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Sample records for dna affects gene

  1. Satellite DNA from the brine shrimp Artemia affects the expression of a flanking gene in yeast.

    PubMed

    Maiorano, D; Cece, R; Badaracco, G

    1997-04-11

    We have previously revealed that in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana an AluI DNA family of repeats, 113 bp in length, is the major component of the constitutive heterochromatin and that this repetitive DNA shows a stable curvature that confers a solenoidal geometry on the double helix in vitro. It was suggested that this particular structure may play a relevant role in determining the condensation of the heterochromatin. In this report we have cloned hexamers of highly-repetitive sequence (AluI-satellite DNA) in proximity to a yeast lacZ reporter gene on a plasmid. We find that the expression of the reporter gene is affected by the presence of this DNA in a dose- and orientation-dependent manner in the yeast, S. cerevisiae. We show that this effect is not dependent on under-replication or re-arrangements of the repetitive DNA in the cell but is due to decreased expression of the reporter gene. Our results indicate that the AluI-satellite DNA of Artemia per se is able to influence gene expression. PMID:9161405

  2. DNA Hypomethylation Affects Cancer-Related Biological Functions and Genes Relevant in Neuroblastoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mayol, Gemma; Martín-Subero, José I.; Ríos, José; Queiros, Ana; Kulis, Marta; Suñol, Mariona; Esteller, Manel; Gómez, Soledad; Garcia, Idoia; de Torres, Carmen; Rodríguez, Eva; Galván, Patricia; Mora, Jaume; Lavarino, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) pathogenesis has been reported to be closely associated with numerous genetic alterations. However, underlying DNA methylation patterns have not been extensively studied in this developmental malignancy. Here, we generated microarray-based DNA methylation profiles of primary neuroblastic tumors. Stringent supervised differential methylation analyses allowed us to identify epigenetic changes characteristic for NB tumors as well as for clinical and biological subtypes of NB. We observed that gene-specific loss of DNA methylation is more prevalent than promoter hypermethylation. Remarkably, such hypomethylation affected cancer-related biological functions and genes relevant to NB pathogenesis such as CCND1, SPRR3, BTC, EGF and FGF6. In particular, differential methylation in CCND1 affected mostly an evolutionary conserved functionally relevant 3′ untranslated region, suggesting that hypomethylation outside promoter regions may play a role in NB pathogenesis. Hypermethylation targeted genes involved in cell development and proliferation such as RASSF1A, POU2F2 or HOXD3, among others. The results derived from this study provide new candidate epigenetic biomarkers associated with NB as well as insights into the molecular pathogenesis of this tumor, which involves a marked gene-specific hypomethylation. PMID:23144874

  3. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  4. RNA interference knockdown of DNA methyl-transferase 3 affects gene alternative splicing in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Li, Yang; Stroud, Hume; Feng, Suhua; Newman, Thomas C.; Kaneda, Megan; Hou, Kirk K.; Worley, Kim C.; Elsik, Christine G.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Ma, Jian; Robinson, Gene E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of DNA methylation from fungi, plants, and animals indicate that gene body methylation is ancient and highly conserved in eukaryotic genomes, but its role has not been clearly defined. It has been postulated that regulation of alternative splicing of transcripts was an original function of DNA methylation, but a direct experimental test of the effect of methylation on alternative slicing at the whole genome level has never been performed. To do this, we developed a unique method to administer RNA interference (RNAi) in a high-throughput and noninvasive manner and then used it to knock down the expression of DNA methyl-transferase 3 (dnmt3), which is required for de novo DNA methylation. We chose the honey bee (Apis mellifera) for this test because it has recently emerged as an important model organism for studying the effects of DNA methylation on development and social behavior, and DNA methylation in honey bees is predominantly on gene bodies. Here we show that dnmt3 RNAi decreased global genomic methylation level as expected and in addition caused widespread and diverse changes in alternative splicing in fat tissue. Four different types of splicing events were affected by dnmt3 gene knockdown, and change in two types, exon skipping and intron retention, was directly related to decreased methylation. These results demonstrate that one function of gene body DNA methylation is to regulate alternative splicing. PMID:23852726

  5. Physical Factors Affecting Plasmid DNA Compaction in Stearylamine-Containing Nanoemulsions Intended for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Silva, André Leandro; Júnior, Francisco Alexandrino; Verissimo, Lourena Mafra; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; Egito, Lucila Carmem Monte; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes; do Egito, Eryvaldo Socrates Tabosa

    2012-01-01

    Cationic lipids have been used in the development of non-viral gene delivery systems as lipoplexes. Stearylamine, a cationic lipid that presents a primary amine group when in solution, is able to compact genetic material by electrostatic interactions. In dispersed systems such as nanoemulsions this lipid anchors on the oil/water interface confering a positive charge to them. The aim of this work was to evaluate factors that influence DNA compaction in cationic nanoemulsions containing stearylamine. The influence of the stearylamine incorporation phase (water or oil), time of complexation, and different incubation temperatures were studied. The complexation rate was assessed by electrophoresis migration on agarose gel 0.7%, and nanoemulsion and lipoplex characterization was done by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The results demonstrate that the best DNA compaction process occurs after 120 min of complexation, at low temperature (4 ± 1 °C), and after incorporation of the cationic lipid into the aqueous phase. Although the zeta potential of lipoplexes was lower than the results found for basic nanoemulsions, the granulometry did not change. Moreover, it was demonstrated that lipoplexes are suitable vehicles for gene delivery. PMID:24281666

  6. Physical factors affecting plasmid DNA compaction in stearylamine-containing nanoemulsions intended for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Silva, André Leandro; Alexandrino, Francisco; Verissimo, Lourena Mafra; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; Egito, Lucila Carmem Monte; de Oliveira, Anselmo Gomes; do Egito, Eryvaldo Socrates Tabosa

    2012-01-01

    Cationic lipids have been used in the development of non-viral gene delivery systems as lipoplexes. Stearylamine, a cationic lipid that presents a primary amine group when in solution, is able to compact genetic material by electrostatic interactions. In dispersed systems such as nanoemulsions this lipid anchors on the oil/water interface confering a positive charge to them. The aim of this work was to evaluate factors that influence DNA compaction in cationic nanoemulsions containing stearylamine. The influence of the stearylamine incorporation phase (water or oil), time of complexation, and different incubation temperatures were studied. The complexation rate was assessed by electrophoresis migration on agarose gel 0.7%, and nanoemulsion and lipoplex characterization was done by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The results demonstrate that the best DNA compaction process occurs after 120 min of complexation, at low temperature (4 ± 1 °C), and after incorporation of the cationic lipid into the aqueous phase. Although the zeta potential of lipoplexes was lower than the results found for basic nanoemulsions, the granulometry did not change. Moreover, it was demonstrated that lipoplexes are suitable vehicles for gene delivery. PMID:24281666

  7. DNA Methylation of Lipid-Related Genes Affects Blood Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Liliane; Wahl, Simone; Pilling, Luke C.; Reischl, Eva; Sandling, Johanna K.; Kunze, Sonja; Holdt, Lesca M.; Kretschmer, Anja; Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Hedman, Åsa K.; Roden, Michael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Teupser, Daniel; Meisinger, Christa; Spector, Timothy D.; Kronenberg, Florian; Prokisch, Holger; Melzer, David; Peters, Annette; Deloukas, Panos; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waldenberger, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms might be involved in the regulation of interindividual lipid level variability and thus may contribute to the cardiovascular risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between genome-wide DNA methylation and blood lipid levels high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Observed DNA methylation changes were also further analyzed to examine their relationship with previous hospitalized myocardial infarction. Methods and Results Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were determined in whole blood samples of 1776 subjects of the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 cohort using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumina). Ten novel lipid-related CpG sites annotated to various genes including ABCG1, MIR33B/SREBF1, and TNIP1 were identified. CpG cg06500161, located in ABCG1, was associated in opposite directions with both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β coefficient=−0.049; P=8.26E-17) and triglyceride levels (β=0.070; P=1.21E-27). Eight associations were confirmed by replication in the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F3 study (n=499) and in the Invecchiare in Chianti, Aging in the Chianti Area study (n=472). Associations between triglyceride levels and SREBF1 and ABCG1 were also found in adipose tissue of the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource cohort (n=634). Expression analysis revealed an association between ABCG1 methylation and lipid levels that might be partly mediated by ABCG1 expression. DNA methylation of ABCG1 might also play a role in previous hospitalized myocardial infarction (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval=1.06–1.25). Conclusions Epigenetic modifications of the newly identified loci might regulate disturbed blood lipid levels and thus contribute to the development of complex lipid-related diseases. PMID:25583993

  8. Smoking and polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolism and DNA repair genes are additive risk factors affecting bladder cancer in Northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rouissi, Kamel; Ouerhani, Slah; Hamrita, Bechr; Bougatef, Karim; Marrakchi, Raja; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Mohamed Riadh; Bouzouita, Mohamed; Chebil, Mohamed; Ben Ammar Elgaaied, Amel

    2011-12-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the nineteen-fifties. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking and genetic polymorphisms on the occurrence of bladder cancer. The tobacco carcinogens are metabolized by various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the super-families of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). DNA repair is essential to an individual's ability to respond to damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Alterations in DNA repair genes may affect cancer risk by influencing individual susceptibility to this environmental exposure. Polymorphisms in NAT2, GST and DNA repair genes alter the ability of these enzymes to metabolize carcinogens or to repair alterations caused by this process. We have conducted a case-control study to assess the role of smoking, slow NAT2 variants, GSTM1 and GSTT1 null, and XPC, XPD, XPG nucleotide excision-repair (NER) genotypes in bladder cancer development in North Tunisia. Taken alone, each gene unless NAT2 did not appear to be a factor affecting bladder cancer susceptibility. For the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, the NAT2*5/*7 diplotype was found to have a 7-fold increased risk to develop bladder cancer (OR = 7.14; 95% CI: 1.30-51.41). However, in tobacco consumers, we have shown that Null GSTM1, Wild GSTT1, Slow NAT2, XPC (CC) and XPG (CC) are genetic risk factors for the disease. When combined together in susceptible individuals compared to protected individuals these risk factors give an elevated OR (OR = 61). So, we have shown a strong cumulative effect of tobacco and different combinations of studied genetic risk factors which lead to a great susceptibility to bladder cancer. PMID:21647780

  9. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  10. Common polymorphism in a highly variable region upstream of the human lactase gene affects DNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hollox, E J; Poulter, M; Wang, Y; Krause, A; Swallow, D M

    1999-01-01

    In most mammals lactase activity declines after weaning when lactose is no longer part of the diet, but in many humans lactase activity persists into adult life. The difference responsible for this phenotypic polymorphism has been shown to be cis-acting to the lactase gene. The causal sequence difference has not been found so far, but a number of polymorphic sites have been found within and near to the lactase gene. We have shown previously that in Europeans there are two polymorphic sites in a small region between 974 bp and 852 bp upstream from the start of transcription, which are detectable by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In this study, analysis of individuals from five other population groups by the same DGGE method reveals four new alleles resulting from three additional nucleotide changes within this very small region. Analysis of sequence in four primate species and comparison with the published pig sequence shows that the overall sequence of this highly variable human region is conserved in pigs as well as primates, and that it lies within a 1kb region which has been shown to control lactase downregulation in pigs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies were carried out to determine whether common variation affected protein-DNA binding and several binding activities were found using this technique. A novel two base-pair deletion that is common in most populations tested, but is not present in Europeans, caused no change in binding activity. However, a previously published C to T transition at -958bp dramatically reduced binding activity, although the functional significance of this is not clear. PMID:10573012

  11. Selective ploidy ablation, a high-throughput plasmid transfer protocol, identifies new genes affecting topoisomerase I–induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Robert J.D.; González-Barrera, Sergio; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Alvaro, David; Ciccone, Samantha; Wagner, Marisa; Rothstein, Rodney

    2011-01-01

    We have streamlined the process of transferring plasmids into any yeast strain library by developing a novel mating-based, high-throughput method called selective ploidy ablation (SPA). SPA uses a universal plasmid donor strain that contains conditional centromeres on every chromosome. The plasmid-bearing donor is mated to a recipient, followed by removal of all donor-strain chromosomes, producing a haploid strain containing the transferred plasmid. As proof of principle, we used SPA to transfer plasmids containing wild-type and mutant alleles of DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) into the haploid yeast gene-disruption library. Overexpression of Top1 identified only one sensitive mutation, rpa34, while overexpression of top1-T722A allele, a camptothecin mimetic, identified 190 sensitive gene-disruption strains along with rpa34. In addition to known camptothecin-sensitive strains, this set contained mutations in genes involved in the Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex, the kinetochore, and vesicle trafficking. We further show that mutations in several ESCRT vesicle trafficking components increase Top1 levels, which is dependent on SUMO modification. These findings demonstrate the utility of the SPA technique to introduce plasmids into the haploid gene-disruption library to discover new interacting pathways. PMID:21173034

  12. DNA topology affects transcriptional regulation of the pertussis toxin gene of Bordetella pertussis in Escherichia coli and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Scarlato, V; Aricò, B; Rappuoli, R

    1993-01-01

    The bvg locus of Bordetella pertussis encodes an environmentally inducible operon essential for the expression of virulence genes. We show that in Escherichia coli, the PTOX promoter cloned in cis of the bvg locus is activated and environmentally regulated. Cotransformation of E. coli with the bvg locus cloned in a low-copy-number plasmid and with the PTOX promoter cloned in a high-copy-number plasmid can give rise to two different results. If the PTOX promoter is cloned in the pGem-3 vector, transcription is absent. If the PTOX promoter is cloned in the plasmid pKK232, containing the PTOX promoter between two ribosomal gene terminators of transcription, transcription occurs, although regulation of transcription is abolished. Under these conditions, the intracellular amount of RNA transcripts is increased by adding to the culture medium novobiocin, an inhibitor of bacterial gyrases. In vitro, the transcription of the PTOX promoter is activated on E. coli RNA polymerase supplemented with cell extracts from wild-type B. pertussis. Addition of DNA gyrase to the mixture dramatically reduces the amount of RNA synthesized. Our data show that the products of the bvg locus, BvgA and BvgS, are directly involved in the regulation of the PTOX promoter in E. coli and that DNA topology may play a role in the induction of transcription. Images PMID:8393006

  13. Post-weaning selenium and folate supplementation affects gene and protein expression and global DNA methylation in mice fed high-fat diets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumption of high-fat diets has negative impacts on health and well-being, some of which may be epigenetically regulated. Selenium and folate are two compounds which influence epigenetic mechanisms. We investigated the hypothesis that post-weaning supplementation with adequate levels of selenium and folate in offspring of female mice fed a high-fat, low selenium and folate diet during gestation and lactation will lead to epigenetic changes of potential importance for long-term health. Methods Female offspring of mothers fed the experimental diet were either maintained on this diet (HF-low-low), or weaned onto a high-fat diet with sufficient levels of selenium and folate (HF-low-suf), for 8 weeks. Gene and protein expression, DNA methylation, and histone modifications were measured in colon and liver of female offspring. Results Adequate levels of selenium and folate post-weaning affected gene expression in colon and liver of offspring, including decreasing Slc2a4 gene expression. Protein expression was only altered in the liver. There was no effect of adequate levels of selenium and folate on global histone modifications in the liver. Global liver DNA methylation was decreased in mice switched to adequate levels of selenium and folate, but there was no effect on methylation of specific CpG sites within the Slc2a4 gene in liver. Conclusions Post-weaning supplementation with adequate levels of selenium and folate in female offspring of mice fed high-fat diets inadequate in selenium and folate during gestation and lactation can alter global DNA methylation in liver. This may be one factor through which the negative effects of a poor diet during early life can be ameliorated. Further research is required to establish what role epigenetic changes play in mediating observed changes in gene and protein expression, and the relevance of these changes to health. PMID:23497688

  14. Coordinate expression of Escherichia coli dnaA and dnaN genes.

    PubMed

    Sako, T; Sakakibara, Y

    1980-01-01

    The defects of temperature-sensitive dnaA and dnaN mutants of Escherichia coli are complemented by a recombinant lambda phage, which carries the bacterial DNA segment composed of two EcoRI segments of 1.0 and 3.3 kilobases. Derivatives of the phage, which have an insertion segment of Tn3 in the dnaA gene, are much less active in expressing the dnaN gene function than the parent phage. The dnaN gene activity was determined as the efficiency of superinfecting phage to suppress loss of the viability of lambda lysogenic dnaN59 cells at the non-permissive temperature. Deletions that include the end of the dnaA gene distal to the dnaN gene also reduce the expression of the dnaN gene function. Deletion and insertion in the dnaN gene do not affect the expression of the dnaA gene function. The expression of the dnaN gene function by the dnaA- dnaN+ phages remains weak upon simultaneous infection with dnaA+ dnaN- phages. Thus the insertion and deletion of the dnaA gene influence in cis the expresion of the dnaN gene. We propose that the dnaA and dnaN genes constitute an operon, where the former is upstream to the latter. PMID:6449652

  15. Stability of mRNA/DNA and DNA/DNA Duplexes Affects mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kraeva, Rayna I.; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Roguev, Assen; Ivanova, Anna; Nedelcheva-Veleva, Marina N.; Stoynov, Stoyno S.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, due to their structural and chemical properties, can form double-stranded secondary structures that assist the transfer of genetic information and can modulate gene expression. However, the nucleotide sequence alone is insufficient in explaining phenomena like intron-exon recognition during RNA processing. This raises the question whether nucleic acids are endowed with other attributes that can contribute to their biological functions. In this work, we present a calculation of thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes across the genomes of four species in the genus Saccharomyces by nearest-neighbor method. The results show that coding regions are more thermodynamically stable than introns, 3′-untranslated regions and intergenic sequences. Furthermore, open reading frames have more stable sense mRNA/DNA duplexes than the potential antisense duplexes, a property that can aid gene discovery. The lower stability of the DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes of 3′-untranslated regions and the higher stability of genes correlates with increased mRNA level. These results suggest that the thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes affects mRNA transcription. PMID:17356699

  16. DNA Microarray and Gene Ontology Enrichment Analysis Reveals That a Mutation in opsX Affects Virulence and Chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Il; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we investigated the effect of a mutation in opsX (XOO1056), which encodes a saccharide biosynthesis regulatory protein, on the virulence and bacterial chemotaxis of Xoo. We performed DNA microarray analysis, which showed that 63 of 2,678 genes, including genes related to bacterial motility (flagellar and chemotaxis proteins) were significantly downregulated (<−2 log2 fold changes) by the mutation in opsX. Indeed, motility assays showed that the mutant strain was nonmotile on semisolid agar swarm plates. In addition, a mutant strain (opsX::Tn5) showed decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar, IR24. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR reaction was performed to confirm the expression levels of these genes, including those related to flagella and chemotaxis, in the opsX mutant. Our findings revealed that mutation of opsX affects both virulence and bacterial motility. These results will help to improve our understanding of Xoo and provide insight into Xoo-rice interactions. PMID:27298594

  17. Deep Sequencing of the Nicastrin Gene in Pooled DNA, the Identification of Genetic Variants That Affect Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lupton, Michelle K.; Proitsi, Petroula; Danillidou, Makrina; Tsolaki, Magda; Hamilton, Gillian; Wroe, Richard; Pritchard, Megan; Lord, Kathryn; Martin, Belinda M.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Harold, Denise; Hollingworth, Paul; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Nicastrin is an obligatory component of the γ-secretase; the enzyme complex that leads to the production of Aβ fragments critically central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Analyses of the effects of common variation in this gene on risk for late onset AD have been inconclusive. We investigated the effect of rare variation in the coding regions of the Nicastrin gene in a cohort of AD patients and matched controls using an innovative pooling approach and next generation sequencing. Five SNPs were identified and validated by individual genotyping from 311 cases and 360 controls. Association analysis identified a non-synonymous rare SNP (N417Y) with a statistically higher frequency in cases compared to controls in the Greek population (OR 3.994, CI 1.105–14.439, p = 0.035). This finding warrants further investigation in a larger cohort and adds weight to the hypothesis that rare variation explains some of genetic heritability still to be identified in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21364883

  18. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  19. Sequence Affects the Cyclization of DNA Minicircles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-03-17

    Understanding how the sequence of a DNA molecule affects its dynamic properties is a central problem affecting biochemistry and biotechnology. The process of cyclizing short DNA, as a critical step in molecular cloning, lacks a comprehensive picture of the kinetic process containing sequence information. We have elucidated this process by using coarse-grained simulations, enhanced sampling methods, and recent theoretical advances. We are able to identify the types and positions of structural defects during the looping process at a base-pair level. Correlations along a DNA molecule dictate critical sequence positions that can affect the looping rate. Structural defects change the bending elasticity of the DNA molecule from a harmonic to subharmonic potential with respect to bending angles. We explore the subelastic chain as a possible model in loop formation kinetics. A sequence-dependent model is developed to qualitatively predict the relative loop formation time as a function of DNA sequence. PMID:26938490

  20. A Sequence-Specific Interaction between the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA Gene Repeats and a Locus Encoding an RNA Polymerase I Subunit Affects Ribosomal DNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cahyani, Inswasti; Cridge, Andrew G.; Engelke, David R.; Ganley, Austen R. D.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of eukaryotic genomes is linked to their functions. However, how individual features of the global spatial structure contribute to nuclear function remains largely unknown. We previously identified a high-frequency interchromosomal interaction within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome that occurs between the intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats and the intergenic sequence between the locus encoding the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit and a lysine tRNA gene [i.e., RPA135-tK(CUU)P]. Here, we used quantitative chromosome conformation capture in combination with replacement mapping to identify a 75-bp sequence within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region that is involved in the interaction. We demonstrate that the RPA135-IGS1 interaction is dependent on the rDNA copy number and the Msn2 protein. Surprisingly, we found that the interaction does not govern RPA135 transcription. Instead, replacement of a 605-bp region within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region results in a reduction in the RPA135-IGS1 interaction level and fluctuations in rDNA copy number. We conclude that the chromosomal interaction that occurs between the RPA135-tK(CUU)P and rDNA IGS1 loci stabilizes rDNA repeat number and contributes to the maintenance of nucleolar stability. Our results provide evidence that the DNA loci involved in chromosomal interactions are composite elements, sections of which function in stabilizing the interaction or mediating a functional outcome. PMID:25421713

  1. Loss of CCDC6, the First Identified RET Partner Gene, Affects pH2AX S139 Levels and Accelerates Mitotic Entry upon DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Mark T.; Pacelli, Roberto; Fusco, Alfredo; Celetti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    CCDC6 was originally identified in chimeric genes caused by chromosomal translocation involving the RET proto-oncogene in some thryoid tumors mostly upon ionizing radiation exposure. Recognised as a pro-apoptotic phosphoprotein that negatively regulates CREB1-dependent transcription, CCDC6 is an ATM substrate that is responsive to genotoxic stress. Here we report that following genotoxic stress, loss or inactivation of CCDC6 in cancers that carry the CCDC6 fusion, accelerates the dephosphorylation of pH2AX S139, resulting in defective G2 arrest and premature mitotic entry. Moreover, we show that CCDC6 depleted cells appear to repair DNA damaged in a shorter time compared to controls, based on reporter assays in cells. High-troughput proteomic screening predicted the interaction between the CCDC6 gene product and the catalytic subunit of Serin–Threonin Protein Phosphatase 4 (PP4c) recently identified as the evolutionarily conserved pH2AX S139 phosphatase that is activated upon DNA Damage. We describe the interaction between CCDC6 and PP4c and we report the modulation of PP4c enzymatic activity in CCDC6 depleted cells. We discuss the functional significance of CCDC6-PP4c interactions and hypothesize that CCDC6 may act in the DNA Damage Response by negatively modulating PP4c activity. Overall, our data suggest that in primary tumours the loss of CCDC6 function could influence genome stability and thereby contribute to carcinogenesis. PMID:22655027

  2. Six DNA polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene: their genetic relationship and an example of their use for identifying affected relatives of patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, S; King-Underwood, L; Gudnason, V; Seed, M; Delattre, S; Clavey, V; Fruchart, J C

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the relative allele frequency and estimated linkage disequilibrium between six DNA polymorphisms of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene. Polymorphisms were detected using the enzymes SfaNI, TaqI, StuI, HincII, AvaII, and NcoI after DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected between many of the pair wise comparisons in a sample of 60 patients heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Using the enzymes HincII, NcoI, and SfaNI, 85% of patients were heterozygous for at least one polymorphism and thus potentially informative for cosegregation studies. The polymorphisms were used to follow the inheritance of the defective allele of the LDL receptor gene in the relatives of a patient with FH. Assays of LDL receptor activity on lymphoblastoid cell lines from two members of the family was used to confirm that the proband, but not the hypercholesterolaemic brother, had a defect in the LDL receptor. In the family, none of the children had inherited the allele of the LDL receptor gene inferred to be defective. The problems associated with this cosegregation approach to identify relatives of patients with a clinical diagnosis of FH are discussed. PMID:8098067

  3. Breast cancer risk and the DNA double-strand break end-joining capacity of nonhomologous end-joining genes are affected by BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Bau, Da-Tian; Fu, Yi-Ping; Chen, Shou-Tung; Cheng, Ting-Chih; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Shen, Chen-Yang

    2004-07-15

    A tumorigenic role of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) has been suggested by the finding of a significant association between increased breast cancer risk and a cooperative effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NHEJ genes. However, the lack of an association between hereditary breast cancer and defective NHEJ genes prevents conclusions from being drawn about a link between NHEJ and breast cancer development. Recently, BRCA1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts were found to have significantly reduced NHEJ activity, suggesting an accessory role of BRCA1 in NHEJ. The present study was performed to confirm this observation in human breast cancer cell lines and to examine whether the interaction between BRCA1 and NHEJ was of tumorigenic significance. Support for this hypothesis came from the findings that (a) a case-control study (469 breast cancer patients and 740 healthy controls) showed that the breast cancer risk associated with high-risk genotypes of NHEJ genes was significantly modified by the BRCA1 genotype. A significant increase in the cancer risk associated either with harboring one additional putative high-risk NHEJ genotype or with the joint effect of having reproductive risk factors (reflected by an interval of > or =12 years between menarche and first full-term pregnancy) and a higher number of high-risk genotypes of the NHEJ genes was only seen in women with at least one variant BRCA1 allele (i.e., the Glu/Gly or Gly/Gly forms of BRCA1 Glu(1038)Gly); and (b) a phenotype-based study measuring in vitro and in vivo NHEJ capacity showed that the precise end-joining capacity was different in breast cancer cell lines with different BRCA1 statuses being higher in BRCA1-expressing MCF-7 cells than in HCC1937 cells (defective BRCA1 expression). Furthermore, this end-joining capacity was decreased in MCF-7 cells in which BRCA1 expression was blocked using small interfering RNA and

  4. The A1555G Mutation in the 12S rRNA Gene of Human mtDNA: Recurrent Origins and Founder Events in Families Affected by Sensorineural Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, Antonio; Cruciani, Fulvio; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; López-Bigas, Núria; Rabionet, Raquel; Govea, Nancy; López de Munain, Adolfo; Sarduy, Maritza; Romero, Lourdes; Villamar, Manuela; del Castillo, Ignacio; Moreno, Felipe; Estivill, Xavier; Scozzari, Rosaria

    1999-01-01

    Summary The mtDNA variation of 50 Spanish and 4 Cuban families affected by nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness due to the A1555G mutation in the 12S rRNA gene was studied by high-resolution RFLP analysis and sequencing of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses of haplotypes and detailed survey of population controls revealed that the A1555G mutation can be attributed to ⩾30 independent mutational events among the 50 Spanish families and that it occurs on mtDNA haplogroups that are common in all European populations. This indicates that the relatively high detection rate of this mutation in Spain is not due to sampling biases or to a single major founder event. Moreover, the distribution of these mutational events on different haplogroups is compatible with a random occurrence of the A1555G mutation and tends to support the conclusion that mtDNA backgrounds do not play a significant role in the expression of the mutation. Overall, these findings appear to indicate that the rare detection of this mutation in other populations is most likely due to inadequacy in patient ascertainment and molecular screening. This probable lack of identification of the A1555G mutation in subjects affected by sensorineural hearing loss implies that their maternally related relatives are not benefiting from presymptomatic detection and information concerning their increased risk of ototoxicity due to aminoglycoside treatments. PMID:10521300

  5. Exposure to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine affects histone and RNA polymerase II modifications, but not DNA methylation status, in the regulatory region of the Xenopus laevis thyroid hormone receptor βΑ gene.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kentaro; Nishiyama, Norihito; Izumi, Yushi; Otsuka, Shunsuke; Ishihara, Akinori; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play a critical role in amphibian metamorphosis, during which the TH receptor (TR) gene, thrb, is upregulated in a tissue-specific manner. The Xenopus laevis thrb gene has 3 TH response elements (TREs) in the 5' flanking regulatory region and 1 TRE in the exon b region, around which CpG sites are highly distributed. To clarify whether exposure to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) affects histone and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) modifications and the level of DNA methylation in the 5' regulatory region, we conducted reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using X. laevis cultured cells and premetamorphic tadpoles treated with or without 2 nM T3. Exposure to T3 increased the amount of the thrb transcript, in parallel with enhanced histone H4 acetylation and RNAPII recruitment, and probably phosphorylation of RNAPII at serine 5, in the 5' regulatory and exon b regions. However, the 5' regulatory region remained hypermethylated even with exposure to T3, and there was no significant difference in the methylation status between DNAs from T3-untreated and -treated cultured cells or tadpole tissues. Our results demonstrate that exposure to T3 induced euchromatin-associated epigenetic marks by enhancing histone acetylation and RNAPII recruitment, but not by decreasing the level of DNA methylation, in the 5' regulatory region of the X. laevis thrb gene. PMID:26417689

  6. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. PMID:25232028

  7. Differences in the ovine HSP90AA1 gene expression rates caused by two linked polymorphisms at its promoter affect rams sperm DNA fragmentation under environmental heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Salces-Ortiz, Judit; Ramón, Manuel; González, Carmen; Pérez-Guzmán, M Dolores; Garde, J Julián; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Calvo, Jorge H; Serrano, M Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) is one of the best-studied exogenous cellular stresses. Almost all tissues, cell types, metabolic pathways and biochemical reactions are affected in greater or lesser extent by HS. However, there are some especially thermo sensible cellular types such as the mammalian male germ cells. The present study examined the role of three INDELs in conjunction with the -660G/C polymorphism located at the HSP90AA1 promoter region over the gene expression rate under HS. Specially, the -668insC INDEL, which is very close to the -660G/C transversion, is a good candidate to be implied in the transcriptional regulation of the gene by itself or in a cooperative way with this SNP. Animals carrying the genotype II-668 showed higher transcription rates than those with ID-668 (FC = 3.07) and DD-668 (FC = 3.40) genotypes for samples collected under HS. A linkage between gene expression and sperm DNA fragmentation was also found. When HS conditions were present along or in some stages of the spermatogenesis, alternative genotypes of the -668insC and -660G/C mutations are involved in the effect of HS over sperm DNA fragmentation. Thus, unfavorable genotypes in terms of gene expression induction (ID-668GC-660 and DD-668GG-660) do not produce enough mRNA (stored as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles) and Hsp90α protein to cope with future thermal stress which might occur in posterior stages when transcriptional activity is reduced and cell types and molecular processes are more sensible to heat (spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids protamination). This would result in the impairment of DNA packaging and the consequent commitment of the events occurring shortly after fertilization and during embryonic development. In the short-term, the assessment of the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation sensitivity and ram's fertility will be of interest to a better understanding of the mechanisms of response to HS and its consequences on animal production and

  8. Differences in the Ovine HSP90AA1 Gene Expression Rates Caused by Two Linked Polymorphisms at Its Promoter Affect Rams Sperm DNA Fragmentation under Environmental Heat Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    González, Carmen; Pérez-Guzmán, M. Dolores; Garde, J. Julián; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Calvo, Jorge H.; Serrano, M. Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) is one of the best-studied exogenous cellular stresses. Almost all tissues, cell types, metabolic pathways and biochemical reactions are affected in greater or lesser extent by HS. However, there are some especially thermo sensible cellular types such as the mammalian male germ cells. The present study examined the role of three INDELs in conjunction with the -660G/C polymorphism located at the HSP90AA1 promoter region over the gene expression rate under HS. Specially, the -668insC INDEL, which is very close to the -660G/C transversion, is a good candidate to be implied in the transcriptional regulation of the gene by itself or in a cooperative way with this SNP. Animals carrying the genotype II-668 showed higher transcription rates than those with ID-668 (FC = 3.07) and DD-668 (FC = 3.40) genotypes for samples collected under HS. A linkage between gene expression and sperm DNA fragmentation was also found. When HS conditions were present along or in some stages of the spermatogenesis, alternative genotypes of the -668insC and -660G/C mutations are involved in the effect of HS over sperm DNA fragmentation. Thus, unfavorable genotypes in terms of gene expression induction (ID-668GC-660 and DD-668GG-660) do not produce enough mRNA (stored as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles) and Hsp90α protein to cope with future thermal stress which might occur in posterior stages when transcriptional activity is reduced and cell types and molecular processes are more sensible to heat (spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids protamination). This would result in the impairment of DNA packaging and the consequent commitment of the events occurring shortly after fertilization and during embryonic development. In the short-term, the assessment of the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation sensitivity and ram’s fertility will be of interest to a better understanding of the mechanisms of response to HS and its consequences on animal production and

  9. FOB1 affects DNA topoisomerase I in vivo cleavages in the enhancer region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA locus

    PubMed Central

    Di Felice, Francesca; Cioci, Francesco; Camilloni, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the FOB1 gene affects replication fork blocking activity at the replication fork block (RFB) sequences and promotes recombination events within the rDNA cluster. Using in vivo footprinting assays we mapped two in vivo Fob1p-binding sites, RFB1 and RFB3, located in the rDNA enhancer region and coincident with those previously reported to be in vitro binding sites. We previously provided evidences that DNA topoisomerase I is able to cleave two sites within this region. The results reported in this paper, indicate that the DNA topoisomerase I cleavage specific activity at the enhancer region is affected by the presence of Fob1p and independent of replication and transcription activities. We thus hypothesize that the binding to DNA of Fob1p itself may be the cause of the DNA topoisomerase I activity in the rDNA enhancer. PMID:16269824

  10. DNA supercoiling and bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Charles J

    2006-01-01

    DNA in bacterial cells is maintained in a negatively supercoiled state. This contributes to the organization of the bacterial nucleoid and also influences the global gene expression pattern in the cell through modulatory effects on transcription. Supercoiling arises as a result of changes to the linking number of the relaxed double-stranded DNA molecule and is set and reset by the action of DNA topoisomerases. This process is subject to a multitude of influences that are usually summarized as environmental stress. Responsiveness of linking number change to stress offers the promise of a mechanism for the wholesale adjustment of the transcription programme of the cell as the bacterium experiences different environments. Recent data from DNA microarray experiments support this proposition. The emerging picture is one of DNA supercoiling acting at or near the apex of a regulatory hierarchy where it collaborates with nucleoid-associated proteins and transcription factors to determine the gene expression profile of the cell. PMID:17338437

  11. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Cloning of the human DNA methyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchanani, S.K.; Rouleau, J.; Szyf, M.

    1994-09-01

    During the process of carcinogenesis it has been observed that DNA methylation is deregulated. At least two levels of regulation of the mouse DNA MeTase have been shown: at the transcriptional level, via its promoter, and at the post transcriptional level in a cell cycle dependent fashion. The sequence of the complete DNA MeTase gene and identification of the promoter has not yet been reported. Using a probe generated by PCR of the human DNA MeTase cDNA, a human genomic library was screened and a clone of approximately 22 kilobases (kb) was isolated. It was found that this clone contains the complete coding sequence of the DNA MeTase enzyme. Sequence analysis along with restriction enzyme digests have allowed us to construct a partial map of the physical structure of the human DNA MeTase gene. This partial structure has already revealed some interesting aspects related to the genetic evolution of the human DNA MeTase. First, the proposed catalytic domain of the human DNA MeTase is extremely homologous to all other cytosine DNA MeTases, even to those that are found in bacteria, and this catalytic domain is conserved within one complete exon in the human gene. This is very different from the structure of the 5{prime} region of the gene, which is fragmented into numerous little introns and exons. Within one of the small introns that have been identified, a trinucleotide repeat of ATG occurs (9 times in a row), and this repeat is upstream of the proposed start site of translation. Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been shown to be a genetic hot spot for mutation, but even more interesting is the nature of the repeat, ATG, which is the translation start codon; this repeat appears to be in frame with the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} coding sequence, the implications being that possible alternative methyltransferases may be translated under certain conditions such as cancer.

  13. Epigenetic gene silencing in cancer: the DNA hypermethylome.

    PubMed

    Esteller, Manel

    2007-04-15

    Epigenetic gene inactivation in transformed cells involves many 'belts of silencing'. One of the best-known lesions of the malignant cell is the transcriptional repression of tumor-suppressor genes by promoter CpG island hypermethylation. We are in the process of completing the molecular dissection of the entire epigenetic machinery involved in methylation-associated silencing, such as DNA methyltransferases, methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, histone deacetylases, histone methyltransferases, histone demethylases and Polycomb proteins. The first indications are also starting to emerge about how the combination of cellular selection and targeted pathways leads to abnormal DNA methylation. One thing is certain already, promoter CpG island hypermethylation of tumor-suppressor genes is a common hallmark of all human cancers. It affects all cellular pathways with a tumor-type specific profile, and in addition to classical tumor-suppressor and DNA repair genes, it includes genes involved in premature aging and microRNAs with growth inhibitory functions. The importance of hypermethylation events is already in evidence at the bedside of cancer patients in the form of cancer detection markers and chemotherapy predictors, and in the approval of epigenetic drugs for the treatment of hematological malignancies. In the very near future, the synergy of candidate gene approaches and large-scale epigenomic technologies, such as methyl-DIP, will yield the complete DNA hypermethylome of cancer cells. PMID:17613547

  14. Pentoxifylline affects idarubicin binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Gołuński, Grzegorz; Borowik, Agnieszka; Lipińska, Andrea; Romanik, Monika; Derewońko, Natalia; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Anticancer drug idarubicin - derivative of doxorubicin - is commonly used in treatment of numerous cancer types. However, in contrast to doxorubicin, its biophysical properties are not well established yet. Additionally, potential direct interactions of idarubicin with other biologically active aromatic compounds, such as pentoxifylline - representative of methylxanthines - were not studied at all. Potential formation of such hetero-aggregates may result in sequestration of the anticancer drug and, in consequence, reduction of its biological activity. This work provide description of the idarubicin biophysical properties as well as assess influence of pentoxifylline on idarubicin interactions with DNA. To achieve these goals we employed spectrophotometric methods coupled with analysis with the appropriate mathematical models as well as flow cytometry and Ames test. Obtained results show influence of pentoxifylline on idarubicin binding to DNA and are well in agreement with the data previously published for other aromatic ligands. Additionally it may be hypothesized that direct interactions between idarubicin and pentoxifylline may influence the anticancer drug biological activity. PMID:26921593

  15. DNA Methylation of BDNF Gene in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Çöpoğlu, Ümit Sertan; İğci, Mehri; Bozgeyik, Esra; Kokaçya, M. Hanifi; İğci, Yusuf Ziya; Dokuyucu, Recep; Arı, Mustafa; Savaş, Haluk A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although genetic factors are risk factors for schizophrenia, some environmental factors are thought to be required for the manifestation of disease. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene functions without causing a change in the nucleotide sequence of DNA. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. It has been suggested that BDNF may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. It is established that methylation status of the BDNF gene is associated with fear learning, memory, and stressful social interactions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the DNA methylation status of BDNF gene in patients with schizophrenia. Material/Methods The study included 49 patients (33 male and 16 female) with schizophrenia and 65 unrelated healthy controls (46 male and 19 female). Determination of methylation pattern of CpG islands was based on the principle that bisulfite treatment of DNA results in conversion of unmethylated cytosine residues into uracil, whereas methylated cytosine residues remain unmodified. Methylation-specific PCR was performed with primers specific for either methylated or unmethylated DNA. Results There was no significant difference in methylated or un-methylated status for BDNF promoters between schizophrenia patients and controls. The mean duration of illness was significantly lower in the hemi-methylated group compared to the non-methylated group for BDNF gene CpG island-1 in schizophrenia patients. Conclusions Although there were no differences in BDNF gene methylation status between schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, there was an association between duration of illness and DNA methylation. PMID:26851233

  16. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... guía de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the ... and lead to a disease such as cancer. DNA Sequencing Sequencing simply means determining the exact order ...

  17. SERS gene probe for DNA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, David L.; Allain, Leonardo R.; Isola, Narayana R.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-07-01

    We describe the development of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering gene (SERGen) probe technology for rapid screening for diseases and pathogens through DNA hybridization assays. The technology combines the use of gene probes labeled with SERS-active markers, and nanostructured metallic platforms for inducing the SERS effect. As a result, SERGen-based methods can offer the spectral selectivity and sensitivity of SERS as well as the molecular specificity of DNA sequence hybridization. Furthermore, these new probe s preclude the use of radioactive labels. As illustrated herein, SERGen probes have been used as primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of specific DNA sequences, hence further boosting the sensitivity of the technology. We also describe several approaches to developing SERS-active DNA assay platforms, addressing the challenges of making the SERGen technology accessible and practical for clinical settings. The usefulness of the SERGen approach has been demonstrated in the detection of HIV, BRCA1 breast cancer, and BAX genes. There is great potential for the use of numerous SERGen probes for multiplexed detection of multiple biological targets.

  18. Preferential DNA repair in expressed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, P C

    1987-01-01

    Potentially deleterious alterations to DNA occur nonrandomly within the mammalian genome. These alterations include the adducts produced by many chemical carcinogens, but not the UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, which may be an exception. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers and certain other lesions is nonrandom in the mammalian genome, exhibiting a distinct preference for actively transcribed DNA sequences. An important consequence of this fact is that mutagenesis and carcinogenesis may be determined in part by the activities of the relevant genes. Repair may also be processive, and a model is proposed in which excision repair is coupled to transcription at the nuclear matrix. Similar but freely diffusing repair complexes may account for the lower overall repair efficiencies in the silent domains of the genome. Risk assessment in relation to chemical carcinogenesis requires assays that determine effective levels of DNA damage for producing malignancy. The existence of nonrandom repair in the genome casts into doubt the reliability of overall indicators of DNA binding and lesion repair for such determinations. Furthermore, some apparent differences between the intragenomic repair heterogeneity in rodent cells and that in human cells mandate a reevaluation of rodent test systems for human risk assessment. Tissue-specific and cell-specific differences in the coordinate regulation of gene expression and DNA repair may account for corresponding differences in the carcinogenic response. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 1. PMID:3447906

  19. Multiple controls affect arsenite oxidase gene expression in Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Both the speciation and toxicity of arsenic are affected by bacterial transformations, i.e. oxidation, reduction or methylation. These transformations have a major impact on environmental contamination and more particularly on arsenic contamination of drinking water. Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans has been isolated from an arsenic- contaminated environment and has developed various mechanisms for coping with arsenic, including the oxidation of As(III) to As(V) as a detoxification mechanism. Results In the present study, a differential transcriptome analysis was used to identify genes, including arsenite oxidase encoding genes, involved in the response of H. arsenicoxydans to As(III). To get insight into the molecular mechanisms of this enzyme activity, a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis was performed. Transposon insertions resulting in a lack of arsenite oxidase activity disrupted aoxR and aoxS genes, showing that the aox operon transcription is regulated by the AoxRS two-component system. Remarkably, transposon insertions were also identified in rpoN coding for the alternative N sigma factor (σ54) of RNA polymerase and in dnaJ coding for the Hsp70 co-chaperone. Western blotting with anti-AoxB antibodies and quantitative RT-PCR experiments allowed us to demonstrate that the rpoN and dnaJ gene products are involved in the control of arsenite oxidase gene expression. Finally, the transcriptional start site of the aoxAB operon was determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and a putative -12/-24 σ54-dependent promoter motif was identified upstream of aoxAB coding sequences. Conclusion These results reveal the existence of novel molecular regulatory processes governing arsenite oxidase expression in H. arsenicoxydans. These data are summarized in a model that functionally integrates arsenite oxidation in the adaptive response to As(III) in this microorganism. PMID:20167112

  20. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  1. Enhancement of DNA vaccine potency through coadministration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines via gene gun.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daejin; Hoory, Talia; Monie, Archana; Ting, Jenny Pan-Yun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-05-15

    Administration of DNA vaccines via gene gun has emerged as an important form of Ag-specific immunotherapy. The MHC CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and also induces expression of class I molecules. We reasoned that the gene gun administration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines employing different strategies to improve MHC I and II processing could enhance DNA vaccine potency. We observed that DC-1 cells transfected with CIITA DNA lead to higher expression of MHC I and II molecules, leading to enhanced Ag presentation through the MHC I/II pathways. Furthermore, our data suggested that coadministration of DNA-encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 Ag (CRT/E6) with CIITA DNA leads to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. In addition, coadministration of the combination of CRT/E6 DNA with CIITA DNA and DNA encoding the invariant chain (Ii) linked to the pan HLA-DR-reactive epitope (Ii-PADRE) further enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. Treatment with the combination vaccine was also shown to enhance the antitumor effects and to prolong survival in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. Vaccination with the combination vaccine also led to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) memory T cells and to long-term protection against TC-1 tumors and prolonged survival in vaccinated mice. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of CIITA DNA with CRT/E6 and Ii-PADRE DNA vaccines represents a potentially effective means to combat tumors in the clinical setting. PMID:18453624

  2. Nanoscale structure of protamine/DNA complexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Simona; Brocca, Paola; Del Favero, Elena; Rondelli, Valeria; Cantù, Laura; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the internal packing of gene carriers is a key-factor to realize both gene protection during transport and de-complexation at the delivery site. Here, we investigate the structure of complexes formed by DNA fragments and protamine, applied in gene delivery. We found that complexes are charge- and size-tunable aggregates, depending on the protamine/DNA ratio, hundred nanometers in size. Their compactness and fractal structure depend on the length of the DNA fragments. Accordingly, on the local scale, the sites of protamine/DNA complexation assume different morphologies, seemingly displaying clumping ability for the DNA network only for shorter DNA fragments.

  3. Junk DNA and sectorial gene repression.

    PubMed

    Zuckerkandl, E

    1997-12-31

    Transcriptional repression in eukaryotes often involves tens or hundreds of kilobase pairs, two to three orders of magnitude more than the bacterial operator/repressor model does. Classical repression, represented by this model, was maintained over the whole span of evolution under different guises, and consists of repressor factors interacting primarily with promoters and, in later evolution, also with enhancers. The use of much larger amounts of DNA in the other mode of repression, here called the sectorial mode ('superrepression'), results in the conceptual transfer of so-called junk DNA to the domain of functional DNA. This contribution to the solution of the c-value paradox involves perhaps 15% of genomic 'junk,' and encompasses the bulk of the introns, thought to fill a stabilizing role in sectorially repressed chromatin structures. In the case of developmental genes, such structures appear to be heterochromatoid in character. However, solid clues regarding general structural features of superrepressed terminal differentiation genes remain elusive. The competition among superrepressible DNA sectors for sectorially binding factors offers, in principle, a molecular mechanism for developmental switches. Position effect variegation may be considered an abnormal manifestation of normal processes that underly development and involve heterochromatoid sectorial repression, which is apparently required for local elimination or modulation of morphological features (morpholysis). Sectorial repression of genes participating either in development or in terminal differentiation is considered instrumental in establishing stable cell types, and provides a basis for the distinction between determination and cell type specification. The gamut of possible stable cell types may have been broadened by the appearance in evolution of heavy isochores. Additional types of relatively frequent GC-rich cis-acting DNA motifs may offer reiterated binding sites to factors endowed with a

  4. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, smoking, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma risk.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Robert R; Bamlet, William R; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; de Andrade, Mariza; Boardman, Lisa A; Petersen, Gloria M

    2008-06-15

    Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are vital responses to multiple types of DNA damage, including damage from tobacco exposure. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in these pathways may affect DNA repair capacity and therefore influence risk for cancer development. We performed a clinic-based, case-control study comprising 481 consecutive patients with confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 625 healthy controls. Allele and genotype frequencies for 16 SNPs in DNA repair genes ERCC1, XPD/ERCC2, XPC, XPF/ERCC4, OGG1, and XRCC1 were compared after adjusting for age, sex, and smoking history. Subgroup analysis by sex and smoking history was performed. Carriers of one or two XPF/ERCC4 minor alleles at R415Q had decreased risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared with those who had two major alleles [odds ratio (OR), 0.59; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.40-0.85]. Heavy smokers (>40 pack-years) had increased risk for cancer if they were carriers of at least one minor allele for XPD/ERCC2 at D312N (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.28-6.04) or D711D (OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.01-4.73). No other significant differences in risk were identified. Minor alleles in DNA repair genes XPF/ERCC4 and XPD/ERCC2 were associated with altered risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18544627

  5. [Bioinformatics analysis of DNA demethylase genes in Lonicera japonica Thunb].

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin-jie; Yuan, Yuan; Wu, Chong; Huang, Lu-qi; Chen, Ping

    2015-03-01

    The DNA demethylase genes are widespread in plants. Four DNA demethylase genes (LJDME1, LJDME2, LJDME3 and LJDME4) were obtained from transcriptome dataset of Lonicera japonica Thunb by using bioinformatics methods and the proteins' physicochemical properties they encoded were predicted. The phylogenetic tree showed that the four DNA demethylase genes and Arabidopsis thaliana DME had a close relationship. The result of gene expression model showed that four DNA demethylase genes were different between species. The expression levels of LJDME1 and LJDME2 were even more higher in Lonicera japonica var. chinensis than those in L. japonica. LJDME] and LJDME2 maybe regulate the active compounds of L. japonica. This study aims to lay a foundation for further understanding of the function of DNA demethylase genes in L. japonica. PMID:26118119

  6. DNA Compaction Induced by a Cationic Polymer or Surfactant Impact Gene Expression and DNA Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Bartles, Andrew; Muck, Joscha; Dias, Rita S.; Carnerup, Anna M.; Zink, Daniele; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in achieving gene regulation in biotechnological and biomedical applications by using synthetic DNA-binding agents. Most studies have so far focused on synthetic sequence-specific DNA-binding agents. Such approaches are relatively complicated and cost intensive and their level of sophistication is not always required, in particular for biotechnological application. Our study is inspired by in vivo data that suggest that DNA compaction might contribute to gene regulation. This study exploits the potential of using synthetic DNA compacting agents that are not sequence-specific to achieve gene regulation for in vitro systems. The semi-synthetic in vitro system we use include common cationic DNA-compacting agents, poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers and the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which we apply to linearized plasmid DNA encoding for the luciferase reporter gene. We show that complexing the DNA with either of the cationic agents leads to gene expression inhibition in a manner that depends on the extent of compaction. This is demonstrated by using a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system. We show that compaction can also protect DNA against degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, our study shows that these effects are reversible and DNA can be released from the complexes. Release of DNA leads to restoration of gene expression and makes the DNA susceptible to degradation by Dnase. A highly charged polyelectrolyte, heparin, is needed to release DNA from dendrimers, while DNA complexed with CTAB dissociates with the non-ionic surfactant C12E5. Our results demonstrate the relation between DNA compaction by non-specific DNA-binding agents and gene expression and gene regulation can be achieved in vitro systems in a reliable dose-dependent and reversible manner. PMID:24671109

  7. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Repression of DNA-binding dependent glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Muzikar, Katy A.; Nickols, Nicholas G.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) affects the transcription of genes involved in diverse processes, including energy metabolism and the immune response, through DNA-binding dependent and independent mechanisms. The DNA-binding dependent mechanism occurs by direct binding of GR to glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at regulatory regions of target genes. The DNA-binding independent mechanism involves binding of GR to transcription factors and coactivators that, in turn, contact DNA. A small molecule that competes with GR for binding to GREs could be expected to affect the DNA-dependent pathway selectively by interfering with the protein-DNA interface. We show that a DNA-binding polyamide that targets the consensus GRE sequence binds the glucocorticoid-induced zipper (GILZ) GRE, inhibits expression of GILZ and several other known GR target genes, and reduces GR occupancy at the GILZ promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of the effects of this polyamide on a set of glucocorticoid-induced and -repressed genes could help to elucidate the mechanism of GR regulation for these genes. PMID:19805343

  9. γ-Glutamyl hydrolase modulation significantly influences global and gene-specific DNA methylation and gene expression in human colon and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Hinoue, Toshinori; Kim, Michael S; Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Cho, Robert C; Cole, Peter D; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Laird, Peter W; Kim, Young-In

    2015-01-01

    γ-Glutamyl hydrolase (GGH) plays an important role in folate homeostasis by catalyzing hydrolysis of polyglutamylated folate into monoglutamates. Polyglutamylated folates are better substrates for several enzymes involved in the generation of S-adenosylmethionine, the primary methyl group donor, and hence, GGH modulation may affect DNA methylation. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic determinant in gene expression, in the maintenance of DNA integrity and stability, and in chromatin modifications, and aberrant or dysregulation of DNA methylation has been mechanistically linked to the development of human diseases including cancer. Using a recently developed in vitro model of GGH modulation in HCT116 colon and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells, we investigated whether GGH modulation would affect global and gene-specific DNA methylation and whether these alterations were associated with significant gene expression changes. In both cell lines, GGH overexpression decreased global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity, while GGH inhibition increased global DNA methylation and DNMT activity. Epigenomic and gene expression analyses revealed that GGH modulation influenced CpG promoter DNA methylation and gene expression involved in important biological pathways including cell cycle, cellular development, and cellular growth and proliferation. Some of the observed altered gene expression appeared to be regulated by changes in CpG promoter DNA methylation. Our data suggest that the GGH modulation-induced changes in total intracellular folate concentrations and content of long-chain folylpolyglutamates are associated with functionally significant DNA methylation alterations in several important biological pathways. PMID:25502219

  10. High Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Genes Affected by Chromosomal Breaks in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Evert; Dijkstra, Maurits J. J.; Krijgsman, Oscar; Sie, Daoud; Haan, Josien C.; Traets, Joleen J. H.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Carvalho, Beatriz; Ylstra, Bauke; Abeln, Sanne; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is caused by somatic DNA alterations such as gene point mutations, DNA copy number aberrations (CNA) and structural variants (SVs). Genome-wide analyses of SVs in large sample series with well-documented clinical information are still scarce. Consequently, the impact of SVs on carcinogenesis and patient outcome remains poorly understood. This study aimed to perform a systematic analysis of genes that are affected by CNA-associated chromosomal breaks in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to determine the clinical relevance of recurrent breakpoint genes. Methods Primary CRC samples of patients with metastatic disease from CAIRO and CAIRO2 clinical trials were previously characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization. These data were now used to determine the prevalence of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes across 352 CRC samples. In addition, mutation status of the commonly affected APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined for 204 CRC samples by targeted massive parallel sequencing. Clinical relevance was assessed upon stratification of patients based on gene mutations and gene breakpoints that were observed in >3% of CRC cases. Results In total, 748 genes were identified that were recurrently affected by chromosomal breaks (FDR <0.1). MACROD2 was affected in 41% of CRC samples and another 169 genes showed breakpoints in >3% of cases, indicating that prevalence of gene breakpoints is comparable to the prevalence of well-known gene point mutations. Patient stratification based on gene breakpoints and point mutations revealed one CRC subtype with very poor prognosis. Conclusions We conclude that CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes represent a highly prevalent and clinically relevant subset of SVs in CRC. PMID:26375816

  11. Characterization of DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in Fragaria vesca.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tingting; Ren, Shuai; Wang, Yuanhua; Han, Yuhui; Li, Yi

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification essential for gene regulations in plants, but understanding on how it is involved in fruit development, especially in non-climacteric fleshy fruit, is limited. The diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) is an important model for non-climacteric fruit crops. In this study, we identified DNA methyltransferase genes and demethylase genes in Fragaria vesca and other angiosperm species. In accordance with previous studies, our phylogenetic analyses of those DNA methylation modifiers support the clustering of those genes into several classes. Our data indicate that whole-genome duplications and tandem duplications contributed to the expansion of those DNA methylation modifiers in angiosperms. We have further demonstrated that some DNA methylase and demethylase genes reach their highest expression levels in strawberry fleshy fruits when turning from white to red, suggesting that DNA methylation might undergo a dramatic change at the onset of fleshy fruit-ripening process. In addition, we have observed that expression of some DNA demethylase genes increases in response to various abiotic stresses including heat, cold, drought and salinity. Collectively, our study indicates a regulatory role of DNA methylation in the turning stage of non-climacteric fleshy fruit and responses to environment stimuli, and would facilitate functional studies of DNA methylation in the growth and development of non-climacteric fruits. PMID:26956009

  12. Preanalytical Conditions and DNA Isolation Methods Affect Telomere Length Quantification in Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Tolios, Alexander; Teupser, Daniel; Holdt, Lesca M

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are located at chromosome ends and their length (TL) has been associated with aging and human diseases such as cancer. Whole blood DNA is frequently used for TL measurements but the influence of preanalytical conditions and DNA isolation methods on TL quantification has not been thoroughly investigated. To evaluate potential preanalytical as well as methodological bias on TL, anonymized leftover EDTA-whole blood samples were pooled according to leukocyte counts and were incubated with and without actinomycin D to induce apoptosis as a prototype of sample degradation. DNA was isolated from fresh blood pools and after freezing at -80°C. Commercially available kits using beads (Invitrogen), spin columns (Qiagen, Macherey-Nagel and 5prime) or precipitation (Stratec/Invisorb) and a published isopropanol precipitation protocol (IPP) were used for DNA isolation. TL was assessed by qPCR, and normalized to the single copy reference gene 36B4 using two established single-plex and a new multiplex protocol. We show that the method of DNA isolation significantly affected TL (e.g. 1.86-fold longer TL when comparing IPP vs. Invitrogen). Sample degradation led to an average TL decrease of 22% when using all except for one DNA isolation method (5prime). Preanalytical storage conditions did not affect TL with exception of samples that were isolated with the 5prime kit, where a 27% increase in TL was observed after freezing. Finally, performance of the multiplex qPCR protocol was comparable to the single-plex assays, but showed superior time- and cost-effectiveness and required > 80% less DNA. Findings of the current study highlight the need for standardization of whole blood processing and DNA isolation in clinical study settings to avoid preanalytical bias of TL quantification and show that multiplex assays may improve TL/SCG measurements. PMID:26636575

  13. Preanalytical Conditions and DNA Isolation Methods Affect Telomere Length Quantification in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tolios, Alexander; Teupser, Daniel; Holdt, Lesca M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are located at chromosome ends and their length (TL) has been associated with aging and human diseases such as cancer. Whole blood DNA is frequently used for TL measurements but the influence of preanalytical conditions and DNA isolation methods on TL quantification has not been thoroughly investigated. To evaluate potential preanalytical as well as methodological bias on TL, anonymized leftover EDTA-whole blood samples were pooled according to leukocyte counts and were incubated with and without actinomycin D to induce apoptosis as a prototype of sample degradation. DNA was isolated from fresh blood pools and after freezing at -80°C. Commercially available kits using beads (Invitrogen), spin columns (Qiagen, Macherey-Nagel and 5prime) or precipitation (Stratec/Invisorb) and a published isopropanol precipitation protocol (IPP) were used for DNA isolation. TL was assessed by qPCR, and normalized to the single copy reference gene 36B4 using two established single-plex and a new multiplex protocol. We show that the method of DNA isolation significantly affected TL (e.g. 1.86-fold longer TL when comparing IPP vs. Invitrogen). Sample degradation led to an average TL decrease of 22% when using all except for one DNA isolation method (5prime). Preanalytical storage conditions did not affect TL with exception of samples that were isolated with the 5prime kit, where a 27% increase in TL was observed after freezing. Finally, performance of the multiplex qPCR protocol was comparable to the single-plex assays, but showed superior time- and cost-effectiveness and required > 80% less DNA. Findings of the current study highlight the need for standardization of whole blood processing and DNA isolation in clinical study settings to avoid preanalytical bias of TL quantification and show that multiplex assays may improve TL/SCG measurements. PMID:26636575

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  15. The FRIABLE1 Gene Product Affects Cell Adhesion in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Neumetzler, Lutz; Humphrey, Tania; Lumba, Shelley; Snyder, Stephen; Yeats, Trevor H.; Usadel, Björn; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Patel, Jignasha; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Persson, Staffan; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1), was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246). Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22916179

  16. Expression of DNA methylation genes in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Mangano, Katia; Di Marco, Roberto; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia; Chikovan, Tinatin; Signorelli, Santo; Lombardo, Giuseppe A G; Patti, Francesco; Mammana, Santa; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-01-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immunoinflammatory disease of the central nervous system that seems to be influenced by DNA methylation. We sought to explore the expression pattern of genes involved in the control of DNA methylation in Secondary Progressive (SP) MS patients' PBMCs. We have found that SP MS is characterized by a significant upregulation of two genes belonging to the MBD family genes, MBD2 and MBD4, and by a downregulation of TDG and TET3. PMID:26711572

  17. Characterization of DNA-hyaluronan matrix for sustained gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Angela; Checkla, Daniel M; Dehazya, Philip; Chen, Weiliam

    2003-06-01

    DNA-Hyaluronan (DNA-HA) matrix formulations intended for use as gene delivery systems have been developed and their potential for delivering DNA encoding a model therapeutic cytokine, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), has been evaluated. The results of enzyme-mediated release kinetics studies suggested that the rate of DNA release from the DNA-HA matrices could be modulated by changing the DNA loading or the degree of crosslinking. SEM imaging of the DNA-HA matrix showed that it was gradually eroded by enzymatic action. The results of gel electrophoresis suggested that there was some degree of interaction between DNA and native HA and that portions of the DNA released from the DNA-HA matrices were associated with crosslinked HA fragments. Only fractions of the DNA released from the DNA-HA matrices were free and the rest was entrapped by HA fragments, which could serve as a mechanism for DNA protection. The results from cell transfection studies using DNA samples collected during the course of release studies confirmed this hypothesis. The PDGF produced by transfection of the DNA released from DNA-HA matrices induced human dermal fibroblast cells to proliferate. PMID:12767709

  18. Cloning a Eukaryotic DNA Glycosylase Repair Gene by the Suppression of a DNA Repair Defect in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Derfler, Bruce; Maskati, Azmat; Samson, Leona

    1989-10-01

    If eukaryotic genes could protect bacteria with defects in DNA repair, this effect could be exploited for the isolation of eukaryotic DNA repair genes. We have thus cloned a DNA repair gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that directs the synthesis of a DNA glycosylase that specifically releases 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and in so doing protects alkylation-sensitive Escherichia coli from killing by methylating agents. The cloned yeast gene was then used to generate a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae that carries a defect in the glycosylase gene and is extremely sensitive to DNA methylation. This approach may allow the isolation of a large number of eukaryotic DNA repair genes.

  19. A mechanism of gene amplification driven by small DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kuntal; Storici, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    DNA amplification is a molecular process that increases the copy number of a chromosomal tract and often causes elevated expression of the amplified gene(s). Although gene amplification is frequently observed in cancer and other degenerative disorders, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of DNA copy number increase remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that small DNA fragments could be the trigger of DNA amplification events. Following our findings that small fragments of DNA in the form of DNA oligonucleotides can be highly recombinogenic, we have developed a system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to capture events of chromosomal DNA amplification initiated by small DNA fragments. Here we demonstrate that small DNAs can amplify a chromosomal region, generating either tandem duplications or acentric extrachromosomal DNA circles. Small fragment-driven DNA amplification (SFDA) occurs with a frequency that increases with the length of homology between the small DNAs and the target chromosomal regions. SFDA events are triggered even by small single-stranded molecules with as little as 20-nt homology with the genomic target. A double-strand break (DSB) external to the chromosomal amplicon region stimulates the amplification event up to a factor of 20 and favors formation of extrachromosomal circles. SFDA is dependent on Rad52 and Rad59, partially dependent on Rad1, Rad10, and Pol32, and independent of Rad51, suggesting a single-strand annealing mechanism. Our results reveal a novel molecular model for gene amplification, in which small DNA fragments drive DNA amplification and define the boundaries of the amplicon region. As DNA fragments are frequently found both inside cells and in the extracellular environment, such as the serum of patients with cancer or other degenerative disorders, we propose that SFDA may be a common mechanism for DNA amplification in cancer cells, as well as a more general cause of DNA copy number variation in nature. PMID

  20. Variations in the progranulin gene affect global gene expression in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Geser, Felix; Plotkin, Joshua B; Clark, Chris M; Kwong, Linda K; Yuan, Wuxing; Grossman, Murray; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2008-05-15

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that results in progressive decline in behavior, executive function and sometimes language. Disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, however, the DNA- and RNA-binding protein TDP-43 has been identified as the major protein present in the hallmark inclusion bodies of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U), suggesting a role for transcriptional dysregulation in FTLD-U pathophysiology. Using the Affymetrix U133A microarray platform, we profiled global gene expression in both histopathologically affected and unaffected areas of human FTLD-U brains. We then characterized differential gene expression with biological pathway analyses, cluster and principal component analyses, and subgroup analyses based on brain region and progranulin (GRN) gene status. Comparing 17 FTLD-U brains to 11 controls, we identified 414 upregulated and 210 downregulated genes in frontal cortex (P-value < 0.001). Moreover, cluster and principal component analyses revealed that samples with mutations or possibly pathogenic variations in the GRN gene (GRN+, 7/17) had an expression signature that was distinct from both normal controls and FTLD-U samples lacking GRN gene variations (GRN-, 10/17). Within the subgroup of GRN+ FTLD-U, we found >1300 dysregulated genes in frontal cortex (P-value < 0.001), many participating in pathways uniquely dysregulated in the GRN+ cases. Our findings demonstrate a distinct molecular phenotype for GRN+ FTLD-U, not readily apparent on clinical or histopathological examination, suggesting distinct pathophysiological mechanisms for GRN+ and GRN- subtypes of FTLD-U. In addition, these data from a large number of human brains provide a valuable resource for future testing of disease hypotheses. PMID:18223198

  1. Gene expression profiling diagnosis through DNA molecular computation.

    PubMed

    Mills, Allen P

    2002-04-01

    Gene expression profiling is the characterization of cells based on the level of gene activity represented by concentrations of complementary DNA reverse transcribed from messenger RNA. The spectrum of cDNA concentrations, the expression profile, is determined using a DNA microarray. Although this approach is valuable for research, a simpler scheme that would give answers on a shorter time-scale for clinical applications is needed. An Adleman DNA self-assembly computer that would use cDNA as input might be ideal for clinical cell discrimination and a neural network architecture would be appropriate for making the necessary classifications. Preliminary experimental results suggest that expression profiling should be feasible using a DNA neural network that acts directly on cDNA. PMID:11906739

  2. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  3. Anthocyanidins modulate the activity of human DNA topoisomerases I and II and affect cellular DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, Michael; Fritz, Jessica; Barthelmes, Hans U; Christensen, Morten O; Larsen, Morten K; Boege, Fritz; Marko, Doris

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of anthocyanidins on human topoisomerases I and II and its relevance for DNA integrity within human cells. Anthocyanidins bearing vicinal hydroxy groups at the B-ring (delphinidin, DEL; cyanidin, CY) were found to potently inhibit the catalytic activity of human topoisomerases I and II, without discriminating between the IIalpha and the IIbeta isoforms. However, in contrast to topoisomerase poisons, DEL and CY did not stabilize the covalent DNA-topoisomerase intermediates (cleavable complex) of topoisomerase I or II. Using recombinant topoisomerase I, the presence of CY or DEL (> or = 1 microM) effectively prohibited the stabilization of the cleavable complex by the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin. We furthermore investigated whether the potential protective effect vs topoisomerase I poisons is reflected also on the cellular level, affecting the DNA damaging properties of camptothecin. Indeed, in HT29 cells, low micromolar concentrations of DEL (1-10 microM) significantly diminished the DNA strand breaking effect of camptothecin (100 microM). However, at concentrations > or = 50 microM, all anthocyanidins tested (delphinidin, cyanidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, and paeonidin), including those not interfering with topoisomerases, were found to induce DNA strand breaks in the comet assay. All of these analogues were able to compete with ethidium bromide for the intercalation into calf thymus DNA and to replace the minor groove binder Hoechst 33258. These data indicate substantial affinity to double-stranded DNA, which might contribute at least to the DNA strand breaking effect of anthocyanidins at higher concentrations (> or = 50 microM). PMID:16167831

  4. Genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation differences in abnormally cloned and normally natural mating piglets.

    PubMed

    Zou, C; Fu, Y; Li, C; Liu, H; Li, G; Li, J; Zhang, H; Wu, Y; Li, C

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have proved that DNA methylation can regulate gene expression and further affect skeletal muscle growth and development of pig, whereas the mechanisms of how DNA methylation or gene expression alteration ultimately lead to phenotypical differences between the cloned and natural mating pigs remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation differences between abnormally cloned and normally natural mating piglets and identify molecular markers related to skeletal muscle growth and development in pig. The DNA methylation and genome-wide gene expression in the two groups of piglets were analysed through methylated DNA immunoprecipitation binding high-throughput sequencing and RNA sequencing respectively. We detected 1493 differentially expressed genes between the two groups, of which 382 genes were also differentially methylated. The results of the integrative analysis between DNA methylation and gene expression revealed that the DNA methylation levels showed a significantly negative and monotonic correlation with gene expression levels around the transcription start site of genes. By contrast, no notable monotonic correlation was observed in other regions. Furthermore, we identified some interesting genes and signalling pathways (e.g. myosin, heavy chain 7 and mammalian target of rapamycin) which possibly play essential roles in skeletal muscle growth and development. The results of this study provide insights into the relationship of DNA methylation with gene expression in newborn piglets and into the mechanisms in abnormally cloned animals through somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:27028246

  5. DNA Methylation is Developmentally Regulated for Genes Essential for Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Alyssa A.; Lin, Mingyan; Lister, Rolanda L.; Maslov, Alex A.; Wang, Yidong; Suzuki, Masako; Wu, Bingruo; Greally, John M.; Zheng, Deyou; Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism altering gene expression in development and disease. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression during heart development is incompletely understood. The aim of this study is to reveal DNA methylation in mouse embryonic hearts and its role in regulating gene expression during heart development. Methods and Results We performed the genome‐wide DNA methylation profiling of mouse embryonic hearts using methyl‐sensitive, tiny fragment enrichment/massively parallel sequencing to determine methylation levels at ACGT sites. The results showed that while global methylation of 1.64 million ACGT sites in developing hearts remains stable between embryonic day (E) 11.5 and E14.5, a small fraction (2901) of them exhibit differential methylation. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these sites are enriched at genes involved in heart development. Quantitative real‐time PCR analysis of 350 genes with differential DNA methylation showed that the expression of 181 genes is developmentally regulated, and 79 genes have correlative changes between methylation and expression, including hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2). Required for heart valve formation, Has2 expression in the developing heart valves is downregulated at E14.5, accompanied with increased DNA methylation in its enhancer. Genetic knockout further showed that the downregulation of Has2 expression is dependent on DNA methyltransferase 3b, which is co‐expressed with Has2 in the forming heart valve region, indicating that the DNA methylation change may contribute to the Has2 enhancer's regulating function. Conclusions DNA methylation is developmentally regulated for genes essential to heart development, and abnormal DNA methylation may contribute to congenital heart disease. PMID:24947998

  6. The structure and duplex context of DNA interstrand crosslinks affects the activity of DNA polymerase η

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upasana; Mukherjee, Shivam; Sharma, Anjali; Frank, Ekaterina G.; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2016-01-01

    Several important anti-tumor agents form DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), but their clinical efficiency is counteracted by multiple complex DNA repair pathways. All of these pathways require unhooking of the ICL from one strand of a DNA duplex by nucleases, followed by bypass of the unhooked ICL by translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases. The structures of the unhooked ICLs remain unknown, yet the position of incisions and processing of the unhooked ICLs significantly influence the efficiency and fidelity of bypass by TLS polymerases. We have synthesized a panel of model unhooked nitrogen mustard ICLs to systematically investigate how the state of an unhooked ICL affects pol η activity. We find that duplex distortion induced by a crosslink plays a crucial role in translesion synthesis, and length of the duplex surrounding an unhooked ICL critically affects polymerase efficiency. We report the synthesis of a putative ICL repair intermediate that mimics the complete processing of an unhooked ICL to a single crosslinked nucleotide, and find that it provides only a minimal obstacle for DNA polymerases. Our results raise the possibility that, depending on the structure and extent of processing of an ICL, its bypass may not absolutely require TLS polymerases. PMID:27257072

  7. DNA uptake, intracellular trafficking and gene transfection after ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Yan, Jing; Santangelo, Philip J; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound has been studied as a promising tool for intracellular gene delivery. In this work, we studied gene transfection of a human prostate cancer cell line exposed to megahertz pulsed ultrasound in the presence of contrast agent and assessed the efficiency of fluorescently labelled DNA delivery into cell nuclei, which is necessary for gene transfection. At the sonication conditions studied, ~30% of cells showed DNA uptake 30min after sonication, but that fraction decreased over time to ~10% of cells after 24h. Most cells containing DNA had DNA in their nuclei, but the amount varied significantly. Transfection efficiency peaked at ~10% at 8h post sonication. Among those cells containing DNA, ~30% of DNA was localized in the cell nuclei, ~30% was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes and the remainder was "free" in the cytoplasm 30min after sonication. At later times up to 24h, ~30% of DNA continued to be found in the nuclei and most or all of the rest of the DNA was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. These results demonstrate that ultrasound can deliver DNA into cell nuclei shortly after sonication and that the rest of the DNA can be cleared by autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. PMID:27165808

  8. Methods of Combinatorial Optimization to Reveal Factors Affecting Gene Length

    PubMed Central

    Bolshoy, Alexander; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for genome ranking according to gene lengths. The main outcomes described in this paper are the following: the formulation of the genome ranking problem, presentation of relevant approaches to solve it, and the demonstration of preliminary results from prokaryotic genomes ordering. Using a subset of prokaryotic genomes, we attempted to uncover factors affecting gene length. We have demonstrated that hyperthermophilic species have shorter genes as compared with mesophilic organisms, which probably means that environmental factors affect gene length. Moreover, these preliminary results show that environmental factors group together in ranking evolutionary distant species. PMID:23300345

  9. DNA array analysis of gene expression in response to UV irradiation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Quillardet, Philippe; Rouffaud, Marie-Ange; Bouige, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of DNA macroarrays that contain all 4290 predicted open reading frames of the E. coli K12 genome was evaluated by measuring changes in gene expression in response to irradiation by ultraviolet light (UV). UV and other DNA damaging agents are known to trigger the induction of the SOS response. This is a coordinated increase in the level of expression of a set of approximately 30 unlinked genes, the SOS genes, negatively regulated by the LexA repressor. The analysis was performed on a set of isogenic strains with mutations that affect expression of genes of the SOS system: (i) the lexA+ strain, in which the SOS system can be induced after DNA damage, (ii) lexAind- mutants in which the SOS system cannot be induced, and (iii) lexAdef mutants in which the SOS system is induced constitutively. We found that a large set of genes appeared to be either upregulated or downregulated following UV irradiation. Among the genes which appeared to be upregulated in a LexA-dependent manner, we correctly identified 9 out of 27 SOS genes printed on the arrays and one gene containing a LexA binding site. One gene, dnaN, encoding the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, was identified as an upregulated gene in a LexA-independent manner. Our results were compared to those of similar studies previously published. Although the SOS response as a whole could not be illustrated by using DNA arrays, the data suggest that regulation of some SOS genes might be more complex than previously thought. PMID:14527657

  10. Identification of host genes that affect acquisition of an integrative and conjugative element in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher M.; Grossman, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Conjugation, a major type of horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, involves transfer of DNA from a donor to a recipient using donor-encoded conjugation machinery. Using a high throughput screen (Tn-seq), we identified genes in recipients that contribute to acquisition of the integrative and conjugative element ICEBs1 by Bacillus subtilis. We found that null mutations in some genes caused an increase, and others a decrease in conjugation efficiency. Some mutations affected conjugation only when present in recipients. Other mutations affected conjugation when present in donors or recipients. Most of the genes identified are known or predicted to affect the cell envelope. Several encode enzymes involved in phospholipid biosynthesis and one encodes a homolog of penicillin binding proteins. Two of the genes identified also affected conjugation of Tn916, indicating that their roles in conjugation may be general. We did not identify any genes in recipients that were essential for ICEBs1 conjugation, indicating that if there are such genes, then these are either essential for cell growth or redundant. Our results indicate that acquisition of ICEBs1, and perhaps other conjugative elements, is robust and not easily avoided by mutation and that several membrane-related functions affect the efficiency of conjugation. PMID:25069588

  11. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  12. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  13. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  14. Global and gene specific DNA methylation changes during zebrafish development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA methylation is dynamic through the life of an organism. In this study, we measured the global and gene specific DNA methylation changes in zebrafish at different developmental stages. We found that the methylation percentage of cytosines was 11.75 ± 0.96% in 3.3 hour post fertilization (hpf) zeb...

  15. The ratio of unsaturated fatty acids in biosurfactants affects the efficiency of gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2010-10-15

    An unsaturated hydrocarbon chain in phospholipid was reported to affect a phase transition and a fusogenic activity after mixing membranes, and consequently to achieve a high DNA transfection efficiency. We previously showed that a biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) enhances the gene transfection efficiency of cationic liposomes. Here, we have studied the effects of unsaturated fatty acid ratio of MEL-A on the physicochemical properties and gene delivery into cells of cationic liposomes using MEL-A with three different unsaturated fatty acid ratios (9.1%, 21.5%, and 46.3%). The gene transfer efficiency of cationic liposomes containing MEL-A (21.5%) was much higher than that of those containing MEL-A (9.1%) and MEL-A (46.3%). MEL-A (21.5%)-containing cationic liposomes induced highly efficient membrane fusion after addition of anionic liposomes and led to subsequent DNA release. Imaging analysis revealed that MEL-A (21.5%)-containing liposomes fused with the plasma membrane and delivered DNA into the nucleus of NIH-3T3 cells, MEL-A (46.3%)-containing liposomes fused with the plasma membrane did not deliver DNA into the nucleus, and MEL-A (9.1%)-containing liposomes neither fused with the plasma membrane nor delivered DNA into the nucleus. Thus, it is understandable that the unsaturated fatty acid ratio of MEL-A strongly influences the gene transfection efficiency of cationic liposomes. PMID:20674726

  16. SPL8, an SBP-box gene that affects pollen sac development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Unte, Ulrike S; Sorensen, Anna-Marie; Pesaresi, Paolo; Gandikota, Madhuri; Leister, Dario; Saedler, Heinz; Huijser, Peter

    2003-04-01

    SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-box genes (SBP-box genes) encode plant-specific proteins that share a highly conserved DNA binding domain, the SBP domain. Although likely to represent transcription factors, little is known about their role in development. In Arabidopsis, SBP-box genes constitute a structurally heterogeneous family of 16 members known as SPL genes. For one of these genes, SPL8, we isolated three independent transposon-tagged mutants, all of which exhibited a strong reduction in fertility. Microscopic analysis revealed that this reduced fertility is attributable primarily to abnormally developed microsporangia, which exhibit premeiotic abortion of the sporocytes. In addition to its role in microsporogenesis, the SPL8 knockout also seems to affect megasporogenesis, trichome formation on sepals, and stamen filament elongation. The SPL8 mutants described help to uncover the roles of SBP-box genes in plant development. PMID:12671094

  17. SPL8, an SBP-Box Gene That Affects Pollen Sac Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Unte, Ulrike S.; Sorensen, Anna-Marie; Pesaresi, Paolo; Gandikota, Madhuri; Leister, Dario; Saedler, Heinz; Huijser, Peter

    2003-01-01

    SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN–box genes (SBP-box genes) encode plant-specific proteins that share a highly conserved DNA binding domain, the SBP domain. Although likely to represent transcription factors, little is known about their role in development. In Arabidopsis, SBP-box genes constitute a structurally heterogeneous family of 16 members known as SPL genes. For one of these genes, SPL8, we isolated three independent transposon-tagged mutants, all of which exhibited a strong reduction in fertility. Microscopic analysis revealed that this reduced fertility is attributable primarily to abnormally developed microsporangia, which exhibit premeiotic abortion of the sporocytes. In addition to its role in microsporogenesis, the SPL8 knockout also seems to affect megasporogenesis, trichome formation on sepals, and stamen filament elongation. The SPL8 mutants described help to uncover the roles of SBP-box genes in plant development. PMID:12671094

  18. Investigation of factors affecting RNA-seq gene expression calls

    PubMed Central

    Harati, Sahar; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-seq enables quantification of the human transcriptome. Estimation of gene expression is a fundamental issue in the analysis of RNA-seq data. However, there is an inherent ambiguity in distinguishing between genes with very low expression and experimental or transcriptional noise. We conducted an exploratory investigation of some factors that may affect gene expression calls. We observed that the distribution of reads that map to exonic, intronic, and intergenic regions are distinct. These distributions may provide useful insights into the behavior of gene expression noise. Moreover, we observed that these distributions are qualitatively similar between two sequence mapping algorithms. Finally, we examined the relationship between gene length and gene expression calls, and observed that they are correlated. This preliminary investigation is important for RNA-seq gene expression analysis because it may lead to more effective algorithms for distinguishing between true gene expression and experimental or transcriptional noise. PMID:25571173

  19. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Prados, Julien; Stenz, Ludwig; Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  20. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  1. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Tonje; Rødland, Einar A; Lagesen, Karin; Seeberg, Erling; Rognes, Torbjørn; Tønjum, Tone

    2004-01-01

    Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within coding regions are the DNA uptake sequences (DUS) required for natural genetic transformation. More importantly, we found a significantly higher density of DUS within genes involved in DNA repair, recombination, restriction-modification and replication than in any other annotated gene group in these organisms. Pasteurella multocida also displayed high frequencies of a putative DUS identical to that previously identified in H.influenzae and with a skewed distribution towards genome maintenance genes, indicating that this bacterium might be transformation competent under certain conditions. These results imply that the high frequency of DUS in genome maintenance genes is conserved among phylogenetically divergent species and thus are of significant biological importance. Increased DUS density is expected to enhance DNA uptake and the over-representation of DUS in genome maintenance genes might reflect facilitated recovery of genome preserving functions. For example, transient and beneficial increase in genome instability can be allowed during pathogenesis simply through loss of antimutator genes, since these DUS-containing sequences will be preferentially recovered. Furthermore, uptake of such genes could provide a mechanism for facilitated recovery from DNA damage after genotoxic stress. PMID:14960717

  2. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  3. Quantitative DNA Methylation Analysis of Candidate Genes in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M.; Riggs, Bridget M.; Delmas, Amber L.; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  4. Hyperglycemia Differentially Affects Maternal and Fetal DNA Integrity and DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreli, Jusciele B.; Santos, Janine H.; Lorenzon-Ojea, Aline Rodrigues; Corrêa-Silva, Simone; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rudge, Marilza V.; Damasceno, Débora C.; Bevilacqua, Estela; Calderon, Iracema M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Investigate the DNA damage and its cellular response in blood samples from both mother and the umbilical cord of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia. Methods: A total of 144 subjects were divided into 4 groups: normoglycemia (ND; 46 cases), mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH; 30 cases), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; 45 cases) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2; 23 cases). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) isolation and/or leukocytes from whole maternal and umbilical cord blood were obtained from all groups at delivery. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage were measured by gene-specific quantitative PCR, and the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway were assessed by real-time qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Apoptosis was measured in vitro experiments by caspase 3/7 activity and ATP levels. Results: GDM and DM2 groups were characterized by an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers, an increase in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and decreased expression of mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1) involved in BER. The levels of hyperglycemia were associated with the in vitro apoptosis pathway. Blood levels of DNA damage in umbilical cord were similar among the groups. Newborns of diabetic mothers had increased expression of BER mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1, POLβ and FEN1). A diabetes-like environment was unable to induce apoptosis in the umbilical cord blood cells. Conclusions: Our data show relevant asymmetry between maternal and fetal blood cell susceptibility to DNA damage and apoptosis induction. Maternal cells seem to be more predisposed to changes in an adverse glucose environment. This may be due to differential ability in upregulating multiple genes involved in the activation of DNA repair response, especially the BER mechanism. However if this study shows a more effective adaptive response by the fetal organism, it also calls for

  5. Analysis of thirteen trinucleotide repeat loci as candidate genes for Schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S.; Leggo, J.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.; Rubinsztein, D.C.

    1996-04-09

    A group of diseases are due to abnormal expansions of trinucleotide repeats. These diseases all affect the nervous system. In addition, they manifest the phenomenon of anticipation, in which the disease tends to present at an earlier age or with greater severity in successive generations. Many additional genes with trinucleotide repeats are believed to be expressed in the human brain. As anticipation has been reported in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, we have examined allele distributions of 13 trinucleotide repeat-containing genes, many novel and all expressed in the brain, in genomic DNA from schizophrenic (n = 20-97) and bipolar affective disorder patients (23-30) and controls (n = 43-146). No evidence was obtained to implicate expanded alleles in these 13 genes as causal factors in these diseases. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. On the role of DNA biomechanics in the regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Milstein, J. N.; Meiners, J.-C.

    2011-01-01

    DNA is traditionally seen as a linear sequence of instructions for cellular functions that are expressed through biochemical processes. Cellular DNA, however, is also organized as a complex hierarchical structure with a mosaic of mechanical features, and a growing body of evidence is now emerging to imply that these mechanical features are connected to genetic function. Mechanical tension, for instance, which must be felt by DNA within the heavily constrained and continually fluctuating cellular environment, can affect a number of regulatory processes implicating a role for biomechanics in gene expression complementary to that of biochemical regulation. In this article, we review evidence for such mechanical pathways of genetic regulation. PMID:21865249

  7. CG gene body DNA methylation changes and evolution of duplicated genes in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haifeng; Beyene, Getu; Zhai, Jixian; Feng, Suhua; Fahlgren, Noah; Taylor, Nigel J.; Bart, Rebecca; Carrington, James C.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Ausin, Israel

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is important for the regulation of gene expression and the silencing of transposons in plants. Here we present genome-wide methylation patterns at single-base pair resolution for cassava (Manihot esculenta, cultivar TME 7), a crop with a substantial impact in the agriculture of subtropical and tropical regions. On average, DNA methylation levels were higher in all three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH, where H equals A, T, or C) than those of the most well-studied model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. As in other plants, DNA methylation was found both on transposons and in the transcribed regions (bodies) of many genes. Consistent with these patterns, at least one cassava gene copy of all of the known components of Arabidopsis DNA methylation pathways was identified. Methylation of LTR transposons (GYPSY and COPIA) was found to be unusually high compared with other types of transposons, suggesting that the control of the activity of these two types of transposons may be especially important. Analysis of duplicated gene pairs resulting from whole-genome duplication showed that gene body DNA methylation and gene expression levels have coevolved over short evolutionary time scales, reinforcing the positive relationship between gene body methylation and high levels of gene expression. Duplicated genes with the most divergent gene body methylation and expression patterns were found to have distinct biological functions and may have been under natural or human selection for cassava traits. PMID:26483493

  8. CG gene body DNA methylation changes and evolution of duplicated genes in cassava.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; Beyene, Getu; Zhai, Jixian; Feng, Suhua; Fahlgren, Noah; Taylor, Nigel J; Bart, Rebecca; Carrington, James C; Jacobsen, Steven E; Ausin, Israel

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation is important for the regulation of gene expression and the silencing of transposons in plants. Here we present genome-wide methylation patterns at single-base pair resolution for cassava (Manihot esculenta, cultivar TME 7), a crop with a substantial impact in the agriculture of subtropical and tropical regions. On average, DNA methylation levels were higher in all three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH, where H equals A, T, or C) than those of the most well-studied model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. As in other plants, DNA methylation was found both on transposons and in the transcribed regions (bodies) of many genes. Consistent with these patterns, at least one cassava gene copy of all of the known components of Arabidopsis DNA methylation pathways was identified. Methylation of LTR transposons (GYPSY and COPIA) was found to be unusually high compared with other types of transposons, suggesting that the control of the activity of these two types of transposons may be especially important. Analysis of duplicated gene pairs resulting from whole-genome duplication showed that gene body DNA methylation and gene expression levels have coevolved over short evolutionary time scales, reinforcing the positive relationship between gene body methylation and high levels of gene expression. Duplicated genes with the most divergent gene body methylation and expression patterns were found to have distinct biological functions and may have been under natural or human selection for cassava traits. PMID:26483493

  9. Nutri-epigenomic Studies Related to Neural Tube Defects: Does Folate Affect Neural Tube Closure Via Changes in DNA Methylation?

    PubMed

    Rochtus, Anne; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), affecting 1-2 per 1000 pregnancies, are severe congenital malformations that arise from the failure of neurulation during early embryonic development. The methylation hypothesis suggests that folate prevents NTDs by stimulating cellular methylation reactions. Folate is central to the one-carbon metabolism that produces pyrimidines and purines for DNA synthesis and for the generation of the methyldonor S-adenosyl-methionine. This review focuses on the relation between the folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism, DNA methylation and NTDs. Studies will be discussed that investigated global or locus-specific DNA methylation differences in patients with NTDs. Folate deficiency may increase NTD risk by decreasing DNA methylation, but to date, human studies vary widely in study design in terms of analyzing different clinical subtypes of NTDs, using different methylation quantification assays and using DNA isolated from diverse types of tissues. Some studies have focused mainly on global DNA methylation differences while others have quantified specific methylation differences for imprinted genes, transposable elements and DNA repair enzymes. Findings of global DNA hypomethylation and LINE-1 hypomethylation suggest that epigenetic alterations may disrupt neural tube closure. However, current research does not support a linear relation between red blood cell folate concentration and DNA methylation. Further studies are required to better understand the interaction between folate, DNA methylation changes and NTDs. PMID:26349489

  10. Quantifying the Effect of DNA Packaging on Gene Expression Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Harold

    2010-10-01

    Gene expression, the process by which the genetic code comes alive in the form of proteins, is one of the most important biological processes in living cells, and begins when transcription factors bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region upstream of a gene. The relationship between gene expression output and transcription factor input which is termed the gene regulation function is specific to each promoter, and predicting this gene regulation function from the locations of transcription factor binding sites is one of the challenges in biology. In eukaryotic organisms (for example, animals, plants, fungi etc), DNA is highly compacted into nucleosomes, 147-bp segments of DNA tightly wrapped around histone protein core, and therefore, the accessibility of transcription factor binding sites depends on their locations with respect to nucleosomes - sites inside nucleosomes are less accessible than those outside nucleosomes. To understand how transcription factor binding sites contribute to gene expression in a quantitative manner, we obtain gene regulation functions of promoters with various configurations of transcription factor binding sites by using fluorescent protein reporters to measure transcription factor input and gene expression output in single yeast cells. In this talk, I will show that the affinity of a transcription factor binding site inside and outside the nucleosome controls different aspects of the gene regulation function, and explain this finding based on a mass-action kinetic model that includes competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors.

  11. FacB, the Aspergillus nidulans activator of acetate utilization genes, binds dissimilar DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Todd, R B; Andrianopoulos, A; Davis, M A; Hynes, M J

    1998-04-01

    The facB gene is required for acetate induction of acetamidase (amdS) and the acetate utilization enzymes acetyl-CoA synthase (facA), isocitrate lyase (acuD) and malate synthase (acuE) in Aspergillus nidulans. The facB gene encodes a transcriptional activator with a GAL4-type Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc binuclear cluster DNA-binding domain which is shown to be required for DNA binding. In vitro DNA-binding sites for FacB in the 5' regions of the amdS, facA, acuD and acuE genes have been identified. Mutations in amdS FacB DNA-binding sites affected expression of an amdS-lacZ reporter in vivo and altered the affinity of in vitro DNA binding. This study shows that the FacB Zn(II)2Cys6 cluster binds to dissimilar sites which show similarity in form but not sequence with DNA-binding sites of other Zn(II)2Cys6 proteins. Sequences with homology to FacB sites are found in the 5' regions of genes regulated by the closely related yeast Zn(II)2Cys6 protein CAT8. PMID:9524126

  12. Divergence of Gene Body DNA Methylation and Evolution of Plant Duplicate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that gene body DNA methylation is associated with gene expression. However, whether and how deviation of gene body DNA methylation between duplicate genes can influence their divergence remains largely unexplored. Here, we aim to elucidate the potential role of gene body DNA methylation in the fate of duplicate genes. We identified paralogous gene pairs from Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) genomes and reprocessed their single-base resolution methylome data. We show that methylation in paralogous genes nonlinearly correlates with several gene properties including exon number/gene length, expression level and mutation rate. Further, we demonstrated that divergence of methylation level and pattern in paralogs indeed positively correlate with their sequence and expression divergences. This result held even after controlling for other confounding factors known to influence the divergence of paralogs. We observed that methylation level divergence might be more relevant to the expression divergence of paralogs than methylation pattern divergence. Finally, we explored the mechanisms that might give rise to the divergence of gene body methylation in paralogs. We found that exonic methylation divergence more closely correlates with expression divergence than intronic methylation divergence. We show that genomic environments (e.g., flanked by transposable elements and repetitive sequences) of paralogs generated by various duplication mechanisms are associated with the methylation divergence of paralogs. Overall, our results suggest that the changes in gene body DNA methylation could provide another avenue for duplicate genes to develop differential expression patterns and undergo different evolutionary fates in plant genomes. PMID:25310342

  13. Mutants affecting nucleotide recognition by T7 DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Donlin, M J; Johnson, K A

    1994-12-13

    Analysis of two mutations affecting nucleotide selection by the DNA polymerase from bacteriophage T7 is reported here. Two conserved residues (Glu480 and Tyr530) in the polymerase active site of an exonuclease deficient (exo-) T7 DNA polymerase were mutated using site-directed mutagenesis (Glu480-Asp and Tyr530-Phe). The kinetic and equilibrium constants governing DNA binding, nucleotide incorporation, and pyrophosphorolysis were measured with the mutants E480D(exo-) and Y530F(exo-) in single-turnover experiments using rapid chemical quench-flow methods. Both mutants have slightly lower Kd values for DNA binding compared to that of wild-type(exo-). With Y530F(exo-) the ground state nucleotide binding affinity was unchanged from wild-type for dGTP and dCTP, was 2-fold lower for dATP and 8-10-fold lower for dTTP binding. With E480D(exo-), the binding constants were 5-6-fold lower for dATP, dGTP, and dCTP and 40-fold lower for dTTP binding compared to those constants for wild-type(exo-). The significance of a specific destabilization of dTTP binding by these amino acids was examined using a dGTP analog, deoxyinosine triphosphate, which mimics the placement and number of hydrogen bonds of an A:T base pair. The Kd for dCTP opposite inosine was unchanged with wild-type(exo-) (197 microM) but higher with Y530F(exo-) (454 microM) and with E480D(exo-) (1 mM). The Kd for dITP was the same with wild-type(exo-) (180 microM) and Y530F(exo-) (229 microM), but significantly higher with E480D(exo-) (3.2 mM). These data support the suggestion that E480 selectively stabilizes dTTP in the wild-type enzyme, perhaps by hydrogen bonding to the unbonded carbonyl. Data on the incorporation of dideoxynucleotide analogs were consistent with the observation of a selective stabilization of dTTP by both residues. Pyrophosphorolysis experiments revealed that neither mutation had a significant effect on the chemistry of polymerization. The fidelity of the mutants were examined in

  14. Natural human gene correction by small extracellular genomic DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Leonid A; Rogachev, Vladimir A; Likhacheva, Anastasia C; Bogachev, Sergei S; Sebeleva, Tamara E; Shilov, Alexander G; Baiborodin, Sergei I; Petrova, Natalia A; Mechetina, Ludmila V; Shurdov, Mikhail A; Wickstrom, Eric

    2007-09-15

    Classical gene targeting employs natural homologous recombination for a gene correction using a specially designed and artificially delivered DNA construct but the method is very inefficient. On the other hand, small DNA fragments in the form of tiny chromatin-like particles naturally present in blood plasma can spontaneously penetrate into human cells and cell nuclei. We hypothesized that these natural DNA nanoparticles with recombinagenic free ends might be effective agents for gene replacement therapy. We demonstrate that a mixture of small fragments of total human chromatin from non-mutant cells added to a culture medium without transfection agents efficiently repaired a 47 base pair deletion in the CASP3 gene in 30% of treated human MCF7 breast cancer cells, as shown by restoration of caspase-3 apoptotic function and CASP3 DNA and mRNA structure. Such an innate gene replacement mechanism might function naturally in an organism using its own apoptotic DNA fragments. This mechanism might enable human cancer cell phenotype normalization in the presence of excess normal cells. PMID:17703110

  15. DNA Methylation Leads to DNA Repair Gene Down-Regulation and Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion in Patient-Derived Huntington Disease Cells.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Peter A; Reid, John A; Ogle, Roy C; Sachs, Patrick C; Bruno, Robert D

    2016-07-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that exhibits genetic anticipation of affected progeny due to expansions of a trinucleotide repeat (TNR) region within the HTT gene. DNA repair machinery is a known effector of TNR instability; however, the specific defects in HD cells that lead to TNR expansion are unknown. We hypothesized that HD cells would be deficient in DNA repair gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression of select DNA repair genes involved in mismatch/loop-out repair (APEX1, BRCA1, RPA1, and RPA3) in patient-derived HD cells and found each was consistently down-regulated relative to wild-type samples taken from unaffected individuals in the same family. Rescue of DNA repair gene expression by 5-azacytidine treatment identified DNA methylation as a mediator of DNA repair gene expression deficiency. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed hypermethylation of the APEX1 promoter region in HD cells relative to control, as well as 5-azacytidine-induced hypomethylation. 5-Azacytidine treatments also resulted in stabilization of TNR expansion within the mutant HTT allele during long-term culture of HD cells. Our findings indicate that DNA methylation leads to DNA repair down-regulation and TNR instability in mitotically active HD cells and offer a proof of principle that epigenetic interventions can curb TNR expansions. PMID:27182645

  16. Land use type significantly affects microbial gene transcription in soil.

    PubMed

    Nacke, Heiko; Fischer, Christiane; Thürmer, Andrea; Meinicke, Peter; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Soil microorganisms play an essential role in sustaining biogeochemical processes and cycling of nutrients across different land use types. To gain insights into microbial gene transcription in forest and grassland soil, we isolated mRNA from 32 sampling sites. After sequencing of generated complementary DNA (cDNA), a total of 5,824,229 sequences could be further analyzed. We were able to assign nonribosomal cDNA sequences to all three domains of life. A dominance of bacterial sequences, which were affiliated to 25 different phyla, was found. Bacterial groups capable of aromatic compound degradation such as Phenylobacterium and Burkholderia were detected in significantly higher relative abundance in forest soil than in grassland soil. Accordingly, KEGG pathway categories related to degradation of aromatic ring-containing molecules (e.g., benzoate degradation) were identified in high abundance within forest soil-derived metatranscriptomic datasets. The impact of land use type forest on community composition and activity is evidently to a high degree caused by the presence of wood breakdown products. Correspondingly, bacterial groups known to be involved in lignin degradation and containing ligninolytic genes such as Burkholderia, Bradyrhizobium, and Azospirillum exhibited increased transcriptional activity in forest soil. Higher solar radiation in grassland presumably induced increased transcription of photosynthesis-related genes within this land use type. This is in accordance with high abundance of photosynthetic organisms and plant-infecting viruses in grassland. PMID:24553913

  17. Reduction in DNA topoisomerase I level affects growth, phenotype and nucleoid architecture of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state negative supercoiling of eubacterial genomes is maintained by the action of DNA topoisomerases. Topoisomerase distribution varies in different species of mycobacteria. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) contains a single type I (TopoI) and a single type II (Gyrase) enzyme, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and other members harbour additional relaxases. TopoI is essential for Mtb survival. However, the necessity of TopoI or other relaxases in Msm has not been investigated. To recognize the importance of TopoI for growth, physiology and gene expression of Msm, we have developed a conditional knock-down strain of TopoI in Msm. The TopoI-depleted strain exhibited extremely slow growth and drastic changes in phenotypic characteristics. The cessation of growth indicates the essential requirement of the enzyme for the organism in spite of having additional DNA relaxation enzymes in the cell. Notably, the imbalance in TopoI level led to the altered expression of topology modulatory proteins, resulting in a diffused nucleoid architecture. Proteomic and transcript analysis of the mutant indicated reduced expression of the genes involved in central metabolic pathways and core DNA transaction processes. RNA polymerase (RNAP) distribution on the transcription units was affected in the TopoI-depleted cells, suggesting global alteration in transcription. The study thus highlights the essential requirement of TopoI in the maintenance of cellular phenotype, growth characteristics and gene expression in mycobacteria. A decrease in TopoI level led to altered RNAP occupancy and impaired transcription elongation, causing severe downstream effects. PMID:25516959

  18. Cooperation of the prs and dnaA gene products for initiation of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Y

    1993-01-01

    A new Escherichia coli mutant allele, named dnaR, that causes thermosensitive initiation of chromosome replication has been identified to be an allele of the prs gene, the gene for phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (Y. Sakakibara, J. Mol. Biol. 226:979-987, 1992; Y. Sakakibara, J. Mol. Biol. 226:989-996, 1992). The dnaR mutant became temperature resistant by acquisition of a mutation in the dnaA gene that did not affect the intrinsic activity for the initiation of replication. The suppressor mutant was capable of initiating replication from oriC at a high temperature restrictive for the dnaR single mutant. The thermoresistant DNA synthesis was inhibited by the presence of the wild-type dnaA allele at a high but not a low copy number. The synthesis was also inhibited by an elevated dose of a mutant dnaR allele retaining dnaR activity. Therefore, thermoresistant DNA synthesis in the suppressor mutant was dependent on both the dnaA and the dnaR functions. On the basis of these results, I conclude that the initiation of chromosome replication requires cooperation of the prs and dnaA products. PMID:8396119

  19. DNA homologies of ribosomal RNA genes of Neurospora species

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Mimiko, R.; Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) of Neurospora crassa contain DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs, in addition to internal and external spacers. As has been reported for many eukaryotes, the DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs in Neurospora species are probably conserved while the internal and external spacer regions are probably variable sequences. Extensive electron microscopic studies of 45S precursor rRNA of several cold and warm blooded animals confirm that spacer regions vary extensively from species to species. It was desirable to know whether such differences in rDNA sequences exist between Neurospora species. Any such difference should be detectable using standard procedures for DNA homology studies rDNA sequences were isolated from N. crassa mycelial cells using the procedure described previously. The purified rDNA was /sup 3/H-labeled (by nick translation) and reassociated with total DNA isolated from the heterothallic species N. crassa and from three homothalliospecies: N. dodgei, N. lineolata, and N. africana. In addition, /sup 32/P-labeled total DNA of N. crassa was reannealed with unlabeled bulk DNA from N. crassa, N. dodgei, and N. lineolata.

  20. Human xeroderma pigmentosum group G gene encodes a DNA endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Habraken, Y; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1994-01-01

    Because of defective nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers. Cell fusion studies have identified seven XP complementation groups, A to G. Previous studies have implicated the products of these seven XP genes in the recognition of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage and in incision of the damage-containing DNA strand. Here, we express the XPG-encoded protein in Sf9 insect cells and purify it to homogeneity. We demonstrate that XPG is a single-strand specific DNA endonuclease, thus identifying the catalytic role of the protein in nucleotide excision repair. We suggest that XPG nuclease acts on the single-stranded region created as a result of the combined action of the XPB helicase and XPD helicase at the DNA damage site. Images PMID:8078765

  1. Deletion of the DNA Ligase IV Gene in Candida glabrata Significantly Increases Gene-Targeting Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Yuke; Fiori, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in the United States. Over the last decades, its incidence increased, whereas that of Candida albicans decreased slightly. One of the main reasons for this shift is attributed to the inherent tolerance of C. glabrata toward the commonly used azole antifungal drugs. Despite a close phylogenetic distance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologous recombination works with poor efficiency in C. glabrata compared to baker's yeast, in fact limiting targeted genetic alterations of the pathogen's genome. It has been shown that nonhomologous DNA end joining is dominant over specific gene targeting in C. glabrata. To improve the homologous recombination efficiency, we have generated a strain in which the LIG4 gene has been deleted, which resulted in a significant increase in correct gene targeting. The very specific function of Lig4 in mediating nonhomologous end joining is the reason for the absence of clear side effects, some of which affect the ku80 mutant, another mutant with reduced nonhomologous end joining. We also generated a LIG4 reintegration cassette. Our results show that the lig4 mutant strain may be a valuable tool for the C. glabrata research community. PMID:26048009

  2. DNA sequence of the yeast transketolase gene.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, T S; Kwee, I L; Nakada, T; Largman, C; Martin, B M

    1992-02-18

    Transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) is the enzyme that, together with aldolase, forms a reversible link between the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways. We have cloned and sequenced the transketolase gene from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). This is the first transketolase gene of the pentose phosphate shunt to be sequenced from any source. The molecular mass of the proposed translated protein is 73,976 daltons, in good agreement with the observed molecular mass of about 75,000 daltons. The 5'-nontranslated region of the gene is similar to other yeast genes. There is no evidence of 5'-splice junctions or branch points in the sequence. The 3'-nontranslated region contains the polyadenylation signal (AATAAA), 80 base pairs downstream from the termination codon. A high degree of homology is found between yeast transketolase and dihydroxyacetone synthase (formaldehyde transketolase) from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. The overall sequence identity between these two proteins is 37%, with four regions of much greater similarity. The regions from amino acid residues 98-131, 157-182, 410-433, and 474-489 have sequence identities of 74%, 66%, 83%, and 82%, respectively. One of these regions (157-182) includes a possible thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) binding domain, and another (410-433) may contain the catalytic domain. PMID:1737042

  3. Towards understanding the breast cancer epigenome: a comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Michiels, Stefan; Metzger-Filho, Otto; Saini, Kamal S.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, an elevated disease risk has been ascribed to a genetic predisposition, however, exciting progress over the past years has discovered alternate elements of inheritance that involve epigenetic regulation. Epigenetic changes are heritably stable alterations that include DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA-mediated silencing. Aberrant DNA methylation is a common molecular basis for a number of important human diseases, including breast cancer. Changes in DNA methylation profoundly affect global gene expression patterns. What is emerging is a more dynamic and complex association between DNA methylation and gene expression than previously believed. Although many tools have already been developed for analyzing genome-wide gene expression data, tools for analyzing genome-wide DNA methylation have not yet reached the same level of refinement. Here we provide an in-depth analysis of DNA methylation in parallel with gene expression data characteristics and describe the particularities of low-level and high-level analyses of DNA methylation data. Low-level analysis refers to pre-processing of methylation data (i.e. normalization, transformation and filtering), whereas high-level analysis is focused on illustrating the application of the widely used class comparison, class prediction and class discovery methods to DNA methylation data. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of DNA methylation on gene expression by measuring the correlation between the degree of CpG methylation and the level of expression and to explore the pattern of methylation as a function of the promoter region. PMID:26657508

  4. Human cytomegalovirus RL13 protein interacts with host NUDT14 protein affecting viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanping; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the host and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is important in determining the outcome of a viral infection. The HCMV RL13 gene product exerts independent, inhibitory effects on viral growth in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. At present, there are few reports on the interactions between the HCMV RL13 protein and human host proteins. The present study provided direct evidence for the specific interaction between HCMV RL13 and host nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)‑type motif 14 (NUDT14), a UDP‑glucose pyrophosphatase, using two‑hybrid screening, an in vitro glutathione S‑transferase pull‑down assay, and co‑immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Additionally, the RL13 protein was shown to co‑localize with the NUDT14 protein in the HEK293 cell membrane and cytoplasm, demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Decreasing the expression level of NUDT14 via NUDT14‑specific small interfering RNAs increased the number of viral DNA copies in the HCMV‑infected cells. However, the overexpression of NUDT14 in a stably expressing cell line did not affect viral DNA levels significantly in the HCMV infected cells. Based on the known functions of NUDT14, the results of the present study suggested that the interaction between the RL13 protein and NUDT14 protein may be involved in HCMV DNA replication, and that NUDT14 may offer potential in the modulation of viral infection. PMID:26781650

  5. DNA in Antibiotic Preparations: Absence of Intact Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Lagler, Heimo; Graninger, Wolfgang; Burgmann, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    Fragments of erm(E2), otrA, and aph(6) shorter than 400 bp and producer strain-specific rRNA genes were amplified from various antibiotics. The amount of genetic material and the sizes of amplicons recovered from murine feces after oral administration of a β-lactamase-encoding plasmid indicated substantial DNA degradation in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. These observations imply that antibiotics are no major source for horizontal resistance gene transfer in clinical settings. PMID:15917552

  6. Eliciting specific humoral immunity from a plasmid DNA encoding infectious bursal disease virus polyprotein gene fused with avian influenza virus hemagglutinin gene.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccine coding for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) polyprotein gene and that for avian influenza virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA) gene have been shown to induce immunity and provide protection against the respective disease. The present study was carried out to determine whether an IBDV polyprotein gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene could trigger immune response to both IBDV and AIV. After transfection, VP2 and HA were detected in the cytoplasm and at cell membrane, respectively, by immunofluorescent antibody double staining method, suggesting the fusion strategy did not affect the location of protein expression. VP4 cleavage between VP2 and HA was confirmed by Western blot, indicating the fusion strategy did not affect VP4 function in transfected cells. After vaccination in chickens, the DNA construct VP24-HA/pcDNA induced ELISA and virus neutralizing antibodies against VP2 and hemagglutination inhibition antibody against the HA subtype. The results indicated that a single plasmid construct carrying IBDV VP243 gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene can elicit specific antibody responses to both IBDV and AIV by DNA vaccination. PMID:25445883

  7. The evolution of genes within genes and the control of DNA replication in microviruses.

    PubMed

    Doore, Sarah M; Baird, Cameron D; Roznowski, Aaron P; Fane, Bentley A

    2014-06-01

    Single-stranded DNA(ssDNA) viral life cycles must balance double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA biosynthesis. Previously published in vitro results suggest that microvirus C and host cell SSB proteins play antagonistic roles to achieve this balance. To investigate this in vivo, microvirus DNA replication was characterized in cells expressing cloned C or ssb genes, which would presumably alter the C:SSB protein ratios. Representatives of each microvirus clade (φX174, G4, and α3) were used in these studies. α3 DNA replication was significantly more complex. Results suggested that the recognized α3 C gene (C(S): small) is one of two C genes. A larger 5' extended gene could be translated from an upstream GTG start codon (C(B): big). Wild-type α3 acquired resistance to elevated SSB levels by mutations that exclusively frameshifted the C(B) reading frame, whereas mutations in the origin of replication conferred resistance to elevated C protein levels. Expression of either the cloned C(B) or C(S) gene complemented am(C) mutants, demonstrating functional redundancy. When the C(S) start codon was eliminated, strains were only viable if an additional amber mutation was placed in gene C and propagated in an informational suppressing host. Thus, C(B) protein likely reaches toxic levels in the absence of C(S) translation. This phenomenon may have driven the evolution of the C(S) gene within the larger C(B) gene and could constitute a unique mechanism of regulation. Furthermore, cross-complementation data suggested that interactions between the α3 C and other viral proteins have evolved enough specificity to biochemically isolate its DNA replication from G4 and φX174. PMID:24600050

  8. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed. PMID:26725041

  9. Gene Targeting of Mouse Tardbp Negatively Affects Masp2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Samar; Xiao, Shangxi; Miletic, Denise; Robertson, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult onset neurodegenerative disease affecting both upper and lower motor neurons. TDP-43, encoded by the TARDBP gene, was identified as a component of motor neuron cytoplasmic inclusions in both familial and sporadic ALS and has become a pathological signature of the disease. TDP-43 is a nuclear protein involved in RNA metabolism, however in ALS, TDP-43 is mislocalized to the cytoplasm of affected motor neurons, suggesting that disease might be caused by TDP-43 loss of function. To investigate this hypothesis, we attempted to generate a mouse conditional knockout of the Tardbp gene using the classical Cre-loxP technology. Even though heterozygote mice for the targeted allele were successfully generated, we were unable to obtain homozygotes. Here we show that although the targeting vector was specifically designed to not overlap with Tardbp adjacent genes, the homologous recombination event affected the expression of a downstream gene, Masp2. This may explain the inability to obtain homozygote mice with targeted Tardbp. PMID:24740308

  10. On the origin and evolutionary consequences of gene body DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Adam J; Ji, Lexiang; Niederhuth, Chad E; Willing, Eva-Maria; Hofmeister, Brigitte T; Shi, Xiuling; Wang, Li; Lu, Zefu; Rohr, Nicholas A; Hartwig, Benjamin; Kiefer, Christiane; Deal, Roger B; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Stroud, Hume; Jacobsen, Steven E; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Schmitz, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    In plants, CG DNA methylation is prevalent in the transcribed regions of many constitutively expressed genes (gene body methylation; gbM), but the origin and function of gbM remain unknown. Here we report the discovery that Eutrema salsugineum has lost gbM from its genome, to our knowledge the first instance for an angiosperm. Of all known DNA methyltransferases, only CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) is missing from E. salsugineum Identification of an additional angiosperm, Conringia planisiliqua, which independently lost CMT3 and gbM, supports that CMT3 is required for the establishment of gbM. Detailed analyses of gene expression, the histone variant H2A.Z, and various histone modifications in E. salsugineum and in Arabidopsis thaliana epigenetic recombinant inbred lines found no evidence in support of any role for gbM in regulating transcription or affecting the composition and modification of chromatin over evolutionary timescales. PMID:27457936

  11. Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk: Role of Genetic Polymorphisms and Gene-Gene Interactions in DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Monroy, Claudia M.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Lopez, Mirtha; Rourke, Elizabeth; Etzel, Carol J.; Younes, Anas; Strom, Sara S.; El-Zein, Randa

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair variants may play a potentially important role in an individual’s susceptibility to developing cancer. Numerous studies have reported the association between genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes and different types of hematologic cancers. However, to date, the effects of such SNPs on modulating Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) risk have not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that gene-gene interaction between candidate genes in Direct Reversal, Nucleotide excision repair (NER), Base excision repair (BER) and Double strand break (DSB) pathways may contribute to susceptibility to HL. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study on 200 HL cases and 220 controls to assess associations between HL risk and 21 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene interactions and the association of multiple polymorphisms in a chromosome region using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multi-factor dimensionality reduction and classification and regression tree approaches. We observed that, in combination, allelic variants in the XPC Ala499Val, NBN Glu185Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Me, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 399Gln polymorphisms modify the risk for developing HL. Moreover, the cumulative genetic risk score revealed a significant trend where the risk for developing HL increases as the number of adverse alleles in BER and DSB genes increase. These findings suggest that DNA repair variants in BER and DSB pathways may play an important role in the development of HL. PMID:21374732

  12. DNA microarrays detect effects of soil contamination on Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Kimberly D; Basu, Amit; Spotila, James R; Avery, Harold W; Bergman, Lawrence W; Hammond, Rachel; Anandan, Shivanthi

    2008-12-01

    Soil contamination, such as heavy metals and benzene compounds, is a widespread problem on military installations. It is important to be able to determine the effects of soil contamination before any adverse effects appear in organisms in surrounding areas. We examined gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in soil from three sites at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant in Radford, Virginia, USA, using DNA microarrays. We analyzed soil, germination, and growth rate to compare with the microarray data. Soil contamination affected both external phenotype and gene expression. Plants grown in soil with high levels of contaminants were chloritic and were smaller than control plants grown in potting soil. Plants grown in soil with the highest copper concentration had the lowest growth rates and had genes up-regulated across several functional groups. Plants grown in soils with elevated lead had many genes down-regulated that were related to photosystem II, metabolism, cellular transport, and protein synthesis. Genes consistently up-regulated across most microarrays were genes related to photosystem I, genes related to water deprivation and oxidative stress response, heat shock proteins, and toxin catabolism genes such as glutathiones. DNA microarrays, in concert with a model genetic organism such as A. thaliana, were an effective assessment tool to determine the presence of toxic substances in soil at a site used for the production of military explosives. PMID:18613744

  13. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with the long term goal of our research to understand the nature of the key enzymes in eukaryotic DNA replication we have characterized the properties of the wild type DNA polymerases of the {alpha}-family and their mutants. We have also provided evidence for the role of aphidicolin in the elongation process of the in vivo DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We also developed a technology for planned prep from a large numbers of clones for direct screening by size or restriction digestion in order to facilitate our goals to clone the DNA polymerase gene.

  14. Identifying sexual differentiation genes that affect Drosophila life span

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sexual differentiation often has significant effects on life span and aging phenotypes. For example, males and females of several species have different life spans, and genetic and environmental manipulations that affect life span often have different magnitude of effect in males versus females. Moreover, the presence of a differentiated germ-line has been shown to affect life span in several species, including Drosophila and C. elegans. Methods Experiments were conducted to determine how alterations in sexual differentiation gene activity might affect the life span of Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila females heterozygous for the tudor[1] mutation produce normal offspring, while their homozygous sisters produce offspring that lack a germ line. To identify additional sexual differentiation genes that might affect life span, the conditional transgenic system Geneswitch was employed, whereby feeding adult flies or developing larvae the drug RU486 causes the over-expression of selected UAS-transgenes. Results In this study germ-line ablation caused by the maternal tudor[1] mutation was examined in a long-lived genetic background, and was found to increase life span in males but not in females, consistent with previous reports. Fitting the data to a Gompertz-Makeham model indicated that the maternal tudor[1] mutation increases the life span of male progeny by decreasing age-independent mortality. The Geneswitch system was used to screen through several UAS-type and EP-type P element mutations in genes that regulate sexual differentiation, to determine if additional sex-specific effects on life span would be obtained. Conditional over-expression of transformer female isoform (traF) during development produced male adults with inhibited sexual differentiation, however this caused no significant change in life span. Over-expression of doublesex female isoform (dsxF) during development was lethal to males, and produced a limited number of female escapers

  15. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. PMID:24861204

  16. Toxic Diatom Aldehydes Affect Defence Gene Networks in Sea Urchins.

    PubMed

    Varrella, Stefano; Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Susan; Ruocco, Nadia; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms possess a series of cellular strategies to counteract the negative effects of toxic compounds, including the massive reorganization of gene expression networks. Here we report the modulated dose-dependent response of activated genes by diatom polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. PUAs are secondary metabolites deriving from the oxidation of fatty acids, inducing deleterious effects on the reproduction and development of planktonic and benthic organisms that feed on these unicellular algae and with anti-cancer activity. Our previous results showed that PUAs target several genes, implicated in different functional processes in this sea urchin. Using interactomic Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we now show that the genes targeted by PUAs are correlated with four HUB genes, NF-κB, p53, δ-2-catenin and HIF1A, which have not been previously reported for P. lividus. We propose a working model describing hypothetical pathways potentially involved in toxic aldehyde stress response in sea urchins. This represents the first report on gene networks affected by PUAs, opening new perspectives in understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the response of benthic organisms to diatom exposure. PMID:26914213

  17. Toxic Diatom Aldehydes Affect Defence Gene Networks in Sea Urchins

    PubMed Central

    Varrella, Stefano; Ruocco, Nadia; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G.; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms possess a series of cellular strategies to counteract the negative effects of toxic compounds, including the massive reorganization of gene expression networks. Here we report the modulated dose-dependent response of activated genes by diatom polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. PUAs are secondary metabolites deriving from the oxidation of fatty acids, inducing deleterious effects on the reproduction and development of planktonic and benthic organisms that feed on these unicellular algae and with anti-cancer activity. Our previous results showed that PUAs target several genes, implicated in different functional processes in this sea urchin. Using interactomic Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we now show that the genes targeted by PUAs are correlated with four HUB genes, NF-κB, p53, δ-2-catenin and HIF1A, which have not been previously reported for P. lividus. We propose a working model describing hypothetical pathways potentially involved in toxic aldehyde stress response in sea urchins. This represents the first report on gene networks affected by PUAs, opening new perspectives in understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the response of benthic organisms to diatom exposure. PMID:26914213

  18. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Susana; Calado, Sofia; Bitoque, Diogo; Oliveira, Ana Vanessa; Øpstad, Christer L.; Zeeshan, Muhammad; Sliwka, Hans-Richard; Partali, Vassilia; Pungente, Michael D.; Silva, Gabriela A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol (Chol). Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy. PMID:25147812

  19. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  20. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death.

    PubMed

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  1. Asynchronous DNA replication within the human. beta. -globin gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Epner, E.; Forrester, W.C.; Groudine, M. )

    1988-11-01

    The timing of DNA replication of the human {beta}-globin gene locus has been studied by blot hybridization of newly synthesized BrdUrd-substituted DNA from cells in different stages of the S phase. Using probes that span >120 kilobases across the human {beta}-globin gene locus, the authors show that the majority of this domain replicates in early S phase in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 and in middle-to-late S phase in the lymphoid cell line Manca. However, in K562 cells three small regions display a strikingly different replication pattern than adjacent sequences. These islands, located in the inter-{gamma}-globin gene region and approximately 20 kilobases 5' to the {epsilon}-globin gene and 20 kilobases 3' to the {beta}-globin gene, replicate later and throughout S phase. A similar area is also present in the {alpha}-globin gene region in K562 cells. They suggest that these regions may represent sites of termination of replication forks.

  2. The study of the relation of DNA repair pathway genes SNPs and the sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy of NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunbo; Nie, Huan; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Guiyou; Wang, Xu; Xing, Shijie; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yue; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relation between SNPs in DNA repair pathway-related genes and sensitivity of tumor radio-chemotherapy, 26 SNPs in 20 DNA repair genes were genotyped on 176 patients of NSCLC undertaking radio-chemotherapy treatment. In squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), as the rs2228000, rs2228001 (XPC), rs2273953 (TP73), rs2279744 (MDM2), rs2299939 (PTEN) and rs8178085, rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) affected the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs8178085, rs12334811 to radiotherapy. Moreover rs344781, rs2273953 and rs12334811 were related with the survival time of SCC. In general, the "good" genotype GG (rs12334811) showed greater efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and MSF (24 months) on SCC. In adenocarcinoma, as the rs2699887 (PIK3), rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) influenced the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs2299939, rs2735343 (PTEN) to radiotherapy. And rs402710, rs80270, rs2279744 and rs2909430 impacted the survival time of the adenocarcinoma patients. Both GG (rs2279744) and AG (rs2909430) showed a shorter survival time (MFS = 6). Additionally, some SNPs such as rs2228000, rs2228001 and rs344781 were found to regulate the expression of DNA repair pathway genes through eQTLs dataset analysis. These results indicate that SNPs in DNA repair pathway genes might regulate the expression and affect the DNA damage repair, and thereby impact the efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and the survival time of NSCLC. PMID:27246533

  3. The study of the relation of DNA repair pathway genes SNPs and the sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy of NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunbo; Nie, Huan; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Guiyou; Wang, Xu; Xing, Shijie; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yue; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relation between SNPs in DNA repair pathway-related genes and sensitivity of tumor radio-chemotherapy, 26 SNPs in 20 DNA repair genes were genotyped on 176 patients of NSCLC undertaking radio-chemotherapy treatment. In squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), as the rs2228000, rs2228001 (XPC), rs2273953 (TP73), rs2279744 (MDM2), rs2299939 (PTEN) and rs8178085, rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) affected the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs8178085, rs12334811 to radiotherapy. Moreover rs344781, rs2273953 and rs12334811 were related with the survival time of SCC. In general, the “good” genotype GG (rs12334811) showed greater efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and MSF (24 months) on SCC. In adenocarcinoma, as the rs2699887 (PIK3), rs12334811 (DNA-PKcs) influenced the sensitivity to chemotherapy, so did the rs2299939, rs2735343 (PTEN) to radiotherapy. And rs402710, rs80270, rs2279744 and rs2909430 impacted the survival time of the adenocarcinoma patients. Both GG (rs2279744) and AG (rs2909430) showed a shorter survival time (MFS = 6). Additionally, some SNPs such as rs2228000, rs2228001 and rs344781 were found to regulate the expression of DNA repair pathway genes through eQTLs dataset analysis. These results indicate that SNPs in DNA repair pathway genes might regulate the expression and affect the DNA damage repair, and thereby impact the efficacy of radio-chemotherapy and the survival time of NSCLC. PMID:27246533

  4. Effect of Surface Chemistry on Gene Transfer Efficiency Mediated by Surface-induced DNA-doped Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingbing; Yi, Minchang; Yacoob, Christina C.; Nguyen, Hai T.; Shen, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Surface-induced biomineralization represents an effective way to immobilize DNA molecules onto biomaterial surfaces for introducing DNA into cells in contact with or in an approximate distance to biomaterial surfaces. Our previous studies have investigated how the composition of mineralizing solutions affects the composition and pH responsiveness of nanocomposites and thus gene transfer efficiency in different cell types. In this study, we investigated how the functional groups of a biomaterial surface would affect the induction and crystallographic properties of nanocomposites and thus the gene transfer efficiency. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with different terminus were used to control the functional groups of a surface. We demonstrated that the induction of DNA-doped nanocomposites depended on the surface functional groups, which is consistent with previous studies. The crystallographic properties did not vary significantly with the functional groups. DNA-doped nanocomposites induced by different surface functional groups resulted in different cellular uptake of DNA and thus gene transfer efficiency. The differential cellular uptake may be attributed to the interactions between nanocomposites and functional groups. The weaker inducer resulted in higher cellular uptake thus higher gene transfer efficiency. Together with others and our previous studies, our current results suggest that surface-mediated gene transfer by DNA-doped nanocomposites can be modulated through both mineralizing solutions and surface chemistries. PMID:22198137

  5. Relationship of eukaryotic DNA replication to committed gene expression: general theory for gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, L P

    1991-01-01

    The historic arguments for the participation of eukaryotic DNA replication in the control of gene expression are reconsidered along with more recent evidence. An earlier view in which gene commitment was achieved with stable chromatin structures which required DNA replication to reset expression potential (D. D. Brown, Cell 37:359-365, 1984) is further considered. The participation of nonspecific stable repressor of gene activity (histones and other chromatin proteins), as previously proposed, is reexamined. The possible function of positive trans-acting factors is now further developed by considering evidence from DNA virus models. It is proposed that these positive factors act to control the initiation of replicon-specific DNA synthesis in the S phase (early or late replication timing). Stable chromatin assembles during replication into potentially active (early S) or inactive (late S) states with prevailing trans-acting factors (early) or repressing factors (late) and may asymmetrically commit daughter templates. This suggests logical schemes for programming differentiation based on replicons and trans-acting initiators. This proposal requires that DNA replication precede major changes in gene commitment. Prior evidence against a role for DNA replication during terminal differentiation is reexamined along with other results from terminal differentiation of lower eukaryotes. This leads to a proposal that DNA replication may yet underlie terminal gene commitment, but that for it to do so there must exist two distinct modes of replication control. In one mode (mitotic replication) replicon initiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle, whereas the other mode (terminal replication) initiation is not cell cycle restricted, is replicon specific, and can lead to a terminally differentiated state. Aberrant control of mitotic and terminal modes of DNA replication may underlie the transformed state. Implications of a replicon basis for chromatin structure-function and

  6. Does varicocelectomy affect DNA fragmentation in infertile patients?

    PubMed Central

    Telli, Onur; Sarici, Hasmet; Kabar, Mucahit; Ozgur, Berat Cem; Resorlu, Berkan; Bozkurt, Selen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of varicocelectomy on DNA fragmentation index and semen parameters in infertile patients before and after surgical repair of varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 72 men with at least 1-year history of infertility, varicocele and oligospermia were examined. Varicocele sperm samples were classified as normal or pathological according to the 2010 World Health Organization guidelines. The acridine orange test was used to assess the DNA fragmentation index (DFI) preoperatively and postoperatively. Results: DFI decreased significantly after varicocelectomy from 34.5% to 28.2% (P = 0.024). In addition all sperm parameters such as mean sperm count, sperm concentration, progressive motility and sperm morphology significantly increased from 19.5 × 106 to 30.7 × 106, 5.4 × 106/ml to 14.3 × 106/ml, and 19.9% to 31.2% (P < 0.001) and 2.6% to 3.1% (P = 0.017). The study was limited by the loss to follow-up of some patients and unrecorded pregnancy outcome due to short follow-up. Conclusion: Varicocele causes DNA-damage in spermatozoa. We suggest that varicocelectomy improves sperm parameters and decreases DFI. PMID:25878412

  7. Non-homologous DNA increases gene disruption efficiency by altering DNA repair outcomes.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C D; Ray, G J; Bray, N L; Corn, J E

    2016-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease can be targeted to genomic sequences by programming the sequence of an associated single guide RNA (sgRNA). For unknown reasons, the activity of these Cas9-sgRNA combinations varies widely at different genomic loci and in different cell types. Thus, disrupting genes in polyploid cell lines or when using poorly performing sgRNAs can require extensive downstream screening to identify homozygous clones. Here we find that non-homologous single-stranded DNA greatly stimulates Cas9-mediated gene disruption in the absence of homology-directed repair. This stimulation increases the frequency of clones with homozygous gene disruptions and rescues otherwise ineffective sgRNAs. The molecular outcome of enhanced gene disruption depends upon cellular context, stimulating deletion of genomic sequence or insertion of non-homologous DNA at the edited locus in a cell line specific manner. Non-homologous DNA appears to divert cells towards error-prone instead of error-free repair pathways, dramatically increasing the frequency of gene disruption. PMID:27530320

  8. Non-homologous DNA increases gene disruption efficiency by altering DNA repair outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C. D.; Ray, G. J.; Bray, N. L.; Corn, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease can be targeted to genomic sequences by programming the sequence of an associated single guide RNA (sgRNA). For unknown reasons, the activity of these Cas9–sgRNA combinations varies widely at different genomic loci and in different cell types. Thus, disrupting genes in polyploid cell lines or when using poorly performing sgRNAs can require extensive downstream screening to identify homozygous clones. Here we find that non-homologous single-stranded DNA greatly stimulates Cas9-mediated gene disruption in the absence of homology-directed repair. This stimulation increases the frequency of clones with homozygous gene disruptions and rescues otherwise ineffective sgRNAs. The molecular outcome of enhanced gene disruption depends upon cellular context, stimulating deletion of genomic sequence or insertion of non-homologous DNA at the edited locus in a cell line specific manner. Non-homologous DNA appears to divert cells towards error-prone instead of error-free repair pathways, dramatically increasing the frequency of gene disruption. PMID:27530320

  9. C-GATE - catalogue of genes affected by transposable elements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Functional regulatory sequences are present in many transposable element (TE) copies, resulting in TEs being frequently exapted by host genes. Today, many examples of TEs impacting host gene expression can be found in the literature and we believe a new catalogue of such exaptations would be useful for the field. Findings We have established the catalogue of genes affected by transposable elements (C-GATE), which can be found at https://sites.google.com/site/tecatalog/. To date, it holds 221 cases of biologically verified TE exaptations and more than 10,000 in silico TE-gene partnerships. C-GATE is interactive and allows users to include missed or new TE exaptation data. C-GATE provides a graphic representation of the entire library, which may be used for future statistical analysis of TE impact on host gene expression. Conclusions We hope C-GATE will be valuable for the TE community but also for others who have realized the role that TEs may have in their research. PMID:22621612

  10. Getting the most from gene delivery by repeated DNA transfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montani, Maura; Marchini, Cristina; Badillo Pazmay, Gretta Veronica; Andreani, Cristina; Bartolacci, Caterina; Amici, Augusto; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular delivery of reporter genes causes cells to be luminescent or fluorescent, this condition being of tremendous relevance in applied physics research. Potential applications range from the study of spatial distribution and dynamics of plasma membrane and cytosolic proteins up to the rational design of nanocarriers for gene therapy. Since efficiency of gene delivery is the main limit in most biophysical studies, versatile methods that can maximize gene expression are urgently needed. Here, we describe a robust methodology based on repeated gene delivery in mammalian cells. We find this procedure to be much more efficient than the more traditional route of gene delivery making it possible to get high-quality data without affecting cell viability. Implications for biophysical investigations are discussed.

  11. Optimal Control of Gene Mutation in DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juanyi; Li, Jr-Shin; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular-level control system view of the gene mutations in DNA replication from the finite field concept. By treating DNA sequences as state variables, chemical mutagens and radiation as control inputs, one cell cycle as a step increment, and the measurements of the resulting DNA sequence as outputs, we derive system equations for both deterministic and stochastic discrete-time, finite-state systems of different scales. Defining the cost function as a summation of the costs of applying mutagens and the off-trajectory penalty, we solve the deterministic and stochastic optimal control problems by dynamic programming algorithm. In addition, given that the system is completely controllable, we find that the global optimum of both base-to-base and codon-to-codon deterministic mutations can always be achieved within a finite number of steps. PMID:22454557

  12. DNA sequence of the Serratia marcescens lipoprotein gene

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kenzo; Inouye, Masayori

    1980-01-01

    The Serratia marcescens gene for the outer membrane lipoprotein (lpp) was cloned in λ phage vector Charon 14. The recombinant phage was very unstable, and the lpp gene with a 300-base-pair deletion at the transcription termination site was further cloned in pBR322. The DNA sequence of 834 base pairs encompassing the lpp gene was determined and compared with that of the Escherichia coli lpp gene. The sequence comparisons exhibit several unique features. (i) The promoter region is highly conserved (84% homology) and has an extremely high A+T content (78%) as in E. coli (80%). (ii) The 5′ nontranslated region of the lipoprotein mRNA is also highly conserved (95% homology). (iii) In the DNA sequence corresponding to the signal peptide of this secretory protein, there are three drastic changes, including addition of one base pair and deletion of four base pairs in S. marcescens as compared to E. coli. The resultant alterations in the amino acid sequence, however, do not change the basic properties of the signal peptide, which are assumed to be essential for its function in the secretory mechanism. (iv) The DNA sequence from the amino terminus to the 51st residue of the mature lipoprotein is highly conserved (95% homology) and there is no amino acid substitution. (v) The DNA sequence corresponding to the seven amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus has only 42% homology, resulting in four amino acid substitutions. (vi) Within the section of 40 base pairs beginning with the termination codon (UAA) and ending immediately before the oligo(T) transcription termination site in the E. coli lpp gene, there is about 60% homology. However, after this section, there is no obvious homology between the two sequences, probably because of a deletion of 300 base pairs at this region. (vii) Seven stable stem-and-loop structures could be formed in the mRNA region. (viii) Alterations in the third position of codons used in the lpp gene suggest that the gene has evolved somewhat

  13. Persistence of DNA in Carcasses, Slime and Avian Feces May Affect Interpretation of Environmental DNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Merkes, Christopher M.; McCalla, S. Grace; Jensen, Nathan R.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Amberg, Jon J.

    2014-01-01

    The prevention of non-indigenous aquatic invasive species spreading into new areas is a goal of many resource managers. New techniques have been developed to survey for species that are difficult to capture with conventional gears that involve the detection of their DNA in water samples (eDNA). This technique is currently used to track the invasion of bigheaded carps (silver carp and bighead carp; Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and H. nobilis) in the Chicago Area Waterway System and Upper Mississippi River. In both systems DNA has been detected from silver carp without the capture of a live fish, which has led to some uncertainty about the source of the DNA. The potential contribution to eDNA by vectors and fomites has not been explored. Because barges move from areas with a high abundance of bigheaded carps to areas monitored for the potential presence of silver carp, we used juvenile silver carp to simulate the barge transport of dead bigheaded carp carcasses, slime residue, and predator feces to determine the potential of these sources to supply DNA to uninhabited waters where it could be detected and misinterpreted as indicative of the presence of live bigheaded carp. Our results indicate that all three vectors are feasible sources of detectable eDNA for at least one month after their deposition. This suggests that current monitoring programs must consider alternative vectors of DNA in the environment and consider alternative strategies to minimize the detection of DNA not directly released from live bigheaded carps. PMID:25402206

  14. Associations between DNA methylation and schizophrenia-related intermediate phenotypes a gene set enrichment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Johanna; Walton, Esther; Wright, Carrie; Beyer, Andreas; Scholz, Markus; Turner, Jessica; Liu, Jingyu; Smolka, Michael N.; Roessner, Veit; Sponheim, Scott R.; Gollub, Randy L.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple genetic approaches have identified microRNAs as key effectors in psychiatric disorders as they post-transcriptionally regulate expression of thousands of target genes. However, their role in specific psychiatric diseases remains poorly understood. In addition, epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, which affect the expression of both microRNAs and coding genes, are critical for our understanding of molecular mechanisms in schizophrenia. Using clinical, imaging, genetic, and epigenetic data of 103 patients with schizophrenia and 111 healthy controls of the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium (MCIC) study of schizophrenia, we conducted gene set enrichment analysis to identify markers for schizophrenia-associated intermediate phenotypes. Genes were ranked based on the correlation between DNA methylation patterns and each phenotype, and then searched for enrichment in 221 predicted microRNA target gene sets. We found the predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene set to be significantly enriched for genes (EPHA4, PKNOX1, ESR1, amongst others) whose methylation status is correlated with hippocampal volume independent of disease status. Our results were strengthened by significant associations between hsa-miR-219a-5p target gene methylation patterns and hippocampus-related neuropsychological variables. IPA pathway analysis of the respective predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes revealed associated network functions in behaviour and developmental disorders. Altered methylation patterns of predicted hsa-miR-219a-5p target genes are associated with a structural aberration of the brain that has been proposed as a possible biomarker for schizophrenia. The (dys)regulation of microRNA target genes by epigenetic mechanisms may confer additional risk for developing psychiatric symptoms. Further study is needed to understand possible interactions between microRNAs and epigenetic changes and their impact on risk for brain-based disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID

  15. Quantitative expression of candidate genes affecting eggshell color.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chuanwei; Li, Zesheng; Yang, Ning; Ning, Zhonghua

    2014-05-01

    There are three pigments that affect the color of an eggshell: protoporphyrin, biliverdin and biliverdin-zinc chelate. Protoporphyrin is the main pigment in brown and light-brown eggshells, whereas very little protoporphyrin is found in white eggshells. Eggshell protoporphyrin is derived from the heme formation in birds. Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX) and ferrochelatase (FECH) represent rate-limiting enzymes for the heme-biosynthetic pathway. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), feline leukemia virus receptor (FLVCR), and heme-responsive gene-1 (HRG1) serve as primary transporters for both protoporphyrinogen and heme. Finally, four organic anion transporting polypeptide family members (including solute carrier organic anion transporter family, SLCO1C1, SLCO1A2, SLCO1B3 and LOC418189) may affect pigment transport within eggshells. Here we measured gene expression levels in key tissues of egg-producing hens. We analyzed three different types of hens that generated distinct eggshell colors: white, pink or brown. Our data revealed three ways in which eggshell color was genetically influenced. First, high-level expression of CPOX generated more protoporphyrinogen and a brown eggshell color. In contrast, high expression of FECH likely converted more protoporphyrinogen into heme, reduced protoporphyrinogen levels within the eggshell and generated a light color. Second, heme transporters also affected eggshell color. High-level expression of BCRP, HRG1 and FLVCR were associated with brown, white and generally lighter eggshell colors, respectively. Finally, protoporphyrin precipitation also affected eggshell color, as high expression of both SLCO1A2 and SLCO1C1 were associated with brown eggshell color. As such, we have identified seven genes in which expression levels in different tissues were associated with eggshell color. PMID:24612318

  16. Gestational diabetes mellitus epigenetically affects genes predominantly involved in metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruchat, Stephanie-May; Houde, Andrée-Anne; Voisin, Grégory; St-Pierre, Julie; Perron, Patrice; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Gaudet, Daniel; Hivert, Marie-France; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2013-09-01

    Offspring exposed to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk for chronic diseases, and one promising mechanism for fetal metabolic programming is epigenetics. Therefore, we postulated that GDM exposure impacts the offspring's methylome and used an epigenomic approach to explore this hypothesis. Placenta and cord blood samples were obtained from 44 newborns, including 30 exposed to GDM. Women were recruited at first trimester of pregnancy and followed until delivery. GDM was assessed after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. DNA methylation was measured at>485,000 CpG sites (Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was conducted to identify metabolic pathways epigenetically affected by GDM. Our results showed that 3,271 and 3,758 genes in placenta and cord blood, respectively, were potentially differentially methylated between samples exposed or not to GDM (p-values down to 1 × 10(-06); none reached the genome-wide significance levels), with more than 25% (n = 1,029) being common to both tissues. Mean DNA methylation differences between groups were 5.7 ± 3.2% and 3.4 ± 1.9% for placenta and cord blood, respectively. These genes were likely involved in the metabolic diseases pathway (up to 115 genes (11%), p-values for pathways = 1.9 × 10(-13)genes, 326 in placenta and 117 in cord blood were also associated with newborn weight. Our results therefore suggest that GDM has epigenetic effects on genes preferentially involved in the metabolic diseases pathway, with consequences on fetal growth and development, and provide supportive evidence that DNA methylation is involved in fetal metabolic programming. PMID:23975224

  17. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica

    PubMed Central

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A.; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5′-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  18. DNA interference: DNA-induced gene silencing in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica.

    PubMed

    Omotezako, Tatsuya; Onuma, Takeshi A; Nishida, Hiroki

    2015-05-22

    RNA interference is widely employed as a gene-silencing system in eukaryotes for host defence against invading nucleic acids. In response to invading double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), mRNA is degraded in sequence-specific manner. So far, however, DNA interference (DNAi) has been reported only in plants, ciliates and archaea, and has not been explored in Metazoa. Here, we demonstrate that linear double-stranded DNA promotes both sequence-specific transcription blocking and mRNA degradation in developing embryos of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica. Introduced polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products or linearized plasmids encoding Brachyury induced tail malformation and mRNA degradation. This malformation was also promoted by DNA fragments of the putative 5'-flanking region and intron without the coding region. PCR products encoding Zic-like1 and acetylcholine esterase also induced loss of sensory organ and muscle acetylcholinesterase activity, respectively. Co-injection of mRNA encoding EGFP and mCherry, and PCR products encoding these fluorescent proteins, induced sequence-specific decrease in the green or red fluorescence, respectively. These results suggest that O. dioica possesses a defence system against exogenous DNA and RNA, and that DNA fragment-induced gene silencing would be mediated through transcription blocking as well as mRNA degradation. This is the first report of DNAi in Metazoa. PMID:25904672

  19. Novel mutational mechanism in the thyroglobulin gene: imperfect DNA inversion as a cause for hereditary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Cintia E; Rossetti, Liliana C; Souchon, Pierre F; Morales, Cecilia; Thouvard-Viprey, Mathilde; Salmon-Musial, Anne S; Mauran, Pierre L A; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; De Brasi, Carlos D; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to perform genetic analysis in three brothers of Turkish origin born from consanguineus parents and affected by congenital hypothyroidism, goiter and low levels of serum TG. The combination of sequencing of DNA, PCR mapping, quantitative real-time PCR, inverse-PCR (I-PCR), multiplex PCR and bioinformatics analysis were used in order to detect TG mutations. We demonstrated that the three affected siblings are homozygous for a DNA inversion of 16,962bp in the TG gene associated with two deleted regions at both sides of the inversion limits. The inversion region includes the first 9bp of exon 48, 1015bp of intron 47, 191bp of exon 47, 1523bp of intron 46, 135bp of exon 46 and the last 14,089bp of intron 45. The proximal deletion corresponds to 27bp of TG intron 45, while the distal deletion spans the last 230bp of TG exon 48 and the first 588bp of intergenic region downstream TG end. The parents were heterozygous carriers of the complex rearrangement. In conclusion, a novel large imperfect DNA inversion within the TG gene was identified by the strategy of I-PCR. This aberration was not detectable by normal sequencing of the exons and exon/intron boundaries. Remarkably, the finding represents the first description of a TG deficiency disease caused by a DNA inversion. PMID:23933148

  20. African Swine Fever Virus Multigene Family 360 and 530 Genes Affect Host Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, C. L.; Piccone, M. E.; Zaffuto, K. M.; Neilan, J.; Kutish, G. F.; Lu, Z.; Balinsky, C. A.; Gibb, T. R.; Bean, T. J.; Zsak, L.; Rock, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) multigene family 360 and 530 (MGF360/530) genes affect viral growth in macrophage cell cultures and virulence in pigs (L. Zsak, Z. Lu, T. G. Burrage, J. G. Neilan, G. F. Kutish, D. M. Moore, and D. L. Rock, J. Virol. 75:3066-3076, 2001). The mechanism by which these novel genes affect virus-host interactions is unknown. To define MGF360/530 gene function, we compared macrophage transcriptional responses following infection with parental ASFV (Pr4) and an MGF360/530 deletion mutant (Pr4Δ35). A swine cDNA microarray containing 7,712 macrophage cDNA clones was used to compare the transcriptional profiles of swine macrophages infected with Pr4 and Pr4Δ35 at 3 and 6 h postinfection (hpi). While at 3 hpi most (7,564) of the genes had similar expression levels in cells infected with either virus, 38 genes had significantly increased (>2.0-fold, P < 0.05) mRNA levels in Pr4Δ35-infected macrophages. Similar up-regulation of these genes was observed at 6 hpi. Viral infection was required for this induced transcriptional response. Most Pr4Δ35 up-regulated genes were part of a type I interferon (IFN) response or were genes that are normally induced by double-stranded RNA and/or viral infection. These included monocyte chemoattractant protein, transmembrane protein 3, tetratricopeptide repeat protein 1, a ubiquitin-like 17-kDa protein, ubiquitin-specific protease ISG43, an RNA helicase DEAD box protein, GTP-binding MX protein, the cytokine IP-10, and the PKR activator PACT. Differential expression of IFN early-response genes in Pr4Δ35 relative to Pr4 was confirmed by Northern blot analysis and real-time PCR. Analysis of IFN-α mRNA and secreted IFN-α levels at 3, 8, and 24 hpi revealed undetectable IFN-α in mock- and Pr4-infected macrophages but significant IFN-α levels at 24 hpi in Pr4Δ35-infected macrophages. The absence of IFN-α in Pr4-infected macrophages suggests that MGF360/530 genes either directly or indirectly suppress a type

  1. African swine fever virus multigene family 360 and 530 genes affect host interferon response.

    PubMed

    Afonso, C L; Piccone, M E; Zaffuto, K M; Neilan, J; Kutish, G F; Lu, Z; Balinsky, C A; Gibb, T R; Bean, T J; Zsak, L; Rock, D L

    2004-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) multigene family 360 and 530 (MGF360/530) genes affect viral growth in macrophage cell cultures and virulence in pigs (L. Zsak, Z. Lu, T. G. Burrage, J. G. Neilan, G. F. Kutish, D. M. Moore, and D. L. Rock, J. Virol. 75:3066-3076, 2001). The mechanism by which these novel genes affect virus-host interactions is unknown. To define MGF360/530 gene function, we compared macrophage transcriptional responses following infection with parental ASFV (Pr4) and an MGF360/530 deletion mutant (Pr4 Delta 35). A swine cDNA microarray containing 7,712 macrophage cDNA clones was used to compare the transcriptional profiles of swine macrophages infected with Pr4 and Pr4 Delta 35 at 3 and 6 h postinfection (hpi). While at 3 hpi most (7,564) of the genes had similar expression levels in cells infected with either virus, 38 genes had significantly increased (>2.0-fold, P < 0.05) mRNA levels in Pr4 Delta 35-infected macrophages. Similar up-regulation of these genes was observed at 6 hpi. Viral infection was required for this induced transcriptional response. Most Pr Delta 35 up-regulated genes were part of a type I interferon (IFN) response or were genes that are normally induced by double-stranded RNA and/or viral infection. These included monocyte chemoattractant protein, transmembrane protein 3, tetratricopeptide repeat protein 1, a ubiquitin-like 17-kDa protein, ubiquitin-specific protease ISG43, an RNA helicase DEAD box protein, GTP-binding MX protein, the cytokine IP-10, and the PKR activator PACT. Differential expression of IFN early-response genes in Pr4 Delta 35 relative to Pr4 was confirmed by Northern blot analysis and real-time PCR. Analysis of IFN-alpha mRNA and secreted IFN-alpha levels at 3, 8, and 24 hpi revealed undetectable IFN-alpha in mock- and Pr4-infected macrophages but significant IFN-alpha levels at 24 hpi in Pr4 Delta 35-infected macrophages. The absence of IFN-alpha in Pr4-infected macrophages suggests that MGF360/530 genes

  2. DNA hydroxymethylation controls cardiomyocyte gene expression in development and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Carolina M.; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Rubino, Marcello; Larcher, Veronica; Carullo, Pierluigi; Anselmo, Achille; Kurz, Kerstin; Carell, Thomas; Angius, Andrea; Latronico, Michael V. G.; Papait, Roberto; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at 5-cytosine (5-mC) is a fundamental epigenetic DNA modification associated recently with cardiac disease. In contrast, the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC)—5-mC's oxidation product—in cardiac biology and disease is unknown. Here we assess the hydroxymethylome in embryonic, neonatal, adult and hypertrophic mouse cardiomyocytes, showing that dynamic modulation of hydroxymethylated DNA is associated with specific transcriptional networks during heart development and failure. DNA hydroxymethylation marks the body of highly expressed genes as well as distal regulatory regions with enhanced activity. Moreover, pathological hypertrophy is characterized by a shift towards a neonatal 5-hmC distribution pattern. We also show that the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme regulates the expression of key cardiac genes, such as Myh7, through 5-hmC deposition on the gene body and at enhancers. Thus, we provide a genome-wide analysis of 5-hmC in the cardiomyocyte and suggest a role for this epigenetic modification in heart development and disease. PMID:27489048

  3. DNA hydroxymethylation controls cardiomyocyte gene expression in development and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Carolina M; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Rubino, Marcello; Larcher, Veronica; Carullo, Pierluigi; Anselmo, Achille; Kurz, Kerstin; Carell, Thomas; Angius, Andrea; Latronico, Michael V G; Papait, Roberto; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at 5-cytosine (5-mC) is a fundamental epigenetic DNA modification associated recently with cardiac disease. In contrast, the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC)-5-mC's oxidation product-in cardiac biology and disease is unknown. Here we assess the hydroxymethylome in embryonic, neonatal, adult and hypertrophic mouse cardiomyocytes, showing that dynamic modulation of hydroxymethylated DNA is associated with specific transcriptional networks during heart development and failure. DNA hydroxymethylation marks the body of highly expressed genes as well as distal regulatory regions with enhanced activity. Moreover, pathological hypertrophy is characterized by a shift towards a neonatal 5-hmC distribution pattern. We also show that the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme regulates the expression of key cardiac genes, such as Myh7, through 5-hmC deposition on the gene body and at enhancers. Thus, we provide a genome-wide analysis of 5-hmC in the cardiomyocyte and suggest a role for this epigenetic modification in heart development and disease. PMID:27489048

  4. Hydrophobin gene expression affects hyphal wall composition in Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    van Wetter, M A; Wösten, H A; Sietsma, J H; Wessels, J G

    2000-11-01

    Disruption of the SC3 hydrophobin gene of Schizophyllum commune (DeltaSC3 strain) affected the composition of the cell wall. Compared to a wild-type strain the amount of mucilage (i.e., water-soluble (1-3)beta-glucan with single glucose residues attached by (1-6)beta-linkages) increased considerably, while the amount of alkali-resistant glucan (linked to chitin) decreased. Reintroduction of the SC3 gene or other hydrophobins genes expressed behind the SC3 promotor restored wild-type cell wall composition. However, addition of purified SC3 protein to the medium or growing the DeltaSC3 strain in spent medium of the wild-type strain had no effect. In young cultures of wild-type strains of S.commune, not yet expressing SC3, the amount of mucilage was also relatively high. These data show that hydrophobins not only function at hydrophilic/hydrophobic interfaces, as shown previously, but also affect wall composition. PMID:11170739

  5. Focal DNA Copy Number Changes in Neuroblastoma Target MYCN Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mestdagh, Pieter; Menten, Björn; Lefever, Steve; Pattyn, Filip; De Brouwer, Sara; Sante, Tom; Schulte, Johannes Hubertus; Schramm, Alexander; Van Roy, Nadine; Van Maerken, Tom; Noguera, Rosa; Combaret, Valérie; Devalck, Christine; Westermann, Frank; Laureys, Geneviève; Eggert, Angelika; Vandesompele, Jo; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor arising from immature sympathetic nervous system cells. Recurrent genomic alterations include MYCN and ALK amplification as well as recurrent patterns of gains and losses of whole or large partial chromosome segments. A recent whole genome sequencing effort yielded no frequently recurring mutations in genes other than those affecting ALK. However, the study further stresses the importance of DNA copy number alterations in this disease, in particular for genes implicated in neuritogenesis. Here we provide additional evidence for the importance of focal DNA copy number gains and losses, which are predominantly observed in MYCN amplified tumors. A focal 5 kb gain encompassing the MYCN regulated miR-17∼92 cluster as sole gene was detected in a neuroblastoma cell line and further analyses of the array CGH data set demonstrated enrichment for other MYCN target genes in focal gains and amplifications. Next we applied an integrated genomics analysis to prioritize MYCN down regulated genes mediated by MYCN driven miRNAs within regions of focal heterozygous or homozygous deletion. We identified RGS5, a negative regulator of G-protein signaling implicated in vascular normalization, invasion and metastasis, targeted by a focal homozygous deletion, as a new MYCN target gene, down regulated through MYCN activated miRNAs. In addition, we expand the miR-17∼92 regulatory network controlling TGFß signaling in neuroblastoma with the ring finger protein 11 encoding gene RNF11, which was previously shown to be targeted by the miR-17∼92 member miR-19b. Taken together, our data indicate that focal DNA copy number imbalances in neuroblastoma (1) target genes that are implicated in MYCN signaling, possibly selected to reinforce MYCN oncogene addiction and (2) serve as a resource for identifying new molecular targets for treatment. PMID:23308108

  6. Characterization of DNA reactive and non-DNA reactive anticancer drugs by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Le Fevre, Anne-Celine; Boitier, Eric; Marchandeau, Jean-Pierre; Sarasin, Alain; Thybaud, Veronique

    2007-06-01

    Gene expression profiling technology is expected to advance our understanding of genotoxic mechanisms involving direct or indirect interaction with DNA. We exposed human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells to 14 anticancer drugs (vincristine, paclitaxel, etoposide, daunorubicin, camptothecin, amsacrine, cytosine arabinoside, hydroxyurea, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU), 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), and bleomycin) for 4-h and examined them immediately or after a 20-h recovery period. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively, were evaluated by cell counting and by in vitro micronucleus assay at 24h. Effects on the cell cycle were determined by flow cytometry at 4 and 24h. Gene expression was profiled at both sampling times by using human Affymetrix U133A GeneChips (22K). Bioanalysis was done with Resolver/Rosetta software and an in-house annotation program. Cell cycle analysis and gene expression profiling allowed us to classify the drugs according to their mechanisms of action. The molecular signature is composed of 28 marker genes mainly involved in signal transduction and cell cycle pathways. Our results suggest that these marker genes could be used as a predictive model to classify genotoxins according to their direct or indirect interaction with DNA. PMID:17374387

  7. DNA repair gene expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity infrared laser.

    PubMed

    de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Araújo de Campos, Vera Maria; Ferreira Machado, Samara Cristina; de Freitas Peregrino, Antonio Augusto; Geller, Mauro; de Paoli, Flavia

    2013-07-01

    Special properties of laser light have led to its usefulness in many applications in therapy. Excitation of endogenous chromophores in biotissues and generation of free radicals could be involved in its biological effects. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluated the expression of APE1 and OGG1 genes related to repair of DNA lesions induced by free radicals. Skin and muscle tissues of Wistar rats were exposed to low-intensity infrared laser at different fluences and frequencies. After laser exposition of 1 and 24 h, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of APE1 and OGG1 gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of APE1 and OGG1 mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissues of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency, and time after exposure. Our study suggests that low-intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of DNA lesions by base excision repair pathway. PMID:22941447

  8. Identification of a DNA methylation-dependent activator sequence in the pseudoxanthoma elasticum gene, ABCC6.

    PubMed

    Arányi, Tamás; Ratajewski, Marcin; Bardóczy, Viola; Pulaski, Lukasz; Bors, András; Tordai, Attila; Váradi, András

    2005-05-13

    ABCC6 encodes MRP6, a member of the ABC protein family with an unknown physiological role. The human ABCC6 and its two pseudogenes share 99% identical DNA sequence. Loss-of-function mutations of ABCC6 are associated with the development of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a recessive hereditary disorder affecting the elastic tissues. Various disease-causing mutations were found in the coding region; however, the mutation detection rate in the ABCC6 coding region of bona fide PXE patients is only approximately 80%. This suggests that polymorphisms or mutations in the regulatory regions may contribute to the development of the disease. Here, we report the first characterization of the ABCC6 gene promoter. Phylogenetic in silico analysis of the 5' regulatory regions revealed the presence of two evolutionarily conserved sequence elements embedded in CpG islands. The study of DNA methylation of ABCC6 and the pseudogenes identified a correlation between the methylation of the CpG island in the proximal promoter and the ABCC6 expression level in cell lines. Both activator and repressor sequences were uncovered in the proximal promoter by reporter gene assays. The most potent activator sequence was one of the conserved elements protected by DNA methylation on the endogenous gene in non-expressing cells. Finally, in vitro methylation of this sequence inhibits the transcriptional activity of the luciferase promoter constructs. Altogether these results identify a DNA methylation-dependent activator sequence in the ABCC6 promoter. PMID:15760889

  9. Comparison of DNA-lipid complexes and DNA alone for gene transfer to cystic fibrosis airway epithelia in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Zabner, J; Cheng, S H; Meeker, D; Launspach, J; Balfour, R; Perricone, M A; Morris, J E; Marshall, J; Fasbender, A; Smith, A E; Welsh, M J

    1997-01-01

    Cationic lipids show promise as vectors for transfer of CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, previous studies have not compared the effect of DNA-lipid to DNA alone. Recently, we developed a formulation of plasmid encoding CFTR (pCF1-CFTR) and cationic lipid (GL-67:DOPE) that generated greater gene transfer in mouse lung than previously described DNA-lipid vectors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-lipid complexes were more effective than DNA alone at transferring CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia in vivo. We administered complexes of DNA-lipid to one nostril and DNA alone to the other nostril in a randomized, double-blind study. Electrophysiologic measurements showed that DNA-lipid complexes partially corrected the Cl- transport defect. Importantly, the pCF1-CFTR plasmid alone was at least as effective as complexes of DNA with lipid. Measurements of vector-specific CFTR transcripts also showed gene transfer with both DNA-lipid and DNA alone. These results indicate that nonviral vectors can transfer CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia and at least partially restore the Cl- transport defect characteristic of CF. However, improvements in the overall efficacy of gene transfer are required to develop a treatment for CF. PMID:9294121

  10. Horizontal gene transfer of an entire metabolic pathway between a eukaryotic alga and its DNA virus.

    PubMed

    Monier, Adam; Pagarete, António; de Vargas, Colomban; Allen, Michael J; Read, Betsy; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-01

    Interactions between viruses and phytoplankton, the main primary producers in the oceans, affect global biogeochemical cycles and climate. Recent studies are increasingly revealing possible cases of gene transfers between cyanobacteria and phages, which might have played significant roles in the evolution of cyanobacteria/phage systems. However, little has been documented about the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic phytoplankton/virus systems. Here we report phylogenetic evidence for the transfer of seven genes involved in the sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway between the cosmopolitan eukaryotic microalga Emiliania huxleyi and its large DNA virus EhV. PCR assays indicate that these genes are prevalent in E. huxleyi and EhV strains isolated from different geographic locations. Patterns of protein and gene sequence conservation support that these genes are functional in both E. huxleyi and EhV. This is the first clear case of horizontal gene transfer of multiple functionally linked enzymes in a eukaryotic phytoplankton-virus system. We examine arguments for the possible direction of the gene transfer. The virus-to-host direction suggests the existence of ancient viruses that controlled the complex metabolic pathway in order to infect primitive eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the host-to-virus direction suggests that the serial acquisition of genes involved in the same metabolic pathway might have been a strategy for the ancestor of EhVs to stay ahead of their closest relatives in the great evolutionary race for survival. PMID:19451591

  11. Horizontal gene transfer of an entire metabolic pathway between a eukaryotic alga and its DNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Monier, Adam; Pagarete, António; de Vargas, Colomban; Allen, Michael J.; Read, Betsy; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between viruses and phytoplankton, the main primary producers in the oceans, affect global biogeochemical cycles and climate. Recent studies are increasingly revealing possible cases of gene transfers between cyanobacteria and phages, which might have played significant roles in the evolution of cyanobacteria/phage systems. However, little has been documented about the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic phytoplankton/virus systems. Here we report phylogenetic evidence for the transfer of seven genes involved in the sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway between the cosmopolitan eukaryotic microalga Emiliania huxleyi and its large DNA virus EhV. PCR assays indicate that these genes are prevalent in E. huxleyi and EhV strains isolated from different geographic locations. Patterns of protein and gene sequence conservation support that these genes are functional in both E. huxleyi and EhV. This is the first clear case of horizontal gene transfer of multiple functionally linked enzymes in a eukaryotic phytoplankton–virus system. We examine arguments for the possible direction of the gene transfer. The virus-to-host direction suggests the existence of ancient viruses that controlled the complex metabolic pathway in order to infect primitive eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the host-to-virus direction suggests that the serial acquisition of genes involved in the same metabolic pathway might have been a strategy for the ancestor of EhVs to stay ahead of their closest relatives in the great evolutionary race for survival. PMID:19451591

  12. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer

    PubMed Central

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level. PMID:26826485

  13. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  14. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. ); Libertin, C.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  15. Mapping of bionic array electric field focusing in plasmid DNA-based gene electrotransfer.

    PubMed

    Browne, C J; Pinyon, J L; Housley, D M; Crawford, E N; Lovell, N H; Klugmann, M; Housley, G D

    2016-04-01

    Molecular medicine through gene therapy is challenged to achieve targeted action. This is now possible utilizing bionic electrode arrays for focal delivery of naked (plasmid) DNA via gene electrotransfer. Here, we establish the properties of array-based electroporation affecting targeted gene delivery. An array with eight 300 μm platinum ring electrodes configured as a cochlear implant bionic interface was used to transduce HEK293 cell monolayers with a plasmid-DNA green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene construct. Electroporation parameters were pulse intensity, number, duration, separation and electrode configuration. The latter determined the shape of the electric fields, which were mapped using a voltage probe. Electrode array-based electroporation was found to require ~100 × lower applied voltages for cell transduction than conventional electroporation. This was found to be due to compression of the field lines orthogonal to the array. A circular area of GFP-positive cells was created when the electrodes were ganged together as four adjacent anodes and four cathodes, whereas alternating electrode polarity created a linear area of GFP-positive cells. The refinement of gene delivery parameters was validated in vivo in the guinea pig cochlea. These findings have significant clinical ramifications, where spatiotemporal control of gene expression can be predicted by manipulation of the electric field via current steering at a cellular level. PMID:26826485

  16. Persistence of DNA in carcasses, slime and avian feces may affect interpretation of environmental DNA data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merkes, Christopher M.; McCalla, S. Grace; Jensen, Nathan R.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Amberg, Jon J.

    2014-01-01

    The prevention of non-indigenous aquatic invasive species spreading into new areas is a goal of many resource managers. New techniques have been developed to survey for species that are difficult to capture with conventional gears that involve the detection of their DNA in water samples (eDNA). This technique is currently used to track the invasion of bigheaded carps (silver carp and bighead carp; Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and H. nobilis) in the Chicago Area Waterway System and Upper Mississippi River. In both systems DNA has been detected from silver carp without the capture of a live fish, which has led to some uncertainty about the source of the DNA. The potential contribution to eDNA by vectors and fomites has not been explored. Because barges move from areas with a high abundance of bigheaded carps to areas monitored for the potential presence of silver carp, we used juvenile silver carp to simulate the barge transport of dead bigheaded carp carcasses, slime residue, and predator feces to determine the potential of these sources to supply DNA to uninhabited waters where it could be detected and misinterpreted as indicative of the presence of live bigheaded carp. Our results indicate that all three vectors are feasible sources of detectable eDNA for at least one month after their deposition. This suggests that current monitoring programs must consider alternative vectors of DNA in the environment and consider alternative strategies to minimize the detection of DNA not directly released from live bigheaded carps.

  17. Associations between polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Inskip, Peter D; Ruder, Avima M; Butler, Maryann; Rajaraman, Preetha; Razavi, Pedram; Patoka, Joe; Wiencke, John K; Bondy, Melissa L; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-04-01

    A pooled analysis was conducted to examine the association between select variants in DNA repair genes and glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and deadliest form of adult brain tumors. Genetic data for approximately 1,000 glioblastoma multiforme cases and 2,000 controls were combined from four centers in the United States that have conducted case-control studies on adult glioblastoma multiforme, including the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, and the University of California at San Francisco. Twelve DNA repair single-nucleotide polymorphisms were selected for investigation in the pilot collaborative project. The C allele of the PARP1 rs1136410 variant was associated with a 20% reduction in risk for glioblastoma multiforme (odds ratio(CT or CC), 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.95). A 44% increase in risk for glioblastoma multiforme was found for individuals homozygous for the G allele of the PRKDC rs7003908 variant (odds ratio(GG), 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.84); there was a statistically significant trend (P = 0.009) with increasing number of G alleles. A significant, protective effect was found when three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ERCC2 rs13181, ERCC1 rs3212986, and GLTSCR1 rs1035938) located near each other on chromosome 19 were modeled as a haplotype. The most common haplotype (AGC) was associated with a 23% reduction in risk (P = 0.03) compared with all other haplotypes combined. Few studies have reported on the associations between variants in DNA repair genes and brain tumors, and few specifically have examined their impact on glioblastoma multiforme. Our results suggest that common variation in DNA repair genes may be associated with risk for glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:19318434

  18. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN POLYMORPHISMS IN DNA REPAIR GENES AND GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Inskip, Peter; Ruder, Avima; Butler, MaryAnn; Rajaraman, Preetha; Razavi, Pedram; Patoka, Joe; Wiencke, John; Bondy, Melissa; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    A pooled analysis was conducted to examine the association between select variants in DNA repair genes and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadliest form of adult brain tumors. Genetic data for approximately 1,000 GBM cases and 2,000 controls were combined from four centers in the United States that have conducted case-control studies of adult GBM including the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, and the University of California at San Francisco. Twelve DNA repair SNPs were selected for investigation in the pilot collaborative project. The C allele of the PARP1 rs1136410 variant was associated with a 20% reduction in risk of GBM (ORCT or CC =0.80; 95%CI 0.67–0.95). A 44% increase in risk of GBM was found for individuals homozygous for the G allele of the PRKDC rs7003908 variant (ORGG 1.44; 95%CI 1.13–1.84); there was a statistically significant trend (p=0.009) with increasing number of G alleles. A significant, protective effect was found when 3 SNPs (ERCC2 rs13181, ERCC1 rs3212986, and GLTSCR1 rs1035938) located near each other on chromosome 19 were modeled as a haplotype. The most common haplotype (AGC) was associated with a 23% reduction in risk (p=0.03) compared to all other haplotypes combined. Few studies have reported on the associations between variants in DNA repair genes and brain tumors, and few specifically have examined their impact on GBMs. Our results suggest that common variation in DNA repair genes may be associated with risk of GBMs. PMID:19318434

  19. Does organizational culture affect out-patient DNA (did not attend) rates?

    PubMed

    Jackson, S

    1997-01-01

    Government interest in health service "did not attend" (DNA) rates was seen to occur by accident, following which efforts to reduce DNAs have tended to concentrate on operational rather than strategic issues. Considers the effect hospital culture has had on DNA rates from an organizational and patient perspective. Identifies some of the key cultural issues that impacted on DNA rates by utilizing observation and telephone survey research methods. Concludes that, in the main, the lack of customer-oriented organizational culture was seen to affect DNA rates adversely within one NHS provider trust. PMID:10179096

  20. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer.

    PubMed

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-02-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the replicative polymerases and results in increased mutation load at the genome. The realization that defective MMR leads to a hypermutation phenotype and increased risk of tumorigenesis highlights the relevance of this pathway for human disease. The association of MMR defects with increased risk of cancer development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome (LS) partly to include the associated risk of developing extra-colonic cancers. In addition, a number of non-hereditary, mostly epigenetic, alterations of MMR genes have been described in sporadic tumors. Besides conferring a strong cancer predisposition, genetic or epigenetic inactivation of MMR genes also renders cells resistant to some chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, diagnosis of MMR deficiency has important implications for the management of the patients, the surveillance of their relatives in the case of LS and for the choice of treatment. Some of the alterations found in MMR genes have already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR genes and anticipates the need of diagnostic tools for rapid assessment of their pathogenicity. This review describes current tools and future strategies for addressing the relevance

  1. Activation of endocrine-related gene expression in placental choriocarcinoma cell lines following DNA methylation knock-down.

    PubMed

    Hogg, K; Robinson, W P; Beristain, A G

    2014-07-01

    Increasingly, placental DNA methylation is assessed as a factor in pregnancy-related complications, yet the transcriptional impact of such findings is not always clear. Using a proliferative in vitro placental model, the effect of DNA methylation loss on gene activation was evaluated at a number of genes selected for being differentially methylated in pre-eclampsia-associated placentae in vivo. We aimed to determine whether reduced DNA methylation at specific loci was associated with transcriptional changes at the corresponding gene, thus providing mechanistic underpinnings for previous clinical findings and to assess the degree of transcriptional response amongst our candidate genes. BeWo and JEG3 choriocarcinoma cells were exposed to 1 μM 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) or vehicle control for 48 h, and re-plated and cultured for a further 72 h in normal media before cells were harvested for RNA and DNA. Bisulphite pyrosequencing confirmed that DNA methylation was reduced by ∼30-50% points at the selected loci studied in both cell lines. Gene activation, measured by qRT-PCR, was highly variable and transcript specific, indicating differential sensitivity to DNA methylation. Most notably, loss of DNA methylation at the leptin (LEP) promoter corresponded to a 200-fold and 40-fold increase in LEP expression in BeWo and JEG3 cells, respectively (P < 0.01). Transcripts of steroidogenic pathway enzymes CYP11A1 and HSD3B1 were up-regulated ∼40-fold in response to 5-Aza-CdR exposure in BeWo cells (P < 0.01). Other transcripts, including aromatase (CYP19), HSD11B2, inhibin (INHBA) and glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) were more moderately, although significantly, affected by loss of associated DNA methylation. These data present a mixed effect of DNA methylation changes at selected loci supporting cautionary interpretation of DNA methylation results in the absence of functional data. PMID:24623739

  2. DNA methylation does not stably lock gene expression but instead serves as a molecular mark for gene silencing memory

    PubMed Central

    Raynal, Noël J.-M.; Si, Jiali; Taby, Rodolphe F.; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Estécio, Marcos R.H.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is commonly thought of as a "molecular lock" that leads to permanent gene silencing. To investigate this notion, we tested 24 different HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) on colon cancer cells that harbor a GFP locus stably integrated and silenced by a hypermethylated CMV promoter. We found that HDACi efficiently reactivated expression of GFP and many other endogenous genes silenced by DNA hypermethylation. After treatment, all promoters were marked with active chromatin, yet DNA hypermethylation did not change. Thus, DNA methylation could not prevent gene reactivation by drug-induced resetting of the chromatin state. In evaluating the relative contribution of DNA methylation and histone modifications to stable gene silencing, we followed expression levels of GFP and other genes silenced by DNA hypermethylation over time after treatment with HDACi or DNA demethylating drugs. Reactivation of methylated loci by HDACi was detectable for only 2 weeks, whereas DNA demethylating drugs induced permanent epigenetic reprogramming. Therefore, DNA methylation cannot be considered as a lock for gene expression, but rather as a memory signal for long-term maintenance of gene silencing. These findings define chromatin as an important druggable target for cancer epigenetic therapy and suggest that removal of DNA methylation signals is required to achieve long-term gene reactivation. PMID:22219169

  3. Gene replacement and expression of foreign DNA in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Husson, R N; James, B E; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    A system that permits molecular genetic manipulation of mycobacteria was developed on the basis of the yeast paradigm of gene replacement by homologous recombination. A shuttle vector that can replicate autonomously at a high copy number in Escherichia coli but must integrate into homologous DNA for survival in Mycobacterium smegmatis was constructed. The vector contains a ColE1 origin of replication, antibiotic resistance markers for ampicillin and kanamycin, a nutritional marker (pyrF) that allows both positive and negative selection in E. coli and M. smegmatis, and unique restriction sites that permit insertion of foreign DNA. Transformation of mycobacteria with this vector results in integration of its DNA into the genomic pyrF locus by either a single or a double homologous recombination event. With this system, the 65-kilodalton Mycobacterium leprae stress protein antigen was inserted into the M. smegmatis genome and expressed. This gene replacement technology, together with a uniquely useful pyrF marker, should be valuable for investigating mycobacterial pathobiology, for the development of candidate mycobacterial vaccine vehicles, and as a model for the development of molecular genetic systems in other pathogenic microorganisms. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:2153655

  4. Iron nanoparticles significantly affect the in vitro and in vivo expression of Id genes.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinglu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Jinke

    2015-03-16

    In recent DNA microarray studies, we found that the transcription of the Id3 gene was significantly down-regulated in five cell lines (RAW264.7, Hepa1-6, THP-1, HepG2, and HL7702) treated with two doses (50 and 100 μg/mL) of a DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticle. Given the regulatory roles of Id genes in the cell cycle, growth, and differentiation, we wanted to do more investigations on the effect of the nanoparticle upon the Id genes. This study detected the expression of Id genes in six cell lines (the above cell lines plus HeLa) treated with the nanoparticle at the same doses using quantitative PCR. The results revealed that the expression of Id genes was significantly affected by the nanoparticle in these cell lines. Under each treatment, the Id3 gene was significantly (p < 0.01) down-regulated in all cell lines, the Id1 gene was significantly down-regulated in all cell lines except the RAW264.7 cells, and the Id2 gene was significantly down-regulated in the HepG2, HL7702, and HeLa cells. Because the Id1, Id2, and Id3 genes were significantly down-regulated in three liver-derived cell lines (Hepa1-6, HepG2, and HL7702) in both microarray and PCR detections, this study then detected the expression of Id genes in the liver tissues of mice that were intravenously injected with the nanoparticle at two doses (2 and 5 mg/kg body weight). The results revealed that the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 genes was also significantly down-regulated in the liver tissues under each treatment. Another Id gene, Id4, was also significantly regulated in some cells or liver tissues treated with the nanoparticle. These results reveal that the nanoparticle exerts a significant effect on the in vitro and in vivo expression of Id genes. This study thus provides new insights into the Id-related nanotoxicity of the nanoparticle and the close relationship between the regulation of Id genes and iron. PMID:25522732

  5. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  6. A mechanistic role for DNA methylation in endothelial cell (EC)-enriched gene expression: relationship with DNA replication timing

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, Apurva V.; St. Bernard, Rosanne; Gavryushova, Anna; Kop, Anna; Knight, Britta J.; Yan, Matthew Shu-Ching; Man, Hon-Sum Jeffrey; Sud, Maneesh; Hebbel, Robert P.; Oettgen, Peter; Aird, William C.; Marsden, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Proximal promoter DNA methylation has been shown to be important for regulating gene expression. However, its relative contribution to the cell-specific expression of endothelial cell (EC)-enriched genes has not been defined. We used methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation and bisulfite conversion to analyze the DNA methylation profile of EC-enriched genes in ECs vs nonexpressing cell types, both in vitro and in vivo. We show that prototypic EC-enriched genes exhibit functional differential patterns of DNA methylation in proximal promoter regions of most (eg, CD31, von Willebrand factor [vWF], VE-cadherin, and intercellular adhesion molecule-2), but not all (eg, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2), EC-enriched genes. Comparable findings were evident in cultured ECs, human blood origin ECs, and murine aortic ECs. Promoter-reporter episomal transfection assays for endothelial nitric oxide synthase, VE-cadherin, and vWF indicated functional promoter activity in cell types where the native gene was not active. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase activity indicated important functional relevance. Importantly, profiling DNA replication timing patterns indicated that EC-enriched gene promoters with differentially methylated regions replicate early in S-phase in both expressing and nonexpressing cell types. Collectively, these studies highlight the functional importance of promoter DNA methylation in controlling vascular EC gene expression. PMID:23449636

  7. Dual requirement for the yeast MMS19 gene in DNA repair and RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Lauder, S; Bankmann, M; Guzder, S N; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1996-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have indicated the involvement of a large number of protein factors in nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-damaged DNA. However, how MMS19 affects this process has remained unclear. Here, we report on the isolation of the MMS19 gene and the determination of its role in NER and other cellular processes. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that besides its function in NER, MMS19 also affects RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription. mms19delta cells do not grow at 37 degrees C, and mutant extract exhibits a thermolabile defect in Pol II transcription. Thus, Mms19 protein resembles TFIIH in that it is required for both transcription and DNA repair. However, addition of purified Mms19 protein does not alleviate the transcriptional defect of the mms19delta extract, nor does it stimulate the incision of UV-damaged DNA reconstituted from purified proteins. Interestingly, addition of purified TFIIH corrects the transcriptional defect of the mms19delta extract. Mms19 is, however, not a component of TFIIH or of Pol II holoenzyme. These and other results suggest that Mms19 affects NER and transcription by influencing the activity of TFIIH as an upstream regulatory element. It is proposed that mutations in the human MMS19 counterpart could result in syndromes in which both NER and transcription are affected. PMID:8943333

  8. Intronic cleavage and polyadenylation regulates gene expression during DNA damage response through U1 snRNA

    PubMed Central

    Devany, Emral; Park, Ji Yeon; Murphy, Michael R; Zakusilo, George; Baquero, Jorge; Zhang, Xiaokan; Hoque, Mainul; Tian, Bin; Kleiman, Frida E

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response involves coordinated control of gene expression and DNA repair. Using deep sequencing, we found widespread changes of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation site usage on ultraviolet-treatment in mammalian cells. Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation regulation in the 3ʹ untranslated region is substantial, leading to both shortening and lengthening of 3ʹ untranslated regions of genes. Interestingly, a strong activation of intronic alternative cleavage and polyadenylation sites is detected, resulting in widespread expression of truncated transcripts. Intronic alternative cleavage and polyadenylation events are biased to the 5ʹ end of genes and affect gene groups with important functions in DNA damage response and cancer. Moreover, intronic alternative cleavage and polyadenylation site activation during DNA damage response correlates with a decrease in U1 snRNA levels, and is reversible by U1 snRNA overexpression. Importantly, U1 snRNA overexpression mitigates ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. Together, these data reveal a significant gene regulatory scheme in DNA damage response where U1 snRNA impacts gene expression via the U1-alternative cleavage and polyadenylation axis. PMID:27462460

  9. Vertebrate HoxB gene expression requires DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel; Méchali, Marcel

    2003-07-15

    To study the relationship between DNA replication and transcription in vivo, we investigated Hox gene activation in two vertebrate systems: the embryogenesis of Xenopus and the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of pluripotent mouse P19 cells. We show that the first cell cycles following the mid- blastula transition in Xenopus are necessary and sufficient for HoxB activation, whereas later cell cycles are necessary for the correct expression pattern. In P19 cells, HoxB expression requires proliferation, and the entire locus is activated within one cell cycle. Using synchronous cultures, we found that activation of HoxB genes is colinear within a single cell cycle, occurs during S phase and requires S phase. The HoxB locus replicates early, whereas replication is still required for maximal expression later in S phase. Thus, induction of HoxB genes occurs in a DNA replication-dependent manner and requires only one cell cycle. We propose that S-phase remodelling licenses the locus for transcriptional regulation. PMID:12853488

  10. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  11. Glycosylation and post-translational modification gene expression analysis by DNA microarrays for cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Arthur Nathan; Caldwell, Mary; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarray analysis of gene expression has become a valuable tool for bioprocessing research aimed at improving therapeutic protein yields. The highly parallel nature of DNA microarray technology allows researchers to assess hundreds of gene simultaneously, essentially enabling genome-wide snapshots. The quality and amount of therapeutic proteins produced by cultured mammalian cells rely heavily on the culture environment. In order to implement beneficial changes to the culture environment, a better understanding of the relationship between the product quality and culture environment must be developed. By analyzing gene expression levels under various environmental conditions, light can be shed on the underlying mechanisms. This paper describes a method for evaluating gene expression changes for cultured NS0 cells, a mouse-derived myeloma cell line, under culture environment conditions, such as ammonia buildup, known to affect product quality. These procedures can be easily adapted to other environmental conditions and any mammalian cell lines cultured in suspension, so long as a sufficient number of gene sequences are publicly available. PMID:22033470

  12. Gene therapy for the treatment of mitochondrial DNA disorders.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert W

    2005-02-01

    Despite recent epidemiological studies confirming that mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders due to mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome are amongst the most common inherited human diseases, realistic therapeutic strategies for these patients remain limited. The disappointing response to various vitamins, cofactors and electron acceptors that have been administered to patients in an attempt to bypass the underlying respiratory chain defect, coupled with the complexities of human mitochondrial genetics, means that novel and innovative means are required to offer realistic treatments. Several 'gene therapy' strategies have therefore been proposed to treat patients with pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, and although these are not without their own inherent problems, several exciting approaches promise much in the near future. This review will provide a basic background to mitochondrial genetics and mitochondrial DNA disorders before introducing the various strategies being tested in vitro at present, in cell culture and animal models, and, in the example of therapeutic exercise, in patients themselves. PMID:15757380

  13. Characterization of How DNA Modifications Affect DNA Binding by C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patel, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about vertebrate DNA methylation and oxidation; however, much less is known about how modified cytosine residues within particular sequences are recognized. Among the known methylated DNA-binding domains, the Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF) protein superfamily is the largest with hundreds of members, each containing tandem ZnFs ranging from 3 to >30 fingers. We have begun to biochemically and structurally characterize these ZnFs not only on their sequence specificity but also on their sensitivity to various DNA modifications. Rather than following published methods of refolding insoluble ZnF arrays, we have expressed and purified soluble forms of ZnFs, ranging in size from a tandem array of two to six ZnFs, from seven different proteins. We also describe a fluorescence polarization assay to measure ZnFs affinity with oligonucleotides containing various modifications and our approaches for cocrystallization of ZnFs with oligonucleotides. PMID:27372763

  14. How-to-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Made Easy II. Gene, Gene, Who's Got the Gene?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an activity in which students are able to determine that DNA can be transferred between bacteria and should be able to predict the type of DNA transferred. Methods, materials, and results are discussed. (CW)

  15. Mutations that affect production of branched RNA-linked msDNA in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed Central

    Dhundale, A; Furuichi, T; Inouye, M; Inouye, S

    1988-01-01

    A deletion mutation of the gene (msd-msr) for the branched RNA-linked msDNA of Myxococcus xanthus was constructed by replacing the chromosomal 0.7-kilobase (kb) SmaI-XhoI fragment encompassing msd-msr with a 1.4-kb fragment carrying a gene for kanamycin resistance. It was found that this deletion strain (delta msSX) could not produce msDNA, although it still contained another species of msDNA, mrDNA (msDNA, reduced size). No apparent differences between delta msSX and the wild-type strain were observed in terms of cell growth, morphogenesis, fruiting-body formation, or motility. Both a deletion mutation at the region 100 base pairs upstream of msd and an insertion mutation at a site 500 base pairs upstream of msd showed a significant reduction of msDNA production, indicating that there is a cis- or trans-acting positive element in this region. When the 3.5-kb BamHI fragment carrying msd-msr from Stigmatella aurantiaca was inserted into the M. xanthus chromosome, the S. aurantiaca msDNA was found to be produced in M. xanthus. Images PMID:2461359

  16. Transcription of two classes of rat growth hormone gene-associated repetitive DNA: differences in activity and effects of tandem repeat structure.

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Hartmann, A; Lieberburg, I; Gardner, D; Baxter, J D; Cathala, G G

    1984-01-01

    The rat growth hormone (rGH) gene contains two classes of repetitive DNA arranged as clusters within intron B and the 3' flanking region. The major family is equivalent to the CHO type 2 DNA. The second ("truncated repeat", TR) is a truncated version of the first and occurs in certain neural-specific transcripts and genes ("identifier" elements, ID). Here we report, using the HeLa cell-free transcription assay, that RNA polymerase III (Pol III) efficiently initiates at internal promoters within a tandem array of rGH gene repetitive DNA monomers and results in a novel organization of overlapping Class III transcription units. Transcription competition studies revealed that the rat type 2 structures share Pol III transcription factors with a tRNA gene, a human Alu repeat, and a mutant VA1 gene. Also, the rGH type 2 but not the TR DNA efficiently promotes Pol III initiation, yet other TR members, which differ only in flanking DNA, are transcribed. Thus, the rGH gene is strikingly enriched with 10 repetitive DNA monomers; multimeric type 2 elements are actively transcribed; rGH-TR sequences are expressed only as part of larger transcripts promoted by type 2 DNA; and, type 2 DNA uses tRNA gene transcription factors. These studies show that flanking sequences, promoter organization and factor competition may all affect rat repetitive DNA expression. Images PMID:6091058

  17. Cloning, characterization, and sequence of the yeast DNA topoisomerase I gene.

    PubMed Central

    Thrash, C; Bankier, A T; Barrell, B G; Sternglanz, R

    1985-01-01

    The structural gene for yeast DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) has been cloned from two yeast genomic plasmid banks. Integration of a plasmid carrying the gene into the chromosome and subsequent genetic mapping shows that TOP1 is identical to the gene previously called MAK1. Seven top1 (mak1) mutants including gene disruptions are viable, demonstrating that DNA topoisomerase I is not essential for viability in yeast. A 3787-base-pair DNA fragment including the gene has been sequenced. The protein predicted from the DNA sequence has 769 amino acids and a molecular weight of 90,020. Images PMID:2989818

  18. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  19. Biodegradable DNA Nanoparticles that Provide Widespread Gene Delivery in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Song, Eric; Zhang, Clark; Berry, Sneha; Park, Hee Won; Kim, Young Eun; Park, Jong Sung; Lee, Seulki; Suk, Jung Soo; Hanes, Justin

    2016-02-01

    Successful gene therapy of neurological disorders is predicated on achieving widespread and uniform transgene expression throughout the affected disease area in the brain. However, conventional gene vectors preferentially travel through low-resistance perivascular spaces and/or are confined to the administration site even with the aid of a pressure-driven flow provided by convection-enhanced delivery. Biodegradable DNA nanoparticles offer a safe gene delivery platform devoid of adverse effects associated with virus-based or synthetic nonbiodegradable systems. Using a state-of-the-art biodegradable polymer, poly(β-amino ester), colloidally stable sub-100 nm DNA nanoparticles are engineered with a nonadhesive polyethylene glycol corona that are able to avoid the adhesive and steric hindrances imposed by the extracellular matrix. Following convection enhanced delivery, these brain-penetrating nanoparticles are able to homogeneously distribute throughout the rodent striatum and mediate widespread and high-level transgene expression. These nanoparticles provide a biodegradable DNA nanoparticle platform enabling uniform transgene expression patterns in vivo and hold promise for the treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:26680637

  20. DNA Sequence Heterogeneity of Campylobacter jejuni CJIE4 Prophages and Expression of Prophage Genes

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Clifford G.; Chong, Patrick M.; McCorrister, Stuart J.; Mabon, Philip; Walker, Matthew; Westmacott, Garrett R.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni carry temperate bacteriophages that can affect the biology or virulence of the host bacterium. Known effects include genomic rearrangements and resistance to DNA transformation. C. jejuni prophage CJIE1 shows sequence variability and variability in the content of morons. Homologs of the CJIE1 prophage enhance both adherence and invasion to cells in culture and increase the expression of a specific subset of bacterial genes. Other C. jejuni temperate phages have so far not been well characterized. In this study we describe investigations into the DNA sequence variability and protein expression in a second prophage, CJIE4. CJIE4 sequences were obtained de novo from DNA sequencing of five C. jejuni isolates, as well as from whole genome sequences submitted to GenBank by other research groups. These CJIE4 DNA sequences were heterogenous, with several different insertions/deletions (indels) in different parts of the prophage genome. Two variants of a 3–4 kb region inserted within CJIE4 had different gene content that distinguished two major conserved CJIE4 prophage families. Additional indels were detected throughout the prophage. Detection of proteins in the five isolates characterized in our laboratory in isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) experiments indicated that prophage proteins within each of the two large indel variants were expressed during growth of the bacteria on Mueller Hinton agar plates. These proteins included the extracellular DNase associated with resistance to DNA transformation and prophage repressor proteins. Other proteins associated with known or suspected roles in prophage biology were also expressed from CJIE4, including capsid protein, the phage integrase, and MazF, a type II toxin-antitoxin system protein. Together with the results previously obtained for the CJIE1 prophage these results demonstrate that sequence variability and expression of moron genes are both general properties of temperate

  1. DNA polymerase kappa deficiency does not affect somatic hypermutation in mice.

    PubMed

    Schenten, Dominik; Gerlach, Valerie L; Guo, Caixia; Velasco-Miguel, Susana; Hladik, Christa L; White, Charles L; Friedberg, Errol C; Rajewsky, Klaus; Esposito, Gloria

    2002-11-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SH) in B cells undergoing T cell-dependent immune responses generates high-affinity antibodies that provide protective immunity. Most current models of SH postulate the introduction of a nick into the DNA and subsequent replication-independent, error-prone short-patch synthesis by one or more DNA polymerases. The Pol kappa (DinB1) gene encodes a specialized mammalian DNA polymerase called DNA polymerase kappa (pol kappa), a member of the recently discovered Y family of DNA polymerases. The mouse PolK gene is expressed at high levels in the seminiferous tubules of the testis and in the adrenal cortex, and at lower levels in most other cells of the body including B lymphocytes. In vitro studies showed that pol kappa can act as an error-prone polymerase, although they failed to ascribe a clear function to this enzyme. The ability of pol kappa to generate mutations when extending primers on undamaged DNA templates identifies this enzyme as a potential candidate for the introduction of nucleotide changes in the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes during the process of SH. Here we show that pol kappa-deficient mice are viable, fertile and able to mount a normal immune response to the antigen (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl-chicken gamma-globulin (NP-GC). They also mutate their Ig genes normally. However, pol kappa-deficient embryonic fibroblasts are abnormally sensitive to killing following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, suggesting a role of pol kappa in translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:12555660

  2. Differential developmental expression of the rep B and rep D xeroderma pigmentosum related DNA helicase genes from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S K; Yu, S L; Garcia, M X; Alexander, H; Alexander, S

    1997-01-01

    DNA helicases are essential to many cellular processes including recombination, replication and transcription, and some helicases function in multiple processes. The helicases encoded by the Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) B and D genes function in both nucleotide excision repair and transcription initiation. Mutations that affect the repair function of these proteins result in XP while mutations affecting transcription result in neurological and developmental abnormalities, although the underlying molecular and cellular basis for these phenotypes is not well understood. To better understand the developmental roles of these genes, we have now identified and characterized the rep B and rep D genes from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum . Both genes encode DNA helicases of the SF2 superfamily of helicases. The rep D gene contains no introns and the rep B gene contains only one intron, which makes their genomic structures dramatically different from the corresponding genes in mammals and fish. However the predicted Dictyostelium proteins share high homology with the human XPB and XPD proteins. The single copy of the rep B and D genes map to chromosomes 3 and 1, respectively. The expression of rep B and D (and the previously isolated rep E) genes during multicellular development was examined, and it was determined that each rep gene has a unique pattern of expression, consistent with the idea that they have specific roles in development. The pattern and extent of expression of these genes was not affected by the growth history of the cells, implying that the expression of these genes is tightly regulated by the developmental program. The expression of the rep genes is a very early step in development and may well represent a key event in the initiation of development in this organism. PMID:9171087

  3. Restriction and sequence alterations affect DNA uptake sequence-dependent transformation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Ambur, Ole Herman; Frye, Stephan A; Nilsen, Mariann; Hovland, Eirik; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    Transformation is a complex process that involves several interactions from the binding and uptake of naked DNA to homologous recombination. Some actions affect transformation favourably whereas others act to limit it. Here, meticulous manipulation of a single type of transforming DNA allowed for quantifying the impact of three different mediators of meningococcal transformation: NlaIV restriction, homologous recombination and the DNA Uptake Sequence (DUS). In the wildtype, an inverse relationship between the transformation frequency and the number of NlaIV restriction sites in DNA was observed when the transforming DNA harboured a heterologous region for selection (ermC) but not when the transforming DNA was homologous with only a single nucleotide heterology. The influence of homologous sequence in transforming DNA was further studied using plasmids with a small interruption or larger deletions in the recombinogenic region and these alterations were found to impair transformation frequency. In contrast, a particularly potent positive driver of DNA uptake in Neisseria sp. are short DUS in the transforming DNA. However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for DUS specificity remains unknown. Increasing the number of DUS in the transforming DNA was here shown to exert a positive effect on transformation. Furthermore, an influence of variable placement of DUS relative to the homologous region in the donor DNA was documented for the first time. No effect of altering the orientation of DUS was observed. These observations suggest that DUS is important at an early stage in the recognition of DNA, but does not exclude the existence of more than one level of DUS specificity in the sequence of events that constitute transformation. New knowledge on the positive and negative drivers of transformation may in a larger perspective illuminate both the mechanisms and the evolutionary role(s) of one of the most conserved mechanisms in nature: homologous recombination. PMID

  4. Restriction and Sequence Alterations Affect DNA Uptake Sequence-Dependent Transformation in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Ambur, Ole Herman; Frye, Stephan A.; Nilsen, Mariann; Hovland, Eirik; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    Transformation is a complex process that involves several interactions from the binding and uptake of naked DNA to homologous recombination. Some actions affect transformation favourably whereas others act to limit it. Here, meticulous manipulation of a single type of transforming DNA allowed for quantifying the impact of three different mediators of meningococcal transformation: NlaIV restriction, homologous recombination and the DNA Uptake Sequence (DUS). In the wildtype, an inverse relationship between the transformation frequency and the number of NlaIV restriction sites in DNA was observed when the transforming DNA harboured a heterologous region for selection (ermC) but not when the transforming DNA was homologous with only a single nucleotide heterology. The influence of homologous sequence in transforming DNA was further studied using plasmids with a small interruption or larger deletions in the recombinogenic region and these alterations were found to impair transformation frequency. In contrast, a particularly potent positive driver of DNA uptake in Neisseria sp. are short DUS in the transforming DNA. However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for DUS specificity remains unknown. Increasing the number of DUS in the transforming DNA was here shown to exert a positive effect on transformation. Furthermore, an influence of variable placement of DUS relative to the homologous region in the donor DNA was documented for the first time. No effect of altering the orientation of DUS was observed. These observations suggest that DUS is important at an early stage in the recognition of DNA, but does not exclude the existence of more than one level of DUS specificity in the sequence of events that constitute transformation. New knowledge on the positive and negative drivers of transformation may in a larger perspective illuminate both the mechanisms and the evolutionary role(s) of one of the most conserved mechanisms in nature: homologous recombination. PMID

  5. DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide for highly efficient gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Kazutaka; Piao, Wenying; Yoshida-Tanaka, Kie; Sujino, Yumiko; Nishina, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Keiko; Yoshioka, Kotaro; Kuwahara, Hiroya; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Baba, Takeshi; Ono, Fumiko; Miyata, Kanjiro; Miyake, Koichi; Seth, Punit P; Low, Audrey; Yoshida, Masayuki; Bennett, C Frank; Kataoka, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Obika, Satoshi; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are recognized therapeutic agents for the modulation of specific genes at the post-transcriptional level. Similar to any medical drugs, there are opportunities to improve their efficacy and safety. Here we develop a short DNA/RNA heteroduplex oligonucleotide (HDO) with a structure different from double-stranded RNA used for short interfering RNA and single-stranded DNA used for ASO. A DNA/locked nucleotide acid gapmer duplex with an α-tocopherol-conjugated complementary RNA (Toc-HDO) is significantly more potent at reducing the expression of the targeted mRNA in liver compared with the parent single-stranded gapmer ASO. Toc-HDO also improves the phenotype in disease models more effectively. In addition, the high potency of Toc-HDO results in a reduction of liver dysfunction observed in the parent ASO at a similar silencing effect. HDO technology offers a novel concept of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and the development of this molecular design opens a new therapeutic field. PMID:26258894

  6. Secure and effective gene delivery system of plasmid DNA coated by polynucleotide.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yukinobu; Ohkubo, Chikako; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Egashira, Kanoko; Sato, Kayoko; Fumoto, Shintaro; Nishida, Koyo; Higuchi, Norihide; Kitahara, Takashi; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Polynucleotides are anionic macromolecules which are expected to transfer into the targeted cells through specific uptake mechanisms. So, we developed polynucleotides coating complexes of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) for a secure and efficient gene delivery system and evaluated their usefulness. Polyadenylic acid (polyA), polyuridylic acid (polyU), polycytidylic acid (polyC), and polyguanylic acid (polyG) were examined as the coating materials. pDNA/PEI/polyA, pDNA/PEI/polyU, and pDNA/PEI/polyC complexes formed nanoparticles with a negative surface charge although pDNA/PEI/polyG was aggregated. The pDNA/PEI/polyC complex showed high transgene efficiency in B16-F10 cells although there was little efficiency in pDNA/PEI/polyA and pDNA/PEI/polyU complexes. An inhibition study strongly indicated the specific uptake mechanism of pDNA/PEI/polyC complex. Polynucleotide coating complexes had lower cytotoxicity than pDNA/PEI complex. The pDNA/PEI/polyC complex showed high gene expression selectively in the spleen after intravenous injection into mice. The pDNA/PEI/polyC complex showed no agglutination with erythrocytes and no acute toxicity although these were observed in pDNA/PEI complex. Thus, we developed polynucleotide coating complexes as novel vectors for clinical gene therapy, and the pDNA/PEI/polyC complex as a useful candidate for a gene delivery system. PMID:25148610

  7. Why is less cationic lipid required to prepare lipoplexes from plasmid DNA than linear DNA in gene therapy?

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Misra, Santosh K; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sierra, María B; Biswas, Joydeep; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2011-11-16

    The most important objective of the present study was to explain why cationic lipid (CL)-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA) is better than that of linear DNA in gene therapy, a question that, until now, has remained unanswered. Herein for the first time we experimentally show that for different types of CLs, pDNA, in contrast to linear DNA, is compacted with a large amount of its counterions, yielding a lower effective negative charge. This feature has been confirmed through a number of physicochemical and biochemical investigations. This is significant for both in vitro and in vivo transfection studies. For an effective DNA transfection, the lower the amount of the CL, the lower is the cytotoxicity. The study also points out that it is absolutely necessary to consider both effective charge ratios between CL and pDNA and effective pDNA charges, which can be determined from physicochemical experiments. PMID:21985329

  8. Variation and expression of KAP9.2 gene affecting cashmere trait in goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhao, Z D; Xu, H R; Qu, L; Zhao, H B; Li, T; Zhang, Z Y

    2012-12-01

    Keratin-associated proteins 9.2 (KAP9.2) gene encodes one of the ultra high sulfur KAPs. Variation in KAP genes may affect the structure of KAPs and hence cashmere characteristics. In order to test the association between the polymorphism of KAP9.2 gene and cashmere trait, DNA sequencing was used to detect a novel C/T polymorphism of KAP9.2 gene from a genomic DNA pool. The mutation could be recognized by Pst I restriction enzyme. To Shanbei white cashmere goat, Inner Mongolia white cashmere goat and Guanzhong dairy goat, the genotypic frequencies of TT, TC and CC from total 1,236 animals were as follows: 0.047, 0.519 and 0.434; 0.180, 0.592 and 0.228; 0.431, 0.544 and 0.025. The allelic frequencies of T and C were 0.307 and 0.693; 0.476 and 0.524; 0.703 and 0.297, respectively, in breeds mentioned above. The frequency of C allele between cashmere and dairy goat was significant (P < 0.01). To provide support for the hypothesis that SNP 586 was responsible for KAP9.2 expression, quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of KAP9.2 was reduced in individuals bearing genotype CC compared with TT individuals, suggesting that C was the nucleotide causing decreased expression of KAP9.2 or was in linkage disequilibrium with the causative SNP. The 586C/T SNP found in this study might control translation or stability of KAP9.2 mRNA, which would be beneficial for marker assistant selection in cashmere goat breeding. PMID:23053952

  9. Association of DNA methylation and monoamine oxidase A gene expression in the brains of different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Eo, JungWoo; Lee, Hee-Eun; Nam, Gyu-Hwi; Kwon, Yun-Jeong; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Sang-Eun; Seo, Bohyun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2016-04-15

    The monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene is an important candidate gene for human behavior that encodes an enzyme regulating the metabolism of key neurotransmitters. The regulatory mechanisms of the MAOA gene in dogs are yet to be elucidated. We measured MAOA gene transcription and analyzed the VNTR genotype and methylation status of the gene promoter region in different dog breeds to determine whether MAOA expression is correlated with the MAOA genotype or epigenetic modification in dogs. We found brain-specific expression of the MAOA gene and different transcription levels in different dog breeds including Beagle, Sapsaree, and German shepherd, and also a robust association of the DNA methylation of the gene promoter with mRNA levels. However, the 90 bp tandem repeats that we observed near the transcription start site were not variable, indicating no correlation with canine MAOA activity. These results show that differential DNA methylation in the MAOA promoter region may affect gene expression by modulating promoter activity. Moreover, the distinctive patterns of MAOA expression and DNA methylation may be involved in breed-specific or individual behavioral characteristics, such as aggression, because behavioral phenotypes are related to different physiological and neuroendocrine responses. PMID:26784655

  10. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair. PMID:26042867

  11. Densely ionizing radiation affects DNA methylation of selective LINE-1 elements.

    PubMed

    Prior, Sara; Miousse, Isabelle R; Nzabarushimana, Etienne; Pathak, Rupak; Skinner, Charles; Kutanzi, Kristy R; Allen, Antiño R; Raber, Jacob; Tackett, Alan J; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A; Koturbash, Igor

    2016-10-01

    Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element 1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons are heavily methylated and are the most abundant transposable elements in mammalian genomes. Here, we investigated the differential DNA methylation within the LINE-1 under normal conditions and in response to environmentally relevant doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. We demonstrate that DNA methylation of LINE-1 elements in the lungs of C57BL6 mice is dependent on their evolutionary age, where the elder age of the element is associated with the lower extent of DNA methylation. Exposure to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and methionine-deficient diet affected DNA methylation of selective LINE-1 elements in an age- and promoter type-dependent manner. Exposure to densely IR, but not sparsely IR, resulted in DNA hypermethylation of older LINE-1 elements, while the DNA methylation of evolutionary younger elements remained mostly unchanged. We also demonstrate that exposure to densely IR increased mRNA and protein levels of LINE-1 via the loss of the histone H3K9 dimethylation and an increase in the H3K4 trimethylation at the LINE-1 5'-untranslated region, independently of DNA methylation. Our findings suggest that DNA methylation is important for regulation of LINE-1 expression under normal conditions, but histone modifications may dictate the transcriptional activity of LINE-1 in response to exposure to densely IR. PMID:27419368

  12. Aberrant DNA methylation of WNT pathway genes in the development and progression of CIMP-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Bodor, András; Ribli, Dezső; Krenács, Tibor; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barnabás; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tóth, Kinga; Valcz, Gábor; Spisák, Sándor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-01

    The WNT signaling pathway has an essential role in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression, which involves a cascade of genetic and epigenetic changes. We aimed to analyze DNA methylation affecting the WNT pathway genes in colorectal carcinogenesis in promoter and gene body regions using whole methylome analysis in 9 colorectal cancer, 15 adenoma, and 6 normal tumor adjacent tissue (NAT) samples by methyl capture sequencing. Functional methylation was confirmed on 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colorectal cancer cell line datasets. In parallel with the DNA methylation analysis, mutations of WNT pathway genes (APC, β-catenin/CTNNB1) were analyzed by 454 sequencing on GS Junior platform. Most differentially methylated CpG sites were localized in gene body regions (95% of WNT pathway genes). In the promoter regions, 33 of the 160 analyzed WNT pathway genes were differentially methylated in colorectal cancer vs. normal, including hypermethylated AXIN2, CHP1, PRICKLE1, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, and hypomethylated CACYBP, CTNNB1, MYC; 44 genes in adenoma vs. NAT; and 41 genes in colorectal cancer vs. adenoma comparisons. Hypermethylation of AXIN2, DKK1, VANGL1, and WNT5A gene promoters was higher, while those of SOX17, PRICKLE1, DAAM2, and MYC was lower in colon carcinoma compared to adenoma. Inverse correlation between expression and methylation was confirmed in 23 genes, including APC, CHP1, PRICKLE1, PSEN1, and SFRP1. Differential methylation affected both canonical and noncanonical WNT pathway genes in colorectal normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Aberrant DNA methylation appears already in adenomas as an early event of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27245242

  13. Longer resistance of some DNA traits from BT176 maize to gastric juice from gastrointestinal affected patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, A M; Mannoni, V; Pontieri, E; Pourshaban, M

    2007-01-01

    The presence of antibiotic resistance marker genes in genetically engineered plants is one of the most controversial issues related to Genetically Modified Organism (GMO)-containing food, raising concern about the possibility that these markers could increase the pool of antibiotic resistance genes. This study investigates the in vitro survival of genes bla and cryIA(b) of maize Bt176 in human gastric juice samples. Five samples of gastric juice were collected from patients affected by gastro-esophageal reflux or celiac disease and three additional samples were obtained by pH modification with NaHCO3. DNA was extracted from maize Bt176 and incubated with samples of gastric juices at different times. The survival of the target traits (bla gene, whole 1914 bp gene cry1A(b), and its 211 bp fragment) was determined using PCR. The stability of the target genes was an inverse function of their lengths in all the samples. Survival in samples from untreated subjects was below the normal physiological time of gastric digestion. On the contrary, survival time in samples from patients under anti-acid drug treatment or in samples whose pH was modified, resulted strongly increased. Our data indicate the possibility that in particular cases the survival time could be so delayed that, as a consequence, some traits of DNA could reach the intestine. In general, this aspect must be considered for vulnerable consumers (people suffering from gastrointestinal diseases related to altered digestive functionality, physiological problems or drug side-effects) in the risk analysis usually referred to healthy subjects. PMID:17346434

  14. Gene polymorphisms and increased DNA damage in morbidly obese women.

    PubMed

    Luperini, B C O; Almeida, D C; Porto, M P; Marcondes, J P C; Prado, R P; Rasera, I; Oliveira, M R M; Salvadori, D M F

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is characterized by increased adipose tissue mass resulting from a chronic imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. Furthermore, there is a clearly defined relationship among fat mass expansion, chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation; leading to ROS-related pathological events. In the past years, genome-wide association studies have generated convincing evidence associating genetic variation at multiple regions of the genome with traits that reflect obesity. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the relationships among the gene polymorphisms ghrelin (GHRL-rs26802), ghrelin receptor (GHSR-rs572169), leptin (LEP-rs7799039), leptin receptor (LEPR-rs1137101) and fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO-rs9939609) and obesity. The relationships among these gene variants and the amount of DNA damage were also investigated. Three hundred Caucasian morbidly obese and 300 eutrophic (controls) women were recruited. In summary, the results demonstrated that the frequencies of the GHRL, GHSR, LEP and LEPR polymorphisms were not different between Brazilian white morbidly obese and eutrophic women. Exceptions were the AA-FTO genotype and allele A, which were significantly more frequent in obese women than in the controls (0.23% vs. 0.10%; 0.46 vs. 0.36, respectively), and the TT-FTO genotype and the T allele, which were less frequent in morbidly obese women (p<0.01). Furthermore, significant differences in the amount of genetic lesions associated with FTO variants were observed only in obese women. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the analyzed SNPs were not closely associated with morbid obesity, suggesting they are not the major contributors to obesity. Therefore, our data indicated that these gene variants are not good biomarkers for predicting risk susceptibility for obesity, whereas ROS generated by the inflammatory status might be one of the causes of DNA damage in obese women, favoring

  15. Promoter DNA demethylation of Keap1 gene in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang-Zhi; Zhang, Xue-Song; Zhang, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Researches have shown that the onset of diabetes is closely associated with oxidative stress and the chronic exposure leads to the development of complications such as diabetic cardiomyopathy. One of the central adaptive responses against the oxidative stresses is the activation of the nuclear transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which then activates more than 20 different antioxidative enzymes. Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets and binds to Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of Nrf2 mediated antioxidant system in myocardial biopsies of non-diabetic (NDM) and type-2 diabetic (DM-T2) cardiomyopathy patients. The western blot analysis of antioxidant proteins, real-time PCR analysis of Nrf2/Keap1 gene and bisulphate DNA sequencing analysis to study the methylation status of the CpG islands of Keap1 promoter DNA were performed. The immunoblot analysis showed the decreased level of antioxidant proteins other than Keap1 in the diabetic cardiopathy patients. Similarly, mRNA levels of Keap1 showed 5-fold increase in diabetic patients. Further analysis on promoter region of Keap1 gene revealed 80% demethylation in diabetic patients. Altogether, our results indicated that demethylation of the CpG islands in the Keap1 promoter will activate the expression of Keap1 protein, which then increases the targeting of Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. Decreased Nrf2 activity represses the transcription of many antioxidant enzyme genes and alters the redox-balance up on diabetes. Thus, our study clearly demonstrates the failure of Nrf2 mediated antioxidant system revealed in biopsies of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25674242

  16. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  17. Dietary Flavanols Modulate the Transcription of Genes Associated with Cardiovascular Pathology without Changes in Their DNA Methylation State

    PubMed Central

    Boby, Céline; Leroux, Christine; Declerck, Ken; Szarc vel Szic, Katarzyna; Heyninck, Karen; Laukens, Kris; Bizet, Martin; Defrance, Matthieu; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Calonne, Emilie; Fuks, Francois; Haegeman, Guy; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Bast, Aalt; Weseler, Antje R.

    2014-01-01

    Background In a recent intervention study, the daily supplementation with 200 mg monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF) from grape seeds for 8 weeks revealed a vascular health benefit in male smokers. The objective of the present study was to determine the impact of MOF consumption on the gene expression profile of leukocytes and to assess changes in DNA methylation. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression profiles were determined using whole genome microarrays (Agilent) and DNA methylation was assessed using HumanMethylation450 BeadChips (Illumina). MOF significantly modulated the expression of 864 genes. The majority of the affected genes are involved in chemotaxis, cell adhesion, cell infiltration or cytoskeleton organisation, suggesting lower immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells. This was corroborated by in vitro experiments showing that MOF exposure of monocytes attenuates their adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) reporter gene assays confirmed that MOF decrease the activity of NF-κB. Strong inter-individual variability in the leukocytes' DNA methylation was observed. As a consequence, on group level, changes due to MOF supplementation could not be found. Conclusion Our study revealed that an 8 week daily supplementation with 200 mg MOF modulates the expression of genes associated with cardiovascular disease pathways without major changes of their DNA methylation state. However, strong inter-individual variation in leukocyte DNA methylation may obscure the subtle epigenetic response to dietary flavanols. Despite the lack of significant changes in DNA methylation, the modulation of gene expression appears to contribute to the observed vascular health effect of MOF in humans. PMID:24763279

  18. DNA Binding Region” of BRCA1 Affects Genetic Stability through modulating the Intra-S-Phase Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takaaki; Xu, Xiaoling; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Lahusen, Tyler; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1) contains 3 domains: an N-terminal RING domain with ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, C-terminal BRCT protein interaction domain and a central region. RING and BRCT domains are well characterized, yet the function of the central region remains unclear. In this study, we identified an essential DNA binding region (DBR: 421-701 amino acids) within the central region of human BRCA1, and found that BRCA1 brings DNA together and preferably binds to splayed-arm DNA in a sequence-independent manner. To investigate the biological role of the DBR, we generated mouse ES cells, which lack the DBR (ΔDBR) by using the TALEN method. The ΔDBR cells exhibited decreased survival as compared to the wild type (WT) cells treated with a PARP inhibitor, however they have an intact ability to conduct DNA repair mediated by homologous recombination (HR). The ΔDBR cells continued to incorporate more EdU in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which causes replication stress and exhibited reduced viability than the WT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of CHK1, which regulates the intra-S phase checkpoint, was moderately decreased in ΔDBR cells. These data suggest that DNA binding by BRCA1 affects the stability of DNA replication folks, resulting in weakened intra-S-phase checkpoint control in the ΔDBR cells. The ΔDBR cells also exhibited an increased number of abnormal chromosome structures as compared with WT cells, indicating that the ΔDBR cells have increased genetic instability. Thus, we demonstrated that the DBR of BRCA1 modulates genetic stability through the intra-S-phase checkpoint activated by replication stress. PMID:26884712

  19. Large sex differences in chicken behavior and brain gene expression coincide with few differences in promoter DNA-methylation.

    PubMed

    Nätt, Daniel; Agnvall, Beatrix; Jensen, Per

    2014-01-01

    While behavioral sex differences have repeatedly been reported across taxa, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms in the brain are mostly lacking. Birds have previously shown to have only limited dosage compensation, leading to high sex bias of Z-chromosome gene expression. In chickens, a male hyper-methylated region (MHM) on the Z-chromosome has been associated with a local type of dosage compensation, but a more detailed characterization of the avian methylome is limiting our interpretations. Here we report an analysis of genome wide sex differences in promoter DNA-methylation and gene expression in the brain of three weeks old chickens, and associated sex differences in behavior of Red Junglefowl (ancestor of domestic chickens). Combining DNA-methylation tiling arrays with gene expression microarrays we show that a specific locus of the MHM region, together with the promoter for the zinc finger RNA binding protein (ZFR) gene on chromosome 1, is strongly associated with sex dimorphism in gene expression. Except for this, we found few differences in promoter DNA-methylation, even though hundreds of genes were robustly differentially expressed across distantly related breeds. Several of the differentially expressed genes are known to affect behavior, and as suggested from their functional annotation, we found that female Red Junglefowl are more explorative and fearful in a range of tests performed throughout their lives. This paper identifies new sites and, with increased resolution, confirms known sites where DNA-methylation seems to affect sexually dimorphic gene expression, but the general lack of this association is noticeable and strengthens the view that birds do not have dosage compensation. PMID:24782041

  20. Large Sex Differences in Chicken Behavior and Brain Gene Expression Coincide with Few Differences in Promoter DNA-Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Nätt, Daniel; Agnvall, Beatrix; Jensen, Per

    2014-01-01

    While behavioral sex differences have repeatedly been reported across taxa, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms in the brain are mostly lacking. Birds have previously shown to have only limited dosage compensation, leading to high sex bias of Z-chromosome gene expression. In chickens, a male hyper-methylated region (MHM) on the Z-chromosome has been associated with a local type of dosage compensation, but a more detailed characterization of the avian methylome is limiting our interpretations. Here we report an analysis of genome wide sex differences in promoter DNA-methylation and gene expression in the brain of three weeks old chickens, and associated sex differences in behavior of Red Junglefowl (ancestor of domestic chickens). Combining DNA-methylation tiling arrays with gene expression microarrays we show that a specific locus of the MHM region, together with the promoter for the zinc finger RNA binding protein (ZFR) gene on chromosome 1, is strongly associated with sex dimorphism in gene expression. Except for this, we found few differences in promoter DNA-methylation, even though hundreds of genes were robustly differentially expressed across distantly related breeds. Several of the differentially expressed genes are known to affect behavior, and as suggested from their functional annotation, we found that female Red Junglefowl are more explorative and fearful in a range of tests performed throughout their lives. This paper identifies new sites and, with increased resolution, confirms known sites where DNA-methylation seems to affect sexually dimorphic gene expression, but the general lack of this association is noticeable and strengthens the view that birds do not have dosage compensation. PMID:24782041

  1. How nanochannel confinement affects the DNA melting transition within the Poland-Scheraga model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter-Schad, Michaela; Werner, Erik; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Mehlig, Bernhard; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    When double-stranded DNA molecules are heated, or exposed to denaturing agents, the two strands are separated. The statistical physics of this process has a long history and is commonly described in terms of the Poland-Scheraga (PS) model. Crucial to this model is the configurational entropy for a melted region (compared to the entropy of an intact region of the same size), quantified by the loop factor. In this study, we investigate how confinement affects the DNA melting transition, by using the loop factor for an ideal Gaussian chain. By subsequent numerical solutions of the PS model, we demonstrate that the melting temperature depends on the persistence lengths of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA. For realistic values of the persistence lengths, the melting temperature is predicted to decrease with decreasing channel diameter. We also demonstrate that confinement broadens the melting transition. These general findings hold for the three scenarios investigated: 1. homo-DNA, i.e., identical basepairs along the DNA molecule, 2. random sequence DNA, and 3. "real" DNA, here T4 phage DNA. We show that cases 2 and 3 in general give rise to broader transitions than case 1. Case 3 exhibits a similar phase transition as case 2 provided the random sequence DNA has the same ratio of AT to GC basepairs (A - adenine, T - thymine, G - guanine, C - cytosine). A simple analytical estimate for the shift in melting temperature is provided as a function of nanochannel diameter. For homo-DNA, we also present an analytical prediction of the melting probability as a function of temperature.

  2. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  3. From DNA Copy Number to Gene Expression: Local aberrations, Trisomies and Monosomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Tal

    The goal of my PhD research was to study the effect of DNA copy number changes on gene expression. DNA copy number aberrations may be local, encompassing several genes, or on the level of an entire chromosome, such as trisomy and monosomy. The main dataset I studied was of Glioblastoma, obtained in the framework of a collaboration, but I worked also with public datasets of cancer and Down's Syndrome. The molecular basis of expression changes in Glioblastoma. Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumors in adults. In collaboration with Prof. Hegi (CHUV, Switzerland), we analyzed a rich Glioblastoma dataset including clinical information, DNA copy number (array CGH) and expression profiles. We explored the correlation between DNA copy number and gene expression at the level of chromosomal arms and local genomic aberrations. We detected known amplification and over expression of oncogenes, as well as deletion and down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes. We exploited that information to map alterations of pathways that are known to be disrupted in Glioblastoma, and tried to characterize samples that have no known alteration in any of the studied pathways. Identifying local DNA aberrations of biological significance. Many types of tumors exhibit chromosomal losses or gains and local amplifications and deletions. A region that is aberrant in many tumors, or whose copy number change is stronger, is more likely to be clinically relevant, and not just a by-product of genetic instability. We developed a novel method that defines and prioritizes aberrations by formalizing these intuitions. The method scores each aberration by the fraction of patients harboring it, its length and its amplitude, and assesses the significance of the score by comparing it to a null distribution obtained by permutations. This approach detects genetic locations that are significantly aberrant, generating a 'genomic aberration profile' for each sample. The 'genomic

  4. Study of design parameters affecting the motion of DNA for nanoinjection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Regis A.; Jensen, Brian D.; Black, Justin L.; Burnett, Sandra H.; Howell, Larry L.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports the effects of various parameters on the attraction and repulsion of DNA to and from a silicon lance. An understanding of DNA motion is crucial for a new approach to insert DNA, or other foreign microscopic matter, into a living cell. The approach, called nanoinjection, uses electrical forces to attract and repel the desired substance to a micromachined lance designed to pierce the cell membranes. We have developed mathematical models to predict the trajectory of DNA. The mathematical model allows investigation of the attraction/repulsion process by varying specific parameters. We find that the ground electrode placement, lance orientation and lance penetration significantly affect attraction or repulsion efficiency, while the gap, lance direction, lance tip width, lance tip half-angle and lance tip height do not.

  5. Flow-Dependent Epigenetic DNA Methylation in Endothelial Gene Expression and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jessilyn; Thabet, Salim; Jo, Hanjoong

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms that regulate endothelial cell gene expression are now emerging. DNA methylation is the most stable epigenetic mark that confers persisting changes in gene expression. Not only is DNA methylation important in rendering cell identity by regulating cell type-specific gene expression throughout differentiation, but it is becoming clear that DNA methylation also plays a key role in maintaining endothelial cell homeostasis and in vascular disease development. Disturbed blood flow causes atherosclerosis, whereas stable flow protects against it by differentially regulating gene expression in endothelial cells. Recently, we and others have shown that flow-dependent gene expression and atherosclerosis development are regulated by mechanisms dependent on DNA methyltransferases (1 and 3A). Disturbed blood flow upregulates DNA methyltransferase expression both in vitro and in vivo, which leads to genome-wide DNA methylation alterations and global gene expression changes in a DNA methyltransferase-dependent manner. These studies revealed several mechanosensitive genes, such as HoxA5, Klf3, and Klf4, whose promoters were hypermethylated by disturbed blood flow, but rescued by DNA methyltransferases inhibitors such as 5Aza-2-deoxycytidine. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism by which flow controls epigenomic DNA methylation patterns, which in turn alters endothelial gene expression, regulates vascular biology, and modulates atherosclerosis development. PMID:25953647

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing of Apoptotic DNA Breakpoints Reveals Association with Actively Transcribed Genes and Gene Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Fullwood, Melissa J.; Lee, Joanne; Lin, Lifang; Li, Guoliang; Huss, Mikael; Ng, Patrick; Sung, Wing-Kin; Shenolikar, Shirish

    2011-01-01

    DNA fragmentation is a well-recognized hallmark of apoptosis. However, the precise DNA sequences cleaved during apoptosis triggered by distinct mechanisms remain unclear. We used next-generation sequencing of DNA fragments generated in Actinomycin D-treated human HL-60 leukemic cells to generate a high-throughput, global map of apoptotic DNA breakpoints. These data highlighted that DNA breaks are non-random and show a significant association with active genes and open chromatin regions. We noted that transcription factor binding sites were also enriched within a fraction of the apoptotic breakpoints. Interestingly, extensive apoptotic cleavage was noted within genes that are frequently translocated in human cancers. We speculate that the non-random fragmentation of DNA during apoptosis may contribute to gene translocations and the development of human cancers. PMID:22087219

  7. Periconceptional folate consumption is associated with neonatal DNA methylation modifications in neural crest regulatory and cancer development genes.

    PubMed

    Gonseth, Semira; Roy, Ritu; Houseman, E Andres; de Smith, Adam J; Zhou, Mi; Lee, Seung-Tae; Nusslé, Sébastien; Singer, Amanda W; Wrensch, Margaret R; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    Folate deficiency during early embryonic development constitutes a risk factor for neural tube defects and potentially for childhood leukemia via unknown mechanisms. We tested whether folate consumption during the 12 months prior to conception induced DNA methylation modifications at birth in healthy neonates with a genome-wide and agnostic approach. We hypothesized that DNA methylation in genes involved in neural tube development and/or cancer susceptibility would be affected by folate exposure. We retrospectively assessed folate exposure at the time of conception by food-frequency questionnaires administered to the mothers of 343 healthy newborns. We measured genome-wide DNA methylation from neonatal blood spots. We implemented a method based on bootstrap resampling to decrease false-positive findings. Folate was inversely associated with DNA methylation throughout the genome. Among the top folate-associated genes that were replicated in an independent Gambian study were TFAP2A, a gene critical for neural crest development, STX11, a gene implicated in acute myeloid leukemia, and CYS1, a candidate gene for cystic kidney disease. Reduced periconceptional folate intake was associated with increased methylation and, in turn, decreased gene expression at these 3 loci. The top folate-sensitive genes defined by their associated CpG sites were enriched for numerous transcription factors by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, including those implicated in cancer development (e.g., MYC-associated zinc finger protein). The influence of estimated periconceptional folate intake on neonatal DNA methylation levels provides potential mechanistic insights into the role of this vitamin in the development of neural tube defects and childhood cancers. PMID:26646725

  8. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  9. Controlled superficial assembly of DNA-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomposite spheres for surface-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Oyane, Ayako; Araki, Hiroko; Nakamura, Maki; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Shubhra, Quazi T H; Ito, Atsuo; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    Surface-mediated gene delivery systems have many potential applications in tissue engineering. We recently fabricated an assembly consisting of DNA-amorphous calcium phosphate (DNA-ACP) nanocomposite spheres on a polymer substrate via coprecipitation in a labile supersaturated calcium phosphate (CaP) solution and demonstrated the assembly's high gene delivery efficacy. In this study, we conducted a detailed investigation of the coprecipitation process in solution and revealed that the negatively charged DNA molecules were immobilized in the ACP spheres during the initial stage of coprecipitation and functioned as both sphere-dispersing and size-regulating agents. As a result, the DNA-ACP nanocomposites grew into size-regulated submicrospheres in solution and assembled onto the substrate via gravity sedimentation. The assembled nanocomposite spheres were chemically anchored to the substrate surface through an intermediate layer of CaP-based nanoparticles that was formed heterogeneously at the substrate surface. The coprecipitation conditions, i.e., coprecipitation time and Ca and P concentrations in solution, greatly affected the state of assembly of the nanocomposite spheres, thereby influencing the gene expression level of the cells cultured on the substrate. Increasing the number density and decreasing the size of the nanocomposite spheres did not always increase the assembly's gene delivery efficacy (per surface area of the substrate) due to adverse effects on cellular viability. As demonstrated herein, controlling the coprecipitation conditions is important for designing a cell-stimulating and biocompatible scaffold surface consisting of an assembly of DNA-ACP nanocomposite spheres. PMID:26896659

  10. Glycans affect DNA extraction and induce substantial differences in gut metagenomic studies.

    PubMed

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bachar, Dipankar; Henrissat, Bernard; Armougom, Fabrice; Audoly, Gilles; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by bacterial species and present in feces are extremely inhibitory to DNA restriction and can cause discrepancies in metagenomic studies. We determined the effects of different DNA extraction methods on the apparent composition of the gut microbiota using Illumina MiSeq deep sequencing technology. DNA was extracted from the stool from an obese female using 10 different methods and the choice of DNA extraction method affected the proportional abundance at the phylum level, species richness (Chao index, 227 to 2,714) and diversity (non parametric Shannon, 1.37 to 4.4). Moreover DNA was extracted from stools obtained from 83 different individuals by the fastest extraction assay and by an extraction assay that degradated exopolysaccharides. The fastest extraction method was able to detect 68% to 100% genera and 42% to 95% species whereas the glycan degradation extraction method was able to detect 56% to 93% genera and 25% to 87% species. To allow a good liberation of DNA from exopolysaccharides commonly presented in stools, we recommend the mechanical lysis of stools plus glycan degradation, used here for the first time. Caution must be taken in the interpretation of current metagenomic studies, as the efficiency of DNA extraction varies widely among stool samples. PMID:27188959

  11. Glycans affect DNA extraction and induce substantial differences in gut metagenomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bachar, Dipankar; Henrissat, Bernard; Armougom, Fabrice; Audoly, Gilles; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by bacterial species and present in feces are extremely inhibitory to DNA restriction and can cause discrepancies in metagenomic studies. We determined the effects of different DNA extraction methods on the apparent composition of the gut microbiota using Illumina MiSeq deep sequencing technology. DNA was extracted from the stool from an obese female using 10 different methods and the choice of DNA extraction method affected the proportional abundance at the phylum level, species richness (Chao index, 227 to 2,714) and diversity (non parametric Shannon, 1.37 to 4.4). Moreover DNA was extracted from stools obtained from 83 different individuals by the fastest extraction assay and by an extraction assay that degradated exopolysaccharides. The fastest extraction method was able to detect 68% to 100% genera and 42% to 95% species whereas the glycan degradation extraction method was able to detect 56% to 93% genera and 25% to 87% species. To allow a good liberation of DNA from exopolysaccharides commonly presented in stools, we recommend the mechanical lysis of stools plus glycan degradation, used here for the first time. Caution must be taken in the interpretation of current metagenomic studies, as the efficiency of DNA extraction varies widely among stool samples. PMID:27188959

  12. DNA methylation affected by male sterile cytoplasm in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male sterile cytoplasm plays an important role in hybrid rice and cytoplasmic effects are sufficiently documented. However, no reports are available on DNA methylation affected by male sterile cytoplasm in hybrid rice. We used a methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique to charac...

  13. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Sunwoo; Bamba, Takeshi; Suyama, Tatsuya; Ishijima, Tomoko; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Abe, Keiko; Nakai, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A high phosphorus (HP) diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus) or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus). Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054) in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty acids

  14. Gene duplication and divergence affecting drug content in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Weiblen, George D; Wenger, Jonathan P; Craft, Kathleen J; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Mehmedic, Zlatko; Treiber, Erin L; Marks, M David

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is an economically important source of durable fibers, nutritious seeds, and psychoactive drugs but few economic plants are so poorly understood genetically. Marijuana and hemp were crossed to evaluate competing models of cannabinoid inheritance and to explain the predominance of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) in marijuana compared with cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) in hemp. Individuals in the resulting F2 population were assessed for differential expression of cannabinoid synthase genes and were used in linkage mapping. Genetic markers associated with divergent cannabinoid phenotypes were identified. Although phenotypic segregation and a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the THCA/CBDA ratio were consistent with a simple model of codominant alleles at a single locus, the diversity of THCA and CBDA synthase sequences observed in the mapping population, the position of enzyme coding loci on the map, and patterns of expression suggest multiple linked loci. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests a history of duplication and divergence affecting drug content. Marijuana is distinguished from hemp by a nonfunctional CBDA synthase that appears to have been positively selected to enhance psychoactivity. An unlinked QTL for cannabinoid quantity may also have played a role in the recent escalation of drug potency. PMID:26189495

  15. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  16. Excision of plastid marker genes using directly repeated DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Elisabeth A; Madesis, Panagiotis; Avila, Elena Martin; Day, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Excision of marker genes using DNA direct repeats makes use of the predominant homologous recombination pathways present in the plastids of algae and plants. The method is simple, efficient, and widely applicable to plants and microalgae. Marker excision frequency is dependent on the length and number of directly repeated sequences. When two repeats are used a repeat size of greater than 600 bp promotes efficient excision of the marker gene. A wide variety of sequences can be used to make the direct repeats. Only a single round of transformation is required, and there is no requirement to introduce site-specific recombinases by retransformation or sexual crosses. Selection is used to maintain the marker and ensure homoplasmy of transgenic plastid genomes. Release of selection allows the accumulation of marker-free plastid genomes generated by marker excision, which is spontaneous, random, and a unidirectional process. Positive selection is provided by linking marker excision to restoration of the coding region of an herbicide resistance gene from two overlapping but incomplete coding regions. Cytoplasmic sorting allows the segregation of cells with marker-free transgenic plastids. The marker-free shoots resulting from direct repeat-mediated excision of marker genes have been isolated by vegetative propagation of shoots in the T0 generation. Alternatively, accumulation of marker-free plastid genomes during growth, development and flowering of T0 plants allows the collection of seeds that give rise to a high proportion of marker-free T1 seedlings. The simplicity and convenience of direct repeat excision facilitates its widespread use to isolate marker-free crops. PMID:24599849

  17. Role of polyplex intermediate species on gene transfer efficiency: polyethylenimine-DNA complexes and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ketola, Tiia-Maaria; Hanzlíková, Martina; Urtti, Arto; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Yliperttula, Marjo; Vuorimaa, Elina

    2011-03-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) is a cationic DNA condensing polymer that facilitates gene transfer into the mammalian cells. The highest gene transfer with branched PEI is obtained at high nitrogen/phosphate (N/P) ratios with free PEI present. The small molecular weight PEI alone is not able to mediate DNA transfection. Here, we used recently developed time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic method to study the mechanism of PEI-DNA complex formation and to investigate how free PEI, mean molecular weight, and branching of PEI affect the complexes. Analysis of fluorescence lifetimes and time-resolved spectra revealed that for both linear and branched high-molecular-weight PEI the complexation takes place in two steps, but the small-molecular-weight branched PEI complexed DNA at a single step. According to the binding constants obtained from time-resolved spectroscopic measurements, the affinity of N/P complexation per nitrogen atom is highest for LPEI and weakest for BPEI, whereas SPEI-DNA complexation showed intermediate values. Thus, the binding constant alone does not give adequate measure for transfection efficiency. On the other hand, the presence of intermediate states during the polyplex formation seems to be favorable for the gene transfection. Free PEI had no impact on the physical state of PEI-DNA complexes, even though it was essential for gene transfection in the cell culture. In conclusion, the molecular size and topology of PEI have direct influence on the DNA complexation but the free PEI does not. Free PEI must facilitate transfection at the cellular level and not via indirect effects on the PEI-DNA complexes. PMID:21291220

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: A gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, G.; Deak, P.; Hall, L.M.

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new {gamma}-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggests that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel {alpha}-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Polymorphisms of the DNA Methyltransferase 1 Gene Predict Survival of Gastric Cancer Patients Receiving Tumorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhifang; Wu, Xing; Cao, Donghui; Wang, Chuan; You, Lili; Jin, Meishan; Wen, Simin; Cao, Xueyuan; Jiang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) plays a pivotal role in maintaining DNA methylation status. Polymorphisms of DNMT1 may modify the role of DNMT1 in prognosis of gastric cancer (GC). Our aim was to test whether polymorphisms of DNMT1 gene were associated with overall survival of GC. Four hundred and forty-seven GC patients who underwent radical tumorectomy were enrolled in the study. Five tagging SNPs (rs10420321, rs16999593, rs2228612, rs2228611, and rs2288349) of the DNMT1 gene were genotyped by TaqMan assays. Kaplan-Meier survival plots and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to analyze the associations between SNPs of DNMT1 and survival of GC. Patients carrying rs2228611 GA/AA genotype tended to live longer than those bearing the GG genotype (HR 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51–0.91, P = 0.007). Further multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that rs2228611 was an independent prognostic factor (GA/AA versus GG: OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49–0.91, P = 0.010). Nevertheless, other SNPs did not show any significant associations with survival of GC. Polymorphisms of the DNMT1 gene may affect overall survival of GC. The SNP rs2228611 has the potentiality to serve as an independent prognostic marker for GC patients. PMID:27087738

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of DNA Dissociation from Liposome Carriers and DNA Escape from Endosomes During Lipid-Mediated Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Salomé; Duarte, Sofia; Monteiro, Gabriel A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nonviral vectors are highly attractive for gene therapy from a clinical point of view, and cationic lipid nanoparticles in particular have generated considerable interest. However, despite considerable recent advances, problems associated with low transfection efficiencies remain to be resolved to fully meet the potential of these vectors. The trafficking of plasmid DNA (pDNA) from the extracellular space up to the nucleus is prevented by several barriers, including liposome/pDNA dissociation within the endosome and pDNA escape into the cytosol. The aim of this work was to develop and optimize a tool that could offer simultaneous quantitative information both on the intracellular dissociation of oligonucleotides from lipid nanoparticles, and on the DNA escape from endocytic compartments. The ability to follow in real time both of these processes simultaneously (in a quantitative manner) is expected to be of high value in the rationalization and conception of new lipid nanoparticle vectors for gene delivery for therapeutic purposes. To this effect, a combination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and colocalization microscopy was employed. We show that it is possible to distinguish between liposome/pDNA dissociation and depletion of DNA within endosomes, providing resolution for the detection of intermediate species between endocytic particles with intact lipoplexes and endosomes devoid of DNA because of DNA escape or degradation. We demonstrate that after endocytosis, exceptionally few endocytic particles are found to exhibit simultaneously DNA/lipid colocalization and low FRET (DNA/lipid dissociation). These results clearly point to an extremely short-lived state for free plasmid within endosomes, which either escapes at once to the cytosol or is degraded within the endocytic compartment (because of exposure of DNA). It is possible that this limitation greatly contributes to reduction in probability of successful gene delivery through cationic

  1. Reversibility of Aberrant Global DNA and Estrogen Receptor-α Gene Methylation Distinguishes Colorectal Precancer from Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rulong; Tao, Lianhui; Xu, Yiqing; Chang, Shi; Van Brocklyn, James; Gao, Jian-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in the global methylation of DNA and in specific regulatory genes are two epigenetic alterations found in cancer. However, the significance of epigenetic changes for diagnosis and/or prognosis of colorectal cancer have not been established, although it has been extensively investigated. Recently we have identified a new type of cancer cell called precancerous stem cells (pCSCs) and proposed that cancer may arise from a lengthy development process of tumor initiating cells (TICs) → pCSCs → cancer stem cells (CSCs) → cancer, which is in parallel to histological changes of hyperplasia (TICs) → precancer (pCSCs) → carcinoma (CSCs/cancer cells), accompanied by clonal evolutionary epigenetic and genetic alterations. In this study, we investigated whether aberrant DNA methylation can be used as a biomarker for the differentiation between premalignant and malignant lesions in the colorectum. The profile of global DNA and estrogen receptor (ER)-α gene methylation during cancer development was determined by analysis of 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, dot blot analysis or a quantitative gene methylation assay (QGMA). Herein we show that global DNA hypomethylation and ER-α gene hypermethylation are progressively enhanced from hyperplastic polyps (HPs) → adenomatous polyps (APs) → adenomatous carcinoma (AdCa). The aberrant methylation can be completely reversed in APs, but not in AdCa by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) celecoxib, which is a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), suggesting that the epigenetic alterations between colorectal precancer (AP) and cancer (AdCa) are fundamentally different in response to anti-cancer therapy. In normal colorectal mucosa, while global DNA methylation was not affected by aging, ER-α gene methylation was significantly increased with aging. However, this increase did not reach the level observed in colorectal APs. Taken together, reversibility of

  2. An increase in negative supercoiling in bacteria reveals topology-reacting gene clusters and a homeostatic response mediated by the DNA topoisomerase I gene

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, María-José; Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; Arnanz, Cristina; Camacho-Soguero, Isabel; Tirado-Vélez, José-Manuel; de la Campa, Adela G.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the transcriptional response to an increase in DNA supercoiling in Streptococcus pneumoniae by using seconeolitsine, a new topoisomerase I inhibitor. A homeostatic response allowing recovery of supercoiling was observed in cells treated with subinhibitory seconeolitsine concentrations. Supercoiling increases of 40.7% (6 μM) and 72.9% (8 μM) were lowered to 8.5% and 44.1%, respectively. Likewise, drug removal facilitated the recovery of cell viability and DNA-supercoiling. Transcription of topoisomerase I depended on the supercoiling level. Also specific binding of topoisomerase I to the gyrase A gene promoter was detected by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. The transcriptomic response to 8 μM seconeolitsine had two stages. An early stage, associated to an increase in supercoiling, affected 10% of the genome. A late stage, manifested by supercoiling recovery, affected 2% of the genome. Nearly 25% of the early responsive genes formed 12 clusters with a coordinated transcription. Clusters were 6.7–31.4 kb in length and included 9–22 responsive genes. These clusters partially overlapped with those observed under DNA relaxation, suggesting that bacteria manage supercoiling stress using pathways with common components. This is the first report of a coordinated global transcriptomic response that is triggered by an increase in DNA supercoiling in bacteria. PMID:27378778

  3. DNA microarray detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in Detection and Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes is essential for research and an important tool for clinical diagnostics. Most techniques used to identify resistance genes can only detect one or a few genes per assay, whereas DNA microarray technology can detect thousands of genes in a single assay. Sev...

  4. Gene structure, DNA methylation, and imprinted expression of the human SNRPN gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, T.C.; Filbrandt, M.M.

    1996-02-01

    The human SNRPN (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N) gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the smallest deletion region involved in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) within chromosome 15q11-q13. Paternal only expression of SNRPN has previously been demonstrated by use of cell lines from PWS patients (maternal allele only) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients (paternal allele only). We have characterized two previously unidentified 5{prime} exons of the SNRPN gene and demonstrate that exons -1 and 0 are included in the full-length transcript. This gene is expressed in a wide range of somatic tissues and at high, approximately equal levels in all regions of the brain. Both the first exon of SNRPN (exon -1) and the putative transcription start site are embedded within a CpG island. This CpG island is extensively methylated on the repressed maternal allele and is unmethylated on the expressed paternal allele, in a wide range of fetal and adult somatic cells. This provides a quick and highly reliable diagnostic assay for PWS and AS, which is based on DNA-methylation analysis that has been tested on >100 patients in a variety of tissues. Conversely, several CpG sites {approximately}22 kb downstream of the transcription start site in intron 5 are preferentially methylated on the expressed paternal allele in somatic tissues and male germ cells, whereas these same sites are unmethylated in fetal oocytes. These findings are consistent with a key role for DNA methylation in the imprinted inheritance and subsequent gene expression of the human SNRPN gene. 59 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients. PMID:26255934

  6. Expression of DNA damage response genes indicate progressive breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Gochhait, Sailesh; Dar, Surabhi; Pal, Ranjana; Gupta, Pawan; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2009-01-18

    To assess how the abnormal expression of DNA damage response (DDR) genes correlate with oncogenesis, we analyzed mRNA levels of ATM-CHK2-P53 axis in 65 sporadic breast tumors by real-time PCR followed by evaluation of P53 protein and its activation status in representative samples. Univariate analysis showed a significantly higher transcript level for ATM (P=0.002), MDM2 (P=0.015) and p21 (P=0.013) in stage 1 tumors when compared against those of later stages. Although p53 transcript levels showed the characteristic increase in stage 1, a fourfold increase of p53 in N3 tumors than other nodal stages (P=0.0007) significantly increased its expression in stage 3B. The accumulated p53 at stage 3B, confirmed also at the protein level (P=0.012), was rendered nonfunctional by reduced P53 activation (p-P53Ser15; P=0.00007) or increased rate of mutation, substantiated further by the corresponding failure of upregulation of downstream genes, MDM2 and p21. We conclude that the alteration of DDR expression facilitates tumor progression and its possible therapeutic implications need to be studied in future. PMID:18805634

  7. CHST11 gene expression and DNA methylation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    HERMAN, DAMIR; LEAKEY, TATIANA I.; BEHRENS, ALICE; YAO-BORENGASSER, AIWEI; COONEY, CRAIG A.; JOUSHEGHANY, FARIBA; PHANAVANH, BOUNLEUT; SIEGEL, ERIC R.; SAFAR, A. MAZIN; KOROURIAN, SOHEILA; KIEBER-EMMONS, THOMAS; MONZAVI-KARBASSI, BEHJATOLAH

    2015-01-01

    Our previously published data link P-selectin-reactive chondroitin sulfate structures on the surface of breast cancer cells to metastatic behavior of cells. We have shown that a particular sulfation pattern mediated by the expression of carbohydrate (chondroitin 4) sulfotransferase-11 (CHST11) correlates with P-selectin binding and aggressiveness of human breast cancer cell lines. The present study was performed to evaluate the prognostic value of CHST11 expression and determine whether aberrant DNA methylation controls CHST11 expression in breast cancer. Publicly available datasets were used to examine the association of CHST11 expression to aggressiveness and progression of breast cancer. Methylation status was analyzed using bisulfite genomic sequencing. 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5AzadC) was used for DNA demethylation. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing was performed in the CpG island of CHST11 with a minimum coverage of 10. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was employed to confirm the expression profile of CHST11 in breast cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry was also used to confirm the expression of the CHST11 product, chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A). The expression of CHST11 was significantly higher in basal-like and Her2-amplified cell lines compared to luminal cell lines. CHST11 was also highly expressed in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues and the expression levels were significantly associated with tumor progression. We observed very low levels of DNA methylation in a CpG island of CHST11 in basal-like cells but very high levels in the same region in luminal cells. Treatment of MCF7 cells, a luminal cell line with very low expression of CHST11, with 5AzadC increased the expression of CHST11 and its immediate product, CS-A, in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that CHST11 may play a direct role in progression of breast cancer and that its expression is controlled by DNA methylation. Therefore, in addition to CHST11 mRNA levels, the

  8. Genome analysis of DNA repair genes in the alpha proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Marques, Regina CP; Menck, Carlos FM

    2007-01-01

    Background The integrity of DNA molecules is fundamental for maintaining life. The DNA repair proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to tolerate them. DNA repair genes are best known from the gamma-proteobacterium Escherichia coli, which is the most understood bacterial model. However, genome sequencing raises questions regarding uniformity and ubiquity of these DNA repair genes and pathways, reinforcing the need for identifying genes and proteins, which may respond to DNA damage in other bacteria. Results In this study, we employed a bioinformatic approach, to analyse and describe the open reading frames potentially related to DNA repair from the genome of the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This was performed by comparison with known DNA repair related genes found in public databases. As expected, although C. crescentus and E. coli bacteria belong to separate phylogenetic groups, many of their DNA repair genes are very similar. However, some important DNA repair genes are absent in the C. crescentus genome and other interesting functionally related gene duplications are present, which do not occur in E. coli. These include DNA ligases, exonuclease III (xthA), endonuclease III (nth), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (ada gene), photolyase-like genes, and uracil-DNA-glycosylases. On the other hand, the genes imuA and imuB, which are involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis, have recently been described in C. crescentus, but are absent in E. coli. Particularly interesting are the potential atypical phylogeny of one of the photolyase genes in alpha-proteobacteria, indicating an origin by horizontal transfer, and the duplication of the Ada orthologs, which have diverse structural configurations, including one that is still unique for C. crescentus. Conclusion The absence and the presence of certain genes are discussed and predictions are made considering the particular aspects of the C. crescentus

  9. Candidate Luminal B Breast Cancer Genes Identified by Genome, Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype. PMID:24416132

  10. Expression of an exogenous eukaryotic DNA methyltransferase gene induces transformation of NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Issa, J P; Herman, J; Bassett, D E; Nelkin, B D; Baylin, S B

    1993-01-01

    Abnormal regional increases in DNA methylation, which have potential for causing gene inactivation and chromosomal instability, are consistently found in immortalized and tumorigenic cells. Increased DNA methyltransferase activity, which is also a characteristic of such cells, is a candidate to mediate these abnormal DNA methylation patterns. We now show that, in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, constitutive overexpression of an exogenous mouse DNA methyltransferase gene results in a marked increase in overall DNA methylation which is accompanied by tumorigenic transformation. These transformation changes can also be elicited by dexamethasone-inducible expression of an exogenous DNA methyltransferase gene. Our findings provide strong evidence that the increase in DNA methyltransferase activity associated with tumor progression could be a key step in carcinogenesis and provide a model system that can be used to further study this possibility. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8415627

  11. PcG Proteins, DNA Methylation, and Gene Repression by Chromatin Looping

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vijay K; McGarvey, Kelly M; Licchesi, Julien D.F; Ohm, Joyce E; Herman, James G; Schübeler, Dirk; Baylin, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    Many DNA hypermethylated and epigenetically silenced genes in adult cancers are Polycomb group (PcG) marked in embryonic stem (ES) cells. We show that a large region upstream (∼30 kb) of and extending ∼60 kb around one such gene, GATA-4, is organized—in Tera-2 undifferentiated embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells—in a topologically complex multi-loop conformation that is formed by multiple internal long-range contact regions near areas enriched for EZH2, other PcG proteins, and the signature PcG histone mark, H3K27me3. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)–mediated depletion of EZH2 in undifferentiated Tera-2 cells leads to a significant reduction in the frequency of long-range associations at the GATA-4 locus, seemingly dependent on affecting the H3K27me3 enrichments around those chromatin regions, accompanied by a modest increase in GATA-4 transcription. The chromatin loops completely dissolve, accompanied by loss of PcG proteins and H3K27me3 marks, when Tera-2 cells receive differentiation signals which induce a ∼60-fold increase in GATA-4 expression. In colon cancer cells, however, the frequency of the long-range interactions are increased in a setting where GATA-4 has no basal transcription and the loops encompass multiple, abnormally DNA hypermethylated CpG islands, and the methyl-cytosine binding protein MBD2 is localized to these CpG islands, including ones near the gene promoter. Removing DNA methylation through genetic disruption of DNA methyltransferases (DKO cells) leads to loss of MBD2 occupancy and to a decrease in the frequency of long-range contacts, such that these now more resemble those in undifferentiated Tera-2 cells. Our findings reveal unexpected similarities in higher order chromatin conformation between stem/precursor cells and adult cancers. We also provide novel insight that PcG-occupied and H3K27me3-enriched regions can form chromatin loops and physically interact in cis around a single gene in mammalian cells. The loops associate with a

  12. The roles of eighteen baculovirus late expression factor genes in transcription and DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, A; Miller, L K

    1995-01-01

    A set of 18 plasmid subclones of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus genome supports expression from a late viral promoter in transient expression assays (J. W. Todd, A. L. Passarelli, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 69:968-974, 1995). Using this set of plasmids, we have assigned a role for each of the 18 genes required for optimal late gene expression with respect to its involvement at the levels of transcription, translation, and/or DNA replication. RNase protection analyses demonstrated that all of the known late expression factor genes (lefs) affected the steady-state level of reporter gene RNA. Thus, none of the lefs appeared to be specifically involved in translation. A subset of the lefs supported plasmid replication; ie-1, lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, p143, and p35 were essential for plasmid replication, while ie-n, lef-7, and dnapol had stimulatory effects. The predicted sequence of lef-7 suggests that it is a homolog of herpesvirus single-stranded DNA-binding protein (UL29). The role of p35 in plasmid replication appears to be suppression of apoptosis, because p35 could be functionally replaced in the replication assay by either Cp-iap or Op-iap, two heterologous baculovirus genes which suppress apoptosis by a mechanism which appears to differ from that of p35. Thus, one or more of the replication-related lefs or the process of plasmid replication appears to induce cellular apoptosis. Our results indicate that the remaining lefs, lefs 4 through 11, p47, and 39K (pp31), function either at the level of transcription or at that of mRNA stabilization. PMID:7815565

  13. Systematic Isolation and Characterization of Cadmium Tolerant Genes in Tobacco: A cDNA Library Construction and Screening Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Mo, Hui; Sun, Wen; Guo, Yan; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a major limiting factor that severely affects plant growth worldwide, and the accumulation of heavy metal in the plant may be hazardous to human health. To identify the processes involved in cadmium detoxification, we constructed a cDNA library of tobacco roots acclimated to cadmium (Cd) stress. According to the results of functional screening cDNA library with a yeast Cd-sensitive mutant, ycf1Δ, we obtained a series of candidate genes that were involved in Cd response. Sequence analysis and yeast functional complementation of 24 positive cDNA clones revealed that, in addition to antioxidant genes, genes implicated in abiotic and biotic stress defenses, cellular metabolism, and signal transduction showed Cd detoxification effects in yeast. The real time RT-PCR analyses revealed that some Cd tolerance/ detoxification genes may be able to anticipate in other stresses such as biotic defense and water balance in tobacco. Taken together, our data suggest that plants' acclimation to Cd stress is a highly complex process associated with broad gene functions. Moreover, our results provide insights into the Cd detoxification mechanisms along with the antioxidant system, defense gene induction, and calcium signal pathway. PMID:27579677

  14. The HRDC domain of E. coli RecQ helicase controls single-stranded DNA translocation and double-stranded DNA unwinding rates without affecting mechanoenzymatic coupling

    PubMed Central

    Harami, Gábor M.; Nagy, Nikolett T.; Martina, Máté; Neuman, Keir C.; Kovács, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    DNA-restructuring activities of RecQ-family helicases play key roles in genome maintenance. These activities, driven by two tandem RecA-like core domains, are thought to be controlled by accessory DNA-binding elements including the helicase-and-RnaseD-C-terminal (HRDC) domain. The HRDC domain of human Bloom’s syndrome (BLM) helicase was shown to interact with the RecA core, raising the possibility that it may affect the coupling between ATP hydrolysis, translocation along single-stranded (ss)DNA and/or unwinding of double-stranded (ds)DNA. Here, we determined how these activities are affected by the abolition of the ssDNA interaction of the HRDC domain or the deletion of the entire domain in E. coli RecQ helicase. Our data show that the HRDC domain suppresses the rate of DNA-activated ATPase activity in parallel with those of ssDNA translocation and dsDNA unwinding, regardless of the ssDNA binding capability of this domain. The HRDC domain does not affect either the processivity of ssDNA translocation or the tight coupling between the ATPase, translocation, and unwinding activities. Thus, the mechanochemical coupling of E. coli RecQ appears to be independent of HRDC-ssDNA and HRDC-RecA core interactions, which may play roles in more specialized functions of the enzyme. PMID:26067769

  15. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  16. Short DNA sequences inserted for gene targeting can accidentally interfere with off-target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ingo D; Bernreuther, Christian; Tilling, Thomas; Neidhardt, John; Wong, Yong Wee; Schulze, Christian; Streichert, Thomas; Schachner, Melitta

    2010-06-01

    Targeting of genes in mice, a key approach to study development and disease, often leaves a neo cassette, loxP, or FRT sites inserted in the mouse genome. Insertion of neo can influence the expression of neighboring genes, but similar effects have not been reported for loxP sites. We therefore performed microarray analyses of mice in which the Ncam or the Tnr gene were targeted either by insertion of neo or loxP/FRT sites. In the case of Ncam, neo, but not loxP/FRT insertion, led to a 2-fold reduction in mRNA levels of 3 genes located at distances between 0.2 and 3.1 Mb from the target. In contrast, after introduction of loxP/FRT sites into introns of Tnr, we observed a 2.5- to 4-fold reduction in the transcript level of the Gas5 gene, 1.1 Mb away from Tnr, most probably due to disruption of a conserved regulatory element in Tnr. Insertion of short DNA sequences such as loxP/FRT can thus influence off-target mRNA levels if these sites are accidentally placed into regulatory elements. Our results imply that conditional knockout mice should be analyzed for genomic positional side effects that may influence the animals' phenotypes. PMID:20110269

  17. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-04-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac.

  18. DNA context represents transcription regulation of the gene in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Misook; Hong, Soondo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding gene regulatory information in DNA remains a significant challenge in biomedical research. This study presents a computational approach to infer gene regulatory programs from primary DNA sequences. Using DNA around transcription start sites as attributes, our model predicts gene regulation in the gene. We find that H3K27ac around TSS is an informative descriptor of the transcription program in mouse embryonic stem cells. We build a computational model inferring the cell-type-specific H3K27ac signatures in the DNA around TSS. A comparison of embryonic stem cell and liver cell-specific H3K27ac signatures in DNA shows that the H3K27ac signatures in DNA around TSS efficiently distinguish the cell-type specific H3K27ac peaks and the gene regulation. The arrangement of the H3K27ac signatures inferred from the DNA represents the transcription regulation of the gene in mESC. We show that the DNA around transcription start sites is associated with the gene regulatory program by specific interaction with H3K27ac. PMID:27075878

  19. Differential Gene Susceptibility to Sperm DNA Damage: Analysis of Developmental Key Genes in Trout

    PubMed Central

    González-Rojo, Silvia; Fernández-Díez, Cristina; Guerra, Susana M.; Robles, Vanesa; Herraez, Maria Paz

    2014-01-01

    Sperm chromatin in mammals is packaged in different blocks associated to protamines (PDNA), histones (HDNA), or nuclear matrix proteins. Differential packaging has been related to early or late transcription and also to differential susceptibility to genotoxic damage. Genes located in the more accessible HDNA could be more susceptible to injuries than those located in PDNA, being potential biomarkers of paternal DNA damage. Fish sperm chromatin organization is much diversified, some species lacking protamines and some others totally depleted of histones. Analyzing genotoxic damage in a species homogeneously compacted with some sperm nuclear basic protein type, could help in deciphering the clues of differential susceptibility to damage. In the present study we analyzed in rainbow trout the differential susceptibility of nine genes to UV irradiation and H2O2 treatment. The absence of histones in the sperm nuclei was confirmed by Western blot. The chromatin fractionation in sensitive and resistant regions to PvuII (presumably HDNA-like and PDNA-like, respectively) revealed that the nine genes locate in the same resistant region. The number of lesions promoted was quantified using a qPCR approach. Location of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. UV irradiation promoted similar number of lesions in all the analyzed genes and a homogenous distribution of 8-OHdG within the nuclei. 8-OHdG was located in the peripheral area of the nucleus after H2O2 treatment, which promoted a significantly higher number of lesions in developmental-related genes (8.76–10.95 lesions/10 kb) than in rDNA genes (1.05–1.67 lesions/10 kb). We showed for the first time, that differential susceptibility to damage is dependent on the genotoxic mechanism and relies on positional differences between genes. Sensitive genes were also analyzed in cryopreserved sperm showing a lower number of lesions than the previous treatments and a predominant

  20. Characterisation of CAH alleles with non-radioactive DNA single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the CYP21 gene.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Iolascon, A; Giannattasio, S; Albrizio, M; Sinisi, A; Prisco, F; Schettini, F; Marra, E

    1997-03-01

    The major cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a common recessive genetic disease, is the deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase (21OH), a microsomal enzyme encoded by the CYP21 gene. Although several CAH causing mutations have been identified in the CYP21 gene of patients with 21OH deficiency, genotyping of the 21OH locus is quite complex because of the high frequency of gene conversion and the presence of multiple mutations on single CAH alleles. In order to perform the complete characterisation of the CYP21 gene coding region more simply, we developed a highly sensitive, non-radioactive method allowing DNA single strand conformation polymorphism (DNA-SSCP) analysis. This method was applied to the characterisation of all the exons and intron-exon junctions of the CYP21 gene in five patients affected by the simple virilising form and one affected by the salt wasting form. In all samples showing SSCP signals, direct sequence analysis showed the presence of more than one single sequence variant. In particular, four mutations which are already known to cause the disease, 16 polymorphisms, and one newly identified C to T transition at position 849 were detected. A random sequence analysis, performed on 31 out of 81 exons showing a normal SSCP pattern, shows the method to be highly sensitive: no sequence variant was detected, thus confirming the validity of this non-radioactive DNA-SSCP analysis in characterising the CYP21 gene in patients with steroid 21OH deficiency. Notwithstanding the complete characterisation of all exons and exon/intron junctions of the CYP21 gene, no complete genotype/phenotype correlation was found in the panel of patients analysed, thus suggesting that characterisation of CAH alleles must be extended to outside the coding region of the CYP21 gene, most probably into the promoter region. PMID:9132494

  1. Characterisation of CAH alleles with non-radioactive DNA single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the CYP21 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bobba, A; Iolascon, A; Giannattasio, S; Albrizio, M; Sinisi, A; Prisco, F; Schettini, F; Marra, E

    1997-01-01

    The major cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a common recessive genetic disease, is the deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase (21OH), a microsomal enzyme encoded by the CYP21 gene. Although several CAH causing mutations have been identified in the CYP21 gene of patients with 21OH deficiency, genotyping of the 21OH locus is quite complex because of the high frequency of gene conversion and the presence of multiple mutations on single CAH alleles. In order to perform the complete characterisation of the CYP21 gene coding region more simply, we developed a highly sensitive, non-radioactive method allowing DNA single strand conformation polymorphism (DNA-SSCP) analysis. This method was applied to the characterisation of all the exons and intron-exon junctions of the CYP21 gene in five patients affected by the simple virilising form and one affected by the salt wasting form. In all samples showing SSCP signals, direct sequence analysis showed the presence of more than one single sequence variant. In particular, four mutations which are already known to cause the disease, 16 polymorphisms, and one newly identified C to T transition at position 849 were detected. A random sequence analysis, performed on 31 out of 81 exons showing a normal SSCP pattern, shows the method to be highly sensitive: no sequence variant was detected, thus confirming the validity of this non-radioactive DNA-SSCP analysis in characterising the CYP21 gene in patients with steroid 21OH deficiency. Notwithstanding the complete characterisation of all exons and exon/intron junctions of the CYP21 gene, no complete genotype/phenotype correlation was found in the panel of patients analysed, thus suggesting that characterisation of CAH alleles must be extended to outside the coding region of the CYP21 gene, most probably into the promoter region. Images PMID:9132494

  2. A wild-type DNA ligase I gene is expressed in Bloom's syndrome cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, J.H.J.; Huwiler, K.G.; Weaver, D.T. )

    1991-09-01

    Alteration of DNA ligase I activity is a consistent biochemical feature of Bloom's syndrome (BS) cells. DNA ligase I activity in BS cells either is reduced and abnormally thermolabile or is present in an anomalously dimeric form. To assess the role of DNA ligase function in the etiology of BS, the authors have cloned the DNA ligase I cDNA from normal human cells by a PCR strategy using degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA ligase genes. Human DNA ligase I cDNAs from normal and BS cells complemented a S. cerevisiae DNA ligase mutation, and protein extracts prepared from S. cerevisiae transformants expressing normal and BS cDNA contained comparable levels of DNA ligase I activity. DNA sequencing and Northern blot analysis of DNA ligase I expression in two BS human fibroblast lines representing each of the two aberrant DNA ligase I molecular phenotypes demonstrated that this gene was unchanged in BS cells. Thus, another factor may be responsible for the observed reduction in DNA ligase I activity associated with this chromosomal breakage syndrome.

  3. DNA repair gene polymorphisms and risk of adult meningioma, glioma, and acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Preetha; Hutchinson, Amy; Wichner, Sara; Black, Peter M; Fine, Howard A; Loeffler, Jay S; Selker, Robert G; Shapiro, William R; Rothman, Nathaniel; Linet, Martha S; Inskip, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Although the etiology of primary brain tumors is largely unknown, prior studies suggest that DNA repair polymorphisms may influence risk of glioma. Altered DNA repair is also likely to affect the risk of meningioma and acoustic neuroma, but these tumors have not been well studied. We estimated the risk of glioma (n = 362), meningioma (n = 134), and acoustic neuroma (n = 69) in non-Hispanic whites with respect to 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 26 genes involved in DNA repair in a hospital-based, case-control study conducted by the National Cancer Institute. We observed significantly increased risk of meningioma with the T variant of GLTSCR1 rs1035938 (OR(CT/TT) = 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.9; P(trend) .0006), which persisted after controlling for multiple comparisons (P = .019). Significantly increased meningioma risk was also observed for the minor allele variants of ERCC4 rs1800067 (P(trend) .01); MUTYH rs3219466 (P(trend) .02), and PCNA rs25406 (P(trend) .03). The NBN rs1805794 minor allele variant was associated with decreased meningioma risk (P(trend) .006). Risk of acoustic neuroma was increased for the ERCC2 rs1799793 (P(trend) .03) and ERCC5 rs17655 (P(trend) .05) variants and decreased for the PARP1 rs1136410 (P(trend) .03). Decreased glioma risk was observed with the XRCC1 rs1799782 variant (P(trend) .04). Our results suggest that common DNA repair variants may affect the risk of adult brain tumors, especially meningioma. PMID:20150366

  4. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue. PMID:26058835

  5. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D; Cobb, George P; Maul, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides increased transcript abundance of CSA and MUTL. In addition, mRNA abundance of HSP70 and GADD45α were increased by endosulfan and mRNA abundance of XPG was increased by α-cypermethrin. XPC, HR23B, XPG, and GADD45α exhibited elevated mRNA concentrations whereas there was a reduction in MUTL transcript concentrations in UVB-alone treatments. It appeared that even

  6. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; zur Hausen, H

    1989-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of six HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensible for SV40 DNA amplification. Our results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo. Images PMID:2547992

  7. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, R.; zur Hausen, H. )

    1989-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of sic HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensable for SV40 DNA amplification. The results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo.

  8. Population-level expression variability of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Mandhan, Ishita; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Cai, James J

    2014-01-01

    Human mitochondria contain multiple copies of a circular genome made up of double-stranded DNA (mtDNA) that encodes proteins involved in cellular respiration. Transcript abundance of mtDNA-encoded genes varies between human individuals, yet the level of variation in the general population has not been systematically assessed. In the present study, we revisited large-scale RNA sequencing data generated from lymphoblastoid cell lines of HapMap samples of European and African ancestry to estimate transcript abundance and quantify expression variation for mtDNA-encoded genes. In both populations, we detected up to over 100-fold difference in mtDNA gene expression between individuals. The marked variation was not due to differences in mtDNA copy number between individuals, but was shaped by the transcription of hundreds of nuclear genes. Many of these nuclear genes were co-expressed with one another, resulting in a module-enriched co-expression network. Significant correlations in expression between genes of the mtDNA and nuclear genomes were used to identify factors involved with the regulation of mitochondrial functions. In conclusion, we determined the baseline amount of variability in mtDNA gene expression in general human populations and cataloged a complete set of nuclear genes whose expression levels are correlated with those of mtDNA-encoded genes. Our findings will enable the integration of information from both mtDNA and nuclear genetic systems, and facilitate the discovery of novel regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial functions. PMID:24398800

  9. [Localization of denitrification genes in plasmid DNA of bacteria Azospirillum brasilense].

    PubMed

    Petrova, L P; Varshalomidze, O É; Shelud'ko, A V; Katsy, E I

    2010-07-01

    In 85-Mda plasmid (p85) of plant-associated bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 model strain, the genes encoding copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK); heterodimeric NO-reductase (norCB); NorQ and NorD proteins affecting synthesis and (or) activation of NirK and (or) NO-reductase (norQD); catalytic subunit I ofcytochrom c oxidase (CccoN); presumable NO sensor carrying two hemeerythrine domains (orf181); and an enzyme required for synthesis of presumable NO antagonist, homocystein (metC) were identified. In the same region of p85, orf293 encoding transcriptional regulator of LysR type, orf208 whose protein product carries a formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase subunit E domain, and an orf164-encoding conservative secretory protein with unknown function were also found. Localization of a set of denitrification genes in the plasmid DNA A. brasilense Sp245 adjacent to IS elements ISAzba1 and ISAzba2 indicates potential mobility of these genes and high probability of their horizontal transfer among populations of rhizospheric bacteria. A site homologous to p85 nirK-orf208-orf181 genes was detected in the 115 kb plasmid of A. brasilense Sp7 type strain. PMID:20795494

  10. Identification of the class I genes of the mouse major histocompatibility complex by DNA-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Goodenow, R S; McMillan, M; Nicolson, M; Sher, B T; Eakle, K; Davidson, N; Hood, L

    1982-11-18

    DNA-mediated gene transfer was used to identify cloned class I genes from the major histocompatibility complex of the BALB/c mouse. Three genes encoding the transplantation antigens H-2 Kd, Dd and Ld were identified as well as genes encoding the Qa-2,3 and two TL differentiation antigens. As many as 10 putative novel class I genes were detected by the association of their gene products with beta 2-microglobulin. Alloantiserum prepared to one of the novel antigens was used to demonstrate the expression of the previously undetected antigen on spleen cells of various inbred, congeneic, and recombinant congeneic strains of mice. PMID:6815535

  11. Niemann-Pick C1 Affects the Gene Delivery Efficacy of Degradable Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite intensive research effort, the rational design of improved nanoparticulate drug carriers remains challenging, in part due to a limited understanding of the determinants of nanoparticle entry and transport in target cells. Recent studies have shown that Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), the lysosome membrane protein that mediates trafficking of cholesterol in cells, is involved in the endosomal escape and subsequent infection caused by filoviruses, and that its absence promotes the retention and efficacy of lipid nanoparticles encapsulating siRNA. Here, we report that NPC1 deficiency results in dramatic reduction in internalization and transfection efficiency mediated by degradable cationic gene delivery polymers, poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs). PBAEs utilized cholesterol and dynamin-dependent endocytosis pathways, and these were found to be heavily compromised in NPC1-deficient cells. In contrast, the absence of NPC1 had minor effects on DNA uptake mediated by polyethylenimine or Lipofectamine 2000. Strikingly, stable overexpression of human NPC1 in chinese hamster ovary cells was associated with enhanced gene uptake (3-fold) and transfection (10-fold) by PBAEs. These findings reveal a role of NPC1 in the regulation of endocytic mechanisms affecting nanoparticle trafficking. We hypothesize that in-depth understanding sites of entry and endosomal escape may lead to highly efficient nanotechnologies for drug delivery. PMID:25010491

  12. Histone Sprocket Arginine Residues Are Important for Gene Expression, DNA Repair, and Cell Viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Amelia J; Gallegos, Isaura J; Laughery, Marian F; Meas, Rithy; Tran, Linh; Wyrick, John J

    2015-07-01

    A critical feature of the intermolecular contacts that bind DNA to the histone octamer is the series of histone arginine residues that insert into the DNA minor groove at each superhelical location where the minor groove faces the histone octamer. One of these "sprocket" arginine residues, histone H4 R45, significantly affects chromatin structure in vivo and is lethal when mutated to alanine or cysteine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). However, the roles of the remaining sprocket arginine residues (H3 R63, H3 R83, H2A R43, H2B R36, H2A R78, H3 R49) in chromatin structure and other cellular processes have not been well characterized. We have genetically characterized mutations in each of these histone residues when introduced either singly or in combination to yeast cells. We find that pairs of arginine residues that bind DNA adjacent to the DNA exit/entry sites in the nucleosome are lethal in yeast when mutated in combination and cause a defect in histone occupancy. Furthermore, mutations in individual residues compromise repair of UV-induced DNA lesions and affect gene expression and cryptic transcription. This study reveals simple rules for how the location and structural mode of DNA binding influence the biological function of each histone sprocket arginine residue. PMID:25971662

  13. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B.; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC. PMID:26227968

  14. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes.

    PubMed

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  15. Lifespan and Stress Resistance in Drosophila with Overexpressed DNA Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Proshkina, Ekaterina; Shilova, Lyubov; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Moskalev, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair declines with age and correlates with longevity in many animal species. In this study, we investigated the effects of GAL4-induced overexpression of genes implicated in DNA repair on lifespan and resistance to stress factors in Drosophila melanogaster. Stress factors included hyperthermia, oxidative stress, and starvation. Overexpression was either constitutive or conditional and either ubiquitous or tissue-specific (nervous system). Overexpressed genes included those involved in recognition of DNA damage (homologs of HUS1, CHK2), nucleotide and base excision repair (homologs of XPF, XPC and AP-endonuclease-1), and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (homologs of BRCA2, XRCC3, KU80 and WRNexo). The overexpression of different DNA repair genes led to both positive and negative effects on lifespan and stress resistance. Effects were dependent on GAL4 driver, stage of induction, sex, and role of the gene in the DNA repair process. While the constitutive/neuron-specific and conditional/ubiquitous overexpression of DNA repair genes negatively impacted lifespan and stress resistance, the constitutive/ubiquitous and conditional/neuron-specific overexpression of Hus1, mnk, mei-9, mus210, and WRNexo had beneficial effects. This study demonstrates for the first time the effects of overexpression of these DNA repair genes on both lifespan and stress resistance in D. melanogaster. PMID:26477511

  16. Expression Profile of DNA Damage Signaling Genes in Proton Exposed Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    Exposure of living systems to radiation results in a wide assortment of lesions, the most signif-icant of is damage to genomic DNA which induce several cellular functions such as cell cycle arrest, repair, apoptosis etc. The radiation induced DNA damage investigation is one of the im-portant area in biology, but still the information available regarding the effects of proton is very limited. In this report, we investigated the differential gene expression pattern of DNA damage signaling genes particularly, damaged DNA binding, repair, cell cycle arrest, checkpoints and apoptosis using quantitative real-time RT-PCR array in proton exposed mouse brain tissues. The expression profiles showed significant changes in DNA damage related genes in 2Gy proton exposed mouse brain tissues as compared with control brain tissues. Furthermore, we also show that significantly increased levels of apoptotic related genes, caspase-3 and 8 activities in these cells, suggesting that in addition to differential expression of DNA damage genes, the alteration of apoptosis related genes may also contribute to the radiation induced DNA damage followed by programmed cell death. In summary, our findings suggest that proton exposed brain tissue undergo severe DNA damage which in turn destabilize the chromatin stability.

  17. Expression profiles of DNA repair-related genes in rat target organs under subchronic cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y X; Lu, Q; Shao, C; He, C C; Lei, Z N; Lian, Y Y

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the toxicity of long-term exposure to different cadmium (Cd) doses in rats and expression profiles of DNA repair-related genes. The model rats were exposed to different concentrations of CdCl2 for 3 months, and 5 DNA repair-related genes - hMSH2, MLH1, XRCC1, hOGG1, ERCC1 - were cloned in different tissues, including the liver, kidney, heart, and lung. Accumulated amounts of Cd were detected in the tissues. Gene and protein detections were conducted via fluorescence quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Methylated sequences of the 5 DNA repair-related gene promoters were used to investigate whether the low expression levels of the genes were related to methylation of the promoter. In the Cd-exposed group, 3 DNA repair genes (i.e., XRCC1, hOGG1, and ERCC1) significantly decreased in the rat liver, kidney, heart, and lung according to the β-actin internal standard (P < 0.01). Western blotting indicated the same trend for the different tissues. Each of the DNA repair genes had special characteristics; for example, hOGG1 gene expression decreased by 75% in the kidney, and XRCC1 gene expression decreased by 5% in the liver and heart when compared to the control group (P < 0.01). A negative correlation between the DNA repair gene expression levels and the cumulative levels of Cd was also suggested by malignancy pathology. The expression levels of 3 DNA repair genes (i.e., ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1) played an important role in the rat response to Cd exposure but not DNA methylated protection. PMID:25729986

  18. Genetic polymorphisms in homologous recombination repair genes in healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Erculj, Nina; Zadel, Maja; Dolzan, Vita

    2012-01-01

    Background Homologous recombination (HR) repair is an important mechanism involved in repairing double-strand breaks in DNA and for maintaining genomic stability. Polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in this pathway may influence the capacity for DNA repair. The aim of this study was to select tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific genes involved in HR repair, to determine their allele frequencies in a healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage detected with comet assay. Materials and methods In total 373 individuals were genotyped for nine tag SNPs in three genes: XRCC3 722C>T, XRCC3 -316A>G, RAD51 -98G>C, RAD51 -61G>T, RAD51 1522T>G, NBS1 553G>C, NBS1 1197A>G, NBS1 37117C>T and NBS1 3474A>C using competitive allele-specific amplification (KASPar assay). Comet assay was performed in a subgroup of 26 individuals to determine the influence of selected SNPs on DNA damage. Results We observed that age significantly affected genotype frequencies distribution of XRCC3 -316A>G (P = 0.039) in healthy male blood donors. XRCC3 722C>T (P = 0.005), RAD51 -61G>T (P = 0.023) and NBS1 553G>C (P = 0.008) had a statistically significant influence on DNA damage. Conclusions XRCC3 722C>T, RAD51 -61G>T and NBS1 553G>C polymorphisms significantly affect the repair of damaged DNA and may be of clinical importance as they are common in Slovenian population. PMID:22933979

  19. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  20. Spontaneous Preterm Delivery, Particularly with Reduced Fetal Growth, is Associated with DNA Hypomethylation of Tumor Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinhua; Bai, Guang; Scholl, Theresa O

    2016-01-01

    Background Preterm delivery and sub-optimal fetal growth are associated with each other and affect both mother and infant. Our aim was to determine (i) whether there are detectable differences in DNA methylation between early and late gestation and (ii) whether changes in DNA methylation from entry are associated with spontaneous preterm delivery with and without reduced fetal growth. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within a large prospective cohort. Gene specific methylation was measured by Methyl-Profiler PCR Array in a Human Breast Cancer Signature Panel of 24 genes from maternal peripheral leukocytes genomic DNA at entry and 3rd trimester (sampled at 16 and 30 weeks of gestation, respectively). Clonal bisulfite DNA sequencing was performed to confirm the changes in selected genes (CYP1B1, GADD45A and CXCL12). Multivariable analysis was used for data analysis. Results There was significantly decrease in DNA methylation in 15 of 24 genes during the 3rd trimester in cases of spontaneous preterm delivery (n=23) as compared to the controls (n=19) (p<0.05–p<0.01 for each gene). Similar results were observed by bisulfite sequencing for 3 genes. The change in DNA methylation between late and early gestation was significantly different in cases (overall decrease in methylation was −4.0 ± 1.5%) compared to the controls (overall increase in methylation was 12.6 ± 2.19%, p<0.0001). A graded pattern of DNA methylation was observed in 15 genes. Cases who delivered preterm with reduced fetal growth had the lowest level of methylation, cases delivering preterm without reduced fetal growth were next and term controls were highest in methylation (p for trend <0.05 to p<0.01 for each gene). Cases of preterm delivery also had significantly lower dietary choline intake. Conclusions These data suggest that epigenetic modification is associated with an increased risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, spontaneous preterm delivery with reduced fetal growth in

  1. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    PubMed Central

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  2. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review.

    PubMed

    Dhanoa, Jasdeep Kaur; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra Sekhar; Arora, Jaspreet Singh

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y) have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion) of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility. PMID:27536043

  3. Cross-species hybridisation of human and bovine orthologous genes on high density cDNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Adjaye, James; Herwig, Ralf; Herrmann, Doris; Wruck, Wasco; BenKahla, Alia; Brink, Thore C; Nowak, Monika; Carnwath, Joseph W; Hultschig, Claus; Niemann, Heiner; Lehrach, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Background Cross-species gene-expression comparison is a powerful tool for the discovery of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms and pathways of expression control. The usefulness of cDNA microarrays in this context is that broad areas of homology are compared and hybridization probes are sufficiently large that small inter-species differences in nucleotide sequence would not affect the analytical results. This comparative genomics approach would allow a common set of genes within a specific developmental, metabolic, or disease-related gene pathway to be evaluated in experimental models of human diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and reproducibility of cross-species analysis employing a human cDNA microarray as probe. Results As a proof of principle, total RNA derived from human and bovine fetal brains was used as a source of labelled targets for hybridisation onto a human cDNA microarray composed of 349 characterised genes. Each gene was spotted 20 times representing 6,980 data points thus enabling highly reproducible spot quantification. Employing high stringency hybridisation and washing conditions, followed by data analysis, revealed slight differences in the expression levels and reproducibility of the signals between the two species. We also assigned each of the genes into three expression level categories- i.e. high, medium and low. The correlation co-efficient of cross hybridisation between the orthologous genes was 0.94. Verification of the array data by semi-quantitative RT-PCR using common primer sequences enabled co-amplification of both human and bovine transcripts. Finally, we were able to assign gene names to previously uncharacterised bovine ESTs. Conclusions Results of our study demonstrate the harnessing and utilisation power of comparative genomics and prove the feasibility of using human microarrays to facilitate the identification of co-expressed orthologous genes in common tissues derived from different

  4. Dietary fatty acids affect mitochondrial phospholipid compositions and mitochondrial gene expression of rainbow trout liver at different ages.

    PubMed

    Almaida-Pagán, P F; De Santis, C; Rubio-Mejía, O L; Tocher, D R

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are among the first responders to various stressors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and organisms. Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL), particularly cardiolipin (CL), and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, liver mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, lipid peroxidation, and mtDNA gene expression were analyzed in rainbow trout fed three diets with the same base formulation but with lipid supplied either by fish oil (FO), rapeseed oil (RO), or high DHA oil (DHA) during 6 weeks. Specifically, two feeding trials were performed using fish from the same population of two ages (1 and 3 years), and PL class compositions of liver mitochondria, fatty acid composition of individual PL classes, TBARS content, and mtDNA expression were determined. Dietary fatty acid composition strongly affected mitochondrial membrane composition from trout liver but observed changes did not fully reflect the diet, particularly when it contained high DHA. The changes were PL specific, CL being particularly resistant to changes in DHA. Some significant differences observed in expression of mtDNA with diet may suggest long-term dietary effects in mitochondrial gene expression which could affect electron transport chain function. All the changes were influenced by fish age, which could be related to the different growth rates observed between 1- and 3-year-old trout but that could also indicate age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes. PMID:25398637

  5. Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling dictates the chromosomal arrangement of bacterial genes

    PubMed Central

    Sobetzko, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Over the recent decade, the central importance of DNA supercoiling in chromosome organization and global gene regulation of bacteria became more and more visible. With a regulon comprising more than 2000 genes in Escherichia coli, DNA supercoiling is among the most influential regulators of gene expression found in bacteria so far. However, the mechanism creating thousands of diverse temporal gene expression patterns coordinated by DNA supercoiling remains unclear. In this study we show that a specific chromosomal arrangement of genes modulates the local levels of DNA supercoiling at gene promoters via transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS) in the model organism E. coli. Our findings provide a consistent explanation for the strong positive coupling of temporal gene expression patterns of neighboring genes. Using comparative genomics we are furthermore able to provide evidence that TCDS is a driving force for the evolution of chromosomal gene arrangement patterns in other Enterobacteriaceae. With the currently available data of promoter supercoiling sensitivity we prove that the same principle is applicable also for the evolutionary distant gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Moreover, our findings are fully consistent with recent investigations concerning the regulatory impact of TCDS on gene pairs in eukaryots underpinning the broad applicability of our analysis. PMID:26783203

  6. Downregulation of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes by HDAC Inhibition in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated through the E2F1 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rosmus, Nadine; Collis, Spencer J.; Kortenhorst, Madeleine S. Q.; Wissing, Michel D.; Hedayati, Mohammad; Shabbeer, Shabana; Mendonca, Janet; Deangelis, Justin; Marchionni, Luigi; Lin, Jianqing; Höti, Naseruddin; Nortier, Johan W. R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Hammers, Hans; Carducci, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) re-express silenced tumor suppressor genes and are currently undergoing clinical trials. Although HDACis have been known to induce gene expression, an equal number of genes are downregulated upon HDAC inhibition. The mechanism behind this downregulation remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that several DNA repair genes are downregulated by HDAC inhibition and provide a mechanism involving the E2F1 transcription factor in the process. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying Analysis of Functional Annotation (AFA) on microarray data of prostate cancer cells treated with HDACis, we found a number of genes of the DNA damage response and repair pathways are downregulated by HDACis. AFA revealed enrichment of homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes of the BRCA1 pathway, as well as genes regulated by the E2F1 transcription factor. Prostate cancer cells demonstrated a decreased DNA repair capacity and an increased sensitization to chemical- and radio-DNA damaging agents upon HDAC inhibition. Recruitment of key HR repair proteins to the site of DNA damage, as well as HR repair capacity was compromised upon HDACi treatment. Based on our AFA data, we hypothesized that the E2F transcription factors may play a role in the downregulation of key repair genes upon HDAC inhibition in prostate cancer cells. ChIP analysis and luciferase assays reveal that the downregulation of key repair genes is mediated through decreased recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor and not through active repression by repressive E2Fs. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicates that several genes in the DNA repair pathway are affected upon HDAC inhibition. Downregulation of the repair genes is on account of a decrease in amount and promoter recruitment of the E2F1 transcription factor. Since HDAC inhibition affects several pathways that could potentially have an impact on DNA repair, compromised DNA repair upon HDAC inhibition could

  7. DNA binding by GATA transcription factor suggests mechanisms of DNA looping and long-range gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongheng; Bates, Darren L.; Dey, Raja; Chen, Po-Han; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.; Rohs, Remo; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Summary GATA transcription factors regulate transcription during development and differentiation by recognizing distinct GATA sites with a tandem of two conserved zinc fingers and by mediating long-range DNA looping. However, the molecular basis of these processes is not well understood yet. Here, we determined three crystal structures of the full DNA binding domain (DBD) of human GATA3 protein, which contains both zinc fingers, in complex with different DNA sites. In one structure, both zinc fingers wrap around a palindromic GATA site, cooperatively enhancing the binding affinity and kinetic stability. Strikingly, in the other two structures, the two fingers of GATA DBD bind GATA sites on different DNA molecules, thus bridging two separate DNA fragments, which is confirmed in solution by an in-gel FRET analysis. These findings not only provide new insights into the structure and function of GATA proteins, but also shed light on the molecular basis of long-range gene regulation. PMID:23142663

  8. Candidate DNA repair susceptibility genes identified by exome sequencing in high-risk pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alyssa L; Alirezaie, Najmeh; Connor, Ashton; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; Grant, Robert; Selander, Iris; Bascuñana, Claire; Borgida, Ayelet; Hall, Anita; Whelan, Thomas; Holter, Spring; McPherson, Treasa; Cleary, Sean; Petersen, Gloria M; Omeroglu, Atilla; Saloustros, Emmanouil; McPherson, John; Stein, Lincoln D; Foulkes, William D; Majewski, Jacek; Gallinger, Steven; Zogopoulos, George

    2016-01-28

    The genetic basis underlying the majority of hereditary pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is unknown. Since DNA repair genes are widely implicated in gastrointestinal malignancies, including PC, we hypothesized that there are novel DNA repair PC susceptibility genes. As germline DNA repair gene mutations may lead to PC subtypes with selective therapeutic responses, we also hypothesized that there is an overall survival (OS) difference in mutation carriers versus non-carriers. We therefore interrogated the germline exomes of 109 high-risk PC cases for rare protein-truncating variants (PTVs) in 513 putative DNA repair genes. We identified PTVs in 41 novel genes among 36 kindred. Additional genetic evidence for causality was obtained for 17 genes, with FAN1, NEK1 and RHNO1 emerging as the strongest candidates. An OS difference was observed for carriers versus non-carriers of PTVs with early stage (≤IIB) disease. This adverse survival trend in carriers with early stage disease was also observed in an independent series of 130 PC cases. We identified candidate DNA repair PC susceptibility genes and suggest that carriers of a germline PTV in a DNA repair gene with early stage disease have worse survival. PMID:26546047

  9. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Regulated by DNA Methylation in Colon Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, Orsolya; Wichmann, Barna; Sipos, Ferenc; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Kovalszky, Ilona; Semsey, Szabolcs; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the DNA methylation pattern. Our aim was to test a novel approach for identification of transcripts at whole transcript level which are regulated by DNA methylation. Our approach is based on comparison of data obtained from transcriptome profiling of primary human samples and in vitro cell culture models. Epithelial cells were collected by LCM from normal, adenoma, and tumorous colonic samples. Using gene expression analysis, we identified downregulated genes in the tumors compared to normal tissues. In parallel 3000 upregulated genes were determined in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cell culture model after DNA demethylation treatment. Of the 2533 transcripts showing reduced expression in the tumorous samples, 154 had increased expression as a result of DNA demethylation treatment. Approximately 2/3 of these genes had decreased expression already in the adenoma samples. Expression of five genes (GCG, NMES-1, LRMP, FAM161B and PTGDR), was validated using RT-PCR. PTGDR showed ambiguous results, therefore it was further studied to verify the extent of DNA methylation and its effect on the protein level. Results confirmed that our approach is suitable for genome-wide screening of genes which are regulated or inactivated by DNA methylation. Activity of these genes possibly interferes with tumor progression, therefore genes identified can be key factors in the formation and in the progression of the disease. PMID:23049694

  10. Transgene-mediated co-suppression of DNA topoisomerase-1 gene in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myon-Hee; Cha, Dong Seok; Mamillapalli, Srivalli Swathi; Kwon, Young Chul; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of multi-transgenic copies can result in reduced expression of the transgene and can induce silence of endogenous gene; this process is called as co-suppression. Using a transgene-mediated co-suppression technique, we demonstrated the biological function of DNA topoisomerase-1 (top-1) in C. elegans development. Introduction of full-length top-1 transgene sufficiently induced the co-suppression of endogenous top-1 gene, causing embryonic lethality and abnormal germline development. We also found that the co-suppression of top-1 gene affected morphogenesis, lifespan and larval growth that were not observed in top-1 (RNAi) animals. Strikingly, co-suppression effects were significantly reduced by the elimination of top-1 introns, suggesting that efficient co-suppression may require intron(s) in C. elegans. Sequence analysis revealed that the introns 1 and 2 of top-1 gene possess consensus binding sites for several transcription factors, including MAB-3, LIN-14, TTX-3/CEH-10, CEH-1, and CEH-22. Among them, we examined a genetic link between ceh-22 and top-1. The ceh-22 is partially required for the specification of distal tip cells (DTC), which functions as a stem cell niche in the C. elegans gonad. Intriguingly, top-1 (RNAi) significantly enhanced DTC loss in ceh-22 mutant gonads, indicating that top-1 may play an important role in CEH-22-mediated DTC fate specification. Therefore, our findings suggest that transgene-mediated co-suppression facilitates the silencing of the specific genes and the study of gene function in vivo. PMID:24955284

  11. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation profiles and gene expression profiles to identify genes associated with pilocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruigang; Man, Yigang

    2016-04-01

    The present study performed an integral analysis of the gene expression and DNA methylation profile of pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was also performed to examine and identify the genes correlated to PAs, to identify candidate therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAs. The DNA methylation profile and gene expression profile were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially methylated regions (DMRs), respectively, integrated analysis of the DEGs and DMRs was performed to detect their correlation. Subsequently, the WGCNA algorithm was applied to identify the significant modules and construct the co‑expression network associated with PAs. Furthermore, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the associated genes was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A total number of 2,259 DEGs and 235 DMRs were screened out. Integrated analysis revealed that 30 DEGs were DMRs with prominent negative correlation (cor=‑0.82; P=0.02). Based on the DEGs, the gene co‑expression network was constructed, and nine network modules associated with PAs were identified. The functional analysis results showed that genes relevant to PAs were closely associated with cell differentiation modulation. The screened PA-associated genes were significantly different at the expression and methylation levels. These genes may be used as reliable candidate target genes for the treatment of PAs. PMID:26934913

  12. Integrated analysis of DNA methylation profiles and gene expression profiles to identify genes associated with pilocytic astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RUIGANG; MAN, YIGANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study performed an integral analysis of the gene expression and DNA methylation profile of pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was also performed to examine and identify the genes correlated to PAs, to identify candidate therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAs. The DNA methylation profile and gene expression profile were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Following screening of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially methylated regions (DMRs), respectively, integrated analysis of the DEGs and DMRs was performed to detect their correlation. Subsequently, the WGCNA algorithm was applied to identify the significant modules and construct the co-expression network associated with PAs. Furthermore, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the associated genes was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A total number of 2,259 DEGs and 235 DMRs were screened out. Integrated analysis revealed that 30 DEGs were DMRs with prominent negative correlation (cor=−0.82; P=0.02). Based on the DEGs, the gene co-expression network was constructed, and nine network modules associated with PAs were identified. The functional analysis results showed that genes relevant to PAs were closely associated with cell differentiation modulation. The screened PA-associated genes were significantly different at the expression and methylation levels. These genes may be used as reliable candidate target genes for the treatment of PAs. PMID:26934913

  13. DNA methylation patterns of protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs in males with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, QI; WANG, YUNLIANG; CHENG, JIA; DAI, DONGJUN; ZHOU, XINGYU; ZHANG, YUZHENG; LI, JINFENG; YIN, HONGLEI; GAO, SHUGUI; DUAN, SHIWEI

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is one of the most complex mental illnesses affecting ~1% of the population worldwide. SCZ pathogenesis is considered to be a result of genetic as well as epigenetic alterations. Previous studies have aimed to identify the causative genes of SCZ. However, DNA methylation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in SCZ has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was conducted using samples from two male patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing was used. In the two patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, 1,397 and 1,437 peaks were identified, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that peaks were enriched in protein-coding genes, which exhibited nervous system and brain functions. A number of these peaks in gene promoter regions may affect gene expression and, therefore, influence SCZ-associated pathways. Furthermore, 7 and 20 lncRNAs, respectively, in the Refseq database were hypermethylated. According to the lncRNA dataset in the NONCODE database, ~30% of intergenic peaks overlapped with novel lncRNA loci. The results of the present study demonstrated that aberrant hypermethylation of lncRNA genes may be an important epigenetic factor associated with SCZ. However, further studies using larger sample sizes are required. PMID:26503909

  14. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  15. Molecular cloning of the human XRCC1 gene, which corrects defective DNA strand break repair and sister chromatid exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, L H; Brookman, K W; Jones, N J; Allen, S A; Carrano, A V

    1990-01-01

    We describe the cloning and function of the human XRCC1 gene, which is the first mammalian gene isolated that affects cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The CHO mutant EM9 has 10-fold-higher sensitivity to ethyl methanesulfonate, 1.8-fold-higher sensitivity to ionizing radiation, a reduced capacity to rejoin single-strand DNA breaks, and a 10-fold-elevated level of sister chromatid exchange compared with the CHO parental cells. The complementing human gene was cloned from a cosmid library of a tertiary transformant. Two cosmid clones produced transformants that showed approximately 100% correction of the repair defect in EM9 cells, as determined by the kinetics of strand break repair, cell survival, and the level of sister chromatid exchange. A nearly full-length clone obtained from the pcD2 human cDNA expression library gave approximately 80% correction of EM9, as determined by the level of sister chromatid exchange. Based on an analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA insert compared with that of the 5' end of the gene from a cosmid clone, the cDNA clone appeared to be missing approximately 100 bp of transcribed sequence, including 26 nucleotides of coding sequence. The cDNA probe detected a single transcript of approximately 2.2 kb in HeLa polyadenylated RNA by Northern (RNA) blot hybridization. From the open reading frame and the positions of likely start sites for transcription and translation, the size of the putative XRCC1 protein is 633 amino acids (69.5 kDa). The size of the XRCC1 gene is 33 kb, as determined by localizing the endpoints on a restriction endonuclease site map of one cosmid clone. The deduced amino acid sequence did not show significant homology with any protein in the protein sequence data bases examined. Images PMID:2247054

  16. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Crujeiras, A. B.; Matarazzo, M. R.; Esteller, M.; Sandoval, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Results Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9), marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs) including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues. Conclusions In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the

  17. Therapeutic success and efficacy of nonviral liposomal cDNA gene transfer to the skin in vivo is dose dependent.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, M G; Richter, G; Herndon, D N; Geissler, E K; Hartl, M; Hofstätter, F; Jauch, K W; Perez-Polo, J R

    2001-12-01

    It is well documented that responses to growth factor treatment typically display bell-shaped dose responses that can significantly affect efficacy. Here we tested the hypothesis that nonviral liposomal gene delivery also displays this characteristic. We chose two different growth factors, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) CMV-driven transfecting constructs at three different concentrations and assessed efficacy on several physiological parameters that are descriptive of wound healing progress in a burn-wound healing model. Rats were given a 60% TBSA scald burn and randomly divided into one of seven groups to receive weekly subcutaneous injections of liposomes containing the cDNA for KGF (0.2 microg, 2.2 microg, or 22.2 microg), or liposomes containing the cDNA for IGF-I (0.2 microg, 2.2 microg, or 22.2 microg) at various concentrations, but constant liposome:DNA ratios and a LacZ gene (0.2 microg) CMV-driven construct for beta-galactosidase as vehicle and marker gene. Transfection was confirmed by histology for beta-galactosidase. Physiological efficacy was evaluated by measuring the wound healing parameters that define dermal and epidermal regeneration. Transfection products were found in the cytoplasm of rapidly dividing cells of the granulation tissue. Different doses of the nonviral cDNA gene transfer coding for KGF or IGF-I resulted in different outcomes for dermal and epidermal regeneration. There was a dose-dependent response to both growth factor gene transfers that was not dissimilar from that typically displayed by treatment with growth factor proteins. Both concentrations below and above the optimal concentration of DNA:liposomal preparations did not yield the results observed at the optimal concentration. PMID:11803397

  18. Candidate genes that affect aging through protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Argon, Yair; Gidalevitz, Tali

    2015-01-01

    Because aging is a multifactorial, pleiotropic process where many interacting mechanisms contribute to the organismal decline, the candidate gene approach rarely provides a clear message. This chapter discusses some of the inherent complexity, focusing on aspects that impinge upon protein homeostasis and maintain a healthy proteome. We discuss candidate genes that operate in these pathways, and compare their actions in invertebrates, mice and humans. We highlight several themes that emerge from recent research—the interconnections of pathways that regulate aging, the pleiotropic effects of mutations and other manipulations of the candidate proteins and the tissue specificity in these pleiotropic outcomes. This body of knowledge highlights the need for multiple specific readouts of manipulating longevity genes, beyond measuring lifespan, as well as the need to understand the integrated picture, beyond examining the immediate outputs of individual longevity pathways. PMID:25916585

  19. Quantitative modeling of gene expression using DNA shape features of binding sites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Pei-Chen; Sinha, Saurabh

    2016-07-27

    Prediction of gene expression levels driven by regulatory sequences is pivotal in genomic biology. A major focus in transcriptional regulation is sequence-to-expression modeling, which interprets the enhancer sequence based on transcription factor concentrations and DNA binding specificities and predicts precise gene expression levels in varying cellular contexts. Such models largely rely on the position weight matrix (PWM) model for DNA binding, and the effect of alternative models based on DNA shape remains unexplored. Here, we propose a statistical thermodynamics model of gene expression using DNA shape features of binding sites. We used rigorous methods to evaluate the fits of expression readouts of 37 enhancers regulating spatial gene expression patterns in Drosophila embryo, and show that DNA shape-based models perform arguably better than PWM-based models. We also observed DNA shape captures information complimentary to the PWM, in a way that is useful for expression modeling. Furthermore, we tested if combining shape and PWM-based features provides better predictions than using either binding model alone. Our work demonstrates that the increasingly popular DNA-binding models based on local DNA shape can be useful in sequence-to-expression modeling. It also provides a framework for future studies to predict gene expression better than with PWM models alone. PMID:27257066

  20. Evolutionary Transition of Promoter and Gene Body DNA Methylation across Invertebrate–Vertebrate Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Thomas E.; Han, Priscilla; Yi, Soojin V.

    2016-01-01

    Genomes of invertebrates and vertebrates exhibit highly divergent patterns of DNA methylation. Invertebrate genomes tend to be sparsely methylated, and DNA methylation is mostly targeted to a subset of transcription units (gene bodies). In a drastic contrast, vertebrate genomes are generally globally and heavily methylated, punctuated by the limited local hypo-methylation of putative regulatory regions such as promoters. These genomic differences also translate into functional differences in DNA methylation and gene regulation. Although promoter DNA methylation is an important regulatory component of vertebrate gene expression, its role in invertebrate gene regulation has been little explored. Instead, gene body DNA methylation is associated with expression of invertebrate genes. However, the evolutionary steps leading to the differentiation of invertebrate and vertebrate genomic DNA methylation remain unresolved. Here we analyzed experimentally determined DNA methylation maps of several species across the invertebrate–vertebrate boundary, to elucidate how vertebrate gene methylation has evolved. We show that, in contrast to the prevailing idea, a substantial number of promoters in an invertebrate basal chordate Ciona intestinalis are methylated. Moreover, gene expression data indicate significant, epigenomic context-dependent associations between promoter methylation and expression in C. intestinalis. However, there is no evidence that promoter methylation in invertebrate chordate has been evolutionarily maintained across the invertebrate–vertebrate boundary. Rather, body-methylated invertebrate genes preferentially obtain hypo-methylated promoters among vertebrates. Conversely, promoter methylation is preferentially found in lineage- and tissue-specific vertebrate genes. These results provide important insights into the evolutionary origin of epigenetic regulation of vertebrate gene expression. PMID:26715626

  1. Preferential DNA repair of 3-alkyladenine sites in essential and nonessential genes of human astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lapcevich, R.K.; Weiss, R.B.; Gallagher, P.E. )

    1991-03-11

    In recent years, numbers of studies examining excision rates of DNA damaged lesions in defined, subgenomic sequences have shown that DNA repair is not a uniform process throughout the genome. Here, the authors report data on the preferential, in vivo DNA repair of alkylation-induced lesions within specific DNA sequences of essential and nonessential genes. The formation and rate of removal of 3-alkyladenine were studied in these DNA fragments following treatment of human astrocytes with dimethyl sulfate. The distribution and quantitation of this damaged lesion in the isolated DNA from these cells were determined by a polymerase chain reaction assay. The results indicate that alkyladenines are more efficiently repaired in DNA fragments of essential genes than in comparable fragments of nonessential genes. In subsequent experiments, the repair rate of 3-alkyladenine was examined in DNA isolated from alkylation-treated human astrocytes, grown in serum-free medium to inhibit proliferation. The rate of repair of alkylation-induced lesions in essential and nonessential gene fragments also differed in actively growing and quiescent human astrocytes. The results of this study indicate that transcription plays an important role in the efficient removal of 3-alkyladenine by DNA repair systems.

  2. Active maize genes are unmodified and flanked by diverse classes of modified, highly repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, J L; Schrick, K; Springer, P S; Brown, W E; SanMiguel, P

    1994-08-01

    We have characterized the copy number, organization, and genomic modification of DNA sequences within and flanking several maize genes. We found that highly repetitive DNA sequences were tightly linked to most of these genes. The highly repetitive sequences were not found within the coding regions but could be found within 6 kb either 3' or 5' to the structural genes. These highly repetitive regions were each composed of unique combinations of different short repetitive sequences. Highly repetitive DNA blocks were not interrupted by any detected single copy DNA. The 13 classes of highly repetitive DNA identified were found to vary little between diverse Zea isolates. The level of DNA methylation in and near these genes was determined by scoring the digestibility of 63 recognition/cleavage sites with restriction enzymes that were sensitive to 5-methylation of cytosines in the sequences 5'-CG-3' and 5'-CNG-3'. All but four of these sites were digestible in chromosomal DNA. The four undigested sites were localized to extragenic DNA within or near highly repetitive DNA, while the other 59 sites were in low copy number DNAs. Pulsed field gel analysis indicated that the majority of cytosine modified tracts range from 20 to 200 kb in size. Single copy sequences hybridized to the unmodified domains, while highly repetitive sequences hybridized to the modified regions. Middle repetitive sequences were found in both domains. PMID:7958822

  3. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  4. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity. PMID:23793613

  5. Expression analysis of cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of necrotic enteritis-induced chicken.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Truong, Anh Duc; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Hong, Yeong Ho

    2016-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a serious problem to the poultry farms, which report NE outbreaks more than once per year, as a result of the inappropriate use of antibiotics in the feed. The NE affected bird die rapidly as a result of various pathophysiological complications in the intestine and immune system. Also, several studies have reported that the genes exclusively related to intestine and immune functions are significantly altered in response to NE. In this study, NE was induced in two genetically disparate chicken lines that are resistant (line 6.3) and sensitive (line 7.2) to avian leukosis and Marek's disease. The intestinal mucosal layer was collected from NE-induced and control chickens, and subjected to RNA-sequencing analysis. The involvement of differentially expressed genes in the intestinal mucosal layer of line 6.3 and 7.2 with the immune system-related pathways was investigated. Among the identified immune system-related pathways, a candidate pathway known as chicken cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway (CDS pathway) was selected for further investigation. RNA-sequencing and pathway analysis identified a total of 21 genes that were involved in CDS pathway and differentially expressed in the intestinal mucosal layer of lines 6.3 and 7.2. The expression of CDS pathway genes was further confirmed by real-time qPCR. In the results, a majority of the CDS pathway genes were significantly altered in the NE-induced intestinal mucosal layer from lines 6.3 and 7.2. In conclusion, our study indicate that NE seriously affects several genes involved in innate immune defense and foreign DNA sensing mechanisms in the chicken intestinal mucosal layer. Identifying the immune genes affected by NE could be an important evidence for the protective immune response to NE-causative pathogens. PMID:26872625

  6. Factors affecting the isolation of CCC DNA from Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kieser, T

    1984-07-01

    Based on the results of a systematic study of factors affecting plasmid yield and purity, a procedure suitable for the rapid screening for and isolation of covalently closed circular DNA from Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli was developed. The method consists of lysis of lysozyme-treated bacteria combined with alkaline denaturation of DNA at high temperature. Renaturation of CCC DNA and precipitation of single-stranded DNA together with protein is achieved by the addition of a minimal amount of phenol/chloroform. The screening procedure uses only a single tube and the samples can be analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis about 30 min after lysis. Removal of phenol and further purification of the plasmid preparation is achieved by consecutive precipitations with isopropanol and spermine, followed by extraction with ethanol, producing samples suitable for restriction endonuclease digestion, ligation, and transformation of S. lividans protoplasts or competent E. coli cells in about 2 h. All steps of the procedure are explained in detail with information about the effects of changing parameters. This should help the experimenter to obtain reproducible results and may be useful if the method has to be adapted to new strains or plasmids. PMID:6387733

  7. Tissue Dependent Limited Pleiotropy Affects Gene Expression in Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-synonymous coding mutations in a gene change the resulting protein no matter where it is expressed, but the effects of cis-regulatory mutations could be spatially or temporally limited, a phenomenon termed limited pleiotropy. Here we report the genome-wide occurrence of limited pleiotropy of cis...

  8. The physics of protein-DNA interaction networks in the control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Leonor

    2012-05-01

    Protein-DNA interaction networks play a central role in many fundamental cellular processes. In gene regulation, physical interactions and reactions among the molecular components together with the physical properties of DNA control how genes are turned on and off. A key player in all these processes is the inherent flexibility of DNA, which provides an avenue for long-range interactions between distal DNA elements through DNA looping. Such versatility enables multiple interactions and results in additional complexity that is remarkably difficult to address with traditional approaches. This topical review considers recent advances in statistical physics methods to study the assembly of protein-DNA complexes with loops, their effects in the control of gene expression, and their explicit application to the prototypical lac operon genetic system of the E. coli bacterium. In the last decade, it has been shown that the underlying physical properties of DNA looping can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including the balance between robustness and sensitivity of the induction process. These physical properties are largely dependent on the free energy of DNA looping, which accounts for DNA bending and twisting effects. These new physical methods have also been used in reverse to uncover the actual in vivo free energy of looping double-stranded DNA in living cells, which was not possible with existing experimental techniques. The results obtained for DNA looping by the lac repressor inside the E. coli bacterium showed a more malleable DNA than expected as a result of the interplay of the simultaneous presence of two distinct conformations of looped DNA.

  9. Minicircle DNA Provides Enhanced and Prolonged Transgene Expression Following Airway Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Munye, Mustafa M.; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Barnes, Josephine L.; Brown, Rachel E.; McAnulty, Robin J.; Howe, Steven J.; Hart, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis using non-viral, plasmid-based formulations has been the subject of intensive research for over two decades but a clinically viable product has yet to materialise in large part due to inefficient transgene expression. Minicircle DNA give enhanced and more persistent transgene expression compared to plasmid DNA in a number of organ systems but has not been assessed in the lung. In this study we compared minicircle DNA with plasmid DNA in transfections of airway epithelial cells. In vitro, luciferase gene expression from minicircles was 5–10-fold higher than with plasmid DNA. In eGFP transfections in vitro both the mean fluorescence intensity and percentage of cells transfected was 2–4-fold higher with minicircle DNA. Administration of equimolar amounts of DNA to mouse lungs resulted in a reduced inflammatory response and more persistent transgene expression, with luciferase activity persisting for 2 weeks from minicircle DNA compared to plasmid formulations. Transfection of equal mass amounts of DNA in mouse lungs resulted in a 6-fold increase in transgene expression in addition to more persistent transgene expression. Our findings have clear implications for gene therapy of airway disorders where plasmid DNA transfections have so far proven inefficient in clinical trials. PMID:26975732

  10. Minicircle DNA Provides Enhanced and Prolonged Transgene Expression Following Airway Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Munye, Mustafa M; Tagalakis, Aristides D; Barnes, Josephine L; Brown, Rachel E; McAnulty, Robin J; Howe, Steven J; Hart, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis using non-viral, plasmid-based formulations has been the subject of intensive research for over two decades but a clinically viable product has yet to materialise in large part due to inefficient transgene expression. Minicircle DNA give enhanced and more persistent transgene expression compared to plasmid DNA in a number of organ systems but has not been assessed in the lung. In this study we compared minicircle DNA with plasmid DNA in transfections of airway epithelial cells. In vitro, luciferase gene expression from minicircles was 5-10-fold higher than with plasmid DNA. In eGFP transfections in vitro both the mean fluorescence intensity and percentage of cells transfected was 2-4-fold higher with minicircle DNA. Administration of equimolar amounts of DNA to mouse lungs resulted in a reduced inflammatory response and more persistent transgene expression, with luciferase activity persisting for 2 weeks from minicircle DNA compared to plasmid formulations. Transfection of equal mass amounts of DNA in mouse lungs resulted in a 6-fold increase in transgene expression in addition to more persistent transgene expression. Our findings have clear implications for gene therapy of airway disorders where plasmid DNA transfections have so far proven inefficient in clinical trials. PMID:26975732

  11. Genome Sequencing of Autism-Affected Families Reveals Disruption of Putative Noncoding Regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tychele N.; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Duyzend, Michael H.; McClymont, Sarah A.; Hook, Paul W.; Iossifov, Ivan; Raja, Archana; Baker, Carl; Hoekzema, Kendra; Stessman, Holly A.; Zody, Michael C.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Huddleston, John; Sandstrom, Richard; Smith, Joshua D.; Hanna, David; Swanson, James M.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Nickerson, Deborah A.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Darnell, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 208 genomes from 53 families affected by simplex autism. For the majority of these families, no copy-number variant (CNV) or candidate de novo gene-disruptive single-nucleotide variant (SNV) had been detected by microarray or whole-exome sequencing (WES). We integrated multiple CNV and SNV analyses and extensive experimental validation to identify additional candidate mutations in eight families. We report that compared to control individuals, probands showed a significant (p = 0.03) enrichment of de novo and private disruptive mutations within fetal CNS DNase I hypersensitive sites (i.e., putative regulatory regions). This effect was only observed within 50 kb of genes that have been previously associated with autism risk, including genes where dosage sensitivity has already been established by recurrent disruptive de novo protein-coding mutations (ARID1B, SCN2A, NR3C2, PRKCA, and DSCAM). In addition, we provide evidence of gene-disruptive CNVs (in DISC1, WNT7A, RBFOX1, and MBD5), as well as smaller de novo CNVs and exon-specific SNVs missed by exome sequencing in neurodevelopmental genes (e.g., CANX, SAE1, and PIK3CA). Our results suggest that the detection of smaller, often multiple CNVs affecting putative regulatory elements might help explain additional risk of simplex autism. PMID:26749308

  12. Genome Sequencing of Autism-Affected Families Reveals Disruption of Putative Noncoding Regulatory DNA.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tychele N; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Duyzend, Michael H; McClymont, Sarah A; Hook, Paul W; Iossifov, Ivan; Raja, Archana; Baker, Carl; Hoekzema, Kendra; Stessman, Holly A; Zody, Michael C; Nelson, Bradley J; Huddleston, John; Sandstrom, Richard; Smith, Joshua D; Hanna, David; Swanson, James M; Faustman, Elaine M; Bamshad, Michael J; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Nickerson, Deborah A; McCallion, Andrew S; Darnell, Robert; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-01-01

    We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 208 genomes from 53 families affected by simplex autism. For the majority of these families, no copy-number variant (CNV) or candidate de novo gene-disruptive single-nucleotide variant (SNV) had been detected by microarray or whole-exome sequencing (WES). We integrated multiple CNV and SNV analyses and extensive experimental validation to identify additional candidate mutations in eight families. We report that compared to control individuals, probands showed a significant (p = 0.03) enrichment of de novo and private disruptive mutations within fetal CNS DNase I hypersensitive sites (i.e., putative regulatory regions). This effect was only observed within 50 kb of genes that have been previously associated with autism risk, including genes where dosage sensitivity has already been established by recurrent disruptive de novo protein-coding mutations (ARID1B, SCN2A, NR3C2, PRKCA, and DSCAM). In addition, we provide evidence of gene-disruptive CNVs (in DISC1, WNT7A, RBFOX1, and MBD5), as well as smaller de novo CNVs and exon-specific SNVs missed by exome sequencing in neurodevelopmental genes (e.g., CANX, SAE1, and PIK3CA). Our results suggest that the detection of smaller, often multiple CNVs affecting putative regulatory elements might help explain additional risk of simplex autism. PMID:26749308

  13. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  14. Ultrasound with microbubbles enhances gene expression of plasmid DNA in the liver via intraportal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shen, ZP; Brayman, AA; Chen, L; Miao, CH

    2013-01-01

    Current ultrasound (US)-mediated gene delivery methods are inefficient due, in part, to a lack of US optimization. We systematically explored the use of microbubbles (MBs), US parameters and plasmid delivery routes to improve gene transfer into the mouse liver. Co-presentation of plasmid DNA (pDNA), 10% Optison MBs and pulsed 1-MHz US at a peak negative pressure of 4.3 MPa significantly increased luciferase gene expression with pDNA delivered by intrahepatic injection to the left liver lobe. Intraportal injection delivered pDNA and MBs to the whole liver; with insonation, all lobes expressed the transgene, thus increasing total gene expression. Gene expression was also dependent on acoustic pressure over the range of 0–4.3 MPa, with a peak effect at 3 MPa. An average of 85-fold enhancement in gene delivery was achieved. No enhancement was observed below 0.25 MPa. Increasing pulse length while decreasing pulse repetition frequency and exposure time to maintain a constant total energy during exposure did not further improve transfection efficiency, nor did extend the US exposure pre- or postinjection of pDNA. The results indicate that coupled with MBs, US can more efficiently and dose-dependently enhance gene expression from pDNA delivered via portal vein injection by an acoustic mechanism of inertial cavitation. PMID:18385766

  15. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  16. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes

    PubMed Central

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Material and methods Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. Results There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. Conclusions The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. PMID:26855801

  17. DNA capture reveals transoceanic gene flow in endangered river sharks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenhong; Corrigan, Shannon; Yang, Lei; Straube, Nicolas; Harris, Mark; Hofreiter, Michael; White, William T.; Naylor, Gavin J. P.

    2015-01-01

    For over a hundred years, the “river sharks” of the genus Glyphis were only known from the type specimens of species that had been collected in the 19th century. They were widely considered extinct until populations of Glyphis-like sharks were rediscovered in remote regions of Borneo and Northern Australia at the end of the 20th century. However, the genetic affinities between the newly discovered Glyphis-like populations and the poorly preserved, original museum-type specimens have never been established. Here, we present the first (to our knowledge) fully resolved, complete phylogeny of Glyphis that includes both archival-type specimens and modern material. We used a sensitive DNA hybridization capture method to obtain complete mitochondrial genomes from all of our samples and show that three of the five described river shark species are probably conspecific and widely distributed in Southeast Asia. Furthermore we show that there has been recent gene flow between locations that are separated by large oceanic expanses. Our data strongly suggest marine dispersal in these species, overturning the widely held notion that river sharks are restricted to freshwater. It seems that species in the genus Glyphis are euryhaline with an ecology similar to the bull shark, in which adult individuals live in the ocean while the young grow up in river habitats with reduced predation pressure. Finally, we discovered a previously unidentified species within the genus Glyphis that is deeply divergent from all other lineages, underscoring the current lack of knowledge about the biodiversity and ecology of these mysterious sharks. PMID:26460025

  18. DNA capture reveals transoceanic gene flow in endangered river sharks.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenhong; Corrigan, Shannon; Yang, Lei; Straube, Nicolas; Harris, Mark; Hofreiter, Michael; White, William T; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2015-10-27

    For over a hundred years, the "river sharks" of the genus Glyphis were only known from the type specimens of species that had been collected in the 19th century. They were widely considered extinct until populations of Glyphis-like sharks were rediscovered in remote regions of Borneo and Northern Australia at the end of the 20th century. However, the genetic affinities between the newly discovered Glyphis-like populations and the poorly preserved, original museum-type specimens have never been established. Here, we present the first (to our knowledge) fully resolved, complete phylogeny of Glyphis that includes both archival-type specimens and modern material. We used a sensitive DNA hybridization capture method to obtain complete mitochondrial genomes from all of our samples and show that three of the five described river shark species are probably conspecific and widely distributed in Southeast Asia. Furthermore we show that there has been recent gene flow between locations that are separated by large oceanic expanses. Our data strongly suggest marine dispersal in these species, overturning the widely held notion that river sharks are restricted to freshwater. It seems that species in the genus Glyphis are euryhaline with an ecology similar to the bull shark, in which adult individuals live in the ocean while the young grow up in river habitats with reduced predation pressure. Finally, we discovered a previously unidentified species within the genus Glyphis that is deeply divergent from all other lineages, underscoring the current lack of knowledge about the biodiversity and ecology of these mysterious sharks. PMID:26460025

  19. Analysis of hypertrophic and normal scar gene expression with cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tsou, R; Cole, J K; Nathens, A B; Isik, F F; Heimbach, D M; Engrav, L H; Gibran, N S

    2000-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one form of abnormal wound healing. Previous studies have suggested that hypertrophic scar formation results from altered gene expression of extracellular matrix molecules. A broadscale evaluation of gene expression in hypertrophic scars has not been reported. To better understand abnormalities in hypertrophic scar gene expression, we compared messenger RNA expression in hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin with the use of complementary (c)DNA microarrays. Total RNA was extracted from freshly excised human hypertrophic scars, normal scars, or uninjured skin and reverse transcribed into cDNA with the incorporation of [33P] deoxycytidine triphosphate. The resulting radioactive cDNA probes were hybridized onto cDNA microarrays of 4000 genes. Hybridization signals were normalized and analyzed. In the comparison of tissue samples, mean intensities were calculated for each gene within each group (hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin). Ratios of the mean intensities of hypertrophic scars to normal scars, hypertrophic scars to uninjured skin, and normal scars to uninjured skin were generated. A ratio that was greater than 1 indicated upregulation of any particular gene and a ratio that was less than 1 indicated downregulation of any particular gene. Our data indicated that 142 genes were overexpressed and 50 genes were underexpressed in normal scars compared with uninjured skin, 107 genes were overexpressed and 71 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with uninjured skin, and 44 genes were overexpressed and 124 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with normal scars. Our analysis of collagen, growth factor, and metalloproteinase gene expression confirmed that our molecular data were consistent with published biochemical and clinical observations of normal scars and hypertrophic scars. cDNA microarray analysis provides a powerful tool for the investigation of differential gene expression in

  20. DETECTION OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE GENES BY DNA MICROARRAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria it is necessary to identify the genes responsible for resistance. Currently, each gene must be screened individually in order to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed resistance expressed by a bacterium. The inability to rapidly...

  1. Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes by DNA microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria it is necessary to detect and characterize the genes responsible for resistance. Currently, each gene must be screened individually in order to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed resistance expressed by a bacterium. The inabi...

  2. Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes by DNA microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the spread of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria it is necessary to identify the genes responsible for resistance. Currently, each gene must be screened individually in order to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed resistance expressed by a bacterium. The inability to rapidly...

  3. Nucleolin is required for DNA methylation state and the expression of rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Debures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-11-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre-rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  4. Nucleolin Is Required for DNA Methylation State and the Expression of rRNA Gene Variants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; DeBures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J.; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S.; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre–rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  5. Validation of Candidate Causal Genes for Abdominal Obesity Which Affect Shared Metabolic Pathways and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Deignan, Joshua L.; Qi, Hongxiu; Zhu, Jun; Qian, Su; Zhong, Judy; Torosyan, Gevork; Majid, Sana; Falkard, Brie; Kleinhanz, Robert R.; Karlsson, Jenny; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Mumick, Sheena; Wang, Kai; Xie, Tao; Coon, Michael; Zhang, Chunsheng; Estrada-Smith, Daria; Farber, Charles R.; Wang, Susanna S.; Van Nas, Atila; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Zhang, Bin; MacNeil, Douglas J.; Lamb, John R.; Dipple, Katrina M.; Reitman, Marc L.; Mehrabian, Margarete; Lum, Pek Y.; Schadt, Eric E.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2010-01-01

    A major task in dissecting the genetics of complex traits is to identify causal genes for disease phenotypes. We previously developed a method to infer causal relationships among genes through the integration of DNA variation, gene transcription, and phenotypic information. Here we validated our method through the characterization of transgenic and knockout mouse models of candidate genes that were predicted to be causal for abdominal obesity. Perturbation of eight out of the nine genes, with Gas7, Me1 and Gpx3 being novel, resulted in significant changes in obesity related traits. Liver expression signatures revealed alterations in common metabolic pathways and networks contributing to abdominal obesity and overlapped with a macrophage-enriched metabolic network module that is highly associated with metabolic traits in mice and humans. Integration of gene expression in the design and analysis of traditional F2 intercross studies allows high confidence prediction of causal genes and identification of involved pathways and networks. PMID:19270708

  6. Identification of marker genes for lipid-lowering effect of a short-chain fructooligosaccharide by DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Murashima, Koichiro; Nemoto, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Koga, Jinichiro; Kubota, Hidetoshi; Kanegae, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    Administration of short-chain fructooligosaccharide (scFOS) is known to lower serum triglyceride levels in rats fed a high-fat diet, but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to identify marker genes for lipid-lowering effect of scFOS administration. The changes in hepatic gene expressions in rats fed scFOS were investigated using DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. The DNA microarray showed that phytanoyl-CoA 2-hydroxylase 2 (Phyh2), lipoprotein lipase (Lpl) and tyrosine aminotransferase (Tat) were significantly affected by scFOS administration (p < .05). Since Lpl is involved in lipid metabolism, the up-regulation of Lpl in the liver can be a potential marker of the lipid-lowering effect of scFOS. PMID:22435477

  7. Age and Diet Affect Gene Expression Profile in Canine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Middelbos, Ingmar S.; Vester, Brittany M.; Karr-Lilienthal, Lisa K.; Schook, Lawrence B.; Swanson, Kelly S.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated gene transcription in canine skeletal muscle (biceps femoris) using microarray analysis to identify effects of age and diet on gene expression. Twelve female beagles were used (six 1-year olds and six 12-year olds) and they were fed one of two experimental diets for 12 months. One diet contained primarily plant-based protein sources (PPB), whereas the second diet contained primarily animal-based protein sources (APB). Affymetrix GeneChip Canine Genome Arrays were used to hybridize extracted RNA. Age had the greatest effect on gene transcription (262 differentially expressed genes), whereas the effect of diet was relatively small (22 differentially expressed genes). Effects of age (regardless of diet) were most notable on genes related to metabolism, cell cycle and cell development, and transcription function. All these genes were predominantly down-regulated in geriatric dogs. Age-affected genes that were differentially expressed on only one of two diets were primarily noted in the PPB diet group (144/165 genes). Again, genes related to cell cycle (22/35) and metabolism (15/19) had predominantly decreased transcription in geriatric dogs, but 6/8 genes related to muscle development had increased expression. Effects of diet on muscle gene expression were mostly noted in geriatric dogs, but no consistent patterns in transcription were observed. The insight these data provide into gene expression profiles of canine skeletal muscle as affected by age, could serve as a foundation for future research pertaining to age-related muscle diseases. PMID:19221602

  8. Requirements in screening cDNA libraries for new genes and solutions offered by SBH technology

    SciTech Connect

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Stavropoulos, N.

    1993-12-31

    Under different assumptions about the total number of genes, the number of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes, and the difference in the number of mRNAs per cell for functional and nonfunctional genes, significantly different results can be expected from screening random cDNA clones. We have developed gene expression models as a guide for interpretation of experimental results. For statistical, biological, and technical reasons, the search for 100,000 plus genes and discrimination between nonfunctional, housekeeping, and tissue-specific genes requires the analysis of up to 10 million clones from 20 to 50 tissues. Oligonucleotide hybridization of dense clone blots is an inexpensive and fast way to screen such large clone sets. Our preliminary results on control clones and thousands of cDNA clones from an infant brain library demonstrate the feasibility of the method. We present several models of gene expression and analyze the main factors which can influence the hunt for new genes via the screening of random cDNA libraries. The basic steps in the preparation and use of dense DNA dot arrays are described, and some results that demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of gene inventorying by oligonucleotide hybridization are presented. Furthermore, partial SBH and single-pass gel sequencing are compared and a gene analysis scheme that combines the two approaches is discussed.

  9. SPERM RNA AMPLIFICATION FOR GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING BY DNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sperm RNA Amplification for Gene Expression Profiling by DNA Microarray Technology
    Hongzu Ren, Kary E. Thompson, Judith E. Schmid and David J. Dix, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triang...

  10. Genomic organization and 5{prime}-flanking DNA sequence of the murine stomatin gene (Epb72)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.G.; Turetsky, T.; Mentzer, W.C.

    1996-06-15

    Stomatin is a poorly understood integral membrane protein that is absent from the erythrocyte membranes of many patients with hereditary stomatocytosis. This report describes the cloning of the murine stomatin chromosomal gene, determination of its genomic structure, and characterization of the 5{prime}-flanking genomic DNA sequences. The stomatin gene is encoded by seven exons spread over {approximately}25 kb of genomic DNA. There is no concordance between the exon structure of the stomatin gene and the locations of three domains predicted on the basis of protein structure. Inspection of the 5{prime}-flanking DNA sequences reveals features of a TATA-less housekeeping gene promoter and consensus sequences for a number of potential DNA-binding proteins. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Testing candidate genes that may affect susceptibility to leprosy.

    PubMed

    Cervino, A C; Curnow, R N

    1997-12-01

    Several statistical methods have been used to search familial data sets for marker alleles associated with the occurrence of a disease. In the present paper, a recently developed method is used to re-analyze published data on leprosy and candidate genes at the HLA loci. This new method of analysis, the randomization transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), confirmed previous conclusions that there was no significant evidence against random transmission at the HLA-A locus but significant positive association with the HLA-DR2 allele. The randomization TDT detected significant protective associations, that had not previously been found, with alleles HLA-B8 in Egyptian families and HLA-B21 (current nomenclature B x 4901, 5001-5002) in South Indian families, highlighting a major advantage of permutation tests in analyzing candidate gene loci with rare alleles. These findings provide evidence that HLA class I restricted T lymphocytes may be of protective importance in leprosy. PMID:9465154

  12. Three Genes Which Affect Founding of Aggregations in Polysphondylium Pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Francis, D.; Shaffer, A.; Smoyer, K.

    1991-01-01

    PN6024 is an extraordinary mutant strain of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum, characterized by having defects in many unlinked genes. New strains with altered development appeared spontaneously as aberrant clones of PN6024. Genetic crosses using the macrocyst sexual cycle were used to show that PN6030 (a clone like PN6024 in phenotype) carries mutations at two loci, emm and hge, whereas PN6031 (a clone of altered morphology) carries in addition a mutation at a third locus, mgt. hge and possibly mgt are linked to the mating type locus mat. The relatively high frequency of recombination between mat and hge is strong evidence that meiosis precedes macrocyst germination. The mutant genes themselves are of interest. A major effect of the emm-1 mutation is to remove the requirement for light to trigger aggregation. hge-1 greatly reduces the frequency of aggregation, whereas mgt-1 greatly increases it under standard conditions. None of these mutations interrupts later development leading to stalks and spore cells. It is hypothesized that all three genes act on steps immediately preceding the differentiation of the founder cells which initiate aggregation. PMID:1874416

  13. DNA Methylation and Gene Expression Profiling of Ewing Sarcoma Primary Tumors Reveal Genes That Are Potential Targets of Epigenetic Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikul; Black, Jennifer; Chen, Xi; Marcondes, A. Mario; Grady, William M.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Borinstein, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    The role of aberrant DNA methylation in Ewing sarcoma is not completely understood. The methylation status of 503 genes in 52 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded EWS tumors and 3 EWS cell lines was compared to human mesenchymal stem cell primary cultures (hMSCs) using bead chip methylation analysis. Relative expression of methylated genes was assessed in 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine-(5-AZA)-treated EWS cell lines and in a cohort of primary EWS samples and hMSCs by gene expression and quantitative RT-PCR. 129 genes demonstrated statistically significant hypermethylation in EWS tumors compared to hMSCs. Thirty-six genes were profoundly methylated in EWS and unmethylated in hMSCs. 5-AZA treatment of EWS cell lines resulted in upregulation of expression of hundreds of genes including 162 that were increased by at least 2-fold. The expression of 19 of 36 candidate hypermethylated genes was increased following 5-AZA. Analysis of gene expression from an independent cohort of tumors confirmed decreased expression of six of nineteen hypermethylated genes (AXL, COL1A1, CYP1B1, LYN, SERPINE1,) and VCAN. Comparing gene expression and DNA methylation analyses proved to be an effective way to identify genes epigenetically regulated in EWS. Further investigation is ongoing to elucidate the role of these epigenetic alterations in EWS pathogenesis. PMID:23024594

  14. Ubiquinol affects the expression of genes involved in PPARα signalling and lipid metabolism without changes in methylation of CpG promoter islands in the liver of mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Constance; Kitano, Mitsuaki; Hosoe, Kazunori; Döring, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor in the respiratory chain and serves as a potent antioxidant in biological membranes. Recent studies in vitro and in vivo provide evidence that Coenzyme Q10 is involved in inflammatory processes and lipid metabolism via gene expression. To study these effects at the epigenomic level, C57BL6J mice were supplemented for one week with reduced Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol). Afterwards, gene expression signatures and DNA promoter methylation patterns of selected genes were analysed. Genome-wide transcript profiling in the liver identified 1112 up-regulated and 571 down-regulated transcripts as differentially regulated between ubiquinol-treated and control animals. Text mining and GeneOntology analysis revealed that the ”top 20” ubiquinol-regulated genes play a role in lipid metabolism and are functionally connected by the PPARα signalling pathway. With regard to the ubiquinol-induced changes in gene expression of about +3.14-fold (p≤0.05), +2.18-fold (p≤0.01), and −2.13-fold (p≤0.05) for ABCA1, ACYP1, and ACSL1 genes, respectively, hepatic DNA methylation analysis of 282 (sense orientation) and 271 (antisense) CpG units in the respective promoter islands revealed no significant effect of ubiquinol. In conclusion, ubiquinol affects the expression of genes involved in PPARα signalling and lipid metabolism without changing the promoter DNA methylation status in the liver of mice. PMID:22448092

  15. Gene regulation and DNA C-value paradox: a model based on diffusion of regulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Kupiec, J J

    1989-01-01

    The general idea of the model is that regulatory molecules can move stochastically from site to site along DNA and that according to their chromosomal position, genes should have a more or less high probability to be activated (or repressed) during differentiation. In this model the role of non coding DNA is to maintain genes in a relative position that determines what is usually called the "differentiation programme". PMID:2538709

  16. Alterations in gene expression and DNA methylation during murine and human lung alveolar septation.

    PubMed

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2015-07-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  17. Alterations in Gene Expression and DNA Methylation during Murine and Human Lung Alveolar Septation

    PubMed Central

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K.; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  18. Metal-polybenzimidazole complexes as a nonviral gene carrier: effects of the DNA affinity on gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueying; Dong, Xiongwei; Li, Xue; Meng, Xianggao; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Changlin

    2013-12-01

    The metal complex-based carriers are emerging likely as a new type of gene-delivery systems prone to systematic structural alteration and chemical tailoring. In our work, the DNA affinity of metal complexes with polybenzimidazoles was found to be one of the determinants that can regulate expression of the transgenes. Here, the correlations between the DNA affinity and transfection efficacy were explored by characterizing gene-delivering properties of a series of Co(2+)- and Ca(2+)-polybenzimidazole complexes. The binding equilibrium constants (Kobs) of the divalent metal complexes to DNA, which is considered as a measure of the DNA affinity of metal complexes, were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and UV-visible absorption titration. The properties of DNA condensates formed with the metal complexes including sizes, ζ potential and morphology were observed to be altered with Kobs values. The monodispersed spherical condensates were found only for the Ca(2+) complexes whose DNA affinity is weaker than that of the Co(2+) complexes. However, the cell internalization examination indicated that cell uptake of the DNA condensates is independent of homogeneity in their sizes and morphology. The comparison of transgene expression showed that that the Ca(2+) complex-mediated transfection has higher efficiency than the Co(2+) complexes under the conditions tested, and the transfection efficacy cannot be correlated with the cell uptake of DNA condensates. Moreover, the Ca(2+) complexes and their DNA condensates had lower cytotoxicity than the Co(2+) complexes. Thus, the DNA affinity should be one of the factors to be capable of regulating the gene-delivering property of metal complexes. PMID:24099694

  19. Immune response in mice and swine to DNA vaccines derived from the Pasteurella multocida toxin gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA vaccines were constructed with either a 5’-truncated or full-length, genetically detoxified toxin gene from Pasteurella multocida and two different DNA vaccine vectors, distinguished by the presence or absence of a secretion signal sequence. Optimal PMT-specific antibody responses and spleen cel...

  20. Non-viral gene delivery for local and controlled DNA release.

    PubMed

    Trentin, Diana; Hubbell, Jeffrey; Hall, Heike

    2005-01-20

    Non-viral DNA delivery systems show important advantages vs. viral systems that are usually associated with an immunological response and safety risks. In this study, disulfide cross-linked peptide-DNA condensates were investigated for local gene delivery. Two different 21 amino acid peptides were designed to have a DNA binding sequence in combination with a transglutaminase substrate site or a nuclear localization site. The peptides were used in different ratios to each other to form stable cross-linked DNA-peptide condensates with a mean diameter of 164 nm and a size distribution from 43 to 204 nm. Such aggregates showed similar stability compared to condensates formed between DNA and high molecular weight poly-L-lysine (PLL). Peptide-DNA condensates were covalently immobilized into fibrin matrices by the activity of factor XIII and were used for gene delivery in vitro. After internalization, reduction of the cross-linked peptide-DNA condensates yielded increased transfection efficiencies into different cell types cultured in 2D sandwich assays, and comparable values for HUVECs cultured in a 3D fibrin matrix, as compared to PLL-DNA condensates. Cell viability 24 h after transfection remained above 95%. The target was to develop a transfection system based on small peptides that can be covalently cross-linked into fibrin-matrices where DNA-release takes place upon cellular degradation of the matrix. This approach provides an interesting tool in non-viral gene delivery. PMID:15653151

  1. Psychological factors and DNA methylation of genes related to immune/inflammatory system markers: the VA Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Kubzansky, Laura D; Baccarelli, Andrea; Sparrow, David; Spiro, Avron; Tarantini, Letizia; Cantone, Laura; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    psychological factors affect DNA methylation of selected genes involved in chronic immune/inflammatory processes and inflammation-related endothelial dysfunction. Such epigenetic changes may represent biological pathways that mediate the effects of psychological factors on CHD. PMID:26733571

  2. Mutation and killing of Escherichia coli expressing a cloned Bacillus subtilis gene whose product alters DNA conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, J K; Randesi, M; Adams, J G; Setlow, B; Setlow, P

    1992-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis gene coding for SspC, a small, acid-soluble protein, caused both killing and mutation in a number of Escherichia coli B and K-12 strains. SspC was previously shown to bind E. coli DNA in vivo, and in vitro this protein binds DNA and converts it into an A-like conformation. Analysis of revertants of nonsense mutations showed that SspC caused single-base changes, and a greater proportion of these were at A-T base pairs. Mutation in the recA gene abolished the induction of mutations upon synthesis of SspC, but the killing was only slightly greater than in RecA+ cells. Mutations in the umuC and umuD genes eliminated most of the mutagenic effect of SspC but not the killing, while the lexA mutation increased mutagenesis but did not appreciably affect the killing. Since there was neither killing nor mutation of E. coli after synthesis of a mutant SspC which does not bind DNA, it appears likely that the binding of wild-type SspC to DNA, with the attendant conformational change, was responsible for the killing and mutation. A strain containing the B. subtilis gene that is constitutive for the RecA protein at 42 degrees C showed a lower frequency of mutation when that temperature was used to induce the RecA protein than when the temperature was 30 degrees C, where the RecA level is low, suggesting that at the elevated temperature the high RecA level could be inhibiting binding of the B. subtilis protein to DNA. PMID:1314805

  3. In silico identification of genes in bacteriophage DNA.

    PubMed

    Kropinski, Andrew M; Borodovsky, Mark; Carver, Tim J; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M; Darling, Aaron; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan; Stothard, Paul; Seto, Donald; Van Domselaar, Gary; Wishart, David S

    2009-01-01

    One of the most satisfying aspects of a genome sequencing project is the identification of the genes contained within it.These are of two types: those which encode tRNAs and those which produce proteins. After a general introduction on the properties of protein-encoding genes and the utility of the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLASTX) to identify genes through homologs, a variety of tools are discussed by their creators. These include for genome annotation: GeneMark, Artemis, and BASys; and, for genome comparisons: Artemis Comparison Tool (ACT), Mauve, CoreGenes, and GeneOrder. PMID:19082552

  4. Natural Selection on Coding and Noncoding DNA Sequences Is Associated with Virulence Genes in a Plant Pathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Gabriel E.; Sanz-Martín, José M.; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A.; Thon, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen. PMID:25193312

  5. Nuclear gene causing multiple mtDNA deletions in autosomal dominant ophthalmoplegia maps to a distinct chromosomal region - involvement of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in a single disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Suomalainen, A.; Kaukonen, J.; Timonen, R.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by muscle weakness, most prominent in ocular muscles. The symptoms are caused by accumulation of multiple large deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the tissues of the patient, especially in those tissues that are most dependent on oxidative metabolism: brain, skeletal muscle and heart. However, the disorder shows autosomal dominant way of transmission, suggesting a primary defect in a nuclear encoded protein, which only secondarily results in mtDNA deletions. The candidate genes could be those actively participating in the mtDNA replication, or those associated with oxidative metabolism and e.g. via overproduction or inefficient elimination of fire oxygen radicals fragmenting mtDNA. We applied random mapping approach to localize the autosomal adPEO gene locus in a large Finnish family. The affected subjects were identified by detection of multiple mtDNA deletions in the Southern blot analysis of DNA extracted from the muscle biopsy specimens. All the family members underwent muscle biopsy. After analysis of 248 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markets dispersed throughout the genome we were able to assign the adPEO gene locus to a distinct chromosomal region with the maximum pairwise lod score of 4.52, recombination fraction 0.0. This is the first evidence that a mutation in a nuclear gene may interfere mtDNA. The pathogenesis of adPEO involves both the genomes: the primary nuclear gene defect leads to secondary mtDNA mutations that cause the symptoms of the patients.

  6. Hematopoietic gene promoters subjected to a group-combinatorial study of DNA samples: identification of a megakaryocytic selective DNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Hazony, Yehonathan; Lu, Jun; St. Hilaire, Cynthia; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Identification of common sub-sequences for a group of functionally related DNA sequences can shed light on the role of such elements in cell-specific gene expression. In the megakaryocytic lineage, no one single unique transcription factor was described as linage specific, raising the possibility that a cluster of gene promoter sequences presents a unique signature. Here, the megakaryocytic gene promoter group, which consists of both human and mouse 5′ non-coding regions, served as a case study. A methodology for group-combinatorial search has been implemented as a customized software platform. It extracts the longest common sequences for a group of related DNA sequences and allows for single gaps of varying length, as well as double- and multiple-gap sequences. The results point to common DNA sequences in a group of genes that is selectively expressed in megakaryocytes, and which does not appear in a large group of control, random and specific sequences. This suggests a role for a combination of these sequences in cell-specific gene expression in the megakaryocytic lineage. The data also point to an intrinsic cross-species difference in the organization of 5′ non-coding sequences within the mammalian genomes. This methodology may be used for the identification of regulatory sequences in other lineages. PMID:16936310

  7. Common and Rare Gene Variants Affecting Plasma LDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, John R; Hooper, Amanda J

    2008-01-01

    The plasma level of LDL cholesterol is clinically important and genetically complex. LDL cholesterol levels are in large part determined by the activity of LDL receptors (LDLR) in the liver. Autosomal dominant familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) – with its high LDL cholesterol levels, xanthomas, and premature atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in either the LDLR or in APOB – the protein in LDL recognised by the LDLR. A third, rare form – autosomal recessive hypercholesterolaemia – arises from mutations in the gene encoding an adaptor protein involved in the internalisation of the LDLR. A fourth variant of inherited hypercholesterolaemia was recently found to be associated with missense mutations in PCSK9, which encodes a serine protease that degrades LDLR. Whereas the gain-of-function mutations in PCSK9 are rare, a spectrum of more frequent loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 associated with low LDL cholesterol levels has been identified in selected populations and could protect against coronary heart disease. Heterozygous familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia (FHBL) – with its low LDL cholesterol levels and resistance to atherosclerosis – is caused by mutations in APOB. In contrast to other inherited forms of severe hypocholesterolaemia such as abetalipoproteinaemia - caused by mutations in MTP - and homozygous FHBL, a deficiency of PCSK9 appears to be benign. Rare variants of NPC1L1, the gene encoding the putative intestinal cholesterol receptor, have shown more modest effects on plasma LDL cholesterol than PCSK9 variants, similar in magnitude to the effect of common APOE variants. Taken together, these findings indicate that heritable variation in plasma LDL cholesterol is conferred by sequence variation in various loci, with a small number of common and multiple rare gene variants contributing to the phenotype. PMID:18566665

  8. Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Status of Glutathione S-Transferase Mu1 and Mu5 in Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shou-Chieh; Huang, Chin-Chin; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Lei-Chen; Zhao, Pei-Wen; Chen, Shih-Ying; Deng, Yu-Chiao; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is highly recurrent after therapy, which has an enormous impact on the health and financial condition of the patient. It is worth developing diagnostic tools for bladder cancer. In our previous study, we found that the bladder carcinogen BBN increased urothelial global DNA CpG methylation and decreased GSTM1 protein expression in mice. Here, the correlation of BBN-decreased GSTM1 and GSTM gene CpG methylation status was analyzed in mice bladders. BBN treatment decreased the protein and mRNA expression of GSTM1, and the CpG methylation ratio of GSTM1 gene promoter was slightly increased in mice bladders. Unlike mouse GSTM1, the human GSTM1 gene tends to be deleted in bladder cancers. Among 7 human bladder cancer cell lines, GSTM1 gene is really null in 6 cell lines except one, T24 cells. The CpG methylation level of GSTM1 was 9.9% and 5-aza-dC did not significantly increase GSTM1 protein and mRNA expression in T24 cells; however, the GSTM5 gene was CpG hypermethylated (65.4%) and 5-aza-dC also did not affect the methylation ratio and mRNA expression. However, in other cell lines without GSTM1, 5-aza-dC increased GSTM5 expression and decreased its CpG DNA methylation ratio from 84.6% to 61.5% in 5637, and from 97.4% to 75% in J82 cells. In summary, two biomarkers of bladder tumor were provided. One is the GSTM1 gene which is down-regulated in mice bladder carcinogenesis and is usually deleted in human urothelial carcinoma, while the other is the GSTM5 gene, which is inactivated by DNA CpG methylation. PMID:27404495

  9. DNA sequence of a gene encoding a BALB/c mouse Ld transplantation antigen.

    PubMed

    Moore, K W; Sher, B T; Sun, Y H; Eakle, K A; Hood, L

    1982-02-01

    The sequence of a gene, denoted 27.5, encoding a transplantation antigen for the BALB/c mouse has been determined. Gene transfer studies and comparison of the translated sequence with the partial amino acid sequence of the Ld transplantation antigen establish that gene 27.5 encodes an Ld polypeptide. A comparison of the gene 27.5 sequence with several complementary DNA sequences suggests that the BALB/c mouse may contain a number of closely related L-like genes. Gene 27.5 has eight exons that correlate with the structural domains of the transplantation antigen. PMID:7058332

  10. Differentially expressed genes in Populus simonii x P. nigra in respnse to NaCl stress using cDNA-AFLP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salinity is an important environmental factor limiting growth and productivity of plants, and affects almost every aspect of the plant physiology and biochemistry. The objective of this study was to apply cDNA-AFLP and to identify differentially expressed genes in response to NaCl stress vs. no-stre...

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of a vaccinia virus gene with an essential role in DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, E; Traktman, P

    1987-01-01

    We have identified a gene encoded by vaccinia virus which is essential for DNA replication. The gene, located in the HindIII D fragment of the viral genome, is transcribed early after infection into two transcripts of 3.0 and 3.7 kilobases which share a 3' terminus. The lesions of three temperature-sensitive DNA replication mutants with defects in this gene have been localized by marker rescue with progressively smaller DNA fragments. We have determined by hybrid selection that the gene encodes an 82-kilodalton protein. An antibody has been prepared against this polypeptide and used to quantitate expression of the protein after infection with wild-type virus or with a viral mutant whose lesion maps within this gene. The temporal pattern of expression in the mutant is unaffected, but the product encoded by the mutant is significantly more thermolabile than the wild-type protein. Images PMID:3041037

  12. Identification of uterine leiomyoma-specific marker genes based on DNA methylation and their clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shun; Maekawa, Ryo; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Isao; Lee, Lifa; Okada, Maki; Jozaki, Kosuke; Asada, Hiromi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas is needed to determine whether the uterus can be retained. Therefore, biomarkers for uterine leiomyomas, and reliable and objective diagnostic methods have been desired besides the pathological diagnosis. In the present study, we identified 12 genes specific to uterine leiomyomas based on DNA methylation. Using these marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, we established a hierarchical clustering system based on the DNA methylation level of the marker genes, which could completely differentiate between uterine leiomyomas and normal myometrium. Furthermore, our hierarchical clustering system completely discriminated uterine cancers and differentiated between uterine leiomyosarcomas and leiomyomas with more than 70% accuracy. In conclusion, this study identified DNA methylation-based marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, and our hierarchical clustering system using these marker genes was useful for differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. PMID:27498619

  13. Identification of uterine leiomyoma-specific marker genes based on DNA methylation and their clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shun; Maekawa, Ryo; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Isao; Lee, Lifa; Okada, Maki; Jozaki, Kosuke; Asada, Hiromi; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas is needed to determine whether the uterus can be retained. Therefore, biomarkers for uterine leiomyomas, and reliable and objective diagnostic methods have been desired besides the pathological diagnosis. In the present study, we identified 12 genes specific to uterine leiomyomas based on DNA methylation. Using these marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, we established a hierarchical clustering system based on the DNA methylation level of the marker genes, which could completely differentiate between uterine leiomyomas and normal myometrium. Furthermore, our hierarchical clustering system completely discriminated uterine cancers and differentiated between uterine leiomyosarcomas and leiomyomas with more than 70% accuracy. In conclusion, this study identified DNA methylation-based marker genes specific to uterine leiomyomas, and our hierarchical clustering system using these marker genes was useful for differential diagnosis of uterine leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas. PMID:27498619

  14. Reduced function of the RNA-binding protein FPA rescues a T-DNA insertion mutant in the Arabidopsis ZHOUPI gene by promoting transcriptional read-through.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaohua; Li, Xin; Goodrich, Justin; Wu, Chunxia; Wei, Haichao; Yang, Suxin; Feng, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants have been widely used to investigate plant gene functions. Unexpectedly, in several reported cases, the phenotype of T-DNA insertion mutations can be suppressed because of trans T-DNA interactions associated with epigenetic modification, which indicates that caution is needed when T-DNA mutants are used. In the present study, we characterized a novel process suppressing a T-DNA mutation. The spz2 (suppressor of zou 2) mutant was isolated as a suppressor of the phenotype of the zou-4 mutant caused by a T-DNA insertion in the first intron. The spz2 mutation partially recovered the native ZOU gene expression in the zou-4 background, but not in two other zou alleles, zou-2 and zou-3, with T-DNAs inserted in the exon and intron, respectively. The suppressed phenotype was inherited in a Mendelian fashion and is not associated with epigenetic modification. The recovery of the native ZOU gene expression in the spz2 zou-4 double mutant is caused by transcriptional read-through of the intronic T-DNA as a result of decreased proximal polyadenylation. SPZ2 encodes an RNA-binding protein, FPA, which is known to regulate polyadenylation site selection. This is the first example of FPA rescuing a T-DNA insertion mutation by affecting the polyadenylation site selection. PMID:27164978

  15. Modulation of gene expression in Leishmania drug resistant mutants as determined by targeted DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Chantal; Trudel, Nathalie; Brochu, Christian; Marquis, Nathalie; Fadili, Amal El; Peytavi, Régis; Briand, Guylaine; Richard, Dave; Messier, Nadine; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Corbeil, Jacques; Bergeron, Michel G.; Légaré, Danielle; Ouellette, Marc

    2003-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, drug resistance can be a complex phenomenon. Several metabolic pathways and membrane transporters are implicated in the resistance phenotype. To monitor the expression of these genes, we generated custom DNA microarrays with PCR fragments corresponding to 44 genes involved with drug resistance. Transcript profiling of arsenite and antimony resistant mutants with these arrays pinpointed a number of genes overexpressed in mutants, including the ABC transporter PGPA, the glutathione biosynthesis genes γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) and the glutathione synthetase (GSH2). Competitive hybridisations with total RNA derived from sensitive and methotrexate resistant cells revealed the overexpression of genes coding for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR-TS), pteridine reductase (PTR1) and S-adenosylmethionine synthase (MAT2) and a down regulation of one gene of the folate transporter (FT) family. By labelling the DNA of sensitive and resistant parasites we could also detect several gene amplification events using DNA microarrays including the amplification of the S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase gene (SAHH). Alteration in gene expression detected by microarrays was validated by northern blot analysis, while Southern blots indicated that most genes overexpressed were also amplified, although other mechanisms were also present. The microarrays were useful in the study of resistant parasites to pinpoint several genes linked to drug resistance. PMID:14530437

  16. Circadian expression of the dnaK gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, S; Kondo, T; Ishiura, M

    1995-01-01

    The expression of the dnaK gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was continuously monitored as bioluminescence by an automated monitoring system, using the bacterial luciferase genes (luxAB) of Vibrio harveyi as a reporter of promoter activity. A dnaK-reporting bioluminescent Synechocystis strain was constructed by fusing a promoterless segment of the luxAB gene set downstream of the promoter region of the Synechocystis dnaK gene and introduction of this gene fusion into a BglII site downstream of the ndhB gene in the Synechocystis chromosome. Bioluminescence from this strain was continuously monitored and oscillated with a period of about 22 h for at least 5 days in continuous light. The phase of the rhythm was reset by the timing of the 12-h dark period administered prior to the continuous light. The period of the rhythm was temperature compensated between 25 and 35 degrees C. Thus, the bioluminescence rhythm satisfied the three criteria of circadian rhythms. Furthermore, the abundance of dnaK mRNA also oscillated with a period of about 1 day for at least 2 days in continuous light conditions, indicating circadian control of dnaK gene expression in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. PMID:7559349

  17. The DNA-damage response to γ-radiation is affected by miR-27a in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Andrea; De Pittà, Cristiano; Moret, Francesca; Barbieri, Vito; Celotti, Lucia; Mognato, Maddalena

    2013-01-01

    Perturbations during the cell DNA-Damage Response (DDR) can originate from alteration in the functionality of the microRNA-mediated gene regulation, being microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. The oncogenic miR-27a is over-expressed in several tumors and, in the present study, we investigated its interaction with ATM, the gene coding for the main kinase of DDR pathway. Experimental validation to confirm miR-27a as a direct regulator of ATM was performed by site-direct mutagenesis of the luciferase reporter vector containing the 3'UTR of ATM gene, and by miRNA oligonucleotide mimics. We then explored the functional miR-27a/ATM interaction under biological conditions, i.e., during the response of A549 cells to ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. To evaluate if miR-27a over-expression affects IR-induced DDR activation in A549 cells we determined cell survival, cell cycle progression and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Our results show that up-regulation of miR-27a promotes cell proliferation of non-irradiated and irradiated cells. Moreover, increased expression of endogenous mature miR-27a in A549 cells affects DBS rejoining kinetics early after irradiation. PMID:24002026

  18. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Prasad, Punit; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1) occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. PMID:23516381

  19. DNA Topoisomerase III Localizes to Centromeres and Affects Centromeric CENP-A Levels in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Prasad, Punit; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-ACnp1 at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-ACnp1 occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-ACnp1 at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-ACnp1 in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-ACnp1 nucleosomes. PMID:23516381

  20. DNA polymerase ι functions in the generation of tandem mutations during somatic hypermutation of antibody genes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Robert W; MacCarthy, Thomas; Frank, Ekaterina G; Donigan, Katherine A; McLenigan, Mary P; Yang, William; Saribasak, Huseyin; Huston, Donald E; Lange, Sabine S; Woodgate, Roger; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2016-08-22

    DNA polymerase ι (Pol ι) is an attractive candidate for somatic hypermutation in antibody genes because of its low fidelity. To identify a role for Pol ι, we analyzed mutations in two strains of mice with deficiencies in the enzyme: 129 mice with negligible expression of truncated Pol ι, and knock-in mice that express full-length Pol ι that is catalytically inactive. Both strains had normal frequencies and spectra of mutations in the variable region, indicating that loss of Pol ι did not change overall mutagenesis. We next examined if Pol ι affected tandem mutations generated by another error-prone polymerase, Pol ζ. The frequency of contiguous mutations was analyzed using a novel computational model to determine if they occur during a single DNA transaction or during two independent events. Analyses of 2,000 mutations from both strains indicated that Pol ι-compromised mice lost the tandem signature, whereas C57BL/6 mice accumulated significant amounts of double mutations. The results support a model where Pol ι occasionally accesses the replication fork to generate a first mutation, and Pol ζ extends the mismatch with a second mutation. PMID:27455952

  1. Induction of innate immune gene expression following methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage in sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Reinardy, H C; Chapman, J; Bodnar, A G

    2016-02-01

    Sea urchins are noted for the absence of neoplastic disease and represent a novel model to investigate cellular and systemic cancer protection mechanisms. Following intracoelomic injection of the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate, DNA damage was detected in sea urchin cells and tissues (coelomocytes, muscle, oesophagus, ampullae and gonad) by the alkaline unwinding, fast micromethod. Gene expression analyses of the coelomocytes indicated upregulation of innate immune markers, including genes involved in NF-κB signalling. Results suggest that activation of the innate immune system following DNA damage may contribute to the naturally occurring resistance to neoplastic disease observed in sea urchins. PMID:26911343

  2. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, F.P.; Kuasne, H.; Marchi, F.A.; Miranda, P.M.; Rogatto, S.R.; Achatz, M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25945745

  3. DNA methylation patterns of candidate genes regulated by thymine DNA glycosylase in patients with TP53 germline mutations.

    PubMed

    Fortes, F P; Kuasne, H; Marchi, F A; Miranda, P M; Rogatto, S R; Achatz, M I

    2015-07-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, hereditary cancer predisposition disorder. In Brazil, the p.R337H TP53 founder mutation causes the variant form of LFS, Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome. The occurrence of cancer and age of disease onset are known to vary, even in patients carrying the same mutation, and several mechanisms such as genetic and epigenetic alterations may be involved in this variability. However, the extent of involvement of such events has not been clarified. It is well established that p53 regulates several pathways, including the thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) pathway, which regulates the DNA methylation of several genes. This study aimed to identify the DNA methylation pattern of genes potentially related to the TDG pathway (CDKN2A, FOXA1, HOXD8, OCT4, SOX2, and SOX17) in 30 patients with germline TP53 mutations, 10 patients with wild-type TP53, and 10 healthy individuals. We also evaluated TDG expression in patients with adrenocortical tumors (ADR) with and without the p.R337H TP53 mutation. Gene methylation patterns of peripheral blood DNA samples assessed by pyrosequencing revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, increased TDG expression was observed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in p.R337H carriers with ADR. Considering the rarity of this phenotype and the relevance of these findings, further studies using a larger sample set are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25945745

  4. Implementing Prenatal Diagnosis Based on Cell-Free Fetal DNA: Accurate Identification of Factors Affecting Fetal DNA Yield

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Angela N.; Zimmermann, Bernhard G.; Wang, Darrell; Holloway, Andrew; Chitty, Lyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cell-free fetal DNA is a source of fetal genetic material that can be used for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. Usually constituting less than 10% of the total cell free DNA in maternal plasma, the majority is maternal in origin. Optimizing conditions for maximizing yield of cell-free fetal DNA will be crucial for effective implementation of testing. We explore factors influencing yield of fetal DNA from maternal blood samples, including assessment of collection tubes containing cell-stabilizing agents, storage temperature, interval to sample processing and DNA extraction method used. Methods Microfluidic digital PCR was performed to precisely quantify male (fetal) DNA, total DNA and long DNA fragments (indicative of maternal cellular DNA). Real-time qPCR was used to assay for the presence of male SRY signal in samples. Results Total cell-free DNA quantity increased significantly with time in samples stored in K3EDTA tubes, but only minimally in cell stabilizing tubes. This increase was solely due to the presence of additional long fragment DNA, with no change in quantity of fetal or short DNA, resulting in a significant decrease in proportion of cell-free fetal DNA over time. Storage at 4°C did not prevent these changes. Conclusion When samples can be processed within eight hours of blood draw, K3EDTA tubes can be used. Prolonged transfer times in K3EDTA tubes should be avoided as the proportion of fetal DNA present decreases significantly; in these situations the use of cell stabilising tubes is preferable. The DNA extraction kit used may influence success rate of diagnostic tests. PMID:21998643

  5. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to

  6. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S. ); Prakash, L. )

    1993-06-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Cotransfer of linked eukaryotic genes and efficient transfer of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase by DNA-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, J L; McBride, O W

    1980-01-01

    The efficiency of DNA-mediated transfer of the gene (hprt) for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; IMP: pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8) is dependent upon the recipient cell used. hprt has been transferred into mouse TG8 or Chinese hamster CHTG49 cells at a high frequency, similar to the frequency of the gene (tk) for thymidine kinase (TK; ATP:thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.21) transfer into mouse LMTK- cells (i.e., 10(-6)). In contrast, the frequency of transfer of hprt into mouse A9 cells was about two orders of magnitude less. The identification of efficient recipient cells for hprt transfer permits the use of DNA-mediated transfer as a bioassay for the gene. Cotransfer of the linked tk gene and the gene (galk) for galactokinase (ATP: D-galactose 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.6) to LMTK- cells has been detected once among 87 tk transferrents. This suggests that the distance between the tk and galk genes in the Chinese hamster genome may be smaller than was previously thought. Significant differences between chromosome-mediated and DNA-mediated gene transfer were observed with respect to both the size of the transferred functional genetic fragment and the recipient cell specificity. Images PMID:6929511

  8. Gene expression promoted by the SV40 DNA targeting sequence and the hypoxia-responsive element under normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sacramento, C B; Moraes, J Z; Denapolis, P M A; Han, S W

    2010-08-01

    The main objective of the present study was to find suitable DNA-targeting sequences (DTS) for the construction of plasmid vectors to be used to treat ischemic diseases. The well-known Simian virus 40 nuclear DTS (SV40-DTS) and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) sequences were used to construct plasmid vectors to express the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene (hVEGF). The rate of plasmid nuclear transport and consequent gene expression under normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (less than 5% O2) were determined. Plasmids containing the SV40-DTS or HRE sequences were constructed and used to transfect the A293T cell line (a human embryonic kidney cell line) in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle cells in vivo. Plasmid transport to the nucleus was monitored by real-time PCR, and the expression level of the hVEGF gene was measured by ELISA. The in vitro nuclear transport efficiency of the SV40-DTS plasmid was about 50% lower under hypoxia, while the HRE plasmid was about 50% higher under hypoxia. Quantitation of reporter gene expression in vitro and in vivo, under hypoxia and normoxia, confirmed that the SV40-DTS plasmid functioned better under normoxia, while the HRE plasmid was superior under hypoxia. These results indicate that the efficiency of gene expression by plasmids containing DNA binding sequences is affected by the concentration of oxygen in the medium. PMID:20640386

  9. The effect of acute dose charge particle radiation on expression of DNA repair genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad Akram; Soedipe, Ayodotun; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Shishodia, Shishir; Gridley, Daila S; Pourmand, Nader; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2011-03-01

    The space radiation environment consists of trapped particle radiation, solar particle radiation, and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), in which protons are the most abundant particle type. During missions to the moon or to Mars, the constant exposure to GCR and occasional exposure to particles emitted from solar particle events (SPE) are major health concerns for astronauts. Therefore, in order to determine health risks during space missions, an understanding of cellular responses to proton exposure is of primary importance. The expression of DNA repair genes in response to ionizing radiation (X-rays and gamma rays) has been studied, but data on DNA repair in response to protons is lacking. Using qPCR analysis, we investigated changes in gene expression induced by positively charged particles (protons) in four categories (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy) in nine different DNA repair genes isolated from the testes of irradiated mice. DNA repair genes were selected on the basis of their known functions. These genes include ERCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), ERCC2/NER (opening DNA around the damage, Nucleotide Excision Repair), XRCC1 (5' incision subunit, DNA strand break repair), XRCC3 (DNA break and cross-link repair), XPA (binds damaged DNA in preincision complex), XPC (damage recognition), ATA or ATM (activates checkpoint signaling upon double strand breaks), MLH1 (post-replicative DNA mismatch repair), and PARP1 (base excision repair). Our results demonstrate that ERCC1, PARP1, and XPA genes showed no change at 0.1 Gy radiation, up-regulation at 1.0 Gy radiation (1.09 fold, 7.32 fold, 0.75 fold, respectively), and a remarkable increase in gene expression at 2.0 Gy radiation (4.83 fold, 57.58 fold and 87.58 fold, respectively). Expression of other genes, including ATM and XRCC3, was unchanged at 0.1 and 1.0 Gy radiation but showed up-regulation at 2.0 Gy radiation (2.64 fold and 2.86 fold, respectively). We were unable to detect gene expression for the

  10. Electrochemical DNA sensor for anthrax toxin activator gene atxA-detection of PCR amplicons.

    PubMed

    Das, Ritu; Goel, Ajay K; Sharma, Mukesh K; Upadhyay, Sanjay

    2015-12-15

    We report the DNA probe functionalized electrochemical genosensor for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, specific towards the regulatory gene atxA. The DNA sensor is fabricated on electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticle on self assembled layer of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTS) on GC electrode. DNA hybridization is monitored by differential pulse voltammogram (DPV). The modified GC electrode is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. We also quantified the DNA probe density on electrode surface by the chronocoulometric method. The detection is specific and selective for atxA gene by DNA probe on the electrode surface. No report is available for the detection of B. anthracis by using atxA an anthrax toxin activator gene. In the light of real and complex sample, we have studied the PCR amplicons of 303, 361 and 568 base pairs by using symmetric and asymmetric PCR approaches. The DNA probe of atxA gene efficiently hybridizes with different base pairs of PCR amplicons. The detection limit is found to be 1.0 pM (S/N ratio=3). The results indicate that the DNA sensor is able to detect synthetic target as well as PCR amplicons of different base pairs. PMID:26257186

  11. Sequence and transcription analysis of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzarides, T.; Bankier, A.T.; Satchwell, S.C.; Weston, K.; Tomlinson, P.; Barrell, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis has revealed that the gene coding for the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase is present within the long unique region of the virus genome. Identification is based on extensive amino acid homology between the predicted HCMV open reading frame HFLF2 and the DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus type 1. The authors present here a 5280 base-pair DNA sequence containing the HCMV pol gene, along with the analysis of transcripts encoded within this region. Since HCMV pol also shows homology to the predicted Epstein-Barr virus pol, they were able to analyze the extent of homology between the DNA polymerases of three distantly related herpes viruses, HCMV, Epstein-Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus. The comparison shows that these DNA polymerases exhibit considerable amino acid homology and highlights a number of highly conserved regions; two such regions show homology to sequences within the adenovirus type 2 DNA polymerase. The HCMV pol gene is flanked by open reading frames with homology to those of other herpes viruses; upstream, there is a reading frame homologous to the glycoprotein B gene of herpes simplex virus type I and Epstein-Barr virus, and downstream there is a reading frame homologous to BFLF2 of Epstein-Barr virus.

  12. The Tip of the Tail Needle Affects the Rate of DNA Delivery by Bacteriophage P22

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Justin C.; Gogokhia, Lasha; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Cingolani, Gino; Casjens, Sherwood R.

    2013-01-01

    The P22-like bacteriophages have short tails. Their virions bind to their polysaccharide receptors through six trimeric tailspike proteins that surround the tail tip. These short tails also have a trimeric needle protein that extends beyond the tailspikes from the center of the tail tip, in a position that suggests that it should make first contact with the host’s outer membrane during the infection process. The base of the needle serves as a plug that keeps the DNA in the virion, but role of the needle during adsorption and DNA injection is not well understood. Among the P22-like phages are needle types with two completely different C-terminal distal tip domains. In the phage Sf6-type needle, unlike the other P22-type needle, the distal tip folds into a “knob” with a TNF-like fold, similar to the fiber knobs of bacteriophage PRD1 and Adenovirus. The phage HS1 knob is very similar to that of Sf6, and we report here its crystal structure which, like the Sf6 knob, contains three bound L-glutamate molecules. A chimeric P22 phage with a tail needle that contains the HS1 terminal knob efficiently infects the P22 host, Salmonella enterica, suggesting the knob does not confer host specificity. Likewise, mutations that should abrogate the binding of L-glutamate to the needle do not appear to affect virion function, but several different other genetic changes to the tip of the needle slow down potassium release from the host during infection. These findings suggest that the needle plays a role in phage P22 DNA delivery by controlling the kinetics of DNA ejection into the host. PMID:23951045

  13. Concentration of carp edema virus (CEV) DNA in koi tissues affected by koi sleepy disease (KSD).

    PubMed

    Adamek, Mikolaj; Jung-Schroers, Verena; Hellmann, John; Teitge, Felix; Bergmann, Sven Michael; Runge, Martin; Kleingeld, Dirk Willem; Way, Keith; Stone, David Michael; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2016-05-26

    Carp edema virus (CEV), the causative agent of 'koi sleepy disease' (KSD), appears to be spreading worldwide and to be responsible for losses in koi, ornamental varieties of the common carp Cyprinus carpio. Clinical signs of KSD include lethargic behaviour, swollen gills, sunken eyes and skin alterations and can easily be mistaken for other diseases, such as infection with cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3). To improve the future diagnosis of CEV infection and to provide a tool to better explore the relationship between viral load and clinical disease, we developed a specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) for strains of the virus known to infect koi carp. In samples from several clinically affected koi, CEV-specific DNA was present in a range from 1 to 2,046,000 copies, with a mean of 129,982 copies and a median of 45 copies per 250 ng of isolated DNA, but virus DNA could not be detected in all clinically affected koi. A comparison of the newly developed qPCR, which is based on a dual-labelled probe, to an existing end-point PCR procedure revealed higher specificity and sensitivity of the qPCR and demonstrated that the new protocol could improve CEV detection in koi. In addition to improved diagnosis, the newly developed qPCR test would be a useful research tool. For example, studies on the pathobiology of CEV could employ controlled infection experiments in which the development of clinical signs could be examined in parallel with a quantitative determination of virus load. PMID:27225208

  14. Gene Risk Factors for Age-Related Brain Disorders May Affect Immune System Function

    MedlinePlus

    ... for age-related brain disorders may affect immune system function June 17, 2014 Scientists have discovered gene ... factors for age-related neurological disorders to immune system functions, such as inflammation, offers new insights into ...

  15. Plasimids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Martinez, Susana; Lopez, Paloma; Espinosa, Manuel

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumocccal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme.

  16. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1991-03-26

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumocccal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 figure.

  17. Plasmids containing the gene for DNA polymerase I from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Martinez, S.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.

    1987-08-28

    A method is disclosed for cloning the gene which encodes a DNA polymerase-exonuclease of /und Streptococcus/ /und pneumoniae/. Plasmid pSM22, the vector containing the pneumococcal polA gene, facilitates the expression of 50-fold greater amounts of the PolI enzyme. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. DNA Microarray Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Bacteria Co-Cultured from Swine Feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One factor leading to the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AR) in bacteria is the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. To study this, a DNA microarray was recently developed to detect these genes. To maximize the capability of this microarray, probes were designed and added to detect all AR g...

  19. DETECTION OF EXOGENOUS GENE SEQUENCES IN DISSOLVED DNA FROM AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for the concentration and detection of gene sequences in the dissolved DNA from freshwater and marine environments has been developed. he limit of detection in the dot blot format was 167 fg/ml (100 ml sample) for exogenous herpes simplex thymidine kinase (TK) gene that ...

  20. Versatile types of polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Bingran; Liu, Fusheng; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2014-07-01

    Different polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycations were readily synthesized by assembling multiple β-cyclodextrin-cored star polycations with an adamantane-functionalized dextran via host-guest interaction in the absence or presence of bioreducible linkages. Compared with nanoplexes of the starting star polycation and pDNA, the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes exhibited similarly low cytotoxicity, improved cellular internalization and significantly higher gene transfection efficiencies. The incorporation of disulfide linkages imparted the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes with the advantage of intracellular bioreducibility, resulting in better gene delivery properties. In addition, the antitumor properties of supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes were also investigated using a suicide gene therapy system. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of cyclodextrin-cored polycations with adamantane-functionalized polysaccharides is an effective strategy for the production of new nanoplex delivery systems. PMID:24890703

  1. Endocytosis and Endosomal Trafficking of DNA After Gene Electrotransfer In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rosazza, Christelle; Deschout, Hendrik; Buntz, Annette; Braeckmans, Kevin; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technique for gene delivery into cells and represents an attractive alternative to virus-based methods for clinical applications including gene therapy and DNA vaccination. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms governing DNA internalization and its fate inside cells. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of endocytosis and to quantify the contribution of different routes of cellular trafficking during DNA electrotransfer. To pursue these objectives, we performed flow cytometry and single-particle fluorescence microscopy experiments using inhibitors of endocytosis and endosomal markers. Our results show that ~50% of DNA is internalized by caveolin/raft-mediated endocytosis, 25% by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and 25% by macropinocytosis. During active transport, DNA is routed through multiple endosomal compartments with, in the hour following electrotransfer, 70% found in Rab5 structures, 50% in Rab11-containing organelles and 30% in Rab9 compartments. Later, 60% of DNA colocalizes with Lamp1 vesicles. Because these molecular markers can overlap while following organelles through several steps of trafficking, the percentages do not sum up to 100%. We conclude that electrotransferred DNA uses the classical endosomal trafficking pathways. Our results are important for a generalized understanding of gene electrotransfer, which is crucial for its safe use in clinics. PMID:26859199

  2. Endocytosis and Endosomal Trafficking of DNA After Gene Electrotransfer In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Rosazza, Christelle; Deschout, Hendrik; Buntz, Annette; Braeckmans, Kevin; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technique for gene delivery into cells and represents an attractive alternative to virus-based methods for clinical applications including gene therapy and DNA vaccination. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms governing DNA internalization and its fate inside cells. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of endocytosis and to quantify the contribution of different routes of cellular trafficking during DNA electrotransfer. To pursue these objectives, we performed flow cytometry and single-particle fluorescence microscopy experiments using inhibitors of endocytosis and endosomal markers. Our results show that ~50% of DNA is internalized by caveolin/raft-mediated endocytosis, 25% by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and 25% by macropinocytosis. During active transport, DNA is routed through multiple endosomal compartments with, in the hour following electrotransfer, 70% found in Rab5 structures, 50% in Rab11-containing organelles and 30% in Rab9 compartments. Later, 60% of DNA colocalizes with Lamp1 vesicles. Because these molecular markers can overlap while following organelles through several steps of trafficking, the percentages do not sum up to 100%. We conclude that electrotransferred DNA uses the classical endosomal trafficking pathways. Our results are important for a generalized understanding of gene electrotransfer, which is crucial for its safe use in clinics. PMID:26859199

  3. Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Transfection In vitro: Enhanced Efficiency by Complexation of Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tachibana, Rie; Okamoto, Akio; Azuma, Takashi; Sasaki, Akira; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Osada, Kensuke; Kataoka, Kazunori; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2012-07-01

    Ultrasound-mediated gene transfection in the presence of microbubbles is a recently developed promising nonviral gene delivery method. The main obstacle towards its clinical application is its low transfection efficiency. In this work, we investigate the effect of the complexation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) into polyplex micelles on the transfection efficiency. Complexation changes the structure of pDNA and results in the condensation in size and enhanced stability. Both naked and complexed pDNAs were transfected into cultured cells using ultrasound in the presence of microbubbles. The transfection rate using complexed pDNA is considerably enhanced (from ˜0.92 to ˜1.67%, by ˜82%) compared with the rate using naked pDNA. Our method provides an alternative for the improvement of the transfection efficiency of the ultrasound-mediated method.

  4. Isolation of genomic DNA fragments corresponding to genes modulated in vivo by a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Caubín, J; Iglesias, T; Bernal, J; Muñoz, A; Márquez, G; Barbero, J L; Zaballos, A

    1994-01-01

    A new methodology for the identification of genes modulated by transcription factors in vivo is described. Mouse genomic DNA fragments bound by the thyroid hormone receptor (T3R) were selected and amplified in vitro. Subsequent hybridisation with biotinylated cDNA allowed the selection of those DNA fragments containing binding sites for T3R that corresponded to transcribed DNA. Expression analysis of the corresponding genes showed that more than 80% are indeed modulated by thyroid hormones in vivo in the liver. Together with the presence of consensus binding sites for T3R this result suggests that the selected DNA fragments may contain T3R transcriptional regulatory elements. This method, extensive to other ligand-modulated transcription factors, might be useful to all transcription factors with slight modifications. Images PMID:7937138

  5. Global and gene-specific DNA methylation pattern discriminates cholecystitis from gallbladder cancer patients in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Kagohara, Luciane Tsukamoto; Schussel, Juliana L; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Lebron, Cynthia; Brait, Mariana; Maldonado, Leonel; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Jahuira, Martha; Lopez, Jaime; Letelier, Pablo; Brebi-Mieville, Priscilla; Ili, Carmen; Pandey, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, Aditi; Sidransky, David; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of global and gene-specific DNA methylation changes as potential biomarkers for gallbladder cancer (GBC) in a cohort from Chile. Material & methods DNA methylation was analyzed through an ELISA-based technique and quantitative methylation-specific PCR. Results Global DNA Methylation Index (p = 0.02) and promoter methylation of SSBP2 (p = 0.01) and ESR1 (p = 0.05) were significantly different in GBC when compared with cholecystitis. Receiver curve operator analysis revealed promoter methylation of APC, CDKN2A, ESR1, PGP9.5 and SSBP2, together with the Global DNA Methylation Index, had 71% sensitivity, 95% specificity, a 0.97 area under the curve and a positive predictive value of 90%. Conclusion Global and gene-specific DNA methylation may be useful biomarkers for GBC clinical assessment. PMID:25066711

  6. Large-scale cDNA transfection screening for genes related to cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Dafang; Gong, Yi; Qin, Wenxin; Zhang, Pingping; Li, Jinjun; Wei, Lin; Zhou, Xiaomei; Li, Hongnian; Qiu, Xiaokun; Zhong, Fei; He, Liping; Yu, Jian; Yao, Genfu; Jiang, Huiqiu; Qian, Lianfang; Yu, Ye; Shu, Huiqun; Chen, Xianlian; Xu, Huili; Guo, Minglei; Pan, Zhimei; Chen, Yan; Ge, Chao; Yang, Shengli; Gu, Jianren

    2004-01-01

    A large-scale assay was performed by transfecting 29,910 individual cDNA clones derived from human placenta, fetus, and normal liver tissues into human hepatoma cells and 22,926 cDNA clones into mouse NIH 3T3 cells. Based on the results of colony formation in hepatoma cells and foci formation in NIH 3T3 cells, 3,806 cDNA species (8,237 clones) were found to possess the ability of either stimulating or inhibiting cell growth. Among them, 2,836 (6,958 clones) were known genes, 372 (384 clones) were previously unrecognized genes, and 598 (895 clones) were unigenes of uncharacterized structure and function. A comprehensive analysis of the genes and the potential mechanisms for their involvement in the regulation of cell growth is provided. The genes were classified into four categories: I, genes related to the basic cellular mechanism for growth and survival; II, genes related to the cellular microenvironment; III, genes related to host-cell systemic regulation; and IV, genes of miscellaneous function. The extensive growth-regulatory activity of genes with such highly diversified functions suggests that cancer may be related to multiple levels of cellular and systemic controls. The present assay provides a direct genomewide functional screening method. It offers a better understanding of the basic machinery of oncogenesis, including previously undescribed systemic regulatory mechanisms, and also provides a tool for gene discovery with potential clinical applications. PMID:15498874

  7. Decreased Expression of a Gene Caused by a T-DNA Insertion in an Adjacent Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Kentaro; Kawabayashi, Takenori; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    ALADIN is a component of the nuclear pore complex in higher eukaryotes. An Arabidopsis knockout line that had a T-DNA insertion in the ALADIN gene was defective in plant growth and thylakoid development and had reduced photosynthetic activity resulting from lower chlorophyll accumulation. The mutation appeared to decrease the level of chloroplast RuBisCO subunits and PSBA and PGL35 proteins. Unexpectedly, the T-DNA insertion in the ALADIN gene decreased the expression of the neighboring gene PSRP5, which functions in translation in chloroplasts. The mutant phenotype was rescued by expressing PSRP5, but not by expressing ALADIN. The abnormal phenotypes were also detected in an artificial microRNA (amiRNA)-mediated PSRPS5 knockdown, but not in an amiRNA-mediated ALADIN knockdown line. Thus, users of T-DNA insertions should be aware that a T-DNA insertion in one gene can have effects on the expression of neighboring genes. PMID:26828726

  8. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  9. Biochemical studies of DNA strand break repair and molecular characterization of mei-41, a gene involved in DNA break repair

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to repair X-irradiation induced single-strand DNA breaks was examined in mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis demonstrated that examined stocks possess a normal capacity to repair X-ray induced single-strand breaks. One of the mutants in this study, mei-41, has been shown to be involved in a number of DNA metabolizing functions. A molecular characterization of this mutant is presented. A cDNA hybridizing to genomic DNA both proximal and distal to a P element inducing a mei-41 mutation was isolated from both embryonic and adult female recombinant lambda phage libraries. A 2.2 kilobase embryonic cDNA clone was sequenced; the sequence of an open reading frame was identified which would predict a protein of 384 amino acids with a molecular weight of 43,132 daltons. An examination of homologies to sequences in protein and nucleic acid data bases revealed no sequences with significant homology to mei-41, however, two potential Zinc-finger domains were identified. Analysis of RNA hybridizing to the embryonic cDNA demonstrated the existence of a major 2.2 kilobase transcript expressed primarily in embryos and adult flies. An examination of the transcription of this gene in mei-41 mutants revealed significant variation from wild-type, an indication that the embryonic cDNA does represent a mei-41 transcript. Expression in tissues from adult animals demonstrated that the 2.2 kilobase RNA is expressed primarily in reproductive tissues. A 3.8kb transcript is the major species of RNA in the adult head and thorax. Evidence is presented which implies that expression of the mei-41 gene is strongly induced by exposure of certain cells to mutagens.

  10. Unusual properties of regulatory DNA from the Drosophila engrailed gene: three "pairing-sensitive" sites within a 1.6-kb region.

    PubMed

    Kassis, J A

    1994-03-01

    We have previously shown that a 2-kb fragment of engrailed DNA can suppress expression of a linked marker gene, white, in the P element vector CaSpeR. This suppression is dependent on the presence of two copies of engrailed DNA-containing P elements (P[en]) in proximity in the Drosophila genome (either in cis or in trans). In this study, the 2-kb fragment was dissected and found to contain three fragments of DNA which could mediate white suppression [called "pairing-sensitive sites" (PS)]. A PS site was also identified in regulatory DNA from the Drosophila escargot gene. The eye colors of six different P[en] insertions in the escargot gene suggest an interaction between P[en]-encoded and genome-encoded PS sites. I hypothesize that white gene expression from P[en] is repressed by the formation of a protein complex which is initiated at the engrailed PS sites and also requires interactions with flanking genomic DNA. Genes were sought which influence the function of PS sites. Mutations in some Polycomb and trithorax group genes were found to affect the eye color from some P[en] insertion sites. However, different mutations affected expression from different P[en] insertion sites and no one mutation was found to affect expression from all P[en] insertion sites examined. These results suggest that white expression from P[en] is not directly regulated by members of the Polycomb and trithorax group genes, but in some cases can be influenced by them. I propose that engrailed PS sites normally act to promote interactions between distantly located engrailed regulatory sites and the engrailed promoter. PMID:8005412

  11. Effects of Choline on DNA Methylation and Macronutrient Metabolic Gene Expression in In Vitro Models of Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinyin; Greenwald, Esther; Jack-Roberts, Chauntelle

    2016-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient that plays an important role in lipid metabolism and DNA methylation. Studies in rodents suggest that choline may adversely affect glycemic control, yet studies in humans are lacking. Using the human hepatic and placental cells, HepG2 and BeWo, respectively, we examined the interaction between choline and glucose treatments. In HepG2 cells, choline supplementation (1 mM) increased global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase expression in both low-glucose (5 mM) and high-glucose (35 mM) conditions. Choline supplementation increased the expression of peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (ACOX1), which mediates fatty acid β-oxidation, especially in the high-glucose condition. High-glucose exposure increased the transcription of the gluconeogenic gene phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), while choline supplementation mitigated such increase. Compared to HepG2 cells, the placenta-derived BeWo cells were relatively unresponsive to either high-glucose or -choline treatment. In conclusion, choline and glucose interacted to affect macronutrient metabolic genes, yet there was no indication that choline may worsen glycemic control in these in vitro human cell culture models. PMID:27081315

  12. Stress and corticosteroids regulate rat hippocampal mitochondrial DNA gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Richard G; Seligsohn, Ma'ayan; Rubin, Todd G; Griffiths, Brian B; Ozdemir, Yildirim; Pfaff, Donald W; Datson, Nicole A; McEwen, Bruce S

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in stress and circadian regulation, and produce many actions via the GC receptor (GR), which is classically understood to function as a nuclear transcription factor. However, the nuclear genome is not the only genome in eukaryotic cells. The mitochondria also contain a small circular genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that encodes 13 polypeptides. Recent work has established that, in the brain and other systems, the GR is translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondria and that stress and corticosteroids have a direct influence on mtDNA transcription and mitochondrial physiology. To determine if stress affects mitochondrially transcribed mRNA (mtRNA) expression, we exposed adult male rats to both acute and chronic immobilization stress and examined mtRNA expression using quantitative RT-PCR. We found that acute stress had a main effect on mtRNA expression and that expression of NADH dehydrogenase 1, 3, and 6 (ND-1, ND-3, ND-6) and ATP synthase 6 (ATP-6) genes was significantly down-regulated. Chronic stress induced a significant up-regulation of ND-6 expression. Adrenalectomy abolished acute stress-induced mtRNA regulation, demonstrating GC dependence. ChIP sequencing of GR showed that corticosterone treatment induced a dose-dependent association of the GR with the control region of the mitochondrial genome. These findings demonstrate GR and stress-dependent transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial genome in vivo and are consistent with previous work linking stress and GCs with changes in the function of brain mitochondria. PMID:27457949

  13. Identification of Genes Affecting Vacuole Membrane Fragmentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Michaillat, Lydie; Mayer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium of membrane fusion and fission influences the volume and copy number of organelles. Fusion of yeast vacuoles has been well characterized but their fission and the mechanisms determining vacuole size and abundance remain poorly understood. We therefore attempted to systematically characterize factors necessary for vacuole fission. Here, we present results of an in vivo screening for deficiencies in vacuolar fragmentation activity of an ordered collection deletion mutants, representing 4881 non-essential genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen identified 133 mutants with strong defects in vacuole fragmentation. These comprise numerous known fragmentation factors, such as the Fab1p complex, Tor1p, Sit4p and the V-ATPase, thus validating the approach. The screen identified many novel factors promoting vacuole fragmentation. Among those are 22 open reading frames of unknown function and three conspicuous clusters of proteins with known function. The clusters concern the ESCRT machinery, adaptins, and lipases, which influence the production of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. A common feature of these factors of known function is their capacity to change membrane curvature, suggesting that they might promote vacuole fragmentation via this property. PMID:23383298

  14. Versatile types of polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Bingran; Liu, Fusheng; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2014-06-01

    Different polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycations were readily synthesized by assembling multiple β-cyclodextrin-cored star polycations with an adamantane-functionalized dextran via host-guest interaction in the absence or presence of bioreducible linkages. Compared with nanoplexes of the starting star polycation and pDNA, the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes exhibited similarly low cytotoxicity, improved cellular internalization and significantly higher gene transfection efficiencies. The incorporation of disulfide linkages imparted the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes with the advantage of intracellular bioreducibility, resulting in better gene delivery properties. In addition, the antitumor properties of supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes were also investigated using a suicide gene therapy system. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of cyclodextrin-cored polycations with adamantane-functionalized polysaccharides is an effective strategy for the production of new nanoplex delivery systems.Different polysaccharide-based supramolecular polycations were readily synthesized by assembling multiple β-cyclodextrin-cored star polycations with an adamantane-functionalized dextran via host-guest interaction in the absence or presence of bioreducible linkages. Compared with nanoplexes of the starting star polycation and pDNA, the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes exhibited similarly low cytotoxicity, improved cellular internalization and significantly higher gene transfection efficiencies. The incorporation of disulfide linkages imparted the supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes with the advantage of intracellular bioreducibility, resulting in better gene delivery properties. In addition, the antitumor properties of supramolecular polycation/pDNA nanoplexes were also investigated using a suicide gene therapy system. The present study demonstrates that the proper assembly of cyclodextrin-cored polycations

  15. DNA repair genes are selectively mutated in diffuse large B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Noel FCC; Peng, Roujun; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Wu, Chenglin; Sörqvist, Elin Falk; Berglund, Mattias; Chen, Longyun; Gao, Zhibo; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Lisboa, Susana; Roos, Fredrik; van Wezel, Tom; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Rosenquist, Richard; Sundström, Christer; Enblad, Gunilla; Nilsson, Mats; Zeng, Yixin; Kipling, David

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are fundamental for B cell development, which relies on the somatic diversification of the immunoglobulin genes by V(D)J recombination, somatic hypermutation, and class switch recombination. Their failure is postulated to promote genomic instability and malignant transformation in B cells. By performing targeted sequencing of 73 key DNA repair genes in 29 B cell lymphoma samples, somatic and germline mutations were identified in various DNA repair pathways, mainly in diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). Mutations in mismatch repair genes (EXO1, MSH2, and MSH6) were associated with microsatellite instability, increased number of somatic insertions/deletions, and altered mutation signatures in tumors. Somatic mutations in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) genes (DCLRE1C/ARTEMIS, PRKDC/DNA-PKcs, XRCC5/KU80, and XRCC6/KU70) were identified in four DLBCL tumors and cytogenetic analyses revealed that translocations involving the immunoglobulin-heavy chain locus occurred exclusively in NHEJ-mutated samples. The novel mutation targets, CHEK2 and PARP1, were further screened in expanded DLBCL cohorts, and somatic as well as novel and rare germline mutations were identified in 8 and 5% of analyzed tumors, respectively. By correlating defects in a subset of DNA damage response and repair genes with genomic instability events in tumors, we propose that these genes play a role in DLBCL lymphomagenesis. PMID:23960188

  16. Structures of herpes simplex virus type 1 genes required for replication of virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D J; Dalrymple, M A; Dolan, A; McNab, D; Perry, L J; Taylor, P; Challberg, M D

    1988-01-01

    Recently, a method has been developed to identify regions in the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) which contain genes required for DNA synthesis from an HSV-1 origin of DNA replication, and seven genomic loci have been identified as representing the necessary and sufficient gene set for such replication (C. A. Wu, N. J. Nelson, D. J. McGeoch, and M. D. Challberg, J. Virol. 62:435-443, 1988). Two of the loci represent the well-known genes for DNA polymerase and major DNA-binding protein, but the remainder had little or no previous characterization. In this report we present the DNA sequences of the five newly identified genes and their deduced transcript organizations and encoded amino acid sequences. These genes were designated UL5, UL8, UL9, UL42, and UL52 and were predicted to encode proteins with molecular weights of, respectively, 99,000, 80,000, 94,000, 51,000, and 114,000. All of these genes had clear counterparts in the genome of the related alphaherpesvirus varicella-zoster virus, but only UL5 and UL52 were detectably conserved in the distantly related gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus, as judged by amino acid sequence similarity. The sequence of the UL5 protein, and of its counterparts in the other viruses, contained a region closely resembling known ATP-binding sites; this could be indicative, for instance, of a helicase or primase activity. PMID:2826807

  17. The role of bacteriophage T7 gene 2 protein in DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, P Q; North, R; Molineux, I J

    1980-01-01

    The in vivo function of the gene 2 protein of bacteriophage T7 has been examined. The gene 2 protein appears to modulate the activity of the gene 3 endonuclease in order to prevent the premature degradation of any newly-formed DNA concatemers. This modulation is not however a direct interacton between the two proteins. In single-burst experiments rifamycin can substitute for the gene 2 protein, allowing formation of fast-sedimenting replicative DNA intermediates and progeny phage production. This suggests that the sole function of the gene 2 protein is inhibition of the host RNA polymerase and that the latter enzyme directs or promotes the endonucleolytic action of the gene 3 protein. PMID:7001361

  18. The Somatic Nature of Cancer Allows It to Affect Highly Constrained Genes.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, Sheli L; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is special among genetic disorders in two major ways: first, cancer is a disease of the most basic of cellular functions, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Second, in contrast to most genetic disorders that are mediated by germline (hereditary) mutations, cancer is largely a somatic disease. Here we show that these two traits are not detached and that it is the somatic nature of cancer that allows it to affect the most basic of cellular functions. We begin by demonstrating that cancer genes are both more functionally central (as measured by their patterns of expression and protein interaction) and more evolutionarily constrained than non-cancer genetic disease genes. We then compare genes that are only modified somatically in cancer (hereinafter referred to as "somatic cancer genes") to those that can also be modified in a hereditary manner, contributing to cancer development (hereinafter referred to as "hereditary cancer genes"). We show that both somatic and hereditary cancer genes are much more functionally central than genes contributing to non-cancer genetic disorders. At the same time, hereditary cancer genes are only as constrained as non-cancer hereditary disease genes, while somatic cancer genes tend to be much more constrained in evolution. Thus, it appears that it is the somatic nature of cancer that allows it to modify the most constrained genes and, therefore, affect the most basic of cellular functions. PMID:27190005

  19. Cationized bovine serum albumin as gene carrier: Influence of specific secondary structure on DNA complexibility and gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianwei; Li, Bangbang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Youxiang

    2016-07-01

    In this research, BSA, one of the natural rigid globular proteins with ca. 51% of α-helix secondary structure, was utilized to prepare cationized BSA (cBSA) as gene carrier. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) or polyethylenimine (PEI1800) was grafted to BSA with different grafting levels. Based on the circular dichoism (CD) spectra, all cBSA remained α-helical structure to some degree. This was exciting to endow cBSA with quite different DNA complexibility and cellular biology behavior from the random coiled and flexible polycations such as PEI and poly-l-lysine (PLL). Strangely, the DNA condensability decreased with the increment of TEPA or PEI1800 grafting level. Also, the cBSA could condense DNA effectively to form irregular nanoparticles around 50-200nm above N/P ratio of 10. On account of the excellent hydration of BSA, the cBSA/DNA complexes revealed good colloidal stability under physiological salt condition. Cell culture experiments indicated this BSA-based gene carrier possessed good cellular compatibility. Surprisingly, cBSA/DNA complexes could be uptaken excellently by up to 90% cells. This might be owing to the agitation effect of α-helical structure and the positive potential of these complexes. BSA-PEI1800/DNA complexes with quick endosome escape even had transfection efficiency as high as PEI25k/DNA complexes. Overall, this paper provided us the potential of cBSA as gene carrier and might have some instructions in the design of protein-based gene delivery system. PMID:26998865

  20. Immortality, but not oncogenic transformation, of primary human cells leads to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Katrina; Clouaire, Thomas; Bao, Xun X.; Kemp, Sadie E.; Xenophontos, Maria; de Las Heras, Jose Ignacio; Stancheva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Tumourigenic transformation of normal cells into cancer typically involves several steps resulting in acquisition of unlimited growth potential, evasion of apoptosis and non-responsiveness to growth inhibitory signals. Both genetic and epigenetic changes can contribute to cancer development and progression. Given the vast genetic heterogeneity of human cancers and difficulty to monitor cancer-initiating events in vivo, the precise relationship between acquisition of genetic mutations and the temporal progression of epigenetic alterations in transformed cells is largely unclear. Here, we use an in vitro model system to investigate the contribution of cellular immortality and oncogenic transformation of primary human cells to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression. Our data demonstrate that extension of replicative life span of the cells is sufficient to induce accumulation of DNA methylation at gene promoters and large-scale changes in gene expression in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, continuous expression of cooperating oncogenes in immortalized cells, although essential for anchorage-independent growth and evasion of apoptosis, does not affect de novo DNA methylation at promoters and induces subtle expression changes. Taken together, these observations imply that cellular immortality promotes epigenetic adaptation to highly proliferative state, whereas transforming oncogenes confer additional properties to transformed human cells. PMID:24371281

  1. Human Endometrial DNA Methylome Is Cycle-Dependent and Is Associated With Gene Expression Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Houshdaran, Sahar; Zelenko, Zara; Irwin, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Human endometrium undergoes major gene expression changes, resulting in altered cellular functions in response to cyclic variations in circulating estradiol and progesterone, largely mediated by transcription factors and nuclear receptors. In addition to classic modulators, epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene expression during development in response to environmental factors and in some diseases and have roles in steroid hormone action. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation plays a role in gene expression regulation in human endometrium in different hormonal milieux. High throughput, genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of endometrial samples in proliferative, early secretory, and midsecretory phases revealed dynamic DNA methylation patterns with segregation of proliferative from secretory phase samples by unsupervised cluster analysis of differentially methylated genes. Changes involved different frequencies of gain and loss of methylation within or outside CpG islands. Comparison of changes in transcriptomes and corresponding DNA methylomes from the same samples revealed association of DNA methylation and gene expression in a number of loci, some important in endometrial biology. Human endometrial stromal fibroblasts treated in vitro with estradiol and progesterone exhibited DNA methylation changes in several genes observed in proliferative and secretory phase tissues, respectively. Taken together, the data support the observation that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in gene expression regulation in human endometrium in different hormonal milieux, adding endometrium to a small number of normal adult tissues exhibiting dynamic DNA methylation. The data also raise the possibility that the interplay between steroid hormone and methylome dynamics regulates normal endometrial functions and, if abnormal, may result in endometrial dysfunction and associated disorders. PMID:24877562

  2. Integrative DNA methylation and gene expression analysis in high-grade soft tissue sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-grade soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous, complex group of aggressive malignant tumors showing mesenchymal differentiation. Recently, soft tissue sarcomas have increasingly been classified on the basis of underlying genetic alterations; however, the role of aberrant DNA methylation in these tumors is not well understood and, consequently, the usefulness of methylation-based classification is unclear. Results We used the Infinium HumanMethylation27 platform to profile DNA methylation in 80 primary, untreated high-grade soft tissue sarcomas, representing eight relevant subtypes, two non-neoplastic fat samples and 14 representative sarcoma cell lines. The primary samples were partitioned into seven stable clusters. A classification algorithm identified 216 CpG sites, mapping to 246 genes, showing different degrees of DNA methylation between these seven groups. The differences between the clusters were best represented by a set of eight CpG sites located in the genes SPEG, NNAT, FBLN2, PYROXD2, ZNF217, COL14A1, DMRT2 and CDKN2A. By integrating DNA methylation and mRNA expression data, we identified 27 genes showing negative and three genes showing positive correlation. Compared with non-neoplastic fat, NNAT showed DNA hypomethylation and inverse gene expression in myxoid liposarcomas, and DNA hypermethylation and inverse gene expression in dedifferentiated and pleomorphic liposarcomas. Recovery of NNAT in a hypermethylated myxoid liposarcoma cell line decreased cell migration and viability. Conclusions Our analysis represents the first comprehensive integration of DNA methylation and transcriptional data in primary high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. We propose novel biomarkers and genes relevant for pathogenesis, including NNAT as a potential tumor suppressor in myxoid liposarcomas. PMID:24345474

  3. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  4. Artificial zinc finger DNA binding domains: versatile tools for genome engineering and modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mir A; Barrow, Joeva J; Shen, Yong; Haq, Md Imdadul; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Genome editing and alteration of gene expression by synthetic DNA binding activities gained a lot of momentum over the last decade. This is due to the development of new DNA binding molecules with enhanced binding specificity. The most commonly used DNA binding modules are zinc fingers (ZFs), TALE-domains, and the RNA component of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These binding modules are fused or linked to either nucleases that cut the DNA and induce DNA repair processes, or to protein domains that activate or repress transcription of genes close to the targeted site in the genome. This review focuses on the structure, design, and applications of ZF DNA binding domains (ZFDBDs). ZFDBDs are relatively small and have been shown to penetrate the cell membrane without additional tags suggesting that they could be delivered to cells without a DNA or RNA intermediate. Advanced algorithms that are based on extensive knowledge of the mode of ZF/DNA interactions are used to design the amino acid composition of ZFDBDs so that they bind to unique sites in the genome. Off-target binding has been a concern for all synthetic DNA binding molecules. Thus, increasing the specificity and affinity of ZFDBDs will have a significant impact on their use in analytical or therapeutic settings. PMID:25989233

  5. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Córdoba-Cañero, Dolores; Qian, Weiqiang; Zhu, Xiaohong; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Huiming; Ariza, Rafael R; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis. PMID:25569774

  6. Thyroid hormone-regulated brain mitochondrial genes revealed by differential cDNA cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Núñez, E; Menéndez-Hurtado, A; Garesse, R; Santos, A; Perez-Castillo, A

    1995-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) plays a critical role in the development of the central nervous system and its deficiency during the early neonatal period results in severe brain damage. However the mechanisms involved and the genes specifically regulated by T3 during brain development are largely unknown. By using a subtractive hybridization technique we have isolated a number of cDNAs that represented mitochondrial genes (12S and 16S rRNAs and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III). The steady state level of all three RNAs was reduced in hypothyroid animals during the postnatal period and T3 administration restored control levels. During fetal life the level of 16S rRNA was decreased in the brain of hypothyroid animals, suggesting a prenatal effect of thyroid hormone on brain development. Since T3 does not affect the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the results suggest that the effect of T3 is at transcriptional and/or postranscriptional level. In addition, the transcript levels for two nuclear-encoded mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunits: subunits IV and VIc were also decreased in the brains of hypothyroid animals. Hypothyroidism-induced changes in mitochondrial RNAs were followed by a concomitant 40% decrease in cytochrome c oxidase activity. This study shows that T3 is an important regulator of mitochondrial function in the neonatal brain and, more importantly, provides a molecular basis for the specific action of this hormone in the developing brain. Images PMID:7635984

  7. Satellite DNA Modulates Gene Expression in the Beetle Tribolium castaneum after Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Feliciello, Isidoro; Akrap, Ivana; Ugarković, Đurđica

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding repetitive DNAs have been proposed to perform a gene regulatory role, however for tandemly repeated satellite DNA no such role was defined until now. Here we provide the first evidence for a role of satellite DNA in the modulation of gene expression under specific environmental conditions. The major satellite DNA TCAST1 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum is preferentially located within pericentromeric heterochromatin but is also dispersed as single repeats or short arrays in the vicinity of protein-coding genes within euchromatin. Our results show enhanced suppression of activity of TCAST1-associated genes and slower recovery of their activity after long-term heat stress relative to the same genes without associated TCAST1 satellite DNA elements. The level of gene suppression is not influenced by the distance of TCAST1 elements from the associated genes up to 40 kb from the genes’ transcription start sites, but it does depend on the copy number of TCAST1 repeats within an element, being stronger for the higher number of copies. The enhanced gene suppression correlates with the enrichment of the repressive histone marks H3K9me2/3 at dispersed TCAST1 elements and their flanking regions as well as with increased expression of TCAST1 satellite DNA. The results reveal transient, RNAi based heterochromatin formation at dispersed TCAST1 repeats and their proximal regions as a mechanism responsible for enhanced silencing of TCAST1-associated genes. Differences in the pattern of distribution of TCAST1 elements contribute to gene expression diversity among T. castaneum strains after long-term heat stress and might have an impact on adaptation to different environmental conditions. PMID:26275223

  8. High dietary intake of sodium selenite does not affect gene mutation frequency in rat colon and liver.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Uthus, Eric O; Ross, Sharon A; Davis, Cindy D

    2009-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that selenium (Se) is protective against dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced preneoplastic colon cancer lesions, and protection against DNA damage has been hypothesized to be one mechanism for the anticancer effect of Se. The present study was designed to determine whether dietary selenite affects somatic mutation frequency in vivo. We used the Big Blue transgenic model to evaluate the in vivo mutation frequency of the cII gene in rats fed either a Se-deficient (0 microg Se/g diet) or Se-supplemented diet (0.2 or 2 microg Se/g diet; n = 3 rats/diet in experiment 1 and n = 5 rats/group in experiment 2) and injected with DMH (25 mg/kg body weight, i.p.). There were no significant differences in body weight between the Se-deficient and Se-supplemented (0.2 or 2 microg Se/g diet) rats, but the activities of liver glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase and concentration of liver Se were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) in Se-deficient rats compared to rats supplemented with Se. We found no effect of dietary Se on liver 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Gene mutation frequency was significantly lower in liver (p < 0.001) than that of colon regardless of dietary Se. However, there were no differences in gene mutation frequency in DNA from colon mucosa or liver from rats fed the Se-deficient diet compared to those fed the Se-supplemented (0.2 or 2 microg Se/g diet) diet. Although gene mutations have been implicated in the etiology of cancer, our data suggest that decreasing gene mutation is not likely a key mechanism through which dietary selenite exerts its anticancer action against DMH-induced preneoplastic colon cancer lesions in a Big Blue transgenic rat model. PMID:19263001

  9. Association of DNA Methylation Levels with Tissue-specific Expression of Adipogenic and Lipogenic Genes in Longissimus dorsi Muscle of Korean Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Baik, M.; Vu, T. T. T.; Piao, M. Y.; Kang, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation status, may regulate adipogenesis and lipogenesis, thus affecting intramuscular fat (IMF) deposition in longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) of beef cattle. In Korean cattle steers, the LM consists mainly of muscle tissue. However, the LM tissue also contains IMF. We compared the gene expression levels between the IMF and muscle portions of the LM after tissue separation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA levels of both adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma isoform 1 (PPARG1) and lipogenic fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) were higher (p<0.01) in the IMF than in the muscle portion of the LM. We determined DNA methylation levels of regulatory regions of the PPARG1 and FABP4 genes by pyrosequencing of genomic DNA. DNA methylation levels of two of three CpG sites in the PPARG1 gene promoter region were lower (p<0.05) in the IMF than in the muscle portion of the LM. DNA methylation levels of all five CpG sites from the FABP4 gene promoter region were also lower (p<0.001) in the IMF than in the muscle portion. Thus, mRNA levels of both PPARG1 and FABP4 genes were inversely correlated with DNA methylation levels in regulatory regions of CpG sites of the corresponding gene. Our findings suggest that DNA methylation status regulates tissue-specific expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the IMF and muscle portions of LM tissue in Korean cattle. PMID:25178302

  10. DNA polymorphism-diet-cofactor-development hypothesis and the gene-teratogen model for schizophrenia and other developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W G

    1999-08-20

    Three problems in identifying genes causing schizophrenia and other developmental disorders may be locus heterogeneity, high disease allele frequency, and unknown mode of inheritance. The DNA polymorphism-diet-cofactor-development (DDCD) hypothesis addresses the first two. The gene-teratogen model addresses the third. The DDCD hypothesis is that schizophrenia results in part from brain abnormality in utero from the aggregate effect of multiple mutations of small effect of genes related to important cofactors (e.g., folate, cobalamin, or pyridoxine) potentiated by maternal dietary deficiency of these cofactors and by pregnancy. The effect results from insufficiency of the cofactors and from resulting effects such as impaired DNA synthesis, immune deficiency, effects on niacin and serotonin metabolism, and teratogens, e.g., hyperhomocysteinemia. The hypothesis addresses all of the unusual features of schizophrenia: e.g., decreased brain gray matter, birth-month effect, geographical differences, socioeconomic predilection, association with obstetrical abnormalities, decreased incidence of rheumatoid arthritis, and association with famine and viral epidemics. In the gene-teratogen model, a teratogenic effect in utero produces a developmental disorder through a teratogenic locus and a modifying or specificity locus, as well as through environmental factors. An example is the major intrauterine effect seen in offspring of phenylketonuric mothers. Thus, the mode of inheritance of genes acting prenatally may in some cases be fundamentally different from that of genes acting postnatally. The model is interesting because it is simple and because teratogenic loci will be difficult to locate by conventional linkage mapping techniques due to misspecification of the affection status of both mother and affected children. A new study design is suggested for identifying teratogenic loci. PMID:10402496

  11. Class I HDACs Affect DNA Replication, Repair, and Chromatin Structure: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Kristy R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The contribution of epigenetic alterations to cancer development and progression is becoming increasingly clear, prompting the development of epigenetic therapies. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) represent one of the first classes of such therapy. Two HDIs, Vorinostat and Romidepsin, are broad-spectrum inhibitors that target multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) and are FDA approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, the mechanism of action and the basis for the cancer-selective effects of these inhibitors are still unclear. Recent Advances: While the anti-tumor effects of HDIs have traditionally been attributed to their ability to modify gene expression after the accumulation of histone acetylation, recent studies have identified the effects of HDACs on DNA replication, DNA repair, and genome stability. In addition, the HDIs available in the clinic target multiple HDACs, making it difficult to assign either their anti-tumor effects or their associated toxicities to the inhibition of a single protein. However, recent studies in mouse models provide insights into the tissue-specific functions of individual HDACs and their involvement in mediating the effects of HDI therapy. Critical Issues: Here, we describe how altered replication contributes to the efficacy of HDAC-targeted therapies as well as discuss what knowledge mouse models have provided to our understanding of the specific functions of class I HDACs, their potential involvement in tumorigenesis, and how their disruption may contribute to toxicities associated with HDI treatment. Future Directions: Impairment of DNA replication by HDIs has important therapeutic implications. Future studies should assess how best to exploit these findings for therapeutic gain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 51–65. PMID:24730655

  12. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanpin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns.Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer inHCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis. PMID:27240978

  13. Genome-wide analysis reveals regulatory role of G4 DNA in gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhuo; Zhao, Yiqiang; Li, Ning

    2008-01-01

    G-quadruplex or G4 DNA, a four-stranded DNA structure formed in G-rich sequences, has been hypothesized to be a structural motif involved in gene regulation. In this study, we examined the regulatory role of potential G4 DNA motifs (PG4Ms) located in the putative transcriptional regulatory region (TRR, –500 to +500) of genes across the human genome. We found that PG4Ms in the 500-bp region downstream of the annotated transcription start site (TSS; PG4MD500) are associated with gene expression. Generally, PG4MD500-positive genes are expressed at higher levels than PG4MD500-negative genes, and an increased number of PG4MD500 provides a cumulative effect. This observation was validated by controlling for attributes, including gene family, function, and promoter similarity. We also observed an asymmetric pattern of PG4MD500 distribution between strands, whereby the frequency of PG4MD500 in the coding strand is generally higher than that in the template strand. Further analysis showed that the presence of PG4MD500 and its strand asymmetry are associated with significant enrichment of RNAP II at the putative TRR. On the basis of these results, we propose a model of G4 DNA-mediated stimulation of transcription with the hypothesis that PG4MD500 contributes to gene transcription by maintaining the DNA in an open conformation, while the asymmetric distribution of PG4MD500 considerably reduces the probability of blocking the progression of the RNA polymerase complex on the template strand. Our findings provide a comprehensive view of the regulatory function of G4 DNA in gene transcription. PMID:18096746

  14. Different patterns of evolution for duplicated DNA repair genes in bacteria of the Xanthomonadales group

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Galhardo, Rodrigo S; Lage, Claudia; Lima-Bessa, Keronninn M; Aires, Karina A; Menck, Carlos FM

    2004-01-01

    Background DNA repair genes encode proteins that protect organisms against genetic damage generated by environmental agents and by-products of cell metabolism. The importance of these genes in life maintenance is supported by their high conservation, and the presence of duplications of such genes may be easily traced, especially in prokaryotic genomes. Results The genome sequences of two Xanthomonas species were used as the basis for phylogenetic analyses of genes related to DNA repair that were found duplicated. Although 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses confirm their classification at the basis of the gamma proteobacteria subdivision, differences were found in the origin of the various genes investigated. Except for lexA, detected as a recent duplication, most of the genes in more than one copy are represented by two highly divergent orthologs. Basically, one of such duplications is frequently positioned close to other gamma proteobacteria, but the second is often positioned close to unrelated bacteria. These orthologs may have occurred from old duplication events, followed by extensive gene loss, or were originated from lateral gene transfer (LGT), as is the case of the uvrD homolog. Conclusions Duplications of DNA repair related genes may result in redundancy and also improve the organisms' responses to environmental challenges. Most of such duplications, in Xanthomonas, seem to have arisen from old events and possibly enlarge both functional and evolutionary genome potentiality. PMID:15333143

  15. An improved method of gene synthesis based on DNA works software and overlap extension PCR.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingxue; Mao, Runqian; Li, Baojian; Liu, Qiuyun; Xu, Peilin; Li, Gang

    2007-11-01

    A bottleneck in recent gene synthesis technologies is the high cost of oligonucleotide synthesis and post-synthesis sequencing. In this article, a simple and rapid method for low-cost gene synthesis technology was developed based on DNAWorks program and an improved single-step overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR). This method enables any DNA sequence to be synthesized with few errors, then any mutated sites could be corrected by site-specific mutagenesis technology or PCR amplification-assembly method, which can amplify different DNA fragments of target gene followed by assembly into an entire gene through their overlapped region. Eventually, full-length DNA sequence without error was obtained via this novel method. Our method is simple, rapid and low-cost, and also easily amenable to automation based on a DNAWorks design program and defined set of OE-PCR reaction conditions suitable for different genes. Using this method, several genes including Manganese peroxidase gene (Mnp) of Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium), Laccase gene (Lac) of Trametes versicolor (T. versicolor) and Cip1 peroxidase gene (cip 1) of Coprinus cinereus (C. cinereus) with sizes ranging from 1.0 kb to 1.5 kb have been synthesized successfully. PMID:17952664

  16. Gene expression profile analysis in astaxanthin-induced Haematococcus pluvialis using a cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyunsuk; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Jin, EonSeon

    2006-05-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Volvocales) is known for the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3, 3'-dihydroxy-beta, beta-carotene-4, 4'-dione) accumulation, which is induced under unfavorable culture conditions. In this work, we used cDNA microarray analysis to screen differentially expressed genes in H. pluvialis under astaxanthin-inductive culture conditions, such as combination of cell exposure to high irradiance and nutrient deprivation. Among the 965 genes in the cDNA array, there are 144 genes exhibiting differential expression (twofold changes) under these conditions. A significant decrease in the expression of photosynthesis-related genes was shown in astaxanthin-accumulating cells (red cells). Defense- or stress-related genes and signal transduction genes were also induced in the red cells. A comparison of microarray and real-time PCR analysis showed good correlation between the differentially expressed genes by the two methods. Our results indicate that the cDNA microarray approach, as employed in this work, can be relied upon and used to monitor gene expression profiles in H. pluvialis. In addition, the genes that were differentially expressed during astaxanthin induction are suitable candidates for further study and can be used as tools for dissecting the molecular mechanism of this unique pigment accumulation process in the green alga H. pluvialis. PMID:16320067

  17. Herpes simplex ICP27 mutant viruses exhibit reduced expression of specific DNA replication genes.

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, S L; Knipe, D M

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants with certain lesions in the ICP27 gene show a 5- to 10-fold reduction in viral DNA synthesis. To determine how ICP27 promotes amplification of viral DNA, we examined the synthesis, accumulation, and stability of the essential viral replication proteins and steady-state levels of the replication gene transcripts throughout the course of ICP27 mutant virus infections. These studies reveal that in the absence of ICP27, expression of the UL5, UL8, UL52, UL9, UL42, and UL30 genes is significantly reduced at the level of mRNA accumulation. In contrast to that of these beta genes, ICP8 expression is unaltered in mutant virus-infected cells, indicating that ICP27 selectively stimulates only a subset of herpes simplex virus beta genes. Analysis of multiple ICP27 mutant viruses indicates a quantitative correlation between the ability of these mutants to replicate viral DNA and the level of replication proteins produced by each mutant. Therefore, we conclude that the primary defect responsible for restricted viral DNA synthesis in cells infected with ICP27 mutants is insufficient expression of most of the essential replication genes. Of further interest, this analysis also provides new information about the structure of the UL52 gene transcripts. PMID:8627723

  18. Genome-wide identification of DNA methylation provides insights into the association of gene expression in rice exposed to pesticide atrazine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi Chen; Feng, Sheng Jun; Zhang, Jing Jing; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a pesticide widely used for controlling weeds for crop production. Crop contamination with ATR negatively affects crop growth and development. This study presents the first genome-wide single-base-resolution maps of DNA methylation in ATR-exposed rice. Widespread differences were identified in CG and non-CG methylation marks between the ATR-exposed and ATR-free (control) rice. Most of DNA methyltransferases, histone methyltransferases and DNA demethylase were differentially regulated by ATR. We found more genes hypermethylated than those hypomethylated in the regions of upstream, genebody and downstream under ATR exposure. A stringent group of 674 genes (p < 0.05, two-fold change) with a strong preference of differential expression in ATR-exposed rice was identified. Some of the genes were identified in a subset of loss of function mutants defective in DNA methylation/demethylation. Provision of 5-azacytidine (AZA, inhibitor of DNA methylation) promoted the rice growth and reduced ATR content. By UPLC/Q-TOF-MS/MS, 8 degraded products and 9 conjugates of ATR in AZA-treated rice were characterized. Two of them has been newly identified in this study. Our data show that ATR-induced changes in DNA methylation marks are possibly involved in an epigenetic mechanism associated with activation of specific genes responsible for ATR degradation and detoxification. PMID:26739616

  19. Genome-wide identification of DNA methylation provides insights into the association of gene expression in rice exposed to pesticide atrazine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi Chen; Feng, Sheng Jun; Zhang, Jing Jing; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a pesticide widely used for controlling weeds for crop production. Crop contamination with ATR negatively affects crop growth and development. This study presents the first genome-wide single-base-resolution maps of DNA methylation in ATR-exposed rice. Widespread differences were identified in CG and non-CG methylation marks between the ATR-exposed and ATR-free (control) rice. Most of DNA methyltransferases, histone methyltransferases and DNA demethylase were differentially regulated by ATR. We found more genes hypermethylated than those hypomethylated in the regions of upstream, genebody and downstream under ATR exposure. A stringent group of 674 genes (p < 0.05, two-fold change) with a strong preference of differential expression in ATR-exposed rice was identified. Some of the genes were identified in a subset of loss of function mutants defective in DNA methylation/demethylation. Provision of 5-azacytidine (AZA, inhibitor of DNA methylation) promoted the rice growth and reduced ATR content. By UPLC/Q-TOF-MS/MS, 8 degraded products and 9 conjugates of ATR in AZA-treated rice were characterized. Two of them has been newly identified in this study. Our data show that ATR-induced changes in DNA methylation marks are possibly involved in an epigenetic mechanism associated with activation of specific genes responsible for ATR degradation and detoxification. PMID:26739616

  20. Cytosines, but not purines, determine recombination activating gene (RAG)-induced breaks on heteroduplex DNA structures: implications for genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Naik, Abani Kanta; Lieber, Michael R; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2010-03-01

    The sequence specificity of the recombination activating gene (RAG) complex during V(D)J recombination has been well studied. RAGs can also act as structure-specific nuclease; however, little is known about the mechanism of its action. Here, we show that in addition to DNA structure, sequence dictates the pattern and efficiency of RAG cleavage on altered DNA structures. Cytosine nucleotides are preferentially nicked by RAGs when present at single-stranded regions of heteroduplex DNA. Although unpaired thymine nucleotides are also nicked, the efficiency is many fold weaker. Induction of single- or double-strand breaks by RAGs depends on the position of cytosines and whether it is present on one or both of the strands. Interestingly, RAGs are unable to induce breaks when adenine or guanine nucleotides are present at single-strand regions. The nucleotide present immediately next to the bubble sequence could also affect RAG cleavage. Hence, we propose "C((d))C((S))C((S))" (d, double-stranded; s, single-stranded) as a consensus sequence for RAG-induced breaks at single-/double-strand DNA transitions. Such a consensus sequence motif is useful for explaining RAG cleavage on other types of DNA structures described in the literature. Therefore, the mechanism of RAG cleavage described here could explain facets of chromosomal rearrangements specific to lymphoid tissues leading to genomic instability. PMID:20051517

  1. Exercise as Gene Therapy: BDNF and DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robin H; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is a common feature of neurodegenerative illnesses, and the ability to repair DNA strand breaks and lesions is crucial for neuronal survival, reported by Jeppesen et al (Prog Neurobiol. 2011;94:166-200) and Shiwaku et al (Curr Mol Med. 2015;15:119-128). Interventions aimed at repairing these lesions, therefore, could be useful for preventing or delaying the progression of disease. One potential strategy for promoting DNA damage repair (DDR) is exercise. Although the role of exercise in DDR is not understood, there is increasing evidence that simple physical activity may impact clinical outcomes for neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and how these mechanisms might influence the DDR process. PMID:27488073

  2. Hepatic gene therapy: efficient gene delivery and expression in primary hepatocytes utilizing a conjugated adenovirus-DNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Cristiano, R J; Smith, L C; Kay, M A; Brinkley, B R; Woo, S L

    1993-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for gene delivery into target cells. We have previously shown that DNA molecules complexed with asialoglycoprotein can be efficiently endocytosed by primary hepatocytes and the internalized DNA can be released from endosomes by the use of a replication-defective adenovirus. Because the DNA and virus enter target cells independently, activity enhancement requires high concentrations of adenoviral particles. In this study, adenoviral particles were chemically conjugated to poly(L-lysine) and bound ionically to DNA molecules. Quantitative delivery to primary hepatocytes was achieved with significantly reduced viral titer when the asialoorosomucoid-poly(L-lysine) conjugate was included in the complex. The conjugated adenovirus was used to deliver a DNA vector containing canine factor IX to mouse hepatocytes, resulting in the expression of significant concentrations of canine factor IX in the culture medium. The results suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis coupled with an efficient endosomal lysis vector should permit the application of targeted and efficient gene delivery into the liver for gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8265587

  3. α-Phellandrene alters expression of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle, and apoptosis in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chang, Shu-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-08-01

    α-phellandrene (α-PA) is a cyclic monoterpene, present in natural plants such as Schinus molle L. α-PA promotes immune responses in mice in vivo. However, there is no available information on whether α-PA affects gene expression in leukemia cells. The present study determined effects of α-PA on expression levels of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptotic cell death in mouse leukemia WEHI-3 cells. WEHI-3 cells were treated with 10 μM α-PA for 24 h, cells were harvested and total RNA was extracted, and gene expression was analyzed by cDNA microarray. Results indicated that α-PA up-regulated 10 genes 4-fold, 13 by over 3-fold and 175 by over 2-fold; 21 genes were down-regulated by over 4-fold, 26 genes by over 3-fold and expression of 204 genes was altered by at leas 2-fold compared with the untreated control cells. DNA damage-associated genes such as DNA damage-inducer transcript 4 and DNA fragmentation factor were up-regulated by 4-fold and over 2-fold, respectively; cell-cycle check point genes such as cyclin G2 and cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor 2D and IA (p21) were up-regulated by over 3-fold and over 2-fold, respectively; apoptosis-associated genes such as BCL2/adenovirus EIB interacting protein 3, XIAP-associated factor 1, BCL2 modifying factor, caspase-8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator were over 2-fold up-regulated. Furthermore, DNA damage-associated gene TATA box binding protein was over 4-fold down-regulated, and D19Ertd652c (DNA segment) over 2-fold down-regulated; cell cycle-associated gene cyclin E2 was over 2-fold down-regulated; apoptosis associated gene growth arrest-specific 5 was over 9-fold down-regulated, Gm5426 (ATP synthase) was over 3-fold down-regulated, and death box polypeptide 33 was over 2-fold down-regulated. Based on these observations, α-PA altered gene expression in WEHI-3 cells in vitro. PMID:25075043

  4. In Ovo injection of betaine affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation in newly hatched chicks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Sun, Qinwei; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Min; Cai, Demin; Li, Xi; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is reported to regulate hepatic cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Chicken eggs contain considerable amount of betaine, yet it remains unknown whether and how betaine in the egg affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks. In this study, eggs were injected with betaine at 2.5 mg/egg and the hepatic cholesterol metabolism was investigated in newly hatched chicks. Betaine did not affect body weight or liver weight, but significantly increased the serum concentration (P < 0.05) and the hepatic content (P < 0.01) of cholesterol. Accordingly, the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMGCR was up-regulated (P < 0.05 for both mRNA and protein), while CYP7A1 which converts cholesterol to bile acids was down-regulated (P < 0.05 for mRNA and P = 0.07 for protein). Moreover, hepatic protein content of the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 which regulates cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis, and the mRNA abundance of ATP binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) which mediates cholesterol counter transport were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in betaine-treated chicks. Meanwhile, hepatic protein contents of DNA methyltransferases 1 and adenosylhomocysteinase-like 1 were increased (P < 0.05), which was associated with global genomic DNA hypermethylation (P < 0.05) and diminished gene repression mark histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, CpG methylation level on gene promoters was found to be increased (P < 0.05) for CYP7A1 yet decreased (P < 0.05) for ABCA1. These results indicate that in ovo betaine injection regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA and histone methylations. PMID:25860502

  5. In Ovo Injection of Betaine Affects Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolism through Epigenetic Gene Regulation in Newly Hatched Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yun; Sun, Qinwei; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Min; Cai, Demin; Li, Xi; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is reported to regulate hepatic cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Chicken eggs contain considerable amount of betaine, yet it remains unknown whether and how betaine in the egg affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks. In this study, eggs were injected with betaine at 2.5 mg/egg and the hepatic cholesterol metabolism was investigated in newly hatched chicks. Betaine did not affect body weight or liver weight, but significantly increased the serum concentration (P < 0.05) and the hepatic content (P < 0.01) of cholesterol. Accordingly, the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMGCR was up-regulated (P < 0.05 for both mRNA and protein), while CYP7A1 which converts cholesterol to bile acids was down-regulated (P < 0.05 for mRNA and P = 0.07 for protein). Moreover, hepatic protein content of the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 which regulates cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis, and the mRNA abundance of ATP binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) which mediates cholesterol counter transport were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in betaine-treated chicks. Meanwhile, hepatic protein contents of DNA methyltransferases 1 and adenosylhomocysteinase-like 1 were increased (P < 0.05), which was associated with global genomic DNA hypermethylation (P < 0.05) and diminished gene repression mark histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, CpG methylation level on gene promoters was found to be increased (P < 0.05) for CYP7A1 yet decreased (P < 0.05) for ABCA1. These results indicate that in ovo betaine injection regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA and histone methylations. PMID:25860502

  6. C DNA SEQUENCE OF CHANNEL CATFISH PEROXIREDOXIN 6 GENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxiredoxin 6 gene (Prdx6) of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, was cloned and sequenced. Total RNA from channel catfish tissues was isolated, reverse transcribed and amplified. The sequence of the channel catfish Prdx6 gene consists of 1003 nucleotides. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence ...

  7. Tissue specific expression of avian vitellogenin gene is correlated with DNA hypomethylation and in vivo specific protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Jost, J P; Saluz, H P; McEwan, I; Feavers, I M; Hughes, M; Reiber, S; Liang, H M; Vaccaro, M

    1990-01-30

    The avian vitellogenin gene is expressed only in the liver of egg-laying hens. It can, however, be activated in immature chicks or roosters by oestradiol. Parallel to the onset of transcription, there is a demethylation of specific mCpGs in the promoter region and in the oestrogen response element (ERE). The methylation pattern in the promoter region is hormone and expression specific, whereas in the ERE it is only hormone and not organ specific. The demethylation occurring in the promoter region is correlated with the appearance of DNase I hypersensitivity sites and changes in the specific protein-DNA interactions. In vivo genomic footprinting of the ERE with varying concentrations of dimethylsulphate revealed, upon gene activation, only minor changes in the protein-DNA interaction. We present evidence that there is another protein that binds with high affinity to the ERE, besides the oestrogen receptor. PMID:1968660

  8. The adeno-associated virus rep gene suppresses herpes simplex virus-induced DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Bürkle, A; Stephan, S; zur Hausen, H

    1990-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces within the host cell genome DNA amplification which can be suppressed by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV). To characterize the AAV functions mediating this effect, cloned AAV type 2 wild-type or mutant genomes were transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells together with the six HSV replication genes (encoding UL5, UL8, major DNA-binding protein, DNA polymerase, UL42, and UL52) which together are necessary and sufficient for the induction of SV40 DNA amplification (R. Heilbronn and H. zur Hausen, J. Virol. 63:3683-3692, 1989). The AAV rep gene was identified as being responsible for the complete inhibition of HSV-induced SV40 DNA amplification. Likewise, rep inhibited origin-dependent HSV replication. rep neither killed the transfected host cells nor interfered with gene expression from the cotransfected amplification genes. This points to a specific interference with HSV-induced DNA amplification. Images PMID:2159559

  9. Stability and functional effectiveness of phosphorothioate modified duplex DNA and synthetic 'mini-genes'.

    PubMed Central

    Ciafrè, S A; Rinaldi, M; Gasparini, P; Seripa, D; Bisceglia, L; Zelante, L; Farace, M G; Fazio, V M

    1995-01-01

    Several gene transfer techniques that employ 'naked DNA' molecules have recently been developed and numerous gene therapy protocols that make use of 'naked-DNA' have been proposed. We studied the possibility of enhancing the stability of 'naked DNA vectors' and thus also gene transfer and expression efficiencies, by constructing phosphorothioate (PS-) double strand DNA molecules and functional transcription units. We first synthesized short PS-double strand DNA molecules by the annealing of two complementary, 35 nt long, oligonucleotides. The accessibility of DNA modifying enzymes to this molecule was significantly decreased: T4-ligase and kinase activity were respectively reduced up to 1/2 and to 1/6, as compared to the normal phosphodiester molecule. Nucleolytic stability was increased either to purified enzymes (DNase I and Bal31) or to incubations in fresh serum, cell culture medium or in muscle protein extract. Phosphorothioate end-capped complete eukaryotic transcription units (obtained by Taq polymerase amplification with PS-primers) were not significantly protected from nucleolytic attack. On the contrary, synthetic transcription units, 'mini genes', obtained by Taq amplification with 1, 2 or 3 PS-dNTP substitutions, were resistant to DNase I and Bal31 nucleolytic activity. Transcription efficiency, driven by the T7 promoter, was 96.5, 95 and 33.5% (respectively with 1, 2 or 3 substitutions), as compared to the normal phosphodiester molecules. Images PMID:7479077

  10. Isolation of a human DNA repair gene by selection in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.C.; Eastman, A.; Bresnick, E.

    1987-05-01

    Alkylation of DNA at the O/sup 6/-position of guanine represents a potent mutagenic and carcinogenic lesion. O/sup 6/-Methylguanine DNA methyltransferase is the repair system responsible for catalyzing the transfer of the methyl group to a cysteine of the protein in a suicide reaction. The gene controlling its expression in mammalian systems is designated mex. Resistance to chloroethylnitrosourea (CNU) is also mediated by this protein; this was used to select cells into which the max gene has been introduced. DNA purified from human liver has been transfected into mex/sup -/ CHO cells by the CaPO/sub 4/ method. pSV2gpt, containing a marker gene, gpt, was cotransfected. The transformed cells were initially selected for the expression of gpt (mycophenolic acid resistance) and reselected in CNU for mex/sup +/. Several clones were resistant to both demonstrating the linkage of these genes. A cosmid library was made from a mex/sup +/gpt/sup +/ clone and grown in a gpt/sup -/ strain of E. coli. gpt/sup +/ colonies were selected and the cosmid DNA rescued. One of the tested cosmid DNA's produced CNU resistance upon introduction into CHO cells. This cosmid was subcloned, restriction endonuclease-treated and a 5.3 kb fragment showed mex activity. This fragment is being further characterized and the DNA sequenced.

  11. Genetic Organization of the Vibrio harveyi dnaA Gene Region and Analysis of the Function of the V. harveyi DnaA Protein in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berenstein, Dvora; Olesen, Kirsten; Speck, Christian; Skovgaard, Ole

    2002-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae family is distantly related to Enterobacteriaceae within the group of bacteria possessing the Dam methylase system. We have cloned, sequenced, and analyzed the dnaA gene region of Vibrio harveyi and found that although the organization of the V. harveyi dnaA region differs from that of Escherichia coli, the expression of both genes is autoregulated and ATP-DnaA binds cooperatively to ATP-DnaA boxes in the dnaA promoter region. The DnaA proteins of V. harveyi and E. coli are interchangeable and function nearly identically in controlling dnaA transcription and the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication despite the evolutionary distance between these bacteria. PMID:11948168

  12. In vitro gene expression data supporting a DNA non-reactive genotoxic mechanism for ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Arbillaga, Leire; Lopez de Cerain, Adela . E-mail: acerain@unav.es

    2007-04-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin often found in cereals and agricultural products. There is unequivocal evidence of renal carcinogenicity of OTA in male rats, although the mechanism of action is unknown. At present, available data support an epigenetic mechanism (DNA non-reactive) resulting from oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, because a direct OTA interaction with DNA has not been demonstrated. Genotoxic mechanism (DNA-reactive vs. DNA non-reactive) may have implications on human risk assessment. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to identify biological pathways modulated by OTA in vitro in a human renal cell line (HK-2) to contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of OTA toxicity. For that purpose, cells were exposed to 50 {mu}M OTA during 6 and 24 h, and gene expression profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 A 2.0 Gene Chips. Under the same experimental conditions, genotoxicity was evaluated by the modified comet assay using FPG and Endo III to detect oxidative DNA damage, and intracellular ROS level by the H{sub 2}DCF assay. After 6 h, with slight cytotoxicity (83% survival), genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain were up-regulated; and after 24 h, with a more pronounced cytotoxicity (51% survival), genes implicated in oxidative stress response were also up-regulated. Increase in intracellular ROS level and oxidative DNA damage was evident at both exposure times being more pronounced with high cytotoxicity. On the contrary, up-regulation of genes implicated in DNA damage response, as cell cycle control or apoptosis, was not detected at any exposure time. In conclusion, these results support a DNA non-reactive mechanism of OTA genotoxicity.

  13. DNA methylation and expression of the folate transporter genes in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Sanja A; Befekadu, Rahel; Hahn-Strömberg, Victoria; Nilsson, Torbjörn K

    2015-07-01

    Folate has a central role in the cell metabolism. This study aims to explore the DNA methylation pattern of the folate transporter genes FOLR1, PCFT, and RFC1 as well as the corresponding protein expressions in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue and adjacent non-cancerous mucosa (ANCM). Our results showed statistically significant differences in the DNA-methylated fraction of all three genes at several gene regions; we identified three differentially methylated CpG sites in the FOLR1 gene, five CpG sites in the PCFT gene, and six CpG sites in the RFC1 gene. There was a pronounced expression of the FRα and RFC proteins in both the CRC and ANCM tissues, though the expression was attenuated in cancer compared to the paired ANCM tissues. The PCFT protein was undetectable or expressed at a very low level in both tissue types. Higher methylated fractions of the CpG sites 3-5 in the RFC1 gene were associated with a lower protein expression, suggestive of epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation of the RFC1 gene in the colorectal cancer. Our results did not show any association between the RFC and FRα protein expression and tumor stage, TNM classification, or tumor location. In conclusion, this is the first study to simultaneously evaluate both DNA methylation and protein expression of all three folate transporter genes, FOLR1, PCFT, and RFC1, in colorectal cancer. The results encourage further investigation into the possible prognostic implications of folate transporter expression and DNA methylation. PMID:25697897

  14. A novel papillation assay for the identification of genes affecting mutation rate in Pseudomonas putida and other pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Tagel, Mari; Tavita, Kairi; Hõrak, Rita; Kivisaar, Maia; Ilves, Heili

    2016-08-01

    Formation of microcolonies (papillae) permits easy visual screening of mutational events occurring in single colonies of bacteria. In this study, we have established a novel papillation assay employable in a wide range of pseudomonads including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida for monitoring mutation frequency in distinct colonies. With the aid of this assay, we conducted a genome-wide search for the factors affecting mutation frequency in P. putida. Screening ∼27,000 transposon mutants for increased mutation frequency allowed us to identify 34 repeatedly targeted genes. In addition to genes involved in DNA replication and repair, we identified genes participating in metabolism and transport of secondary metabolites, cell motility, and cell wall synthesis. The highest effect on mutant frequency was observed when truA (tRNA pseudouridine synthase), mpl (UDP-N-acetylmuramate-alanine ligase) or gacS (multi-sensor hybrid histidine kinase) were inactivated. Inactivation of truA elevated the mutant frequency only in growing cells, while the deficiency of gacS affected mainly stationary-phase mutagenesis. Thus, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the assay for isolating mutants with elevated mutagenesis in growing as well as stationary-phase bacteria. PMID:27447898

  15. Gene-expression profiling of human mononuclear cells from welders using cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Rim, Kyung Taek; Park, Kun Koo; Kim, Yang Ho; Lee, Yong Hwan; Han, Jeong Hee; Chung, Yong Hyun; Yu, Il Je

    2007-08-01

    A toxicogenomic chip developed to detect welding-related diseases was tested and validated for field trials. To verify the suitability of the microarray, white blood cells (WBC) or whole blood was purified and characterized from 20 subjects in the control group (average work experience of 7 yr) and 20 welders in the welding-fume exposed group (welders with an average work experience of 23 yr). Two hundred and fifty-three rat genes homologous to human genes were obtained and spotted on the chip slide. Meanwhile, a human cDNA chip spotted with 8600 human genes was also used to detect any increased or decreased levels of gene expression among the welders. After comparing the levels of gene expression between the control and welder groups using the toxicogenomic chips, 103 genes were identified as likely to be specifically changed by welding-fume exposure. Eighteen of the 253 rat genes were specifically changed in the welders, while 103 genes from the human cDNA chip were specifically changed. The genes specifically expressed by the welders were associated with inflammatory responses, toxic chemical metabolism, stress proteins, transcription factors, and signal transduction. In contrast, there was no significant change in the genes related to short-term welding-fume exposure, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin. In conclusion, if further validation studies are conducted, the present toxicogenomic gene chips could be used for the effective monitoring of welding-fume-exposure-related diseases among welders. PMID:17654244

  16. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-10-15

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10(-17), 3.1 × 10(-31), 4.0 × 10(-71) and 5.2 × 10(-199)), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10(-18)-1.0 × 10(-123)). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10(-13)-7.1 × 10(-20)), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26220975

  17. Translation Start Sequences Affect the Efficiency of Silencing of Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA Oncogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyewon; Humann, Jodi L.; Pitrak, Jennifer S.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Parks, T. Dawn; Whistler, Cheryl A.; Mok, Machteld C.; Ream, L. Walt

    2003-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens oncogenes cause transformed plant cells to overproduce auxin and cytokinin. Two oncogenes encode enzymes that convert tryptophan to indole-3-acetic acid (auxin): iaaM (tryptophan mono-oxygenase) and iaaH (indole-3-acetamide hydrolase). A third oncogene (ipt) encodes AMP isopentenyl transferase, which produces cytokinin (isopentenyl-AMP). Inactivation of ipt and iaaM (or iaaH) abolishes tumorigenesis. Because adequate means do not exist to control crown gall, we created resistant plants by introducing transgenes designed to elicit posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of iaaM and ipt. Transgenes that elicit silencing trigger sequence-specific destruction of the inducing RNA and messenger RNAs with related sequences. Although PTGS has proven effective against a variety of target genes, we found that a much higher percentage of transgenic lines silenced iaaM than ipt, suggesting that transgene sequences influenced the effectiveness of PTGS. Sequences required for oncogene silencing included a translation start site. A transgene encoding a translatable sense-strand RNA from the 5′ end of iaaM silenced the iaaM oncogene, but deletion of the translation start site abolished the ability of the transgene to silence iaaM. Silencing A. tumefaciens T-DNA oncogenes is a new and effective method to produce plants resistant to crown gall disease. PMID:12972655

  18. Administration of DNA Encoding the Interleukin-27 Gene Augments Antitumour Responses through Non-adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Sato, A; Shimozato, O; Shingyoji, M; Tada, Y; Tatsumi, K; Shimada, H; Hiroshima, K; Tagawa, M

    2015-10-01

    DNA-mediated immunization of a tumour antigen is a possible immunotherapy for cancer, and interleukin (IL)-27 has diverse functions in adaptive immunity. In this study, we examined whether IL-27 DNA administration enhanced antitumour effects in mice vaccinated with DNA encoding a putative tumour antigen, β-galactosidase (β-gal). An intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin before DNA administration facilitated the exogenous gene expression. In mice received β-gal and IL-27 DNA, growth of β-gal-positive P815 tumours was retarded and survival of the mice was prolonged. Development of β-gal-positive Colon 26 tumours was suppressed by vaccination of β-gal DNA and further inhibited by additional IL-27 DNA administration or IL-12 family cytokines. Nevertheless, a population of β-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells did not increase, and production of anti-β-gal antibody was not enhanced by IL-27 DNA administration. Spleen cells from mice bearing IL-27-expressing Colon 26 tumours showed greater YAC-1-targeted cytotoxicity although CD3(-)/DX5(+) natural killer (NK) cell numbers remained unchanged. Recombinant IL-27 enhanced YAC-1-targeted cytotoxicity of IL-2-primed splenic NK cells and augmented a phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and an expression of perforin. These data collectively indicate that IL-27 DNA administration activates NK cells and augments vaccination effects of DNA encoding a tumour antigen through non-adaptive immune responses. PMID:26095954

  19. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  20. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression. PMID:24789080

  1. Osmotic stress at the barley root affects expression of circadian clock genes in the shoot.

    PubMed

    Habte, Ermias; Müller, Lukas M; Shtaya, Munqez; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2014-06-01

    The circadian clock is an important timing system that controls physiological responses to abiotic stresses in plants. However, there is little information on the effects of the clock on stress adaptation in important crops, like barley. In addition, we do not know how osmotic stress perceived at the roots affect the shoot circadian clock. Barley genotypes, carrying natural variation at the photoperiod response and clock genes Ppd-H1 and HvELF3, were grown under control and osmotic stress conditions to record changes in the diurnal expression of clock and stress-response genes and in physiological traits. Variation at HvELF3 affected the expression phase and shape of clock and stress-response genes, while variation at Ppd-H1 only affected the expression levels of stress genes. Osmotic stress up-regulated expression of clock and stress-response genes and advanced their expression peaks. Clock genes controlled the expression of stress-response genes, but had minor effects on gas exchange and leaf transpiration. This study demonstrated that osmotic stress at the barley root altered clock gene expression in the shoot and acted as a spatial input signal into the clock. Unlike in Arabidopsis, barley primary assimilation was less controlled by the clock and more responsive to environmental perturbations, such as osmotic stress. PMID:24895755

  2. Interconverting Conformations of Slipped-DNA Junctions Formed by Trinucleotide Repeats Affect Repair Outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Expansions of (CTG)·(CAG) repeated DNAs are the mutagenic cause of 14 neurological diseases, likely arising through the formation and processing of slipped-strand DNAs. These transient intermediates of repeat length mutations are formed by out-of-register mispairing of repeat units on complementary strands. The three-way slipped-DNA junction, at which the excess repeats slip out from the duplex, is a poorly understood feature common to these mutagenic intermediates. Here, we reveal that slipped junctions can assume a surprising number of interconverting conformations where the strand opposite the slip-out either is fully base paired or has one or two unpaired nucleotides. These unpaired nucleotides can also arise opposite either of the nonslipped junction arms. Junction conformation can affect binding by various structure-specific DNA repair proteins and can also alter correct nick-directed repair levels. Junctions that have the potential to contain unpaired nucleotides are repaired with a significantly higher efficiency than constrained fully paired junctions. Surprisingly, certain junction conformations are aberrantly repaired to expansion mutations: misdirection of repair to the non-nicked strand opposite the slip-out leads to integration of the excess slipped-out repeats rather than their excision. Thus, slipped-junction structure can determine whether repair attempts lead to correction or expansion mutations. PMID:23339280

  3. Mutations affecting sensitivity of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C E; Welker, D L; Deering, R A

    1992-09-01

    We describe 22 new mutants of D. discoideum that are sensitive to DNA damage. These mutants were isolated on the basis of sensitivity to either temperature, gamma-rays, or 4-nitroquinolone-1-oxide (4NQO). The doses of gamma-rays, ultraviolet light (UV), and 4NQO required to reduce the survival of colony-forming ability of these mutants to 10% (D10) range from 2% to 100% of the D10s for the nonmutant, parent strains. For most of the mutants, those which are very sensitive to one agent are very sensitive to all agents tested and those which are moderately sensitive to one agent, are moderately sensitive to all agents tested. One mutant is sensitive only to 4NQO. Linkage relationships have been examined for 13 of these mutants. This linkage information was used to design complementation tests to determine allelism with previously characterized complementation groups affecting sensitivity to radiation. 4 of the new mutants fall within previously identified complementation groups and 3 new complementation groups have been identified (radJ, radK and radL). Other new loci probably also exist among these new mutants. This brings the number of characterized mutants of D. discoideum which are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents to 33 and the number of assigned complementation groups to 11. PMID:1380652

  4. Horizontal Gene Transfer Regulation in Bacteria as a “Spandrel” of DNA Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Saliou; Mercier, Anne; Bertolla, Franck; Calteau, Alexandra; Gueguen, Laurent; Perrière, Guy; Vogel, Timothy M.; Simonet, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is recognized as the major force for bacterial genome evolution. Yet, numerous questions remain about the transferred genes, their function, quantity and frequency. The extent to which genetic transformation by exogenous DNA has occurred over evolutionary time was initially addressed by an in silico approach using the complete genome sequence of the Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 strain. Methods based on phylogenetic reconstruction of prokaryote homologous genes families detected 151 genes (13.3%) of foreign origin in the R. solanacearum genome and tentatively identified their bacterial origin. These putative transfers were analyzed in comparison to experimental transformation tests involving 18 different genomic DNA positions in the genome as sites for homologous or homeologous recombination. Significant transformation frequency differences were observed among these positions tested regardless of the overall genomic divergence of the R. solanacearum strains tested as recipients. The genomic positions containing the putative exogenous DNA were not systematically transformed at the highest frequencies. The two genomic “hot spots”, which contain recA and mutS genes, exhibited transformation frequencies from 2 to more than 4 orders of magnitude higher than positions associated with other genes depending on the recipient strain. These results support the notion that the bacterial cell is equipped with active mechanisms to modulate acquisition of new DNA in different genomic positions. Bio-informatics study correlated recombination “hot-spots” to the presence of Chi-like signature sequences with which recombination might be preferentially initiated. The fundamental role of HGT is certainly not limited to the critical impact that the very rare foreign genes acquired mainly by chance can have on the bacterial adaptation potential. The frequency to which HGT with homologous and homeologous DNA happens in the environment might have led

  5. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen. PMID:26527082

  6. Timing of a mtDNA gene rearrangement and intercontinental dispersal of varanid lizards.

    PubMed

    Amer, Sayed A M; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2008-06-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of the Komodo monitor (Varanus komodoensis) and the Nile monitor (V. niloticus) were previously shown to have an extensive gene rearrangement. Here, we show that this gene arrangement widely occurs in varanid taxa originated from Africa, Asia and Australasia. Based on phylogenetic relationships of the varanids constructed using mitochondrial DNA sequences encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene and seven flanking tRNA genes, we estimated their divergence times by the Bayesian method without assuming the molecular clock. The results suggested that the mitochondrial DNA gene rearrangement took place once in an ancestral varanid lineage in the Paleocene or earlier. Our results are more consistent with Cenozoic over-water dispersal of Southeast Asian varanids across the Indonesian Archipelago rather than the Cretaceous Gondwanan vicariance for the origin of Australasian varanids. PMID:18670139

  7. Alteration of Gene Expression, DNA Methylation, and Histone Methylation in Free Radical Scavenging Networks in Adult Mouse Hippocampus following Fetal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chater-Diehl, Eric J.; Castellani, Christina A.; Alberry, Bonnie L.; Singh, Shiva M.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is poorly understood; however, epigenetic and gene expression changes have been implicated. We have developed a mouse model of FASD characterized by learning and memory impairment and persistent gene expression changes. Epigenetic marks may maintain expression changes over a mouse’s lifetime, an area few have explored. Here, mice were injected with saline or ethanol on postnatal days four and seven. At 70 days of age gene expression microarray, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation microarray, H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray were performed. Following extensive pathway analysis of the affected genes, we identified the top affected gene expression pathway as “Free radical scavenging”. We confirmed six of these changes by droplet digital PCR including the caspase Casp3 and Wnt transcription factor Tcf7l2. The top pathway for all methylation-affected genes was “Peroxisome biogenesis”; we confirmed differential DNA methylation in the Acca1 thiolase promoter. Altered methylation and gene expression in oxidative stress pathways in the adult hippocampus suggests a novel interface between epigenetic and oxidative stress mechanisms in FASD. PMID:27136348

  8. 3-base periodicity in coding DNA is affected by intercodon dinucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    All coding DNAs exhibit 3-base periodicity (TBP), which may be defined as the tendency of nucleotides and higher order n-tuples, e.g. trinucleotides (triplets), to be preferentially spaced by 3, 6, 9 etc, bases, and we have proposed an association between TBP and clustering of same-phase triplets. We here investigated if TBP was affected by intercodon dinucleotide tendencies and whether clustering of same-phase triplets was involved. Under constant protein sequence intercodon dinucleotide frequencies depend on the distribution of synonymous codons. So, possible effects were revealed by randomly exchanging synonymous codons without altering protein sequences to subsequently document changes in TBP via frequency distribution of distances (FDD) of DNA triplets. A tripartite positive correlation was found between intercodon dinucleotide frequencies, clustering of same-phase triplets and TBP. So, intercodon C|A (where “|” indicates the boundary between codons) was more frequent in native human DNA than in the codon-shuffled sequences; higher C|A frequency occurred along with more frequent clustering of C|AN triplets (where N jointly represents A, C, G and T) and with intense CAN TBP. The opposite was found for C|G, which was less frequent in native than in shuffled sequences; lower C|G frequency occurred together with reduced clustering of C|GN triplets and with less intense CGN TBP. We hence propose that intercodon dinucleotides affect TBP via same-phase triplet clustering. A possible biological relevance of our findings is briefly discussed. PMID:21814388

  9. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kosinová, Lucie; Cahová, Monika; Fábryová, Eva; Týcová, Irena; Koblas, Tomáš; Leontovyč, Ivan; Saudek, František; Kříž, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3) in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0–120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48–120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information from 48 hrs

  10. Bioinformatics analysis of time-series genes profiling to explore key genes affected by age in fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Hao; Xie, Jingjing; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Yu; Lu, Hua

    2014-06-01

    The present study was aimed to explore possible key genes and bioprocess affected by age during fracture healing. GSE589, GSE592 and GSE1371 were downloaded from gene expression omnibus database. The time-series genes of three age levels rats were firstly identified with hclust function in R. Then functional and pathway enrichment analysis for selected time-series genes were performed. Finally, the VennDiagram package of R language was used to screen overlapping n time-series genes. The expression changes of time-series genes in the rats of three age levels were classified into two types: one was higher expressed at 0 day, decreased at 3 day to 2 week, and increased from 4 to 6 week; the other was the opposite. Functional and pathways enrichment analysis showed that 12 time-series genes of adult and old rats were significantly involved in ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression changes of 11 genes were consistent with time axis, 10 genes were up-regulated at 3 days after fracture, and increased slowly in 6 week, while Itga2b was down-regulated. The functions of 106 overlapping genes were all associated with growth and development of bone after fracture. The key genes in ECM-receptor interaction pathway including Spp1, Ibsp, Tnn and Col3a1 have been reported to be related to fracture in literatures. The difference during fracture healing in three age levels rats is mainly related to age. The Spp1, Ibsp, Tnn and Col3a1 are possible potential age-related genes and ECM-receptor interaction pathway is the potential age-related process during fracture healing. PMID:24627361

  11. Positive regulation of minichromosome maintenance gene expression, DNA replication, and cell transformation by a plant retinoblastoma gene

    PubMed Central

    Sabelli, Paolo A.; Hoerster, George; Lizarraga, Lucina E.; Brown, Sara W.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) genes inhibit the cell cycle primarily by repressing adenovirus E2 promoter binding factor (E2F) transcription factors, which drive the expression of numerous genes required for DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression. The RBR-E2F pathway is conserved in plants, but cereals such as maize are characterized by having a complex RBR gene family with at least 2 functionally distinct members, RBR1 and RBR3. Although RBR1 has a clear cell cycle inhibitory function, it is not known whether RBR3 has a positive or negative role. By uncoupling RBR3 from the negative regulation of RBR1 in cultured maize embryos through a combination of approaches, we demonstrate that RBR3 has a positive and critical role in the expression of E2F targets required for the initiation of DNA synthesis, DNA replication, and the efficiency with which transformed plants can be obtained. Titration of endogenous RBR3 activity through expression of a dominant-negative allele with a compromised pocket domain suggests that these RBR3 functions require an activity distinct from its pocket domain. Our results indicate a cell cycle pathway in maize, in which 2 RBR genes have specific and opposing functions. Thus, the paradigm that RBR genes are negative cell cycle regulators cannot be considered universal. PMID:19234120

  12. Lung Gene Therapy with Highly Compacted DNA Nanoparticles that Overcome the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J.; Trehan, Kanika; Schneider, Craig S.; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Woodward, Owen M.; Boylan, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Michael P.; Lai, Samuel K.; Guggino, William B.; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled gene carriers must penetrate the highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus barrier in the airway in order to overcome rapid mucociliary clearance and reach the underlying epithelium; however, even the most widely used viral gene carriers are unable to efficiently do so. We developed two polymeric gene carriers that compact plasmid DNA into small and highly stable nanoparticles with dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings. These highly compacted, densely PEG-coated DNA nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus ex vivo and mouse airway mucus ex situ. Intranasal administration of the mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles greatly enhanced particle distribution, retention and gene transfer in the mouse lung airways compared to conventional gene carriers. Successful delivery of a full-length plasmid encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was achieved in mouse lungs and airway cells, including a primary culture of mucus-covered human airway epithelium grown at air-liquid interface, without causing acute inflammation or toxicity. Highly compacted mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles hold promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:24440664

  13. Epigenetic conservation at gene regulatory elements revealed by non-methylated DNA profiling in seven vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Long, Hannah K; Sims, David; Heger, Andreas; Blackledge, Neil P; Kutter, Claudia; Wright, Megan L; Grützner, Frank; Odom, Duncan T; Patient, Roger; Ponting, Chris P; Klose, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Two-thirds of gene promoters in mammals are associated with regions of non-methylated DNA, called CpG islands (CGIs), which counteract the repressive effects of DNA methylation on chromatin. In cold-blooded vertebrates, computational CGI predictions often reside away from gene promoters, suggesting a major divergence in gene promoter architecture across vertebrates. By experimentally identifying non-methylated DNA in the genomes of seven diverse vertebrates, we instead reveal that non-methylated islands (NMIs) of DNA are a central feature of vertebrate gene promoters. Furthermore, NMIs are present at orthologous genes across vast evolutionary distances, revealing a surprising level of conservation in this epigenetic feature. By profiling NMIs in different tissues and developmental stages we uncover a unifying set of features that are central to the function of NMIs in vertebrates. Together these findings demonstrate an ancient logic for NMI usage at gene promoters and reveal an unprecedented level of epigenetic conservation across vertebrate evolution. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00348.001. PMID:23467541

  14. Lung gene therapy with highly compacted DNA nanoparticles that overcome the mucus barrier.

    PubMed

    Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J; Trehan, Kanika; Schneider, Craig S; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Woodward, Owen M; Boylan, Nicholas J; Boyle, Michael P; Lai, Samuel K; Guggino, William B; Hanes, Justin

    2014-03-28

    Inhaled gene carriers must penetrate the highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus barrier in the airway in order to overcome rapid mucociliary clearance and reach the underlying epithelium; however, even the most widely used viral gene carriers are unable to efficiently do so. We developed two polymeric gene carriers that compact plasmid DNA into small and highly stable nanoparticles with dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings. These highly compacted, densely PEG-coated DNA nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus ex vivo and mouse airway mucus ex situ. Intranasal administration of the mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles greatly enhanced particle distribution, retention and gene transfer in the mouse lung airways compared to conventional gene carriers. Successful delivery of a full-length plasmid encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was achieved in the mouse lungs and airway cells, including a primary culture of mucus-covered human airway epithelium grown at air-liquid interface, without causing acute inflammation or toxicity. Highly compacted mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles hold promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:24440664

  15. Accurate multiplex gene synthesis from programmable DNA microchips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jingdong; Gong, Hui; Sheng, Nijing; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Gulari, Erdogan; Gao, Xiaolian; Church, George

    2004-12-01

    Testing the many hypotheses from genomics and systems biology experiments demands accurate and cost-effective gene and genome synthesis. Here we describe a microchip-based technology for multiplex gene synthesis. Pools of thousands of `construction' oligonucleotides and tagged complementary `selection' oligonucleotides are synthesized on photo-programmable microfluidic chips, released, amplified and selected by hybridization to reduce synthesis errors ninefold. A one-step polymerase assembly multiplexing reaction assembles these into multiple genes. This technology enabled us to synthesize all 21 genes that encode the proteins of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit, and to optimize their translation efficiency in vitro through alteration of codon bias. This is a significant step towards the synthesis of ribosomes in vitro and should have utility for synthetic biology in general.

  16. Reactivation of a silenced H19 gene in human rhabdomyosarcoma by demethylation of DNA but not by histone hyperacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Catherine A; Tycko, Benjamin; Bestor, Timothy H; Walsh, Colum P

    2002-01-01

    Background The active copy of the imprinted gene H19 is turned off by inappropriate methylation in several pediatric tumors including Wilms' Tumour and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. H19 controls in cis the linked Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene, encoding an important growth factor. Recent work has suggested that methylation of a gene may lead to deacetylation of its associated histones and that silenced genes can be reactivated by increasing histone acetylation levels. Results Treatment of a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line which has a silent, methylated H19 gene with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors under conditions which gave maximal hyperacetylation of histone 4, both globally and at the H19 gene itself could not reactivate H19 or affect the active Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene, but caused clear up-regulation of the Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator (TPA) gene, a non-imprinted gene known to respond to changes in histone acetylation. In contrast, mild treatment of the cells with the methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC-2'-deoxycytidine (AzaC) on its own was able to reactivate H19. Combining AzaC treatment with HDAC inhibitors gave a reduced rather than enhanced reactivation. These findings were confirmed in mouse primary liver and kidney explants which maintain normal imprinting, where we also found that the silent Igf2 gene could not be reactivated by HDAC inhibitors. Conclusion These results suggest that DNA methylation rather than histone acetylation is the primary determinant of silencing of H19 in rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:12234381

  17. DNA Storage under High Temperature Conditions Does Not Affect Performance in Human Leukocyte Antigen Genotyping via Next-Generation Sequencing (DNA Integrity Maintained in Extreme Conditions)

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Shana L; Hogan, Michael E; Pappas, Derek J; Wong, Lily Y

    2014-01-01

    classical HLA genes. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the GenTegra product as a suitable genomic DNA preservation tool for collection and long-term biobanking of DNA at fluctuating and high temperatures. PMID:25496152

  18. Natural variation in the histone demethylase, KDM4C, influences expression levels of specific genes including those that affect cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Brittany L.; Cheung, Vivian G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA sequence variants influence gene expression and cellular phenotypes. In this study, we focused on natural variation in the gene encoding the histone demethylase, KDM4C, which promotes transcriptional activation by removing the repressive histone mark, H3K9me3, from its target genes. We uncovered cis-acting variants that contribute to extensive individual differences in KDM4C expression. We also identified the target genes of KDM4C and demonstrated that variation in KDM4C expression lea