Two subjective tests providing quality evaluations are presented and analyzed. The analyses of variance show significant interactions of the factors peak white and ambient light with the perceived quality. Therefore, we proceed to predict the subjective quality grades with objective measures. The rendering of the frames on liquid crystal displays with light emitting diodes backlight at various ambient light and peak white levels is computed using a model of the display. Widely used objective quality metrics are applied based on the rendering models of the videos to predict the subjective evaluations. As these predictions are not satisfying, three machine learning methods are applied: partial least square regression, elastic net, and support vector regression. The elastic net method obtains the best prediction accuracy with a spearman rank order correlation coefficient of 0.71, and two features are identified as having a major influence on the visual quality. PMID:27295667

  12. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome.

    PubMed

    Gil-Quintana, Erena; Lyon, David; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; González, Esther M

    2015-12-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean. PMID:26503705

  13. Pedestal and edge localized mode characteristics with different first wall materials and nitrogen seeding in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. A.; Barrera Orte, L.; Burckhart, A.; Dunne, M. G.; Fuchs, C.; Gude, A.; Kurzan, B.; Suttrop, W.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) discharges performed with carbon and the full tungsten wall shows that the pedestal performance at low triangularity is not altered without gas puffing. The pedestal electron pressure is the same for both wall materials as is the confinement. With the tungsten wall the natural density is higher even without an additional gas puff. In typical operation with gas puffing the density is again higher in tungsten. This results in a higher collisionality with the tungsten wall. Pedestal pressure and plasma confinement, however, are not degraded until very large amounts of deuterium are puffed. The edge localized mode (ELM) crash in typical AUG discharges is observed to be composed of two independent phases. This is observed for both the carbon and the tungsten wall. The 1st phase of the crash is unaffected by scans of the plasma parameters as long as the pedestal pressure remains constant. The duration of the 2nd phase is strongly anti-correlated with the separatrix density and can be suppressed by the application of nitrogen seeding for divertor cooling. A consistent explanation for the two phases of the ELM crash does not seem possible when considering only the pre-ELM pedestal profiles. The scrape off layer (SOL) plasma provides the necessary free parameter for a consistent explanation, indicating the importance of the SOL in understanding the ELM crash evolution.

  14. Genome-wide localization analysis of a complete set of Tafs reveals a specific effect of the taf1 mutation on Taf2 occupancy and provides indirect evidence for different TFIID conformations at different promoters.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Kazushige; Kasahara, Koji; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2010-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TFIID and SAGA principally mediate transcription of constitutive housekeeping genes and stress-inducible genes, respectively, by delivering TBP to the core promoter. Both are multi-protein complexes composed of 15 and 20 subunits, respectively, five of which are common and which may constitute a core sub-module in each complex. Although genome-wide gene expression studies have been conducted extensively in several TFIID and/or SAGA mutants, there are only a limited number of studies investigating genome-wide localization of the components of these two complexes. Specifically, there are no previous reports on localization of a complete set of Tafs and the effects of taf mutations on localization. Here, we examine the localization profiles of a complete set of Tafs, Gcn5, Bur6/Ncb2, Sua7, Tfa2, Tfg1, Tfb3 and Rpb1, on chromosomes III, IV and V by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip analysis in wild-type and taf1-T657K mutant strains. In addition, we conducted conventional and sequential ChIP analysis of several ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) and non-RPGs. Intriguingly, the results revealed a novel relationship between TFIIB and NC2, simultaneous co-localization of SAGA and TFIID on RPG promoters, specific effects of taf1 mutation on Taf2 occupancy, and an indirect evidence for the existence of different TFIID conformations. PMID:20026583

  15. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of rare events: a different look at local structure and chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Glatzel, Pieter; Robblee, John H.; Messinger, Johannes; Fernandez, Carmen; Cinco, Roehl; Visser, Henk; McFarlane, Karen; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Pizarro, Shelly; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Klein, Melvin P.; Cox, Billie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of large-acceptance high-resolution X-ray optics with bright synchrotron sources permits quantitative analysis of rare events such as X-ray fluorescence from very dilute systems, weak fluorescence transitions or X-ray Raman scattering. Transition-metal Kβ fluorescence contains information about spin and oxidation state; examples of the characterization of the Mn oxidation states in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II and Mn-consuming spores from the marine bacillus SG-1 are presented. Weaker features of the Kβ spectrum resulting from valence-level and ‘interatomic’ ligand to metal transitions contain detailed information on the ligand-atom type, distance and orientation. Applications of this spectral region to characterize the local structure of model compounds are presented. X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) is an extremely rare event, but also represents a unique technique to obtain bulk-sensitive low-energy (<600 eV) X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra using hard (~10 keV) X-rays. A photon is inelastically scattered, losing part of its energy to promote an electron into an unoccupied level. In many cases, the cross section is proportional to that of the corresponding absorption process yielding the same X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) features. XRS finds application for systems that defy XAFS analysis at low energies, e.g. liquids or highly concentrated complex systems, reactive compounds and samples under extreme conditions (pressure, temperature). Recent results are discussed. PMID:11512725

  16. Different patterns of local field potentials from limbic DBS targets in patients with major depressive and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Neumann, W-J; Huebl, J; Brücke, C; Gabriëls, L; Bajbouj, M; Merkl, A; Schneider, G-H; Nuttin, B; Brown, P; Kühn, A A

    2014-11-01

    The role of distinct limbic areas in emotion regulation has been largely inferred from neuroimaging studies. Recently, the opportunity for intracranial recordings from limbic areas has arisen in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for neuropsychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder (MDD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we test the hypothesis that distinct temporal patterns of local field potential (LFP) activity in the human limbic system reflect disease state and symptom severity in MDD and OCD patients. To this end, we recorded LFPs via implanted DBS electrodes from the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST area) in 12 patients (5 OCD, 7 MDD) and from the subgenual cingulate cortex in 7 MDD patients (CG25 area). We found a distinct pattern of oscillatory activity with significantly higher α-power in MDD compared with OCD in the BNST area (broad α-band 8-14 Hz; P<0.01) and a similar level of α-activity in the CG25 area as in the BNST area in MDD patients. The mean α-power correlated with severity of depressive symptoms as assessed by the Beck depression inventory in MDD (n=14, r=0.55, P=0.042) but not with severity of obsessive compulsive symptoms in OCD. Here we show larger α-band activity in MDD patients compared with OCD recorded from intracranial DBS targets. Our results suggest that α-activity in the limbic system may be a signature of symptom severity in MDD and may serve as a potential state biomarker for closed loop DBS in MDD. PMID:24514569

  17. The Associations between Various Ectopic Visceral Adiposity and Body Surface Electrocardiographic Alterations: Potential Differences between Local and Remote Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Po-Ching; Chang, Shun-Chuan; Yun, Chun-Ho; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Yang, Fei-Shih; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Yeh, Hung-I

    2016-01-01

    Background The associations between pericardial adiposity and altered atrial conduction had been demonstrated. However, data comparing differential effects of various body sites visceral adiposity on atrial and ventricular electrocardiographic alterations remains largely unknown. Methods and Results We assessed both peri-cardial fat (PCF) and peri-aortic visceral adiposity (TAT) using dedicated computed tomography (CT) software (Aquarius 3D Workstation, TeraRecon, San Mateo, CA, USA), with anthropometrics including body mass index (BMI) and biochemical data obtained. We further related PCF and TAT data to standardized 12-leads electrocardiogram (ECG), including P and QRS wave morphologies. Among 3,087 study subjects (mean age, 49.6 years; 28% women), we observed a linear association among greater visceral adiposity burden, leftward deviation of P and QRS axes, longer PR interval and widened QRS duration (all p<0.001). These associations became attenuated after accounting for BMI and baseline clinical co-variates, with greater PCF remained independently associated with prolonged QRS duration (β = 0.91 [95% CI: 0.52, 1.31] per 1-SD increase in PCF, p<0.001). Finally, both PCF and TAT showed incremental value in identifying abnormally high PR interval (>200ms, likelihood-ratio: 33.17 to 41.4 & 39.03 for PCF and TAT) and widened QRS duration (>100ms, likelihood-ratio: 55.67 to 65.4 & 61.94 for PCF and TAT, all X2 p<0.05) when superimposed on age and BMI. Conclusion We show in our data greater visceral fat burden may have differential associations on several body surface electrocardiographic parameters. Compared to remote adiposity, those surrounding the heart tissue demonstrated greater influences on altered cardiac activation or conduction, indicating a possible local biological effect. PMID:27391045

  18. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R) measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC), however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X) during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue. PMID:27110795

  19. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R) measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC), however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X) during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue. PMID:27110795

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 shows different patterns of localization within the parallel visual pathways in macaque and squirrel monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Yuri; Wenger, Ashley; Mavity-Hudson, Julia; Casagrande, Vivien A

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is used as an excitatory neurotransmitter by the koniocellular (K), magnocellular (M), and parvocellular (P) pathways to transfer signals from the primate lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to primary visual cortex (V1). Glutamate acts through both fast ionotropic receptors, which appear to carry the main sensory message, and slower, modulatory metabotropic receptors (mGluRs). In this study, we asked whether mGluR5 relates in distinct ways to the K, M, and P LGN axons in V1. To answer this question, we used light microscopic immunocytochemistry and preembedding electron microscopic immunogold labeling to determine the localization of mGluR5 within the layers of V1 in relation to the K, M, and P pathways in macaque and squirrel monkeys. These pathways were labeled separately via wheat germ agglutinin–horseradish peroxidase (WGA–HRP) injections targeting the LGN layers. mGluR5 is of interest because it: 1) has been shown to be expressed in the thalamic input layers; 2) appears to be responsible for some types of oscillatory firing, which could be important in the binding of visual features; and 3) has been associated with a number of sensory-motor gating-related pathologies, including schizophrenia and autism. Our results demonstrated the presence of mGluR5 in the neuropil of all V1 layers. This protein was lowest in IVCα (M input) and the infragranular layers. In layer IVC, mGluR5 also was found postsynaptic to about 30% of labeled axons, but the distribution was uneven, such that postsynaptic mGluR5 label tended to occur opposite smaller (presumed P), and not larger (presumed M) axon terminals. Only in the K pathway in layer IIIB, however, was mGluR5 always found in the axon terminals themselves. The presence of mGluR5 in K axons and not in M and P axons, and the presence of mGluR5 postsynaptic mainly to smaller P and not larger M axons suggest that the response to the release of glutamate is modulated in distinct ways within and between the parallel

  1. [Features of clinical course and proteinase inhibitor balance in tears in eye burns of different localization (an experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, N B; Malarpv, P V; Beznos, O V

    2001-01-01

    Chemical burns of the eye of different location (cornea, corneal fragment with adjacent conjunctiva, and limbus) were studied in experiments. Clinical picture and changes in the lacrimal proteinase inhibitor balance were analyzed. Burn disease is less severe and the number of complications is less if a fragment of the cornea with adjacent conjunctiva and a fragment of the limbus are injured than in case of a corneal burn of the same depth and area. Burn of the total limbus area is a severe injury involving essential shifts in the proteinase inhibitor balance, leading to deep organic changes in the cornea and inner structures of the eye, eventuating in its subatrophy. PMID:11510165

  2. Calculation of Shallow Shell Subject to Influence of Load Local Effect by the Difference Technique on Irregular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Duc, Chinh

    1997-05-01

    In this paper, a methodology for the calculation of shallow shell with positive Gauss radius, and boundaries supported on the rectangular plane subject to influence of uniform load and concentrated forces has been considered. In order to solve differential equations (written in the form that assumes deflections as unknowns) of bending shallow shell theory, the author has used the finite difference technique on irregular networks. A detailed algorithm has been formulated that enables to solve the problem by computer. By the above algorithm, the author has obtained numerical results in the form of internal forces and deflections diagrams.

  3. Nano-structure fabrication of GaAs using AFM tip-induced local oxidation method: different doping types and plane orientations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have fabricated nano-scaled oxide structures on GaAs substrates that are doped in different conductivity types of p- and n-types and plane orientations of GaAs(100) and GaAs(711), respectively, using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip-induced local oxidation method. The AFM-induced GaAs oxide patterns were obtained by varying applied bias from approximately 5 V to approximately 15 V and the tip loading forces from 60 to 180 nN. During the local oxidation, the humidity and the tip scan speed are fixed to approximately 45% and approximately 6.3 μm/s, respectively. The local oxidation rate is further improved in p-type GaAs compared to n-type GaAs substrates whereas the rate is enhanced in GaAs(100) compared to and GaAs(711), respectively, under the identical conditions. In addition, the oxide formation mechanisms in different doping types and plane orientations were investigated and compared with two-dimensional simulation results. PMID:21978373

  4. Transportation and localization of phenanthrene and its interaction with different species of arsenic in Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Ma, Xu; Yan, Xiulan; Lin, Longyong; Shi, Peili; Wu, Zeying

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between arsenic (As) and phenanthrene (PHE) in Pteris vittata L. was investigated in this study. The migration and occurrence of PHE in P. vittata were determined by two-photon laser scanning confocal microscopy. Data indicated that PHE supplementation lowers the As concentration in P. vittata, decreasing As levels by 16.8-39.9% in the pinnae, 30.0-49.0% in the rachis, and 45-51.5% in the roots, respectively. Different arsenic species inhibited P. vittata PHE absorption. The most significant effect was observed using dimethylarsenic acid (DMA), which decreased PHE accumulation by 20.73%. With the exception of elevated As(V) concentrations in As(III)-treated plants, PHE treatment significantly reduced inorganic As concentrations in P. vittata. However, PHE elevated root DMA concentrations by 9%. According to in situ visualization, PHE is primarily found in the upper and lower epidermis and stomatal cells, particularly the stomata guard cells. PMID:27023118

  5. Systemic and local anti-Mullerian hormone reflects differences in the reproduction potential of Zebu and European type cattle.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anja Stojsin-; Mahboubi, Kiana; Costa, Nathalia N; Gillis, Daniel J; Carter, Timothy F; Neal, Michael S; Miranda, Moyses S; Ohashi, Otavio M; Favetta, Laura A; King, W Allan

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate plasma anti-Mullerian hormone (Pl AMH), follicular fluid AMH (FF AMH) and granulosa cell AMH transcript (GC AMH) levels and their relationships with reproductive parameters in two cattle subspecies, Bos taurus indicus (Zebu), and Bos taurus taurus (European type cattle). Two-dimensional ultrasound examination and serum collection were performed on Zebu, European type and crossbreed cows to determine antral follicle count (AFC), ovary diameter (OD) and Pl AMH concentration. Slaughterhouse ovaries for Zebu and European type cattle were collected to determine FF AMH concentrations, GC AMH RNA levels, AFC, oocyte number, cleavage and blastocyst rate. Additionally GC AMH receptor 2 (AMHR2) RNA level was measured for European type cattle. Relationship between AMH and reproductive parameters was found to be significantly greater in Zebu compared to European cattle. Average Pl AMH mean±SE for Zebu and European cattle was 0.77±0.09 and 0.33±0.24ng/ml respectively (p=0.01), whereas average antral FF AMH mean±SE for Zebu and European cattle was 4934.3±568.5 and 2977.9±214.1ng/ml respectively (p<0.05). This is the first published report of FF and GC AMH in Zebu cattle. Levels of GC AMHR2 RNA in European cattle were correlated to oocyte number (p=0.01). Crossbred animals were found more similar to their maternal Zebu counterparts with respect to their Pl AMH to AFC and OD relationships. These results demonstrate that AMH reflects differences between reproduction potential of the two cattle subspecies therefore can potentially be used as a reproductive marker. Furthermore these results reinforce the importance of separately considering the genetic backgrounds of animals when collecting or interpreting bovine AMH data for reproductive performance. PMID:26898391

  6. Local Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-05-31

    The LOCAL Toolkit contains tools and libraries developed under the LLNL LOCAL LDRD project for managing and processing large unstructured data sets primrily from parallel numerical simulations, such as triangular, tetrahedral, and hexahedral meshes, point sets, and graphs. The tools have three main functionalities: cache-coherent, linear ordering of multidimensional data; lossy and lossless data compression optimized for different data types; and an out-of-core streaming I/O library with simple processing modules for unstructed data.

  7. The influence of local effects on thermal sensation under non-uniform environmental conditions--gender differences in thermophysiology, thermal comfort and productivity during convective and radiant cooling.

    PubMed

    Schellen, L; Loomans, M G L C; de Wit, M H; Olesen, B W; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W D

    2012-09-10

    Applying high temperature cooling concepts, i.e. high temperature cooling (T(supply) is 16-20°C) HVAC systems, in the built environment allows the reduction in the use of (high quality) energy. However, application of high temperature cooling systems can result in whole body and local discomfort of the occupants. Non-uniform thermal conditions, which may occur due to application of high temperature cooling systems, can be responsible for discomfort. Contradictions in literature exist regarding the validity of the often used predicted mean vote (PMV) index for both genders, and the index is not intended for evaluating the discomfort due to non-uniform environmental conditions. In some cases, however, combinations of local and general discomfort factors, for example draught under warm conditions, may not be uncomfortable. The objective of this study was to investigate gender differences in thermophysiology, thermal comfort and productivity in response to thermal non-uniform environmental conditions. Twenty healthy subjects (10 males and 10 females, age 20-29 years) were exposed to two different experimental conditions: a convective cooling situation (CC) and a radiant cooling situation (RC). During the experiments physiological responses, thermal comfort and productivity were measured. The results show that under both experimental conditions the actual mean thermal sensation votes significantly differ from the PMV-index; the subjects are feeling colder than predicted. Furthermore, the females are more uncomfortable and dissatisfied compared to the males. For females, the local sensations and skin temperatures of the extremities have a significant influence on whole body thermal sensation and are therefore important to consider under non-uniform environmental conditions. PMID:22877870

  8. Development and evaluation of a local grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using shared nodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    A new method of local grid refinement for two-dimensional block-centered finite-difference meshes is presented in the context of steady-state groundwater-flow modeling. The method uses an iteration-based feedback with shared nodes to couple two separate grids. The new method is evaluated by comparison with results using a uniform fine mesh, a variably spaced mesh, and a traditional method of local grid refinement without a feedback. Results indicate: (1) The new method exhibits quadratic convergence for homogeneous systems and convergence equivalent to uniform-grid refinement for heterogeneous systems. (2) Coupling the coarse grid with the refined grid in a numerically rigorous way allowed for improvement in the coarse-grid results. (3) For heterogeneous systems, commonly used linear interpolation of heads from the large model onto the boundary of the refined model produced heads that are inconsistent with the physics of the flow field. (4) The traditional method works well in situations where the better resolution of the locally refined grid has little influence on the overall flow-system dynamics, but if this is not true, lack of a feedback mechanism produced errors in head up to 3.6% and errors in cell-to-cell flows up to 25%. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Different Models for Ground-Level Atmospheric Attenuation Prediction with New Models According to Local Weather Data for FSO Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arockia Bazil Raj, A.; Arputha Vijaya Selvi, J.

    2015-06-01

    A dedicated Free Space Optical Link (FSOL) for the range of 0.5 km at an altitude of 15.25 m is established and explained. The power levels of the received signal with meteorological parameters are continuously measured using the opto-electronic assembly and developed weather station respectively and stored in a computer. The existing models selected for comparative analysis are briefed. Measured meteorological parameters and optical attenuation of size [2000×4] are used for linear regression analysis as well as to design the mathematical models more suitable at the test field. In addition, the prediction accuracy of the proposed and selected models during different seasons in one-year period are investigated and validated in terms of RMSE. The average Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 0.041 dB/km for the optical attenuation is achieved in the longer range dynamic of meteorological parameters during different local seasons.

  10. Phenology of Spondias tuberosa Arruda (Anacardiaceae) under different landscape management regimes and a proposal for a rapid phenological diagnosis using local knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies aimed at investigating the influence of habitat change on species phenology. Studies that investigate people's perceptions of the phenology of certain species still area few; yet this approach is important for effective decision-making for conservation. The aim of this study was to investigate the phenology of Spondias tuberosa Arruda (Anacardiaceae), a native species of economic and ecological importance in northeastern Brazil, in five landscape units (LUs) (Mountain, Mountain Base, Pasture, Cultivated Areas and Homegardens) of a Caatinga region in Altinho, Pernambuco, northeastern Brazil. These data could then be compared with local people's perceptions of the species’ phenophases. Method Collection of phenological data was carried out monthly from February 2007 to January 2009 and included activity, intensity and synchronization of reproductive and vegetative phenophases. Ethnobotanical data were gathered using a collaborative approach to access local people’s knowledge about the species’ phenological schedule. Results There were no significant differences in the intensity of phenophases among LUs, and there was a correspondence between people’s perception of phenophases and the phenological data collected. The data show that the different management practices for LUs did not influence the phenology of the species. Conclusion The main conclusion of this study is the use of traditional knowledge as interesting tool for rapid phenological diagnosis. However further studies need to be developed to test this tool in other environments and cultural contexts. PMID:23369197

  11. The global monsoon definition using the difference of local minimum and maximum pentad precipitation rates associated with cross-equatorial flow reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Jiang, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Since most previous attempts to establish monsoon indices have been limited to specific regions, they have lacked the applicability to universally describe the global monsoon domain. In this paper, we first review the history of global monsoon study and then identify the climatology of global precipitation associated with major systems of the atmospheric general circulation. A new index, based on the annual and semiannual harmonic precipitation rate difference between two local calendar maximal and minimal precipitation pentads, is used to identify the global monsoon domain focusing on where experienced and what caused the climatic dry-wet alteration. The global monsoon domain is defined by the regions where two pentad-mean precipitation difference exceeds 4 mm ṡday-1, which is also influenced by the low-level prevailing wind reversal associated with the cross-equatorial flow. This definition not only confirmed previous results of the classical global monsoon domain from the tropical Africa to Asia-Australia and non-classical monsoon region in the tropical America but also solved an issue of missing local summer monsoon spots.

  12. Immunocytological localization of the HNK-1 carbohydrate in murine cerebellum, hippocampus and spinal cord using monoclonal antibodies with different epitope specificities.

    PubMed

    Rollenhagen, A; Czaniera, R; Albert, M; Wintergerst, E S; Schachner, M

    2001-04-01

    The HNK-1 carbohydrate, an unusual 3'-sulfated glucuronic acid epitope characteristic of many neural recognition molecules, serves as a ligand in neural cell interactions and is differentially expressed in the quadriceps and saphenous branches of the femoral nerve in the PNS of adult mice. Based on these observations, we investigated the possibility that the HNK-1 carbohydrate may be differentially distributed in neurons and fiber tracts also in the CNS thereby contributing to different targeting and guidance mechanisms. We have used antibodies with different HNK-1 epitope specificities to probe for subtle differences in expression patterns. In the adult mouse cerebellum the HNK-1 carbohydrate is detectable in stripe-like compartments in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers, whereas N-CAM and its associated alpha2,8 polysialic acid does not show this compartmentation. In the adult hippocampus, the HNK-1 carbohydrate localizes to perineuronal nets of inhibitory interneurons and marks the inner third of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. In the adult spinal cord, HNK-1 labeling is most pronounced in gray matter areas. White matter enriched regions show differential labeling with regard to fiber tracts and antibody specificity. Whereas the different antibodies do not show differences in staining in the cerebellum and the hippocampus, they show differences in staining pattern of fiber tracts and motoneurons in the spinal cord. The HNK-1 expression pattern also differed in the adult spinal cord from that observed at embryonic day 14 and postnatal day 14. Our observations suggest a functional role in the specification of functionally discrete compartments in different areas of the CNS and during development. PMID:11875281

  13. Subcellular Nutrient Element Localization and Enrichment in Ecto- and Arbuscular Mycorrhizas of Field-Grown Beech and Ash Trees Indicate Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Jasmin; Polle, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhizas are the chief organ for plant mineral nutrient acquisition. In temperate, mixed forests, ash roots (Fraxinus excelsior) are colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM) and beech roots (Fagus sylvatica) by ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcM). Knowledge on the functions of different mycorrhizal species that coexist in the same environment is scarce. The concentrations of nutrient elements in plant and fungal cells can inform on nutrient accessibility and interspecific differences of mycorrhizal life forms. Here, we hypothesized that mycorrhizal fungal species exhibit interspecific differences in mineral nutrient concentrations and that the differences correlate with the mineral nutrient concentrations of their associated root cells. Abundant mycorrhizal fungal species of mature beech and ash trees in a long-term undisturbed forest ecosystem were the EcM Lactarius subdulcis, Clavulina cristata and Cenococcum geophilum and the AM Glomus sp. Mineral nutrient subcellular localization and quantities of the mycorrhizas were analysed after non-aqueous sample preparation by electron dispersive X-ray transmission electron microscopy. Cenococcum geophilum contained the highest sulphur, Clavulina cristata the highest calcium levels, and Glomus, in which cations and P were generally high, exhibited the highest potassium levels. Lactarius subdulcis-associated root cells contained the highest phosphorus levels. The root cell concentrations of K, Mg and P were unrelated to those of the associated fungal structures, whereas S and Ca showed significant correlations between fungal and plant concentrations of those elements. Our results support profound interspecific differences for mineral nutrient acquisition among mycorrhizas formed by different fungal taxa. The lack of correlation between some plant and fungal nutrient element concentrations may reflect different retention of mineral nutrients in the fungal part of the symbiosis. High mineral concentrations, especially of

  14. Localization of ginsenosides in Panax ginseng with different age by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hangrui; Wang, Shujuan; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia; Cai, Zongwei

    2016-07-15

    The root of Panax ginseng C.A. Mey. (P. ginseng) is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicines, with ginsenosides as its main bioactive components. Because different ginsenosides have varied pharmacological effects, extraction and separation of ginsenosides are usually required for the investigation of pharmacological effects of different ginsenosides. However, the contents of ginsenosides vary with the ages and tissues of P. ginseng root. In this research, an efficient method to explore the distribution of ginsenosides and differentiate P. ginseng roots with different ages was developed based on matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-TOF-MSI). After a simple sample preparation, there were 18 peaks corresponding to 31 ginsenosides with distinct localization in the mass range of m/z 700-1400 identified by MALDI-TOF-MSI and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. All the three types of ginsenosides were successfully detected and visualized in images, which could be correlated with anatomical features. The P. ginseng at the ages of 2, 4 and 6 could be differentiated finely through the principal component analysis of data collected from the cork based on the ion images but not data from the whole tissue. The experimental result implies that the established method for the direct analysis of metabolites in plant tissues has high potential for the rapid identification of metabolites and analysis of their localizations in medicinal herbs. Furthermore, this technique also provides valuable information for the component-specific extraction and pharmacological research of herbs. PMID:26520809

  15. Disease-Related Differences in Resting State Networks: A Comparison between Localized Provoked Vulvodynia, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arpana; Rapkin, Andrea J.; Gill, Zafar; Kilpatrick, Lisa; Fling, Connor; Stains, Jean; Masghati, Salome; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A.; Labus, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Localized provoked vulvodynia (LPVD) affects approximately 16% of the female population, but biological mechanisms underlying symptoms remain unknown. Like in other, often comorbid chronic pain disorders, altered sensory processing and modulation of pain, including central sensitization, dysregulation of endogenous pain modulatory systems, and attentional enhancement of pain perception have been implicated. The aim of this study was to test whether regions of interest showing differences in LPVD compared to healthy controls (HCs) in structural and evoked-pain neuroimaging studies, also show alterations in during rest compared to HCs and a chronic pain control group (irritable bowel syndrome, IBS). Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed during resting state in 87 age-matched premenopausal females (29 LPVD, 29 HCs, 29 IBS). Group independent component analysis and general linear models were applied to investigate group differences in the intrinsic connectivity of regions comprising sensorimotor, salience, and default mode resting state networks. LPVD subjects showed substantial alterations in the intrinsic connectivity of these networks compared to HCs and IBS. The intrinsic connectivity of many of the regions showing group differences during rest were moderately associated with clinical symptom reports in LPVD. Findings were robust to controlling for affect and medication usage. The current findings indicate LPVD subjects have alterations in the intrinsic connectivity of regions comprising the sensorimotor, salience, and default mode networks. Although shared brain mechanisms between different chronic pain disorders have been postulated, the current findings suggest some alterations in functional connectivity may show disease specificity. PMID:25735001

  16. The localization of NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species in in vitro-cultured Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. hypocotyls discloses their differing roles in rhizogenesis.

    PubMed

    Libik-Konieczny, Marta; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Desel, Christine; Michalec-Warzecha, Żaneta; Miszalski, Zbigniew; Konieczny, Robert

    2015-03-01

    This work demonstrated how reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the regulation of rhizogenesis from hypocotyls of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. cultured on a medium containing 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). The increase of NADPH oxidase activity was correlated with an increase of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content and induction of mitotic activity in vascular cylinder cells, leading to root formation from cultured hypocotyls. Diphenylene iodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, inhibited H2O2 production and blocked rhizogenesis. Ultrastructural studies revealed differences in H2O2 localization between the vascular cylinder cells and cortex parenchyma cells of cultured explants. We suggest that NADPH oxidase is responsible for H2O2 level regulation in vascular cylinder cells, while peroxidase (POD) participates in H2O2 level regulation in cortex cells. Blue formazan (NBT) precipitates indicating superoxide radical (O2 (•-)) accumulation were localized within the vascular cylinder cells during the early stages of rhizogenesis and at the tip of root primordia, as well as in the distal and middle parts of newly formed organs. 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining of H2O2 was more intense in vascular bundle cells and in cortex cells. In newly formed roots, H2O2 was localized in vascular tissue. Adding DPI to the medium led to a decrease in the intensity of NBT and DAB staining in cultured explants. Accumulation of O2 (•-) was then limited to epidermis cells, while H2O2 was accumulated only in vascular tissue. These results indicate that O2 (•-) is engaged in processes of rhizogenesis induction involving division of competent cells, while H2O2 is engaged in developmental processes mainly involving cell growth. PMID:25172434

  17. Expression and localization of ghrelin and its receptor in ovarian follicles during different stages of development and the modulatory effect of ghrelin on granulosa cells function in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Dangi, S S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, a hormone predominantly found in the stomach, was recently described as a factor that controls female reproductive function. The aim of our study was to investigate the expression and localization of ghrelin and its active receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a) in buffalo ovarian follicles of different follicular size and to investigate role of ghrelin on estradiol (E2) secretion, aromatase (CYP19A1), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and apoptosis regulator Bax gene expression on granulosa cell culture. Using real time PCR and western blot, we measured gene and protein expression of examined factors. Localization was done with immunofluorescence method. Expression of ghrelin increased with follicle size with significantly highest in dominant or pre-ovulatory follicle (P<0.05). Expression of GHS-R1a was comparable in medium and large follicle but was higher than small follicles (P<0.05). Both the factors were localized in granulosa and theca cells. Pattern of intensity of immunofluorescence was similar with mRNA and protein expression. In the in vitro study granulosa cells (GCs) were cultured and treated with ghrelin each at 1, 10 and 100ng/ml concentrations for two days after obtaining 75-80 per cent confluence. Ghrelin treatment significantly (P<0.05) inhibited E2 secretion, CYP19A1 expression, apoptosis and promoted cell proliferation. In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence for the presence of ghrelin and receptor GHS-R1a in ovarian follilcles and modulatory role of ghrelin on granulosa cell function in buffalo. PMID:25275756

  18. Local tolerance and systemic toxicity of single and repeated intramuscular administrations of two different formulations of the RTS,S malaria candidate vaccine in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Segal, Lawrence; Morelle, Danielle; Blee, Mark; Moore, Emma; Damsten, Micaela; Liu, Kai Chiu; Destexhe, Eric; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    RTS,S malaria antigen is weakly immunogenic as such and needs to be formulated with an adjuvant to improve the magnitude and duration of the immune responses to RTS,S. Two Adjuvant Systems, AS01 and AS02 were evaluated during the development of the RTS,S vaccine. The evaluation included non-clinical studies in rabbits to evaluate the local intramuscular tolerance following administration on a single occasion, and the local and systemic effects following repeated administrations of RTS,S/AS01 or RTS,S/AS02 formulations. In the first study, rabbits were injected on one occasion with RTS,S/AS01, RTS,S/AS02 or controls, and the local intramuscular tolerance was evaluated up to 3 days after injection. In the second study, the different formulations were injected on Days 0, 14, 28 and 42. General health status, haematology and blood chemistry parameters were monitored on a regular basis. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluations were made after termination of the study. No sign of toxicity was detected following single or repeated administrations of the adjuvanted RTS,S formulations. Changes in haematology or clinical chemistry parameters were indicative of a developing immune response in the groups receiving either RTS,S formulation. All examined parameters returned to normal within 28 days after the last injection. The absence of toxicological effects following the injection of RTS,S/AS01 or RTS,S/AS02 in rabbits was supportive of further clinical evaluation of these two formulations. PMID:25545314

  19. Investigation of the influence of different cutting procedures on the global and local magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumoski, H.; Riedmüller, B.; Minkow, A.; Herr, U.

    2015-10-01

    The process of manufacturing iron cores for electric machines out of electrical steel sheets can strongly affect the magnetic properties of the material. In order to better understand the influence of cutting on the iron losses, a characterization of the magnetization behavior near the cutting edge is needed. The local magnetic properties of the material are modified by the cutting process which leads to an increase in the iron losses measured for 5 mm wide ring core samples by nearly 160% at low inductions. We present investigations on the effect of cutting by observation of the magnetic domain structure of 0.35 mm thick non-oriented electrical steel. By using the magneto-optical Kerr-effect on a ring samples the local magnetic properties of the material after processing are characterized in the form of domain wall displacements under an applied external ac-field. The influence of various cutting techniques on the magnetic properties was studied before and after stress relief annealing. This method allows a quantitative analysis of the influence of different cutting techniques on the micro-magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steel for rotating machines.

  20. The social geography of AIDS and hepatitis risk: qualitative approaches for assessing local differences in sterile-syringe access among injection drug users.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M; Stopka, T; Siano, C; Springer, K; Barton, G; Khoshnood, K; Gorry de Puga, A; Heimer, R

    2000-01-01

    While significant gains have been achieved in understanding and reducing AIDS and hepatitis risks among injection drug users (IDUs), it is necessary to move beyond individual-level characteristics to gain a fuller understanding of the impact of social context on risk. In this study, 6 qualitative methods were used in combination with more traditional epidemiologic survey approaches and laboratory bioassay procedures to examine neighborhood differences in access to sterile syringes among IDUs in 3 northeastern cities. These methods consisted of (1) neighborhood-based IDU focus groups to construct social maps of local equipment acquisition and drug use sites; (2) ethnographic descriptions of target neighborhoods; (3) IDU diary keeping on drug use and injection equipment acquisition; (4) ethnographic day visits with IDUs in natural settings; (5) interviews with IDUs about syringe acquisition and collection of syringes for laboratory analysis; and (6) focused field observation and processual interviewing during drug injection. Preliminary findings from each of these methods are reported to illustrate the methods' value in elucidating the impact of local and regional social factors on sterile syringe access. PMID:10897181

  1. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-15

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h{sup 2}) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  2. Splice Variants of the Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation-regulated Kinase 4 (DYRK4) Differ in Their Subcellular Localization and Catalytic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Chrisovalantis; Arato, Krisztina; Lilienthal, Eva; Zerweck, Johannes; Schutkowski, Mike; Chatain, Nicolas; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Becker, Walter; de la Luna, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases, DYRKs, are a family of conserved protein kinases that play key roles in the regulation of cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Of the five mammalian DYRKs, DYRK4 is the least studied family member. Here, we show that several splice variants of DYRK4 are expressed in tissue-specific patterns and that these variants have distinct functional capacities. One of these variants contains a nuclear localization signal in its extended N terminus that mediates its interaction with importin α3 and α5 and that is capable of targeting a heterologous protein to the nucleus. Consequently, the nucleocytoplasmic mobility of this variant differs from that of a shorter isoform in live cell imaging experiments. Other splicing events affect the catalytic domain, including a three-amino acid deletion within subdomain XI that markedly reduces the enzymatic activity of DYRK4. We also show that autophosphorylation of a tyrosine residue within the activation loop is necessary for full DYRK4 kinase activity, a defining feature of the DYRK family. Finally, by comparing the phosphorylation of an array of 720 peptides, we show that DYRK1A, DYRK2, and DYRK4 differ in their target recognition sequence and that preference for an arginine residue at position P −3 is a feature of DYRK1A but not of DYRK2 and DYRK4. Therefore, we highlight the use of subcellular localization as an important regulatory mechanism for DYRK proteins, and we propose that substrate specificity could be a source of functional diversity among DYRKs. PMID:21127067

  3. Differences between patients with chronic widespread pain and local chronic low back pain in primary care - a comparative cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is a common reason for consultation in general practice. Current research distinguishes between chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to identify differences between CWP and chronic low back pain (CLBP), a common type of CLP, in primary care settings. Methods Fifty-eight German general practitioners (GPs) consecutively recruited all eligible patients who consulted for chronic low back pain during a 5-month period. All patients received a questionnaire on sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, comorbidities, psychosomatic symptoms, and previous therapies. Results GPs recruited 647 eligible patients where of a quarter (n = 163, 25.2%) met the CWP criteria according to the American College of Rheumatology. CWP patients had significantly more comorbidities and psychosomatic symptoms, showed longer pain duration, and suffered predominantly from permanent pain instead of distinguishable pain attacks. CWP patients were more often females, are less working and reported a current pension application or a state-approved grade of disability more frequently. We found no other differences in demographic parameters such as age, nationality, marital status, number of persons in household, education, health insurance status, or in health care utilization data. Conclusions This project is the largest study performed to date which analyzes differences between CLBP and CWP in primary care settings. Our results showed that CWP is a frequent and particularly severe pain syndrome. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Register, DRKS00003123. PMID:24330525

  4. Hemodynamic changes following injection of local anesthetics with different concentrations of epinephrine during simple tooth extraction: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Al-Showaikhat, Fatimah; Al-Shubbar, Fatimah; Al-Zawad, Kawther; Al-Zawad, Fatimah

    2015-01-01

    Background Presence of epinephrine in local anesthetic cartridge increases the duration of local anesthesia (LA), decreases the risk of toxicity, and provides hemostasis. However, the unfavorable effects are increasing heart rate (HR) and raising blood pressure (BP). The aim was to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the BP, HR, and oxygen saturation (SpO2) of normal patients undergoing tooth extraction using LA with various epinephrine concentrations. Material and Methods A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted on 120 patients who were divided randomly into 3 parallel groups according to the LA received. Group 1: lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 (L80). Group 2: articaine 4% with epinephrine 1:100,000 (A100). Group 3: articaine 4% with epinephrine 1:200,000 (A200). Inclusion criteria: normal patients whose BP < 140/90. Exclusion criteria: hypertension, cardiovascular disease, hyperthyroidism, pregnancy, and allergy to LA. BP, HR, and (SpO2) were evaluated in 3 different time points: 3 minutes before LA, 3 minutes after LA, and 3 minutes after extraction. Results Systolic blood pressure (SBP) significantly increased after injection of L80 and continued after extraction to be significant than pre-injection. SBP significantly increased after injection of A100 then decreased after extraction. In the group of A200, SBP insignificantly decreased after injection then increased after extraction. The increasing of SBP between time point 1and 2 was significantly higher in G1 than G3 (p=0.014). Diastolic blood pressure decreased after LA in the 3 groups; however it was significant only with L80, then increased after extraction for all. Conclusions The changings of DBP, HR and SpO2 after anesthesia and extraction showed no significant difference among the three groups. However, A200 had significant lesser effect on SBP than L80 and the least effect on other parameters. Therefore, A200 is considered safer than L80 and A100 and is recommended for LA before teeth

  5. Localized prostate cancer in Norway, USA and Spain: Between-country differences of pretreatment variables among patients eligible for curative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Storås, Anne Holck; Sanda, Martin G.; Ferrer, Montse; Loge, Jon Håvard; Dahl, Alv A.; Steinsvik, Eivind A.S.; Guedea, Ferran; Cvancarova, Milada; Fosså, Sophie D.

    2016-01-01

    Background In men with prostate cancer (PCa) large variations of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after radical prostatectomy (RP) or high-dose radiotherapy (RAD) may be related to between-country differences of pre-treatment medical and socio-demographic variables, as well as to differences in pre-treatment PROs in the sexual and urinary domain. METHODS In 1908 patients with localized PCa from Norway, USA or Spain the relation was investigated between pre-treatment data on medical (PSA, Gleason score, cT-category ) and socio-demographic variables (age, education, marital status). Using the EPIC questionnaire pre-treatment PROs within the sexual and urinary domain were also considered. RESULTS Compared to the European patients American patients were younger, fewer had co-morbid conditions and more had a high education level. Fifty-three % of the US-men eligible for RP had low-risk tumors compared to 42% and 31% among respectively the Norwegian and the Spanish patients. Among the Spanish RAD patients 54% had had low- risk tumors compared to respectively 34% of the American and 21% of the Norwegian men planned for RAD. Compared to the European patients significantly fewer US patients reported moderate or severe sexual dysfunction and related problems. In most subgroups the number of patients with sexual or urinary dysfunctions exceeded that of patients with bother related to the reported dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS Statistically significant between-country differences were observed in pre-treatment medical and socio-demographic variables, as well as in pre-treatment PROs within the sexual and urinary domain. Large differences between reported dysfunction and related problems within the sexual and urinary domain indicate that dysfunction and bother should be reported separately in addition to calculation of summary scores. The documented differences, not at least regarding PROs, may in part explain the large variation of post-treatment side effects evident in the medical

  6. Immunolabeling of Gamma-glutamyl transferase 5 in Normal Human Tissues Reveals Expression and Localization Differs from Gamma-glutamyl transferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Marie H.; Gillies, Elizabeth M.; Wickham, Stephanie; Wakeham, Nancy; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT5) was discovered due to its ability to convert leukotriene C4 (LTC4, a glutathione S-conjugate) to LTD4 and may have an important role in the immune system. However, it was not known which cells express the enzyme in humans. We have developed a sensitive and specific antibody that can be used to detect human GGT5 on western blots and in fixed tissue sections. We localized GGT5 expression in normal human tissues. We observed GGT5 expressed by macrophages present in many tissues, including tissue-fixed macrophages such as Kupffer cells in the liver and dust cells in the lung. GGT5 was expressed in some of the same tissues that have been shown to express gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT1), the only other enzymatically active protein in this family. But, the two enzymes were often expressed by different cell types within the tissue. For example, GGT5 was expressed by the interstitial cells of the kidney; whereas, GGT1 is expressed on the apical surface of the renal proximal tubules. Other tissues with GGT5-positive cells included: adrenal gland, salivary gland, pituitary, thymus, spleen, liver, bone marrow, small intestine, stomach, testis, prostate and placenta. GGT5 and GGT1 are cell surface enzymes. The different pattern of expression results in their access to different extracellular fluids and therefore different substrates. GGT5 has access to substrates in blood and intercellular fluids, while GGT1 has access primarily to fluids in ducts and glands throughout the body. These data provide new insights into the different functions of these two related enzymes. PMID:25377544

  7. Tumor induction in mice following localized single or fractionated dose irradiation: differences in tumor histotype and genetic susceptibility based on dose scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Elijah F.; Hunter, Nancy R.; Weil, Michael M.; Mason, Kathryn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate differences in tumor histotype, incidence, latency, and strain susceptibility in mice exposed to single dose or clinically relevant, fractioned dose γ-ray radiation. Methods C3Hf/Kam and C57BL/6J mice were locally irradiated to the right hindlimb with either single large doses between 10 and 70 Gray (Gy) or fractionated doses totaling 40 to 80 Gy delivered at 2 Gy/day fractions, 5 days/week, for 4 to 8 weeks. The mice were closely evaluated for tumor development in the irradiated field for 800 days following irradiation and all tumors were characterized histologically. Results A total of 210 tumors were induced within the radiation field in 788 mice. An overall decrease in tumor incidence was observed following fractionated irradiation (16.4%) in comparison to single dose irradiation (36.1%). Sarcomas were the predominant post-irradiation tumor observed (n = 201) with carcinomas occurring less frequently (n = 9). The proportion of mice developing tumors increased significantly with total dose for both single dose and fractionated schedules and latencies were significantly decreased in mice exposed to larger total doses. C3Hf/Kam mice were more susceptible to tumor induction than C57BL/6J mice following single dose irradiation, however, significant differences in tumor susceptibilities following fractionated radiation were not observed. For both strains of mice, osteosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas were significantly more common following fractionated irradiation whereas fibrosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas were significantly more common following single dose irradiation. Conclusions This study investigated the tumorigenic effect of acute large doses in comparison to fractionated radiation in which both the dose and delivery schedule were similar to those used in clinical radiotherapy. Differences in tumor histotype following single dose or fractionated radiation exposures provides novel in vivo evidence for differences in tumor

  8. Tumor Induction in Mice After Localized Single- or Fractionated-Dose Irradiation: Differences in Tumor Histotype and Genetic Susceptibility Based on Dose Scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Elijah F.; Hunter, Nancy R.; Weil, Michael M.; Mason, Kathryn A.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate differences in tumor histotype, incidence, latency, and strain susceptibility in mice exposed to single-dose or clinically relevant, fractioned-dose γ-ray radiation. Methods and Materials: C3Hf/Kam and C57BL/6J mice were locally irradiated to the right hindlimb with either single large doses between 10 and 70 Gy or fractionated doses totaling 40 to 80 Gy delivered at 2-Gy/d fractions, 5 d/wk, for 4 to 8 weeks. The mice were closely evaluated for tumor development in the irradiated field for 800 days after irradiation, and all tumors were characterized histologically. Results: A total of 210 tumors were induced within the radiation field in 788 mice. An overall decrease in tumor incidence was observed after fractionated irradiation (16.4%) in comparison with single-dose irradiation (36.1%). Sarcomas were the predominant postirradiation tumor observed (n=201), with carcinomas occurring less frequently (n=9). The proportion of mice developing tumors increased significantly with total dose for both single-dose and fractionated schedules, and latencies were significantly decreased in mice exposed to larger total doses. C3Hf/Kam mice were more susceptible to tumor induction than C57BL/6J mice after single-dose irradiation; however, significant differences in tumor susceptibilities after fractionated radiation were not observed. For both strains of mice, osteosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas were significantly more common after fractionated irradiation, whereas fibrosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas were significantly more common after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This study investigated the tumorigenic effect of acute large doses in comparison with fractionated radiation in which both the dose and delivery schedule were similar to those used in clinical radiation therapy. Differences in tumor histotype after single-dose or fractionated radiation exposures provide novel in vivo evidence for differences in tumor

  9. A study of the expression and localization of toll-like receptors 2 and 9 in different grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Dasgupta, Anindya; Bandyopadhyay, Arghya; Ghosh, TapanKumar; Dalui, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subhas; Banerjee, Uma; Basu, Anupam

    2015-12-01

    TLRs are important molecules of innate immune response, those play central role in host pathogen interaction and recognition through pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Previous studies have indicated the role of TLRs in many human malignancy and cervical cancer in terms of viral recognition and inflammatory changes in-vivo. The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression and localization of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9 in preinvasive and invasive cervical cancer patients and to investigate its use as a probable diagnostic tool for better management cervical cancer. This single institution study includes individuals with normal, precancerous lesions, cervical intraepithelial neoplastic (CIN) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix. Upon confirmation by histopathology, fluorescence based immunohistochemistry was performed in all patients for TLR2 and TLR9, followed by semi-quantitative estimation of the staining intensity and grade of expression. The expression pattern of TLR2 and TLR9 does not vary greatly from normal to precancerous lesions, but a significant variation was observed in advance stages, i.e. squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Additionally the expression increased marginally in higher grades. In spite of their low difference in expression along different stages of cervical cancer, both TLR2 and TLR9 could detect the disease at an advance stages as depicted by the receiver operator characteristics curve analysis. PMID:26569074

  10. A different immunologic profile characterizes patients with HER-2-overexpressing and HER-2-negative locally advanced breast cancer: implications for immune-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The clinical efficacy of trastuzumab and taxanes is at least partly related to their ability to mediate or promote antitumor immune responses. On these grounds, a careful analysis of basal immune profile may be capital to dissect the heterogeneity of clinical responses to these drugs in patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Blood samples were collected from 61 locally advanced breast cancers (36 HER2- and 25 HER2+) at diagnosis and from 23 healthy women. Immunophenotypic profiling of circulating and intratumor immune cells, including regulatory T (Treg) cells, was assessed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Serum levels of 10 different cytokines were assessed by multiplex immunoassays. CD8+ T cell responses to multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAA) were evaluated by IFN-γ-enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). The Student's t test for two tailed distributions and the Wilcoxon two-sample test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results The proportion of circulating immune effectors was similar in HER2+ patients and healthy donors, whereas higher percentages of natural killer and Treg cells and a lower CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio (with a prevalence of naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells) were observed in HER2- cases. Higher numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells specific for several HLA-A*0201-restricted TAA-derived peptides were observed in HER2+ cases, together with a higher prevalence of intratumor CD8+ T cells. Serum cytokine profile of HER2+ patients was similar to that of controls, whereas HER2- cases showed significantly lower cytokine amounts compared to healthy women (IL-2, IL-8, IL-6) and HER2+ cases (IL-2, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10). Conclusions Compared to HER2- cases, patients with HER2-overexpressing locally advanced breast cancer show a more limited tumor-related immune suppression. This may account for the clinical benefit achieved in this subset

  11. Royal jelly-like protein localization reveals differences in hypopharyngeal glands buildup and conserved expression pattern in brains of bumblebees and honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Štefan; Spaethe, Johannes; Grübel, Kornelia; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) of the honeybee bear several open questions. One of them is their expression in tissues other than the hypopharyngeal glands (HGs), the site of royal jelly production. The sole MRJP-like gene of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (BtRJPL), represents a pre-diversification stage of the MRJP gene evolution in bees. Here we investigate the expression of BtRJPL in the HGs and the brain of bumblebees. Comparison of the HGs of bumblebees and honeybees revealed striking differences in their morphology with respect to sex- and caste-specific appearance, number of cells per acinus, and filamentous actin (F-actin) rings. At the cellular level, we found a temporary F-actin-covered meshwork in the secretory cells, which suggests a role for actin in the biogenesis of the end apparatus in HGs. Using immunohistochemical localization, we show that BtRJPL is expressed in the bumblebee brain, predominantly in the Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, the site of sensory integration in insects, and in the optic lobes. Our data suggest that a dual gland-brain function preceded the multiplication of MRJPs in the honeybee lineage. In the course of the honeybee evolution, HGs dramatically changed their morphology in order to serve a food-producing function. PMID:24682007

  12. The Bacterial Composition within the Sarracenia purpurea Model System: Local Scale Differences and the Relationship with the Other Members of the Food Web

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Sarah M.; Akob, Denise M.; Green, Stefan J.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    The leaves of the carnivorous pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea, contain a microscopic aquatic food web that is considered a model system in ecological research. The species identity of the intermediate and top trophic level of this food web, as well the detritivore midge, are highly similar across the native geographic range of S. purpurea and, in some cases, appear to have co-evolved with the plant. However, until recently, the identity, geographic variation, and diversity of the bacteria in the bottom trophic level of this food web have remained largely unknown. This study investigated bacterial community composition inside the leaves of S. purpurea to address: 1) variation in bacterial communities at the beginning of succession at the local scale in different areas of the plant’s native geographic range (southern and mid-regional sites) and 2) the impacts of bacterial consumers and other members of the aquatic food web (i.e., insects) on bacterial community structure. Communities from six leaves (one leaf per plant) from New York and Florida study sites were analyzed using 16S ribosomal RNA gene cloning. Each pitcher within each site had a distinct community; however, there was more overlap in bacterial composition within each site than when communities were compared across sites. In contrast, the identity of protozoans and metazoans in this community were similar in species identity both within a site and between the two sites, but abundances differed. Our results indicate that, at least during the beginning of succession, there is no strong selection for bacterial taxa and that there is no core group of bacteria required by the plant to start the decomposition of trapped insects. Co-evolution between the plant and bacteria appears to not have occurred as it has for other members of this community. PMID:23227224

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of the Local Cecal Response of Genetic Chicken Lines That Differ in Their Susceptibility to Campylobacter jejuni Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Chiang, Hsin-I; Wang, Ying; Genovese, Kenneth J.; He, Haiqi; Zhou, Huaijun

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is one of the most common causes of human bacterial enteritis worldwide primarily due to contaminated poultry products. Previously, we found a significant difference in C. jejuni colonization in the ceca between two genetically distinct broiler lines (Line A (resistant) has less colony than line B (susceptible) on day 7 post inoculation). We hypothesize that different mechanisms between these two genetic lines may affect their ability to resist C. jejuni colonization in chickens. The molecular mechanisms of the local host response to C. jejuni colonization in chickens have not been well understood. In the present study, to profile the cecal gene expression in the response to C. jejuni colonization and to compare differences between two lines at the molecular level, RNA of ceca from two genetic lines of chickens (A and B) were applied to a chicken whole genome microarray for a pair-comparison between inoculated (I) and non-inoculated (N) chickens within each line and between lines. Our results demonstrated that metabolism process and insulin receptor signaling pathways are key contributors to the different response to C. jejuni colonization between lines A and B. With C. jejuni inoculation, lymphocyte activation and lymphoid organ development functions are important for line A host defenses, while cell differentiation, communication and signaling pathways are important for line B. Interestingly, circadian rhythm appears play a critical role in host response of the more resistant A line to C. jejuni colonization. A dramatic differential host response was observed between these two lines of chickens. The more susceptible line B chickens responded to C. jejuni inoculation with a dramatic up-regulation in lipid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism, which is undoubtedly for use in the response to the colonization with little or no change in immune host defenses. However, in more resistant line A birds the host defense responses were

  14. Visual Attention to Global and Local Stimulus Properties in 6-Month-Old Infants: Individual Differences and Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guy, Maggie W.; Reynolds, Greg D.; Zhang, Dantong

    2013-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were utilized in an investigation of 21 six-month-olds' attention to and processing of global and local properties of hierarchical patterns. Overall, infants demonstrated an advantage for processing the overall configuration (i.e., global properties) of local features of hierarchical patterns; however,…

  15. Selective Changes in the Immune Profile of Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes After Different Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Regimens for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Martinelli, Enrica; Fanelli, Mara; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess how neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens modulate the immune system state in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN), in the setting of advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients undergoing chemotherapy only (nonirradiated, NI-TDLN) and chemoradiation with lower-dose (39.6 Gy, LD-TDLN) and higher-dose radiation (50 Gy, HD-TDLN) were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results: Enlarging our previous data, LD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an enhanced antitumor response as compared with NI-TDLN, namely a significant Th1 and Tc1 polarization and a lower amount of the potent CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup high} regulatory T cell (Treg) subset identified by neuropilin-1 expression. Conversely, compared with NI-TDLN, HD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an impaired antitumor response, namely a significantly inverted CD4/CD8 cell ratio, a higher Nrp1{sup +}Treg frequency, and a higher frequency of CCR4{sup +}Treg, a Treg subset facilitated in migrating out from TDLN to suppress the immune response against distant cancer cells. Moreover, the Th1 and Tc1 polarization induced by LD radiation was lost, and there was an unfavorable tolerogenic/immunogenic dendritic cell ratio compared with LD-TDLN. Conclusions: Even minor differences in radiation dose in neoadjuvant regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer are crucial for determining the balance between a tolerogenic and an efficacious antitumor immune response in TDLN. Because most of the anticancer immune response takes place in TDLN, the present findings also emphasize the importance of chemoradiation protocols in the context of immunotherapeutic trials.

  16. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-01

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate® (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate® 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate® 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate® 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate® 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of ⩽7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  17. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-09

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate registered (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate registered 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate registered 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate registered 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate registered 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of <=7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  18. NK cell activity differs between patients with localized and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis infected with Leishmania mexicana: a comparative study of TLRs and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cañeda-Guzmán, Isabel Cristina; Salaiza-Suazo, Norma; Fernández-Figueroa, Edith A; Carrada-Figueroa, Georgina; Aguirre-García, Magdalena; Becker, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania mexicana causes localized (LCL) or diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). The cause of dissemination in DCL remains unknown, yet NK cells possibly play a role in activating leishmanicidal mechanisms during innate and adaptive immune responses. We had previously shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is a ligand for TLR2, activating human NK cells. We have now analyzed NK cells in LCL and DCL patients. NK numbers and effector mechanisms differed drastically between both groups of patients: DCL patients showed reduced NK cell numbers; diminished IFN-γ and TNF-α production; and lower TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6 expression as compared to LCL patients. The altered protein expression found in NK cells of DCL patients correlated with their down-regulation of IFN-γ gene expression in LPG-stimulated and non-stimulated cells as compared to LCL patients. NK cell response was further analyzed according to gender, age, and disease evolution in LCL patients showing that female patients produced higher IFN-γ levels throughout the disease progression, whereas TLR2 expression diminished in both genders with prolonged disease evolution and age. We furthermore show the activation pathway of LPG binding to TLR2 and demonstrated that TLR2 forms immunocomplexes with TLR1 and TLR6. In addition to the reduced NK cell numbers in peripheral blood, DCL patients also showed reduced NK cell numbers in the lesions. They were randomly scattered within the lesions, showing diminished cytokine production, which contrasts with those of LCL lesions, where NK cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α and were found within organized granulomas. We conclude that in DCL patients the reduced NK-cell numbers and their diminished activity, evidenced by low TLR expression and low cytokine production, are possibly involved in the severity of the disease. Our results provide new information on the contribution of NK cells in Leishmania infections of the human host. PMID:25397678

  19. Communication: Experimentally determined profile of local glass transition temperature across a glassy-rubbery polymer interface with a Tg difference of 80 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglay, Roman R.; Roth, Connie B.

    2015-09-01

    Studying the local glass transition temperature Tg across a boundary, we investigate the characteristic length scales of cooperative dynamics. High molecular weight polymers have a large separation in time scales between cooperative segmental motion (α-relaxation) and chain diffusion allowing us to measure the local Tg(z) profile across a glassy-rubbery interface of polystyrene/poly(n-butyl methacrylate) using fluorescence. We find this profile in cooperative dynamics does not correlate with the 7-nm wide symmetric composition profile of the interface, but instead is very broad, spanning 350-400 nm from one bulk Tg value to another, and highly asymmetric, extending further into the glassy side.

  20. Determination of total antioxidant activity in three types of local vegetables shoots and the cytotoxic effect of their ethanolic extracts against different cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahmat, Asmah; Kumar, Vijay; Fong, Loo Mei; Endrini, Susi; Sani, Huzaimah Abdullah

    2003-01-01

    Antioxidants play an important role in inhibiting and scavenging radicals, thus providing protection to humans against infections and degenerative diseases. Literature shows that the antioxidant activity is high on herbal and vegetable plants. Realizing the fact, this research was carried out to determine total antioxidant activity and the potential anticancer properties in three types of selected local vegetable shoots such as Diplazium esculentum (paku shoot), Manihot utillissima (tapioca shoot) and Sauropous androgynus (cekur manis). The research was also done to determine the effect of boiling, on total antioxidant activity whereby samples of fresh shoots are compared with samples of boiled shoots. In every case, antioxidant activity is compared to alpha-tocopherol and two methods of extraction used are the organic and the aqueous methods. Besides that, two research methods used were the ferric thiocyanate (FTC) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) with absorbance of 500 nm and 532 nm respectively. Oneway ANOVA test at P <0.05 determines significant differences between various samples. In the cytotoxic study, the ethanolic extract and several cell lines i.e. breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), colon cancer (Caco-2), liver cancer (HepG2) and normal liver (Chang liver) were used. The IC50-value was determined by using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay. The antioxidant study found that all the samples in both aqueous and organic extraction were significantly different. The total antioxidant activity values of aqueous extract in descending order are as follows : M. utilissima (fresh)> D. esculentum (fresh) > S.androgynus (fresh) > M.utilissima (boiled) > D. esculentum (boiled) > S.androgynus (boiled). It also was found that S.androgynus shoots ethanolic extract was able to inhibit the viability of the breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 with the IC subset 50 value of 53.33 microg/ml. However, S.androgynus shoots and D

  1. An analysis of spatiotemporal localized solutions in the variable coefficients (3 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with six different forms of dispersion parameters.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, K; Senthilvelan, M

    2016-07-01

    We construct spatiotemporal localized envelope solutions of a (3 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with varying coefficients such as dispersion, nonlinearity and gain parameters through similarity transformation technique. The obtained localized rational solutions can serve as prototypes of rogue waves in different branches of science. We investigate the characteristics of constructed localized solutions in detail when it propagates through six different dispersion profiles, namely, constant, linear, Gaussian, hyperbolic, logarithm, and exponential. We also obtain expressions for the hump and valleys of rogue wave intensity profiles for these six dispersion profiles and study the trajectory of it in each case. Further, we analyze how the intensity of another localized solution, namely, breather, changes when it propagates through the aforementioned six dispersion profiles. Our studies reveal that these localized solutions co-exist with the collapsing solutions which are already found in the (3 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The obtained results will help to understand the corresponding localized wave phenomena in related fields. PMID:27475076

  2. A preliminary study of longitudinal differences in local dynamic stability between recently concussed and healthy athletes during single and dual-task gait.

    PubMed

    Fino, Peter C

    2016-06-14

    Concussed individuals commonly exhibit locomotor deficits during dual-task gait that can last substantially longer than clinical signs and symptoms. Previous studies have examined traditional stability measures, but nonlinear stability may offer further information about the health of the motor control system post-concussion. For up to one year post-concussion, this study longitudinally examined the local dynamic stability of five concussed athletes and four matched healthy controls during single- and dual-task gait. Local dynamic stability (LDS) was estimated using short-term, finite-time maximum Lyapunov exponents calculated from tri-axial accelerometers placed on the trunk and head. No main effects of group or task were found for LDS or stride time variability, but significant group*task interactions were apparent for trunk stability and stride time variability. Concussed individuals exhibited decreased trunk LDS and increased stride time variability during dual-task walking compared to matched controls despite similar single-task stability and variability. These preliminary results reinforce previous reports that concussions persistently affect dual-task processes even when single-tasks may be unaffected. Furthermore, the decreased local dynamic stability during dual-task gait indicates the concussed group attenuated local disturbances less than their healthy teammates. The decreased dynamic stability during dual-task activities was present after the athletes were cleared for competition and may be a contributing factor in the higher rates of musculoskeletal injuries in athletes post-concussion. PMID:27207386

  3. Locally refined block-centered finite-difference groundwater models: Evaluation of parameter sensitivity and the consequences for inverse modelling and predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Models with local grid refinement, as often required in groundwater models, pose special problems for model calibration. This work investigates the calculation of sensitivities and performance of regression methods using two existing and one new method of grid refinement. The existing local grid refinement methods considered are (1) a variably spaced grid in which the grid spacing becomes smaller near the area of interest and larger where such detail is not needed and (2) telescopic mesh refinement (TMR), which uses the hydraulic heads or fluxes of a regional model to provide the boundary conditions for a locally refined model. The new method has a feedback between the regional and local grids using shared nodes, and thereby, unlike the TMR methods, balances heads and fluxes at the interfacing boundary. Results for sensitivities are compared for the three methods and the effect of the accuracy of sensitivity calculations are evaluated by comparing inverse modelling results. For the cases tested, results indicate that the inaccuracies of the sensitivities calculated using the TMR approach can cause the inverse model to converge to an incorrect solution.

  4. In Vitro Reparative Dentin: a Biochemical and Morphological Study

    PubMed Central

    Teti, G.; Salvatore, V.; Ruggeri, A.; Manzoli, L.; Gesi, M.; Orsini, G.; Falconi, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, starting from human dental pulp cells cultured in vitro, we simulated reparative dentinogenesis using a medium supplemented with different odontogenic inductors. The differentiation of dental pulp cells in odontoblast-like cells was evaluated by means of staining, and ultramorphological, biochemical and biomolecular methods. Alizarin red staining showed mineral deposition while transmission electron microscopy revealed a synthesis of extracellular matrix fibers during the differentiation process. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the differentiated phenotype expressed odontoblast markers, such as Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) and Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP), as well as type I collagen. Quantitative data regarding the mRNA expression of DMP1, DSP and type I collagen were obtained by Real Time PCR. Immunofluorescence data demonstrated the various localizations of DSP and DMP1 during odontoblast differentiation. Based on our results, we obtained odontoblast-like cells which simulated the reparative dentin processes in order to better investigate the mechanism of odontoblast differentiation, and dentin extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization. PMID:24085272

  5. A brief review on the efficacy of different possible and nonpharmacological techniques in eliminating discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Amin; Rismanchian, Mansour; Akhavan, Ali; Nosouhian, Saeid; Bajoghli, Farshad; Haghighat, Abbas; Arbabzadeh, Farahnaz; Samimi, Pouran; Fiez, Atiyeh; Shadmehr, Elham; Tabari, Kasra; Jahadi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety and fear of needle injection is one of the most common problems encountered by dental practitioners, especially in the pediatric patient. In consequences, it might affect the patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to lower the discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures. Desensitization of injection site is one of the recommended strategies. Among chemical anesthetic topical agents that are effective but might have allergic side effects, using some nonpharmacological and safe techniques might be useful. This study aimed to overview the efficacy of using cooling techniques, mostly by ice or popsicles, warming or pH buffering of drug, and using modern devices to diminish the discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures. PMID:26957683

  6. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.

  7. Different Personal Skills and Competencies Which Local Agricultural Advisers Can Use to Co-Create Change in Management Procedures: A Case-Study of Danish Dairy Farmers and Advisers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, H. J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper three different skills and competencies of the local agricultural adviser are described: "The specialist, the reflective specialist and the reflective listener". The skills and competencies are framed as potentials and theoretically rooted in the ideas of George Herbert Mead, Chris Argyris and Donald Schon. The empirical background…

  8. Cloning of Arabidopsis serotonin N-acetyltransferase and its role with caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in the biosynthesis of melatonin in vitro despite their different subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Kyungjin; Lee, Hye-Jung; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-11-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis. We cloned SNAT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSNAT) and functionally characterized this enzyme for the first time from dicotyledonous plants. Similar to rice SNAT, AtSNAT was found to localize to chloroplasts with peak enzyme activity at 45 °C (Km , 309 μm; Vmax , 1400 pmol/min/mg protein). AtSNAT also catalyzed 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT) into melatonin with high catalytic activity (Km , 51 μm; Vmax , 5300 pmol/min/mg protein). In contrast, Arabidopsis caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (AtCOMT) localized to the cytoplasm. Interestingly, AtCOMT can methylate serotonin into 5-MT with low catalytic activity (Km , 3.396 mm; Vmax , 528 pmol/min/mg protein). These data suggest that serotonin can be converted into either N-acetylserotonin by SNAT or into 5-MT by COMT, after which it is metabolized into melatonin by COMT or SNAT, respectively. To support this hypothesis, serotonin was incubated in the presence of both AtSNAT and AtCOMT enzymes. In addition to melatonin production, the production of major intermediates depended on incubation temperatures; N-acetylserotonin was predominantly produced at high temperatures (45 °C), while low temperatures (37 °C) favored the production of 5-MT. Our results provide biochemical evidence for the presence of a serotonin O-methylation pathway in plant melatonin biosynthesis. PMID:25250906

  9. Serum erythropoietin and its relation with soluble transferrin receptor in patients with different types of anaemia in a locally defined reference population.

    PubMed

    Roque, M E; Sandoval, M J; Aggio, M C

    2001-10-01

    Serum erythropoietin (Epo) and soluble transferrin receptor (sTR) were measured in a locally defined reference population (n=100): healthy volunteers (n=50); iron- deficiency anaemia (n=41) and haemolytic anaemia (n=9) (beta-thalassaemia, n = 4; autoimmune, n=5). Our data demonstrated an inverse relationship between erythroid activity and Epo levels. The regression line between Ln Epo and haemoglobin (Hb) was highly significant: P < 0.0001, r2=0.8275, Ln Epo=8.5346-0.04275 Hb, confidence limit 95%. The mean observed/predicted (O/P) ratio of Ln (Epo) was 1.01 +/- 0.11. We demonstrated that the serum Epo concentration in this particular population correlated consistently with clinical measures of erythropoietic activity. sTR, a new index of erythropoiesis, varied from 16.1 to 148 nmol/l, mean 62.0 nmol/l in the anaemic patients' group. The relationship between Ln Epo and Ln sTR was highly significant: P < 0.0001. We conclude that locally defined regression analyses are crucial for correct data interpretation and can indicate whether or not Epo production is appropriate or inappropriate. Serial determinations of sTR could help in the assessment of response to therapeutic doses of Epo. PMID:11703410

  10. Three-dimensional local grid refinement for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using iteratively coupled shared nodes: a new method of interpolation and analysis of errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Steffen; Hill, Mary C.

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes work that extends to three dimensions the two-dimensional local-grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models of Mehl and Hill [Development and evaluation of a local grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using shared nodes. Adv Water Resour 2002;25(5):497-511]. In this approach, the (parent) finite-difference grid is discretized more finely within a (child) sub-region. The grid refinement method sequentially solves each grid and uses specified flux (parent) and specified head (child) boundary conditions to couple the grids. Iteration achieves convergence between heads and fluxes of both grids. Of most concern is how to interpolate heads onto the boundary of the child grid such that the physics of the parent-grid flow is retained in three dimensions. We develop a new two-step, "cage-shell" interpolation method based on the solution of the flow equation on the boundary of the child between nodes shared with the parent grid. Error analysis using a test case indicates that the shared-node local grid refinement method with cage-shell boundary head interpolation is accurate and robust, and the resulting code is used to investigate three-dimensional local grid refinement of stream-aquifer interactions. Results reveal that (1) the parent and child grids interact to shift the true head and flux solution to a different solution where the heads and fluxes of both grids are in equilibrium, (2) the locally refined model provided a solution for both heads and fluxes in the region of the refinement that was more accurate than a model without refinement only if iterations are performed so that both heads and fluxes are in equilibrium, and (3) the accuracy of the coupling is limited by the parent-grid size—a coarse parent grid limits correct representation of the hydraulics in the feedback from the child grid.

  11. Three-dimensional local grid refinement for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using iteratively coupled shared nodes: A new method of interpolation and analysis of errors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes work that extends to three dimensions the two-dimensional local-grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models of Mehl and Hill [Development and evaluation of a local grid refinement method for block-centered finite-difference groundwater models using shared nodes. Adv Water Resour 2002;25(5):497-511]. In this approach, the (parent) finite-difference grid is discretized more finely within a (child) sub-region. The grid refinement method sequentially solves each grid and uses specified flux (parent) and specified head (child) boundary conditions to couple the grids. Iteration achieves convergence between heads and fluxes of both grids. Of most concern is how to interpolate heads onto the boundary of the child grid such that the physics of the parent-grid flow is retained in three dimensions. We develop a new two-step, "cage-shell" interpolation method based on the solution of the flow equation on the boundary of the child between nodes shared with the parent grid. Error analysis using a test case indicates that the shared-node local grid refinement method with cage-shell boundary head interpolation is accurate and robust, and the resulting code is used to investigate three-dimensional local grid refinement of stream-aquifer interactions. Results reveal that (1) the parent and child grids interact to shift the true head and flux solution to a different solution where the heads and fluxes of both grids are in equilibrium, (2) the locally refined model provided a solution for both heads and fluxes in the region of the refinement that was more accurate than a model without refinement only if iterations are performed so that both heads and fluxes are in equilibrium, and (3) the accuracy of the coupling is limited by the parent-grid size - A coarse parent grid limits correct representation of the hydraulics in the feedback from the child grid.

  12. "It's Just More in the Real World Really": How Can a Local Project Support Early Years Practitioners from Different Settings in Working and Learning Together?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Lizzie

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how early years practitioners working in different settings, with different experiences and qualifications, can work and learn together. It is a small-scale case study of an eight-month project, with a grass-roots approach, involving early years settings within the reach area of an inner-London Children's Centre. The data…

  13. Strain localization on different scales and the importance of brittle precursors during deformation in the lower crust (Davenport Shear Zone, Central Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Mancktelow, Neil; Wex, Sebastian; Camacho, Alfredo; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    High strain rocks in the Musgrave Ranges (Central Australia) provide a rather unique insight into the development of lower crustal shear zones during the 550 Ma Petermann Orogeny, allowing common models for lower crustal deformation to be critically evaluated. The observed structures in the study area are, from south to north: (1) The Mann Fault, which is poorly exposed but evident on airborne geomagnetic maps. This regional scale fault with a component of dextral shear shows a step-over resulting in the formation of a pull-apart basin. (2) The Davenport Shear Zone, accommodating the horizontal extension in a 7 km wide WNW-ESE-trending mylonitic zone developed under subeclogitic, lower crustal conditions. This high strain zone is bounded to the north by a more than 50 km long, continuous, sheared dolerite dyke. North of this dyke, the ~1200 Ma Musgravian fabric is still preserved, only slightly rotated and typically N-S trending. (3) The Woodroffe Thrust, marking the northern boundary of the Musgrave Ranges, brings these lower crustal rocks on top of amphibolite facies units, with a top-to-north sense of movement. Strain in the Davenport Shear Zone is very heterogeneously distributed, with localization and partitioning from the kilometre down to the millimetre scale. Pseudotachylyte is commonly associated with dykes, especially on the boundaries, and is often sheared. The orientation of sheared dykes and localized shear zones is typically at a high angle to either side of the shortening direction, resulting in a variable sense of shear and a major component of flattening, with a nearly horizontal extension direction. Detailed outcrop-scale mapping shows that compositional inhomogeneities, such as quartz veins, are generally not exploited, even when favourably oriented for shear reactivation. Ultramylonitic shear zones are sometimes only a few millimetres wide but extend for several metres and are generally oblique to the background foliation. Pseudotachylyte often

  14. Porcine dentin matrix protein 1: gene structure, cDNA sequence, and expression in teeth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Wook; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Iwata, Takanori; Hu, Yuan Yuan; Zhang, Hengmin; Hu, Jan C.-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic non-collagenous protein that is necessary for the proper biomineralization of bone, cartilage, cementum, dentin, and enamel. Dentin matrix protein 1 is highly phosphorylated and potentially glycosylated, but there is no experimental data identifying which specific amino acids are modified. For the purpose of facilitating the characterization of DMP1 from pig, which has the advantage of large developing teeth for obtaining protein in quantity and extensive structural information concerning other tooth matrix proteins, we characterized the porcine DMP1 cDNA and gene structure, raised anti-peptide immunoglobulins that are specific for porcine DMP1, and detected DMP1 protein in porcine tooth extracts and histological sections. Porcine DMP1 has 510 amino acids, including a 16-amino acid signal peptide. The deduced molecular weight of the secreted, unmodified protein is 53.5 kDa. The protein has 93 serines and 12 threonines in the appropriate context for phosphorylation, and four asparagines in a context suitable for glycosylation. Dentin matrix protein 1 protein bands with apparent molecular weights between 30 and 45 kDa were observed in partially purified dentin extracts. In developing teeth, immunohistochemistry localized DMP1 in odontoblasts and the dentinal tubules of mineralized dentin and in ameloblasts, but not in the enamel matrix. PMID:16460339

  15. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein 1 on Sharpey's fibers in monkey tooth cementum.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Ishikawa, T; Shintani, S; Yanagisawa, T

    2012-07-01

    Despite the importance of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) in the formation of mineralized tissue, including dentinogenesis and osteogenesis, its precise role in cementogenesis remains to be clarified fully. The purpose of our study was to demonstrate the ultrastructural immunolocalization of DMP1 in monkey molar tooth cementum. Japanese Macaca fuscata monkeys were fixed by perfusion. The upper molar teeth and accompanying periodontium then were dissected and demineralized with EDTA. Cryosections were obtained, incubated in anti-DMP1 polyclonal antibody, and processed by immunoperoxidase and immunogold labeling. Intense immunoperoxidase staining for DMP1 was observed in acellular extrinsic fiber cementum, particularly in Sharpey's fibers. Cementocyte lacunae with canaliculi showed DMP1 staining in the apical region of the tooth root. Electron immunomicroscopy revealed the close proximity of DMP1 to collagen fibrils in Sharpey's fibers at the mineralization front. Intense immunogold labeling was localized on the walls of the cementocyte lacunae in cellular cementum. These results should contribute to better understanding of the role of DMP1, not only in Sharpey's fiber biomineralization, but also in the maintenance of the cementocyte lacunar space in cementum. PMID:22435407

  16. Adaptations to “Thermal Time” Constraints in Papilio: Latitudinal and Local Size Clines Differ in Response to Regional Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Scriber, J. Mark; Elliot, Ben; Maher, Emily; McGuire, Molly; Niblack, Marjie

    2014-01-01

    Adaptations to “thermal time” (=Degree-day) constraints on developmental rates and voltinism for North American tiger swallowtail butterflies involve most life stages, and at higher latitudes include: smaller pupae/adults; larger eggs; oviposition on most nutritious larval host plants; earlier spring adult emergences; faster larval growth and shorter molting durations at lower temperatures. Here we report on forewing sizes through 30 years for both the northern univoltine P. canadensis (with obligate diapause) from the Great Lakes historical hybrid zone northward to central Alaska (65° N latitude), and the multivoltine, P. glaucus from this hybrid zone southward to central Florida (27° N latitude). Despite recent climate warming, no increases in mean forewing lengths of P. glaucus were observed at any major collection location (FL to MI) from the 1980s to 2013 across this long latitudinal transect (which reflects the “converse of Bergmann’s size Rule”, with smaller females at higher latitudes). Unlike lower latitudes, the Alaska, Ontonogon, and Chippewa/Mackinac locations (for P. canadensis) showed no significant increases in D-day accumulations, which could explain lack of size change in these northernmost locations. As a result of 3–4 decades of empirical data from major collection sites across these latitudinal clines of North America, a general “voltinism/size/D-day” model is presented, which more closely predicts female size based on D-day accumulations, than does latitude. However, local “climatic cold pockets” in northern Michigan and Wisconsin historically appeared to exert especially strong size constraints on female forewing lengths, but forewing lengths quickly increased with local summer warming during the recent decade, especially near the warming edges of the cold pockets. Results of fine-scale analyses of these “cold pockets” are in contrast to non-significant changes for other Papilio populations seen across the latitudinal

  17. Differential effects of sucrose and auxin on localized phosphate deficiency-induced modulation of different traits of root system architecture in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ajay; Poling, Michael D; Karthikeyan, Athikkattuvalasu S; Blakeslee, Joshua J; Peer, Wendy A; Titapiwatanakun, Boosaree; Murphy, Angus S; Raghothama, Kashchandra G

    2007-05-01

    Phosphorus, one of the essential elements for plants, is often a limiting nutrient in soils. Low phosphate (Pi) availability induces sugar-dependent systemic expression of genes and modulates the root system architecture (RSA). Here, we present the differential effects of sucrose (Suc) and auxin on the Pi deficiency responses of the primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Inhibition of primary root growth and loss of meristematic activity were evident in seedlings grown under Pi deficiency with or without Suc. Although auxin supplementation also inhibited primary root growth, loss of meristematic activity was observed specifically under Pi deficiency with or without Suc. The results suggested that Suc and auxin do not influence the mechanism involved in localized Pi sensing that regulates growth of the primary root and therefore delineates it from sugar-dependent systemic Pi starvation responses. However, the interaction between Pi and Suc was evident on the development of the lateral roots and root hairs in the seedlings grown under varying levels of Pi and Suc. Although the Pi+ Suc- condition suppressed lateral root development, induction of few laterals under the Pi- Suc- condition point to increased sensitivity of the roots to auxin during Pi deprivation. This was supported by expression analyses of DR5uidA, root basipetal transport assay of auxin, and RSA of the pgp19 mutant exhibiting reduced auxin transport. A significant increase in the number of lateral roots under the Pi- Suc- condition in the chalcone synthase mutant (tt4-2) indicated a potential role for flavonoids in auxin-mediated Pi deficiency-induced modulation of RSA. The study thus demonstrated differential roles of Suc and auxin in the developmental responses of ontogenetically distinct root traits during Pi deprivation. In addition, lack of cross talk between local and systemic Pi sensing as revealed by the seedlings grown under either the Pi- Suc- condition or in the

  18. Influence of the micro- and nanoscale local mechanical properties of the interfacial transition zone on impact behavior of concrete made with different aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Savas Dawson, Andrew Robert; Thom, Nicholas Howard

    2012-02-15

    The influence of the microscale local mechanical properties of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on macro-level mechanical response and impact behavior is studied for concretes made with copper slag and gravel aggregates. 3D nanotech vertical scanning interferometry, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray micro-analysis, digital image analysis, and 3D X-ray computed tomography were used to characterize the microstructures and the ITZs. It was deduced that a stronger and denser ITZ in the copper slag specimen would reduce its vulnerability to stiffness loss and contribute to its elastic and more ductile response under impact loading. The analysis also indicated that a significant degeneration in the pore structure of the gravel specimen associated with a relatively weaker and non-homogeneous ITZ occurred under impact. Finally, it was also concluded that increased roughness of ITZ may contribute to the load-carrying capacity of concrete under impact by improving contact point interactions and energy dissipation.

  19. In-plane and through-plane local and average Nusselt numbers in fibrous porous materials with different fiber layer temperatures: Gas diffusion layers for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza

    2016-09-01

    Convective heat transfer inside fibrous gas diffusion layers (GDLs) noticeably impacts the heat and water management of air-cooled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Cutting-edge experiments have recently proved that convective heat transfer inside fibrous GDLs increases their thermal resistances considerably. However, heat transfer coefficients are difficult to measure experimentally or compute numerically for the millions of the tiny pores inside microstructural GDLs. The present study provides robust analytic models for predicting the heat transfer coefficient for both through-plane and in-plane flows inside fibrous media such as GDLs. The model is based on the unit cell approach and the integral method. Closed-form formulas are developed for local and average heat transfer coefficients. The model considers the temperature variations of the fiber layers along the medium thickness while assuming the same temperature for all the fibers in each layer. The model is well verified by COMSOL numerical data for a few pores inside a GDL. The simple, closed-form easy-to-use formulas developed in this study can be readily employed for predicting Nusselt number inside multilayer fibrous porous materials.

  20. The effect of different ranges of motion on local dynamic stability of the elbow during unloaded repetitive flexion-extension movements.

    PubMed

    Gsell, Kelsey Y; Beaudette, Shawn M; Graham, Ryan B; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-08-01

    Local dynamic stability (LDS) of movement is controlled primarily by active muscles, and is known to be influenced by factors such as movement speed and inertial load. Other factors such as muscle length, the length of the target trajectory, and the resistance of passive tissues through ranges of motion (ROM) may also influence LDS. This study was designed to examine the effect of ROM, which impacts each of the aforementioned factors, on LDS of the elbow. 16 participants performed 30 unloaded, repetitive, flexion-extension movements of the elbow with varying (1) angular displacement magnitudes: 40° and 80°; (2) locations of ROM: mid-range, flexion end-range, extension end-range; and (3) rotated positions of the forearm: pronated and supinated. LDS was calculated using a finite time Lyapunov analysis of angular elbow flexion-extension kinematic data. EMG-based muscle activation and co-contraction data were also examined for possible mechanisms of stabilization. Results showed no changes in LDS with any movement condition; however, there were significant effects on muscle activation with ROM location and forearm rotated position. This suggests that a consistent level of LDS of the elbow through varying ROMs is maintained, at least in part, by the active control of the elbow flexor and extensor muscles. PMID:26048713

  1. Construction of local gene network for revealing different liver function of rats fed deep-fried oil with or without resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Liao, Tianqi; Zhou, Zhongkai; Wang, Yuyang; Diao, Yongjia; Strappe, Padraig; Prenzler, Paul; Ayton, Jamie; Blanchard, Chris

    2016-09-01

    To study the mechanism underlying the liver damage induced by deep-fried oil (DO) consumption and the beneficial effects from resistant starch (RS) supplement, differential gene expression and pathway network were analyzed based on RNA sequencing data from rats. The up/down regulated genes and corresponding signaling pathways were used to construct a novel local gene network (LGN). The topology of the network showed characteristics of small-world network, with some pathways demonstrating a high degree. Some changes in genes led to a larger probability occurrence of disease or infection with DO intake. More importantly, the main pathways were found to be almost the same between the two LGNs (30 pathways overlapped in total 48) with gene expression profile. This finding may indicate that RS supplement in DO-containing diet may mainly regulate the genes that related to DO damage, and RS in the diet may provide direct signals to the liver cells and modulate its effect through a network involving complex gene regulatory events. It is the first attempt to reveal the mechanism of the attenuation of liver dysfunction from RS supplement in the DO-containing diet using differential gene expression and pathway network. PMID:27363782

  2. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau

    PubMed Central

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M.; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  3. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau.

    PubMed

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  4. Local Wellness Policy 5 Years Later: Is It Making a Difference for Students in Low-Income, Rural Colorado Elementary Schools?

    PubMed Central

    Cutforth, Nick; Gilbert, Lynn; Litt, Jill; Reed, Hannah; Scarbro, Sharon; Marshall, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The federally mandated Local Wellness Policy (LWP) was intended to promote student health in schools. This study assesses the 5-year effects of the LWP on the health practices of rural elementary schools in Colorado. Methods One year before and 5 years after the LWP mandate, a survey was administered to a random sample of principals, physical education (PE) teachers, and food-service managers in 45 rural, low-income elementary schools in Colorado. Response rates were 71% in 2005 and 89% in 2011. Results Minutes for PE and recess did not increase, nor did offerings of fresh fruits and vegetables. More schools adopted policies prohibiting teachers from taking recess away as punishment (9.7% in 2005 vs 38.5% in 2011, P = .02) or for making up missed instructional time, class work, or tests in other subjects (3.2% in 2005 vs 28.2% in 2011, P = .03). More schools scheduled recess before lunch (22.6% in 2005 vs 46.2% in 2011, P = .04) and developed policies for vending machines (42.9% in 2005 vs 85.7% in 2011, P = .01) and parties (21.4% in 2005 vs 57.9% in 2011, P = .004). Conclusion Changes in school practices are modest, and arguably the important school practices such as increased PE and recess time and increased offerings of fruits and vegetables in the lunch line have not changed in the 5 years since the mandate went into effect. Further investigation is needed to identify the knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as financial and physical resources required for school administrators to make changes in school practices. PMID:24199737

  5. Difference in distant failure site between locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix after C-ion RT

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Ando, Ken; Irie, Daisuke; Shiba, Shintaro; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Kamada, Tadashi; Shozu, Makio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the first site of distant failure after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in three clinical trials. A total of 91 cases were enrolled in the three trials (Protocol 9702, 9704 and 9902). Histologically, 36 cases had squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) and 55 cases had adenocarcinoma (AC), including 13 with adenosquamous cell carcinoma. The number of cases with Stage IIB, IIIB and IVA disease was 21, 59 and 11, respectively. Of the 91 cases, 42 had positive pelvic lymph nodes (PLNs). The median tumor size was 6.0 cm (range, 3.0–12.0 cm). The median follow-up duration for all cases was 40 months (range, 7–181 months). A total of 40 cases developed distant failure as the first site of failure: 13 of 36 (36.1%) SqCC cases had distant failure, with 9 of them with para-aortic lymph node (PALN) failure; 27 of 55 (44.0%) AC cases had distant failure, and 23 of them had distant failure excluding PALN metastasis. Distant failure rates of SqCC cases who had positive and negative PLNs before C-ion RT were 61.1% and 11.1%, respectively (P = 0.0045). Those of AC cases were 54.2% and 45.2%, respectively (P = 0.507). In conclusion, there were high rates of distant failure after C-ion RT in AC cases regardless of PLN status, and there were high rates of distant failure after C-ion RT, especially PALN failure, in SqCC cases with positive PLNs. PMID:25589503

  6. The Localization of Cytochrome P450s CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 into Different Lipid Microdomains Is Governed by Their N-terminal and Internal Protein Regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Reed, James R; Backes, Wayne L

    2015-12-01

    In cellular membranes, different lipid species are heterogeneously distributed forming domains with different characteristics. Ordered domains are tightly packed with cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and saturated fatty acids, whereas disordered domains contain high levels of unsaturated fatty acids. Our laboratory has shown that membrane heterogeneity affects the organization of cytochrome P450s and their cognate redox partner, the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, CYP1A1 was found to localize to disordered regions, whereas CYP1A2 resided in ordered domains. We hypothesized that regions of amino acid sequence variability may contain signal motifs that direct CYP1A proteins into ordered or disordered domains. Thus, chimeric constructs of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were created, and their localization was tested in HEK293T cells. CYP1A2, containing the N-terminal regions from CYP1A1, no longer localized in ordered domains, whereas the N terminus of CYP1A2 partially directed CYP1A1 into ordered regions. In addition, intact CYP1A2 containing a 206-302-residue peptide segment of CYP1A1 had less affinity to bind to ordered microdomains. After expression, the catalytic activity of CYP1A2 was higher than that of the CYP1A1-CYP1A2 chimera containing the N-terminal end of CYP1A1 with subsaturating CPR concentrations, but it was approximately equal with excess CPR suggesting that the localization of the CYP1A enzyme in ordered domains favored its interaction with CPR. These data demonstrate that both the N-terminal end and an internal region of CYP1A2 play roles in targeting CYP1A2 to ordered domains, and domain localization may influence P450 function under conditions that resemble those found in vivo. PMID:26468279

  7. Differential co-localization with choline acetyltransferase in nervus terminalis suggests functional differences for GnRH isoforms in bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo).

    PubMed

    Moeller, John F; Meredith, Michael

    2010-12-17

    The nervus terminalis (NT) is a vertebrate cranial nerve whose function in adults is unknown. In bonnethead sharks, the nerve is anatomically independent of the olfactory system, with two major cell populations within one or more ganglia along its exposed length. Most cells are immunoreactive for either gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or RF-amide-like peptides. To define further the cell populations and connectivity, we used double-label immunocytochemistry with antisera to different isoforms of GnRH and to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). The labeling patterns of two GnRH antisera revealed different populations of GnRH-immunoreactive (ir) cell profiles in the NT ganglion. One antiserum labeled a large group of cells and fibers, which likely contain mammalian GnRH (GnRH-I) as described in previous studies and which were ChAT immunoreactive. The other antiserum labeled large club-like structures, which were anuclear, and a sparse number of fibers, but with no clear labeling of cell bodies in the ganglion. These club structures were choline acetyltrasferase (ChAT)-negative, and preabsorption control tests suggest they may contain chicken-GnRH-II (GnRH-II) or dogfish GnRH. The second major NT ganglion cell-type was immunoreactive for RF-amides, which regulate GnRH release in other vertebrates, and may provide an intraganglionic influence on GnRH release. The immunocytochemical and anatomical differences between the two GnRH-immunoreactive profile types indicate possible functional differences for these isoforms in the NT. The club-like structures may be sites of GnRH release into the general circulation since these structures were observed near blood vessels and resembled structures seen in the median eminence of rats. PMID:20950589

  8. The expression and localization of Crb3 in developmental stages of the mice embryos and in different organs of 1-week-old female mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y; Sheng, J; Hu, R; Yang, Y; Qing, S

    2014-10-01

    Crumbs homolog 3 (Crb3) is a member of the Crumbs family of proteins. This protein may play a role in epithelial cell polarity and is associated with tight junctions at the apical surface of epithelial cells. Alternative transcriptional splice variants that encode different Crb3 isoforms have been characterized. The expression of Crb3 mRNA and protein was observed in the pre-implantation mouse embryos and different organs of 1-week-old mouse, and Crb3 expression was primarily observed in the cytoplasm. Crb3 was expressed in a unique temporal pattern in pre-implantation embryos. The main characteristic of Crb3 expression was that the positive signals were stronger in the mature oocytes and zygotes than in the 2-cell, 4-cell, and 8-cell stages and the morula, but a similar level of high expression was observed in blastocysts. Therefore, the Crb3 expression signal during the course of development process grew gradually stronger from the 2-cell stage to blastocyst. In addition, Crb3 protein was widely distributed in each stage of the post-implantation embryos. Crb3 expression was observed in the inner cell mass, trophoblast cells and endoderm of E4.5d embryos; in the chorion, amnion, trophoblast cells, yolk sac endoderm and embryo ectoderm of E7.5d embryos; in the amnion and limb bud of E8.0d embryos; and in the semicircular canal epithelium, retina, lens vesicle and liver tissue of E13.5d embryos. Crb3 was expressed at different levels in different organs of 1-week-old mouse with the strengths in the following order: kidney > small intestine > stomach > uterus > liver > skeletal muscle > cerebellum > brain. The presence of Crb3 in many organs and the regularity of Crb3 distribution in the process of mouse embryonic development indicate that Crb3 protein plays an important role in establishing and maintaining the polarity of mouse embryos. PMID:25131306

  9. Clinically Meaningful Differences in Patient-Reported Outcomes With Amifostine in Combination With Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 9801

    SciTech Connect

    Sarna, Linda Swann, Suzanne; Langer, Corey; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Nicolaou, Nicos; Komaki, Ritsuko; Machtay, Mitchell; Byhardt, Roger; Wasserman, Todd; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze changes in quality of life (QOL) and symptoms from pretreatment to 6 weeks posttreatment in a Phase III randomized study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9801) of amifostine (AM) vs. no AM in patients with Stages II-III non-small-cell lung cancer receiving paclitaxel and carboplatin as induction and then concurrently with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-eight patients with baseline and 6-week posttreatment QOL data were analyzed. There were no significant differences in baseline demographics between those who did and did not have QOL data. The QOL and symptoms were assessed by using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Global QOL and Pain subscales and the EORTC-Lung Cancer-13 symptom tool. Clinically relevant changes in QOL were characterized by 10-point differences in individual scores pre/post treatment. A daily diary of patient-rated difficulty swallowing and a weekly physician-rated dysphagia log (using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria) were completed during treatment. Weight loss was monitored. Differences in outcomes were examined according to smoking status, alcohol use, and sex. Results: Patients receiving AM reported significantly greater pain reduction after chemoradiation (34% vs. no AM, 21%), less difficulty swallowing during chemoradiation, and less weight loss than patients not receiving AM. However, physician-rated assessments of dysphagia were not significantly different by treatment arm. There were no other significant changes in QOL or symptoms according to treatment arm, smoking status, alcohol use, or sex. Conclusions: Patient evaluations of difficulty swallowing and pain suggest benefits from AM use that are distinct from clinician-rated assessments.

  10. Genome Analysis of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and subsp. pertenue Strains: Most of the Genetic Differences Are Localized in Six Regions

    PubMed Central

    Mikalová, Lenka; Strouhal, Michal; Čejková, Darina; Zobaníková, Marie; Pospíšilová, Petra; Norris, Steven J.; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Šmajs, David

    2010-01-01

    The genomes of eight treponemes including T. p. pallidum strains (Nichols, SS14, DAL-1 and Mexico A), T. p. pertenue strains (Samoa D, CDC-2 and Gauthier), and the Fribourg-Blanc isolate, were amplified in 133 overlapping amplicons, and the restriction patterns of these fragments were compared. The approximate sizes of the genomes investigated based on this whole genome fingerprinting (WGF) analysis ranged from 1139.3–1140.4 kb, with the estimated genome sequence identity of 99.57–99.98% in the homologous genome regions. Restriction target site analysis, detecting the presence of 1773 individual restriction sites found in the reference Nichols genome, revealed a high genome structure similarity of all strains. The unclassified simian Fribourg-Blanc isolate was more closely related to T. p. pertenue than to T. p. pallidum strains. Most of the genetic differences between T. p. pallidum and T. p. pertenue strains were accumulated in six genomic regions. These genome differences likely contribute to the observed differences in pathogenicity between T. p. pallidum and T. p. pertenue strains. These regions of sequence divergence could be used for the molecular detection and discrimination of syphilis and yaws strains. PMID:21209953

  11. Differences of immune responses between Tongcheng (Chinese local breed) and Large White pigs after artificial infection with highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wan; Li, Zhenhong; Wang, Peng; Fan, Pengcheng; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qingde; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Bang

    2016-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the severest infectious diseases of pigs throughout the world. Pigs of different breeds infected with PRRS virus (PRRSV) have been reported to vary in their immune responses. Here, the differences of immune responses to highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) were investigated by artificially infecting Tongcheng (TC) pigs (a Chinese indigenous breed) and Large White (LW) pigs with PRRSV WUH3. Compared to LW pigs, TC pigs showed less severe symptoms and lower level of viral load. The routine blood test results indicated that TC pigs were relatively steady in terms of erythrocyte, leukocyte and platelet. Additionally, PRRSV infection induced higher IFN-γ activity in TC pigs, but stimulated an excessive level of IL-10 and IL-12p40 in LW pigs. Our study provides direct evidence that TC pigs have stronger resistance to early PRRSV infection than LW pigs, suggesting that the resistance of pigs to PRRSV is likely associated with breed differences. PMID:26878768

  12. The Role of Alveolar Epithelial Type II-Like Cells in Uptake of Structurally Different Antigens and in Polarisation of Local Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akgün, Johnnie; Schabussova, Irma; Schwarzer, Martin; Kozakova, Hana; Kundi, Michael; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Background Our previous studies on intranasal tolerance induction demonstrated reduction of allergic responses with different allergen constructs. The underlying mechanisms varied depending on their conformation or size. Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the uptake of two structurally different allergen molecules within the respiratory tract following intranasal application. Methods The three-dimensional Bet v 1 (Bv1-Protein) and the T cell epitope peptide of Bet v 1 (Bv1-Peptide) were labelled with 5,6-Carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and their uptake was investigated in lung cells and cells of the nasal associated lymphoid tissue from naive and sensitised BALB/c mice. Phenotypic characterisation of FAM+ lung cells after antigen incubation in vitro and after intranasal application was performed by flow cytometry. Impact of Bv1-Protein and Bv1-Peptide on cytokine profiles and gene expression in vivo or in an alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell line were assessed in mono- and co-cultures with monocytes using ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR. Results Both antigens were taken up preferably by ATII-like cells (ATII-LCs) in naive mice, and by macrophages in sensitised mice. After intranasal application, Bv1-Peptide was taken up faster and more efficiently than Bv1-Protein. In vivo and in vitro experiments revealed that Bv1-Protein induced the transcription of thymic stromal lymphopoietin mRNA while Bv1-Peptide induced the transcription of IL-10 and MCP1 mRNA in ATII-LCs. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Both tested antigens were taken up by ATII-LCs under steady state conditions and induced different polarisation of the immune responses. These data may have an important impact for the generation of novel and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic tools targeting the respiratory mucosa. PMID:25894334

  13. [Study of local immunostimulating effect of the use of different pharmaceutical forms of the remedy Traumeel S in treatment of inflammatory parodontal diseases].

    PubMed

    Grudianov, A I; Bezrukova, I V; Serebriakova, L E; Aleksandrovskaia, I Iu

    2006-01-01

    In order to optimize the way of the remedy "Traumeel S" administration there was studied by the luminol-depending chemiluminescent method immunostimulating effect of its different pharmaceutical forms on functional status of gingival blood granulocytes of patients with inflammatory periodontal diseases. The immunostimulating effect of Traumeel S depended upon only the inflammatory periodontal disease severity and not the ways of its introduction. But the use of the preparation in the pellet form gave some additional advantage: simplicity of use, painlessness, dosage accuracy and possibility not to attend doctor. PMID:16710275

  14. Phytochemical screening, antimicrobial and antioxidant efficacy of different extracts of Rumex dentatus L. - A locally used medicinal herb of Kashmir Himalaya

    PubMed Central

    Nisa, Humeera; Kamili, Azra N.; Bandh, Suhaib A.; Amin, Shajr-ul; Lone, Bashir A.; Parray, Javaid A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Rumex dentatus L. (R. dentatus) along with its phytochemical analysis. Methods Agar disk diffusion method for antimicrobial activity and DPPH, riboflavin photo-oxidation, deoxyribose and lipid peroxidation assay for antioxidant activity. Results The antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of different concentrations of five R. dentatus extracts were tested against different clinical bacterial strains (Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhimurium) and fungal strains (Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus flavus, Accremonium spp., Penicillium dimorphosporum, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida kruesie). Among all extracts, the butanol extract showed strong antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae (inhibition zone diameter of 20 mm) and aqueous extract showed no activity against any of the bacterial strains. While as in case of the fungal strains, the maximum antifungal activity was observed against Aspergillus flavus by aqueous extract. The antioxidant activity revealed that the extracts exhibited scavenging effect in concentration-dependent manner on superoxide anion radicals and hydroxyl radicals. The phytochemical tests carried out with the crude extracts of R. dentatus showed the presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids, saponins, tannins, anthraquinones and cardiac glycosides in it. The total phenolic content of these extracts was estimated quantitatively from standard calibration curve of gallic acid and it varied from 145 µg/mg in butanol extract to 45 µg/mg in petroleum ether extract. Conclusions It can be concluded that the plant has got a broad spectrum antimicrobial and antioxidant activity and could be used as a potential alternative for treating various diseases.

  15. The local production of 1,25(OH)2D3 promotes osteoblast and osteocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew G; Hanrath, Maarten A; Morris, Howard A; Atkins, Gerald J; Anderson, Paul H

    2014-10-01

    Maintenance of an adequate vitamin D status, as indicated by the level of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), is associated with higher bone mass and decreased risk of fracture. However, the molecular actions of vitamin D hormone (1,25(OH)2D3) in bone are complex, and include stimulation of osteoclastogenesis via RANK-ligand up-regulation, as well as the inhibition of mineralisation. We hypothesise that these divergent data may be reconciled by autocrine actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 which effect skeletal maintenance, as opposed to endocrine 1,25(OH)2D3 which acts to maintain serum calcium homeostasis. We have previously described local metabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3 within osteoblasts, with effects on gene expression and cell function. The aim of the current study was to investigate potential autocrine actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 within cells that exhibit osteocyte-like properties. Late osteoblastic MLO-A5 cells were cultured in the presence of 25(OH)D for 9 days with gene expression analysed pre- and post-mineralisation. Gene expression analysis revealed maturation within this time frame to an osteocyte-like stage, evidenced by increased Dmp1 and Phex mRNA expression. Expression of Cyp27b1 in 25(OH)D treated MLO-A5 cells was associated with elevated media levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 (p<0.05), induction of Cyp24a1 (p<0.001) and elevated ratios of Opg:Rankl mRNA (p<0.01). Chronic 25(OH)D exposure also increased osteocalcin mRNA in MLO-A5 cells, which contrasted with the dose-dependent inhibition of osteocalcin mRNA observed with acute treatment in MLO-Y4 cells (p<0.01). Treatment of MLO-Y4 cells with 25(OH)D also inhibited Phex mRNA expression (p<0.05), whilst Enpp1 gene expression was induced (p<0.01). Overall, the current study demonstrates that osteocyte-like cells convert physiological levels of 25(OH)D to 1,25(OH)2D3, with changes in gene expression that are consistent with increased osteocyte maturation. Although the physiological role of local metabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3

  16. Maize Varieties Released in Different Eras Have Similar Root Length Density Distributions in the Soil, Which Are Negatively Correlated with Local Concentrations of Soil Mineral Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Peng; Li, Sa; White, Philip J.; Li, Chunjian

    2015-01-01

    Larger, and deeper, root systems of new maize varieties, compared to older varieties, are thought to have enabled improved acquisition of soil resources and, consequently, greater grain yields. To compare the spatial distributions of the root systems of new and old maize varieties and their relationships with spatial variations in soil concentrations of available nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), two years of field experiments were performed using six Chinese maize varieties released in different eras. Vertical distributions of roots, and available N, P and K in the 0–60 cm soil profile were determined in excavated soil monoliths at silking and maturity. The results demonstrated that new maize varieties had larger root dry weight, higher grain yield and greater nutrient accumulation than older varieties. All varieties had similar total root length and vertical root distribution at silking, but newer varieties maintained greater total root length and had more roots in the 30–60 cm soil layers at maturity. The spatial variation of soil mineral N (Nmin) in each soil horizon was larger than that of Olsen-P and ammonium-acetate-extractable K, and was inversely correlated with root length density (RLD), especially in the 0–20 cm soil layer. It was concluded that greater acquisition of mineral nutrients and higher yields of newer varieties were associated with greater total root length at maturity. The negative relationship between RLD and soil Nmin at harvest for all varieties suggests the importance of the spatial distribution of the root system for N uptake by maize. PMID:25799291

  17. Mitigation of numerical Cerenkov radiation and instability using a hybrid finite difference-FFT Maxwell solver and a local charge conserving current deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Tableman, Adam; Decyk, Viktor K.; Tsung, Frank S.; Fiuza, Frederico; Davidson, Asher; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2015-12-01

    A hybrid Maxwell solver for fully relativistic and electromagnetic (EM) particle-in-cell (PIC) codes is described. In this solver, the EM fields are solved in k space by performing an FFT in one direction, while using finite difference operators in the other direction(s). This solver eliminates the numerical Cerenkov radiation for particles moving in the preferred direction. Moreover, the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) induced by the relativistically drifting plasma and beam can be eliminated using this hybrid solver by applying strategies that are similar to those recently developed for pure FFT solvers. A current correction is applied for the charge conserving current deposit to ensure that Gauss's Law is satisfied. A theoretical analysis of the dispersion properties in vacuum and in a drifting plasma for the hybrid solver is presented, and compared with PIC simulations with good agreement obtained. This hybrid solver is applied to both 2D and 3D Cartesian and quasi-3D (in which the fields and current are decomposed into azimuthal harmonics) geometries. Illustrative results for laser wakefield accelerator simulation in a Lorentz boosted frame using the hybrid solver in the 2D Cartesian geometry are presented, and compared against results from 2D UPIC-EMMA simulation which uses a pure spectral Maxwell solver, and from OSIRIS 2D lab frame simulation using the standard Yee solver. Very good agreement is obtained which demonstrates the feasibility of using the hybrid solver for high fidelity simulation of relativistically drifting plasma with no evidence of the numerical Cerenkov instability.

  18. Sclerostin Is a Locally Acting Regulator of Late-Osteoblast/Preosteocyte Differentiation and Regulates Mineralization Through a MEPE-ASARM-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Gerald J; Rowe, Peter S; Lim, Hui P; Welldon, Katie J; Ormsby, Renee; Wijenayaka, Asiri R; Zelenchuk, Lesya; Evdokiou, Andreas; Findlay, David M

    2012-01-01

    The identity of the cell type responsive to sclerostin, a negative regulator of bone mass, is unknown. Since sclerostin is expressed in vivo by mineral-embedded osteocytes, we tested the hypothesis that sclerostin would regulate the behavior of cells actively involved in mineralization in adult bone, the preosteocyte. Differentiating cultures of human primary osteoblasts exposed to recombinant human sclerostin (rhSCL) for 35 days displayed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of in vitro mineralization, with late cultures being most responsive in terms of mineralization and gene expression. Treatment of advanced (day 35) cultures with rhSCL markedly increased the expression of the preosteocyte marker E11 and decreased the expression of mature markers DMP1 and SOST. Concomitantly, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) expression was increased by rhSCL at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas PHEX was decreased, implying regulation through the MEPE-ASARM axis. We confirmed that mineralization by human osteoblasts is exquisitely sensitive to the triphosphorylated ASARM-PO4 peptide. Immunostaining revealed that rhSCL increased the endogenous levels of MEPE-ASARM. Importantly, antibody-mediated neutralization of endogenous MEPE-ASARM antagonized the effect of rhSCL on mineralization, as did the PHEX synthetic peptide SPR4. Finally, we found elevated Sost mRNA expression in the long bones of HYP mice, suggesting that sclerostin may drive the increased MEPE-ASARM levels and mineralization defect in this genotype. Our results suggest that sclerostin acts through regulation of the PHEX/MEPE axis at the preosteocyte stage and serves as a master regulator of physiologic bone mineralization, consistent with its localization in vivo and its established role in the inhibition of bone formation. PMID:21312267

  19. Local Heroes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uehling, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    As critics complain about higher education's shortcomings, trustees may need to communicate their institution's economic, cultural, and intellectual contributions to the local community. The most obvious and easily understood benefit is purchasing power, but it also contributes to small business growth, individual quality of life, the social,…

  20. Localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (also called morphea) is a term encompassing a spectrum of sclerotic autoimmune diseases that primarily affect the skin, but also might involve underlying structures such as the fat, fascia, muscle, and bones. Its exact pathogenesis is still unknown, but several trigger factors in genetically predisposed individuals might initially lead to an immunologically triggered release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, resulting in a profound dysregulation of the connective tissue metabolism and ultimately to induction of fibrosis. To date, there are no specific serological markers available for localized scleroderma. Within the last years, several validated clinical scores have been introduced as potential outcome measures for the disease. Given the rarity of localized scleroderma, only few evidence-based therapeutical treatment options exist. So far, the most robust data is available for ultraviolet A1 phototherapy in disease that is restricted to the skin, and methotrexate alone or in combination with systemic corticosteroids in more severe disease that additionally affects extracutaneous structures. This practical review summarizes relevant information on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical subtypes and classifications, differential diagnoses, clinical scores and outcome measures, and current treatment strategies of localized scleroderma. PMID:22741933

  1. Local Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the value of setting-specific research for action research in social psychology. Discusses the following concepts: (1) local variation; (2) seeing the general in the specific; (3) connectedness as the fundamental law of ecology; and (4) the value of field stations for community research. (JS)

  2. High-resolution Mn K -edge x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy study of the electronic and local structure of the three different phases in N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuerza, S.; García, J.; Subías, G.; Blasco, J.; Glatzel, P.

    2016-05-01

    N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 is particularly representative of mixed-valent manganites since their three characteristic macroscopic phases (charge-ordered insulator, ferromagnetic-metallic, and paramagnetic insulator) appear at different temperatures. We here report a complete x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy (XES-XAS) study of N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 as a function of temperature to investigate the electronic and local structure changes of the Mn atom in these three phases. Compared with the differences in the XES-XAS spectra between N d0.5S r0.5Mn O3 and the single-valent reference compounds NdMn O3 (M n3 + ) and Sr/CaMn O3 (M n4 + ), only modest changes have been obtained across the magnetoelectrical transitions. The XES spectra, including both the Mn Kα and Kβ emission lines, have mainly shown a subtle decrease in the local spin density accompanying the passage to the ferromagnetic-metallic phase. For the same phase, the small intensity variations in the pre-edge region of the high-resolution XAS spectra reflect an increase of the p -d mixing. The analysis of these XAS spectra imply a charge segregation between the two different Mn sites far from one electron, being in intermediate valences M n+3.5 ±δ /2(δ <0.2 e -) for all the phases. Our results indicate that the spin, charge, and geometrical structure of the Mn atom hardly change among the three macroscopic phases demonstrating the strong competition between the ferromagnetic conductor and the charge-ordered insulator behaviors in the manganites.

  3. Local site-effects for the city of Thessaloniki (N. Greece) using a 3-D finite-difference method: a case of complex dependence on source and model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlatoudis, A. A.; Papazachos, C. B.; Theodoulidis, N.; Kristek, J.; Moczo, P.

    2010-07-01

    The site effects of seismic motion in the metropolitan area of the city of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece) are investigated using a 3-D finite-difference modelling approach. Three different seismic scenarios are assumed with two different focal mechanisms for each one. Standard spectral ratios (SSR) are calculated from 3-D synthetics and compared with the ratios from the recorded motion, as well as ratios obtained from 1-D and 2-D modelling by other researchers. The average SSR curves from the six scenarios are in good agreement with the empirical ones, whereas the SSR results from 3-D modelling are different from those from 1-D modelling, exhibiting higher fundamental frequencies and larger amplification amplitudes, in much better agreement with observed SSR ratios. Comparisons of Fourier amplitude spectra obtained for various scenarios for the broader area of Thessaloniki show considerable dependence of the site effects on the source properties (position, depth and fault-plane solution), as well as on the local structure.

  4. Local hyperdynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F

    2013-10-14

    We present a new formulation of the hyperdynamics method in which the biasing effect is local, making it suitable for large systems. In standard hyperdynamics, the requirement that the bias potential be zero everywhere on the dividing surface bounding the state has the consequence that as the system size increases the boost factor decays to unity, regardless of the form of the bias potential. In the new method, the bias force on each atom is obtained by differentiating a local bias energy that depends only on the coordinates of atoms within a finite range of this atom. This bias force is thus independent of the bias force in distant parts of the system, providing a method that gives a constant boost factor, independent of the system size. We demonstrate for some realistic atomistic systems that the method gives escape rates in excellent agreement with direct molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24116606

  5. Ergodicity breaking and localization.

    PubMed

    Geneston, Elvis; Tuladhar, Rohisha; Beig, M T; Bologna, Mauro; Grigolini, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    We study the joint action of the non-Poisson renewal events (NPR) yielding Continuous-time random walk (CTRW) with index α<1 and two different generators of Hurst coefficient H≠0.5, one generating fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and another scaled Brownian motion (SBM). We discuss the ergodicity breaking emerging from these joint actions and we find that in both cases the adoption of time averages leads to localization. In the case of the joint action of NPR and SBM, localization occurs when SBM would produce subdiffusion. The joint action of NPR and FBM, on the contrary, may lead to localization when FBM is a source of superdiffusion. The joint action of NPR and FBM is equivalent to extending the CTRW to the case where the jumps of the runner are correlated and we argue that the the memory-induced localization requires a refinement of the theoretical perspective about determinism and randomness. PMID:27575105

  6. Ergodicity breaking and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geneston, Elvis; Tuladhar, Rohisha; Beig, M. T.; Bologna, Mauro; Grigolini, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    We study the joint action of the non-Poisson renewal events (NPR) yielding Continuous-time random walk (CTRW) with index α <1 and two different generators of Hurst coefficient H ≠0.5 , one generating fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and another scaled Brownian motion (SBM). We discuss the ergodicity breaking emerging from these joint actions and we find that in both cases the adoption of time averages leads to localization. In the case of the joint action of NPR and SBM, localization occurs when SBM would produce subdiffusion. The joint action of NPR and FBM, on the contrary, may lead to localization when FBM is a source of superdiffusion. The joint action of NPR and FBM is equivalent to extending the CTRW to the case where the jumps of the runner are correlated and we argue that the the memory-induced localization requires a refinement of the theoretical perspective about determinism and randomness.

  7. Vitamin D represses dentin matrix protein 1 in cementoblasts and osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Nociti, F H; Foster, B L; Tran, A B; Dunn, D; Presland, R B; Wang, L; Bhattacharyya, N; Collins, M T; Somerman, M J

    2014-02-01

    Calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is achieved by interplay among hormones, including 1,25(OH)2D3 (1,25D), parathyroid hormone, and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), and their interactions with other proteins. For example, mutations in dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) result in increased FGF23 and hypophosphatemic rickets. 1,25D is reported to modulate FGF23; thus, we hypothesized that 1,25D may be involved in modulating DMP-1 in an intermediary step. Murine cementoblasts (OCCM-30) and osteocyte-like cells (MLO-Y4 and MLO-A5), known to express DMP-1, were used to analyze effects of 1,25D on DMP-1 expression in vitro. DMP-1 mRNA levels decreased by 50% (p < .05) in the presence of 1,25D in all cell types, while use of a vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonist (EB1089) and antagonist (23S,25S)-DLAM-2P confirmed that VDR pathway activation was required for this response. Further analysis showed that histone deacetylase recruitment was necessary, but neither protein kinase A nor C pathways were required. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that 1,25D regulates DMP-1 expression through a VDR-dependent mechanism, possibly contributing to local changes in bone/tooth mineral homeostasis. PMID:24334408

  8. Local Molecular Orbitals from a Projection onto Localized Centers.

    PubMed

    Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-06-14

    A localization method for molecular orbitals is presented which exploits the locality of the eigenfunctions associated with the largest eigenvalues of the matrix representation of spatially localized functions. Local molecular orbitals are obtained by a projection of the canonical orbitals onto the set of the eigenvectors which correspond to the largest eigenvalues of these matrices. Two different types of spatially localized functions were chosen in this work, a two-parameter smooth-step-type function and the weight functions determined by a Hirshfeld partitioning of the molecular volume. It is shown that the method can provide fairly local occupied molecular orbitals if the positions of the set of local functions are set to the molecular bond centers. The method can also yield reasonably well-localized virtual molecular orbitals, but here, a sensible choice of the positions of the functions are the atomic sites and the locality then depends more strongly on the shape of the set of local functions. The method is tested for a range of polypeptide molecules in two different conformations, namely, a helical and a β-sheet conformation. Futhermore, it is shown that an adequate locality of the occupied and virtual orbitals can also be obtained for highly delocalized systems. PMID:27164445

  9. Localized Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... patches of skin thickening with different degrees of pigment changes. Some areas are dark while others are ... could remain permanent. This is because the increased pigment persists in the deeper portions of the skin ...

  10. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    , in response to Griffiths' challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has described is flawed.

  11. The two neutrophil plasma membrane markers alkaline phosphatase and HLA class I antigen localize differently in granule-deficient cytoplasts. An ideal plasma membrane marker in human neutrophils is still lacking.

    PubMed

    Pellmé, Sara; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-08-31

    Neutrophil function relies largely on the ability of the cell to mobilize its different granules and vesicles to the cell surface and thereby expose and/or release effector molecules to the surrounding tissue. To properly identify these subcellular compartments is thus a prerequisite for studies of neutrophil physiology. A range of specific markers for the classical granules is available, but finding optimal markers for the secretory vesicles and plasma membrane has historically been more challenging. Latent and non-latent alkaline phosphatase activities are often used to distinguish these two light membrane structures, but the outcome using this technique depends on the level of cellular activation. Therefore, HLA-I was introduced some years ago as a specific, stimulation-independent marker for the plasma membrane. In this study we however report that detailed fractionation studies of neutrophil cytoplasts, lacking secretory vesicles, granules and other dense organelles, reveal that the HLA-I antigen is not only co-localizing with the plasma membrane marker ALP, but is also present in other, more dense organelles. Further, we found the mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), detecting the beta(2)-microglobulin/HLA-I complex, to be negatively influenced by uncomplexed beta(2)-microglobulin present in the specific granules and secretory vesicles, making it difficult to use HLA-I as a plasma membrane marker during maturation of for example phagolysosomes. PMID:17673253

  12. Chemical applicability domain of the Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) for skin sensitisation potency. Part 3. Apparent discrepancies between LLNA and GPMT sensitisation potential: False positives or differences in sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Roberts, David W; Schultz, Terry W; Api, Anne Marie

    2016-10-01

    The Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) is the gold standard regulatory toxicology test for skin sensitisation along with the guinea pig maximisation test (GPMT). Compared with the GPMT, LLNA uses fewer animals, it is quantitative, and it gives a numerical prediction of potency. However several concerns have been raised with this assay, mainly related to false positives and false negatives. Over the years, many authors, including the developers of the assay, have presented cases where there have been discrepancies between the GMPT and LLNA results. Several theories have been put forward for these discrepancies, the main one being the "over-sensitivity" of the GPMT. This paper analyses the data from a systematic study, published in three papers from 2008 to 2011, covering several classes of chemicals, in particular unsaturated fatty acids, sugar surfactants and ethoxylated alcohols, with many cases of chemicals testing positive in the LLNA being negative in the GPMT. Based on consideration of reaction chemistry and structural alerts, it is concluded that these discrepancies are not LLNA false positives, but can be rationalised in terms of the different protocols of the assays. PMID:27477089

  13. Local relativistic exact decoupling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Daoling; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-28

    We present a systematic hierarchy of approximations for local exact decoupling of four-component quantum chemical Hamiltonians based on the Dirac equation. Our ansatz reaches beyond the trivial local approximation that is based on a unitary transformation of only the atomic block-diagonal part of the Hamiltonian. Systematically, off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix blocks can be subjected to a unitary transformation to yield relativistically corrected matrix elements. The full hierarchy is investigated with respect to the accuracy reached for the electronic energy and for selected molecular properties on a balanced test molecule set that comprises molecules with heavy elements in different bonding situations. Our atomic (local) assembly of the unitary exact-decoupling transformation--called local approximation to the unitary decoupling transformation (DLU)--provides an excellent local approximation for any relativistic exact-decoupling approach. Its order-N(2) scaling can be further reduced to linear scaling by employing a neighboring-atomic-blocks approximation. Therefore, DLU is an efficient relativistic method well suited for relativistic calculations on large molecules. If a large molecule contains many light atoms (typically hydrogen atoms), the computational costs can be further reduced by employing a well-defined nonrelativistic approximation for these light atoms without significant loss of accuracy. We also demonstrate that the standard and straightforward transformation of only the atomic block-diagonal entries in the Hamiltonian--denoted diagonal local approximation to the Hamiltonian (DLH) in this paper--introduces an error that is on the order of the error of second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (i.e., DKH2) when compared with exact-decoupling results. Hence, the local DLH approximation would be pointless in an exact-decoupling framework, but can be efficiently employed in combination with the fast to evaluate DKH2 Hamiltonian in order to speed up calculations

  14. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  15. Statistical signatures of photon localization

    PubMed

    Chabanov; Stoytchev; Genack

    2000-04-20

    The realization that electron localization in disordered systems (Anderson localization) is ultimately a wave phenomenon has led to the suggestion that photons could be similarly localized by disorder. This conjecture attracted wide interest because the differences between photons and electrons--in their interactions, spin statistics, and methods of injection and detection--may open a new realm of optical and microwave phenomena, and allow a detailed study of the Anderson localization transition undisturbed by the Coulomb interaction. To date, claims of three-dimensional photon localization have been based on observations of the exponential decay of the electromagnetic wave as it propagates through the disordered medium. But these reports have come under close scrutiny because of the possibility that the decay observed may be due to residual absorption, and because absorption itself may suppress localization. Here we show that the extent of photon localization can be determined by a different approach--measurement of the relative size of fluctuations of certain transmission quantities. The variance of relative fluctuations accurately reflects the extent of localization, even in the presence of absorption. Using this approach, we demonstrate photon localization in both weakly and strongly scattering quasi-one-dimensional dielectric samples and in periodic metallic wire meshes containing metallic scatterers, while ruling it out in three-dimensional mixtures of aluminium spheres. PMID:10786786

  16. Localized RNAs and their functions.

    PubMed

    Ding, D; Lipshitz, H D

    1993-10-01

    The eukaryotic cell is partitioned by membranes into spatially and functionally discrete subcellular organelles. In addition, the cytoplasm itself is partitioned into discrete subregions that carry out specific functions. Such compartmentation can be achieved by localizing proteins and RNAs to different subcellular regions. This review will focus on localized RNAs, with a particular emphasis on RNA localization mechanisms and on the possible biological functions of localization of these RNAs. In recent years, an increasing number of localized RNAs have been identified in a variety of cell types among many animal species. Emphasis here will be on localized RNAs in the most intensively studied systems-Drosophila and Xenopus eggs and early embryos. PMID:7506023

  17. Localized structure of Euglena bioconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iima, Makoto; Shoji, Erika; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku; Izumi, Shunsuke; Hiroshima University Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Bioconvection of a suspension of Euglena gracilis, a photosensitive flagellate whose body length is approximately 50 micrometers, was experimentally studied. Under strong light intensity, Euglena has a negative phototaxis; they tend to go away from the light source. When the bright illumination is given from the bottom, a large scale spatio-temporal pattern is generated as a result of interaction between Euglena and surrounding flow. Recently, localized convection pattern had been reported, however, the generation process and interaction of the localized convection cells has not been analyzed. We performed experimental study to understand the localization mechanism, in particular, the onset of bioconvection and lateral localization behavior due to phototaxis. Experiments started from different initial condition suggests a bistability near the onset of the convection as binary fluid convection that also shows localized convection cells. Dynamics of localized convections cells, which is similar to the binary fluid convection case although the basic equations are not the same, is also reported.

  18. Climate adaptation: Cultural knowledge and local risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    A focus on African American communities on the Eastern Shore of Maryland highlights the ways that local cultural knowledge differs from place to place, developing understanding of local climate risks and resources for adaptation.

  19. Symbolic local information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Haruna, T.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the permutation-information theoretic approach has been used in a broad range of research fields. In particular, in the study of high-dimensional dynamical systems, it has been shown that this approach can be effective in characterizing global properties, including the complexity of their spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we show that this approach can also be applied to reveal local spatiotemporal profiles of distributed computations existing at each spatiotemporal point in the system. J. T. Lizier et al. have recently introduced the concept of local information dynamics, which consists of information storage, transfer, and modification. This concept has been intensively studied with regard to cellular automata, and has provided quantitative evidence of several characteristic behaviors observed in the system. In this paper, by focusing on the local information transfer, we demonstrate that the application of the permutation-information theoretic approach, which introduces natural symbolization methods, makes the concept easily extendible to systems that have continuous states. We propose measures called symbolic local transfer entropies, and apply these measures to two test models, the coupled map lattice (CML) system and the Bak-Sneppen model (BS-model), to show their relevance to spatiotemporal systems that have continuous states. In the CML, we demonstrate that it can be successfully used as a spatiotemporal filter to stress a coherent structure buried in the system. In particular, we show that the approach can clearly stress out defect turbulences or Brownian motion of defects from the background, which gives quantitative evidence suggesting that these moving patterns are the information transfer substrate in the spatiotemporal system. We then show that these measures reveal qualitatively different properties from the conventional approach using the sliding window method, and are also robust against external noise. In the BS-model, we demonstrate that

  20. Acoustic source localization.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Tribikram

    2014-01-01

    In this article different techniques for localizing acoustic sources are described and the advantages/disadvantages of these techniques are discussed. Some source localization techniques are restricted to isotropic structures while other methods can be applied to anisotropic structures as well. Some techniques require precise knowledge of the direction dependent velocity profiles in the anisotropic body while other techniques do not require that knowledge. Some methods require accurate values of the time of arrival of the acoustic waves at the receivers while other techniques can function without that information. Published papers introducing various techniques emphasize the advantages of the introduced techniques while ignoring and often not mentioning the limitations and weaknesses of the new techniques. What is lacking in the literature is a comprehensive review and comparison of the available techniques; this article attempts to do that. After reviewing various techniques the paper concludes which source localization technique should be most effective for what type of structure and what the current research needs are. PMID:23870388

  1. Fermion localization on thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Tempo, Jose David

    2006-02-15

    We consider chiral fermion confinement in scalar thick branes, which are known to localize gravity, coupled through a Yukawa term. The conditions for the confinement and their behavior in the thin-wall limit are found for various different BPS branes, including double walls and branes interpolating between different AdS{sub 5} spacetimes. We show that only one massless chiral mode is localized in all these walls, whenever the wall thickness is keep finite. We also show that, independently of wall's thickness, chiral fermionic modes cannot be localized in dS{sub 4} walls embedded in a M{sub 5} spacetime. Finally, massive fermions in double wall spacetimes are also investigated. We find that, besides the massless chiral mode localization, these double walls support quasilocalized massive modes of both chiralities.

  2. Stress Localization in Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, Sarah; Evans, Arthur; Bende, Nakul; Hayward, Ryan; Santangelo, Christian

    Upon indentation, thin shells react by localizing strain energy in polygonal structures as opposed to a uniform axisymmetric distribution. While the formation of these localized structures are well-characterized for perfect shells, a change in shell thickness or the introduction of a crease fundamentally changes the nature of the shell deformation. We perform finite element simulations, in tandem with experiments to explore the effect of different shell geometries on the energy landscape. We find that the crease induces a new symmetry-breaking localization that does not appear in perfect shells, and we explore the deformation characteristics of the creased shell over a wide range of crease radii, and crease orientations.

  3. Local Government Uses of Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    The local government cable access channel is essentially a television station completely controlled by the local government. It differs from a local broadcast television station by being able to reach only those places which are connected to the cable system, having much less programming distribution costs, and having the capacity to deliver…

  4. Localization model for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas A.; Matin, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-01

    Normal hearing persons are able to localize the direction of sounds better using both ears than when listening with only one ear. Localization ability is dependent on auditory system perception of interaural differences in time, intensity, and phase. Interaural timing differences (ITDs) provide information for locating direction of low and mid frequency sounds, while interaural level differences (ILDs), which occur because of the horizontal plane shadowing effect of the head, provide information for locating direction of higher frequency sounds. The head related transfer function (HRTF) contains characteristic information important for acoustic localization. Models based on HRTFs take into account head shadow, torso, and pinna effects, and their impact on interaural frequency, level, and timing differences. Cochlear implants (CIs) have proven a successful treatment for persons with bilateral severe to profound hearing loss. A problem is that only some ITD and ILD cues are maintained with CI sound processing, and the microphone position alters the acoustic cues. The relative impact of differences in physical cues received by the auditory system with bilateral CIs versus differences in the ability of the damaged auditory nervous system to process bilateral inputs is not yet clear. The model presented in this paper was constructed as a step toward answering this question, and is intended to serve as a tool for future development of more optimal signal processing algorithms that may provide better localization ability for persons with bilateral CIs.

  5. Different Disciplines, Different Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Leigh; Solomonides, Ian

    2008-01-01

    There is not just one mathematics taught at university level, nor is there one group of students. Mathematics is taught differently depending on the discipline and the perceived background of the student. There is engineering mathematics for the students heading towards engineering degrees, life science mathematics for those heading towards…

  6. Local reaction kinetics by imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchorski, Yuri; Rupprechter, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution we present an overview of our recent studies using the "kinetics by imaging" approach for CO oxidation on heterogeneous model systems. The method is based on the correlation of the PEEM image intensity with catalytic activity: scaled down to the μm-sized surface regions, such correlation allows simultaneous local kinetic measurements on differently oriented individual domains of a polycrystalline metal-foil, including the construction of local kinetic phase diagrams. This allows spatially- and component-resolved kinetic studies and, e.g., a direct comparison of inherent catalytic properties of Pt(hkl)- and Pd(hkl)-domains or supported μm-sized Pd-powder agglomerates, studies of the local catalytic ignition and the role of defects and grain boundaries in the local reaction kinetics.

  7. Local reaction kinetics by imaging☆

    PubMed Central

    Suchorski, Yuri; Rupprechter, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution we present an overview of our recent studies using the “kinetics by imaging” approach for CO oxidation on heterogeneous model systems. The method is based on the correlation of the PEEM image intensity with catalytic activity: scaled down to the μm-sized surface regions, such correlation allows simultaneous local kinetic measurements on differently oriented individual domains of a polycrystalline metal-foil, including the construction of local kinetic phase diagrams. This allows spatially- and component-resolved kinetic studies and, e.g., a direct comparison of inherent catalytic properties of Pt(hkl)- and Pd(hkl)-domains or supported μm-sized Pd-powder agglomerates, studies of the local catalytic ignition and the role of defects and grain boundaries in the local reaction kinetics. PMID:26865736

  8. Sunscreens and T4N5 liposomes differ in their ability to protect against ultraviolet-induced sunburn cell formation, alterations of dendritic epidermal cells, and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P; Cox, P; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1995-02-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation can lead to diverse biologic effects, including inflammation, sunburn cell formation, alterations of cutaneous immune cells, and impaired induction of contact hypersensitivity responses. The molecular mechanisms of these UV-induced effects are not completely understood. We investigated the ability of sunscreens and liposomes containing the DNA excision repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V to prevent these effects of UV radiation. The use of T4N5 liposomes, which increase the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, provides an approach for assessing the role of DNA damage in the effects of UV radiation on the skin. Exposing C3H mice to 500 mJ/cm2 UVB radiation from FS40 sunlamps resulted in skin edema, sunburn cell formation, and morphologic alterations and decreased numbers of Langerhans cells and Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal T cells. In addition, the induction of contact hypersensitivity after application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene on UV-irradiated skin was diminished by 80%. Applying sunscreens containing octyl-N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoate, 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate, or benzophenone-3 before this dose of UV irradiation gave nearly complete protection against all of these effects of UV irradiation. In contrast, topical application of T4N5 liposomes after UV irradiation had no effect on UV-induced skin edema and only partially protected against sunburn cell formation and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity, although its ability to protect against alterations in dendritic immune cells was comparable to that of the sunscreens. These results suggest that DNA damage is involved in only some of the local effects of UV radiation on the skin. In addition, T4N5 liposomes may be a useful adjunct to sunscreens because they can reduce some of the deleterious effects of UV radiation on skin even after a sunburn has been initiated. PMID:7829886

  9. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially–locally

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. Schütz, M.

    2015-06-15

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, “local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate].” This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835–871 (2012)], relying on the “spectral flow technique” or “quasi-adiabatic continuation” [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique “bulk ground state” or “topological quantum order.” We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  10. Local and Non-⁠local Mechanisms of Polar Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, V. A.; Jackson, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Polar amplification (PA) is a prominent feature of currently observed and predicted future climate change suggested by both observations and models. Surface albedo feedback (SAF) has been shown to contribute prominently to the currently observed PA along with other mechanisms, e.g. involving atmospheric heat transport. SAF is believed to be a strong positive local feedback, while the atmospheric heat transport makes the connection between the Arctic and the low latitudes non-local. We will discuss several PA mechanisms and feedbacks suggested by different researchers. We will also discuss a more general method of feedback analysis that results in feedback and gain matrices. These matrices generalize (both globally and locally) the classically defined numerical gains and feedback factors and are independent of the applied forcing. The gain matrix, in particular, is shown to reveal, under any forcing scenario, the global pattern by which a given feedback process amplifies or dampens fixed-feedback temperature anomalies. Moreover, in the case of a feedback process that is not purely a function of local temperature, these matrices will show the degree to which this "local feedback process" depends on non-local perturbations. We apply this method in the context of a simple box model as well as a one-dimensional energy balance climate model.

  11. Headphone localization of speech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional acoustic display systems have recently been developed that synthesize virtual sound sources over headphones based on filtering by head-related transfer functions (HRTFs), the direction-dependent spectral changes caused primarily by the pinnae. In this study, 11 inexperienced subjects judged the apparent spatial location of headphone-presented speech stimuli filtered with nonindividualized HRTFs. About half of the subjects 'pulled' their judgments toward either the median or the lateral-vertical planes, and estimates were almost always elevated. Individual differences were pronounced for the distance judgments; 15 to 46 percent of stimuli were heard inside the head, with the shortest estimates near the median plane. The results suggest that most listeners can obtain useful azimuth information from speech stimuli filtered by nonindividualized HRTFs. Measurements of localization error and reversal rates are comparable with a previous study that used broadband noise stimuli.

  12. Sleep locally, act globally.

    PubMed

    Rattenborg, Niels C; Lima, Steven L; Lesku, John A

    2012-10-01

    In most animals, sleep is considered a global brain and behavioral state. However, recent intracortical recordings have shown that aspects of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and wakefulness can occur simultaneously in different parts of the cortex in mammals, including humans. Paradoxically, however, NREM sleep still manifests as a global behavioral shutdown. In this review, the authors examine this paradox from an evolutionary perspective. On the basis of strategic modeling, they suggest that in animals with brains composed of heavily interconnected and functionally interdependent units, a global regulator of sleep maintains the behavioral shutdown that defines sleep and thereby ensures that local use-dependent functions are performed in a safe and efficient manner. This novel perspective has implications for understanding deficits in human cognitive performance resulting from sleep deprivation, sleep disorders such as sleepwalking, changes in consciousness that occur during sleep, and the function of sleep itself. PMID:22572533

  13. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  14. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  15. Time to Go Local!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Time to Go Local! Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take you to information about ...

  16. Local network assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, D. V.

    1985-04-01

    Local networks, related standards activities of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers the American National Standards Institute and other elements are presented. These elements include: (1) technology choices such as topology, transmission media, and access protocols; (2) descriptions of standards for the 802 local area networks (LAN's); high speed local networks (HSLN's) and military specification local networks; and (3) intra- and internetworking using bridges and gateways with protocols Interconnection (OSI) reference model. The convergence of LAN/PBX technology is also described.

  17. Atom localization with double-cascade configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, Maksim Yu; Efremova, Ekaterina A.; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri V.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) atom localization of a four-level system in a double-cascade configuration. We demonstrate the possibility of 1D localization in the field of a standing wave, 2D localization in the field of two standing waves and 2D localization only in the field of running waves by using different configurations of driven waves on transitions. In addition, for each configuration we reached a high-precision atom localization in one of the states at scales much smaller than the wavelength of the incident optical radiation.

  18. Texture classification by local rank correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, D.; Subbarao, M.; Davis, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to texture classification based on local rank correlation is proposed here. Its performance is compared with Laws' method which uses local convolution with feature masks. In the experiments, texture samples are classified based on their distribution of local statistics, either rank correlations or convolutions. The new method achieves generally optimal classification rates. It appears to be more robust because local order statistics are unaffected by local sample differences due to monotonic shifts of texture gray values and are less sensitive to noise.

  19. Increased localization precision by interference fringe analysis.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Carl G; Meiri, Amihai; Martineau, Jason; Zalevsky, Zeev; Gerton, Jordan M; Menon, Rajesh

    2015-06-21

    We report a novel optical single-emitter-localization methodology that uses the phase induced by path length differences in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to improve localization precision. Using information theory, we demonstrate that the localization capability of a modified Fourier domain signal generated by photon interference enables a more precise localization compared to a standard Gaussian intensity distribution of the corresponding point-spread function. The calculations were verified by numerical simulations and an exemplary experiment, where the centers of metal nanoparticles were localized to a precision of 3 nm. PMID:25999093

  20. Learning from Software Localization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, She-Sen

    2003-01-01

    Localization is the process of adapting a product to meet the language, cultural and other requirements of a specific target environment or market. This article describes ways in which software localization impacts upon curriculum, and discusses what students will learn from software localization. (AEF)

  1. Operator Localization of Virtual Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Menges, Brian M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Errors in the localization of nearby virtual objects presented via see-through, helmet mounted displays are examined as a function of viewing conditions and scene content. Monocular, biocular or stereoscopic presentation of the virtual objects, accommodation (required focus), subjects'age, and the position of physical surfaces are examined. Nearby physical surfaces are found to introduce localization errors that differ depending upon the other experimental factors. The apparent physical size and transparency of the virtual objects and physical surfaces respectively are also influenced by their relative position when superimposed. Design implications are discussed.

  2. Sex Differences in Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairweather, Hugh

    1976-01-01

    Sex differences in cognitive skills, grouped into motor, spatial and linguistic areas, are assessed in relation to current theories of cerebral lateralization. Few convincing sex differences exist, either overall, or in interactions with functional localization. Qualifying criteria include age, birth order, culture, sex of experimenter and sex…

  3. THz Local Oscillator Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Schlecht, Erich; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Siegel, Peter H.

    Most operational Submillimeter-wave radio telescopes, both space borne and ground based, employ local oscillator sources based on Gunn diodes followed by whisker contacted Schottky multipliers. Enough progress, however, has been made on a number of fronts to conclude that next generation of radio telescopes that become operational in the new Millennium will have a different local oscillator (LO) generation architecture. MMIC power amplifiers with impressive gain in the Ka- to-W band have enabled the use of microwave synthesizers which can then be actively multiplied to provide a frequency agile power source beyond 100 GHz. This medium power millimeter source can then be amplified to enable efficient pumping of follow-on balanced multiplier stages. Input power to the multipliers can be further enhanced by power combining to achieve close to half a Watt at W-band. An 800 GHz three-stage multiplier chain, implemented this way has demonstrated a peak output power of 1 mW. A second advance in LO generation lies in the Schottky diode varactor technology. Planar Schottky diode multipliers have now been demonstrated up to 1500 GHz and it can be assumed that most of the future multiplier chains will be based on these robust devices rather than the whisker contacted diode of the past. The ability to produce planar GaAs diode chips deep into the THz range, with submicron dimensions, has opened up a wide range of circuit design space which can be taken advantage of to improve efficiency, bandwidth, and power handling capability of the multipliers. A third breakthrough has been the demonstration of photonic based LO sources utilizing GaAs photomixers. These sources, though not yet implemented in robust space borne missions, offer a number of advantages over their electronic counterparts, including extremely broad tuning, fiber coupled components, and solid-state implementation. Another development, which holds some promise, is the use of micro-machining technology to implement

  4. Modeling the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. P.

    Modeling the Local Bubble is one of those activities fraught with danger. It is very easy to be too naive, to fail to consider the dependence of the model on assumptions about the nearby ambient state, or the likelihood of such a structure. It is similarly easy to become so caught up in the details of the vicinity that it is unclear where to begin a necessarily idealized modeling effort. And finally, it is important to remember that the data we have may in some cases be lying to us, and that we have not yet learned to read their facial expressions quite carefully enough. That said, I've tried in this paper to be helpful to those who may wish to take the risks. I surveyed the very most basic stories that the data seem to tell, and pointed out the standard coincidences that may be telling us a lot about what is happening, but may turn out once again to have been just coincidences. I've described 5 distinct conceptions that in one flavor or another pretty well survey the collection of mental images that have so far been carried by those who've attempted models. One may be right, or something entirely different may be more appropriate. It's at least vital to realize that a conception comes first, followed by a simplified model of details. I've also included a long list of questions directed at observers. Some have partial answers, some one wouldn't know today quite how to approach. But it is a list that students of the soft x-ray background, interstellar absorption lines, possible instrumentation, and the heliosphere may wish to review from time to time, just to see whether they can figure out how to be more helpful. There is another list for modelers, things the models must address, however-so-flimsily if necessary, because there are strong observational constraints (and stronger ones coming) on what can and cannot be present in the local ISM. To that I've added a few remarks concerning x-ray emission coming from beyond the Local Bubble, and another few on how x

  5. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Nonlinear Local Lyapunov Exponent and Quantification of Local Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rui-Qiang; Li, Jian-Ping; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2008-05-01

    Nonlinear local Lyapunov exponent (NLLE) is applied to quantitatively determine the local predictability limit of chaotic systems. As an example, we find that the local predictability limit of Henon attractor varies considerably with time, and some underlying phase-spatial structure does not appear. The local predictability limit of initially adjacent points in phase space may be completely different. This will cause difficulties in making the long-time analogue forecast.

  6. Sound localization in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Hilary S; Carr, Catherine E

    2015-11-01

    In early tetrapods, it is assumed that the tympana were acoustically coupled through the pharynx and therefore inherently directional, acting as pressure difference receivers. The later closure of the middle ear cavity in turtles, archosaurs, and mammals is a derived condition, and would have changed the ear by decoupling the tympana. Isolation of the middle ears would then have led to selection for structural and neural strategies to compute sound source localization in both archosaurs and mammalian ancestors. In the archosaurs (birds and crocodilians) the presence of air spaces in the skull provided connections between the ears that have been exploited to improve directional hearing, while neural circuits mediating sound localization are well developed. In this review, we will focus primarily on directional hearing in crocodilians, where vocalization and sound localization are thought to be ecologically important, and indicate important issues still awaiting resolution. PMID:26048335

  7. A comparative study of the local cytokine response in the lungs of pigs experimentally infected with different PRRSV-1 strains: upregulation of IL-1α in highly pathogenic strain induced lesions.

    PubMed

    Amarilla, Shyrley P; Gómez-Laguna, Jaime; Carrasco, Librado; Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M; Caridad Y Ocerín, José M; Morgan, Sophie B; Graham, Simon P; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Drew, Trevor W; Salguero, Francisco J

    2015-04-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses (PRRSV) show high genetic differences both among and within genotypes. Recently, several highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strains have been described. This study compares and characterizes the production of cytokines by pulmonary macrophages in pigs experimentally infected with four different PRRSV-1 strains: two low-virulent strains, Lelystad (LV) and a British field strain (215-06); a HP strain (SU1-bel) from Belarus and the attenuated vaccine strain DV (Porcilis(®) PRRS). Animals were clinically monitored and post-mortem examinations were performed at 3, 7 and 35 days post-infection (dpi). Lung samples were processed for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies by using specific antibodies against PRRSV, IL1-α, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10 and IFN-γ. SU1-bel infected animals presented the highest mean scores for clinical observations, gross and microscopic lesions as well as for PRRSV expression compared with the other infected groups (p≤0.027). These animals displayed the highest expression of IL1-α at 7dpi, together with the highest score for lung pathology, whereas LV, 215-06 and DV inoculated animals only showed a transient enhancement in some of these cytokines. SU1-bel-infected pigs showed a positive correlation between the amount of PRRSV antigen and IL-1α expression (r=0.645, p<0.001). The highest expression of IL-10 was detected in 215-06-infected animals (p≤0.004), with a positive correlation with the numbers of virus-infected cells (r=0.375, p≤0.013). In conclusion, the HP-PRRSV SU1-bel strain replicated more efficiently in the lung of infected animals and induced a higher expression of IL-1α than the other PRRSV-1-infected groups, which may have played a key role in the onset of the clinical signs and interstitial pneumonia. PMID:25739319

  8. The structure and vibrational spectra of the 2,5-dimethylpyrazine (2,5-DMP) 1:1 adduct with 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone (CLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Sawka-Dobrowolska, W.; Bator, G.; Sobczyk, L.; Grech, E.; Nowicka-Scheibe, J.

    2011-02-01

    The complexation of 2,5-dimethylpyrazine (2,5-DMP) with 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone (CLA) leads to the formation of the hydrogen bonded OH⋯N infinite chains without any proton transfer. In the high and medium frequency region of the IR spectra a characteristic Hadži's trio with maxima at ca. 2400, 1800 and 1150 cm -1 is observed. The infrared, Raman and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra are compared with those calculated by using the DFT methods applied to the crystalline state. The optimization of the structure by using this theoretical approach is also performed. Very good conformity of the experimental and theoretical structures is visible. The reproduction of vibrational spectra is also good except for the low frequency bands related to the CH 3 torsional modes. One gets relatively good agreement by using PWC(dnp) approach. Applications of other theoretical models leads to much higher values of CH 3 torsional frequency.

  9. Localization and Quantitative Co-localization of Enamelin with Amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, Victoria; Chen, Lisha; Yang, Xiudong; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Enamelin and amelogenin are vital proteins in enamel formation. The cooperative function of these two proteins controls crystal nucleation and morphology in vitro. We quantitatively analyzed the co-localization between enamelin and amelogenin by confocal microscopy and using two antibodies, one raised against a sequence in the porcine 32 kDa enamelin region and the other raised against full-length recombinant mouse amelogenin. We further investigated the interaction of the porcine 32 kDa enamelin and recombinant amelogenin using immuno-gold labeling. This study reports the quantitative co-localization results for postnatal days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 mandibular mouse molars. We show that amelogenin and enamelin are secreted into the extracellular matrix on the cuspal slopes of the molars at day 1 and that secretion continues to at least day 8. Quantitative co-localization analysis (QCA) was performed in several different configurations using large (45 μm height, 33 μm width) and small (7 μm diameter) regions of interest to elucidate any patterns. Co-localization patterns in day 8 samples revealed that enamelin and amelogenin co-localize near the secretory face of the ameloblasts and appear to be secreted approximately in a 1:1 ratio. The degree of co-localization decreases as the enamel matures, both along the secretory face of ameloblasts and throughout the entire thickness of the enamel. Immuno-reactivity against enamelin is concentrated along the secretory face of ameloblasts, supporting the theory that this protein together with amelogenin is intimately involved in mineral induction at the beginning of enamel formation. PMID:23563189

  10. Socio-economic differences and health seeking behaviour for the diagnosis and treatment of malaria: a case study of four local government areas operating the Bamako initiative programme in south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Uzochukwu, Benjamin SC; Onwujekwe, Obinna E

    2004-01-01

    Background Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Nigeria. It is not known how user fees introduced under the Bamako Initiative (BI) system affect healthcare seeking among different socio-economic groups in Nigeria for diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Reliable information is needed to initiate new policy thrusts to protect the poor from the adverse effect of user fees. Methods Structured questionnaires were used to collect information from 1594 female household primary care givers or household head on their socio-economic and demographic status and use of malaria diagnosis and treatment services. Principal components analysis was used to create a socio-economic status index which was decomposed into quartiles and chi-square for trends was used to calculate for any statistical difference. Results The study showed that self diagnosis was the commonest form of diagnosis by the respondents. This was followed by diagnosis through laboratory tests, community health workers, family members and traditional healers. The initial choice of care for malaria was a visit to the patent medicine dealers for most respondents. This was followed by visit to the government hospitals, the BI health centres, traditional medicine healers, private clinics, community health workers and does nothing at home. Furthermore, the private health facilities were the initial choice of treatment for the majority with a decline among those choosing them as a second source of care and an increase in the utilization of public health facilities as a second choice of care. Self diagnosis was practiced more by the poorer households while the least poor used the patent medicine dealers and community health workers less often for diagnosis of malaria. The least poor groups had a higher probability of seeking treatment at the BI health centres (creating equity problem in BI), hospitals, and private clinics and in using laboratory procedures. The least poor also used the patent

  11. Association of Different Genetic Types of Francisella-Like Organisms with the Rocky Mountain Wood Tick (Dermacentor andersoni) and the American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabilis) in Localities Near Their Northern Distributional Limits

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Neil B.

    2012-01-01

    Dermacentor andersoni and Dermacentor variabilis from allopatric and sympatric populations near their northern distributional limits were examined for the presence of Francisella species using molecular techniques that targeted 373 bp of the 16S rRNA gene. Although there was no evidence for the presence of Francisella tularensis in any tick, Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) were common in D. andersoni and D. variabilis adults and immatures. A significantly greater proportion of female ticks contained FLEs compared to male ticks. In addition, significantly more D. variabilis adult individuals contained multiple FLE sequence types than did D. andersoni adults. Ten different types of FLEs were identified based on the sequence data, which has implications for diagnostic tests and epidemiological studies of F. tularensis in tick populations in Canada. The three most prevalent types of FLEs have been detected previously in D. andersoni or D. variabilis from other parts of their distributional ranges, whereas the other seven FLE types have not been reported previously. A comparison of the FLEs from both allopatric and sympatric populations of these two tick species provided insight into the relative host-specificity and the modes of transmission of these tick-borne bacteria. In general, each FLE type was specific for one tick species, suggesting vertical transmission of each bacterium. However, there were a few instances of potential cross-transfer of two FLE types to the other tick species at locations where D. andersoni and D. variabilis occurred in sympatry, suggesting that there may be occasional horizontal transmission of some FLEs. PMID:22179251

  12. Locally accessible information and distillation of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sibasish; Joag, Pramod; Kar, Guruprasad; Kunkri, Samir; Roy, Anirban

    2005-01-01

    A different type of complementarity relation is found between locally accessible information and final average entanglement for a given ensemble. It is also shown that in some well-known distillation protocols, this complementary relation is optimally satisfied. We discuss the interesting trade-off between locally accessible information and distillable entanglement for some states.

  13. Our Local Superbubble and Local Bubble Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiles, Carl

    2009-08-01

    We briefly describe the local superbubbles and supershells that lie near the Sun. These include, of course, the famous ones-the Orion/Eridanus superbubble and the North Polar Spur shell. It also includes less famous, less prominent, older, but equally important ones: we stress the elliptical Lindblad Ring, which surrounds the Sun and has a maximum diameter 364 pc, and GSH 238+00+09, which is a huge old shell. Both appear to be responsible for shock-induced star formation; GSR 238+0+09, in particular, may be responsible for the Orion and Gum associations. We then turn to the Local Bubble and describe some of its little-known and remarkable occupants: interstellar scattering centers, which are ionized blobs having sizes of a few Earth diameters, and one of the coldest HI clouds known, which produces prominent X-ray shadow and allows us to estimate the local X-ray production rate within a few dozen parsec from the Sun.

  14. Localization of magnetic pills

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Bryan; Gidmark, Nicholas J.; Tripathi, Anubhav; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Numerous therapeutics demonstrate optimal absorption or activity at specific sites in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Yet, safe, effective pill retention within a desired region of the GI remains an elusive goal. We report a safe, effective method for localizing magnetic pills. To ensure safety and efficacy, we monitor and regulate attractive forces between a magnetic pill and an external magnet, while visualizing internal dose motion in real time using biplanar videofluoroscopy. Real-time monitoring yields direct visual confirmation of localization completely noninvasively, providing a platform for investigating the therapeutic benefits imparted by localized oral delivery of new and existing drugs. Additionally, we report the in vitro measurements and calculations that enabled prediction of successful magnetic localization in the rat small intestines for 12 h. The designed system for predicting and achieving successful magnetic localization can readily be applied to any area of the GI tract within any species, including humans. The described system represents a significant step forward in the ability to localize magnetic pills safely and effectively anywhere within the GI tract. What our magnetic pill localization strategy adds to the state of the art, if used as an oral drug delivery system, is the ability to monitor the force exerted by the pill on the tissue and to locate the magnetic pill within the test subject all in real time. This advance ensures both safety and efficacy of magnetic localization during the potential oral administration of any magnetic pill-based delivery system. PMID:21257903

  15. Local Power: Tribe & Township.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlala, Padi; Moloi, Dudley

    1995-01-01

    Examines the service infrastructure of a rural township in South Africa and the struggle to acquire services like water and electricity. Discusses the interaction of a system of transitional local councils and tribal authorities in the face of local government elections. (LZ)

  16. Local available quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundarain, Douglas F.; de Guevara, María L. Ladrón

    2015-12-01

    In this work, local available quantum correlations are studied. They are defined in terms of mutual information of bipartite local measurements done over an optimal local basis complementary to the local basis which defines the respective classical correlations. For two qubits, it is always possible to choose the basis of classical correlations as the set of eigenvectors of σ _z (the third Pauli matrix) and complementary bases become the sets of eigenvectors of the observables orthogonal to σ _z. It is shown that all states with zero local available quantum correlations are separable but not necessarily strictly classical; this fact puts this kind of correlations in the middle between discord and entanglement. Since in many cases it may suffice to know whether a given state has quantum correlations, the structure of the states with zero local available quantum correlations is presented. It is also shown that there is a close connection between local available quantum correlations and the protocol of entanglement activation developed by Piani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 106:220403, 2011). If a state satisfies the sufficient condition for the entanglement swapping associated with this protocol, this state has nonzero local available quantum correlations.

  17. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation. PMID:26172624

  18. Local likelihood estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Tibshirani, R.J.

    1984-12-01

    In this work, we extend the idea of local averaging to likelihood-based regression models. One application is in the class of generalized linear models (Nelder and Wedderburn (1972). We enlarge this class by replacing the covariate form chi..beta.. with an unspecified smooth function s(chi). This function is estimated from the data by a technique we call Local Likelihood Estimation - a type of local averaging. Multiple covariates are incorporated through a forward stepwise algorithm. In a number of real data examples, the local likelihood technique proves to be effective in uncovering non-linear dependencies. Finally, we give some asymptotic results for local likelihood estimates and provide some methods for inference.

  19. Localization by entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, J.; Flach, S.; Fleurov, V.; Schulman, L. S.; Tolkunov, D.

    2008-08-01

    We study the localization of bosonic atoms in an optical lattice, which interact in a spatially confined region. The classical theory predicts that there is no localization below a threshold value for the strength of interaction that is inversely proportional to the number of participating atoms. In a full quantum treatment, however, we find that localized states exist for arbitrarily weak attractive or repulsive interactions for any number (>1) of atoms. We further show, using an explicit solution of the two-particle bound state and an appropriate measure of entanglement, that the entanglement tends to a finite value in the limit of weak interactions. Coupled with the non-existence of localization in an optimized quantum product state, we conclude that the localization exists by virtue of entanglement.

  20. Deconstructing spatiotemporal chaos using local symbolic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pethel, Shawn D; Corron, Ned J; Bollt, Erik

    2007-11-23

    We find that the global symbolic dynamics of a diffusively coupled map lattice is well approximated by a very small local model for weak to moderate coupling strengths. A local symbolic model is a truncation of the full symbolic model to one that considers only a single element and a few neighbors. Using interval analysis, we give rigorous results for a range of coupling strengths and different local model widths. Examples are presented of extracting a local symbolic model from data and of controlling spatiotemporal chaos. PMID:18233220

  1. NMR local coil with adjustable spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Dembinski, G.T.

    1988-03-22

    A local coil assembly for use in NMR imaging is described which comprises: a base; a first local coil module mounted to the base and extending upward therefrom; sockets disposed in the base, each at a different distance from the first local coil module; a second local coil module having a connector therein which mates with each of the sockets to enable the second local coil module to be connected to the base at any one of the sockets; and a set of reactive components. The values of the respective reactive components are selected such that the second local oil module may be connected to any of the sockets without any substantial change in the resonant frequency of the assembly.

  2. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    PubMed

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed. PMID:20586467

  3. Sound localization by echolocating bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, Murat

    Echolocating bats emit ultrasonic vocalizations and listen to echoes reflected back from objects in the path of the sound beam to build a spatial representation of their surroundings. Important to understanding the representation of space through echolocation are detailed studies of the cues used for localization, the sonar emission patterns and how this information is assembled. This thesis includes three studies, one on the directional properties of the sonar receiver, one on the directional properties of the sonar transmitter, and a model that demonstrates the role of action in building a representation of auditory space. The general importance of this work to a broader understanding of spatial localization is discussed. Investigations of the directional properties of the sonar receiver reveal that interaural level difference and monaural spectral notch cues are both dependent on sound source azimuth and elevation. This redundancy allows flexibility that an echolocating bat may need when coping with complex computational demands for sound localization. Using a novel method to measure bat sonar emission patterns from freely behaving bats, I show that the sonar beam shape varies between vocalizations. Consequently, the auditory system of a bat may need to adapt its computations to accurately localize objects using changing acoustic inputs. Extra-auditory signals that carry information about pinna position and beam shape are required for auditory localization of sound sources. The auditory system must learn associations between extra-auditory signals and acoustic spatial cues. Furthermore, the auditory system must adapt to changes in acoustic input that occur with changes in pinna position and vocalization parameters. These demands on the nervous system suggest that sound localization is achieved through the interaction of behavioral control and acoustic inputs. A sensorimotor model demonstrates how an organism can learn space through auditory-motor contingencies

  4. When Gravity Fails: Local Search Topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Local search algorithms for combinatorial search problems frequently encounter a sequence of states in which it is impossible to improve the value of the objective function; moves through these regions, called {\\em plateau moves), dominate the time spent in local search. We analyze and characterize {\\em plateaus) for three different classes of randomly generated Boolean Satisfiability problems. We identify several interesting features of plateaus that impact the performance of local search algorithms. We show that local minima tend to be small but occasionally may be very large. We also show that local minima can be escaped without unsatisfying a large number of clauses, but that systematically searching for an escape route may be computationally expensive if the local minimum is large. We show that plateaus with exits, called benches, tend to be much larger than minima, and that some benches have very few exit states which local search can use to escape. We show that the solutions (i.e. global minima) of randomly generated problem instances form clusters, which behave similarly to local minima. We revisit several enhancements of local search algorithms and explain their performance in light of our results. Finally we discuss strategies for creating the next generation of local search algorithms.

  5. Mesotherapy for local fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, S; Guillot, T; Bissoon, L; Greenway, F

    2013-10-01

    Mesotherapy, which is the injection of substances locally into mesodermally derived subcutaneous tissue, developed from empirical observations of a French physician in the 1950s. Although popular in Europe for many medical purposes, it is used for local cosmetic fat reduction in the United States. This paper reviews manuscripts indexed in PubMed/MEDLINE under 'mesotherapy', which pertains to local fat reduction. The history of lipolytic mesotherapy, the physiology of body fat distribution, the mechanism of action of different lipolytic stimulators and their increased efficacy in combination are reviewed. Mesotherapy falls into two categories. Lipolytic mesotherapy using lipolytic stimulators requires more frequent treatments as the fat cells are not destroyed and can refill over time. Ablative mesotherapy destroys fat cells with a detergent, causes inflammation and scarring from the fat necrosis, but requires fewer treatments. The historic and empiric mixing of sodium channel blocking local anaesthetics in mesotherapy solutions inhibits the intended lipolysis. Major mesotherapy safety concerns include injection site infections from poor sterile technique. Cosmetic mesotherapy directs the area from which fat is lost to improve self-image. Studies were of relatively small number, many with limited sample sizes. Future research should be directed towards achieving a Food and Drug Administration indication rather than continuing expansion of off-label use. PMID:23800269

  6. Local shape of pictorial relief

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2014-01-01

    How is pictorial relief represented in visual awareness? Certainly not as a “depth map,” but perhaps as a map of local surface attitudes (Koenderink & van Doorn, 1995). Here we consider the possibility that observers might instead, or concurrently, represent local surface shape, a geometrical invariant with respect to motions. Observers judge local surface shape, in a picture of a piece of sculpture, on a five-point categorical scale. Categories are cap–ridge–saddle–rut–cup–flat, where “flat” denotes the absence of shape. We find that observers readily perform such a task, with full resolution of a shape index scale (cap–ridge–saddle–rut–cup), and with excellent self-consistency over days. There exist remarkable inter-observer differences. Over a group of 10 naive observers we find that the dispersion of judgments peaks at the saddle category. There may be a relation of this finding to the history of the topic—Alberti's (1827) omission of the saddle category in his purportedly exhaustive catalog of local surface shapes. PMID:25469225

  7. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  8. Disentangling collective trends from local dynamics.

    PubMed

    Barthélemy, Marc; Nadal, Jean-Pierre; Berestycki, Henri

    2010-04-27

    A single social phenomenon (such as crime, unemployment, or birthrate) can be observed through temporal series corresponding to units at different levels (i.e., cities, regions, and countries). Units at a given local level may follow a collective trend imposed by external conditions, but also may display fluctuations of purely local origin. The local behavior is usually computed as the difference between the local data and a global average (e.g, a national average), a viewpoint that can be very misleading. We propose here a method for separating the local dynamics from the global trend in a collection of correlated time series. We take an independent component analysis approach in which we do not assume a small average local contribution in contrast with previously proposed methods. We first test our method on synthetic series generated by correlated random walkers. We then consider crime rate series (in the United States and France) and the evolution of obesity rate in the United States, which are two important examples of societal measures. For the crime rates in the United States, we observe large fluctuations in the transition period of mid-70s during which crime rates increased significantly, whereas since the 80s, the state crime rates are governed by external factors and the importance of local specificities being decreasing. In the case of obesity, our method shows that external factors dominate the evolution of obesity since 2000, and that different states can have different dynamical behavior even if their obesity prevalence is similar. PMID:20385842

  9. Stereotype locally convex spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarov, S. S.

    2000-08-01

    We give complete proofs of some previously announced results in the theory of stereotype (that is, reflexive in the sense of Pontryagin duality) locally convex spaces. These spaces have important applications in topological algebra and functional analysis.

  10. Focus on Local Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Rod

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how the student newspaper "The Lance" (at Westside High School in Omaha, Nebraska) covered the shootings at Columbine High School. Notes that the staff localized the event and brought the student body into the story. (RS)

  11. Local entropy generation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1991-02-01

    Second law analysis techniques have been widely used to evaluate the sources of irreversibility in components and systems of components but the evaluation of local sources of irreversibility in thermal processes has received little attention. While analytical procedures for evaluating local entropy generation have been developed, applications have been limited to fluid flows with analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields. The analysis of local entropy generation can be used to evaluate more complicated flows by including entropy generation calculations in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The research documented in this report consists of incorporating local entropy generation calculations in an existing CFD code and then using the code to evaluate the distribution of thermodynamic losses in two applications: an impinging jet and a magnetic heat pump. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Role of Newspaper Coverage and Political Ads in Local Elections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luttbeg, Norman R.

    1988-01-01

    Characterizes the differences in the content of local newspaper's coverage (including political advertisements) of municipal and school board elections. Finds that local newspapers can raise consciousness of these elections and can increase voter turnout. (RS)

  13. Evaluating Functional Localizers: The Case of the FFA

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Marc G.; Park, Joonkoo; Gonzalez, Richard; Polk, Thad A.; Gehrke, Amanda; Knaffla, Scott; Jonides, John

    2010-01-01

    Functional localizers are routinely used in neuroimaging studies to test hypotheses about the function of specific brain areas. The specific tasks and stimuli used to localize particular regions vary widely from study to study even when the same cortical region is targeted. Thus, it is important to ask whether task and stimulus changes lead to differences in localization or whether localization procedures are largely immune to differences in tasks and contrasting stimuli. We present two experiments and a literature review that explore whether face localizer tasks yield differential localization in the fusiform gyrus as a function of task and contrasting stimuli. We tested standard localization tasks---passive viewing, 1-back, and 2-back memory tests---and did not find differences in localization based on task. We did, however, find differences in the extent, strength and patterns/reliabilities of the activation in the fusiform gyrus based on comparison stimuli (faces vs. houses compared to faces vs. scrambled stimuli). PMID:20025980

  14. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Müller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2009-11-01

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  15. Localized pityriasis rosea.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, I; Charles-Holmes, R

    2000-11-01

    Pityriasis rosea is a relatively common skin disorder. In its typical form it is easily recognizable; however, atypical forms can pose diagnostic problems. We report a 44-year-old woman with an acute onset of a localized eruption on her left breast. The morphology of the rash and the time course were typical of pityriasis rosea. Localized pityriasis rosea is an unusual variant, which has been described previously. PMID:11167977

  16. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Mueller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique

    2009-11-20

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  17. Localization protected quantum order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Many body localization occurs in isolated quantum systems, usually with strong disorder, and is marked by absence of dissipation, absence of thermal equilibration, and a memory of the initial conditions that survives in local observables for arbitrarily long times. The many body localized regime is a non-equilibrium, strongly disordered, non-self averaging regime that presents a new frontier for quantum statistical mechanics. In this talk, I point out that there exists a vast zoo of correlated many body localized states of matter, which may be classified using familiar notions of spontaneous symmetry breaking and topological order. I will point out that in the many body localized regime, spontaneous symmetry breaking can occur even at high energy densities in one dimensional systems, and topological order can occur even without a bulk gap. I will also discuss the phenomenology of imperfectly isolated many body localized systems, which are weakly coupled to a heat bath. I will conclude with a brief discussion of how these phenomena may best be detected in experiments. Collaborators: David Huse, S.L. Sondhi, Arijeet Pal, Vadim Oganesyan, A.C. Potter, Sarang Gopalakrishnan, S. Johri, R.N. Bhatt.

  18. Stacking attributes from local slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Gajewski, D.; Dell, S.; Nath, S. K.; Wave Inversion Technology (Wit) Consortium

    2010-12-01

    CMP stacking is controlled by the stacking velocity which is determined by a one-dimendional optimization procedure using semblance as a coherence criterion. New multi-parameter stacking formulas like the Common Reflection Surface (CRS) operator consider neighboring CMP locations in the stack. These methods stack considerably more traces than conventional CMP processing leading to stacked sections with an improved signal-to-nose ratio and better image quality. The corresponding stacking trajectories are controlled by three stacking attributes for the 2-D case and eight for the 3-D case. The determination of these attributes requires a multi-dimensional optimization procedure which is time consuming. If we know good starting values, we can limit the search intervals considerably and speed up the process. It was shown that the stacking attributes are linked to local slopes in seismic zero offset and constant offset sections. Therefore, the determination of local slopes can guide the choice of the search intervals in the optimization procedure. We use structural tensors for the determination of local slopes. Structural tensors represent a versatile tool to investigate coherent features in the data superior to other slop determination tools like slant stacking or plane wave destructors. The window size is adjustable and allows to optimize smoothing and smearing in the slope determination process where the smoothing can be performed along structural events (directional smoothing). This smart feature helps to consider complex geologies and acknowledges faults and conflicting dips without any significant change in computation time. Different variants of the algorithm are used to determine slopes in CMP gathers, stacked and time or depth migrated sections. The results of the local slope determinations are used to compute stacking attributes for the CRS method. We compare these to stacking attributes obtained from optimization. The attributes determined from local slopes

  19. Hearing in three dimensions: Sound localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to localize a source of sound in space is a fundamental component of the three dimensional character of the sound of audio. For over a century scientists have been trying to understand the physical and psychological processes and physiological mechanisms that subserve sound localization. This research has shown that important information about sound source position is provided by interaural differences in time of arrival, interaural differences in intensity and direction-dependent filtering provided by the pinnae. Progress has been slow, primarily because experiments on localization are technically demanding. Control of stimulus parameters and quantification of the subjective experience are quite difficult problems. Recent advances, such as the ability to simulate a three dimensional sound field over headphones, seem to offer potential for rapid progress. Research using the new techniques has already produced new information. It now seems that interaural time differences are a much more salient and dominant localization cue than previously believed.

  20. Evaluation of river restoration by local residents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Roman; Stauffacher, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Today, river corrections aiming at better flood protection must consider ecological aspects such as "naturalness" and biodiversity. Gaining acceptance among local residents for these projects is important, since they impact local infrastructure and alter the familiar landscape. The question addressed in this paper is whether there are differences between local residents regarding the question of whether they think a river restoration project at a section of the Swiss Thur River was reasonable. We also investigate whether there are differences regarding the reasons for this evaluation, such as improved flood protection, higher perceived naturalness, increased biodiversity, and aesthetics. Results show that for farmers flood protection and naturalness are more important factors than for others and that there are differences among the local villages.

  1. Global-local methodologies and their application to nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1989-01-01

    An assessment is made of the potential of different global-local analysis strategies for predicting the nonlinear and postbuckling responses of structures. Two postbuckling problems of composite panels are used as benchmarks and the application of different global-local methodologies to these benchmarks is outlined. The key elements of each of the global-local strategies are discussed and future research areas needed to realize the full potential of global-local methodologies are identified.

  2. A localization model to localize multiple sources using Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Joshua Rolv

    Accurate localization of a sound source in a room setting is important in both psychoacoustics and architectural acoustics. Binaural models have been proposed to explain how the brain processes and utilizes the interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) of sound waves arriving at the ears of a listener in determining source location. Recent work shows that applying Bayesian methods to this problem is proving fruitful. In this thesis, pink noise samples are convolved with head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) and compared to combinations of one and two anechoic speech signals convolved with different HRTFs or binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) to simulate room positions. Through exhaustive calculation of Bayesian posterior probabilities and using a maximal likelihood approach, model selection will determine the number of sources present, and parameter estimation will result in azimuthal direction of the source(s).

  3. LOCAL TADPOLE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Putko, Joseph; Dewberry, Janosz; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Sanchez Almeida, Jorge; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2012-05-10

    Tadpole galaxies have a giant star-forming region at the end of an elongated intensity distribution. Here we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey data to determine the ages, masses, and surface densities of the heads and tails in 14 local tadpoles selected from the Kiso and Michigan surveys of UV-bright galaxies, and we compare them to tadpoles previously studied in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The young stellar mass in the head scales linearly with rest-frame galaxy luminosity, ranging from {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} at galaxy absolute magnitude U = -13 mag to 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} at U = -20 mag. The corresponding head surface density increases from several M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2} locally to 10-100 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} at high redshift, and the star formation rate (SFR) per unit area in the head increases from {approx}0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} locally to {approx}1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} at high z. These local values are normal for star-forming regions, and the increases with redshift are consistent with other cosmological SFRs, most likely reflecting an increase in gas abundance. The tails in the local sample look like bulge-free galaxy disks. Their photometric ages decrease from several Gyr to several hundred Myr with increasing z, and their surface densities are more constant than the surface densities of the heads. The far-outer intensity profiles in the local sample are symmetric and exponential. We suggest that most local tadpoles are bulge-free galaxy disks with lopsided star formation, perhaps from environmental effects such as ram pressure or disk impacts, or from a Jeans length comparable to half the disk size.

  4. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  5. Local quanta, unitary inequivalence, and vacuum entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Vázquez, Matías R. Rey, Marco del Westman, Hans León, Juan

    2014-12-15

    In this work we develop a formalism for describing localised quanta for a real-valued Klein–Gordon field in a one-dimensional box [0,R]. We quantise the field using non-stationary local modes which, at some arbitrarily chosen initial time, are completely localised within the left or the right side of the box. In this concrete set-up we directly face the problems inherent to a notion of local field excitations, usually thought of as elementary particles. Specifically, by computing the Bogoliubov coefficients relating local and standard (global) quantisations, we show that the local quantisation yields a Fock representation of the Canonical Commutation Relations (CCR) which is unitarily inequivalent to the standard one. In spite of this, we find that the local creators and annihilators remain well defined in the global Fock space F{sup G}, and so do the local number operators associated to the left and right partitions of the box. We end up with a useful mathematical toolbox to analyse and characterise local features of quantum states in F{sup G}. Specifically, an analysis of the global vacuum state |0{sub G}〉∈F{sup G} in terms of local number operators shows, as expected, the existence of entanglement between the left and right regions of the box. The local vacuum |0{sub L}〉∈F{sup L}, on the contrary, has a very different character. It is neither cyclic (with respect to any local algebra of operators) nor separating and displays no entanglement between left and right partitions. Further analysis shows that the global vacuum also exhibits a distribution of local excitations reminiscent, in some respects, of a thermal bath. We discuss how the mathematical tools developed herein may open new ways for the analysis of fundamental problems in local quantum field theory.

  6. The program implications of administrative relationships between local health departments and state and local government.

    PubMed Central

    DeFriese, G H; Hetherington, J S; Brooks, E F; Miller, C A; Jain, S C; Kavaler, F; Stein, J S

    1981-01-01

    A typology of organizational arrangements between state and local public health agencies was used as a framework within which the organizational environment of the local health department was studied for its effects on program development and implementation by local public health departments. Data collected in a national sample of local health officers were used in measuring the effect of four different patterns of administrative relationships on the selected characteristics of local health department programs. Important differences were observed among the four organizational types with regard to constraints on programs and program priorities, and health officers' perceptions of the primary functions of local health departments and sources of local health department funding. These findings were then used as a baseline from which to consider the possible impact of recent federal health budgetary proposals (specifically, block grants) both on existing patterns of intergovernmental relations and on the funding and operation of local health department programs. It was determined that the most likely general development arising from these proposed changes in federal budgetary policy is that the administrative control of state health agencies over those at the local level is likely to be enhanced. Other likely developments include changes in the programs and priorities of local health departments related to reductions in overall funding levels for human services and forced competition for fewer dollars by an enlarged constituency. PMID:7270759

  7. Protein localization with flexible DNA or RNA.

    PubMed

    Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Localization of activity is ubiquitous in life, and also within sub-cellular compartments. Localization provides potential advantages as different proteins involved in the same cellular process may supplement each other on a fast timescale. It might also prevent proteins from being active in other regions of the cell. However localization is at odds with the spreading of unbound molecules by diffusion. We model the cost and gain for specific enzyme activity using localization strategies based on binding to sites of intermediate specificity. While such bindings in themselves decrease the activity of the protein on its target site, they may increase protein activity if stochastic motion allows the acting protein to touch both the intermediate binding site and the specific site simultaneously. We discuss this strategy in view of recent suggestions on long non-coding RNA as a facilitator of localized activity of chromatin modifiers. PMID:22347995

  8. Local contrast and Pavlovian induction1

    PubMed Central

    Malone, John C.

    1976-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of number and similarity of stimuli on local contrast. In the first experiment, local contrast effects differed in magnitude as a function of the similarity among stimuli; greater positive local contrast appeared when stimuli were less similar, though this effect sometimes reversed for very dissimilar stimuli. In the second experiment, both positive and negative local contrast appeared transiently during the course of training a discrimination including two quite dissimilar stimuli. When two new stimuli were added, both effects reappeared in several cases. The effects remained when the discrimination was rendered more difficult by substituting a new stimulus very similar to one of the original pair. These and other data suggest that local contrast depends on the same factors that produce Pavlovian induction; in the absence of an alternative account, Pavlov's interpretation may be useful in suggesting further research that will help identify the mechanisms involved in both classical and operant discrimination learning. PMID:16811958

  9. Target localization and real-time tracking using the Calypso 4D localization system in patients with localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A. . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Pouliot, Jean; Shinohara, Katsuto; Aubin, Michelle; Roach, Mack; Skrumeda, Lisa L.; Balter, James M.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Wei, John T.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The Calypso 4D Localization System is being developed to provide accurate, precise, objective, and continuous target localization during radiotherapy. This study involves the first human use of the system, to evaluate the localization accuracy of this technique compared with radiographic localization and to assess its ability to obtain real-time prostate-motion information. Methods and Materials: Three transponders were implanted in each of 20 patients. Eleven eligible patients of the 20 patients participated in a study arm that compared radiographic triangulated transponder locations to electromagnetically recorded transponder locations. Transponders were tracked for 8-min periods. Results: The implantations were all successful, with no major complications. Intertransponder distances were largely stable. Comparison of the patient localization on the basis of transponder locations as per the Calypso system with the radiographic transponder localization showed an average ({+-}SD) 3D difference of 1.5 {+-} 0.9 mm. Upon tracking during 8 min, 2 of the 11 patients showed significant organ motion (>1 cm), with some motion lasting longer that 1 min. Conclusion: Calypso transponders can be used as magnetic intraprostatic fiducials. Clinical evaluation of this novel 4D nonionizing electromagnetic localization system with transponders indicates a comparable localization accuracy to isocenter (within 2 mm) compared with X-ray localiza0010ti.

  10. Anderson localization from classical trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Piet W.; Altland, Alexander

    2008-08-01

    We show that Anderson localization in quasi-one-dimensional conductors with ballistic electron dynamics, such as an array of ballistic chaotic cavities connected via ballistic contacts, can be understood in terms of classical electron trajectories only. At large length scales, an exponential proliferation of trajectories of nearly identical classical action generates an abundance of interference terms, which eventually leads to a suppression of transport coefficients. We quantitatively describe this mechanism in two different ways: the explicit description of transition probabilities in terms of interfering trajectories, and an hierarchical integration over fluctuations in the classical phase space of the array cavities.

  11. Pontin is localized in nucleolar fibrillar centers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Pontin is a multifunctional protein having roles in various cellular processes including regulation of gene expression. Here, we addressed Pontin intracellular localization using two different monoclonal antibodies directed against different Pontin epitopes. For the first time, Pontin was directly visualized in nucleoli where it co-localizes with Upstream Binding Factor and RNA polymerase I. Nucleolar localization of Pontin was confirmed by its detection in nucleolar extracts and by electron microscopy, which revealed Pontin accumulation specifically in the nucleolar fibrillar centers. Pontin localization in the nucleolus was dynamic and Pontin accumulated in large nucleolar dots mainly during S-phase. Pontin concentration in the large nucleolar dots correlated with reduced transcriptional activity of nucleoli. In addition, Pontin was found to associate with RNA polymerase I and to interact in a complex with c-Myc with rDNA sequences indicating that Pontin is involved in the c-Myc-dependent regulation of rRNA synthesis. PMID:18548265

  12. Hyperfine-resolved 3.4-{mu}m spectroscopy of CH{sub 3}I with a widely tunable difference frequency generation source and a cavity-enhanced cell: A case study of a local Coriolis interaction between the v{sub 1}=1 and (v{sub 2},v{sub 6}{sup l})=(1,2{sup 2}) states

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, Sho; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-15

    Saturated absorption spectra of the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental band of CH{sub 3}I are recorded with a cavity-enhanced cell and a tunable difference frequency generation source having an 86-cm{sup -1} range. The recorded spectral lines are 250 kHz wide, and most of them are resolved into the individual hyperfine components. The Coriolis interaction between the v{sub 1}=1 and (v{sub 2},v{sub 6}{sup l})=(1,2{sup 2}) states locally perturbing the hyperfine structures is analyzed to yield the Coriolis and hyperfine coupling constants with uncertainties similar to those in typical microwave spectroscopy. The spectrometer has demonstrated the potential for precisely determining the energy structure in the vibrational excited states.

  13. Localization of airborne pure tones by pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.; Schusterman, Ronald J.; Southall, Brandon L.; Kastak, David

    2001-05-01

    Although all pinnipeds communicate acoustically in air, most previous research on sound localization has been done under water. We have recently shown that several pinniped species localize aerial broadband signals as well as some terrestrial carnivores [Holt et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113 (2003)]. However, it is unclear which frequencies are particularly important for localization in these animals. In this study, we tested a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) in a hemianechoic chamber at frequencies ranging between 0.8 and 20 kHz. A left/right procedure was used to measure minimum audible angles (MAAs) corresponding to 75%-correct discrimination. MAAs ranged from approximately 4 to 13 deg in both subjects, with the largest MAAs or poorest acuity measured at the intermediate frequencies tested. These results are consistent with the duplex theory of sound localization in that low-frequency sounds appear to be localized on the basis of interaural time differences, while high-frequency sounds appear to be localized on the basis of interaural intensity differences. Testing with a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) will provide further insight on the use of binaural cues and head-size effects with respect to localization in pinnipeds.

  14. Lauding Local Legacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamolinara, Guy

    1999-01-01

    As part of its bicentennial celebration, the Library of Congress is sponsoring the Local Legacies project, an unprecedented effort in which Americans across the nation work with their members of Congress to document unique traditions for the collections of the American Folklife Center. Libraries will have a critical role in directing documentation…

  15. Theme: Local Program Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Includes "Professional Propagation" (Camp); "Managing Human Resources with Local Program Success (LPS)" (Daley); "Profit Sharing with LPS" (Moses); "Partners for Success" (Mecey- Smith); "Achieving LPS by Collaborating with Partners, Allies and Volunteers" (Oglesby); LPS...Just What Agricultural Education Needs, Another Acronym" (Rist); "The…

  16. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasatir, Marilyn; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four papers discuss LANs (local area networks) and library applications: (1) "Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers Standards..." (Charles D. Brown); (2) "Facilities Planning for LANs..." (Gail Persky); (3) "Growing up with the Alumni Library: LAN..." (Russell Buchanan); and (4) "Implementing a LAN...at the Health Sciences Library"…

  17. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, David

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of word processors, micro- and minicomputer systems, and other digital office equipment is causing major design changes in existing networks. Local Area Networks (LANs) which have adequately served terminal users in the past must now be redesigned. Implementation at Clemson is described. (MLW)

  18. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Kenneth E.; Nielsen, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Discusses cabling that is needed in local area networks (LANs). Types of cables that may be selected are described, including twisted pair, coaxial cables (or ethernet), and fiber optics; network topologies, the manner in which the cables are laid out, are considered; and cable installation issues are discussed. (LRW)

  19. Social Studies: Local History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kressler, Joe, Comp.

    Elementary and secondary school teachers interested in developing a local history unit can adapt this fourth grade program created for three school districts in Cortland County, New York. Material is divided into 13 chapters. Chapter 1 charts the New York fourth grade curriculum by concept and content and outlines specific community study…

  20. Tackling a Local Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Students studying water as a class project were concerned by levels of pollution at a nearby river and the local beach. They identified three environmental problems for research including sewage discharge, beach litter, and quality of swimming water. Research consisted of field trips which allowed for opportunities to improve skills in collecting…

  1. State and local governments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The Virginia Space Grant Consortium approach to a close working relation to state and local governments is presented as a model for consideration. State government relations are especially important in that this is a primary resource in securing matching funds. Avenues for establishing these relationships are listed and discussed.

  2. Teaching Local History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This Social Science Docket theme issue focuses on teaching local history and included theme and non-themed articles, lesson plans, learning activities, and book, movie, and museum reviews designed for K-12 social studies teachers. Articles and materials in this issue are: "Editing Is Not Censorship" (Alan Singer); "Teachers Respond to 'Editing Is…

  3. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Ian A.; Hancock, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes. PMID:21924373

  4. Analysis of GPCR Localization and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, James N.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Localization and trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is increasingly recognized to play a fundamental role in receptor-mediated signaling and its regulation. Individual receptors, including closely homologous subtypes with otherwise similar functional properties, can differ considerably in their membrane trafficking properties. In this chapter, we describe several approaches for experimentally assessing the subcellular localization and trafficking of selected GPCRs. Firstly, we describe a flexible method for receptor localization using fluorescence microscopy. We then describe two complementary approaches, using fluorescence flow cytometry and surface biotinylation, for examining receptor internalization and trafficking in the endocytic pathway. PMID:21607873

  5. Software for neutrino acoustic detection and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhadef, B.

    2009-06-01

    The evidence of the existing of UHE (E>10eV) cosmic rays and its possible connection to UHE neutrino suggests the building of an acoustic telescope for neutrino, exploiting thermo-acoustic effect. We present software for neutrino acoustic signal detection and localization. The main points discussed here are the sea noise model, the determination of time differences of arrival (TDOA) between hydrophones signals, the source localization algorithm, and the telescope geometry effect. The effect of TDOAs errors and telescope geometry on the localization accuracy is also discussed.

  6. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect

    Minogin, V.G.

    2014-03-15

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  7. Entanglement quantification by local unitary operations

    SciTech Connect

    Monras, A.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Gualdi, G.; Illuminati, F.; Adesso, G.; Davies, G. B.

    2011-07-15

    Invariance under local unitary operations is a fundamental property that must be obeyed by every proper measure of quantum entanglement. However, this is not the only aspect of entanglement theory where local unitary operations play a relevant role. In the present work we show that the application of suitable local unitary operations defines a family of bipartite entanglement monotones, collectively referred to as ''mirror entanglement.'' They are constructed by first considering the (squared) Hilbert-Schmidt distance of the state from the set of states obtained by applying to it a given local unitary operator. To the action of each different local unitary operator there corresponds a different distance. We then minimize these distances over the sets of local unitary operations with different spectra, obtaining an entire family of different entanglement monotones. We show that these mirror-entanglement monotones are organized in a hierarchical structure, and we establish the conditions that need to be imposed on the spectrum of a local unitary operator for the associated mirror entanglement to be faithful, i.e., to vanish in and only in separable pure states. We analyze in detail the properties of one particularly relevant member of the family, the ''stellar mirror entanglement'' associated with the traceless local unitary operations with nondegenerate spectra and equispaced eigenvalues in the complex plane. This particular measure generalizes the original analysis of S. M. Giampaolo and F. Illuminati [Phys. Rev. A 76, 042301 (2007)], valid for qubits and qutrits. We prove that the stellar entanglement is a faithful bipartite entanglement monotone in any dimension and that it is bounded from below by a function proportional to the linear entropy and from above by the linear entropy itself, coinciding with it in two- and three-dimensional spaces.

  8. Entanglement quantification by local unitary operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monras, A.; Adesso, G.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Gualdi, G.; Davies, G. B.; Illuminati, F.

    2011-07-01

    Invariance under local unitary operations is a fundamental property that must be obeyed by every proper measure of quantum entanglement. However, this is not the only aspect of entanglement theory where local unitary operations play a relevant role. In the present work we show that the application of suitable local unitary operations defines a family of bipartite entanglement monotones, collectively referred to as “mirror entanglement.” They are constructed by first considering the (squared) Hilbert-Schmidt distance of the state from the set of states obtained by applying to it a given local unitary operator. To the action of each different local unitary operator there corresponds a different distance. We then minimize these distances over the sets of local unitary operations with different spectra, obtaining an entire family of different entanglement monotones. We show that these mirror-entanglement monotones are organized in a hierarchical structure, and we establish the conditions that need to be imposed on the spectrum of a local unitary operator for the associated mirror entanglement to be faithful, i.e., to vanish in and only in separable pure states. We analyze in detail the properties of one particularly relevant member of the family, the “stellar mirror entanglement” associated with the traceless local unitary operations with nondegenerate spectra and equispaced eigenvalues in the complex plane. This particular measure generalizes the original analysis of S. M. Giampaolo and F. Illuminati [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.76.042301 76, 042301 (2007)], valid for qubits and qutrits. We prove that the stellar entanglement is a faithful bipartite entanglement monotone in any dimension and that it is bounded from below by a function proportional to the linear entropy and from above by the linear entropy itself, coinciding with it in two- and three-dimensional spaces.

  9. Localization and vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes the following localization property for vector spherical harmonics: a wide class of non-local, vector-valued operators reduce to local, multiplication-type operations when applied to a vector spherical harmonic. As localization occurs in a very precise, quantifiable and explicitly computable fashion, the localization property provides a set of useful formulae for analyzing vector-valued fractional diffusion and non-local differential equations defined on S d - 1. As such analyses require a detailed understanding of operators for which localization occurs, we provide several applications of the result in the context of non-local differential equations.

  10. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  11. Local adaptation in the ventral photoreceptors of Limulus

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Local adaptation was demonstrated in the ventral photoreceptors of Lumulus using either flashes or continuous illumination. Spots of light locally desensitized the region of the photoreceptor on which they were focused. In dark-adapted photoreceptors where "quantum bumps" were clearly discernible, local adaptation of the quantum bumps was observed. Local adaptation could induce differences of threshold of 1 decade over distances of 50-80 mum. With continuous local illumination these gradients could be maintained from 2 s to 30 min. In addition, the decrease in time scale associated with light adaptation was also found to be localized to the region of illumination. PMID:1194890

  12. A new approach to the photon localization problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1994-01-01

    Since wavelets form a representation of the Poincare group, it is possible to construct a localized superposition of light waves with different frequencies in a Lorentz-covariant manner. This localized wavelet satisfies a Lorentz-invariant uncertainty relation, and also the Lorentz-invariant Parseval's relation. A quantitative analysis is given for the difference between photons and localized waves. It is then shown that this localized entity corresponds to a relativistic photon with a sharply defined momentum in the non-localization limit. Waves are not particles. It is confirmed that the wave-particle duality is subject to the uncertainty principle.

  13. Local normal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    In the near future, high energy (E greater than 20 MeV) gamma ray astronomy offers the promise of a new means of examining the closest galaxies. Two and possibly three local galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds and M31, should be visible to the high energy gamma ray telescope on the Gamma Ray Observatory, and the first should be seen by GAMMA-1. With the assumptions of adequate cosmic ray production and reasonable magnetic field strengths, both of which should likely be satisfied, specific predictions of the gamma ray emission can be made separating the concepts of the galactic and universal nature of cosmic rays. A study of the synchrotron radiation from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) suggests that the cosmic ray density is similar to that in the local region of our galaxy, but not uniform. It is hoped the measurements will be able to verify this independent of assumptions about the magnetic fields in the LMC.

  14. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  15. Broadband local dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labardi, M.; Lucchesi, M.; Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A route to extend the measurement bandwidth of local dielectric spectroscopy up to the MHz range has been devised. The method is based on a slow amplitude modulation at a frequency Ω of the excitation field oscillating at a frequency ω and the coherent detection of the modulated average electric force or force gradient at Ω. The cantilever mechanical response does not affect the measurement if Ω is well below its resonant frequency; therefore, limitations on the excitation field frequency are strongly reduced. Demonstration on a thin poly(vinyl acetate) film is provided, showing its structural relaxation spectrum on the local scale up to 45 °C higher than glass temperature, and nanoscale resolution dielectric relaxation imaging near conductive nanowires embedded in the polymer matrix was obtained up to 5 MHz frequency, with no physical reason to hinder further bandwidth extension.

  16. Local quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, N.; Knorr, B.; Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Reichert, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the ultraviolet behavior of quantum gravity within a functional renormalization group approach. The present setup includes the full ghost and graviton propagators and, for the first time, the dynamical graviton three-point function. The latter gives access to the coupling of dynamical gravitons and makes the system minimally self-consistent. The resulting phase diagram confirms the asymptotic safety scenario in quantum gravity with a nontrivial UV fixed point. A well-defined Wilsonian block spinning requires locality of the flow in momentum space. This property is discussed in the context of functional renormalization group flows. We show that momentum locality of graviton correlation functions is nontrivially linked to diffeomorphism invariance, and is realized in the present setup.

  17. Classical dynamical localization.

    PubMed

    Guarneri, Italo; Casati, Giulio; Karle, Volker

    2014-10-24

    We consider classical models of the kicked rotor type, with piecewise linear kicking potentials designed so that momentum changes only by multiples of a given constant. Their dynamics display quasilocalization of momentum, or quadratic growth of energy, depending on the arithmetic nature of the constant. Such purely classical features mimic paradigmatic features of the quantum kicked rotor, notably dynamical localization in momentum, or quantum resonances. We present a heuristic explanation, based on a classical phase space generalization of a well-known argument, that maps the quantum kicked rotor on a tight-binding model with disorder. Such results suggest reconsideration of generally accepted views that dynamical localization and quantum resonances are a pure result of quantum coherence. PMID:25379918

  18. The Local Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Helfer, H.L.

    2005-10-21

    The observations of the extended rotation curves of some galaxies provide important constraints upon the nature of the local dark matter present in the halos of these galaxies. Using these constraints, one can show that the halo dark matter cannot be some population of conventional astronomical objects and (most probably) cannot be a population of exotic non-interacting particles. We suggest that the halos can be regarded as large spatial fluctuations in a classic scalar field.

  19. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  20. Quantum discord, local operations, and Maxwell's demons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodutch, Aharon; Terno, Daniel R.

    2010-06-15

    Quantum discord was proposed as a measure of the quantumness of correlations. There are at least three different discordlike quantities, two of which determine the difference between the efficiencies of a Szilard's engine under different sets of restrictions. The three discord measures vanish simultaneously. We introduce an easy way to test for zero discord, relate it to the Cerf-Adami conditional entropy and show that there is no simple relation between the discord and the local distinguishability.

  1. [Cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics].

    PubMed

    de La Coussaye, J E; Eledjam, J J; Brugada, J; Sassine, A

    1993-01-01

    The intravascular administration and the high blood resorption of local anesthetic agents are known to induce neurotoxic accidents. However, the use of potent local anesthetic drugs such as bupivacaine is responsible for serious cardiotoxic accidents with a mortality of about 50%. Indeed, bupivacaine induces both electrophysiologic and haemodynamic disturbances with the occurrence of conduction blocks, arrhythmias and cardiovascular collapse. Moreover, cardiotoxicity is worsened by: bupivacaine-induced sympathetic activation which facilitates tachycardia and arrhythmias, metabolic abnormalities such as hypoxia, acidosis, hyperkaliemia and hypothermia, pregnancy, diazepam pretreatment, and the antiarrhythmic drugs. In case of cardiac arrest, CPR must be made. In the other cases, the first treatment is to oxygenate, to intubate the trachea and to ventilate the lungs, and then to stop convulsions. Specific cardiac resuscitation remains controversial because it is based principally on experimental results. We demonstrated that the combination of clonidine and dobutamine is efficient to reverse both haemodynamic and electrophysiologic impairments induced by a large dose of bupivacaine in anesthetized dogs. Whatever the efficiency of specific resuscitation, it must be emphasized that prevention of toxic accident must always include: the best choice of local anesthetic drug (e.g.: lidocaine+alpha-2 agonist vs bupivacaine), test dose, aspiration and slow administration. Finally, the monitoring of regional anaesthesia must be similar to that in use for general anaesthesia and drugs and devices for resuscitation must be ready. PMID:8287299

  2. Enhanced local tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomography is enhanced to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. In a first method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, the relative attenuation data is inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA. to define the location S of the density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA. is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA.. In a second method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, a gradient value for a mollified local tomography function .gradient..function..sub..LAMBDA..epsilon. (x.sub.ij) is determined along the discontinuity; and the value of the jump of the density across the discontinuity curve (or surface) S is estimated from the gradient values.

  3. Expression and distribution of grp-78/bip in mineralizing tissues and mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; Gao, Qi; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Sundivakkam, Premanand; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP-78) is one of the many endoplasmic reticulum chaperone proteins that have been shown to possess multifunctional roles. We have previously demonstrated that GRP-78 functions as a receptor for dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and is required for DMP1-mediated calcium release; that it is a secreted protein and can bind to type I collagen and DMP1 extra-cellularly and aid in the nucleation of calcium phosphate. We provide evidence in this study that tyrosine phosphorylation is required for DMP1/GRP-78-mediated calcium release in mesenchymal cells. We further demonstrate that GRP-78 is localized in the nucleus of mesenchymal cells and that the cell surface GRP-78 is not associated with the G-protein Gαq in mesenchymal cells. Results from this study show that during development of mineralized tissues, increased expression of GRP-78 can be observed in condensing cartilage and mesenchymal cells of the alveolar bone, endochondral bone and dental pulp. Additionally, we show that GRP-78 is present in the mineralizing matrices of teeth, bone and in the extracellular matrix of differentiating human marrow stromal cells and dental pulp stem cells. Collectively, our observations provide a new perspective on GRP-78 with respect to mineralized matrix formation. PMID:22527697

  4. An improved solution of local window parameters setting for local singularity analysis based on Excel VBA batch processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojun; Cheng, Qiuming; Agterberg, Frits; Chen, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper Excel VBA is used for batch calculation in Local Singularity Analysis (LSA), which is for the information extracting from different kinds of geoscience data. Capabilities and advantages of a new module called Batch Tool for Local Singularity Index Mapping (BTLSIM) are: (1) batch production of series of local singularity maps with different settings of local window size, shape and orientation parameters; (2) local parameter optimization based on statistical tests; and (3) provision of extra output layers describing how spatial changes induced by parameter optimization are related to spatial structure of the original input layers.

  5. Different Strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In these line graphs of laboratory spectra, it is evident that different minerals have different spectra. The graph on the left shows the typical minerals found in igneous rocks, which are rocks related to magma or volcanic activity. The graph on the right shows iron-bearing candidates for further study and comparison to spectra from the Mars Exploration Rover panoramic cameras on Mars.

  6. New local duals in eternal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Mainemer Katz, Dan

    2012-10-01

    Global-local duality is the equivalence of seemingly different regulators in eternal inflation. For example, the light-cone time cutoff (a global measure, which regulates time) makes the same predictions as the causal patch (a local measure that cuts off space). We show that global-local duality is far more general. It rests on a redundancy inherent in any global cutoff: at late times, an attractor regime is reached, characterized by the unlimited exponential self-reproduction of a certain fundamental region of spacetime. An equivalent local cutoff can be obtained by restricting to this fundamental region. We derive local duals to several global cutoffs of interest. The new scale factor cutoff is dual to the short fat geodesic, a geodesic of fixed infinitesimal proper width. Vilenkin’s comoving apparent horizon cutoff is equivalent to the Hubbletube, whose width is proportional to the local Hubble volume. The famous youngness problem of the proper time cutoff can be readily understood by considering its local dual, the incredible shrinking geodesic.

  7. Infrared face recognition based on intensity of local micropattern-weighted local binary pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Liu, Guodong

    2011-07-01

    The traditional local binary pattern (LBP) histogram representation extracts the local micropatterns and assigns the same weight to all local micropatterns. To combine the different contributions of local micropatterns to face recognition, this paper proposes a weighted LBP histogram based on Weber's law. First, inspired by psychological Weber's law, intensity of local micropattern is defined by the ratio between two terms: one is relative intensity differences of a central pixel against its neighbors and the other is intensity of local central pixel. Second, regarding the intensity of local micropattern as its weight, the weighted LBP histogram is constructed with the defined weight. Finally, to make full use of the space location information and lessen the complexity of recognition, the partitioning and locality preserving projection are applied to get final features. The proposed method is tested on our infrared face databases and yields the recognition rate of 99.2% for same-session situation and 96.4% for elapsed-time situation compared to the 97.6 and 92.1% produced by the method based on traditional LBP.

  8. Local ventilation for powder handling--combination of local supply and exhaust air.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, K; Kulmala, I; Säämänen, A

    1996-04-01

    The performance of a modified local ventilation unit equipped with local supply and exhaust ventilation was evaluated during the manual handling of flour additive powder. The investigation tested five different configurations to study the effects of the exhaust opening location and local supply air on worker exposure. The measurements were done under controlled conditions in a test room. The breathing zone (BZ) dust concentration was measured by gravimetric sampling and real time monitoring. The different local ventilation configurations were also modeled numerically using computational fluid dynamics. Without local ventilation the average BZ dust concentration was 42 mg/m3. With local exhaust only the exposure was reduced below 1 mg/m3. The addition of local supply air further reduced the exposure to below 0.5 mg/m3. The lowest results were achieved by locating two exhaust openings on either side of the contaminant source combined with local supply air. With this configuration the average BZ exposure was only 0.08 mg/m3, a reduction of 99.8%. Numerical simulations also gave useful information about the airflow fields in stationary conditions. However, the worker's exposure was greatly affected by body movements, and this was not possible to simulate numerically. The results of this investigation can be useful when controlling dust exposure in manual powder handling operations. PMID:8901237

  9. Local discrimination scheme for some unitary operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, TianQing; Gao, Fei; Tian, GuoJing; Xie, ShuCui; Wen, QiaoYan

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that for two different multipartite unitary operations U 1 and U 2, when tr( U 1 † U 2) = 0, they can always be perfectly distinguished by local operations and classical communication in the single-run scenario. However, how to find the detailed scheme to complete the local discrimination is still a fascinating problem. In this paper, aiming at some U 1 and U 2 acting on the bipartite and tripartite space respectively, especially for U 1 † U 2 locally unitary equivalent to the high dimensional X-type hermitian unitary matrix V with tr V = 0, we put forward the explicit local distinguishing schemes in the single-run scenario.

  10. Induction therapy for locally advanced thymoma.

    PubMed

    Riely, Gregory J; Huang, James

    2010-10-01

    Thymomas are the most frequently encountered tumors of the mediastinum and often present with either localized or locally advanced disease. The prognosis in thymoma has been consistently shown to correspond to the invasiveness of the tumor (as represented by the Masaoka stage of the tumor) and the completeness of surgical resection. Because treatment with a variety of different chemotherapy regimens has demonstrated radiographic response rates greater than 50% in patients with advanced thymoma, a number of investigators have explored the use of preoperative (induction, neoadjuvant) therapy for patients with locally advanced thymoma. In this review, we summarize the published experience with preoperative therapy for thymoma and discuss ongoing clinical trials exploring multimodality therapy for treatment of locally advanced thymoma. PMID:20859127

  11. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering "beats" which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its' quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  12. Visual Self-Localization with Tiny Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Marius; Erhard, Sara; Zell, Andreas

    Self-localization of mobile robots is often performed visually, whereby the resolution of the images influences a lot the computation time. In this paper, we examine how a reduction of the image resolution affects localization accuracy. We downscale the images, preserving their aspect ratio, up to a tiny resolution of 15×11 and 20×15 pixels. Our results are based on extensive tests on different datasets that have been recorded indoors by a small differential drive robot and outdoors by a flying quadrocopter. Four well-known global image features and a pixel-wise image comparison method are compared under realistic conditions such as illumination changes and translations. Our results show that even when reducing the image resolution down to the tiny resolutions above, accurate localization is achievable. In this way, we can speed up the localization process considerably.

  13. [Local invasive treatment of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, L A; Zagorul'ko, O I; Gnezdilov, A V

    2014-01-01

    The literature on methods of invasive local treatment of chronic pain was analyzed. We reviewed 14 publications including meta-analyses and systematic reviews. The use of regional anesthesia conducted by anesthesiologists in pain clinics demonstrated the evidence based efficacy of different types of peridural injections of local anesthetics with steroids in patients with root pain syndromes at cervical and lumbar levels. Therapeutic blockades of the occipital nerve is effective method of treatment of cervicogenic and cluster headache as well as occipital nerve neuralgia. There are clear indications of the efficacy of local injections in primary chronic cephalgia (migraine and headache of tension). The possibility of the abortion of the pain information flow in peripheral nociceptive pathways and, as a consequence, breaking the vicious circle is emphasized. Issues on the efficacy of local injections at trigger points in the treatment of chronic pain are highlighted. PMID:24874319

  14. Supersonic projectile models for asynchronous shooter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozick, Richard J.; Whipps, Gene T.; Ash, Joshua N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we consider the localization of a gunshot using a distributed sensor network measuring time differences of arrival between a firearm's muzzle blast and the shockwave induced by a supersonic bullet. This so-called MB-SW approach is desirable because time synchronization is not required between the sensors, however it suffers from increased computational complexity and requires knowledge of the bullet's velocity at all points along its trajectory. While the actual velocity profile of a particular gunshot is unknown, one may use a parameterized model for the velocity profile and simultaneously fit the model and localize the shooter. In this paper we study efficient solutions for the localization problem and identify deceleration models that trade off localization accuracy and computational complexity. We also develop a statistical analysis that includes bias due to mismatch between the true and actual deceleration models and covariance due to additive noise.

  15. A hybrid localization technique for patient tracking.

    PubMed

    Rodionov, Denis; Kolev, George; Bushminkin, Kirill

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays numerous technologies are employed for tracking patients and assets in hospitals or nursing homes. Each of them has advantages and drawbacks. For example, WiFi localization has relatively good accuracy but cannot be used in case of power outage or in the areas with poor WiFi coverage. Magnetometer positioning or cellular network does not have such problems but they are not as accurate as localization with WiFi. This paper describes technique that simultaneously employs different localization technologies for enhancing stability and average accuracy of localization. The proposed algorithm is based on fingerprinting method paired with data fusion and prediction algorithms for estimating the object location. The core idea of the algorithm is technology fusion using error estimation methods. For testing accuracy and performance of the algorithm testing simulation environment has been implemented. Significant accuracy improvement was showed in practical scenarios. PMID:24111287

  16. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two–dimensional physical topology–merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two–dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  17. Local Affinity Release.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-07-26

    The use of hydrogels for therapeutic delivery is a burgeoning area of investigation. These water-swollen polymer matrices are ideal platforms for localized drug delivery that can be further combined with specific ligands or nanotechnologies to advance the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and proteins. Due to the advantage of hydrophobic, electrostatic, or specific extracellular matrix interactions, affinity-based strategies can overcome burst release and challenges associated with encapsulation. Future studies will provide innovative binding tools, truly stimuli-responsive systems, and original combinations of emerging technologies to control the release of therapeutics spatially and temporally. Local drug delivery can be achieved by directly injecting a therapeutic to its site of action and is advantageous because off-target effects associated with systemic delivery can be minimized. For prolonged benefit, a vehicle that provides sustained drug release is required. Hydrogels are versatile platforms for localized drug release, owing to the large library of biocompatible building blocks from which they can be formed. Injectable hydrogel formulations that gel quickly in situ and provide sustained release of therapeutics are particularly advantageous to minimize invasiveness. The incorporation of polymers, ligands or nanoparticles that have an affinity for the therapeutic of interest improve control over the release of small-molecule drugs and proteins from hydrogels, enabling spatial and temporal control over the delivery. Such affinity-based strategies can overcome drug burst release and challenges associated with protein instability, allowing more effective therapeutic molecule delivery for a range of applications from therapeutic contact lenses to ischemic tissue regeneration. PMID:27403513

  18. Localized modes in optics of photonic liquid crystals with local anisotropy of absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, V. A.; Semenov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    The localized optical modes in spiral photonic liquid crystals are theoretically studied for the certainty at the example of chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) for the case of CLC with an anisotropic local absorption. The model adopted here (absence of dielectric interfaces in the structures under investigation) makes it possible to get rid of mixing of polarizations on the surfaces of the CLC layer and of the defect structure and to reduce the corresponding equations to only the equations for light with polarization diffracting in the CLC. The dispersion equations determining connection of the edge mode (EM) and defect mode (DM) frequencies with the CLC layer parameters (anisotropy of local absorption, CLC order parameter) and other parameters of the DMS are obtained. Analytic expressions for the transmission and reflection coefficients of CLC layer and DMS for the case of CLC with an anisotropic local absorption are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the CLC layers with locally anisotropic absorption reduce the EM and DM lifetimes (and increase the lasing threshold) in the way different from the case of CLC with an isotropic local absorption. Due to the Borrmann effect revealing of which is different at the opposite stop-band edges in the case of CLC layers with an anisotropic local absorption the EM life-times for the EM frequencies at the opposite stop-bands edges may be significantly different. The options of experimental observations of the theoretically revealed phenomena are briefly discussed.

  19. Object localization using a biosonar beam: how opening your mouth improves localization

    PubMed Central

    Arditi, G.; Weiss, A. J.; Yovel, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the location of a sound source is crucial for survival. Both predators and prey usually produce sound while moving, revealing valuable information about their presence and location. Animals have thus evolved morphological and neural adaptations allowing precise sound localization. Mammals rely on the temporal and amplitude differences between the sound signals arriving at their two ears, as well as on the spectral cues available in the signal arriving at a single ear to localize a sound source. Most mammals rely on passive hearing and are thus limited by the acoustic characteristics of the emitted sound. Echolocating bats emit sound to perceive their environment. They can, therefore, affect the frequency spectrum of the echoes they must localize. The biosonar sound beam of a bat is directional, spreading different frequencies into different directions. Here, we analyse mathematically the spatial information that is provided by the beam and could be used to improve sound localization. We hypothesize how bats could improve sound localization by altering their echolocation signal design or by increasing their mouth gape (the size of the sound emitter) as they, indeed, do in nature. Finally, we also reveal a trade-off according to which increasing the echolocation signal's frequency improves the accuracy of sound localization but might result in undesired large localization errors under low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. PMID:26361552

  20. Object localization using a biosonar beam: how opening your mouth improves localization.

    PubMed

    Arditi, G; Weiss, A J; Yovel, Y

    2015-08-01

    Determining the location of a sound source is crucial for survival. Both predators and prey usually produce sound while moving, revealing valuable information about their presence and location. Animals have thus evolved morphological and neural adaptations allowing precise sound localization. Mammals rely on the temporal and amplitude differences between the sound signals arriving at their two ears, as well as on the spectral cues available in the signal arriving at a single ear to localize a sound source. Most mammals rely on passive hearing and are thus limited by the acoustic characteristics of the emitted sound. Echolocating bats emit sound to perceive their environment. They can, therefore, affect the frequency spectrum of the echoes they must localize. The biosonar sound beam of a bat is directional, spreading different frequencies into different directions. Here, we analyse mathematically the spatial information that is provided by the beam and could be used to improve sound localization. We hypothesize how bats could improve sound localization by altering their echolocation signal design or by increasing their mouth gape (the size of the sound emitter) as they, indeed, do in nature. Finally, we also reveal a trade-off according to which increasing the echolocation signal's frequency improves the accuracy of sound localization but might result in undesired large localization errors under low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. PMID:26361552

  1. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  2. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. PMID:27083105

  3. Local Group Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David

    2013-11-01

    List of contributors; List of participants; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. The formation of the Milky Way in the CDM paradigm Ken Freeman; 2. Dark matter content and tidal effects in Local Group dwarf galaxies Steven R. Majewski; 3. Notes on the missing satellites problem James Bullock; 4. The Milky Way satellite galaxies Pavel Kroupa; 5. Stellar tidal streams Rodrigo Ibata; 6. Tutorial: the analysis of colour-magnitude diagrams David Valls-Gabaud; 7. Tutorial: modeling tidal streams using N-body simulations Jorge Peñarrubia.

  4. Research fuels local economies

    SciTech Connect

    Bosisio, M. )

    1990-04-01

    Research from US DOA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has resulted in a number of new products, alternative crops, and an increase in planted acreage of crops due to pest control by pheromones. Superslurper, produced from cornstarch, was found to absorb 1400 times its weight in moisture. This material is being used in fuel filters to remove water in fuel tanks and pumps. There is a growing market for these filters; superslurpers also are used in body powders, diapers, absorbent soft goods, batteries, soil additives, and in medical and recreational coldpacks. Local economies have benefited as a direct result of ARS efforts.

  5. A novel biologically inspired local feature descriptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Tian, Tian; Tian, Jinwen; Gong, Junbin; Ming, Delie

    2014-06-01

    Local feature descriptor is a fundamental representation for image patch which has been extensively used in many computer vision applications. In this paper, different from state-of-the-art features, a novel biologically inspired local descriptor (BILD) is proposed based on the visual information processing mechanism of ventral pathway in human brain. The local features used for constructing BILD are extracted by a two-layer network, which corresponds to the simple-to-complex cell hierarchy in the primary visual cortex (V1). It works in a similar way as the simple cell and complex cell do to get responses by applying the lateral inhibition from different orientations and operating an improved cortical pooling. To enhance the distinctiveness of BILD, we combine the local features from different orientations. Extensive evaluations have been performed for image matching and object recognition. Experimental results reveal that our proposed BILD outperforms many widely used descriptors such as SIFT and SURF, which demonstrate its efficiency for representing local regions. PMID:24677037

  6. Localized Excitons in Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamska, Lyudmyla; Doorn, Stephen K.; Tretiak, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    It has been historically known that unintentional defects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may fully quench the fluorescence. However, some dopants may enhance the fluorescence by one order of magnitude thus turning the CNTs, which are excellent light absorbers, in good emitters. We have correlated the experimentally observed photoluminescence spectra to the electronic structure simulations. Our experiment reveals multiple sharp asymmetric emission peaks at energies 50-300 meV red-shifted from that of the lowest bright exciton peak. Our simulations suggest an association of these peaks with deep trap states tied to different specific chemical adducts. While the wave functions of excitons in undoped CNTs are delocalized, those of the deep-trap states are strongly localized and pinned to the dopants. These findings are consistent with the experimental observation of asymmetric broadening of the deep trap emission peaks, which can result from scattering of acoustic phonons on localized excitons. Our work lays the foundation to utilize doping as a generalized route for wave function engineering and direct control of carrier dynamics in SWCNTs toward enhanced light emission properties for photonic applications.

  7. Local Effects of Delayed Food

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M

    2007-01-01

    Five pigeons were trained on a procedure in which seven concurrent variable-interval schedules arranged seven different food–rate ratios in random sequence in each session. Each of these components lasted for 10 response-produced food deliveries, and components were separated by 10-s blackouts. We varied delays to food (signaled by blackout) between the two response alternatives in an experiment with three phases: In Phase 1, the delay on one alternative was 0 s, and the other was varied between 0 and 8 s; in Phase 2, both delays were equal and were varied from 0 to 4 s; in Phase 3, the two delays summed to 8 s, and each was varied from 1 to 7 s. The results showed that increasing delay affected local choice, measured by a pulse in preference, in the same way as decreasing magnitude, but we found also that increasing the delay at the other alternative increased local preference. This result casts doubt on the traditional view that a reinforcer strengthens a response depending only on the reinforcer's value discounted by any response–reinforcer delay. The results suggest that food guides, rather than strengthens, behavior. PMID:17465314

  8. Developing Photo Activated Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy, PALM, acquires super-resolution images by activating a subset of activatable fluorescent labels and estimating the center of the each molecular label to sub-diffractive accuracy. When this process is repeated thousands of times for different subsets of molecules, then an image can be rendered from all the center coordinates of the molecules. I will describe the circuitous story of its development that began with another super-resolution technique, NSOM, developed by my colleague Eric Betzig, who imaged single molecules at room temperature, and later we spectrally resolved individual luminescent centers of quantum wells. These two observations inspired a generalized path to localization microscopy, but that path was abandoned because no really useful fluorescent labels were available. After a decade of nonacademic industrial pursuits and the subsequent freedom of unemployment, we came across a class of genetically expressible fluorescent proteins that were switchable or convertible that enabled the concept to be implemented and be biologically promising. The past ten years have been very active with many groups exploring applications and enhancements of this concept. Demonstrating significant biological relevance will be the metric if its success.

  9. Gravity localization on hybrid branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, D. F. S.; Cruz, W. T.; Maluf, R. V.; Almeida, C. A. S.

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with gravity localization on codimension-1 brane worlds engendered by compacton-like kinks, the so-called hybrid branes. In such scenarios, the thin brane behavior is manifested when the extra dimension is outside the compact domain, where the energy density is non-trivial, instead of asymptotically as in the usual thick brane models. The zero mode is trapped in the brane, as required. The massive modes, although not localized in the brane, have important phenomenological implications such as corrections to the Newton's law. We study such corrections in the usual thick domain wall and in the hybrid brane scenarios. By means of suitable numerical methods, we attain the mass spectrum for the graviton and the corresponding wavefunctions. The spectra possess the usual linearly increasing behavior from the Kaluza-Klein theories. Further, we show that the 4D gravitational force is slightly increased at short distances. The first eigenstate contributes highly for the correction to the Newton's law. The subsequent normalized solutions have diminishing contributions. Moreover, we find out that the phenomenology of the hybrid brane is not different from the usual thick domain wall. The use of numerical techniques for solving the equations of the massive modes is useful for matching possible phenomenological measurements in the gravitational law as a probe to warped extra dimensions.

  10. Can EPR non-locality be geometrical?

    SciTech Connect

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Botero, A.

    1995-10-01

    The presence in Quantum Mechanics of non-local correlations is one of the two fundamentally non-intuitive features of that theory. The non-local correlations themselves fall into two classes: EPR and Geometrical. The non-local characteristics of the geometrical type are well-understood and are not suspected of possibly generating acausal features, such as faster-than-light propagation of information. This has especially become true since the emergence of a geometrical treatment for the relevant gauge theories, i.e. Fiber Bundle geometry, in which the quantum non-localities are seen to correspond to pure homotopy considerations. This aspect is reviewed in section 2. Contrary-wise, from its very conception, the EPR situation was felt to be paradoxical. It has been suggested that the non-local features of EPR might also derive from geometrical considerations, like all other non-local characteristics of QM. In[7], one of the authors was able to point out several plausibility arguments for this thesis, emphasizing in particular similarities between the non-local correlations provided by any gauge field theory and those required by the preservation of the quantum numbers of the original EPR state-vector, throughout its spatially-extended mode. The derivation was, however, somewhat incomplete, especially because of the apparent difference between, on the one hand, the closed spatial loops arising in the analysis of the geometrical non-localities, from Aharonov-Bohm and Berry phases to magnetic monopoles and instantons, and on the other hand, in the EPR case, the open line drawn by the positions of the two moving decay products of the disintegrating particle. In what follows, the authors endeavor to remove this obstacle and show that as in all other QM non-localities, EPR is somehow related to closed loops, almost involving homotopy considerations. They develop this view in section 3.

  11. The Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, S.

    2006-09-01

    The Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) is a unique environment that presents an opportunity to study general interstellar phenomena in great detail and in three dimensions. In particular, high resolution optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy have proven to be powerful tools for addressing fundamental questions concerning the physical conditions and three-dimensional (3D) morphology of this local material. After reviewing our current understanding of the structure of gas in the solar neighborhood, I will discuss the influence that the LISM can have on stellar and planetary systems, including LISM dust deposition onto planetary atmospheres and the modulation of galactic cosmic rays through the astrosphere --- the balancing interface between the outward pressure of the magnetized stellar wind and the inward pressure of the surrounding interstellar medium. On Earth, galactic cosmic rays may play a role as contributors to ozone layer chemistry, planetary electrical discharge frequency, biological mutation rates, and climate. Since the LISM shares the same volume as practically all known extrasolar planets, the prototypical debris disks systems, and nearby low-mass star-formation sites, it will be important to understand the structures of the LISM and how they may influence planetary atmospheres.

  12. Pattern Driven Stress Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croll, Andrew; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-03-01

    The self-assembly of patterns from isotropic initial states is a major driver of modern soft-matter research. This avenue of study is directed by the desire to understand the complex physics of the varied structures found in Nature, and by technological interest in functional materials that may be derived through biomimicry. In this work we show how a simple striped phase can respond with significant complexity to an appropriately chosen perturbation. In particular, we show how a buckled elastic plate transitions into a state of stress localization using a simple, self-assembled variation in surface topography. The collection of topographic boundaries act in concert to change the state from isotropic sinusoidal wrinkles, to sharp folds or creases separated by relatively flat regions. By varying the size of the imposed topographic pattern or the wavelength of the wrinkles, we construct a state diagram of the system. The localized state has implications for both biological systems, and for the control of non-linear pattern formation.

  13. LOCALITY AND REALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P.

    1980-02-01

    Einstein's principle that no signal travels faster than suggests that observations in one spacetime region should not depend on whether or not a radioactive decay is detected in a spacelike separated region. This locality property is incompatible with the predictions of quantum theory, and this incompatibility holds independently of the questions of realism, objective reality, and hidden variables. It holds both in the pragmatic quantum theory of Bohr and in realistic frameworks. It is shown here to hold in a completed realistic quantum theory that reconciles Einstein's demand for a description of reality itself with Bohr's contention that quantum theory is complete. This completed realistic quantum theory has no hidden variables, and no objective reality in which observable attributes can become definite independently of observers. The, theory is described in some detail, with particular attention to those aspects related to the question of locality. This completed realistic quantum theory is in principle more comprehensive than Bohr.' s pragmatic quantum theory because it is not limited in principle by the requirement that the observed system be physically separated from the observing one. Applications are discussed.

  14. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  15. Global and Local Pitch Perception in Children with Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Johannes C.; Pech-Georgel, Catherine; George, Florence; Foxton, Jessica M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated global versus local pitch pattern perception in children with dyslexia aged between 8 and 11 years. Children listened to two consecutive 4-tone pitch sequences while performing a same/different task. On the different trials, sequences either preserved the contour (local condition) or they violated the contour (global…

  16. Malaysian Employer Perceptions about Local and Foreign MBA Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabid, A. R.; Ling, C. N.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine employer perceptions of local and foreign MBA graduates along with the problems encountered and factors considered important in hiring them. Based on a sample of 91 respondents, the findings show significant differences in perceptions of local and foreign MBA graduates, as well as significant differences in…

  17. eSLDB: eukaryotic subcellular localization database.

    PubMed

    Pierleoni, Andea; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic Subcellular Localization DataBase collects the annotations of subcellular localization of eukaryotic proteomes. So far five proteomes have been processed and stored: Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana. For each sequence, the database lists localization obtained adopting three different approaches: (i) experimentally determined (when available); (ii) homology-based (when possible); and (iii) predicted. The latter is computed with a suite of machine learning based methods, developed in house. All the data are available at our website and can be searched by sequence, by protein code and/or by protein description. Furthermore, a more complex search can be performed combining different search fields and keys. All the data contained in the database can be freely downloaded in flat file format. The database is available at http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/esldb/. PMID:17108361

  18. Headphone localization of speech stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, three dimensional acoustic display systems have been developed that synthesize virtual sound sources over headphones based on filtering by Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs), the direction-dependent spectral changes caused primarily by the outer ears. Here, 11 inexperienced subjects judged the apparent spatial location of headphone-presented speech stimuli filtered with non-individualized HRTFs. About half of the subjects 'pulled' their judgements toward either the median or the lateral-vertical planes, and estimates were almost always elevated. Individual differences were pronounced for the distance judgements; 15 to 46 percent of stimuli were heard inside the head with the shortest estimates near the median plane. The results infer that most listeners can obtain useful azimuth information from speech stimuli filtered by nonindividualized RTFs. Measurements of localization error and reversal rates are comparable with a previous study that used broadband noise stimuli.

  19. Local fat treatments: classification proposal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    The poor understanding of the real, intimate action mechanisms behind any aesthetic procedures is a huge problem for many Aesthetic physicians. In addition, nomenclature of and regarding any procedure has become a true barrier when speaking about medical knowledge in the Aesthetic Medicine field since marketing and science often collide one another. Medical procedures for localized fat reduction are very different from each other and it is, at least, inaccurate to refer to all of them plainly as "fat reduction methods." A specific classification has become urgent and its categories should be able to imply what each method entails. For this classification proposal, "reversibility," "membrane disruption or inflammation," and "action selectivity," have been the selected criteria. PMID:27144093

  20. Local fat treatments: classification proposal

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The poor understanding of the real, intimate action mechanisms behind any aesthetic procedures is a huge problem for many Aesthetic physicians. In addition, nomenclature of and regarding any procedure has become a true barrier when speaking about medical knowledge in the Aesthetic Medicine field since marketing and science often collide one another. Medical procedures for localized fat reduction are very different from each other and it is, at least, inaccurate to refer to all of them plainly as “fat reduction methods.” A specific classification has become urgent and its categories should be able to imply what each method entails. For this classification proposal, “reversibility,” “membrane disruption or inflammation,” and “action selectivity,” have been the selected criteria. PMID:27144093

  1. Einstein locality, EPR locality, and the significance for science of the nonlocal character of quantum theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    The immense difference between Einstein locality and EPR locality is discussed. The latter provides a basis for establishing the nonlocal character of quantum theory, whereas the former does not. A model representing Heisenberg's idea of physical reality is introduced. It is nondeterministic and holistic: the objects, measuring devices, and their environment are treated as an inseparable entity, with, however, macroscopically localizable attributes. The EPR principle that no disturbance can propagate faster than light is imposed without assuming any structure incompatible with orthodox quantum thinking. This locality requirement renders the model incompatible with rudimentary predictions of quantum theory. A more general proof not depending on any model is also given. A recent argument that purports to show that quantum theory is compatible with EPR locality is examined. It illustrates the importance of the crucial one-world assumption. The significance for science of the failure of EPR locality is discussed.

  2. All Holdings Are Local: Archivists and Local Government Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell D.

    2004-01-01

    Archivists working in repositories that contain local government records play an integral role within the local community. Unlike their colleagues in state, regional, or national repositories, the local government archivist concentrates on a small geographic region and demonstrates knowledge of the politics, history, and socio-economics of the…

  3. Material sound source localization through headphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunai, Larisa; Peris-Fajarnes, Guillermo; Lengua, Ismael Lengua; Montaña, Ignacio Tortajada

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper a study of sound localization is carried out, considering two different sounds emitted from different hit materials (wood and bongo) as well as a Delta sound. The motivation of this research is to study how humans localize sounds coming from different materials, with the purpose of a future implementation of the acoustic sounds with better localization features in navigation aid systems or training audio-games suited for blind people. Wood and bongo sounds are recorded after hitting two objects made of these materials. Afterwards, they are analysed and processed. On the other hand, the Delta sound (click) is generated by using the Adobe Audition software, considering a frequency of 44.1 kHz. All sounds are analysed and convolved with previously measured non-individual Head-Related Transfer Functions both for an anechoic environment and for an environment with reverberation. The First Choice method is used in this experiment. Subjects are asked to localize the source position of the sound listened through the headphones, by using a graphic user interface. The analyses of the recorded data reveal that no significant differences are obtained either when considering the nature of the sounds (wood, bongo, Delta) or their environmental context (with or without reverberation). The localization accuracies for the anechoic sounds are: wood 90.19%, bongo 92.96% and Delta sound 89.59%, whereas for the sounds with reverberation the results are: wood 90.59%, bongo 92.63% and Delta sound 90.91%. According to these data, we can conclude that even when considering the reverberation effect, the localization accuracy does not significantly increase.

  4. Style Differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station Expedition 11 crew, set for liftoff Apr. 15 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, is to perform two extravehicular activities-one in Russian and the other in U.S. spacesuits, a unique combination that points up different national space-operating styles. The outgoing Expedition 10 commander, astronaut Leroy Chiao, addressed the differences in an e-mail exchange from the ISS. Chiao is well qualified to discuss these topics, having logged four shuttle-based EVAs in the American suit and two in the Russian Orlan, the most recent one Mar. 28. Chiao and Expedition 10 cosmonaut Salizhan Sharipov are to return to Earth in their own Soyuz Apr. 25.

  5. Skeletal Muscle, but not Cardiovascular Function, Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Michael J.; Touchberry, Chad D.; Silswal, Neerupma; Brotto, Leticia; Elmore, Chris J.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Andresen, Jon; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well-characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand in order to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL-fast-twitch muscle), soleus (SOL–slow-twitch muscle), heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum) which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2α or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In summary

  6. Skeletal Muscle, but not Cardiovascular Function, Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Recessive Hypophosphatemic Rickets.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Michael J; Touchberry, Chad D; Silswal, Neerupma; Brotto, Leticia; Elmore, Chris J; Bonewald, Lynda F; Andresen, Jon; Brotto, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) is a heritable disorder characterized by hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and poor bone development. ARHR results from inactivating mutations in the DMP1 gene with the human phenotype being recapitulated in the Dmp1 null mouse model which displays elevated plasma fibroblast growth factor 23. While the bone phenotype has been well-characterized, it is not known what effects ARHR may also have on skeletal, cardiac, or vascular smooth muscle function, which is critical to understand in order to treat patients suffering from this condition. In this study, the extensor digitorum longus (EDL-fast-twitch muscle), soleus (SOL-slow-twitch muscle), heart, and aorta were removed from Dmp1 null mice and ex-vivo functional tests were simultaneously performed in collaboration by three different laboratories. Dmp1 null EDL and SOL muscles produced less force than wildtype muscles after normalization for physiological cross sectional area of the muscles. Both EDL and SOL muscles from Dmp1 null mice also produced less force after the addition of caffeine (which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum) which may indicate problems in excitation contraction coupling in these mice. While the body weights of the Dmp1 null were smaller than wildtype, the heart weight to body weight ratio was higher. However, there were no differences in pathological hypertrophic gene expression compared to wildtype and maximal force of contraction was not different indicating that there may not be cardiac pathology under the tested conditions. We did observe a decrease in the rate of force development generated by cardiac muscle in the Dmp1 null which may be related to some of the deficits observed in skeletal muscle. There were no differences observed in aortic contractions induced by PGF2α or 5-HT or in endothelium-mediated acetylcholine-induced relaxations or endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxations. In summary, these

  7. Local oscillator selection for digital satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Surinder

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of different local oscillator (LO) designs and their suitability for digital communications. Based on the system budget for performance degradation due to carrier phase noise, a specification for the LO phase noise is derived. Consideration is given to the following types of LO subsystems: mechanical cavity, VTO-PLO, DRO-PLO, and multiplier chain.

  8. Local Government Responses to Education Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Ronald C.; Papke, Leslie E.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a primer for policymakers about the economics of education grants and draws implications for school finance reform. Includes an overview of the types of education grants that states and the federal government have used to aid local spending and summarizes findings from states' experiences with different forms of education finance.…

  9. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  10. The local minority game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moelbert, S.; De Los Rios, P.

    2002-01-01

    Ecologists and economists try to explain collective behavior in terms of competitive systems of selfish individuals with the ability to learn from the past. Statistical physicists have been investigating models which might contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these systems. During the last 3 yr one intuitive model, commonly referred to as the minority game (MG), has attracted considerable attention. Powerful yet simple, the minority game has produced encouraging results which can explain the temporal behavior of competitive systems. Here we switch the interest to the phenomena due to a distribution of the individuals in space. For analyzing these effects we modify the minority game and the local minority game (LMG) is introduced. We study the system both numerically and analytically, using the customary techniques already developed for the ordinary Minority Game.

  11. Localized wave pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D L; Henderson, T L; Krueger, K L; Lewis, D K; Zilkowski, R N

    1999-06-01

    The Localized Wave project of the Strategic System Support Program has recently finished an experiment in cooperation with the Advanced SONAR group of the Applied Research Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin. The purpose of the experiment was three-fold. They wanted to see if (1) the LW pulse could propagate over significant distances, to see if (2) a new type of array and drive system specifically designed for the pulse would increase efficiency over single frequency tone bursts, and to see if (3) the complexity of our 24 channel drivers resulted in better efficiency than a single equivalent pulse driving a piston. In the experiment, several LW pulses were launched from the Lake Travis facility and propagated over distances of either 100 feet or 600 feet, through a thermocline for the 600 foot measurements. The results show conclusively that the Localized Wave will propagate past the near field distance. The LW pulses resulted in extremely broad frequency band width pulses with narrow spatial beam patterns and unmeasurable side lobes. Their array gain was better than most tone bursts and further, were better than their equivalent piston pulses. This marks the first test of several Low Diffraction beams against their equivalent piston pulses, as well as the first propagation of LW pulses over appreciable distances. The LW pulse is now proven a useful tool in open water, rather than a laboratory curiosity. The experimental system and array were built by ARL, and the experiments were conducted by ARL staff on their standard test range. The 600 feet measurements were made at the farthest extent of that range.

  12. Going Local to Find Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury Going Local to Find Help Past Issues / ... the time. From the MedlinePlus page on Traumatic Brain Injury, you can use Go Local to find ...