Science.gov

Sample records for dna base-pair mismatch

  1. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green’s function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  2. Isomers of the DNA bases and their possible role in base pair mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelian, Karo; Romero, Aldo

    2004-03-01

    We have found stable isomers of the two DNA purines, adenine and guanine, in global searches using a force field potential and ab initio local relaxations. The stability characteristics were investigated by searching for the lowest energy connecting saddles, and by using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. Expected equilibrium concentrations and possible non-equilibrium production mechanisms are discussed. It is suggested that these isomers may play a role in base-pair miss-match leading to point mutation of the gnome, and in a number of other important biological processes based on the purine structures.

  3. Thermodynamic and structural properties of the specific binding between Ag⁺ ion and C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA to form C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Okamoto, Itaru; Dairaku, Takenori; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Metal ion-nucleic acid interactions have attracted considerable interest for their involvement in structure formation and catalytic activity of nucleic acids. Although interactions between metal ion and mismatched base pair duplex are important to understand mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions, they have not been well-characterized. We recently found that the Ag(+) ion stabilized a C:C mismatched base pair duplex DNA. A C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair was supposed to be formed by the binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C mismatched base pair to stabilize the duplex. Here, we examined specificity, thermodynamics and structure of possible C-Ag-C metal-mediated base pair. UV melting indicated that only the duplex with the C:C mismatched base pair, and not of the duplexes with the perfectly matched and other mismatched base pairs, was specifically stabilized on adding the Ag(+) ion. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that the Ag(+) ion specifically bound with the C:C base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with a binding constant of 10(6) M(-1), which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also supported the specific 1:1 binding between the Ag(+) ion and the C:C base pair. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and NMR revealed that the Ag(+) ion may bind with the N3 positions of the C:C base pair without distorting the higher-order structure of the duplex. We conclude that the specific formation of C-Ag-C base pair with large binding affinity would provide a binding mode of metal ion-DNA interactions, similar to that of the previously reported T-Hg-T base pair. The C-Ag-C base pair may be useful not only for understanding of molecular mechanism of gene mutations related to heavy metal ions but also for wide variety of potential applications of metal-mediated base pairs in various fields, such as material, life and environmental sciences. PMID:22766014

  4. Silver Ions in Non-canonical DNA Base Pairs: Metal-Mediated Mismatch Stabilization of 2'-Deoxyadenosine and 7-Deazapurine Derivatives with 2'-Deoxycytidine and 2'-Deoxyguanosine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Novel silver-mediated dA-dC, dA*-dC, and dA*-dG base pairs were formed in a natural DNA double helix environment (dA* denotes 7-deaza-dA, 7-deaza-7-iodo-dA, and 7-cyclopropyl-7-deaza-dA). 7-Deazapurine nucleosides enforce silver ion binding and direct metal-mediated base pair formation to their Watson-Crick face. New phosphoramidites were prepared from 7-deaza-dA, 7-deaza-7-iodo-dA, and 7-cyclopropyl-7-deaza-dA, which contain labile isobutyryl protecting groups. Solid-phase synthesis furnished oligonucleotides that contain mismatches in near central positions. Increased thermal stabilities (higher Tm values) were observed for oligonucleotide duplexes with non-canonical dA*-dC and dA-dC pairs in the presence of silver ions. The stability of the silver-mediated base pairs was pH dependent. Silver ion binding was not observed for the dA-dG mismatch but took place when mismatches were formed between 7-deazaadenine and guanine. The specific binding of silver ions was confirmed by stoichiometric UV titration experiments, which proved that one silver ion is captured by one mismatch. The stability increase of canonical DNA mismatches might have an impact on cellular DNA repair. PMID:27492501

  5. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  6. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  7. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Dawson, John

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  8. Automated DNA Base Pair Calling Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-07

    The procedure solves the problem of calling the DNA base pair sequence from two channel electropherogram separations in an automated fashion. The core of the program involves a peak picking algorithm based upon first, second, and third derivative spectra for each electropherogram channel, signal levels as a function of time, peak spacing, base pair signal to noise sequence patterns, frequency vs ratio of the two channel histograms, and confidence levels generated during the run. Themore » ratios of the two channels at peak centers can be used to accurately and reproducibly determine the base pair sequence. A further enhancement is a novel Gaussian deconvolution used to determine the peak heights used in generating the ratio.« less

  9. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  10. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, A.M.; Dawson, J.

    1993-12-14

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source. 6 figures.

  11. Charge Transport in DNA with Five Base Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunhee; Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2008-10-01

    Recently, much interest has arisen in the process of charge transport through DNA due to its fundamental roles in biological processes and in possible novel molecular electronics. We investigate quantum mechanical electron transmission along the long axis of the DNA molecule using a one-dimensional tight-binding model. In this system, we consider a single central conduction channel in which individual sites represent a base-pair formed by either AT (TA) or GC (CG) pairs coupled via hydrogen bonds. The sites are linked by a hopping amplitude, or quantum overlap integral. The sugar-phosphate backbone and the hopping amplitude between each site of the base and the backbone are incorporated into an energy-dependent on-site potential in the main DNA site. For the sake of simplicity, a simple DNA molecule segment with five base pairs is studied, and the transmission for different values of on-site energy is calculated to determine the influence of mismatch (impurity) effects in the DNA sequence. Finally, we present results for the temperature dependence of the transmission, and the current-voltage characteristics in order to examine the extent and efficiency of charge migration. *One of the authors (E.R.H) is partially supported by a grant from the Center for Energy Research, Education, and Service (CERES) at Ball State University.

  12. The structural impact of DNA mismatches.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-04-30

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  13. The structural impact of DNA mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D.; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  14. NMR analysis of base-pair opening kinetics in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Szulik, Marta W.; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Base pairing in nucleic acids plays a crucial role in their structure and function. Differences in the base pair opening and closing kinetics of individual double stranded DNA sequences or between chemically modified base pairs provide insight into the recognition of these base pairs by DNA processing enzymes. This unit describes how to quantify the kinetics for localized base pairs by observing changes in the imino proton signals by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The determination of all relevant parameters using state of the art techniques and NMR instrumentation, including cryoprobes, is discussed. PMID:25501592

  15. Discrimination of Single Base Pair Differences Among Individual DNA Molecules Using a Nanopore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; DeGuzman, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    The protein toxin alpha-hemolysin form nanometer scale channels across lipid membranes. Our lab uses a single channel in an artificial lipid bilayer in a patch clamp device to capture and examine individual DNA molecules. This nanopore detector used with a support vector machine (SVM) can analyze DNA hairpin molecules on the millisecond time scale. We distinguish duplex stem length, base pair mismatches, loop length, and single base pair differences. The residual current fluxes also reveal structural molecular dynamics elements. DNA end-fraying (terminal base pair dissociation) can be observed as near full blockades, or spikes, in current. This technique can be used to investigate other biological processes dependent on DNA end-fraying, such as the processing of HIV DNA by HIV integrase.

  16. Charge transport in DNA oligonucleotides with various base-pairing patterns.

    PubMed

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Todorciuc, Tatiana; Král, Karel; Nemec, Hynek; Buncek, Martin; Sebera, Jakub; Zális, Stanislav; Vokácová, Zuzana; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Bednárová, Lucie; Mojzes, Peter; Schneider, Bohdan

    2010-04-22

    We combined various experimental (scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy) and theoretical (density functional theory and molecular dynamics) approaches to study the relationships between the base-pairing patterns and the charge transfer properties in DNA 32-mer duplexes that may be relevant for identification and repair of defects in base pairing of the genetic DNA and for DNA use in nanotechnologies. Studied were two fully Watson-Crick (W-C)-paired duplexes, one mismatched (containing three non-W-C pairs), and three with base pairs chemically removed. The results show that the charge transport varies strongly between these duplexes. The conductivity of the mismatched duplex is considerably lower than that of the W-C-paired one despite the fact that their structural integrities and thermal stabilities are comparable. Structurally and thermally much less stable abasic duplexes have still lower conductivity but not markedly different from the mismatched duplex. All duplexes are likely to conduct by the hole mechanism, and water orbitals increase the charge transport probability. PMID:20353252

  17. Low-energy electron scattering from DNA including structural water and base-pair irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, Laurent; Sanche, Leon; Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H.

    2009-07-15

    Elastic scattering of low-energy (0-13 eV) electrons from more realistic models of a DNA base-pair decamer is studied using multiple-scattering theory and T matrices obtained from ab initio R-matrix calculations. The models include two types of irregularities usually found in cellular DNA: base-pair mismatch and structural water molecules. Furthermore, we include in our calculation inelastic collisions. It is found that the basic interference patterns observed in the ideal and nonideal (i.e., more realistic) decamers are similar but have different amplitudes and are shifted in energy. Substantial inelastic losses, interestingly, cause pronounced local resonances, which could have an important influence in DNA strand breaks.

  18. Natural versus artificial creation of base pairs in DNA: origin of nucleobases from the perspectives of unnatural base pair studies.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Yamashige, Rie

    2012-12-18

    Since life began on Earth, the four types of bases (A, G, C, and T(U)) that form two sets of base pairs have remained unchanged as the components of nucleic acids that replicate and transfer genetic information. Throughout evolution, except for the U to T modification, the four base structures have not changed. This constancy within the genetic code raises the question of how these complicated nucleotides were generated from the molecules in a primordial soup on the early Earth. At some prebiotic stage, the complementarity of base pairs might have accelerated the generation and accumulation of nucleotides or oligonucleotides. We have no clues whether one pair of nucleobases initially appeared on the early Earth during this process or a set of two base pairs appeared simultaneously. Recently, researchers have developed new artificial pairs of nucleobases (unnatural base pairs) that function alongside the natural base pairs. Some unnatural base pairs in duplex DNA can be efficiently and faithfully amplified in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using thermostable DNA polymerases. The addition of unnatural base pair systems could expand the genetic alphabet of DNA, thus providing a new mechanism for the generation novel biopolymers by the site-specific incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids and proteins. Furthermore, the process of unnatural base pair development might provide clues to the origin of the natural base pairs in a primordial soup on the early Earth. In this Account, we describe the development of three representative types of unnatural base pairs that function as a third pair of nucleobases in PCR and reconsider the origin of the natural nucleic acids. As researchers developing unnatural base pairs, they use repeated "proof of concept" experiments. As researchers design new base pairs, they improve the structures that function in PCR and eliminate those that do not. We expect that this process is similar to the one functioning in the

  19. Ultrafast dynamics in DNA base pairs following ultraviolet excitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Photo-protective mechanisms in DNA are essential to maintain the integrity of the genetic code by preventing damage from absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We have used time-resolved infra-red (TRIR) spectroscopy to observe the dynamics of Watson-Crick nucleobase pairs following absorption of femtosecond UV laser pulses. The base pairs are prepared as nucleosides in solution, and photo-induced dynamics are probed in the carbonyl and N-H bond stretching regions using broadband IR pulses with picosecond time resolution. Results will be presented for the guanine-cytosine (G-C) base pair, contrasting the rapid recovery of ground-state products (the photo-protection pathway) with formation of other photoproducts which might represent photo-damage mechanisms. This work is a collaboration with the group of Prof F. Temps (Christian-Albrechts-Universitat zu Kiel). This research is supported by ERC Advanced Grant 290966 CAPRI.

  20. Physics of base-pairing dynamics in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    As a key molecule of life, Deoxyribo-Nucleic Acid (DNA) is the focus of numbers of investigations with the help of biological, chemical and physical techniques. From a physical point of view, both experimental and theoretical works have brought quantitative insights into DNA base-pairing dynamics that we review in this Report, putting emphasis on theoretical developments. We discuss the dynamics at the base-pair scale and its pivotal coupling with the polymer one, with a polymerization index running from a few nucleotides to tens of kilo-bases. This includes opening and closure of short hairpins and oligomers as well as zipping and unwinding of long macromolecules. We review how different physical mechanisms are either used by Nature or utilized in biotechnological processes to separate the two intertwined DNA strands, by insisting on quantitative results. They go from thermally-assisted denaturation bubble nucleation to force- or torque-driven mechanisms. We show that the helical character of the molecule, possibly supercoiled, can play a key role in many denaturation and renaturation processes. We categorize the mechanisms according to the relative timescales associated with base-pairing and chain orientational degrees of freedom such as bending and torsional elastic ones. In some specific situations, these chain orientational degrees of freedom can be integrated out, and the quasi-static approximation is valid. The complex dynamics then reduces to the diffusion in a low-dimensional free-energy landscape. In contrast, some important cases of experimental interest necessarily appeal to far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics.

  1. Mammalian cells defective in DNA mismatch correction

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, P.; Aquilina, G.; Hess, P.

    1994-12-31

    Mammalian cells counteract the cytotoxicity of methylating agents, including some used in antitumor chemotherapy, by removing the methylated base, O{sup 6}-methylguanine (O{sup 6}-meG) from their DNA. This removal is normally effected by a specific DNA repair enzyme (O{sup 6}-meG-DNA methyltransferase) that is expressed constitutively. In addition, an alternative type of resistance to methylating agents can be acquired after exposure of cells to the drug. This acquired resistance is highly specific for O{sup 6}-meG and is unusual in that alkylation of DNA is normal and there is no increase in the rate of repair of O{sup 6}-meG or any other damaged base. Instead, the cell is able to tolerate the presence of the usually cytotoxic O{sup 6}-meG and to replicate its DNA normally. The ambiguity of base pairing by O{sup 6}-meG and the observation that tolerant cells are also cross-resistant to the structurally similar 6-thioguanine in DNA has led to the suggestion that the cytotoxicity of O{sup 6}-meG (and 6-thioguanine) arises from ineffective attempts at DNA mismatch correction. This model postulates that tolerance arises as a consequence of loss of this important pathway.

  2. The Effect of Basepair Mismatch on DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, D W Bo; Kim, Harold D

    2016-04-12

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single basepair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage time approach to quantitatively explain the salient features of the observed relationship. We also introduce the concept of splitting probabilities to justify that the concurrent model can be simplified into a three-step sequential model in the presence of an invader mismatch. We expect our model to become a powerful tool to design DNA-based reaction schemes with broad functionality. PMID:27074674

  3. [Ru(Me4phen)2dppz](2+), a Light Switch for DNA Mismatches.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Adam N; Marcélis, Lionel; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2016-04-20

    [Ru(Me4phen)2dppz](2+) serves as a luminescent "light switch" for single base mismatches in DNA. The preferential luminescence enhancement observed with mismatches results from two factors: (i) the complex possesses a 26-fold higher binding affinity toward the mismatch compared to well-matched base pairs, and (ii) the excited state emission lifetime of the ruthenium bound to the DNA mismatch is 160 ns versus 35 ns when bound to a matched site. Results indicate that the complex binds to the mismatch through a metalloinsertion binding mode. Cu(phen)2(2+) quenching experiments show that the complex binds to the mismatch from the minor groove, characteristic of metalloinsertion. Additionally, the luminescence intensity of the complex with DNA containing single base mismatches correlates with the thermodynamic destabilization of the mismatch, also consistent with binding through metalloinsertion. This complex represents a potentially new early cancer diagnostic for detecting deficiencies in mismatch repair. PMID:27068529

  4. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  5. Development of artificial nucleic acid that recognizes a CG base pair in triplex DNA formation.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    An oligonucleotide that can form a triplex with double-stranded DNA is called a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO). TFOs have gained considerable attention because of their potential as gene targeting tools. However, triplex DNA formation involves inherent problems for practical use. The most important problem is that natural nucleotides in TFO do not have sufficient affinity and base pair-selectivity to pyrimidine-purine base pair, like a CG or TA base pair, within dsDNA. This suggests that dsDNA region including a CG or TA base pair cannot be targeted. Therefore, artificial nucleotides, especially with non-natural nucleobases, capable of direct recognition of a CG or TA base pair via hydrogen bond formation have been developed; however, nucleotides with better selectivity and stronger affinity are necessary for implementing this dsDNA-targeting technology using TFOs. Under such a background, we considered that facile and efficient synthesis of various nucleobase derivatives in TFOs would be useful for finding an ideal nucleobase for recognition of a CG or TA base pair because detailed and rational exploration of nucleobase structures is facilitated. Recently, to develop a nucleobase recognizing a CG base pair, we have used post-elongation modification, i.e., modification after oligonucleotide synthesis, for the facile synthesis of nucleobase derivatives. This review mainly summarizes our recent findings on the development of artificial nucleobases and nucleotides for recognition of a CG base pair in triplexes formed between dsDNA and TFOs. PMID:24189561

  6. Constructing optimal backbone segments for joining fixed DNA base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, J; Jernigan, R L; Sarai, A

    1996-01-01

    A method is presented to link a sequence of space-fixed base pairs by the sugar-phosphate segments of single nucleotides and to evaluate the effects in the backbone caused by this positioning of the bases. The entire computational unit comprises several nucleotides that are energy-minimized, subject to constraints imposed by the sugar-phosphate backbone segments being anchored to space-fixed base pairs. The minimization schemes are based on two stages, a conjugate gradient method followed by a Newton-Raphson algorithm. Because our purpose is to examine the response, or relaxation, of an artificially stressed backbone, it is essential to be able to obtain, as closely as possible, a lowest minimum energy conformation of the backbone segment in conformational space. For this purpose, an algorithm is developed that leads to the generation of an assembly of many local energy minima. From these sets of local minima, one conformation corresponding to the one with the lowest minimum is then selected and designated to represent the backbone segment at its minimum. The effective electrostatic potential of mean force is expressed in terms of adjustable parameters that incorporate solvent screening action in the Coulombic interactions between charged backbone atoms; these parameters are adjusted to obtain the best fit of the nearest-neighbor phosphorous atoms in an x-ray structure. PMID:8874023

  7. Flexibility of short DNA helices with finite-length effect: From base pairs to tens of base pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-03-28

    Flexibility of short DNA helices is important for the biological functions such as nucleosome formation and DNA-protein recognition. Recent experiments suggest that short DNAs of tens of base pairs (bps) may have apparently higher flexibility than those of kilo bps, while there is still the debate on such high flexibility. In the present work, we have studied the flexibility of short DNAs with finite-length of 5–50 bps by the all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and Monte Carlo simulations with the worm-like chain model. Our microscopic analyses reveal that short DNAs have apparently high flexibility which is attributed to the significantly strong bending and stretching flexibilities of ∼6 bps at each helix end. Correspondingly, the apparent persistence length l{sub p} of short DNAs increases gradually from ∼29 nm to ∼45 nm as DNA length increases from 10 to 50 bps, in accordance with the available experimental data. Our further analyses show that the short DNAs with excluding ∼6 bps at each helix end have the similar flexibility with those of kilo bps and can be described by the worm-like chain model with l{sub p} ∼ 50 nm.

  8. An unnatural base pair system for efficient PCR amplification and functionalization of DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Michiko; Kawai, Rie; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hirao, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, we present an unnatural base pair system for efficient PCR amplification, enabling the site-specific incorporation of extra functional components into DNA. This system can be applied to conventional PCR protocols employing DNA templates containing unnatural bases, natural and unnatural base triphosphates, and a 3′→5′ exonuclease-proficient DNA polymerase. For highly faithful and efficient PCR amplification involving the unnatural base pairing, we identified the natural-base sequences surrounding the unnatural bases in DNA templates by an in vitro selection technique, using a DNA library containing the unnatural base. The system facilitates the site-specific incorporation of a variety of modified unnatural bases, linked with functional groups of interest, into amplified DNA. DNA fragments (0.15 amol) containing the unnatural base pair can be amplified 107-fold by 30 cycles of PCR, with <1% total mutation rate of the unnatural base pair site. Using the system, we demonstrated efficient PCR amplification and functionalization of DNA fragments for the extremely sensitive detection of zeptomol-scale target DNA molecules from mixtures with excess amounts (pmol scale) of foreign DNA species. This unnatural base pair system will be applicable to a wide range of DNA/RNA-based technologies. PMID:19073696

  9. G.T wobble base-pairing in Z-DNA at 1.0 A atomic resolution: the crystal structure of d(CGCGTG).

    PubMed Central

    Ho, P S; Frederick, C A; Quigley, G J; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Wang, A H; Rich, A

    1985-01-01

    The DNA oligomer d(CGCGTG) crystallizes as a Z-DNA double helix containing two guanine-thymine base pair mismatches of the wobble type. The crystal diffracts to 1 A resolution and the structure has been solved and refined. At this resolution, a large amount of information is revealed about the organization of the water molecules in the lattice generally and more specifically around the wobble base pairs. By comparing this structure with the analogous high resolution structure of d(CGCGCG) we can visualize the structural changes as well as the reorganization of the solvent molecules associated with wobble base pairing. There is only a small distortion of the Z-DNA backbone resulting from introduction of the GT mismatched base pairs. The water molecules cluster around the wobble base pair taking up all of the hydrogen bonding capabilities of the bases due to wobble pairing. These bridging water molecules serve to stabilize the base-base interaction and, thus, may be generally important for base mispairing either in DNA or in RNA molecules. PMID:4092690

  10. Raising the barrier for photoinduced DNA charge injection with a cyclohexyl artificial base pair.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arunoday P N; Harris, Michelle A; Young, Ryan M; Miller, Stephen A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Lewis, Frederick D

    2015-01-01

    The effects of an artificial cyclohexyl base pair on the quantum yields of fluorescence and dynamics of charge separation and charge recombination have been investigated for several synthetic DNA hairpins. The hairpins possess stilbenedicarboxamide, perylenediimide, or naphthalenediimide linkers and base-paired stems. In the absence of the artificial base pair hole injection into both adenine and guanine purine bases is exergonic and irreversible, except in the case of stilbene with adenine for which it is slightly endergonic and reversible. Insertion of the artificial base pair renders hole injection endergonic or isoergonic except in the case of the powerful naphthalene acceptor for which it remains exergonic. Both hole injection and charge recombination are slower for the naphthalene acceptor in the presence of the artificial base pair than in its absence. The effect of an artificial base pair on charge separation and charge recombination in hairpins possessing stilbene and naphthalene acceptor linkers and a stilbenediether donor capping group has also been investigated. In the case of the stilbene acceptor-stilbene donor capped hairpins photoinduced charge separation across six base pairs is efficient in the absence of the artificial base pair but does not occur in its presence. In the case of the naphthalene acceptor-stilbene donor capped hairpins the artificial base pair slows but does not stop charge separation and charge recombination, leading to the formation of long-lived charge separated states. PMID:26442603

  11. Hydrophobic, Non-Hydrogen-Bonding Bases and Base Pairs in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Barbara A.; Kool, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    We report the properties of hydrophobic isosteres of pyrimidines and purines in synthetic DNA duplexes. Phenyl nucleosides 1 and 2 are nonpolar isosteres of the natural thymidine nucleoside, and indole nucleoside 3 is an analog of the complementary purine 2-aminodeoxyadenosine. The nucleosides were incorporated into synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides and were paired against each other and against the natural bases. Thermal denaturation experiments were used to measure the stabilities of the duplexes at neutral pH. It is found that the hydrophobic base analogs are nonselective in pairing with the four natural bases but selective for pairing with each other rather than with the natural bases. For example, compound 2 selectively pairs with itself rather than with A, T, G, or C; the magnitude of this selectivity is found to be 6.5–9.3 °C in Tm or 1.5–1.8 kcal/mol in free energy (25 °C). All possible hydrophobic pairing combinations of 1, 2, and 3 were examined. Results show that the pairing affinity depends on the nature of the pairs and on position in the duplex. The highest affinity pairs are found to be the 1–1 and 2–2 self-pairs and the 1–2 heteropair. The best stabilization occurs when the pairs are placed at the ends of duplexes rather than internally; the internal pairs may be destabilized by imperfect steric mimicry which leads to non-ideal duplex structure. In some cases the hydrophobic pairs are significantly stabilizing to the DNA duplex; for example, when situated at the end of a duplex, the 1–1 pair is more stabilizing than a T–A pair. When situated internally, the affinity of the 1–1 pair is the same as, or slightly better than, the analogous T–T mismatch pair, which is known to have two hydrogen bonds. The studies raise the possibility that hydrogen bonds may not always be required for the formation of stable duplex DNA-like structure. In addition, the results point out the importance of solvation and desolvation in natural base pairing

  12. Biochemical evidence for the requirement of Hoogsteen base pairing for replication by human DNA polymerase iota.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert E; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2005-07-26

    Because of the near geometric identity of Watson-Crick (W-C) GxC and AxT base pairs, a given DNA polymerase forms the four possible correct base pairs with nearly identical catalytic efficiencies. However, human DNA polymerase iota (Pol iota), a member of the Y family of DNA polymerases, exhibits a marked template specificity, being more efficient at incorporating the correct nucleotide opposite template purines than opposite pyrimidines. By using 7-deazaadenine and 7-deazaguanine as the templating residues, which disrupt Hoogsteen base pair formation, we show that, unlike the other DNA polymerases belonging to the A, B, or Y family, DNA synthesis by Pol iota is severely inhibited by these N7-modified bases. These observations provide biochemical evidence that, during normal DNA synthesis, template purines adopt a syn conformation in the Pol iota active site, enabling the formation of a Hoogsteen base pair with the incoming pyrimidine nucleotide. Additionally, mutational studies with Leu-62, which lies in close proximity to the templating residue in the Pol iota ternary complex, have indicated that both factors, steric constraints within the active site and the stability provided by the hydrogen bonds in the Hoogsteen base pair, contribute to the efficiency of correct nucleotide incorporation opposite template purines by Pol iota. PMID:16014707

  13. Thermodynamics of the formation of Ag(I)-mediated azole base pairs in DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Kristina; Léon, J Christian; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Müller, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was applied to determine the thermodynamic parameters for the specific binding of Ag(I) ions to a series of DNA duplexes comprising Im:Im or Tr:Tr mispairs to form metal-mediated Im-Ag(I)-Im or Tr-Ag(I)-Tr base pairs (Im=imidazole nucleoside; Tr=1.2,4-triazole nucleoside). A total of seven different duplexes are discussed, incorporating one to three artificial base pairs in neighboring or non-neighboring positions. The association constant related to the formation of Tr-Ag(I)-Tr base pairs is estimated to be <10(3)M(-1). In contrast, Im-Ag(I)-Im base pairs are much more stable. The intrinsic association constant for their formation is in the order of 10(6)M(-1) and is therefore larger than that for the formation of T-Hg(II)-T and C-Ag(I)-C base pairs consisting of natural nucleobases. Two neighboring Im-Ag(I)-Im base pairs form cooperatively, whereas two remotely located Im-Ag(I)-Im base pairs form non-cooperatively. In general, the specific binding of Ag(I) to Im:Im-containing duplexes is enthalpically driven, with a significant additional entropic contribution in most cases. PMID:27032292

  14. Impact of a single base pair substitution on the charge transfer rate along short DNA hairpins

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Nicolas; Berlin, Yuri A.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical studies of hole migration along short DNA hairpins were performed with a particular emphasis on the variations of the rate and quantum yield of the charge separation process with the location of a single guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair. Our calculations show that the hole arrival rate increases as the position of the guanine:cytosine base pair shifts from the beginning to the end of the sequence. Although these results are in agreement with recent experimental findings, the mechanism governing the charge migration along these sequences is revisited here. Instead of the phenomenological two-step hopping mechanism via the guanine base, the charge propagation occurs through a delocalization of the hole density along the base pair stack. Furthermore, the variations of the charge transfer with the position of the guanine base are explained by the impact of the base pair substitutions on the delocalized conduction channels. PMID:23980166

  15. Formation of Silver Nanoclusters from a DNA Template Containing Ag(I)-Mediated Base Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Léon, J. Christian; Stegemann, Linda; Peterlechner, Martin; Litau, Stefanie; Wilde, Gerhard; Strassert, Cristian A.; Müller, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A series of DNA double helices containing different numbers of silver(I)-mediated base pairs involving the artificial nucleobases imidazole or 2-methylimidazole has been applied for the generation of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters. The original Ag(I)-containing nucleic acids as well as the resulting nanoclusters and nanoparticles have been characterized by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show for the first time that metal-mediated base pairs can be used for the templated growth of metal nanoclusters. PMID:27034627

  16. Single-molecule derivation of salt dependent base-pair free energies in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Josep M; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Forns, Núria; Smith, Steven B; Bustamante, Carlos; Ritort, Felix

    2010-08-31

    Accurate knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids is crucial to predicting their structure and stability. To date most measurements of base-pair free energies in DNA are obtained in thermal denaturation experiments, which depend on several assumptions. Here we report measurements of the DNA base-pair free energies based on a simplified system, the mechanical unzipping of single DNA molecules. By combining experimental data with a physical model and an optimization algorithm for analysis, we measure the 10 unique nearest-neighbor base-pair free energies with 0.1 kcal mol(-1) precision over two orders of magnitude of monovalent salt concentration. We find an improved set of standard energy values compared with Unified Oligonucleotide energies and a unique set of 10 base-pair-specific salt-correction values. The latter are found to be strongest for AA/TT and weakest for CC/GG. Our unique energy values and salt corrections improve predictions of DNA unzipping forces and are fully compatible with melting temperatures for oligos. The method should make it possible to obtain free energies, enthalpies, and entropies in conditions not accessible by bulk methodologies. PMID:20716688

  17. Single-molecule derivation of salt dependent base-pair free energies in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Josep M.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Forns, Núria; Smith, Steven B.; Bustamante, Carlos; Ritort, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids is crucial to predicting their structure and stability. To date most measurements of base-pair free energies in DNA are obtained in thermal denaturation experiments, which depend on several assumptions. Here we report measurements of the DNA base-pair free energies based on a simplified system, the mechanical unzipping of single DNA molecules. By combining experimental data with a physical model and an optimization algorithm for analysis, we measure the 10 unique nearest-neighbor base-pair free energies with 0.1 kcal mol-1 precision over two orders of magnitude of monovalent salt concentration. We find an improved set of standard energy values compared with Unified Oligonucleotide energies and a unique set of 10 base-pair-specific salt-correction values. The latter are found to be strongest for AA/TT and weakest for CC/GG. Our unique energy values and salt corrections improve predictions of DNA unzipping forces and are fully compatible with melting temperatures for oligos. The method should make it possible to obtain free energies, enthalpies, and entropies in conditions not accessible by bulk methodologies. PMID:20716688

  18. B-DNA structure is intrinsically polymorphic: even at the level of base pair positions

    SciTech Connect

    Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Woods, Kristen Kruger; Moulaei, Tinoush; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2012-10-23

    Increasingly exact measurement of single crystal X-ray diffraction data offers detailed characterization of DNA conformation, hydration and electrostatics. However, instead of providing a more clear and unambiguous image of DNA, highly accurate diffraction data reveal polymorphism of the DNA atomic positions and conformation and hydration. Here we describe an accurate X-ray structure of B-DNA, painstakingly fit to a multistate model that contains multiple competing positions of most of the backbone and of entire base pairs. Two of ten base-pairs of CCAGGCCTGG are in multiple states distinguished primarily by differences in slide. Similarly, all the surrounding ions are seen to fractionally occupy discrete competing and overlapping sites. And finally, the vast majority of water molecules show strong evidence of multiple competing sites. Conventional resolution appears to give a false sense of homogeneity in conformation and interactions of DNA. In addition, conventional resolution yields an average structure that is not accurate, in that it is different from any of the multiple discrete structures observed at high resolution. Because base pair positional heterogeneity has not always been incorporated into model-building, even some high and ultrahigh-resolution structures of DNA do not indicate the full extent of conformational polymorphism.

  19. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  20. Triple helical DNA in a duplex context and base pair opening

    PubMed Central

    Esguerra, Mauricio; Nilsson, Lennart; Villa, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    It is fundamental to explore in atomic detail the behavior of DNA triple helices as a means to understand the role they might play in vivo and to better engineer their use in genetic technologies, such as antigene therapy. To this aim we have performed atomistic simulations of a purine-rich antiparallel triple helix stretch of 10 base triplets flanked by canonical Watson–Crick double helices. At the same time we have explored the thermodynamic behavior of a flipping Watson–Crick base pair in the context of the triple and double helix. The third strand can be accommodated in a B-like duplex conformation. Upon binding, the double helix changes shape, and becomes more rigid. The triple-helical region increases its major groove width mainly by oversliding in the negative direction. The resulting conformations are somewhere between the A and B conformations with base pairs remaining almost perpendicular to the helical axis. The neighboring duplex regions maintain a B DNA conformation. Base pair opening in the duplex regions is more probable than in the triplex and binding of the Hoogsteen strand does not influence base pair breathing in the neighboring duplex region. PMID:25228466

  1. Free energy analysis and mechanism of base pair stacking in nicked DNA.

    PubMed

    Häse, Florian; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-09-01

    The equilibrium of stacked and unstacked base pairs is of central importance for all nucleic acid structure formation processes. The stacking equilibrium is influenced by intramolecular interactions between nucleosides but also by interactions with the solvent. Realistic simulations on nucleic acid structure formation and flexibility require an accurate description of the stacking geometry and stability and its sequence dependence. Free energy simulations have been conducted on a series of double stranded DNA molecules with a central strand break (nick) in one strand. The change in free energy upon unstacking was calculated for all ten possible base pair steps using umbrella sampling along a center-of-mass separation coordinate and including a comparison of different water models. Comparison to experimental studies indicates qualitative agreement of the stability order but a general overestimation of base pair stacking interactions in the simulations. A significant dependence of calculated nucleobase stacking free energies on the employed water model was observed with the tendency of stacking free energies being more accurately reproduced by more complex water models. The simulation studies also suggest a mechanism of stacking/unstacking that involves significant motions perpendicular to the reaction coordinate and indicate that the equilibrium nicked base pair step may slightly differ from regular B-DNA geometry in a sequence-dependent manner. PMID:27407106

  2. Free energy analysis and mechanism of base pair stacking in nicked DNA

    PubMed Central

    Häse, Florian; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium of stacked and unstacked base pairs is of central importance for all nucleic acid structure formation processes. The stacking equilibrium is influenced by intramolecular interactions between nucleosides but also by interactions with the solvent. Realistic simulations on nucleic acid structure formation and flexibility require an accurate description of the stacking geometry and stability and its sequence dependence. Free energy simulations have been conducted on a series of double stranded DNA molecules with a central strand break (nick) in one strand. The change in free energy upon unstacking was calculated for all ten possible base pair steps using umbrella sampling along a center-of-mass separation coordinate and including a comparison of different water models. Comparison to experimental studies indicates qualitative agreement of the stability order but a general overestimation of base pair stacking interactions in the simulations. A significant dependence of calculated nucleobase stacking free energies on the employed water model was observed with the tendency of stacking free energies being more accurately reproduced by more complex water models. The simulation studies also suggest a mechanism of stacking/unstacking that involves significant motions perpendicular to the reaction coordinate and indicate that the equilibrium nicked base pair step may slightly differ from regular B-DNA geometry in a sequence-dependent manner. PMID:27407106

  3. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair. PMID:26042867

  4. A quantum theoretical study of reactions of methyldiazonium ion with DNA base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Ganapathy, Vinay; Mishra, P. C.

    2011-09-01

    Methylation of the DNA bases in the Watson-Crick GC and AT base pairs by the methyldiazonium ion was investigated employing density functional and second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theories. Methylation at the N3, N7 and O6 sites of guanine, N1, N3 and N7 sites of adenine, O2 and N3 sites of cytosine and the O2 and O4 sites of thymine were considered. The computed reactivities for methylation follow the order N7(guanine) > N3(adenine) > O6(guanine) which is in agreement with experiment. The base pairing in DNA is found to play a significant role with regard to reactivities of the different sites.

  5. DNA separation and fluorescent detection in an optofluidic chip with sub-base-pair resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollnau, Markus; Hammer, Manfred; Dongre, Chaitanya; Hoekstra, Hugo J.

    2015-03-01

    DNA sequencing in a lab-on-a-chip aims at providing cheap, high-speed analysis of low reagent volumes to, e.g., identify genomic deletions or insertions associated with genetic illnesses. Detecting single base-pair insertions/deletions from DNA fragments in the diagnostically relevant range of 150-1000 base-pairs requires a sizing accuracy of S < 10-3. Here we demonstrate S = 4×10-4. A microfluidic chip was post-processed by femtosecond-laser writing of an optical waveguide. 12 blue-labeled and 23 red-labeled DNA fragments were separated in size by capillary electrophoresis, each set excited by either of two lasers power-modulated at different frequencies, their fluorescence detected by a photomultiplier, and blue/red signals distinguished by Fourier analysis. Different calibration strategies were tested: a) use either set of DNA molecules as reference to calibrate the set-up and identify the base-pair sizes of the other set in the same flow experiment, thereby eliminating variations in temperature, wall-coating and sieving-gel conditions, and actuation voltages; b) use the same molecular set as reference and sample with the same fluorescence label, flown in consecutive experiments; c) perform cross-experiments based on different molecular sets with different labels, flown in consecutive experiments. From the results we conclude: Applying quadratic instead of linear fit functions improves the calibration accuracy. Blue-labeled molecules are separated with higher accuracy. The influence of dye label is higher than fluctuations between two experiments. Choosing a single, suitable dye label combined with reference calibration and sample investigation in consecutive experiments results in S = 4×10-4, enabling detection of single base-pair insertion/deletion in a lab-on-a-chip.

  6. 6-Pyrazolylpurine as an Artificial Nucleobase for Metal-Mediated Base Pairing in DNA Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Léon, J. Christian; Sinha, Indranil; Müller, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The artificial nucleobase 6-pyrazol-1-yl-purine (6PP) has been investigated with respect to its usability in metal-mediated base pairing. As was shown by temperature-dependent UV spectroscopy, 6PP may form weakly stabilizing 6PP–Ag(I)–6PP homo base pairs. Interestingly, 6PP can be used to selectively recognize a complementary pyrimidine nucleobase. The addition of Ag(I) to a DNA duplex comprising a central 6PP:C mispair (C = cytosine) leads to a slight destabilization of the duplex. In contrast, a stabilizing 6PP–Ag(I)–T base pair is formed with a complementary thymine (T) residue. It is interesting to note that 6PP is capable of differentiating between the pyrimidine moieties despite the fact that it is not as sterically crowded as 6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)purine, an artificial nucleobase that had previously been suggested for the recognition of nucleic acid sequences via the formation of a metal-mediated base pair. Hence, the additional methyl groups of 6-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)purine may not be required for the specific recognition of the complementary nucleobase. PMID:27089326

  7. Molecular mechanism of base pairing infidelity during DNA duplication upon one-electron oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2010-01-01

    The guanine radical cation (G•+) is formed by one-electron oxidation from its parent guanine (G). G•+ is rapidly deprotonated in the aqueous phase resulting in the formation of the neutral guanine radical [G(-H)•]. The loss of proton occurs at the N1 nitrogen, which is involved in the classical Watson-Crick base pairing with cytosine (C). Employing the density functional theory (DFT), it has been observed that a new shifted base pairing configuration is formed between G(-H)• and C constituting only two hydrogen bonds after deprotonation occurs. Using the DFT method, G(-H)• was paired with thymine (T), adenine (A) and G revealing substantial binding energies comparable to those of classical G-C and A-T base pairs. Hence, G(-H)• does not display any particular specificity for C compared to the other bases. Taking into account the long lifetime of the G(-H)• radical in the DNA helix (5 s) and the rapid duplication rate of DNA during mitosis/meiosis (5-500 bases per s), G(-H)• can pair promiscuously leading to errors in the duplication process. This scenario constitutes a new mechanism which explains how one-electron oxidation of the DNA double helix can lead to mutations. PMID:21603305

  8. DNA Aptamer Generation by Genetic Alphabet Expansion SELEX (ExSELEX) Using an Unnatural Base Pair System.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Michiko; Matsunaga, Ken-ichiro; Hirao, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Genetic alphabet expansion of DNA using unnatural base pair systems is expected to provide a wide variety of novel tools and methods. Recent rapid progress in this area has enabled the creation of several types of unnatural base pairs that function as a third base pair in polymerase reactions. Presently, a major topic is whether the genetic alphabet expansion system actually increases nucleic acid functionalities. We recently applied our unnatural base pair system to in vitro selection (SELEX), using a DNA library containing four natural bases and an unnatural base, and succeeded in the generation of high-affinity DNA aptamers that specifically bind to target proteins. Only a few hydrophobic unnatural bases greatly augmented the affinity of the aptamers. Here, we describe a new approach (genetic alphabet Expansion SELEX, ExSELEX), using our hydrophobic unnatural base pair system for high affinity DNA aptamer generation. PMID:26552815

  9. Electric-field induced mutation of DNA: a theoretical investigation of the GC base pair.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis

    2013-04-01

    It is known that intense external electric fields affect the proton transfer (PT) reactions in simple chemical systems, such as hydrated chlorhydric acid or formic acid dimer. Accordingly, electric fields might be used to modulate the PT reactions responsible for the spontaneous mutation mechanism in DNA. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of these fields on the tautomeric equilibria of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair in order to gain further insight into this hypothesis. This task is performed with both density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) approaches. Our results demonstrate that electric fields not only drastically alter the rate constants of PT but also tune the mechanism of the PT reactions in the GC base pair. PMID:23338206

  10. Identification of DNA lesions using a third base pair for amplification and nanopore sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Jan; Ding, Yun; Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the genome is implicated in the progression of cancer and stress-induced diseases. DNA lesions exist in low levels, and cannot be amplified by standard PCR because they are frequently strong blocks to polymerases. Here, we describe a method for PCR amplification of lesion-containing DNA in which the site and identity could be marked, copied and sequenced. Critical for this method is installation of either the dNaM or d5SICS nucleotides at the lesion site after processing via the base excision repair process. These marker nucleotides constitute an unnatural base pair, allowing large quantities of marked DNA to be made by PCR amplification. Sanger sequencing confirms the potential for this method to locate lesions by marking, amplifying and sequencing a lesion in the KRAS gene. Detection using the α-hemolysin nanopore is also developed to analyse the markers in individual DNA strands with the potential to identify multiple lesions per strand. PMID:26542210

  11. How many base-pairs per turn does DNA have in solution and in chromatin? Some theoretical calculations.

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, M

    1978-01-01

    Calculations on a 20-base pair segment of DNA double helix using empirical energy functions show that DNA can be bent smoothly and uniformly into a superhelix with a small enough radius (45 A) to fit the dimensions of chromatin. The variation of energy with the twist of the base pairs about the helix axis shows the straight DNA free in solution is most stable with about 10 1/2 base pairs per turn rather than 10 as observed in the solid state, whereas superhelical DNA in chromatin is most stable with about 10 base pairs per turn. This result, which has a simple physical interpretation, explains the pattern of nuclease cuts and the linkage number changes observed for DNA arranged in chromatin. PMID:273227

  12. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-01

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication. PMID:25127298

  13. Base Pair Fraying in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Otyepka, Michal; Šponer, Jiří; Lankaš, Filip; Jurečka, Petr

    2014-08-12

    Terminal base pairs of DNA and RNA molecules in solution are known to undergo frequent transient opening events (fraying). Accurate modeling of this process is important because of its involvement in nucleic acid end recognition and enzymatic catalysis. In this article, we describe fraying in molecular dynamics simulations with the ff99bsc0, ff99bsc0χOL3, and ff99bsc0χOL4 force fields, both for DNA and RNA molecules. Comparison with the experiment showed that while some features of fraying are consistent with the available data, others indicate potential problems with the force field description. In particular, multiple noncanonical structures are formed at the ends of the DNA and RNA duplexes. Among them are tWC/sugar edge pair, C-H edge/Watson-Crick pair, and stacked geometries, in which the terminal bases are stacked above each other. These structures usually appear within the first tens to hundreds of nanoseconds and substantially limit the usefulness of the remaining part of the simulation due to geometry distortions that are transferred to several neighboring base pairs ("end effects"). We show that stability of the noncanonical structures in ff99bsc0 may be partly linked to inaccurate glycosidic (χ) torsion potentials that overstabilize the syn region and allow for rapid anti to syn transitions. The RNA refined glycosidic torsion potential χOL3 provides an improved description and substantially more stable MD simulations of RNA molecules. In the case of DNA, the χOL4 correction gives only partial improvement. None of the tested force fields provide a satisfactory description of the terminal regions, indicating that further improvement is needed to achieve realistic modeling of fraying in DNA and RNA molecules. PMID:26588288

  14. Mitochondrial DNA 4977-base pair common deletion in blood leukocytes and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Wan, Jie; Huff, Chad; Fang, Shenying; Lee, Jeffrey E; Zhao, Hua

    2016-05-01

    The 4977-base pair common deletion DmtDNA4977 is the most frequently observed mitochondrial DNA mutation in human tissues. Because mitochondrial DNA mutations are mainly caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and given that oxidative stress plays an important role in melanoma carcinogenesis, the investigation of DmtDNA4977 may be particularly relevant to the development of melanoma. In this study, we compared DmtDNA4977 levels in blood leukocytes from 206 melanoma patients and 219 healthy controls. Overall, melanoma cases had significantly higher levels of DmtDNA4977 than healthy controls (median: 0.60 vs 0.20, P = 0.008). The difference was evident among individuals who were older than 47 yrs, women, and had pigmentation risk factors (e.g., blond or red hair, blue eye, fair skin, light, or none tanning ability after prolonged sun exposure, and freckling in the sun as a child). The difference was also evident among those who had at least one lifetime sunburn with blistering and had no reported use of a sunlamp. Interestingly, among controls, DmtDNA4977 levels differed by phenotypic index and reported use of a sunlamp. In the risk assessment, increased levels of DmtDNA4977 were associated with a 1.23-fold increased risk of melanoma (odds ratio (OR): 1.23, 95% confidence interval (90% CI): 1.01, 1.50). A significant dose-response relationship was observed in quartile analysis (P = 0.001). In summary, our study suggests that high levels of DmtDNA4977 in blood leukocytes are associated with increased risk of melanoma and that association is affected by both pigmentation and personal history of sun exposure. PMID:26988264

  15. A 145-base pair DNA sequence that positions itself precisely and asymmetrically on the nucleosome core.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, N; Felsenfeld, G; Rushton, B M; McGhee, J D

    1984-01-01

    A 145-bp DNA sequence, cloned from Escherichia coli, was reconstituted into nucleosome core particles by a number of methods. The behaviour of the resulting complex upon sucrose gradient sedimentation and nucleoprotein gel electrophoresis closely resembled that of control bulk nucleosome core particles. DNase I digestion of the 32P-end-labelled complex revealed the 10-bp periodicity of cleavages expected for DNA bound on a histone surface. The narrow cleavage sites observed (1 bp wide) imply that the sequence occupies a single preferred position on the nucleosome core, accurate to the level of single base pairs. By relating the digestion pattern observed to the pattern of site protection found for random sequence nucleosomes, the DNA position was found to be offset by 17 bp from that in the normal core particle. A number of experiments argue against the involvement of length or end effects and suggest that it is some feature of the DNA sequence itself that determines this precise positioning of DNA on the nucleosome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6096135

  16. New insights into Hoogsteen base pairs in DNA duplexes from a structure-based survey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huiqing; Hintze, Bradley J; Kimsey, Isaac J; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Yang, Shan; Richardson, Jane S; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2015-04-20

    Hoogsteen (HG) base pairs (bps) provide an alternative pairing geometry to Watson-Crick (WC) bps and can play unique functional roles in duplex DNA. Here, we use structural features unique to HG bps (syn purine base, HG hydrogen bonds and constricted C1'-C1' distance across the bp) to search for HG bps in X-ray structures of DNA duplexes in the Protein Data Bank. The survey identifies 106 A•T and 34 G•C HG bps in DNA duplexes, many of which are undocumented in the literature. It also uncovers HG-like bps with syn purines lacking HG hydrogen bonds or constricted C1'-C1' distances that are analogous to conformations that have been proposed to populate the WC-to-HG transition pathway. The survey reveals HG preferences similar to those observed for transient HG bps in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance, including stronger preferences for A•T versus G•C bps, TA versus GG steps, and also suggests enrichment at terminal ends with a preference for 5'-purine. HG bps induce small local perturbations in neighboring bps and, surprisingly, a small but significant degree of DNA bending (∼14°) directed toward the major groove. The survey provides insights into the preferences and structural consequences of HG bps in duplex DNA. PMID:25813047

  17. Silver-mediated base pairings: towards dynamic DNA nanostructures with enhanced chemical and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal and chemical fragility of DNA nanomaterials assembled by Watson–Crick (WC) pairing constrain the settings in which these materials can be used and how they can be functionalized. Here we investigate use of the silver cation, Ag+, as an agent for more robust, metal-mediated self-assembly, focusing on the simplest duplex building blocks that would be required for more elaborate Ag+–DNA nanostructures. Our studies of Ag+-induced assembly of non-complementary DNA oligomers employ strands of 2–24 bases, with varied base compositions, and use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to determine product compositions. High yields of duplex products containing narrowly distributed numbers of Ag+ can be achieved by optimizing solution conditions. These Ag+-mediated duplexes are stable to at least 60 mM Mg2+, higher than is necessary for WC nanotechnology schemes such as tile assemblies and DNA origami, indicating that sequential stages of Ag+-mediated and WC-mediated assembly may be feasible. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests simple helical structures for Ag+-mediated duplexes with lengths to at least 20 base pairs, and further indicates that the structure of cytosine-rich duplexes is preserved at high urea concentrations. We therefore propose an approach towards dynamic DNA nanomaterials with enhanced thermal and chemical stability through designs that combine sturdy silver-mediated ‘frames’ with WC paired ‘pictures’.

  18. Active destabilization of base pairs by a DNA glycosylase wedge initiates damage recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J.; Li, Haoquan; Mechetin, Grigory V.; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur P.; Fedorova, Olga S.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) excises 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) from DNA but ignores normal guanine. We combined molecular dynamics simulation and stopped-flow kinetics with fluorescence detection to track the events in the recognition of oxoG by Fpg and its mutants with a key phenylalanine residue, which intercalates next to the damaged base, changed to either alanine (F110A) or fluorescent reporter tryptophan (F110W). Guanine was sampled by Fpg, as evident from the F110W stopped-flow traces, but less extensively than oxoG. The wedgeless F110A enzyme could bend DNA but failed to proceed further in oxoG recognition. Modeling of the base eversion with energy decomposition suggested that the wedge destabilizes the intrahelical base primarily through buckling both surrounding base pairs. Replacement of oxoG with abasic (AP) site rescued the activity, and calculations suggested that wedge insertion is not required for AP site destabilization and eversion. Our results suggest that Fpg, and possibly other DNA glycosylases, convert part of the binding energy into active destabilization of their substrates, using the energy differences between normal and damaged bases for fast substrate discrimination. PMID:25520195

  19. Double proton transfer dynamics of model DNA base pairs in the condensed phase

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of excited-state double proton transfer of model DNA base pairs, 7-azaindole dimers, is reported using femtosecond fluorescence spectroscopy. To elucidate the nature of the transfer in the condensed phase, here we examine variation of solvent polarity and viscosity, solute concentration, and isotopic fractionation. The rate of proton transfer is found to be significantly dependent on polarity and on the isotopic composition in the pair. Consistent with a stepwise mechanism, the results support the presence of an ionic intermediate species which forms on the femtosecond time scale and decays to the final tautomeric form on the picosecond time scale. We discuss the results in relation to the molecular motions involved and comment on recent claims of concerted transfer in the condensed phase. The nonconcerted mechanism is in agreement with previous isolated-molecule femtosecond dynamics and is also consistent with the most-recent high-level theoretical study on the same pair. PMID:17502610

  20. Inverse Temperature Dependence of Nuclear Quantum Effects in DNA Base Pairs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Chen, Ji; Rossi, Mariana; Feng, Yexin; Li, Xin-Zheng; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-06-01

    Despite the inherently quantum mechanical nature of hydrogen bonding, it is unclear how nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) alter the strengths of hydrogen bonds. With this in mind, we use ab initio path integral molecular dynamics to determine the absolute contribution of NQEs to the binding in DNA base pair complexes, arguably the most important hydrogen-bonded systems of all. We find that depending on the temperature, NQEs can either strengthen or weaken the binding within the hydrogen-bonded complexes. As a somewhat counterintuitive consequence, NQEs can have a smaller impact on hydrogen bond strengths at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. We rationalize this in terms of a competition of NQEs between low-frequency and high-frequency vibrational modes. Extending this idea, we also propose a simple model to predict the temperature dependence of NQEs on hydrogen bond strengths in general. PMID:27195654

  1. Inverse Temperature Dependence of Nuclear Quantum Effects in DNA Base Pairs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inherently quantum mechanical nature of hydrogen bonding, it is unclear how nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) alter the strengths of hydrogen bonds. With this in mind, we use ab initio path integral molecular dynamics to determine the absolute contribution of NQEs to the binding in DNA base pair complexes, arguably the most important hydrogen-bonded systems of all. We find that depending on the temperature, NQEs can either strengthen or weaken the binding within the hydrogen-bonded complexes. As a somewhat counterintuitive consequence, NQEs can have a smaller impact on hydrogen bond strengths at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. We rationalize this in terms of a competition of NQEs between low-frequency and high-frequency vibrational modes. Extending this idea, we also propose a simple model to predict the temperature dependence of NQEs on hydrogen bond strengths in general. PMID:27195654

  2. A 26-base-pair repetitive sequence specific for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Correia, F F; Inouye, S; Inouye, M

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional heteroduplex mapping of Neisseria gonorrhoeae genomic DNA revealed a number of spots, indicating the existence of repetitive sequences. When one of the spots was extracted and used as a probe for Southern blot analysis, two HindIII bands (11.0 and 3.6 kilobases [kb]) of the genomic digest hybridized with approximately equal intensity. The 3.6-kb fragment was cloned and found to contain two different types of repeated sequence. One type was approximately 1.1 kb in length and was found at least twice in the entire genome. The other consisted of a 26-base-pair family GT(C/A)C(Py)G(Pu)TTTTTGTTAAT(Py)C(Pu)CTATA (Py, pyrimidine; Pu, purine) that was repeated at least 20 times in the entire genome. This repetitive sequence was found also in Neisseria meningitidis but not in various other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3091577

  3. In silico studies toward understanding the interactions of DNA base pairs with protonated linear/cyclic diamines.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anik; Sahu, Debashis; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2013-08-29

    Protonated amino groups are ubiquitous in nature and important in the fields of chemistry and biology. In search of efficient polyamine analogues, we have performed DFT calculations on the interactions of some simple cyclic and constrained protonated diamines with the DNA base pairs and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding interactions involving linear diamines, which mimic biogenic polyamines such as spermine. The interactions are mainly governed by the strong hydrogen bonding between the ligand and the DNA base pairs. The DFT calculations suggest that the major-groove N7 interaction (GC base pair) with linear diamine is energetically more favored than other possible interactions, as reported with spermine. The cyclic diamines exhibited better interactions with the N7 site of the AT and GC base pairs of DNA than the linear diamines. The net atomic charges calculated for the protonated amine hydrogens were higher for the cyclic systems than for the linear diamines, inducing better binding affinity with the DNA base pairs. The stable conformers of cyclic diamines were predicted using the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. The positions of the protonated diamine groups in these cyclic systems are crucial for effective binding with the DNA base pairs. The DFT-calculated results show that diequatorial (ee) 1,2-cyclohexadiamine (CHDA) is a promising candidate as a polyamine analogue for biogenic polyamines. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed using explicit water molecules for the interaction of representative ligands with the DNA base pairs to examine the influence of solvent molecules on such interactions. PMID:23909683

  4. Protein-protein interactions in DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, Peter; Li, Pingping; Gotthardt, Julia

    2016-02-01

    The principal DNA mismatch repair proteins MutS and MutL are versatile enzymes that couple DNA mismatch or damage recognition to other cellular processes. Besides interaction with their DNA substrates this involves transient interactions with other proteins which is triggered by the DNA mismatch or damage and controlled by conformational changes. Both MutS and MutL proteins have ATPase activity, which adds another level to control their activity and interactions with DNA substrates and other proteins. Here we focus on the protein-protein interactions, protein interaction sites and the different levels of structural knowledge about the protein complexes formed with MutS and MutL during the mismatch repair reaction. PMID:26725162

  5. UvrD helicase unwinds DNA one base pair at a time by a two-part power stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Young; Yang, Wei

    2006-12-29

    Helicases use the energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to unwind double helices in essentially every metabolic pathway involving nucleic acids. Earlier crystal structures have suggested that DNA helicases translocate along a single-stranded DNA in an inchworm fashion. We report here a series of crystal structures of the UvrD helicase complexed with DNA and ATP hydrolysis intermediates. These structures reveal that ATP binding alone leads to unwinding of 1 base pair by directional rotation and translation of the DNA duplex, and ADP and Pi release leads to translocation of the developing single strand. Thus DNA unwinding is achieved by a two-part power stroke in a combined wrench-and-inchworm mechanism. The rotational angle and translational distance of DNA define the unwinding step to be 1 base pair per ATP hydrolyzed. Finally, a gateway for ssDNA translocation and an alternative strand-displacement mode may explain the varying step sizes reported previously. PMID:17190599

  6. 2',4'-BNA bearing a 2-pyridine nucleobase for CG base pair recognition in the parallel motif triplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoshiyuki; Matsugu, Sachiko; Inohara, Hiroyasu; Hatanaka, Yuri; Akabane, Masaaki; Imanishi, Takeshi; Obika, Satoshi

    2010-09-21

    We succeeded in the synthesis of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) that contain a deoxyribonucleotide (Py) bearing a 2-pyridine nucleobase or the 2',4'-BNA congener (Py(B)). By UV melting experiments, it was found that 2-pyridine was a very promising nucleobase for the sequence-selective recognition of a CG base pair within double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in a parallel motif triplex. Moreover, Py(B) in TFOs showed stronger affinity to a CG base pair than Py with further increase in the selectivity. Using TFO including multiple Py(B) units, triplex formation with dsDNA containing three CG base pairs was observed. PMID:20648389

  7. Structure of d(CACGTG), a Z-DNA hexamer containing AT base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Coll, M; Fita, I; Lloveras, J; Subirana, J A; Bardella, F; Huynh-Dinh, T; Igolen, J

    1988-01-01

    The left-handed Z-DNA conformation has been observed in crystals made from the self-complementary DNA hexamer d(CACGTG). This is the first time that a non disordered Z form is found in the crystal structure of an alternating sequence containing AT base pairs without methylated or brominated cytosines. The structure has been determined and refined to an agreement factor R = 22.9% using 746 reflections in the resolution in the resolution shell 7 to 2.5 A. The overall shape of the molecule is very similar to the Z-structure of the related hexamer d(CG)3 confirming the rigidity of the Z form. No solvent molecules were detected in the minor groove of the helix near the A bases. The disruption of the spine of hydration in the AT step appears to be a general fact in the Z form in contrast with the B form. The biological relevance of the structure in relation to the CA genome repeats is discussed. PMID:3419929

  8. The spontaneous replication error and the mismatch discrimination mechanisms of human DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Koag, Myong-Chul; Nam, Kwangho; Lee, Seongmin

    2014-01-01

    To provide molecular-level insights into the spontaneous replication error and the mismatch discrimination mechanisms of human DNA polymerase β (polβ), we report four crystal structures of polβ complexed with dG•dTTP and dA•dCTP mismatches in the presence of Mg2+ or Mn2+. The Mg2+-bound ground-state structures show that the dA•dCTP-Mg2+ complex adopts an ‘intermediate’ protein conformation while the dG•dTTP-Mg2+ complex adopts an open protein conformation. The Mn2+-bound ‘pre-chemistry-state’ structures show that the dA•dCTP-Mn2+ complex is structurally very similar to the dA•dCTP-Mg2+ complex, whereas the dG•dTTP-Mn2+ complex undergoes a large-scale conformational change to adopt a Watson–Crick-like dG•dTTP base pair and a closed protein conformation. These structural differences, together with our molecular dynamics simulation studies, suggest that polβ increases replication fidelity via a two-stage mismatch discrimination mechanism, where one is in the ground state and the other in the closed conformation state. In the closed conformation state, polβ appears to allow only a Watson–Crick-like conformation for purine•pyrimidine base pairs, thereby discriminating the mismatched base pairs based on their ability to form the Watson–Crick-like conformation. Overall, the present studies provide new insights into the spontaneous replication error and the replication fidelity mechanisms of polβ. PMID:25200079

  9. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  10. Base-Pairing Energies of Protonated Nucleoside Base Pairs of dCyd and m5dCyd: Implications for the Stability of DNA i-Motif Conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-08-01

    Hypermethylation of cytosine in expanded (CCG)n•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats results in Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited mental retardation. The (CCG)n•(CGG)n repeats adopt i-motif conformations that are preferentially stabilized by base-pairing interactions of protonated base pairs of cytosine. Here we investigate the effects of 5-methylation and the sugar moiety on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) of protonated cytosine base pairs by examining protonated nucleoside base pairs of 2'-deoxycytidine (dCyd) and 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (m5dCyd) using threshold collision-induced dissociation techniques. 5-Methylation of a single or both cytosine residues leads to very small change in the BPE. However, the accumulated effect may be dramatic in diseased state trinucleotide repeats where many methylated base pairs may be present. The BPEs of the protonated nucleoside base pairs examined here significantly exceed those of Watson-Crick dGuo•dCyd and neutral dCyd•dCyd base pairs, such that these base-pairing interactions provide the major forces responsible for stabilization of DNA i-motif conformations. Compared with isolated protonated nucleobase pairs of cytosine and 1-methylcytosine, the 2'-deoxyribose sugar produces an effect similar to the 1-methyl substituent, and leads to a slight decrease in the BPE. These results suggest that the base-pairing interactions may be slightly weaker in nucleic acids, but that the extended backbone is likely to exert a relatively small effect on the total BPE. The proton affinity (PA) of m5dCyd is also determined by competitive analysis of the primary dissociation pathways that occur in parallel for the protonated (m5dCyd)H+(dCyd) nucleoside base pair and the absolute PA of dCyd previously reported.

  11. Base pairing enhances fluorescence and favors cyclobutane dimer formation induced upon absorption of UVA radiation by DNA.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Vayá, Ignacio; Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Gustavsson, Thomas; Douki, Thierry; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2011-04-13

    The photochemical properties of the DNA duplex (dA)(20)·(dT)(20) are compared with those of the parent single strands. It is shown that base pairing increases the probability of absorbing UVA photons, probably due to the formation of charge-transfer states. UVA excitation induces fluorescence peaking at ∼420 nm and decaying on the nanosecond time scale. The fluorescence quantum yield, the fluorescence lifetime, and the quantum yield for cyclobutane dimer formation increase upon base pairing. Such behavior contrasts with that of the UVC-induced processes. PMID:21417388

  12. System for DNA sequencing with resolution of up to 600 base pairs.

    PubMed

    Ansorge, W; Barker, R

    1984-03-01

    A system capable of resolving about 500 bases is of interest for sequencing of longer DNA molecules. Studies on further optimization of resolution on DNA sequencing gels were carried out. The effect of physico-chemical properties of gels and buffers on resolution were tested, e.g. ionic strength and pH of buffers, different buffer systems, acrylamide concentration, crosslinker concentration, type of crosslinker, temperature of polymerization, denaturing conditions, gel length and thickness. Tested were as well different running conditions like electric field, gel temperature, dimension of sample slots. Gels 0.1-0.2 mm thick and up to 1.2 m long were cast and tested routinely. Gel lengths of 60-70 cm (for sequencing up to 350-400 bases) to about 100 cm (above 400 bases) are practicable. Little is gained in resolution by increasing the gel length from 1 to 1.2 m. Resolution was improved using 0.1 mm thick gels, at a higher pH value of 8.6-8.8, and molarity increased to 0.2 M. The sequencing pattern in the region of higher bases could be better resolved on a twice-magnified picture of that region on the autoradiogram. With the long gels (70-120 cm), it is advantageous to obtain the sequence overlap by running in parallel gels of different concentrations, without re-application of samples, all loaded at the same time. Buffer chamber for running of two of three gels and thermostating plates up to 1.2 m long were designed. In this way four to six thermostated gels can be run from a power supply with two inputs. Three 1 m long gels (concentrations: 4%, 6%, 12-16%) are loaded with several samples of DNA to be sequenced and run in parallel without re-application of the samples. With good samples, the sequence overlap from the gels could be counted up to 500 base pairs, with exceptionally good samples closer to 600 bases. At present this number seems to be near the limit of the resolving power of the polyacrylamide gels. PMID:6725850

  13. [Structural and energetic properties of the four configurations of the A.T and G.C DNA base pairs].

    PubMed

    Brovarets', O O

    2013-01-01

    Using the methods of non-empirical quantum chemistry at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)// B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory it was established for the first time, that Hoogsteen, reverse Hoogsteen, Watson-Crick and reverse Watson-Crick configurations of the A.T and G.C DNA base pairs are isoelectronic and isomorphic structures with similar dynamic properties. Based on these results, non-ionisation mechanism of the Hoogsteen <"breathing" of the G*.C* DNA base pair, namely transformation of the tautomerised (Lowdin's) G-C base pair with Watson-Crick geometry into the Hoogsteen electroneutral G*.C* H base pair stabilized by the three O6H...N4, N3H...N7 and C8H...02 H-bonds, was postulated. It is suggested that such scenario activates only in those cases, when DNA is not located in aqueous solution, but works together with proteins and cytosine protonation at the N3 atom is precluded. PMID:24319980

  14. Anomalous cross-linking by mechlorethamine of DNA duplexes containing C-C mismatch pairs.

    PubMed

    Romero, R M; Mitas, M; Haworth, I S

    1999-03-23

    Nitrogen mustards such as mechlorethamine have previously been shown to covalently cross-link DNA through the N7 position of the two guanine bases of a d[GXC].d[GYC] duplex sequence, a so-called 1,3 G-G-cross-link, when X-Y = C-G or T-A. Here, we report the formation of a new mechlorethamine cross-link with the d[GXC].d[GYC] fragment when X-Y is a C-C mismatch pair. Mechlorethamine cross-links this fragment preferentially between the two mismatched cytosine bases, rather than between the guanine bases. The cross-link also forms when one or both of the guanine bases of the d[GCC].d[GCC] fragment are replaced by N7-deazaguanine, and, more generally, forms with any C-C mismatch, regardless of the flanking base pairs. Piperidine cleavage of the cross-link species containing the d[GCC].d[GCC] sequence gives DNA fragments consistent with alkylation at the mismatched cytosine bases. We also provide evidence that the cross-link reaction occurs between the N3 atoms of the two cytosine bases by showing that the formation of the C-C cross-link is pH dependent for both mechlorethamine and chlorambucil. Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) probing of the cross-linked d[GCC].d[GCC] fragment showed that the major groove of the guanine adjacent to the C-C mismatch is still accessible to DMS. In contrast, the known minor groove binder Hoechst 33258 inhibits the cross-link formation with a C-C mismatch pair flanked by A-T base pairs. These results suggest that the C-C mismatch is cross-linked by mechlorethamine in the minor groove. Since C-C pairs may be involved in unusual secondary structures formed by the trinucleotide repeat sequence d[CCG]n, and associated with triplet repeat expansion diseases, mechlorethamine may serve as a useful probe for these structures. PMID:10090751

  15. Ribonucleotides Misincorporated into DNA Act as Strand-Discrimination Signals in Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ghodgaonkar, Medini Manohar; Lazzaro, Federico; Olivera-Pimentel, Maite; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Cejka, Petr; Reijns, Martin A.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Plevani, Paolo; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Jiricny, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Summary To improve replication fidelity, mismatch repair (MMR) must detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs and direct their repair to the nascent DNA strand. Eukaryotic MMR in vitro requires pre-existing strand discontinuities for initiation; consequently, it has been postulated that MMR in vivo initiates at Okazaki fragment termini in the lagging strand and at nicks generated in the leading strand by the mismatch-activated MLH1/PMS2 endonuclease. We now show that a single ribonucleotide in the vicinity of a mismatch can act as an initiation site for MMR in human cell extracts and that MMR activation in this system is dependent on RNase H2. As loss of RNase H2 in S.cerevisiae results in a mild MMR defect that is reflected in increased mutagenesis, MMR in vivo might also initiate at RNase H2-generated nicks. We therefore propose that ribonucleotides misincoporated during DNA replication serve as physiological markers of the nascent DNA strand. PMID:23603115

  16. Mechanism of mismatch recognition revealed by human MutS[beta] bound to unpaired DNA loops

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shikha; Gellert, Martin; Yang, Wei

    2012-04-17

    DNA mismatch repair corrects replication errors, thus reducing mutation rates and microsatellite instability. Genetic defects in this pathway cause Lynch syndrome and various cancers in humans. Binding of a mispaired or unpaired base by bacterial MutS and eukaryotic MutS{alpha} is well characterized. We report here crystal structures of human MutS{beta} in complex with DNA containing insertion-deletion loops (IDL) of two, three, four or six unpaired nucleotides. In contrast to eukaryotic MutS{alpha} and bacterial MutS, which bind the base of a mismatched nucleotide, MutS{beta} binds three phosphates in an IDL. DNA is severely bent at the IDL; unpaired bases are flipped out into the major groove and partially exposed to solvent. A normal downstream base pair can become unpaired; a single unpaired base can thereby be converted to an IDL of two nucleotides and recognized by MutS{beta}. The C-terminal dimerization domains form an integral part of the MutS structure and coordinate asymmetrical ATP hydrolysis by Msh2 and Msh3 with mismatch binding to signal for repair.

  17. Double threading through DNA: NMR structural study of a bis-naphthalene macrocycle bound to a thymine–thymine mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Muriel; Granzhan, Anton; Guillot, Regis; Dumy, Pascal; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2012-01-01

    The macrocyclic bis-naphthalene macrocycle (2,7-BisNP), belonging to the cyclobisintercalator family of DNA ligands, recognizes T–T mismatch sites in duplex DNA with high affinity and selectivity, as evidenced by thermal denaturation experiments and NMR titrations. The binding of this macrocycle to an 11-mer DNA oligonucleotide containing a T–T mismatch was studied using NMR spectroscopy and NMR-restrained molecular modeling. The ligand forms a single type of complex with the DNA, in which one of the naphthalene rings of the ligand occupies the place of one of the mismatched thymines, which is flipped out of the duplex. The second naphthalene unit of the ligand intercalates at the A-T base pair flanking the mismatch site, leading to encapsulation of its thymine residue via double stacking. The polyammonium linking chains of the macrocycle are located in the minor and the major grooves of the oligonucleotide and participate in the stabilization of the complex by formation of hydrogen bonds with the encapsulated thymine base and the mismatched thymine remaining inside the helix. The study highlights the uniqueness of this cyclobisintercalation binding mode and its importance for recognition of DNA lesion sites by small molecules. PMID:22362757

  18. Free energy landscape and transition pathways from Watson–Crick to Hoogsteen base pairing in free duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changwon; Kim, Eunae; Pak, Youngshang

    2015-01-01

    Houghton (HG) base pairing plays a central role in the DNA binding of proteins and small ligands. Probing detailed transition mechanism from Watson–Crick (WC) to HG base pair (bp) formation in duplex DNAs is of fundamental importance in terms of revealing intrinsic functions of double helical DNAs beyond their sequence determined functions. We investigated a free energy landscape of a free B-DNA with an adenosine–thymine (A–T) rich sequence to probe its conformational transition pathways from WC to HG base pairing. The free energy landscape was computed with a state-of-art two-dimensional umbrella molecular dynamics simulation at the all-atom level. The present simulation showed that in an isolated duplex DNA, the spontaneous transition from WC to HG bp takes place via multiple pathways. Notably, base flipping into the major and minor grooves was found to play an important role in forming these multiple transition pathways. This finding suggests that naked B-DNA under normal conditions has an inherent ability to form HG bps via spontaneous base opening events. PMID:26250116

  19. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  20. Reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography method for purification of duplex DNA with single base pair resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wysoczynski, Christina L.; Roemer, Sarah C.; Dostal, Vishantie; Barkley, Robert M.; Churchill, Mair E. A.; Malarkey, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining quantities of highly pure duplex DNA is a bottleneck in the biophysical analysis of protein–DNA complexes. In traditional DNA purification methods, the individual cognate DNA strands are purified separately before annealing to form DNA duplexes. This approach works well for palindromic sequences, in which top and bottom strands are identical and duplex formation is typically complete. However, in cases where the DNA is non-palindromic, excess of single-stranded DNA must be removed through additional purification steps to prevent it from interfering in further experiments. Here we describe and apply a novel reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography purification method for double-stranded DNA ranging in lengths from 17 to 51 bp. Both palindromic and non-palindromic DNA can be readily purified. This method has the unique ability to separate blunt double-stranded DNA from pre-attenuated (n-1, n-2, etc) synthesis products, and from DNA duplexes with single base pair overhangs. Additionally, palindromic DNA sequences with only minor differences in the central spacer sequence of the DNA can be separated, and the purified DNA is suitable for co-crystallization of protein–DNA complexes. Thus, double-stranded ion-pair liquid chromatography is a useful approach for duplex DNA purification for many applications. PMID:24013567

  1. Extension of the range of DNA sequences available for triple helix formation: stabilization of mismatched triplexes by acridine-containing oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, S; Sun, J S; Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1997-01-01

    Triple helix formation usually requires an oligopyrimidine*oligopurine sequence in the target DNA. A triple helix is destabilized when the oligopyrimidine*oligopurine target contains one (or two) purine*pyrimidine base pair inversion(s). Such an imperfect target sequence can be recognized by a third strand oligonucleotide containing an internally incorporated acridine intercalator facing the inverted purine*pyrimidine base pair(s). The loss of triplex stability due to the mismatch is partially overcome. The stability of triplexes formed at perfect and imperfect target sequences was investigated by UV thermal denaturation experiments. The stabilization provided by an internally incorporated acridine third strand oligonucleotide depends on the sequences flanking the inverted base pair. For triplexes containing a single mismatch the highest stabilization is observed for an acridine or a propanediol tethered to an acridine on its 3'-side facing an inverted A*T base pair and for a cytosine with an acridine incorporated to its 3'-side or a guanine with an acridine at its 5'-side facing an inverted G*C base pair. Fluorescence studies provided evidence that the acridine was intercalated into the triplex. The target sequences containing a double base pair inversion which form very unstable triplexes can still be recognized by oligonucleotides provided they contain an appropriately incorporated acridine facing the double mismatch sites. Selectivity for an A*T base pair inversion was observed with an oligonucleotide containing an acridine incorporated at the mismatched site when this site is flanked by two T*A*T base triplets. These results show that the range of DNA base sequences available for triplex formation can be extended by using oligonucleotide intercalator conjugates. PMID:9336456

  2. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structure of the pi kappa DNA base pair.

    PubMed

    Florián, J; Leszczyński, J

    1995-04-01

    The structure of the nonclassical pi kappa base pair (7-methyl-oxoformycin B. . .2,4-diaminopyrimidine) was studied at the ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and MP2 levels using the 6-31G* and 6-31G** basis sets. The pi kappa base pair is bound by three parallel hydrogen bonds with the donor-acceptor-donor recognition pattern. Recently, these bases were proposed as an extension of the genetic alphabet from four to six letters (Piccirilli et al, Nature 343,33 (1990)). By the HF/6-31G* method with full geometry optimization we calculated the 12 degree propeller twist for the minimum energy structure of this complex. The linearity of hydrogen bonds is preserved in the twisted structure by virtue of the pyramidal arrangement of the kappa-base amino groups. The rings of both the pi and kappa molecules remain nearly planar. This nonplanar structure of the pi kappa base pair is only 0.1 kcal/mol more stable than the planar (Cs) conformation. The HF/6-31G* level gas-phase interaction energy of pi kappa (-13.5 kcal/mol) calculated by us turned out to be nearly the same as the interaction energy obtained previously for the adenine-thymine base pair (-13.4 kcal/mol) at the same computational level. The inclusion of p-polarization functions on hydrogens, electron correlation effects (MP2/6-31G** level), and the correction for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) increase this energy to -14.0 kcal/mol. PMID:7626240

  3. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting. PMID:25099886

  4. Chromosomal directionality of DNA mismatch repair in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, A. M. Mahedi; Leach, David R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) result in elevated mutagenesis and in cancer predisposition. This disease burden arises because MMR is required to correct errors made in the copying of DNA. MMR is bidirectional at the level of DNA strand polarity as it operates equally well in the 5′ to 3′ and the 3′ to 5′ directions. However, the directionality of MMR with respect to the chromosome, which comprises parental DNA strands of opposite polarity, has been unknown. Here, we show that MMR in Escherichia coli is unidirectional with respect to the chromosome. Our data demonstrate that, following the recognition of a 3-bp insertion-deletion loop mismatch, the MMR machinery searches for the first hemimethylated GATC site located on its origin-distal side, toward the replication fork, and that resection then proceeds back toward the mismatch and away from the replication fork. This study provides support for a tight coupling between MMR and DNA replication. PMID:26170312

  5. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation. PMID:26739522

  6. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation. PMID:26739522

  7. Twisting Right to Left: A…A Mismatch in a CAG Trinucleotide Repeat Overexpansion Provokes Left-Handed Z-DNA Conformation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational polymorphism of DNA is a major causative factor behind several incurable trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders that arise from overexpansion of trinucleotide repeats located in coding/non-coding regions of specific genes. Hairpin DNA structures that are formed due to overexpansion of CAG repeat lead to Huntington’s disorder and spinocerebellar ataxias. Nonetheless, DNA hairpin stem structure that generally embraces B-form with canonical base pairs is poorly understood in the context of periodic noncanonical A…A mismatch as found in CAG repeat overexpansion. Molecular dynamics simulations on DNA hairpin stems containing A…A mismatches in a CAG repeat overexpansion show that A…A dictates local Z-form irrespective of starting glycosyl conformation, in sharp contrast to canonical DNA duplex. Transition from B-to-Z is due to the mechanistic effect that originates from its pronounced nonisostericity with flanking canonical base pairs facilitated by base extrusion, backbone and/or base flipping. Based on these structural insights we envisage that such an unusual DNA structure of the CAG hairpin stem may have a role in disease pathogenesis. As this is the first study that delineates the influence of a single A…A mismatch in reversing DNA helicity, it would further have an impact on understanding DNA mismatch repair. PMID:25876062

  8. Design and Synthesis of Heterocyclic Cations for Specific DNA Recognition: From AT-Rich to Mixed-Base-Pair DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The compounds synthesized in this research were designed with the goal of establishing a new paradigm for mixed-base-pair DNA sequence-specific recognition. The design scheme starts with a cell-permeable heterocyclic cation that binds to AT base pair sites in the DNA minor groove. Modifications were introduced in the original compound to include an H-bond accepting group to specifically recognize the G-NH that projects into the minor groove. Therefore, a series of heterocyclic cations substituted with an azabenzimidazole ring has been designed and synthesized for mixed-base-pair DNA recognition. The most successful compound, 12a, had an azabenzimidazole to recognize G and additional modifications for general minor groove interactions. It binds to the DNA site −AAAGTTT– more strongly than the −AAATTT– site without GC and indicates the design success. Structural modifications of 12a generally weakened binding. The interactions of the new compound with a variety of DNA sequences with and without GC base pairs were evaluated by thermal melting analysis, circular dichroism, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular modeling. PMID:24422528

  9. Transition State in DNA Polymerase β Catalysis: Rate-Limiting Chemistry Altered by Base-Pair Configuration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Kinetics studies of dNTP analogues having pyrophosphate-mimicking β,γ-pCXYp leaving groups with variable X and Y substitution reveal striking differences in the chemical transition-state energy for DNA polymerase β that depend on all aspects of base-pairing configurations, including whether the incoming dNTP is a purine or pyrimidine and if base-pairings are right (T•A and G•C) or wrong (T•G and G•T). Brønsted plots of the catalytic rate constant (log(kpol)) versus pKa4 for the leaving group exhibit linear free energy relationships (LFERs) with negative slopes ranging from −0.6 to −2.0, consistent with chemical rate-determining transition-states in which the active-site adjusts to charge-stabilization demand during chemistry depending on base-pair configuration. The Brønsted slopes as well as the intercepts differ dramatically and provide the first direct evidence that dNTP base recognition by the enzyme–primer–template complex triggers a conformational change in the catalytic region of the active-site that significantly modifies the rate-determining chemical step. PMID:24580380

  10. Attacking mechanism of hydroxyl radical to DNA base-pair: density functional study in vacuum and in water.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Eisuke; Tokuyama, Yuki; Okutsu, Naoko; Nomura, Kazuya; Danilov, Victor I; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the influence of radiation on human body has been recognized as a serious problem. In particular, highly reactive hydroxyl radicals *OH produced by the radiation react with DNA, resulting in a great damage on its structure and electronic properties. It is thus important to investigate the reaction mechanism of *OH to DNA for elucidating the initial damage in DNA induced by the radiation. In the present study, we search for transition states (TS) of the reaction between G-C/A-T base-pair and [Formula: see text] in vacuum and in water, by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At first, we obtain the stable structures for the dehydrogenated G-C and A-T, in which the hydrogen atom of NH2 group of G or A base is abstracted by [Formula: see text]. From the structures of the dehydrogenated as well as the natural base-pairs, the TS between these structures is searched for and the activation free energy (AFE) is estimated for the reaction. In vacuum, AFEs for the G-C and A-T are almost the same each other, while the stabilization energy by the reaction for G-C is about 4.9 kcal/mol larger than that for A-T, indicating that the population of the dehydrogenated G-C is remarkably larger than that of the dehydrogenated A-T in vacuum. On the other hand, in water approximated by the continuum solvation model, the AFE for A-T is 2.6 kcal/mol smaller than that for G-C, indicating that the reaction dehydrogenated by [Formula: see text] occurs more frequently for the solvated A-T base-pair than G-C. PMID:24460544

  11. End-to-end stacking and liquid crystal condensation of 6- to 20-base pair DNA duplexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, M.; Zanchetta, G.; Chapman, B.D.; Christopher, D.; Jones, D.; Cross, J.O.; Pindak, R.; Bellini, T.; Noel, N.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Colorado; Univ. di Milano; BNL

    2007-11-23

    Short complementary B-form DNA oligomers, 6 to 20 base pairs in length, are found to exhibit nematic and columnar liquid crystal phases, even though such duplexes lack the shape anisotropy required for liquid crystal ordering. Structural study shows that these phases are produced by the end-to-end adhesion and consequent stacking of the duplex oligomers into polydisperse anisotropic rod-shaped aggregates, which can order into liquid crystals. Upon cooling mixed solutions of short DNA oligomers, in which only a small fraction of the DNA present is complementary, the duplex-forming oligomers phase-separate into liquid crystal droplets, leaving the unpaired single strands in isotropic solution. In a chemical environment where oligomer ligation is possible, such ordering and condensation would provide an autocatalytic link whereby complementarity promotes the extended polymerization of complementary oligomers.

  12. Hydrogen-bonding studies of amino acid side-chains with DNA base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, P.; Kolandaivel, P.; Senthilkumar, K.

    2011-08-01

    The interactions of the amino acid side-chains arginine (ARG), aspartic acid (ASP), asparagine (ASN), lysine (LYS) and serine (SER) with nucleic acid base pairs have been investigated using theoretical methods. The interaction energy of the short intermolecular N-H ... N, N-H ... O, O-H ... O, O-H ... N, C-H ... O and C-H ... N hydrogen bonds present in both isolated base pairs and complexes and its role in providing stability to the complexes have been explored. The homonuclear interactions are found to be stronger than the heteronuclear interactions. An improper hydrogen bond has been observed for some of the N-H ... O and N-H ... N hydrogen-bond interactions with the contraction of the N-H bond varying from 0.001 to 0.0260 Å and the corresponding blue shift of the stretching frequency by 4-291 cm-1. Localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (LMOEDA) reveals that the major contributions to the energetics are from the long-range polarization (PL) interaction, and the short-range attractive (ES, EX) and repulsive (REP) interactions. The Bader's atoms in molecules (AIM) theory shows good correlation for the electron density and its Laplacian at the bond critical points (BCP) with the N-H ... N and N-H ... O hydrogen-bond lengths in the complexes, and gives a proper explanation for the stability of the structure. The charge-transfer from the proton acceptor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H bond in the complexes was studied using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis.

  13. Torque Spectroscopy of DNA: Base-Pair Stability, Boundary Effects, Backbending, and Breathing Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstrass, Florian C.; Fernandes, Louis E.; Lebel, Paul; Bryant, Zev

    2013-04-01

    Changes in global DNA linking number can be accommodated by localized changes in helical structure. We have used single-molecule torque measurements to investigate sequence-specific strand separation and Z-DNA formation. By controlling the boundary conditions at the edges of sequences of interest, we have confirmed theoretical predictions of distinctive boundary-dependent backbending patterns in torque-twist relationships. Abrupt torque jumps are associated with the formation and collapse of DNA bubbles, permitting direct observations of DNA breathing dynamics.

  14. NMR study of the conformation of the 2-aminopurine: Cytosine mismatch in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, P.A.; Wemmer, D.E.; Goodman, M.F.

    1996-04-02

    DNA polymerase makes errors by misincorporating natural DNA bases and base analogs. Because of the wide variety of possible mismatches and the varying efficiency with which they are repaired, structural studies are necessary to understand in detail how these mispairs differ and can be distinguished from standard Watson-Crick base pairs. 2-Aminopurine (AP) is a highly mutagenic base analog. The objective of this study was to determine the geometry of the AP{center_dot}C mispair in DNA at neutral pH. Although several studies have focused on the AP{center_dot} mispair in DNA, there is not as of yet consensus on its structure. At least four models have been proposed for this mispair. Through the use of NMR spectroscopy with selective {sup 15}N-labeling of exocyclic amino nitrogens on bases of interest, we are able to resolve ambiguities in previous studies. We find here that, in two different DNA sequences, the AP{center_dot}C mispair at neutral and high pH is in a wobble geometry. The structure and stability of this base mispair is dependent upon the local base sequence. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William

    2011-11-21

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  16. A naproxen complex of dysprosium intercalates into calf thymus DNA base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mengsi; Jin, Jianhua; Xu, Guiqing; Cui, Fengling; Luo, Hongxia

    2014-01-01

    The binding mode and mechanism of dysprosium-naproxen complex (Dy-NAP) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) were studied using UV-vis and fluorescence spectra in physiological buffer (pH 7.4). The results showed that more than one type of quenching process occurred and the binding mode between Dy-NAP with ctDNA might be intercalation. In addition, ionic strength, iodide quenching and fluorescence polarization experiments corroborated the intercalation binding mode between Dy-NAP and ctDNA. The calculated thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS at different temperature demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction force played a major role in the binding process.

  17. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  18. Kinetics and binding of the thymine-DNA mismatch glycosylase, Mig-Mth, with mismatch-containing DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Begley, Thomas J; Haas, Brian J; Morales, Juan C; Kool, Eric T; Cunningham, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the removal of thymine residues from T-G mismatches in DNA by the thymine-DNA mismatch glycosylase from Methanobacterium thermoautrophicum (Mig-Mth), within the context of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, to investigate why this glycosylase has such low activity in vitro. Using single-turnover kinetics and steady-state kinetics, we calculated the catalytic and product dissociation rate constants for Mig-Mth, and determined that Mig-Mth is inhibited by product apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) provide evidence that the specificity of product binding is dependent upon the base opposite the AP site. The binding of Mig-Mth to DNA containing the non-cleavable substrate analogue difluorotoluene (F) was also analyzed to determine the effect of the opposite base on Mig-Mth binding specificity for substrate-like duplex DNA. The results of these experiments support the idea that opposite strand interactions play roles in determining substrate specificity. Endonuclease IV, which cleaves AP sites in the next step of the BER pathway, was used to analyze the effect of product removal on the overall rate of thymine hydrolysis by Mig-Mth. Our results support the hypothesis that endonuclease IV increases the apparent activity of Mig-Mth significantly under steady-state conditions by preventing reassociation of enzyme to product. PMID:12509271

  19. Subtle Recognition of 14-Base Pair DNA Sequences via Threading Polyintercalation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner could act as antibiotic, antiviral, or anticancer agents because of their potential ability to manipulate gene expression. Our laboratory has developed threading polyintercalators based on 1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide (NDI) units connected in a head-to-tail fashion by flexible peptide linkers. Previously, a threading tetraintercalator composed of alternating minor–major–minor groove-binding modules was shown to bind specifically to a 14 bp DNA sequence with a dissociation half-life of 16 days [Holman, G. G., et al. (2011) Nat. Chem. 3, 875–881]. Herein are described new NDI-based tetraintercalators with a different major groove-binding module and a reversed N to C directionality of one of the minor groove-binding modules. DNase I footprinting and kinetic analyses revealed that these new tetraintercalators are able to discriminate, by as much as 30-fold, 14 bp DNA binding sites that differ by 1 or 2 bp. Relative affinities were found to correlate strongly with dissociation rates, while overall C2 symmetry in the DNA-binding molecule appeared to contribute to enhanced association rates. PMID:22554127

  20. Parallel-stranded duplex DNA containing blocks of trans purine-purine and purine-pyrimidine base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Evertsz, E M; Rippe, K; Jovin, T M

    1994-01-01

    A 30 base pair parallel-stranded (ps) duplex ps-L1.L2 composed of two adjoined purine-purine and purine-pyrimidine sequence blocks has been characterized thermodynamically and spectroscopically. The 5'-terminal 15 residues in both strands ('left-half') consisted of the alternating d(GA)7G sequence that forms a ps homoduplex secondary structure stabilized by d(G.G) and d(A.A) base pairs. The 3'-terminal 15 positions of the sequence ('right-half') were combinations of A and T with complementary reverse Watson-Crick d(A.T) base pairing between the two strands. The characteristics of the full length duplex were compared to those of the constituent left and right halves in order to determine the compatibility of the two ps helical forms. The thermal denaturation curves and hyperchromicity profiles of all three duplexes determined by UV absorption spectroscopy were characteristic of ps-DNA, in accordance with previous studies. The thermodynamic properties of the 30 bp duplex corresponded within experimental error to the linear combination of the two 15-mers. Thus, the Tm and delta HvH of ps-L1.L2 in 10 mM MgCl2, derived from analyses according to a statistical mechanical formulation for the helix-coil transition, were 43 degrees C and 569 kJ mol-1, compared to 21 degrees C, 315 kJ mol-1 (ps-F5.F6) and 22 degrees C, 236 kJ mol-1 (ps-GA15). The UV absorption and CD spectra of ps-L1.L2 and the individual 15-mer ps motifs were also compared quantitatively. The sums of the two constituent native spectra (left+right halves) accurately matched that of the 30 bp duplex, with only small deviations in the 195-215 nm (CD) and 220-240 nm (absorption) regions. Based on analysis by native gel electrophoresis, the sequences studied formed duplex structures exclusively; there were no indications of higher order species. Chemical modification with diethyl pyrocarbonate showed no hyperreactivity of the junctional bases, indicating a smooth transition between the two parallel

  1. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  2. Dynamic DNA devices and assemblies formed by shape-complementary, non-base pairing 3D components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Thomas; Wagenbauer, Klaus F.; Neuner, Andrea M.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that discrete three-dimensional (3D) DNA components can specifically self-assemble in solution on the basis of shape-complementarity and without base pairing. Using this principle, we produced homo- and heteromultimeric objects, including micrometer-scale one- and two-stranded filaments and lattices, as well as reconfigurable devices, including an actuator, a switchable gear, an unfoldable nanobook, and a nanorobot. These multidomain assemblies were stabilized via short-ranged nucleobase stacking bonds that compete against electrostatic repulsion between the components’ interfaces. Using imaging by electron microscopy, ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility analysis, we show that the balance between attractive and repulsive interactions, and thus the conformation of the assemblies, may be finely controlled by global parameters such as cation concentration or temperature and by an allosteric mechanism based on strand-displacement reactions.

  3. Dynamic DNA devices and assemblies formed by shape-complementary, non-base pairing 3D components.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Thomas; Wagenbauer, Klaus F; Neuner, Andrea M; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-03-27

    We demonstrate that discrete three-dimensional (3D) DNA components can specifically self-assemble in solution on the basis of shape-complementarity and without base pairing. Using this principle, we produced homo- and heteromultimeric objects, including micrometer-scale one- and two-stranded filaments and lattices, as well as reconfigurable devices, including an actuator, a switchable gear, an unfoldable nanobook, and a nanorobot. These multidomain assemblies were stabilized via short-ranged nucleobase stacking bonds that compete against electrostatic repulsion between the components' interfaces. Using imaging by electron microscopy, ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility analysis, we show that the balance between attractive and repulsive interactions, and thus the conformation of the assemblies, may be finely controlled by global parameters such as cation concentration or temperature and by an allosteric mechanism based on strand-displacement reactions. PMID:25814577

  4. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Watson-Crick Base Pairing Driven DNA Origami Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zenk, John; Tuntivate, Chanon; Schulman, Rebecca

    2016-03-16

    We investigate the kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA origami dimerization using flat rectangle origami components and different architectures of Watson-Crick complementary single-stranded DNA ("sticky end") linking strategies. We systematically vary the number of linkers, the length of the sticky ends on the linker, and linker architecture and measure the corresponding yields as well as forward and reverse reaction rate constants through fluorescence quenching assays. Yields were further verified using atomic force microscopy. We calculate values of H° and ΔS° for various interface designs and find nonlinear van't Hoff behavior, best described by two linear equations, suggesting distinct regimes of dimerization between those with and those without well-formed interfaces. We find that self-assembly reactions can be tuned by manipulating the interface architecture without suffering a loss in yield, even when yield is high, ∼75-80%. We show that the second-order forward reaction rate constant (k(on)) depends on both linker architecture and number of linkers used, with typical values on the order of 10(5)-10(6) (M·s)(-1), values that are similar to those of bimolecular association of small, complementary DNA strands. The k(on) values are generally non-Arrhenius, tending to increase with decreasing temperature. Finally, we use kinetic and thermodynamic information about the optimal linking architecture to extend the system to an infinite, two-component repeating lattice system and show that we can form micron-sized lattices, with well-formed structures up to 8 μm(2). PMID:26925853

  5. Synthesis and triplex-forming properties of oligonucleotides capable of recognizing corresponding DNA duplexes containing four base pairs.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Akihiro; Yamada, Kenji; Ito, Yu; Yoshimura, Kiichi; Miyauchi, Koichiro; Kanamori, Takashi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Seio, Kohji; Yuasa, Hideya; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2015-07-13

    A triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) could be a useful molecular tool for gene therapy and specific gene modification. However, unmodified TFOs have two serious drawbacks: low binding affinities and high sequence-dependencies. In this paper, we propose a new strategy that uses a new set of modified nucleobases for four-base recognition of TFOs, and thereby overcome these two drawbacks. TFOs containing a 2'-deoxy-4N-(2-guanidoethyl)-5-methylcytidine (d(g)C) residue for a C-G base pair have higher binding and base recognition abilities than those containing 2'-OMe-4N-(2-guanidoethyl)-5-methylcytidine (2'-OMe (g)C), 2'-OMe-4N-(2-guanidoethyl)-5-methyl-2-thiocytidine (2'-OMe (g)Cs), d(g)C and 4S-(2-guanidoethyl)-4-thiothymidine ((gs)T). Further, we observed that N-acetyl-2,7-diamino-1,8-naphtyridine ((DA)Nac) has a higher binding and base recognition abilities for a T-A base pair compared with that of dG and the other DNA derivatives. On the basis of this knowledge, we successfully synthesized a fully modified TFO containing (DA)Nac, d(g)C, 2'-OMe-2-thiothymidine (2'-OMe (s)T) and 2'-OMe-8-thioxoadenosine (2'-OMe (s)A) with high binding and base recognition abilities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which a fully modified TFO accurately recognizes a complementary DNA duplex having a mixed sequence under neutral conditions. PMID:26013815

  6. Synthesis and triplex-forming properties of oligonucleotides capable of recognizing corresponding DNA duplexes containing four base pairs

    PubMed Central

    Ohkubo, Akihiro; Yamada, Kenji; Ito, Yu; Yoshimura, Kiichi; Miyauchi, Koichiro; Kanamori, Takashi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Seio, Kohji; Yuasa, Hideya; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    A triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) could be a useful molecular tool for gene therapy and specific gene modification. However, unmodified TFOs have two serious drawbacks: low binding affinities and high sequence-dependencies. In this paper, we propose a new strategy that uses a new set of modified nucleobases for four-base recognition of TFOs, and thereby overcome these two drawbacks. TFOs containing a 2’-deoxy-4N-(2-guanidoethyl)-5-methylcytidine (dgC) residue for a C-G base pair have higher binding and base recognition abilities than those containing 2’-OMe-4N-(2-guanidoethyl)-5-methylcytidine (2’-OMegC), 2’-OMe-4N-(2-guanidoethyl)-5-methyl-2-thiocytidine (2’-OMegCs), dgC and 4S-(2-guanidoethyl)-4-thiothymidine (gsT). Further, we observed that N-acetyl-2,7-diamino-1,8-naphtyridine (DANac) has a higher binding and base recognition abilities for a T-A base pair compared with that of dG and the other DNA derivatives. On the basis of this knowledge, we successfully synthesized a fully modified TFO containing DANac, dgC, 2’-OMe-2-thiothymidine (2’-OMesT) and 2’-OMe-8-thioxoadenosine (2’-OMesA) with high binding and base recognition abilities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which a fully modified TFO accurately recognizes a complementary DNA duplex having a mixed sequence under neutral conditions. PMID:26013815

  7. Long-Range Vibrational Dynamics Are Directed by Watson-Crick Base Pairing in Duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Hithell, Gordon; Shaw, Daniel J; Donaldson, Paul M; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Burley, Glenn A; Parker, Anthony W; Hunt, Neil T

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy of a 15-mer A-T DNA duplex in solution has revealed structure-dependent vibrational coupling and energy transfer processes linking bases with the sugar-phosphate backbone. Duplex melting induces significant changes in the positions of off-diagonal peaks linking carbonyl and ring-stretching vibrational modes of the adenine and thymine bases with vibrations of the phosphate group and phosphodiester linkage. These indicate that Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding and helix formation lead to a unique vibrational coupling arrangement of base vibrational modes with those of the phosphate unit. On the basis of observations from time-resolved 2D-IR data, we conclude that rapid energy transfer processes occur between base and backbone, mediated by additional modes located on the deoxyribose moiety within the same nucleotide. These relaxation dynamics are insensitive to duplex melting, showing that efficient intramolecular energy relaxation to the solvent via the phosphate groups is the key to excess energy dissipation in both single- and double-stranded DNA. PMID:27079484

  8. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Gargi; Sharma, Dipendra; Dwivedi, K. K.; Dwivedi, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  9. Longitudinal displacements of base pairs in DNA and effects on the dynamics of nonlinear excitations.

    PubMed

    Di Garbo, Angelo

    2013-09-01

    A model of the DNA is proposed and studied analytically and numerically. The model is an extension of a well known model and describes the double helix as two chains of pendula (each pendulum representing a base). Each base (or pendulum) can rotate and translate along the helix axis. In the continuum limit the system is described by the perturbed Sine-Gordon equation describing the twist of the bases and by a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) describing the longitudinal displacements of the bases. This coupled system of PDEs was studied analytically using different approaches and the corresponding results were tested through numerical simulations. It was found that if the coupling parameters satisfy a well defined relationship, then there exist bounded travelling wave solutions. PMID:23567838

  10. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V.; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3′- or 5′-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5′-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2–HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5′ → 3′ exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1–HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5′-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2–HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1–HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5′ MMR. PMID:26951673

  11. Mechanisms in E. coli and Human Mismatch Repair (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Modrich, Paul

    2016-07-18

    DNA molecules are not completely stable, they are subject to chemical or photochemical damage and errors that occur during DNA replication resulting in mismatched base pairs. Through mechanistic studies Paul Modrich showed how replication errors are corrected by strand-directed mismatch repair in Escherichia coli and human cells. PMID:27198632

  12. DNA mismatch repair: molecular mechanisms and biological function.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Mark J; Hsieh, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) guards the integrity of the genome in virtually all cells. It contributes about 1000-fold to the overall fidelity of replication and targets mispaired bases that arise through replication errors, during homologous recombination, and as a result of DNA damage. Cells deficient in MMR have a mutator phenotype in which the rate of spontaneous mutation is greatly elevated, and they frequently exhibit microsatellite instability at mono- and dinucleotide repeats. The importance of MMR in mutation avoidance is highlighted by the finding that defects in MMR predispose individuals to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. In addition to its role in postreplication repair, the MMR machinery serves to police homologous recombination events and acts as a barrier to genetic exchange between species. PMID:14527292

  13. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells.

    PubMed

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J; Te Riele, Hein P J

    2016-04-12

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype. PMID:26951689

  14. Mismatch recognition-coupled stabilization of Msh2-Msh6 in an ATP-bound state at the initiation of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Antony, Edwin; Hingorani, Manju M

    2003-07-01

    Mismatch repair proteins correct errors in DNA via an ATP-driven process. In eukaryotes, the Msh2-Msh6 complex recognizes base pair mismatches and small insertion/deletions in DNA and initiates repair. Both Msh2 and Msh6 proteins contain Walker ATP-binding motifs that are necessary for repair activity. To understand how these proteins couple ATP binding and hydrolysis to DNA binding/mismatch recognition, the ATPase activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Msh2-Msh6 was examined under pre-steady-state conditions. Acid-quench experiments revealed that in the absence of DNA, Msh2-Msh6 hydrolyzes ATP rapidly (burst rate = 3 s(-1) at 20 degrees C) and then undergoes a slow step in the pathway that limits catalytic turnover (k(cat) = 0.1 s(-1)). ATP is hydrolyzed similarly in the presence of fully matched duplex DNA; however, in the presence of a G:T mismatch or +T insertion-containing DNA, ATP hydrolysis is severely suppressed (rate = 0.1 s(-1)). Pulse-chase experiments revealed that Msh2-Msh6 binds ATP rapidly in the absence or in the presence of DNA (rate = 0.1 microM(-1) s(-1)), indicating that for the Msh2-Msh6.mismatched DNA complex, a step after ATP binding but before or at ATP hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the pathway. Thus, mismatch recognition is coupled to a dramatic increase in the residence time of ATP on Msh2-Msh6. This mismatch-induced, stable ATP-bound state of Msh2-Msh6 likely signals downstream events in the repair pathway. PMID:12820877

  15. DNA mismatch correction by Very Short Patch repair may have altered the abundance of oligonucleotides in the E. coli genome.

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, A S; McClelland, M

    1992-01-01

    A base mismatch correction process in E. coli K-12 called Very Short Patch (VSP) repair corrects T:G mismatches to C:G when found in certain sequence contexts. Two of the substrate mismatches (5'-CTWGG/3'-GGW'CC; W = A or T) occur in the context of cytosine methylation in DNA and reduce the mutagenic effects of 5-methylcytosine deamination to thymine. However, VSP repair is also known to repair T:G mismatches that are not expected to arise from 5-methylcytosine deamination (example--CTAG/GGT-C). In these cases, if the original base pair were a T:A, VSP repair would cause a T to C transition. We have carried out Markov chain analysis of an E. coli sequence database to determine if repair at the latter class of sites has altered the abundance of the relevant tetranucleotides. The results are consistent with the prediction that VSP repair would tend to deplete the genome of the 'T' containing sequences (example--CTAG), while enriching it for the corresponding 'C' containing sequences (CCAG). Further, they provide an explanation for the known scarcity of CTAG containing restriction enzyme sites among the genomes of enteric bacteria and identify VSP repair as a force in shaping the sequence composition of bacterial genomes. PMID:1579457

  16. MCM9 Is Required for Mammalian DNA Mismatch Repair.

    PubMed

    Traver, Sabine; Coulombe, Philippe; Peiffer, Isabelle; Hutchins, James R A; Kitzmann, Magali; Latreille, Daniel; Méchali, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that corrects DNA polymerase errors during replication to maintain genomic integrity. In E. coli, the DNA helicase UvrD is implicated in MMR, yet an analogous helicase activity has not been identified in eukaryotes. Here, we show that mammalian MCM9, a protein involved in replication and homologous recombination, forms a complex with MMR initiation proteins (MSH2, MSH3, MLH1, PMS1, and the clamp loader RFC) and is essential for MMR. Mcm9-/- cells display microsatellite instability and MMR deficiency. The MCM9 complex has a helicase activity that is required for efficient MMR since wild-type but not helicase-dead MCM9 restores MMR activity in Mcm9-/- cells. Moreover, MCM9 loading onto chromatin is MSH2-dependent, and in turn MCM9 stimulates the recruitment of MLH1 to chromatin. Our results reveal a role for MCM9 and its helicase activity in mammalian MMR. PMID:26300262

  17. Post Hartree-Fock studies of the canonical Watson-Crick DNA base pairs: molecular structure and the nature of stability.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Victor I; Anisimov, Victor M

    2005-02-01

    Gas-phase gradient optimization was carried out on the canonical Watson-Crick DNA base pairs using the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method at the 6-31G(d) and 6-31G(d,p) basis sets. It is detected that full geometry optimization at the MP2 level leads to an intrinsically nonplanar propeller-twisted and buckled geometry of G-C and A-T base pairs; while HF and DFT methods predict perfect planar or almost planar geometry of the base pairs. Supposedly the nonplanarity of the pairs is caused by pyramidalization of the amino nitrogen atoms, which is underestimated by the HF and DFT methods. This justifies the importance of geometry optimization at the MP2 level for obtaining reliable prediction of the charge distribution, molecular dipole moments and geometrical structure of the base pairs. The Morokuma-Kitaura and the Reduced Variational Space methods of the decomposition for molecular HF interaction energies were used for investigation of the hydrogen bonding in the Watson-Crick base pairs. It is shown that the HF stability of the hydrogen-bonded DNA base pairs originates mainly from electrostatic interactions. At the same time, the calculated magnitude of the second order intramolecular correlation correction to the Coulomb energy showed that electron correlation reduces the contribution of the electrostatic term to the attractive interaction for the A-T and G-C base pairs. Polarization, charge transfer and dispersion interactions also make considerable contribution to the attraction energy of bases. PMID:15588110

  18. DNA Electronic Circular Dichroism on the Inter-Base Pair Scale: An Experimental-Theoretical Case Study of the AT Homo-Oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Florent; Pedersen, Morten N; Rubio-Magnieto, Jenifer; Surin, Mathieu; Linares, Mathieu; Norman, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    A successful elucidation of the near-ultraviolet electronic circular dichroism spectrum of a short double-stranded DNA is reported. Time-dependent density functional theory methods are shown to accurately predict spectra and assign bands on the microscopic base-pair scale, a finding that opens the field for using circular dichroism spectroscopy as a sensitive nanoscale probe of DNA to reveal its complex interactions with the environment. PMID:26261947

  19. Novel DNA mismatch repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Mason, Penelope A.; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch binding and recognition steps. PMID:19272840

  20. SINGLE-BASE-PAIR MISMATCH DISCRIMINATION USING OLIGONUCLEOTIDE DNA MICROARRAYS AND MELTING PROFILES. (R829458C004)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Changes in dynamical behavior of the retinoid X receptor DNA-binding domain upon binding to a 14 base-pair DNA half site.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, P J; Czisch, M; Mulder, F A; Folkers, G E; Bonvin, A M; Nair, M; Boelens, R; Kaptein, R

    2000-08-01

    The retinoid X receptor (RXR) is a prominent member of the nuclear receptor family of ligand-inducible transcription factors. Many proteins of this family exert their function as heterodimers with RXR as a common upstream partner. Studies of the DNA-binding domains of several nuclear receptors reveal differences in structure and dynamics, both between the different proteins and between the free- and DNA-bound receptor DBDs. We investigated the differences in dynamics between RXR free in solution and in complex with a 14 base-pair oligonucleotide, using (1)H and (15)N relaxation studies. Nano- to picosecond dynamics were probed on (15)N, employing Lipari-Szabo analysis with an axially symmetric tumbling model to estimate the exchange contributions to the transverse relaxation rates. Furthermore, milli- to microsecond dynamics were estimated qualitatively for (1)H and (15)N, using CPMG-HSQC and CPMG-T(2) measurements with differential pulse spacing. RXR shows hardly any nano- to picosecond time-scale internal motion. Upon DNA binding, the order parameters show a tiny increase. Dynamics in the milli- to microsecond time scale is more prevalent. It is localized in the first and second zinc fingers of the free RXR. Upon DNA-binding, exchange associated with specific/aspecific DNA-binding of RXR is observed throughout the sequence, whereas conformational flexibility of the D-box and the second zinc finger of RXR is greatly reduced. Since this DNA-binding induced folding transition occurs remote from the DNA in a region which is involved in protein-protein interactions, it may very well be related to the cooperativity of dimeric DNA binding. PMID:10913286

  2. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer.

    PubMed

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-02-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the replicative polymerases and results in increased mutation load at the genome. The realization that defective MMR leads to a hypermutation phenotype and increased risk of tumorigenesis highlights the relevance of this pathway for human disease. The association of MMR defects with increased risk of cancer development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome (LS) partly to include the associated risk of developing extra-colonic cancers. In addition, a number of non-hereditary, mostly epigenetic, alterations of MMR genes have been described in sporadic tumors. Besides conferring a strong cancer predisposition, genetic or epigenetic inactivation of MMR genes also renders cells resistant to some chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, diagnosis of MMR deficiency has important implications for the management of the patients, the surveillance of their relatives in the case of LS and for the choice of treatment. Some of the alterations found in MMR genes have already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR genes and anticipates the need of diagnostic tools for rapid assessment of their pathogenicity. This review describes current tools and future strategies for addressing the relevance

  3. Structural studies of the 5'-phenazinium-tethered matched and G-A-mismatched DNA duplexes by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maltseva, T; Sandström, A; Ivanova, I M; Sergeyev, D S; Zarytova, V F; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1993-05-01

    The mechanism through which modified oligo-DNA analogues act as antisense repressors at the transcriptional and translational level of gene expression is based on the information content in the nucleotide sequence which is determined by the specific base pairing. The efficiency of such action is largely determined by the stability of the duplex formed between the oligonucleotide reagent and the target sequence and also by the mismatched base pairing, such as G-A, that occurs during replication or recombination. We herein report that the phenazinium (Pzn)-tethered matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(CCAAACA)) (III) (Tm = 50 degrees C) has a much larger stability than the parent matched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(CCAAACA)) (I) (Tm = 30 degrees C). On the other hand, the Pzn-tethered G-A-mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):(Pzn)-p(d(ACAAACA)) (IV) (Tm = 34 degrees C) is only slightly more stable than its parent mismatched duplex p(d(TGTTTGGC)):p(d(ACAAACA)) (Tm = 25 degrees C). A detailed 500 MHz NMR study and constrained MD refinements of NMR-derived structures have been undertaken for the DNA duplexes (I), (II), (III) and (IV) in order to understand the structural basis of stabilization of Pzn-tethered matched DNA duplex (delta Tm = 20 degrees C) compared to mismatched duplex (delta Tm = 9 degrees C). Assignment of the 1H-NMR (500 MHz) spectra of the duplexes has been carried out by 2D NOESY, HOHAHA and DQF-COSY experiments. The torsion angles have been extracted from the J-coupling constants obtained by simulation of most of the DQF-COSY cross-peaks using program SMART. The solution structure of the duplexes were assessed by an iterative hybride relaxation matrix method (MORASS) combined with NOESY distances and torsion angles restrained molecular dynamics (MD) using program Amber 4.0. The standard Amber 4.0 force-field parameters were used for the oligonucleotide in conjunction with the new parameters for Pzn residue which was obtained by full geometry

  4. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  5. 5-Methylation of Cytosine in CG:CG Base-pair Steps: A Physicochemical Mechanism for the Epigenetic Control of DNA Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals density functional theory is integrated with analysis of a non-redundant set of protein-DNA crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database to study the stacking energetics of CG:CG base-pair steps, specifically the role of cytosine 5-methylation. Principal component analysis of the steps reveals the dominant collective motions to correspond to a tensile ‘opening’ mode and two shear ‘sliding’ and ‘tearing’ modes in the orthogonal plane. The stacking interactions of the methyl groups globally inhibit CG:CG step overtwisting while simultaneously softening the modes locally via potential energy modulations that create metastable states. Additionally, the indirect effects of the methyl groups on possible base-pair steps neighboring CG:CG are observed to be of comparable importance to their direct effects on CG:CG. The results have implications for the epigenetic control of DNA mechanics. PMID:24313757

  6. Altering the Electrostatic Potential in the Major Groove: Thermodynamic and Structural Characterization of 7-Deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine:dT Base Pairing in DNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to explore the effect of major groove electrostatics on the thermodynamic stability and structure of DNA, a 7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine:dT (7-deaza-dA:dT) base pair in the Dickerson–Drew dodecamer (DDD) was studied. The removal of the electronegative N7 atom on dA and the replacement with an electropositive C–H in the major groove was expected to have a significant effect on major groove electrostatics. The structure of the 7-deaza-dA:dT base pair was determined at 1.1 Å resolution in the presence of Mg2+. The 7-deaza-dA, which is isosteric for dA, had minimal effect on the base pairing geometry and the conformation of the DDD in the crystalline state. There was no major groove cation association with the 7-deaza-dA heterocycle. In solution, circular dichroism showed a positive Cotton effect centered at 280 nm and a negative Cotton effect centered at 250 nm that were characteristic of a right-handed helix in the B-conformation. However, temperature-dependent NMR studies showed increased exchange between the thymine N3 imino proton of the 7-deaza-dA:dT base pair and water, suggesting reduced stacking interactions and an increased rate of base pair opening. This correlated with the observed thermodynamic destabilization of the 7-deaza-dA modified duplex relative to the DDD. A combination of UV melting and differential scanning calorimetry experiments were conducted to evaluate the relative contributions of enthalpy and entropy in the thermodynamic destabilization of the DDD. The most significant contribution arose from an unfavorable enthalpy term, which probably results from less favorable stacking interactions in the modified duplex, which was accompanied by a significant reduction in the release of water and cations from the 7-deaza-dA modified DNA. PMID:22059929

  7. Altering the Electrostatic Potential in the Major Groove: Thermodynamic and Structural Characterization of 7-Deaza-2;#8242;-deoxyadenosine:dT Base Pairing in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kowal, Ewa A.; Ganguly, Manjori; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Marky, Luis A.; Gold, Barry; Egli, Martin; Stone, Michael P.

    2012-02-15

    As part of an ongoing effort to explore the effect of major groove electrostatics on the thermodynamic stability and structure of DNA, a 7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine:dT (7-deaza-dA:dT) base pair in the Dickerson-Drew dodecamer (DDD) was studied. The removal of the electronegative N7 atom on dA and the replacement with an electropositive C-H in the major groove was expected to have a significant effect on major groove electrostatics. The structure of the 7-deaza-dA:dT base pair was determined at 1.1 {angstrom} resolution in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. The 7-deaza-dA, which is isosteric for dA, had minimal effect on the base pairing geometry and the conformation of the DDD in the crystalline state. There was no major groove cation association with the 7-deaza-dA heterocycle. In solution, circular dichroism showed a positive Cotton effect centered at 280 nm and a negative Cotton effect centered at 250 nm that were characteristic of a right-handed helix in the B-conformation. However, temperature-dependent NMR studies showed increased exchange between the thymine N3 imino proton of the 7-deaza-dA:dT base pair and water, suggesting reduced stacking interactions and an increased rate of base pair opening. This correlated with the observed thermodynamic destabilization of the 7-deaza-dA modified duplex relative to the DDD. A combination of UV melting and differential scanning calorimetry experiments were conducted to evaluate the relative contributions of enthalpy and entropy in the thermodynamic destabilization of the DDD. The most significant contribution arose from an unfavorable enthalpy term, which probably results from less favorable stacking interactions in the modified duplex, which was accompanied by a significant reduction in the release of water and cations from the 7-deaza-dA modified DNA.

  8. Can tautomerization of the A·T Watson-Crick base pair via double proton transfer provoke point mutations during DNA replication? A comprehensive QM and QTAIM analysis.

    PubMed

    Brovarets, Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-01-01

    Trying to answer the question posed in the title, we have carried out a detailed theoretical investigation of the biologically important mechanism of the tautomerization of the A·T Watson-Crick DNA base pair, information that is hard to establish experimentally. By combining theoretical investigations at the MP2 and density functional theory levels of QM theory with quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis, the tautomerization of the A·T Watson-Crick base pair by the double proton transfer (DPT) was comprehensively studied in vacuo and in the continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ = 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interfaces of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Based on the sweeps of the electron-topological, geometric, and energetic parameters, which describe the course of the tautomerization along its intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC), it was proved that the A·T → A(∗)·T(∗) tautomerization through the DPT is a concerted (i.e. the pathway without an intermediate) and asynchronous (i.e. protons move with a time gap) process. The limiting stage of this phenomenon is the final PT along the N6H⋯O4 hydrogen bond (H-bond). The continuum with ϵ = 4 does not affect qualitatively the course of the tautomerization reaction: similar to that observed in vacuo, it proceeds via a concerted asynchronous process with the same structure of the transition state (TS). For the first time, the nine key points along the IRC of the A·T base pair tautomerization, which could be considered as electron-topological "fingerprints" of a concerted asynchronous process of the tautomerization via the DPT, have been identified and fully characterized. These nine key points have been used to define the reactant, TS, and product regions of the DPT in the A·T base pair. Considering the energy dependence of each of the three H-bonds, which stabilize the Watson-Crick and Löwdin's base pairs, along the IRC of the tautomerization, it was found that all these H

  9. Synthesis of 5-[3-(2-aminopyrimidin-4-yl)aminopropyn-1-yl]uracil derivative that recognizes Ade-Thy base pairs in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yu; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Kanamori, Takashi; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    5-[3-(2-Aminopyrimidin-4-yl)aminopropyn-1-yl]uracil (Ura(Pyr)) was designed as a new nucleobase to recognize Ade-Thy base pair in double-stranded DNA. We successfully synthesized the dexoynucleoside phosphoramidite having Ura(Pyr) and incorporated it into triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). Melting temperature analysis revealed that introduction of Ura(Pyr) into TFOs could effectively stabilize their triplex structures without loss of base recognition capabilities. PMID:26602276

  10. Structure of p53 binding to the BAX response element reveals DNA unwinding and compression to accommodate base-pair insertion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongheng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Ding, Yuan; Chen, Zhuchu; Qin, Peter Z; Rohs, Remo; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    The p53 core domain binds to response elements (REs) that contain two continuous half-sites as a cooperative tetramer, but how p53 recognizes discontinuous REs is not well understood. Here we describe the crystal structure of the p53 core domain bound to a naturally occurring RE located at the promoter of the Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) gene, which contains a one base-pair insertion between the two half-sites. Surprisingly, p53 forms a tetramer on the BAX-RE that is nearly identical to what has been reported on other REs with a 0-bp spacer. Each p53 dimer of the tetramer binds in register to a half-site and maintains the same protein-DNA interactions as previously observed, and the two dimers retain all the protein-protein contacts without undergoing rotation or translation. To accommodate the additional base pair, the DNA is deformed and partially disordered around the spacer region, resulting in an apparent unwinding and compression, such that the interactions between the dimers are maintained. Furthermore, DNA deformation within the p53-bound BAX-RE is confirmed in solution by site-directed spin labeling measurements. Our results provide a structural insight into the mechanism by which p53 binds to discontinuous sites with one base-pair spacer. PMID:23836939

  11. Oxygen-aromatic contacts in intra-strand base pairs: analysis of high-resolution DNA crystal structures and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Jain, Alok; Krishna Deepak, R N V; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2014-07-01

    Three-dimensional structures of biomolecules are stabilized by a large number of non-covalent interactions and some of them such as van der Waals, electrostatic and hydrogen bond interactions are well characterized. Delocalized π-electron clouds of aromatic residues are known to be involved in cation-π, CH-π, OH-π and π-π interactions. In proteins, many examples have been found in which the backbone carbonyl oxygen of one residue makes close contact with the aromatic center of aromatic residues. Quantum chemical calculations suggest that such contacts may provide stability to the protein secondary structures. In this study, we have systematically analyzed the experimentally determined high-resolution DNA crystal structures and identified 91 examples in which the aromatic center of one base is in close contact (<3.5Ǻ) with the oxygen atom of preceding (Group-I) or succeeding base (Group-II). Examples from Group-I are overwhelmingly observed and cytosine or thymine is the preferred base contributing oxygen atom in Group-I base pairs. A similar analysis of high-resolution RNA structures surprisingly did not yield many examples of oxygen-aromatic contact of similar type between bases. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations on compounds based on DNA crystal structures and model compounds show that interactions between the bases in base pairs with oxygen-aromatic contacts are energetically favorable. Decomposition of interaction energies indicates that dispersion forces are the major cause for energetically stable interaction in these base pairs. We speculate that oxygen-aromatic contacts in intra-strand base pairs in a DNA structure may have biological significance. PMID:24816369

  12. Formation of N-N cross-links in DNA by reaction of radiation-produced DNA base pair diradicals: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Pottiboyina, Venkata; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D

    2011-12-22

    This study employs DFT (density functional theory) to investigate the formation of hydrazine-like (N-N) cross-linked structures between DNA base pair diradicals that are likely to result from the interaction of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, such as ion-beam radiation, with DNA. In our calculations, we generated the guanine (G), cytosine (C), adenine (A), and thymine (T) radicals by removing one hydrogen atom from an N-H bond involved in the normal base pairing. The radical species formed are those that naturally result from one-electron oxidation of the bases followed by deprotonation. N-N cross-links between G and C or A and T diradicals were studied using the BHandHLYP, B3LYP, M06, and M06-2X density functionals and 6-31G* basis set. From a comparison to several test cases performed with the G3B3 method, which gives thermodynamically reliable values, we found that calculations employing the BHandHLYP/6-31G* method predict the best estimates of bonding energies for hydrazine-like structures. Our study shows that the N-N cross-link formed between guanine radical and a neutral cytosine is endothermic in nature but can form metastable structures. However, the reactions between two DNA base radicals (diradical) to form several N-N cross-linked structures are found to be highly exothermic in nature. The N-N cross-links formed between various G-C, G-G, and C-C diradicals have binding energies in the range of ca. -54 to -68, -41 to -47, and -67 to -75 kcal/mol, respectively, whereas A-T, A-A, and T-T have binding energies of -80, -60, and -98 kcal/mol, respectively. In all purine-pyrimidine N-N cross-linked structures, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) is found to be localized on the purine moiety and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) is on the pyrimidine moiety. PMID:22050209

  13. In-Phase Assembly of Slim DNA Lattices with Small Circular DNA Motifs via Short Connections of 11 and 16 Base Pairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Guo, Xin; Jiang, Chuan; Wang, Xuemei; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2016-06-16

    Two kinds of stable motif were constructed: SAE (semi-crossover, antiparallel, even half-turns) tile from one small circular DNA molecule (42 or 64 nt) and two linear oligonucleotides; and DAE (double-crossover, antiparallel, even half-turns) tile from one small circular DNA molecule (42 or 64 nt) and four linear oligonucleotides. With the SAE tiles, in-phase assembly of SAE-E (SAE tiles with even half-turns as connections (-E)) with the shortest -E of 11 base pairs (bp) generated homogeneous nanotubes with an average length of over 14 μm and a diameter of 16-20 nm; with the DAE tiles, in-phase assembly of DAE-O (DAE tiles with odd half-turns as connections (-O)) with the shortest -O of 16 bp produced slim monolayer nanoyarns (25-30 nm wide), nanoscarfs (100-300 nm wide), and nanoribbons (∼100 nm wide). Interestingly, a phenomenon we term "knitting nanoyarns" into nanoscarfs was observed. Finally a curvature mechanism according to the ring rotation directions is suggested to explain the formation of nanotubes, wavy nanoyarns, nanoscarfs, and nanoribbons. PMID:27187004

  14. Compensating Bends in a 16 base-pair DNA Oligomer Containing a T3A3 Segment: A NMR Study of Global DNA Curvature

    SciTech Connect

    McAteer, Kathleen; Aceves Gaona, Alejandro; Michalczyk, Ryszard; Buchko, Garry W.; Isern, Nancy G.; Silks, Louis A.; Miller, John H.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-12-15

    DNA curvature but no single model has been able to explain all the experimental data. An intriguing observation is that AnTn segments ligated in phase exhibit retarded migration in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) but TnAn segments do not. We have determined a high-resolution structure of a 16 base-pair DNA oligomer [d(CGAGGTTTAAACCTCG)2] containing a T3A3 tract. The refinement included residual dipolar coupling (RDC) restraints. A radius of curvature, Rc, analysis was used to measure the overall bending in the molecule. A plot of the helical axis reference points showed a sigmoidal shape indicating a discontinuity at the central TpA step in the overall curvature. Because of the length of the 16mer it was possible to accurately measure Rc for the two halves of the molecule centered about the TpA step. The Rc for the overall molecule (Rc=128 nm) is large, i.e. a low overall magnitude of global bending, whereas the Rc for the two halves of the molecule (Rc=72 nm) is small indicating a much larger magnitude of localized bending. However the direction of bending in the two halves is in partial opposition leading to cancellation of the overall bending. This indicates that TnAn-containing DNA sequences are strongly and multiply bent locally, but are nearly straight globally which is consistent with PAGE results. The RDC refined structure lacked anomalous features present in NOE-only structures indicating the RDC and NOE measurements have a different sensitivity to conformational dynamics at the central TpA step. Because of its increased length and refinement using RDC restraints, the structure of the 16mer reported here provides new insight into the structural origins of the enigmatic PAGE behavior of AnTn and TnAn tracts and the large amplitude, slow base dynamics observed at TpA steps.

  15. Effect of base-pair stability of nearest-neighbor nucleotides on the fidelity of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Patten, J E; So, A G; Downey, K M

    1984-04-10

    The influence of the stability of base pairs formed by nearest-neighbor nucleotides on misincorporation frequency has been studied with the large fragment of DNA polymerase I, the alternating DNA copolymers, poly(dI-dC) and poly-(dG-dC), as template-primers, and dGTP, dITP, and dCTP as substrates. We have utilized the difference in thermodynamic stability between the doubly H-bonded I X C base pair and triply H-bonded G X C base pair to examine the effects of base-pair stability of both the "preceding" and the "following" nucleotides on the frequency of insertion of a mismatched nucleotide, as well as on its stable incorporation into polynucleotide. The present studies demonstrate that the stability of the base pairs formed by nearest-neighbor nucleotides affects the frequency of incorporation of noncomplementary nucleotides. Misincorporation frequency is increased when the nearest-neighbor nucleotides form more stable base pairs with the corresponding nucleotides in the template and is decreased when they form less stable base pairs. The stability of the base pair formed by a nucleotide either preceding (5' to) or following (3' to) a misincorporated nucleotide influences misincorporation frequency, but by different mechanisms. The stability of base pairs formed by preceding nucleotides affects the rate of insertion of mismatched nucleotide but does not protect the mismatched nucleotide from removal by the 3' to 5' exonuclease activity. In contrast, the stability of a base pair formed by a following nucleotide determines whether a misincorporated nucleotide is extended or excised by affecting the ability of the enzyme to edit errors of incorporation. PMID:6722115

  16. Probing DNA hybridization efficiency and single base mismatch by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Chun; Zhang, Xin; He, Nong-Yue; Lu, Zu-Hong; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study DNA hybridization. Target DNA labeled with hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) was hybridized to DNA arrays with four different probes. Each probe dot of the hybridized arrays was detected with XPS. The XPS Cl2p peak areas were found to decrease with an increase in mismatched bases in DNA probes. The Cl2p core-level peak area ratio of a probe perfectly matched to one, two and three base-mismatched probes accorded well with the results of conventional fluorescent imaging, which shows that XPS is a potential tool for analyzing DNA arrays. The DNA arrays' hybridization efficiency was assessed by the molar ratio of chlorine to phosphorus in a DNA strand, which was determined from the relevant XPS Cl2p and P2p core-level peak areas after hybridization. This could provide a new method to detect DNA hybridization efficiency. PMID:19282155

  17. MutL traps MutS at a DNA mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ruoyi; Sakato, Miho; Sacho, Elizabeth J.; Wilkins, Hunter; Zhang, Xingdong; Modrich, Paul; Hingorani, Manju M.; Erie, Dorothy A.; Weninger, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) identifies and corrects errors made during replication. In all organisms except those expressing MutH, interactions between a DNA mismatch, MutS, MutL, and the replication processivity factor (β-clamp or PCNA) activate the latent MutL endonuclease to nick the error-containing daughter strand. This nick provides an entry point for downstream repair proteins. Despite the well-established significance of strand-specific nicking in MMR, the mechanism(s) by which MutS and MutL assemble on mismatch DNA to allow the subsequent activation of MutL’s endonuclease activity by β-clamp/PCNA remains elusive. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, MutS homologs undergo conformational changes to a mobile clamp state that can move away from the mismatch. However, the function of this MutS mobile clamp is unknown. Furthermore, whether the interaction with MutL leads to a mobile MutS–MutL complex or a mismatch-localized complex is hotly debated. We used single molecule FRET to determine that Thermus aquaticus MutL traps MutS at a DNA mismatch after recognition but before its conversion to a sliding clamp. Rather than a clamp, a conformationally dynamic protein assembly typically containing more MutL than MutS is formed at the mismatch. This complex provides a local marker where interaction with β-clamp/PCNA could distinguish parent/daughter strand identity. Our finding that MutL fundamentally changes MutS actions following mismatch detection reframes current thinking on MMR signaling processes critical for genomic stability. PMID:26283381

  18. A bifurcated hydrogen-bonded conformation in the d(A.T) base pairs of the DNA dodecamer d(CGCAAATTTGCG) and its complex with distamycin.

    PubMed Central

    Coll, M; Frederick, C A; Wang, A H; Rich, A

    1987-01-01

    The crystal structures of d(CGCA3T3GCG) complex to the antitumor drug distamycin and the DNA fragment alone were solved by x-ray diffraction at 2.2 and 2.5 A resolution, respectively. The drug lies in the narrow minor groove near the center of the B-DNA fragment covering 5 of the 6 A.T base pairs. It is bound to the DNA by hydrogen bonding, van der Waals, and electrostatic interactions. In addition, the DNA was found to have an unusual conformation in the (dA)3.(dT)3 regions. These base pairs have a high positive propeller twist so that in the major groove the adenine amino group is located intermediate between the carbonyl O-4 groups of two adjacent thymines of the opposite strand, making bifurcated hydrogen bonds to the two thymine residues. This suggests a model to explain the unusual properties of poly-(dA).poly(dT) in which a modified B conformation is associated with a large propeller twist of the bases and a set of continuous bifurcating hydrogen bonds along the major groove, which may provide incremental stability to these segments. In addition, shorter segments of (dA)3-6.(dT)3-6 may have this conformation in the midst of B-DNA and stabilize bends in the DNA that may be associated with stacking on one of the high propeller-twisted bases at the ends of these segments. Images PMID:3479798

  19. A polymerization-based method to construct a plasmid containing clustered DNA damage and a mismatch.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Momoko; Akamatsu, Ken; Shikazono, Naoya

    2016-10-01

    Exposure of biological materials to ionizing radiation often induces clustered DNA damage. The mutagenicity of clustered DNA damage can be analyzed with plasmids carrying a clustered DNA damage site, in which the strand bias of a replicating plasmid (i.e., the degree to which each of the two strands of the plasmid are used as the template for replication of the plasmid) can help to clarify how clustered DNA damage enhances the mutagenic potential of comprising lesions. Placement of a mismatch near a clustered DNA damage site can help to determine the strand bias, but present plasmid-based methods do not allow insertion of a mismatch at a given site in the plasmid. Here, we describe a polymerization-based method for constructing a plasmid containing clustered DNA lesions and a mismatch. The presence of a DNA lesion and a mismatch in the plasmid was verified by enzymatic treatment and by determining the relative abundance of the progeny plasmids derived from each of the two strands of the plasmid. PMID:27449134

  20. Base-pair opening and bubble transport in a DNA double helix induced by a protein molecule in a viscous medium.

    PubMed

    Vasumathi, V; Daniel, M

    2009-12-01

    The protein-DNA interaction dynamics is studied by modeling the DNA bases as classical spins in a coupled spin system, which are bosonized and coupled to thermal phonons and longitudinal motion of the protein molecule in the nonviscous limit. The nonlinear dynamics of this protein-DNA complex molecular system is governed by the completely integrable nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which admits N -soliton solutions. The soliton excitations of the DNA bases in the two strands make localized base-pair opening and travel along the DNA chain in the form of a bubble. This may characterize the bubble generated during the transcription process, when an RNA polymerase binds to a promoter site in the DNA double helical chain. When the protein-DNA molecular system interacts with the surrounding viscous solvating water medium, the dynamics is governed by a perturbed NLS equation. This equation is solved using a multiple scale perturbation analysis, by treating the viscous effect as a weak perturbation, and the results show that the viscosity of the solvent medium damps out the soliton as time progresses. PMID:20365187

  1. The Eukaryotic Mismatch Recognition Complexes Track with the Replisome during DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Joanna E.; Gammie, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    During replication, mismatch repair proteins recognize and repair mispaired bases that escape the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase. In this work, we tested the model that the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex tracks with the advancing replisome. Using yeast, we examined the dynamics during replication of the leading strand polymerase Polε using Pol2 and the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex using Msh2, the invariant protein involved in mismatch recognition. Specifically, we synchronized cells and processed samples using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with custom DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip). The Polε signal was not detectable in G1, but was observed at active origins and replicating DNA throughout S-phase. The Polε signal provided the resolution to track origin firing timing and efficiencies as well as replisome progression rates. By detecting Polε and Msh2 dynamics within the same strain, we established that the mismatch recognition complex binds origins and spreads to adjacent regions with the replisome. In mismatch repair defective PCNA mutants, we observed that Msh2 binds to regions of replicating DNA, but the distribution and dynamics are altered, suggesting that PCNA is not the sole determinant for the mismatch recognition complex association with replicating regions, but may influence the dynamics of movement. Using biochemical and genomic methods, we provide evidence that both MutS complexes are in the vicinity of the replisome to efficiently repair the entire spectrum of mutations during replication. Our data supports the model that the proximity of MutSα/β to the replisome for the efficient repair of the newly synthesized strand before chromatin reassembles. PMID:26684201

  2. Cernunnos/XLF promotes the ligation of mismatched and noncohesive DNA ends.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun J; Kim, Sunny A; Chu, Gilbert

    2007-05-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repairs DNA double-strand breaks created by ionizing radiation or V(D)J recombination of the immunoglobulin genes. The breaks often leave mismatched or nonligatable ends, and NHEJ must repair the breaks with high efficiency and minimal nucleotide loss. Here, the NHEJ proteins Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, XRCC4/Ligase IV, and Cernunnos/XRCC4-like factor joined mismatched and noncohesive DNA ends in the absence of processing factors. Depending on the mismatch, Cernunnos stimulated joining 8- to 150-fold. For substrates with a blunt end and a 3' overhanging end, Ku, XRCC4/Ligase IV, and Cernunnos ligated the 3' overhanging hydroxyl group to the 5' phosphate of the blunt end, leaving the other strand unjoined. This activity provides a mechanism for retaining 3' overhang sequences, as observed during V(D)J recombination in vivo. Thus, Cernunnos/XRCC4-like factor promotes a mismatched end (MEnd) DNA ligase activity to facilitate joining and to preserve DNA sequence. Furthermore, MEnd ligase activity may have applications in recombinant DNA technology. PMID:17470781

  3. 5-Methylation of Cytosine in CG:CG Base-Pair Steps: A Physicochemical Mechanism for the Epigenetic Control of DNA Nanomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Olson, Wilma; Li, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals density functional theory is integrated with analysis of a non-redundant set of protein-DNA crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database to study the stacking energetics of CG:CG base-pair steps, specifically the role of cytosine 5-methylation. Principal component analysis of the steps reveals the dominant collective motions to correspond to a tensile ``opening'' mode and two shear ``sliding'' and ``tearing'' modes in the orthogonal plane. The stacking interactions of the methyl groups are observed to globally inhibit CG:CG step overtwisting while simultaneously softening the modes locally via potential energy modulations that create metastable states. The results have implications for the epigenetic control of DNA mechanics.

  4. Solvation of deoxynucleosides in aqueous mixtures of organic solvents probed through their intrinsic fluorescence: Implications for open base pair states in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Anas Mohammad

    Because of the importance of solvation in the function of DNA, there is considerable interest in understanding the solvation network of its constituent components. This is of particular importance in connection with the closing of base pairs that have been disrupted as a result of structural fluctuations. Following the opening of a base pair, the open base is exposed to a heterogeneous environment which involves polar as well as nonpolar interactions. Toward the goal of understanding how the open bases interact with such a heterogeneous environment, we have studied the intrinsic fluorescence properties of the purine and pyrimidine nucleosides (dG, dA, dT, and dC) in organic solvents in the presence of small amounts of water. Exposure of the nucleoside to water was done by preparing solutions in three different ways: (i) "premixed" solution in which the nucleoside is dissolved in a water-organic solvent mixture, (ii) "carry its own water" solution in which the nucleoside is first dissolved in water and then diluted in the organic solvent, and (iii) "injected" solution in which water is added to a solution of the nucleoside in the organic solvent. The organic solvents used in the present study were: n-butanol, acetonitrile, methanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, and isobutanol. We find that for n-butanol and acetonitrile, which have a high degree of amphiphilicity and weak hydrogen bonding ability, respectively, the fluorescence spectral properties of the purines are found to depend on the sequence of the steps in which the aqueous mixture was formed. By contrast, no such dependence was observed in the other organic solvents. On the other hand, no such dependence was observed for the pyrimidines in any of the organic solvents used in the present study. These findings suggest that the final solvation network around the purines is dependent on the nature of the environment to which they were initially exposed. This would tend to present an impediment to the closing of

  5. Interaction of an anti-cancer photosensitizer with a genomic DNA: From base pair specificity and thermodynamic landscape to tuning the rate of detergent-sequestered dissociation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2016-05-15

    A detailed characterization of the binding interaction of a potent cancer cell photosensitizer, norharmane (NHM) with a genomic DNA (herring sperm; hsDNA) is undertaken with particular emphasis on deciphering the strength, mode, dynamics, energetics and kinetics of binding. A major focus of the study underlies a successful exploration of the concept of detergent-sequestered dissociation of drug from the drug-DNA complex. Biophysical techniques such as absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, DNA helix melting, stopped-flow fluorescence kinetics and calorimetry have been used. A primarily intercalative mode of binding of NHM with DNA is shown. However, the overall interaction is governed by more than one type of binding forces. We demonstrate that the essential prerequisite of a slower dissociation rate of drug from DNA helix is achieved by tenable choice surfactants. Our results also highlight an effective tunability of the rate of dissociation of the DNA-intercalated drug via detergent-sequestration. A detailed isothermal titration calorimetric study unveils the key role of hydrophobic force underlying NHM-hsDNA association. This is further substantiated by the enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior. The major entropic contribution in detergent-induced dissociation of NHM from NHM-hsDNA complex is also demonstrated. Our results present not only a comprehensive structural and thermodynamic profile, base pair specificity, association kinetics for binding of NHM with DNA but also explore the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of dissociation of bound drug. Characterization and tuning of the essential prerequisites for a drug to be efficient in anti-cancer functionality bear direct and widespread significance in contemporary global research. PMID:26945117

  6. Influence of local duplex stability and N6-methyladenine on uracil recognition by mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug).

    PubMed

    Valinluck, Victoria; Liu, Pingfang; Burdzy, Artur; Ryu, Junichi; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2002-12-01

    To maintain genomic integrity, DNA repair enzymes continually remove damaged bases and lesions resulting from endogenous and exogenous processes. These repair enzymes must distinguish damaged bases from normal bases to prevent the inadvertent removal of normal bases, which would promote genomic instability. The mechanisms by which this high level of specificity is accomplished are as yet unresolved. One member of the uracil-DNA glycosylase family of repair enzymes, Escherichia coli mismatch-specific uracil-DNA glycosylase (Mug), is reported to distinguish U:G mispairs from U:A base pairs based upon specific contacts with the mispaired guanine after flipping the target uracil out of the duplex. However, recent studies suggest other mechanisms for base selection, including local duplex stability. In this study, we used the modified base N6-methyladenine to probe the effect of local helix perturbation on Mug recognition of uracil. N6-Methyladenine is found in E. coli as part of both the mismatch repair and restriction-modification systems. In its cis isomer, N6-methyladenine destabilizes hydrogen bonding by interfering with pseudo-Watson-Crick base pairing. It is observed that the selection of uracil by Mug is sequence dependent and that uracil residues in sequences of reduced thermostability are preferentially removed. The replacement of adenine by N6-methyladenine increases the frequency of removal of the uracil residue paired opposite the modified adenine. These results are in accord with suggestions that local helix stability is an important determinant of base recognition by some DNA repair enzymes and provide a potential strategy for identifying the sequence location of modified bases in DNA. PMID:12482242

  7. Mismatch repair inhibits homeologous recombination via coordinated directional unwinding of trapped DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Tham, Khek-Chian; Hermans, Nicolaas; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Cox, Michael M; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2013-08-01

    Homeologous recombination between divergent DNA sequences is inhibited by DNA mismatch repair. In Escherichia coli, MutS and MutL respond to DNA mismatches within recombination intermediates and prevent strand exchange via an unknown mechanism. Here, using purified proteins and DNA substrates, we find that in addition to mismatches within the heteroduplex region, secondary structures within the displaced single-stranded DNA formed during branch migration within the recombination intermediate are involved in the inhibition. We present a model that explains how higher-order complex formation of MutS, MutL, and DNA blocks branch migration by preventing rotation of the DNA strands within the recombination intermediate. Furthermore, we find that the helicase UvrD is recruited to directionally resolve these trapped intermediates toward DNA substrates. Thus, our results explain on a mechanistic level how the coordinated action between MutS, MutL, and UvrD prevents homeologous recombination and maintains genome stability. PMID:23932715

  8. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  9. Electrochemical signature of mismatch in overhang DNA films: a scanning electrochemical microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Mohtashim Hassan; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2013-06-21

    High throughput DNA basepair mismatch detection is an ultimate goal for earlier and point-of-care diagnostics. However, the size of a target sequence on single nucleotide mismatch detection will critically impact the design of sensors in future. To study the potential impact of target size, the probe and target strands of unequal size were hybridized in the absence and presence of single nucleotide mismatches along the sequence. After hybridization, the shorter target sequences form overhangs in the probe strand while longer target sequences form overhangs in the complementary strand. The resulting double stranded DNA hybrids were printed on gold surfaces and the electrochemical response of the films was studied by scanning electrochemical microscopy without signal amplification and label. The redox mediator, [Fe(CN)(6)](4-), experiences lower repulsion in the vicinity of mismatch containing ds-DNA films, which ultimately manifests into higher feedback current regardless of the size and hybridization position of the complementary strands. Kinetic rate constants monitored right above the ds-DNA films show k(0) = 4.5 ± 0.1 × 10(-5) cm s(-1) for the short sequence hybridized at the upper portion of the probe while k(0) = 4.1 ± 0.2 × 10(-5) cm s(-1) for longer complementary strands which has only top overhang. It suggests that hybridization position is important for mismatch detection in short complementary stands. However, in longer complementary strands, mismatches are easily detectable in the absence of bottom overhangs. PMID:23671908

  10. Mismatched DNTP Incorporation By DNA Polymerase Beta Does Not Proceed Via Globally Different Conformational Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.-H.; Niebuhr, M.; Tung, C.-S.; Chan, H.-c.; Chou, C.-C.; Tsai, M.-D.

    2009-05-26

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  11. Saturation of DNA mismatch repair and error catastrophe by a base analogue in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Kazuo; Loakes, David; Schaaper, Roel M

    2002-01-01

    Deoxyribosyl-dihydropyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (dP) is a potent mutagenic deoxycytidine-derived base analogue capable of pairing with both A and G, thereby causing G. C --> A. T and A. T --> G. C transition mutations. We have found that the Escherichia coli DNA mismatch-repair system can protect cells against this mutagenic action. At a low dose, dP is much more mutagenic in mismatch-repair-defective mutH, mutL, and mutS strains than in a wild-type strain. At higher doses, the difference between the wild-type and the mutator strains becomes small, indicative of saturation of mismatch repair. Introduction of a plasmid containing the E. coli mutL(+) gene significantly reduces dP-induced mutagenesis. Together, the results indicate that the mismatch-repair system can remove dP-induced replication errors, but that its capacity to remove dP-containing mismatches can readily be saturated. When cells are cultured at high dP concentration, mutant frequencies reach exceptionally high levels and viable cell counts are reduced. The observations are consistent with a hypothesis in which dP-induced cell killing and growth impairment result from excess mutations (error catastrophe), as previously observed spontaneously in proofreading-deficient mutD (dnaQ) strains. PMID:12196386

  12. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A

    2016-05-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  13. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  14. Poorly repaired mismatches in heteroduplex DNA are hyper-recombinagenic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Manivasakam, P.; Hastings, P.J.; Rosenberg, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    In yeast meiotic recombination, alleles used as genetic markers fall into two classes as regards their fate when incorporated into heteroduplex DNA. Normal alleles are those that form heteroduplexes that are nearly always recognized and corrected by the mismatch repair system operating in meiosis. High PMS (postmeiotic segregation) alleles form heteroduplexes that are inefficiently mismatch repaired. We propose that this hyperrecombination is caused by the high PMS allele blocking a mismatch repair tract initiated from the normal allele, thus preventing corepair of the two alleles, which would prevent formation of recombinants. The results of three point crosses involving two PMS alleles and a normal allele suggest that high PMS alleles placed between two alleles that are normally corepaired block that corepair. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Dual daughter strand incision is processive and increases the efficiency of DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Nicolaas; Laffeber, Charlie; Cristovão, Michele; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Mardenborough, Yannicka; Ikpa, Pauline; Jaddoe, Aruna; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Wyman, Claire; Jiricny, Josef; Kanaar, Roland; Friedhoff, Peter; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2016-08-19

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an evolutionarily-conserved process responsible for the repair of replication errors. In Escherichia coli, MMR is initiated by MutS and MutL, which activate MutH to incise transiently-hemimethylated GATC sites. MMR efficiency depends on the distribution of these GATC sites. To understand which molecular events determine repair efficiency, we quantitatively studied the effect of strand incision on unwinding and excision activity. The distance between mismatch and GATC site did not influence the strand incision rate, and an increase in the number of sites enhanced incision only to a minor extent. Two GATC sites were incised by the same activated MMR complex in a processive manner, with MutS, the closed form of MutL and MutH displaying different roles. Unwinding and strand excision were more efficient on a substrate with two nicks flanking the mismatch, as compared to substrates containing a single nick or two nicks on the same side of the mismatch. Introduction of multiple nicks by the human MutLα endonuclease also contributed to increased repair efficiency. Our data support a general model of prokaryotic and eukaryotic MMR in which, despite mechanistic differences, mismatch-activated complexes facilitate efficient repair by creating multiple daughter strand nicks. PMID:27174933

  16. Functional interactions and signaling properties of mammalian DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellacosa, A

    2001-11-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system promotes genomic fidelity by repairing base-base mismatches, insertion-deletion loops and heterologies generated during DNA replication and recombination. This function is critically dependent on the assembling of multimeric complexes involved in mismatch recognition and signal transduction to downstream repair events. In addition, MMR proteins coordinate a complex network of physical and functional interactions that mediate other DNA transactions, such as transcription-coupled repair, base excision repair and recombination. MMR proteins are also involved in activation of cell cycle checkpoint and induction of apoptosis when DNA damage overwhelms a critical threshold. For this reason, they play a role in cell death by alkylating agents and other chemotherapeutic drugs, including cisplatin. Inactivation of MMR genes in hereditary and sporadic cancer is associated with a mutator phenotype and inhibition of apoptosis. In the future, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and functional interactions of MMR proteins will lead to the development of more effective cancer prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:11687886

  17. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  18. A 'bottom up', ab initio computational approach to understanding fundamental photophysical processes in nitrogen containing heterocycles, DNA bases and base pairs.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Barbara; Karsili, Tolga N V; Ashfold, Michael N R; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-07-27

    The availability of non-radiative decay mechanisms by which photoexcited molecules can revert to their ground electronic state, without experiencing potentially deleterious chemical transformation, is fundamental to molecular photostability. This Perspective Article combines results of new ab initio electronic structure calculations and prior experimental data in an effort to systematise trends in the non-radiative decay following UV excitation of selected families of heterocyclic molecules. We start with the prototypical uni- and bicyclic molecules phenol and indole, and explore the structural and photophysical consequences of incorporating progressively more nitrogen atoms within the respective ring structures en route to the DNA bases thymine, cytosine, adenine and guanine. For each of the latter, we identify low energy non-radiative decay pathways via conical intersections with the ground state potential energy surface accessed by out-of-plane ring deformations. This is followed by summary descriptions and illustrations of selected rival (electron driven H atom transfer) non-radiative excited state decay processes that demand consideration once the nucleobases are merely components in larger biomolecular systems like nucleosides, and both individual and stacked base-pairs. PMID:26980149

  19. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  20. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5′-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  1. Mismatch extension of DNA polymerases and high-accuracy single nucleotide polymorphism diagnostics by gold nanoparticle-improved isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhao, Yue; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yongxi

    2015-09-01

    Sequence mismatches may induce nonspecific extension reaction, causing false results for SNP diagnostics. Herein, we systematically investigated the impact of various 3'-terminal mismatches on isothermal amplification catalyzed by representative DNA polymerases. Despite their diverse efficiencies depending on types of mismatch and kinds of DNA polymerase, all 12 kinds of single 3'-terminal mismatches induced the extension reaction. Generally, only several mismatches (primer-template, C-C, G-A, A-G, and A-A) present an observable inhibitory effect on the amplification reaction, whereas other mismatches trigger amplified signals as high as those of Watson-Crick pairs. The related mechanism was deeply discussed, and a primer-design guideline for specific SNP analysis was summarized. Furthermore, we found that the addition of appropriate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can significantly inhibit mismatch extension and enhance the amplification specificity. Also the high-accuracy SNP analysis of human blood genomic DNA has been demonstrated by AuNPs-improved isothermal amplification, the result of which was verified by sequencing (the gold standard method for SNP assay). Collectively, this work provides mechanistic insight into mismatch behavior and achieves accurate SNP diagnostics, holding great potential for the application in molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. PMID:26249366

  2. Mismatch oxidation assay: detection of DNA mutations using a standard UV/Vis microplate reader.

    PubMed

    Tabone, Tania; Sallmann, Georgina; Cotton, Richard G H

    2009-01-01

    Simple, low-cost mutation detection assays that are suitable for low-throughput analysis are essential for diagnostic applications where the causative mutation may be different in every family. The mismatch oxidation assay is a simple optical absorbance assay to detect nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions in heteroduplex DNA. The method relies on detecting the oxidative modification products of mismatched thymine and cytosine bases by potassium permanganate as it is reduced to manganese dioxide. This approach, unlike other methods commonly used to detect sequence variants, does not require costly labeled probes or primers, toxic chemicals, or a time-consuming electrophoretic separation step. The oxidation rate, and hence the presence of a sequence variant, is detected by measuring the formation of the potassium permanganate reduction product (hypomanganate diester), which absorbs at the 420-nm visible wavelength, using a standard UV/vis microplate reader. PMID:19768598

  3. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  4. Luminescent platinum(II) complexes with functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene or diphosphine selectively probe mismatched and abasic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Sin Ki; Zou, Taotao; Cao, Bei; Chen, Tianfeng; To, Wai-Pong; Yang, Chen; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The selective targeting of mismatched DNA overexpressed in cancer cells is an appealing strategy in designing cancer diagnosis and therapy protocols. Few luminescent probes that specifically detect intracellular mismatched DNA have been reported. Here we used Pt(II) complexes with luminescence sensitive to subtle changes in the local environment and report several Pt(II) complexes that selectively bind to and identify DNA mismatches. We evaluated the complexes' DNA-binding characteristics by ultraviolet/visible absorption titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. These Pt(II) complexes show up to 15-fold higher emission intensities upon binding to mismatched DNA over matched DNA and can be utilized for both detecting DNA abasic sites and identifying cancer cells and human tissue samples with different levels of mismatch repair. Our work highlights the potential of luminescent Pt(II) complexes to differentiate between normal cells and cancer cells which generally possess more aberrant DNA structures. PMID:26883164

  5. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-04-20

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeonPyrococcus furiosus The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as themismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated fromPyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog fromThermococcus kodakarensisclearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5'-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  6. Using stable MutS dimers and tetramers to quantitatively analyze DNA mismatch recognition and sliding clamp formation.

    PubMed

    Groothuizen, Flora S; Fish, Alexander; Petoukhov, Maxim V; Reumer, Annet; Manelyte, Laura; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Marinus, Martin G; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Svergun, Dmitri I; Friedhoff, Peter; Sixma, Titia K

    2013-09-01

    The process of DNA mismatch repair is initiated when MutS recognizes mismatched DNA bases and starts the repair cascade. The Escherichia coli MutS protein exists in an equilibrium between dimers and tetramers, which has compromised biophysical analysis. To uncouple these states, we have generated stable dimers and tetramers, respectively. These proteins allowed kinetic analysis of DNA recognition and structural analysis of the full-length protein by X-ray crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering. Our structural data reveal that the tetramerization domains are flexible with respect to the body of the protein, resulting in mostly extended structures. Tetrameric MutS has a slow dissociation from DNA, which can be due to occasional bending over and binding DNA in its two binding sites. In contrast, the dimer dissociation is faster, primarily dependent on a combination of the type of mismatch and the flanking sequence. In the presence of ATP, we could distinguish two kinetic groups: DNA sequences where MutS forms sliding clamps and those where sliding clamps are not formed efficiently. Interestingly, this inability to undergo a conformational change rather than mismatch affinity is correlated with mismatch repair. PMID:23821665

  7. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Pérezprina, Juan Cristóbal; León-Galván, Miguel Ángel; Konigsberg, Mina

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”). The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others. PMID:23213348

  8. Efficient PCR amplification by an unnatural base pair system.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Michiko; Kawai, Rie; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hirao, Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Expansion of the genetic alphabet by an unnatural base pair system enables the site-specific incorporation of extra functional components into nucleic acids and proteins. In this system, PCR amplification of DNA templates containing unnatural base pairs is essential for modern biotechnology. We present a new unnatural base pair system, in which DNA duplexes containing the unnatural base pairs can be efficiently amplified by PCR. The system also provides a method for the site-specific incorporation of functional components into amplified DNA fragments by PCR, using unnatural base substrates linked with functional groups of interest. PMID:18776457

  9. Differential DNA mismatch repair underlies mutation rate variation across the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has revealed considerable variation in somatic mutation rates across the human genome, with mutation rates elevated in heterochromatic late replicating regions and reduced in early replicating euchromatin1-5. Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to underlie this2,6-10, but the actual cause is unknown. Here we identify variable DNA mismatch repair (MMR) as the basis of this variation. Analysing ~17 million single nucleotide variants from the genomes of 652 tumours, we show that regional autosomal mutation rates at megabase resolution are largely stable across cancer types, with differences related to changes in replication timing and gene expression. However, mutations arising after the inactivation of MMR are no longer enriched in early replicating euchromatin relative to late replicating heterochromatin. Thus, differential DNA repair and not differential mutation supply is the primary cause of the large-scale regional mutation rate variation across the human genome. PMID:25707793

  10. Human mismatch repair, drug-induced DNA damage, and secondary cancer.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Offman, Judith; Bignami, Margherita

    2003-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an important replication error avoidance mechanism that prevents mutation. The association of defective MMR with familial and sporadic gastrointestinal and endometrial cancer has been acknowledged for some years. More recently, it has become apparent that MMR defects are common in acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) that follows successful chemotherapy for a primary malignancy. Therapy-related haematological malignancies are often associated with treatment with alkylating agents. Their frequency is increasing and they now account for at least 10% of all AML cases. There is also evidence for an association between MMR deficient AML/MDS and immunosuppressive treatment with thiopurine drugs. Here we review how MMR interacts with alkylating agent and thiopurine-induced DNA damage and suggest possible ways in which MMR defects may arise in therapy-related AML/MDS. PMID:14726020

  11. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis. PMID:21747960

  12. Single-molecule detection and mismatch discrimination of unlabeled DNA targets.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Anders; Jönsson, Peter; Marie, Rodolphe; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Höök, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    We report on a single-molecule readout scheme on total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) demonstrating a detection limit in the low fM regime for short (30-mer) unlabeled DNA strands. Detection of unlabeled DNA targets is accomplished by letting them mediate the binding of suspended fluorescently labeled DNA-modified small unilamellar vesicles (Ø approximately 100 nm) to a DNA-modified substrate. On top of rapid and sensitive detection, the technique is also shown capable of extracting kinetics data from statistics of the residence time of the binding reaction in equilibrium, that is, without following neither the rate of binding upon injection nor release upon rinsing. The potential of this feature is demonstrated by discriminating a single mismatch from a fully complementary sequence. The success of the method is critically dependent on a surface modification that provides sufficiently low background. This was achieved through self-assembly of a biotinylated copolymer, Poly(L-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) on a silicon dioxide surface, followed by subsequent addition of streptavidin and biotinylated DNA. The proposed detection scheme is particularly appealing due to the simplicity of the sensor, which relies on self-assembly principles and conventional TIRFM. Therefore, we foresee a great potential of the concept to serve as an important component in future multiplexed sensing schemes. This holds in particular true in cases when information about binding kinetics is valuable, such as in single nucleotide polymorphism diagnostics. PMID:18088151

  13. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  14. [DNA mismatch repair and BRAF status in colorectal cancer: Interest for the therapeutic management?].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Romain; Cervera, Pascale; Svrcek, Magali; Dumont, Clément; Garcia, Marie-Line; Chibaudel, Benoist; de Gramont, Aimery; Pocard, Marc; Duval, Alex; Fléjou, Jean-François; André, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in France. Recently, colorectal cancer subtyping consortium (CRCSC) identified 4 consensus molecular subtypes (CMS). CMS1 is enriched for CRC with deficient DNA mismatch repair system (dMMR) and tumors with mutated BRAF. Intriguingly, CMS1 is characterized by better relapse-free survival but worse survival after relapse, compared with the other subtypes. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of prognostic and predictive impacts of MMR and BRAF status. We highlight immune checkpoints inhibitors as potentially future therapeutics for CRC with deficient MMR. We also focus on the management of BRAF mutant metastatic CRC, with a particular interest on targeted therapies. PMID:26118880

  15. Does the G.G*syn DNA mismatch containing canonical and rare tautomers of the guanine tautomerise through the DPT? A QM/QTAIM microstructural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-12-01

    We have established that the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT), moving with a time gap and without stable intermediates, is the underlying mechanism for the tautomerisation of the G.G*syn DNA base mispair (C1 symmetry), formed by the keto and enol tautomers of the guanine in the anti- and syn-configurations, into the G*.G*syn base mispair (C1), formed by the enol and imino tautomers of the G base, using quantum-mechanical calculations and Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. By constructing the sweeps of the geometric, electron-topological, energetic, polar and natural bond orbital properties along the intrinsic reaction coordinate of the G.G*syn↔G*.G*syn DPT tautomerisation, the nine key points, that are critical for the atomistic understanding of the tautomerisation reaction, were set and comprehensively analysed. It was found that the G.G*syn mismatch possesses pairing scheme with the formation of the O6...HO6 (7.01) and N1H...N7 (6.77) H-bonds, whereas the G*.G*syn mismatch - of the O6H...O6 (10.68) and N1...HN7 (9.59 kcal mol-1) H-bonds. Our results highlight that these H-bonds are significantly cooperative and mutually reinforce each other in both mismatches. The deformation energy necessary to apply for the G.G*syn base mispair to acquire the Watson-Crick sizes has been calculated. We have shown that the thermodynamically stable G*.G*syn base mispair is dynamically unstable structure with a lifetime of 4.1 × 10-15 s and any of its six low-lying intermolecular vibrations can develop during this period of time. These data exclude the possibility to change the tautomeric status of the bases under the dissociation of the G.G*syn mispair into the monomers during DNA replication. Finally, it has been made an attempt to draw from the physico-chemical properties of all four incorrect purine-purine DNA base pairs a general conclusion, which claims the role of the transversions in spontaneous point mutagenesis.

  16. Mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair proteins cooperate in the recognition of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Jain, Aklank; Iyer, Ravi R; Modrich, Paul L; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-07-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, thus ICL-inducing agents such as psoralen, are clinically useful chemotherapeutics. Psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) have been used to target ICLs to specific genomic sites to increase the selectivity of these agents. However, how TFO-directed psoralen ICLs (Tdp-ICLs) are recognized and processed in human cells is unclear. Previously, we reported that two essential nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein complexes, XPA-RPA and XPC-RAD23B, recognized ICLs in vitro, and that cells deficient in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) complex MutSbeta were sensitive to psoralen ICLs. To further investigate the role of MutSbeta in ICL repair and the potential interaction between proteins from the MMR and NER pathways on these lesions, we performed electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of MutSbeta and NER proteins with Tdp-ICLs. We found that MutSbeta bound to Tdp-ICLs with high affinity and specificity in vitro and in vivo, and that MutSbeta interacted with XPA-RPA or XPC-RAD23B in recognizing Tdp-ICLs. These data suggest that proteins from the MMR and NER pathways interact in the recognition of ICLs, and provide a mechanistic link by which proteins from multiple repair pathways contribute to ICL repair. PMID:19468048

  17. Proteogenomic analysis reveals unanticipated adaptations of colorectal tumor cells to deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Halvey, Patrick J.; Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Jing; Bhat, Ajaz A.; Dhawan, Punita; Li, Ming; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C.; Slebos, Robbert J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A growing body of genomic data on human cancers poses the critical question of how genomic variations translate to cancer phenotypes. We employed standardized shotgun proteomics and targeted protein quantitation platforms to analyze a panel of 10 colon cancer cell lines differing by mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In addition, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to enable detection of protein sequence variants from the proteomic data. Biological replicate cultures yielded highly consistent proteomic inventories with a cumulative total of 6,513 protein groups with a protein FDR of 3.17% across all cell lines. Networks of co-expressed proteins with differential expression based on MMR status revealed impact on protein folding, turnover and transport, on cellular metabolism and on DNA and RNA synthesis and repair. Analysis of variant amino acid sequences suggested higher stability of proteins affected by naturally occurring germline polymorphisms than of proteins affected by somatic protein sequence changes. The data provide evidence for multi-system adaptation to MMR deficiency with a stress response that targets misfolded proteins for degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway. Enrichment analysis suggested epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in RKO cells, as evidenced by increased mobility and invasion properties compared to SW480. The observed proteomic profiles demonstrate previously unknown consequences of altered DNA repair and provide an expanded basis for mechanistic interpretation of MMR phenotypes. PMID:24247723

  18. Sheared-type G(anti).C(syn) base-pair: a unique d(GXC) loop closure motif.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2003-05-30

    Stable DNA loop structures closed by a novel G.C base-pair have been determined for the single-residue d(GXC) loops (X=A, T, G or C) in low-salt solution by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The closing G.C base-pair in these loops is not of the canonical Watson-Crick type, but adopts instead a unique sheared-type (trans Watson-Crick/sugar-edge) pairing, like those occurring in the sheared mismatched G.A or A.C base-pair, to draw the two opposite strands together. The cytidine residue in the closing base-pair is transformed into the rare syn domain to form two H-bonds with the guanine base and to prevent the steric clash between the G 2NH(2) and the C H-5 protons. Besides, the sugar pucker of the syn cytidine is still located in the regular C2'-endo domain, unlike the C3'-endo domain adopted for the pyrimidines of the out-of-alternation left-handed Z-DNA structure. The facile formation of the compact d(GXC) loops closed by a unique sheared-type G(anti).C(syn) base-pair demonstrates the great potential of the single-stranded d(GXC) triplet repeats to fold into stable hairpins. PMID:12758081

  19. Mismatched dNTP incorporation by DNA polymerase [beta] does not proceed via globally different conformational pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Niebuhr, Marc; Tung, Chang-Shung; Chan, Hsiu-chien; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2008-07-07

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  20. Base-Pairing Energies of Proton-Bound Dimers and Proton Affinities of 1-Methyl-5-Halocytosines: Implications for the Effects of Halogenation on the Stability of the DNA i-Motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R. R.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-09-01

    (CCG)n•(CGG)n trinucleotide repeats have been found to be associated with fragile X syndrome, the most widespread inherited cause of mental retardation in humans. The (CCG)n•(CGG)n repeats adopt i-motif conformations that are preferentially stabilized by base-pairing interactions of noncanonical proton-bound dimers of cytosine (C+•C). Halogenated cytosine residues are one form of DNA damage that may be important in altering the structure and stability of DNA or DNA-protein interactions and, hence, regulate gene expression. Previously, we investigated the effects of 5-halogenation and 1-methylation of cytosine on the base-pairing energies (BPEs) using threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) techniques. In the present study, we extend our work to include proton-bound homo- and heterodimers of cytosine, 1-methyl-5-fluorocytosine, and 1-methyl-5-bromocytosine. All modifications examined here are found to produce a decrease in the BPEs. However, the BPEs of all of the proton-bound dimers examined significantly exceed those of Watson-Crick G•C, neutral C•C base pairs, and various methylated variants such that DNA i-motif conformations should still be preserved in the presence of these modifications. The proton affinities (PAs) of the halogenated cytosines are also obtained from the experimental data by competitive analysis of the primary dissociation pathways that occur in parallel for the proton-bound heterodimers. 5-Halogenation leads to a decrease in the N3 PA of cytosine, whereas 1-methylation leads to an increase in the N3 PA. Thus, the 1-methyl-5-halocytosines exhibit PAs that are intermediate.

  1. Short Hairpin RNA Suppression of Thymidylate Synthase Produces DNA Mismatches and Results in Excellent Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Cooper, Kristin S.; Mannava, Sudha; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA)-mediated suppression of thymidylate synthase (TS) on cytotoxicity and radiosensitization and the mechanism by which these events occur. Methods and Materials: shRNA suppression of TS was compared with 5-fluoro-2 Prime -deoxyuridine (FdUrd) inactivation of TS with or without ionizing radiation in HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were measured by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of FdUrd or shRNA suppression of TS on dNTP deoxynucleotide triphosphate imbalances and consequent nucleotide misincorporations into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and as pSP189 plasmid mutations, respectively. Results: TS shRNA produced profound ({>=}90%) and prolonged ({>=}8 days) suppression of TS in HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas FdUrd increased TS expression. TS shRNA also produced more specific and prolonged effects on dNTPs deoxynucleotide triphosphates compared with FdUrd. TS shRNA suppression allowed accumulation of cells in S-phase, although its effects were not as long-lasting as those of FdUrd. Both treatments resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1. TS shRNA alone was less cytotoxic than FdUrd but was equally effective as FdUrd in eliciting radiosensitization (radiation enhancement ratio: TS shRNA, 1.5-1.7; FdUrd, 1.4-1.6). TS shRNA and FdUrd produced a similar increase in the number and type of pSP189 mutations. Conclusions: TS shRNA produced less cytotoxicity than FdUrd but was equally effective at radiosensitizing tumor cells. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FdUrd on TS alone is sufficient to elicit radiosensitization with FdUrd, but it only partially explains FdUrd-mediated cytotoxicity and cell cycle inhibition. The increase in DNA mismatches after TS shRNA or FdUrd supports a causal and sufficient role for the depletion of dTTP thymidine triphosphate and consequent DNA

  2. Proteomic analysis of mismatch repair-mediated alkylating agent-induced DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mediating DNA damage-induced apoptosis is an important genome-maintenance function of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. Defects in MMR not only cause carcinogenesis, but also render cancer cells highly resistant to chemotherapeutics, including alkylating agents. To understand the mechanisms of MMR-mediated apoptosis and MMR-deficiency-caused drug resistance, we analyze a model alkylating agent (N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, MNNG)-induced changes in protein phosphorylation and abundance in two cell lines, the MMR-proficient TK6 and its derivative MMR-deficient MT1. Results Under an experimental condition that MNNG-induced apoptosis was only observed in MutSα-proficient (TK6), but not in MutSα-deficient (MT1) cells, quantitative analysis of the proteomic data revealed differential expression and phosphorylation of numerous individual proteins and clusters of protein kinase substrates, as well differential activation of response pathways/networks in MNNG-treated TK6 and MT1 cells. Many alterations in TK6 cells are in favor of turning on the apoptotic machinery, while many of those in MT1 cells are to promote cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis. Conclusions Our work provides novel molecular insights into the mechanism of MMR-mediated DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:24330662

  3. Mlh2 Is an Accessory Factor for DNA Mismatch Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsan, Anjana; Bowen, Nikki; Gries, Kerstin; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the essential mismatch repair (MMR) endonuclease Mlh1-Pms1 forms foci promoted by Msh2-Msh6 or Msh2-Msh3 in response to mispaired bases. Here we analyzed the Mlh1-Mlh2 complex, whose role in MMR has been unclear. Mlh1-Mlh2 formed foci that often colocalized with and had a longer lifetime than Mlh1-Pms1 foci. Mlh1-Mlh2 foci were similar to Mlh1-Pms1 foci: they required mispair recognition by Msh2-Msh6, increased in response to increased mispairs or downstream defects in MMR, and formed after induction of DNA damage by phleomycin but not double-stranded breaks by I-SceI. Mlh1-Mlh2 could be recruited to mispair-containing DNA in vitro by either Msh2-Msh6 or Msh2-Msh3. Deletion of MLH2 caused a synergistic increase in mutation rate in combination with deletion of MSH6 or reduced expression of Pms1. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae Mlh2 protein and the mammalian PMS1 protein are homologs. These results support a hypothesis that Mlh1-Mlh2 is a non-essential accessory factor that acts to enhance the activity of Mlh1-Pms1. PMID:24811092

  4. A theoretical study of Ru(II) polypyridyl DNA intercalators structure and electronic absorption spectroscopy of [Ru(phen)2(dppz)]2+ and [Ru(tap)2(dppz)]2+ complexes intercalated in guanine-cytosine base pairs.

    PubMed

    Ambrosek, David; Loos, Pierre-François; Assfeld, Xavier; Daniel, Chantal

    2010-09-01

    The structural and spectroscopic properties of [Ru(phen)(2)(dppz)](2+) and [Ru(tap)(2)(dppz)](2+) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline; tap=1,4,5,8-tetraazaphenanthrene; dppz=dipyridophenazine ) have been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) within the polarized continuum model (IEF-PCM) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The model of the Delta and Lambda enantiomers of Ru(II) intercalated in DNA in the minor and major grooves is limited to the metal complexes intercalated in two guanine-cytosine base pairs. The main experimental spectral features of these complexes reported in DNA or synthetic polynucleotides are better reproduced by the theoretical absorption spectra of the Delta enantiomers regardless of intercalation mode (major or minor groove). This is especially true for [Ru(phen)(2)(dppz)](2+). The visible absorption of [Ru(tap)(2)(dppz)](2+) is governed by the MLCT(tap) transitions regardless of the environment (water, acetonitrile or bases pair), the visible absorption of [Ru(phen)(2)(dppz)](2+) is characterized by transitions to metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer MLCT(dppz) in water and acetonitrile and to MLCT(phen) when intercalated in DNA. The response of the IL(dppz) state to the environment is very sensitive. In vacuum, water and acetonitrile these transitions are characterized by significant oscillator strengths and their positions depend significantly on the medium with blue shifts of about 80 nm when going from vacuum to solvent. When the complex is intercalated in the guanine-cytosine base pairs the (1)IL(dppz) transition contributes mainly to the band at 370 nm observed in the spectrum of [Ru(phen)(2)(dppz)](2+) and to the band at 362 nm observed in the spectrum of [Ru(tap)(2)(dppz)](2+). PMID:20554006

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  6. DNA Packaging Specificity of Bacteriophage N15 with an Excursion into the Genetics of a Cohesive End Mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Feiss, Michael; Young Min, Jea; Sultana, Sawsan; Patel, Priyal; Sippy, Jean

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication by the λ-like bacteriophages, immature concatemeric DNA is produced by rolling circle replication. The concatemers are processed into mature chromosomes with cohesive ends, and packaged into prohead shells, during virion assembly. Cohesive ends are generated by the viral enzyme terminase, which introduces staggered nicks at cos, an approx. 200 bp-long sequence containing subsites cosQ, cosN and cosB. Interactions of cos subsites of immature concatemeric DNA with terminase orchestrate DNA processing and packaging. To initiate DNA packaging, terminase interacts with cosB and nicks cosN. The cohesive ends of N15 DNA differ from those of λ at 2/12 positions. Genetic experiments show that phages with chromosomes containing mismatched cohesive ends are functional. In at least some infections, the cohesive end mismatch persists through cyclization and replication, so that progeny phages of both allelic types are produced in the infected cell. N15 possesses an asymmetric packaging specificity: N15 DNA is not packaged by phages λ or 21, but surprisingly, N15-specific terminase packages λ DNA. Implications for genetic interactions among λ-like bacteriophages are discussed. PMID:26633301

  7. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  8. Mismatch Tolerance by DNA Polymerase Pol4 in the Course of Nonhomologous End Joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Benjamin; Ma, Emilie; Marcand, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    In yeast, the nonhomologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) mobilizes the DNA polymerase Pol4 to repair DNA double-strand breaks when gap filling is required prior to ligation. Using telomere–telomere fusions caused by loss of the telomeric protein Rap1 and double-strand break repair on transformed DNA as assays for NHEJ between fully uncohesive ends, we show that Pol4 is able to extend a 3′-end whose last bases are mismatched, i.e., mispaired or unpaired, to the template strand. PMID:16452137

  9. DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause

    PubMed Central

    Perry, John R.B.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Chasman, Daniel I.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy; Albrecht, Eva; Andrulis, Irene L.; Beesley, Jonathan; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bergmann, Sven; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Brown, Judith; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Corre, Tanguy; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davies, Gail; Deary, Ian J.; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F.; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Esko, Tõnu; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flyger, Henrik; Fraser, Abigail; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Giles, Graham; Guenel, Pascal; Hägg, Sara; Hall, Per; Hayward, Caroline; Hopper, John; Ingelsson, Erik; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kasiman, Katherine; Knight, Julia A.; Lahti, Jari; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Margolin, Sara; Marsh, Julie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Olson, Janet E.; Pennell, Craig E.; Polasek, Ozren; Rahman, Iffat; Ridker, Paul M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Salumets, Andres; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Smith, Erin N.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Southey, Melissa; Stöckl, Doris; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Truong, Therese; Ulivi, Sheila; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Qin; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F.; Zgaga, Lina; Ong, Ken K.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Karasik, David; Murray, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are known to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain <15% of the genetic component. We have used genome-wide association in a bivariate meta-analysis of both traits to identify genes involved in determining reproductive lifespan. We observed significant genetic correlation between the two traits using genome-wide complex trait analysis. However, we found no robust statistical evidence for individual variants with an effect on both traits. A novel association with age at menopause was detected for a variant rs1800932 in the mismatch repair gene MSH6 (P = 1.9 × 10−9), which was also associated with altered expression levels of MSH6 mRNA in multiple tissues. This study contributes to the growing evidence that DNA repair processes play a key role in ovarian ageing and could be an important therapeutic target for infertility. PMID:24357391

  10. DNA mismatch repair gene MSH6 implicated in determining age at natural menopause.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Chasman, Daniel I; Johnson, Andrew D; Elks, Cathy; Albrecht, Eva; Andrulis, Irene L; Beesley, Jonathan; Berenson, Gerald S; Bergmann, Sven; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Brown, Judith; Buring, Julie E; Campbell, Harry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Corre, Tanguy; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davies, Gail; Deary, Ian J; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F; Engelhardt, Ellen G; Eriksson, Johan G; Esko, Tõnu; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flyger, Henrik; Fraser, Abigail; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Giles, Graham; Guenel, Pascal; Hägg, Sara; Hall, Per; Hayward, Caroline; Hopper, John; Ingelsson, Erik; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kasiman, Katherine; Knight, Julia A; Lahti, Jari; Lawlor, Debbie A; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Margolin, Sara; Marsh, Julie A; Metspalu, Andres; Olson, Janet E; Pennell, Craig E; Polasek, Ozren; Rahman, Iffat; Ridker, Paul M; Robino, Antonietta; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Salumets, Andres; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Smith, Erin N; Smith, Jennifer A; Southey, Melissa; Stöckl, Doris; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Thompson, Deborah J; Truong, Therese; Ulivi, Sheila; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Qin; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Zgaga, Lina; Ong, Ken K; Murabito, Joanne M; Karasik, David; Murray, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The length of female reproductive lifespan is associated with multiple adverse outcomes, including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease and infertility. The biological processes that govern the timing of the beginning and end of reproductive life are not well understood. Genetic variants are known to contribute to ∼50% of the variation in both age at menarche and menopause, but to date the known genes explain <15% of the genetic component. We have used genome-wide association in a bivariate meta-analysis of both traits to identify genes involved in determining reproductive lifespan. We observed significant genetic correlation between the two traits using genome-wide complex trait analysis. However, we found no robust statistical evidence for individual variants with an effect on both traits. A novel association with age at menopause was detected for a variant rs1800932 in the mismatch repair gene MSH6 (P = 1.9 × 10(-9)), which was also associated with altered expression levels of MSH6 mRNA in multiple tissues. This study contributes to the growing evidence that DNA repair processes play a key role in ovarian ageing and could be an important therapeutic target for infertility. PMID:24357391

  11. Potential role of Escherichia coli DNA mismatch repair proteins in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahanavaj

    2015-12-01

    The epithelium of gastrointestinal tract organizes many innate defense systems against microbial intruders such as integrity of epithelial, rapid eviction of infected cells, quick turnover of epithelial cell, intrinsic immune responses and autophagy. However, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are equipped with well developed infectious tricks that evade the host defense systems and utilize the gastrointestinal epithelium as a multiplicative foothold. During multiplication on and within the epithelium, EPEC secrete various toxins that can weaken, usurp, and use many host cellular systems. However, the possible mechanisms of pathogenesis are still poorly elusive. Recent study reveals the existence of EPEC in colorectal cancer patients and their potential role in depletion of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins of host cell in colonic cell lines. The EPEC colonised intracellularly in colon mucosa of colorectal carcinoma whereas extracellular strain was detected in mucosa of normal colon cells. Interestingly, alteration in MutS, MutL complexes and MUTYH of mammalian cells may be involved in development of CRC. These data propose that MMR of E. coli may be potential therapeutic targets and early detection biomarkers for CRC. This article reviews the potential role of E. coli MutS, MutL and MutY protein in CRC aetiology. PMID:26014615

  12. Visualization of Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Reveals Distinct Recognition and Repair Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S.; Smith, Catherine E.; Desai, Arshad; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) increases replication fidelity by eliminating mispaired bases resulting from replication errors. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae mispairs are primarily detected by the Msh2-Msh6 complex and corrected following subsequent recruitment of the Mlh1-Pms1 complex. Here, we visualized functional fluorescent versions of Msh2-Msh6 and Mlh1-Pms1 in living cells. Msh2-Msh6 formed foci in S-phase that colocalized with replication factories; this localized pool accounted for 10–15% of MMR in wild-type cells but was essential for MMR in the absence of the exonuclease Exo1. Mlh1-Pms1 also formed foci that, while requiring Msh2-Msh6 for their formation, rarely colocalized with Msh2-Msh6. Mlh1-Pms1 foci increased when the number of mispaired bases was increased; in contrast, Msh2-Msh6 foci were unaffected. These results suggest that (I) mispair recognition can occur via either a replication factory-targeted or a second distinct pool of Msh2-Msh6, and (II) superstoichiometric Mlh1-Pms1 assembly triggered by mispair-bound Msh2-Msh6 defines sites of active MMR. PMID:22118461

  13. Synthesis, base pairing and structure studies of geranylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Vangaveti, Sweta; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V; Basanta-Sanchez, Maria; Haruehanroengra, Phensinee; Chen, Alan; Sheng, Jia

    2016-07-27

    Natural RNAs utilize extensive chemical modifications to diversify their structures and functions. 2-Thiouridine geranylation is a special hydrophobic tRNA modification that has been discovered very recently in several bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella Typhimurium The geranylated residues are located in the first anticodon position of tRNAs specific for lysine, glutamine and glutamic acid. This big hydrophobic terpene functional group affects the codon recognition patterns and reduces frameshifting errors during translation. We aimed to systematically study the structure, function and biosynthesis mechanism of this geranylation pathway, as well as answer the question of why nature uses such a hydrophobic modification in hydrophilic RNA systems. Recently, we have synthesized the deoxy-analog of S-geranyluridine and showed the geranylated T-G pair is much stronger than the geranylated T-A pair and other mismatched pairs in the B-form DNA duplex context, which is consistent with the observation that the geranylated tRNA(Glu) UUC recognizes GAG more efficiently than GAA. In this manuscript we report the synthesis and base pairing specificity studies of geranylated RNA oligos. We also report extensive molecular simulation studies to explore the structural features of the geranyl group in the context of A-form RNA and its effect on codon-anticodon interaction during ribosome binding. PMID:27307604

  14. Differentiation of Mycobacterial Species by PCR-Restriction Analysis of DNA (342 Base Pairs) of the RNA Polymerase Gene (rpoB)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum-Joon; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Park, Bo-Na; Kim, Seo-Jeong; Bai, Gill-Han; Kim, Sang-Jae; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2001-01-01

    PCR amplification-restriction analysis (PRA) of rpoB DNA (342 bp), which comprises the Rifr region, was used for the differential identification of 49 mycobacteria. The DNA had been used previously for the identification of mycobacterial species by comparative sequence analysis (B. J. Kim et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 37:1714–1720, 1999). Digestion with four restriction enzymes (HaeIII, HindII, MvaI, and AccII), which were selected on the basis of rpoB DNA sequences, generated distinctive PRA patterns that allowed not only the reference strains but also the clinical isolates of mycobacteria to be distinguished. Both rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria were distinctly differentiated by HaeIII digestion of the amplified rpoB DNA. By HindII digestion the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was distinguished from the other mycobacteria. Furthermore, six subspecies of Mycobacterium kansasii (subspecies I to VI) as well as the closely related Mycobacterium gastri, and other closely related species, were distinguished by simultaneous digestion of MvaI and AccII. According to the rpoB PRA scheme, 240 strains of clinical isolates could be identified. It was also possible to detect and identify M. tuberculosis directly from sputa and bronchoalveolar lavage specimens. These results suggest that PRA of rpoB DNA is a simple and feasible method not only for the differentiation of culture isolates but also for the rapid detection and identification of pathogenic mycobacteria in primary clinical specimens. PMID:11376042

  15. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined “Lynch-like syndrome” if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or “familial colorectal cancer type X” if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies. PMID:25716099

  16. Crystal structure of Δ-Ru(bpy)2dppz2+ bound to mismatched DNA reveals side-by-side metalloinsertion and intercalation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hang; Kaiser, Jens T.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    DNA mismatches represent a novel target in developing diagnostics and therapeutics for cancer, since deficiencies in DNA-mismatch repair (MMR) are implicated in many cancers and cells that are MMR-deficient show a high frequency of mismatches. We use metal complexes with bulky intercalating ligands serve as probes for DNA mismatches. Here, we report the high resolution (0.92 Å) crystal structure of the ruthenium ‘light switch’ complex Δ-Ru(bpy)2dppz2+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine and dppz = dipyridophenazine), known to show luminescence on binding to duplex DNA, bound to both mismatched and well matched sites in the oligonucleotide 5′-(dCGGAAATTACCG)2-3′ (underline denotes AA mismatches). Two crystallographically independent views reveal that the complex binds mismatches through metalloinsertion, where the dppz inserts into the duplex through the minor groove, ejecting both mispaired adenosines. Additional ruthenium complexes are intercalated at well-matched sites, creating an array of complexes in the minor groove stabilized through stacking interactions between bpy ligands and extruded adenosines. This structure attests to the generality of metalloinsertion and metallointercalation as DNA binding modes. PMID:22824892

  17. Mutation detection by mismatch binding protein, MutS, in amplified DNA: Application to the cystic fibrosis gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lishanski, A.; Ostrander, E.A.; Rine, J. |

    1994-03-29

    An experimental strategy for detecting heterozygosity in genomic DNA has been developed based on preferential binding of Escherichia coli MutS protein to DNA molecules containing mismatched bases. The binding was detected by a gel mobility-shift assay. This approach was tested by using as a model the most commonly occurring mutations within the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) gene. Genomic DNA samples were amplified with 5{prime}-end-labeled primers that bracket the site of the {Delta}F508 3-bp deletion in exon 10 of the CFTR gene. The renatured PCR products from homozygotes produced homoduplexes; the PCR products from heterozygotes produced heteroduplexes and homoduplexes (1:1). MutS protein bound more strongly to heteroduplexes that correspond to heterozygous carriers of {Delta}F508 and contain a CTT or a GAA loop in one of the strands than to homoduplexes corresponding to homozygotes. The ability of MutS protein to detect heteroduplexes in PCR-amplified DNA extended to fragments {approximately} 500 bp long. The method was also able to detect carriers of the point mutations in exon 11 of the CFTR gene by a preferential binding of MutS to single-base mismatches in PCR-amplified DNA.

  18. Transfection of shRNA-encoding Minivector DNA of a few hundred base pairs to regulate gene expression in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, N; Fogg, J M; Zechiedrich, L; Zu, Y

    2011-01-01

    This work illustrates the utility of Minivector DNA, a non-viral, supercoiled gene therapy vector incorporating short hairpin RNA from an H1 promoter. Minivector DNA is superior to both plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) in that it has improved biostability while maintaining high cell transfection efficiency and gene silencing capacity. Minivector DNAs were stable for over 48 h in human serum, as compared with only 0.5 and 2 h for siRNA and plasmid, respectively. Although all three nucleic acids exhibited similar transfection efficiencies in easily transfected adhesion fibroblasts cells, only Minivector DNAs and siRNA were capable of transfecting difficult-to-transfect suspension lymphoma cells. Minivector DNA and siRNA were capable of silencing the gene encoding anaplastic lymphoma kinase, a key pathogenic factor of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and this silencing caused inhibition of the lymphoma cells. Based on these results, Minivector DNAs are a promising new gene therapy tool. PMID:20962872

  19. Hidden in Plain Sight: Subtle Effects of the 8-Oxoguanine Lesion on the Structure, Dynamics, and Thermodynamics of a 15-Base-Pair Oligodeoxynucleotide Duplex†

    PubMed Central

    Crenshaw, Charisse M.; Wade, Jacqueline E.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Frueh, Dominique; Lane, Benjamin F.; Núñez, Megan E.

    2011-01-01

    The base lesion 8-oxoguanine is formed readily by oxidation of DNA, potentially leading to G→T transversion mutations. Despite the apparent similarity of 8-oxoguanine-cytosine base pairs to normal guanine-cytosine base pairs, cellular base excision repair systems effectively recognize the lesion base. Here we apply several techniques to examine a single 8-oxoguanine lesion at the center of a nonpalindromic 15-mer duplex oligonucleotide in an effort to determine what, if anything, distinguishes an 8-oxoguanine-cytosine base pair from a normal base pair. The lesion duplex is globally almost indistinguishable from the unmodified parent duplex using CD spectroscopy and UV melting thermodynamics. The DNA mismatch-detecting photocleavage agent Rh(bpy)2chrysi3+ cleaves only weakly and nonspecifically, revealing that the 8oxoG-C pair is locally stable at the level of the individual base pairs. NMR spectra are also consistent with a well-conserved B-form duplex structure. In the 2D NOESY spectra, base-sugar and imino-imino crosspeaks are strikingly similar between parent and lesion duplexes. Changes in chemical shift due to the 8oxoG lesion are localized to its complementary cytosine and to the 2–3 base pairs immediately flanking the lesion on the lesion strand. Residues further removed from the lesion are shown to be unperturbed by its presence. Notably, imino exchange experiments indicate that the 8-oxoguanine-cytosine pair is strong and stable, with an apparent equilibrium constant for opening equal to that of other internal guanine-cytosine base pairs, on the order of 10−6. This collection of experiments shows that the 8-oxoguanine-cytosine base pair is incredibly stable and similar to the native pair. PMID:21902242

  20. Deficient DNA mismatch repair is associated with favorable prognosis in Thai patients with sporadic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korphaisarn, Krittiya; Pongpaibul, Ananya; Limwongse, Chanin; Roothumnong, Ekkapong; Klaisuban, Wipawi; Nimmannit, Akarin; Jinawath, Artit; Akewanlop, Charuwan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prognostic significance of deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) and BRAF V600E in Thai sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. METHODS: We studied a total of 211 out of 405 specimens obtained from newly diagnosed CRC patients between October 1, 2006 and December 31, 2007 at Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks of CRC tissue samples were analyzed for dMMR by detection of MMR protein expression loss by immunohistochemistry or microsatellite instability using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-DHPLC. BRAF V600E mutational analysis was performed in DNA extracted from the same archival tissues by two-round allele-specific PCR and analyzed by high sensitivity DHPLC. Associations between patient characteristics, MMR and BRAF status with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier survival plots and log-rank test together with Cox’s proportional hazard regression. RESULTS: dMMR and BRAF V600E mutations were identified in 31 of 208 (14.9%) and 23 of 211 (10.9%) tumors, respectively. dMMR was more commonly found in patients with primary colon tumors rather than rectal cancer (20.4% vs 7.6%, P =0.01), but there was no difference in MMR status between the right-sided and left-sided colon tumors (20.8% vs 34.6%, P = 0.24). dMMR was associated with early-stage rather than metastatic disease (17.3% vs 0%, P = 0.015). No clinicopathological features such primary site or tumor differentiation were associated with the BRAF mutation. Six of 31 (19.3%) samples with dMMR carried the BRAF mutation, while 17 of 177 (9.6%) with proficient MMR (pMMR) harbored the mutation (P = 0.11). Notably, patients with dMMR tumors had significantly superior DFS (HR = 0.30, 95%CI: 0.15-0.77; P = 0.01) and OS (HR = 0.29, 95%CI: 0.10-0.84; P = 0.02) compared with patients with pMMR tumors. By contrast, the BRAF V600E mutation had no prognostic impact on DFS and OS. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of dMMR and

  1. NMR solution structure of an N2-guanine DNA adduct derived from the potent tumorigen dibenzo[a,l]pyrene: Intercalation from the minor groove with ruptured Watson-Crick base pairing

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yijin; Liu, Zhi; Ding, Shuang; Lin, Chin H.; Cai, Yuqin; Rodriguez, Fabian A.; Sayer, Jane M.; Jerina, Donald M.; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2012-01-01

    The most potent tumorigen identified among the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is the non-planar fjord region dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P). It is metabolically activated in vivo through the widely-studied diol epoxide (DE) pathway to form covalent adducts with DNA bases, predominantly guanine and adenine. The (+)-11S,12R,13R,14S DE enantiomer forms adducts via its C14-position with the exocyclic amino group of guanine. Here, we present the first NMR solution structure of a DB[a,l]P-derived adduct, the 14R (+)-trans-anti-DB[a,l]P–N2-dG (DB[a,l]P-dG) lesion in double-stranded DNA. In contrast to the stereochemically identical benzo[a]pyrene-derived N2-dG adduct (B[a]P-dG) in which the B[a]P rings reside in the B-DNA minor groove on the 3’-side of the modifed deoxyguanosine, in the DB[a,l]P-derived adduct the DB[a,l]P rings intercalate into the duplex on the 3’-side of the modified base from the sterically crowded minor groove. Watson-Crick base pairing of the modified guanine with the partner cytosine is broken, but these bases retain some stacking with the bulky DB[a,l]P ring system. This new theme in PAH DE - DNA adduct conformation differs from: (1) the classical intercalation motif where Watson-Crick base-pairing is intact at the lesion site, and (2) the base-displaced intercalation motif in which the damaged base and its partner are extruded from the helix . The structural considerations that lead to the intercalated conformation of the DB[a,l]P-dG lesion in contrast to the minor groove alignment of the B[a]P-dG adduct, and the implications of the DB[a,l]P-dG conformational motif for the recognition of such DNA lesions by the human nucleotide excision repair apparatus, are discussed. PMID:23121427

  2. Spectroscopic and structural impact of a stem base-pair change in DNA hairpins: GTTC-ACA-GAAC versus GTAC-ACA-GTAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Michèle; Patard, Louis; Hernandez, Belen; Couesnon, Thierry; Santini, Guillaume P. H.; Cognet, Jean A. H.; Gouyette, Catherine; Cordier, Christine

    2006-09-01

    Successive investigations over the last decade have revealed and confirmed a stable loop closure in a family of d-[GTAC-5Pur6N7N-GTAC] hairpins, where 5Pur6N7N is a AAA, GAG and AXC loop (X being any nucleotide). The trinucleotide loop is characterized by a well defined 5Pur-7N mispairing mode, and by upfield chemical shifts for three sugar protons of the apical nucleotide 6N. The GTTC-ACA-GAAC DNA hairpin, of interest for its likely involvement in Vibrio cholerae genome mutations, has now been investigated. The GTAC-ACA-GTAC DNA hairpin has also been studied because it is intermediate between the other structures, as it contains the loop of the hairpin under consideration and the stem of the above family. The two hairpins with the ACA loop are stable. They show the same mispairing mode and similar upfield shifts as the previous family, but GTTC-ACA-GAAC seems to be slightly less compact than any other. GTTC-ACA-GAAC is remarkable in that it exhibits a B II character for the phosphate-ester conformation at 8Gp9A, together with a swing of the upper hairpin into the major groove that, in particular, brings 6CH1' roughly as close to 7AH2 as to 6CH6. These unexpected structural features are qualitatively deduced from 1H and 31P NMR spectra, and confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. This comparative study shows that not only the loop sequence but also the stem sequence may control hairpin structures.

  3. Mechanism for verification of mismatched and homoduplex DNAs by nucleotides-bound MutS analyzed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    In order to understand how MutS recognizes mismatched DNA and induces the reaction of DNA repair using ATP, the dynamics of the complexes of MutS (bound to the ADP and ATP nucleotides, or not) and DNA (with mismatched and matched base-pairs) were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. As for DNA, the structure of the base-pairs of the homoduplex DNA which interacted with the DNA recognition site of MutS was intermittently disturbed, indicating that the homoduplex DNA was unstable. As for MutS, the disordered loops in the ATPase domains, which are considered to be necessary for the induction of DNA repair, were close to (away from) the nucleotide-binding sites in the ATPase domains when the nucleotides were (not) bound to MutS. This indicates that the ATPase domains changed their structural stability upon ATP binding using the disordered loop. Conformational analysis by principal component analysis showed that the nucleotide binding changed modes which have structurally solid ATPase domains and the large bending motion of the DNA from higher to lower frequencies. In the MutS-mismatched DNA complex bound to two nucleotides, the bending motion of the DNA at low frequency modes may play a role in triggering the formation of the sliding clamp for the following DNA-repair reaction step. Moreover, MM-PBSA/GBSA showed that the MutS-homoduplex DNA complex bound to two nucleotides was unstable because of the unfavorable interactions between MutS and DNA. This would trigger the ATP hydrolysis or separation of MutS and DNA to continue searching for mismatch base-pairs. Proteins 2016; 84:1287-1303. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27238299

  4. Label-free detection of DNA single-base mismatches using a simple reflectance-based optical technique.

    PubMed

    Nava, G; Ceccarello, E; Giavazzi, F; Salina, M; Damin, F; Chiari, M; Buscaglia, M; Bellini, T; Zanchetta, G

    2016-05-21

    Rapid and quantitative detection of the binding of nucleic acids to surface-immobilized probes remains a challenge in many biomedical applications. We investigated the hybridization of a set of fully complementary and defected 12-base long DNA oligomers by using the Reflective Phantom Interface (RPI), a recently developed multiplexed label-free detection technique. Based on the simple measurement of reflected light intensity, this technology enables to quantify the hybridization directly as it occurs on the surface with a sensitivity of 10 pg mm(-2). We found a strong effect of single-base mismatches and of their location on hybridization kinetics and equilibrium binding. In line with previous studies, we found that DNA-DNA binding is weaker on a surface than in the bulk. Our data indicate that this effect is a consequence of weak nonspecific binding of the probes to the surface. PMID:27122358

  5. Recognition of DNA insertion/deletion mismatches by an activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miret, J J; Parker, B O; Lahua, R S

    1996-02-15

    An activity in nuclear extracts of S.cerevisiae binds specifically to heteroduplexes containing four to nine extra bases in one strand. The specificity of this activity (IMR, for insertion mismatch recognition) in band shift assays was confirmed by competition experiments. IMR is biochemically and genetically distinct from the MSH2 dependent, single base mismatch binding activity. The two activities migrate differently during electrophoresis, they are differentially competable and their spectra of mispair binding are distinct. Furthermore, IMR activity is observed in extracts from an msh2- msh3- msh4- strain. IMR exhibits specificity for insertion mispairs in two different sequence contexts. Binding is influenced by the structure of the mismatch since an insertion with a hairpin configuration is not recognized by this activity. IMR does not result from single-strand binding because single-stranded probes to not yield IMR complex and single-stranded competitors are unable to displace insertion heteroduplexes from the complex. Similar results with intrinsically bent duplexes make it unlikely that recognition is conferred by a bend alone. Heteroduplexes bound by IMR do not contain any obvious damage. These findings are consistent with the idea that yeast contains a distinct recognition factor, IMR that is specific for insertion/deletion mismatches. PMID:8604316

  6. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Assays for mismatch discrimination and detection of single nucleotide variations by hybridization-controlled assembly of liposomes, which do not require tedious surface chemistry, are versatile for both DNA and RNA targets. We report herein a comprehensive study on different DNA and LNA (locked nucleic acids) probe designs, including membrane-anchoring requirements, studies on different probes and target lengths (including overhangs), DNA and RNA targets (including sequences associated with pathogens) for lipidated nucleic acids (LiNAs). Advantages and limitations of the liposome assembly based assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes without the need for long spacers and the inherent mobility of membrane-anchored probes in lipid-bilayer membranes will be described for several different probe designs. PMID:27356098

  7. Mismatch repair deficiency endows tumors with a unique mutation signature and sensitivity to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Thienpont, Bernard; Yesilyurt, Betül Tuba; Moisse, Matthieu; Reumers, Joke; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Sagaert, Xavier; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Smeets, Dominiek; Matthijs, Gert; Aerts, Stein; Cools, Jan; Metcalf, Alex; Spurdle, Amanda; Amant, Frederic; Lambrechts, Diether

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication errors that persist as mismatch mutations make up the molecular fingerprint of mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient tumors and convey them with resistance to standard therapy. Using whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing, we here confirm an MMR-deficient mutation signature that is distinct from other tumor genomes, but surprisingly similar to germ-line DNA, indicating that a substantial fraction of human genetic variation arises through mutations escaping MMR. Moreover, we identify a large set of recurrent indels that may serve to detect microsatellite instability (MSI). Indeed, using endometrial tumors with immunohistochemically proven MMR deficiency, we optimize a novel marker set capable of detecting MSI and show it to have greater specificity and selectivity than standard MSI tests. Additionally, we show that recurrent indels are enriched for the ‘DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination’ pathway. Consequently, DSB repair is reduced in MMR-deficient tumors, triggering a dose-dependent sensitivity of MMR-deficient tumor cultures to DSB inducers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02725.001 PMID:25085081

  8. AP endonuclease 1 prevents the extension of a T/G mismatch by DNA polymerase β to prevent mutations in CpGs during base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yanhao; Jiang, Zhongliang; Zhou, Jing; Osemota, Emmanuel; Liu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of DNA methylation and demethylation at CpG clusters are involved in gene regulation. CpG clusters have been identified as hot spots of mutagenesis because of their susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage. Damaged Cs and Gs at CpGs can disrupt a normal DNA methylation pattern through modulation of DNA methylation and demethylation, leading to mutations and deregulation of gene expression. DNA base excision repair (BER) plays a dual role of repairing oxidative DNA damage and mediating an active DNA demethylation pathway on CpG clusters through removal of a T/G mismatch resulting from deamination of a 5mC adjacent to a guanine that can be simultaneously damaged by oxidative stress. However, it remains unknown how BER processes clustered lesions in CpGs and what are the consequences from the repair of these lesions. In this study, we examined BER of an abasic lesion next to a DNA demethylation intermediate, the T/G mismatch in a CpG dinucleotide, and its effect on the integrity of CpGs. Surprisingly, we found that the abasic lesion completely abolished the activity of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) for removing the mismatched T. However, we found that APE1 could still efficiently incise the abasic lesion leaving a 3-terminus mismatched T, which was subsequently extended by pol β. This in turn resulted in a C to T transition mutation. Interestingly, we also found that APE1 3'-5' exonuclease activity efficiently removed the mismatched T, thereby preventing pol β extension of the mismatched nucleotide and the resulting mutation. Our results demonstrate a crucial role of APE1 3'-5' exonuclease activity in combating mutations in CpG clusters caused by an intermediate of DNA demethylation during BER. PMID:27183823

  9. Aberrant DNA Methylation in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer without Mismatch Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ajay; Xicola, Rosa M.; Nguyen, Thuy-Phuong; Doyle, Brian J; Sohn, Vanessa R.; Bandipalliam, Prathap; Reyes, Josep; Cordero, Carmen; Balaguer, Francesc; Castells, Antoni; Jover, Rodrigo; Andreu, Montserrat; Syngal, Sapna; Boland, C. Richard; Llor, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Approximately half of the families that fulfill Amsterdam criteria for Lynch syndrome or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) do not have evidence of the germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations that define this syndrome and result in microsatellite instability. The carcinogenic pathways and the best diagnostic approaches to detect microsatellite stable (MSS) HNPCC tumors are unclear. We investigated the contribution of epigenetic alterations to development of MSS HNPCC tumors. Methods Colorectal cancers were divided in four groups: 1. Microsatellite stable, Amsterdam positive (MSS HNPCC) (N=22); 2. Lynch syndrome cancers (identified mismatch repair mutations) (N=21); 3. Sporadic MSS (N=92); 4. Sporadic MSI (N=46). Methylation status was evaluated for CACNAG1, SOCS1, RUNX3, NEUROG1, MLH1, and LINE-1. KRAS and BRAF mutations status was analyzed. Results MSS HNPCC tumors displayed a significantly lower degree of LINE-1 methylation, marker for global methylation, than any other group. Whereas most MSS HNPCC tumors had some degree of CpG island methylation, none presented a high index of methylation. MSS HNPCC tumors had KRAS mutations exclusively in codon 12, but none harbored V600E BRAF mutations. Conclusions Tumors from Amsterdam-positive patients without mismatch repair deficiency (MSS HNPCC) have certain molecular features, including global hypomethylation that distinguish them from all other colorectal cancers. These characteristics could have an important impact on tumor behavior or treatment response. Studies are underway to further assess the cause and effects of these features. PMID:20102720

  10. The effect of sequence context on the activity of cytosine DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Scott T; Brown, Tom; Fox, Keith R

    2015-12-01

    We have prepared single (N204D) and double (N204D:L272A) mutants of human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUDG), generating two cytosine DNA glycosylases (hCDG and hCYDG). Both these enzymes are able to excise cytosine (but not 5-methylcytosine), when this base is part of a mismatched base pair. hCDG is more active than the equivalent E. coli enzyme (eCYDG) and also has some activity when the cytosine is paired with guanine, unlike eCYDG. hCDG also has some activity against single stranded DNA, while having poor activity towards an unnatural base pair that forces the cytosine into an extrahelical conformation (in contrast to eCYDG for which a bulky base enhances the enzyme's activity). We also examined how sequence context affects the activity of these enzymes, determining the effect of flanking base pairs on cleavage efficiency. An abasic site or a hexaethylene glycol linker placed opposite the target cytosine, also causes an increase in activity compared with an AC mismatch. Flanking an AC mismatch with GC base pairs resulted in a 100-fold decrease in excision activity relative to flanking AT base pairs and the 5'-flanking base pair had a greater effect on the rate of cleavage. However, this effect is not simply due to the stability of the flanking base pairs as adjacent GT mismatches also produce low cleavage efficiency. PMID:26463365

  11. Repair of lesions and initiation of DNA replication in vertebrate cells. Progress report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the search for sequences in Xenopus DNA that serve as origins for replication; (2) preparation of a partial library of Xenopus genomic DNA and search for other origins; and (3) base pair mismatch correction and DNA methylation. (ACR)

  12. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA. Progress report, March 1, 1990--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  13. New Therapeutic Opportunities Based on DNA Mismatch Repair and BRAF Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Romain; Svrcek, Magali; Dreyer, Chantal; Cervera, Pascale; Duval, Alex; Pocard, Marc; Fléjou, Jean-François; de Gramont, Aimery; André, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Recently, colorectal cancer (CRC) subtyping consortium identified four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS1-4). CMS1 is enriched for deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) and BRAF (V600E) tumors. Intriguingly, this subtype has better relapse-free survival but worse overall survival after relapse compared with the other subtypes. Growing evidence is accumulating on the benefit of specific therapeutic strategies such as immune checkpoint inhibition therapy in dMMR tumors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway targeted therapy in tumors harboring BRAF (V600E) mutation. After reviewing dMMR prognostic value, immune checkpoints as major targets for dMMR carcinomas will be highlighted. Following, BRAF (V600E) prognostic impact will be reviewed and therapeutic strategies with the combination of cytotoxic agents and especially the combinations of BRAF and MAPK inhibitors will be discussed. PMID:26861657

  14. Kinetics of Mismatch Formation opposite Lesions by the Replicative DNA Polymerase from Bacteriophage RB69

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, Matthew; Rudnicki, Jean; Midkiff, John; Reha-Krantz, Linda; Doubli, Sylvie; Wallace, Susan S.

    2010-04-12

    The fidelity of DNA replication is under constant threat from the formation of lesions within the genome. Oxidation of DNA bases leads to the formation of altered DNA bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, commonly called 8-oxoG, and 2-hydroxyadenenine, or 2-OHA. In this work we have examined the incorporation kinetics opposite these two oxidatively derived lesions as well as an abasic site analogue by the replicative DNA polymerase from bacteriophage RB69. We compared the kinetic parameters for both wild type and the low fidelity L561A variant. While nucleotide incorporation rates (k{sub pol}) were generally higher for the variant, the presence of a lesion in the templating position reduced the ability of both the wild-type and variant DNA polymerases to form ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes. Thus, the L561A substitution does not significantly affect the ability of the RB69 DNA polymerase to recognize damaged DNA; instead, the mutation increases the probability that nucleotide incorporation will occur. We have also solved the crystal structure of the L561A variant forming an 8-oxoG {center_dot} dATP mispair and show that the propensity for forming this mispair depends on an enlarged polymerase active site.

  15. Conformational Interconversion of the trans-4-Hydroxynonenal-Derived (6S,8R,11S) 1,N2-Deoxyguanosine Adduct When Mismatched with Deoxyadenosine in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Wang, Hao; Lloyd, R. Stephen; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Stone, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The (6S,8R,11S) 1,N2-HNE-dG adduct of trans-4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) was incorporated into the duplex 5′-d(GCTAGCXAGTCC)-3′•5′-d(GGACTAGCTAGC)-3′ [X=(6S,8R,11S) HNE-dG], in which the lesion was mismatched opposite dA. The (6S,8R,11S) adduct maintained the ring-closed 1,N2-HNE-dG structure. This was in contrast to when this adduct was correctly paired with dC, conditions under which it underwent ring opening and re-arrangement to diastereomeric minor groove hemiacetals [Huang, H., Wang, H., Qi, N., Lloyd, R.S., Harris, T.M., Rizzo, C.J., & Stone, M.P. (2008) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 10898–10906]. The (6S,8R,11S) adduct exhibited a syn/anti conformational equilibrium about the glycosyl bond. The syn conformation was predominant in acidic solution. Structural analysis of the syn conformation revealed that X7 formed a distorted base pair with the complementary protonated A18. The HNE moiety was located in the major groove. Structural perturbations were observed at the neighbor C6•G19 and A8•T17 base pairs. At basic pH, the anti conformation of X7 was the major species. At X7 the 1,N2-HNE-dG intercalated and displaced the complementary A18 in the 5′-direction, resulting in a bulge at the X7•A18 base pair. The HNE aliphatic chain was oriented towards the minor groove. The Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of the neighboring A8•T17 base pair was also disrupted. PMID:19053179

  16. Structure of 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine - Theobromine Alternate Base Pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Callahan, Michael P.; Kabelac, Martin; Rijs, Anouk M.; deVries, Mattanjah S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structure of clusters of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine with 3,7-dimethylxanthine (theobromine) in the gas phase determined by IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in both the near-IR and mid-IR regions in combination with ab initio computations. These clusters represent potential alternate nucleobase pairs, geometrically equivalent to guanine-cytosine. We have found the four lowest energy structures, which include the Watson-Crick base pairing motif. This Watson-Crick structure has not been observed by resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) in the gas phase for the canonical DNA base pairs.

  17. Selenium compounds activate ATM-dependent DNA damage responses via the mismatch repair protein hMLH1 in colorectal cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that selenium supplementation suppresses risk of colorectal and other cancers. The majority of colorectal cancers are characterized by a defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) process. Here, we have employed the MMR-deficient HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells ...

  18. Rapid Identification of Chemoresistance Mechanisms Using Yeast DNA Mismatch Repair Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ojini, Irene; Gammie, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Resistance to cancer therapy is a major obstacle in the long-term treatment of cancer. A greater understanding of drug resistance mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent resistance from occurring. Here, we exploit the mutator phenotype of mismatch repair defective yeast cells combined with whole genome sequencing to identify drug resistance mutations in key pathways involved in the development of chemoresistance. The utility of this approach was demonstrated via the identification of the known CAN1 and TOP1 resistance targets for two compounds, canavanine and camptothecin, respectively. We have also experimentally validated the plasma membrane transporter HNM1 as the primary drug resistance target of mechlorethamine. Furthermore, the sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant strains identified inactivating mutations within IPT1, a gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In the case of bactobolin, a promising anticancer drug, the endocytosis pathway was identified as the drug resistance target responsible for conferring resistance. Finally, we show that that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor previously shown to alter the fitness of the ipt1 mutant, can effectively prevent the formation of mitoxantrone resistance. The rapid and robust nature of these techniques, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, should accelerate the identification of drug resistance targets and guide the development of novel therapeutic combination strategies to prevent the development of chemoresistance in various cancers. PMID:26199284

  19. Rapid Identification of Chemoresistance Mechanisms Using Yeast DNA Mismatch Repair Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ojini, Irene; Gammie, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to cancer therapy is a major obstacle in the long-term treatment of cancer. A greater understanding of drug resistance mechanisms will ultimately lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies to prevent resistance from occurring. Here, we exploit the mutator phenotype of mismatch repair defective yeast cells combined with whole genome sequencing to identify drug resistance mutations in key pathways involved in the development of chemoresistance. The utility of this approach was demonstrated via the identification of the known CAN1 and TOP1 resistance targets for two compounds, canavanine and camptothecin, respectively. We have also experimentally validated the plasma membrane transporter HNM1 as the primary drug resistance target of mechlorethamine. Furthermore, the sequencing of mitoxantrone-resistant strains identified inactivating mutations within IPT1, a gene encoding inositolphosphotransferase, an enzyme involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. In the case of bactobolin, a promising anticancer drug, the endocytosis pathway was identified as the drug resistance target responsible for conferring resistance. Finally, we show that that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor previously shown to alter the fitness of the ipt1 mutant, can effectively prevent the formation of mitoxantrone resistance. The rapid and robust nature of these techniques, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, should accelerate the identification of drug resistance targets and guide the development of novel therapeutic combination strategies to prevent the development of chemoresistance in various cancers. PMID:26199284

  20. Formation and Repair of Mismatches Containing Ribonucleotides and Oxidized Bases at Repeated DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Cilli, Piera; Minoprio, Anna; Bossa, Cecilia; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2015-10-23

    The cellular pool of ribonucleotide triphosphates (rNTPs) is higher than that of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates. To ensure genome stability, DNA polymerases must discriminate against rNTPs and incorporated ribonucleotides must be removed by ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). We investigated DNA polymerase β (POL β) capacity to incorporate ribonucleotides into trinucleotide repeated DNA sequences and the efficiency of base excision repair (BER) and RER enzymes (OGG1, MUTYH, and RNase H2) when presented with an incorrect sugar and an oxidized base. POL β incorporated rAMP and rCMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) and extended both mispairs. In addition, POL β was able to insert and elongate an oxidized rGMP when paired with dA. We show that RNase H2 always preserves the capacity to remove a single ribonucleotide when paired to an oxidized base or to incise an oxidized ribonucleotide in a DNA duplex. In contrast, BER activity is affected by the presence of a ribonucleotide opposite an 8-oxodG. In particular, MUTYH activity on 8-oxodG:rA mispairs is fully inhibited, although its binding capacity is retained. This results in the reduction of RNase H2 incision capability of this substrate. Thus complex mispairs formed by an oxidized base and a ribonucleotide can compromise BER and RER in repeated sequences. PMID:26338705

  1. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections. PMID:26199185

  2. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebitz, Anett S.; Hoffman, Joel C.; Grant, George W.; Billehus, Tyler M.; Pilgrim, Erik M.

    2015-07-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections.

  3. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries.

    PubMed

    Trebitz, Anett S; Hoffman, Joel C; Grant, George W; Billehus, Tyler M; Pilgrim, Erik M

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to bioassessment and non-native species monitoring. The ability to assign species identities to DNA sequences found depends on the availability of comprehensive DNA reference libraries. Here, we compile inventories for aquatic metazoans extant in or threatening to invade the Laurentian Great Lakes and examine the availability of reference mitochondrial COI DNA sequences (barcodes) in the Barcode of Life Data System for them. We found barcode libraries largely complete for extant and threatening-to-invade vertebrates (100% of reptile, 99% of fish, and 92% of amphibian species had barcodes). In contrast, barcode libraries remain poorly developed for precisely those organisms where morphological identification is most challenging; 46% of extant invertebrates lacked reference barcodes with rates especially high among rotifers, oligochaetes, and mites. Lack of species-level identification for many aquatic invertebrates also is a barrier to matching DNA sequences with physical specimens. Attaining the potential for DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples covering the breadth of aquatic fauna requires a concerted effort to build supporting barcode libraries and voucher collections. PMID:26199185

  4. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  5. A novel DNA damage response mediated by DNA mismatch repair in Caenorhabditis elegans: induction of programmed autophagic cell death in non-dividing cells

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Takahito; Kato, Yuichi; Nakamura, Chihiro; Ishikawa, Satoru; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) contributes to genome integrity by correcting errors of DNA polymerase and inducing cell death in response to DNA damage. Dysfunction of MMR results in increased mutation frequency and cancer risk. Clinical researches revealed that MMR abnormalities induce cancers of non-dividing tissues, such as kidney and liver. However, how MMR suppresses cancer in non-dividing tissues is not understood. To address that mechanism, we analyzed the roles of MMR in non-dividing cells using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), in which all somatic cells are non-dividing in the adult stage. In this study, we used stable MMR-mutant lines with a balancer chromosome. First, we confirmed that deficiency of MMR leads to resistance to various mutagens in C. elegans dividing cells. Next, we performed drug resistance assays, and found that MMR-deficient adult worms were resistant to SN1-type alkylating and oxidizing agents. In addition, dead cell staining and reporter assays of an autophagy-related gene demonstrated that the cell death was autophagic cell death. Interestingly, this autophagic cell death was not suppressed by caffeine, implying that MMR induces death of non-dividing cells in an atl-1-independent manner. Hence, we propose the hypothesis that MMR prevents cancers in non-dividing tissues by directly inducing cell death. PMID:26413217

  6. Expression of human DNA mismatch-repair protein, hMSH2, in patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Huai; Chen, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    hMSH2 is one of the human DNA mismatch repair genes that plays an important role in reducing mutations and maintaining genomic stability. The aim of the present study was to detect the expression and significance of hMSH2 protein in patients with oral lichen planus (OLP). The expression levels of hMSH2 in the OLP group (n=51) and control group with normal oral mucosa (NM; n=40) were detected using an immunohistochemical method and subsequently assessed. The positive rate of hMSH2 expression in the OLP group was 52.94%, while the rate was 80% in the control group, exhibiting a statistically significant difference (χ(2)=7.1993; P<0.05). However, the expression of hMSH2 in the OLP tissues was not shown to significantly correlate with the patient gender, age and type of OLP (P>0.05). In conclusion, the protein expression levels of hMSH2 in the OLP tissues were significantly reduced as compared with that in the NM tissues, indicating that hMSH2 plays a role in the development of OLP. Therefore, hMSH2 may be used as a biomarker for evaluating the cancer risk of patients with OLP. PMID:25452803

  7. Therapy and progression--induced O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and mismatch repair alterations in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, S; Suri, V; Sharma, M C; Sarkar, C

    2015-01-01

    Despite multimodality treatment protocol including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), most suffer from treatment failure and tumor recurrence within a few months of initial surgery. The effectiveness of temozolomide (TMZ), the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, is largely dependent on the methylation status of the promoter of the gene O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and the integrity of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. Changes in these regulatory mechanisms at the time of recurrence may influence response to therapy. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of resistance to these drugs may in future lead to improvised patient management. In this article, we provide an update of the spectrum of molecular changes that occur in recurrent GBMs, and thus may have an impact on patient survival and treatment response. For review, electronic search for the keywords "Recurrent GBM", "Recurrent GBM AND MGMT" "Recurrent glioma AND MGMT", "Recurrent GBM AND MMR" and "Recurrent glioma AND MMR", "Recurrent GBM AND MMR" and "Recurrent glioma AND MMR" was done on PubMed and relevant citations were screened including cross-references. PMID:26960480

  8. Dependence of Colorectal Cancer Risk on the Parent-of-Origin of Mutations in DNA Mismatch Repair Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Christine M.; Dowty, James G.; van Vliet, Jane L.; Smith, Letitia; Mead, Leeanne J.; Macrae, Finlay A.; St. John, D. James B.; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Velan, Gary M.; Hopper, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diseases associated with dynamic mutations in microsatellite DNA often display parent-of-origin effects (POEs) in which the risk of disease depends on the sex of the parent from whom the disease allele was inherited. Carriers of germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have high risks of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). We investigated whether these risks depend on the parent-of-origin of the mutation. We studied 422 subjects, including 89 MMR gene mutation carriers, from 17 population-based families who were each recruited via a CRC case diagnosed before age 45 years and found to carry a MMR gene mutation. The POE hazard ratio (HRPOE), defined to be the CRC incidence for carriers with maternally derived mutations divided by the corresponding paternal incidence, was estimated using a novel application of modified segregation analysis. HRPOE (95% confidence interval) was estimated to be 3.2 (1.1–9.8) for males (P=0.03) and 0.8 (0.2–2.8) for females (P=0.5) and the corresponding cumulative risks to age 80 years were 88% (54%–100%) for male carriers with maternally derived mutations and 38–48% for all other carriers. If confirmed by larger studies, these results will have important implications for the etiology of CRC and for the clinical management of MMR gene mutation carriers. PMID:21120946

  9. Dependence of colorectal cancer risk on the parent-of-origin of mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Christine M; Dowty, James G; van Vliet, Jane L; Smith, Letitia; Mead, Leeanne J; Macrae, Finlay A; St John, D James B; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Jenkins, Mark A; Velan, Gary M; Hopper, John L

    2011-02-01

    Genetic diseases associated with dynamic mutations in microsatellite DNA often display parent-of-origin effects (POEs) in which the risk of disease depends on the sex of the parent from whom the disease allele was inherited. Carriers of germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have high risks of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). We investigated whether these risks depend on the parent-of-origin of the mutation. We studied 422 subjects, including 89 MMR gene mutation carriers, from 17 population-based families who were each recruited via a CRC case diagnosed before age 45 years and found to carry a MMR gene mutation. The POE hazard ratio (HR(POE)), defined to be the CRC incidence for carriers with maternally derived mutations divided by the corresponding paternal incidence, was estimated using a novel application of modified segregation analysis. HR(POE) (95% confidence interval) was estimated to be 3.2 (1.1-9.8) for males (P = 0.03) and 0.8 (0.2-2.8) for females (P = 0.5) and the corresponding cumulative risks to age 80 years were 88% (54%-100%) for male carriers with maternally derived mutations and 38-48% for all other carriers. If confirmed by larger studies, these results will have important implications for the etiology of CRC and for the clinical management of MMR gene mutation carriers. PMID:21120946

  10. Assessment of primer/template mismatch effects on real-time PCR amplification of target taxa for GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Ghedira, Rim; Papazova, Nina; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Ruttink, Tom; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2009-10-28

    GMO quantification, based on real-time PCR, relies on the amplification of an event-specific transgene assay and a species-specific reference assay. The uniformity of the nucleotide sequences targeted by both assays across various transgenic varieties is an important prerequisite for correct quantification. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) frequently occur in the maize genome and might lead to nucleotide variation in regions used to design primers and probes for reference assays. Further, they may affect the annealing of the primer to the template and reduce the efficiency of DNA amplification. We assessed the effect of a minor DNA template modification, such as a single base pair mismatch in the primer attachment site, on real-time PCR quantification. A model system was used based on the introduction of artificial mismatches between the forward primer and the DNA template in the reference assay targeting the maize starch synthase (SSIIb) gene. The results show that the presence of a mismatch between the primer and the DNA template causes partial to complete failure of the amplification of the initial DNA template depending on the type and location of the nucleotide mismatch. With this study, we show that the presence of a primer/template mismatch affects the estimated total DNA quantity to a varying degree. PMID:19778057

  11. The poor homology stringency in the heteroduplex allows strand exchange to incorporate desirable mismatches without sacrificing recognition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Danilowicz, Claudia; Yang, Darren; Kelley, Craig; Prévost, Chantal; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. In bacteria, homology search begins after RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site, forming the presynaptic filament. Once the filament is formed, it interrogates double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). During the interrogation, bases in the dsDNA attempt to form Watson–Crick bonds with the corresponding bases in the initiating strand. Mismatch dependent instability in the base pairing in the heteroduplex strand exchange product could provide stringent recognition; however, we present experimental and theoretical results suggesting that the heteroduplex stability is insensitive to mismatches. We also present data suggesting that an initial homology test of 8 contiguous bases rejects most interactions containing more than 1/8 mismatches without forming a detectable 20 bp product. We propose that, in vivo, the sparsity of accidental sequence matches allows an initial 8 bp test to rapidly reject almost all non-homologous sequences. We speculate that once the initial test is passed, the mismatch insensitive binding in the heteroduplex allows short mismatched regions to be incorporated in otherwise homologous strand exchange products even though sequences with less homology are eventually rejected. PMID:26089391

  12. Immunohistochemistry for hMLH1 and hMSH2: a practical test for DNA mismatch repair-deficient tumors.

    PubMed

    Marcus, V A; Madlensky, L; Gryfe, R; Kim, H; So, K; Millar, A; Temple, L K; Hsieh, E; Hiruki, T; Narod, S; Bapat, B V; Gallinger, S; Redston, M

    1999-10-01

    Inactivation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair genes, most commonly human mutL homologue 1 (hMLH1) or human mutS homologue 2 (hMSH2), is a recently described alternate pathway in cancer development and progression. The resulting genetic instability is characterized by widespread somatic mutations in tumor DNA, and is termed high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Although described in a variety of tumors, mismatch repair deficiency has been studied predominantly in colorectal carcinoma. Most MSI-H colorectal carcinomas are sporadic, but some occur in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), and are associated with germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. Until now, the identification of MSI-H cancers has required molecular testing. To evaluate the role of immunohistochemistry as a new screening tool for mismatch repair-deficient neoplasms, the authors studied the expression of hMLH1 and hMSH2, using commercially available monoclonal antibodies, in 72 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors that had been tested previously for microsatellite instability. They compared immunohistochemical patterns of 38 MSI-H neoplasms, including 16 cases from HNPCC patients with known germline mutations in hMLH1 or hMSH2, with 34 neoplasms that did not show microsatellite instability. Thirty-seven of 38 MSI-H neoplasms were predicted to have a mismatch repair gene defect, as demonstrated by the absence of hMLH1 and/or hMSH2 expression. This included correspondence with all 16 cases with germline mutations. All 34 microsatellite-stable cancers had intact staining with both antibodies. These findings clearly demonstrate that immunohistochemistry can discriminate accurately between MSI-H and microsatellite-stable tumors, providing a practical new technique with important clinical and research applications. PMID:10524526

  13. Choline Ions Stabilize A-T Base Pairs by Fitting into Minor Groove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Miki; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Tanaka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Naoki

    In a Watson-Crick base paired DNA duplex, G-C base pairs are more stable than A-T base pairs. However, in solvent containing choline ions, the stabilities of these base pairs are reversed. To elucidate the mechanism through which choline ions exert this effect from a microscopic viewpoint, we performed molecular dynamics simulations. We found that choline ions interact with a DNA duplex through multiple hydrogen bonds. The affinity of choline ion for the minor groove of A-T base pairs was higher than that for the major groove. The binding of choline ions to the minor groove of A-T base pairs supports groove formation without disturbing the formation of hydrogen bonds between the base pairs. In contrast, choline ions inhibit the formation of hydrogen bonds between G-C base pairs by binding to atoms of these bases that are involved in Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding. These findings will help us understand the stabilities of canonical DNA structures under the crowded conditions inside cells.

  14. DNA Mismatch Repair Interacts with CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent Histone (H3-H4)2 Tetramer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodriges Blanko, Elena; Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y; Kadyrov, Farid A

    2016-04-22

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is required for the maintenance of genome stability and protection of humans from several types of cancer. Human MMR occurs in the chromatin environment, but little is known about the interactions between MMR and the chromatin environment. Previous research has suggested that MMR coincides with replication-coupled assembly of the newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes. The first step in replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is CAF-1-dependent histone (H3-H4)2 tetramer deposition, a process that involves ASF1A-H3-H4 complex. In this work we used reconstituted human systems to investigate interactions between MMR and CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent histone (H3-H4)2 tetramer deposition. We have found that MutSα inhibits CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent packaging of a DNA mismatch into a tetrasome. This finding supports the idea that MMR occurs before the DNA mismatch is packaged into the tetrasome. Our experiments have also revealed that CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent deposition of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramers does not interfere with MMR reactions. In addition, we have established that unnecessary degradation of the discontinuous strand that takes place in both DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ)- and DNA polymerase ϵ (Pol ϵ)-dependent MMR reactions is suppressed by CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent deposition of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramers. These data suggest that CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent deposition of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramers is compatible with MMR and protects the discontinuous daughter strand from unnecessary degradation by MMR machinery. PMID:26945061

  15. Reduction of DNA mismatch repair protein expression in airway epithelial cells of premenopausal women chronically exposed to biomass smoke.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bidisha; Dutta, Anindita; Chowdhury, Saswati; Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of indoor air pollution in rural India. This study examined whether chronic inhalation of biomass smoke causes change in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway in the airway cells. For this, airway cells exfoliated in sputum were collected from 72 premenopausal nonsmoking rural women (median age 34 years) who cooked with biomass (wood, dung, crop residues) and 68 control women who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for the past 5 years or more. The levels of particulate matters with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) in indoor air were measured by real-time aerosol monitor. Benzene exposure was monitored by measuring trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in airway cells were measured by flow cytometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. Immunocytochemical assay revealed lower percentage of airway epithelial cells expressing MMR proteins mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2) in biomass-using women compared to LPG-using controls. Women who cooked with biomass had 6.7 times higher level of urinary t,t-MA, twofold increase in ROS generation, and 31 % depletion of SOD. Indoor air of biomass-using households had three times more particulate matters than that of controls. ROS, urinary t,t-MA, and particulate pollution in biomass-using kitchen had negative correlation, while SOD showed positive correlation with MSH2 and MLH1 expression. It appears that chronic exposure to biomass smoke reduces MMR response in airway epithelial cells, and oxidative stress plays an important role in the process. PMID:24146321

  16. Expression of hMSH2 protein of the human DNA mismatch repair system in oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease of inflammatory nature and unknown etiology. It is characterized by a cell-mediated immunological response to induced antigenic change in skin and/or mucosa. The possible malignant transformation of lichen planus remains a subject of controversial discussions in the literature. hMSH2 is one of the human DNA mismatch repair (hMMR) genes and it plays an important role in reducing mutation and maintaining genomic stability. hMSH2 alterations have been reported in oral squamous cell carcinoma and there are evidences suggesting the association between oral lichen planus and squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we aim to investigate the immunolocalization of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus compared to oral normal mucosa epithelium. We examined the expression of hMSH2 protein by immunohistochemistry in twenty-six cases of oral lichen planus. Clinically, 12 of them were categorized into reticular subtype and 14 were atrophic/erosive. Ten cases of normal mucosa were added to the control group. Results showed that the percentage of positive cells to hMSH2 was smaller in reticular (46.54%; p=0,006) and atrophic/erosive (48.79%; p=0,028) subtypes of oral lichen planus compared to normal mucosa (61.29%). The reduced expression of hMSH2 protein in oral lichen planus suggests that this lesion is more susceptible to mutation and therefore facilitate the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:15912193

  17. Mutation rates, spectra, and genome-wide distribution of spontaneous mutations in mismatch repair deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gregory I; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E

    2013-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  18. Structural, molecular and cellular functions of MSH2 and MSH6 during DNA mismatch repair, damage signaling and other noncanonical activities

    PubMed Central

    Edelbrock, Michael A.; Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan; Williams, Kandace J.

    2013-01-01

    The field of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) has rapidly expanded after the discovery of the MutHLS repair system in bacteria. By the mid 1990s yeast and human homologues to bacterial MutL and MutS had been identified and their contribution to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome) was under intense investigation. The human MutS homologue 6 protein (hMSH6), was first reported in 1995 as a G:T binding partner (GTBP) of hMSH2, forming the hMutSα mismatch-binding complex. Signal transduction from each DNA-bound hMutSα complex is accomplished by the hMutLα heterodimer (hMLH1 and hPMS2). Molecular mechanisms and cellular regulation of individual MMR proteins are now areas of intensive research. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms associated with mismatch binding, as well as emerging evidence that MutSα and in particular, MSH6, is a key protein in MMR-dependent DNA damage response and communication with other DNA repair pathways within the cell. MSH6 is unstable in the absence of MSH2, however it is the DNA lesion-binding partner of this heterodimer. MSH6, but not MSH2, has a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif that recognizes and binds several different DNA structural distortions, initiating different cellular responses. hMSH6 also contains the nuclear localization sequences required to shuttle hMutSα into the nucleus. For example, upon binding to O6meG:T, MSH6 triggers a DNA damage response that involves altered phosphorylation within the N-terminal disordered domain of this unique protein. While many investigations have focused on MMR as a post-replication DNA repair mechanism, MMR proteins are expressed and active in all phases of the cell cycle. There is much more to be discovered about regulatory cellular roles that require the presence of MutSα and, in particular, MSH6. PMID:23391514

  19. The 6-thioguanine/5-methyl-2-pyrimidinone base pair.

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, H P

    1988-01-01

    As part of a program to determine the physical possibility of expanding the number of types of base pairs in DNA, the pairing stabilities of the analog bases 6-thioguanine (GS) and 5-methyl-2-pyrimidinone (TH) in oligodeoxynucleotides were measured. Procedures were developed to synthesize oligodeoxynucleotides with the analog bases. The sequences of the synthesized oligomers were T-C-G-A-C-G-G-X-Y-C-C-G. An enzymatic procedure was developed to measure relative association constants of oligomer pairs with the self complementary reference oligomer, X = A and Y = T, K(T/A) = K. The results were K(C/G) = (5 +/- .5)K, K(TH/GS) = K/(1 +/- .5), K(T/G) = K/(9 +/- 3), K(TH/G) = K/(25 +/- 5), K(C/GS) less than K/30, K(TH/A) less than K/40, K(T/GS) less than K/40, K(C/A) less than K/40. The results with the standard bases are consistent with other methods of measurement. The stability of the base pair GS/TH is approximately the same as the standard base pair A/T. PMID:3412886

  20. Femtosecond molecular dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douhal, A.; Kim, S. K.; Zewail, A. H.

    1995-11-01

    HYDROGEN bonds commonly lend robustness and directionality to molecular recognition processes and supramolecular structures1,2. In particular, the two or three hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick base pairs bind the double-stranded DNA helix and determine the complementarity of the pairing. Watson and Crick pointed out3, however, that the possible tautomers of base pairs, in which hydrogen atoms become attached to the donor atom of the hydrogen bond, might disturb the genetic code, as the tautomer is capable of pairing with different partners. But the dynamics of hydrogen bonds in general, and of this tautomerization process in particular, are not well understood. Here we report observations of the femtosecond dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs (7-azaindole dimers) containing two hydrogen bonds. Because of the femtosecond resolution of proton motions, we are able to examine the cooperativity of formation of the tautomer (in which the protons on each base are shifted sequentially to the other base), and to determine the characteristic timescales of the motions in a solvent-free environment. We find that the first step occurs on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds, whereas the second step, to form the full tautomer, is much slower, taking place within several picoseconds; the timescales are changed significantly by replacing hydrogen with deuterium. These results establish the molecular basis of the dynamics and the role of quantum tunnelling.

  1. Non-Watson-Crick base pairing in RNA. quantum chemical analysis of the cis Watson-Crick/sugar edge base pair family.

    PubMed

    Sponer, Judit E; Spacková, Nad'a; Kulhanek, Petr; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Sponer, Jirí

    2005-03-17

    Large RNA molecules exhibit an astonishing variability of base-pairing patterns, while many of the RNA base-pairing families have no counterparts in DNA. The cis Watson-Crick/sugar edge (cis WC/SE) RNA base pairing is investigated by ab initio quantum chemical calculations. A detailed structural and energetic characterization of all 13 crystallographically detected members of this family is provided by means of B3LYP/6-31G and RIMP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations. Further, a prediction is made for the remaining 3 cis WC/SE base pairs which are yet to be seen in the experiments. The interaction energy calculations point at the key role of the 2'-OH group in stabilizing the sugar-base contact and predict all 16 cis WC/SE base-pairing patterns to be nearly isoenergetic. The perfect correlation of the main geometrical parameters in the gas-phase optimized and X-ray structures shows that the principle of isosteric substitutions in RNA is rooted from the intrinsic structural similarity of the isolated base pairs. The present quantum chemical calculations for the first time analyze base pairs involving the ribose 2'-OH group and unambiguously correlate the structural information known from experiments with the energetics of interactions. The calculations further show that the relative importance and absolute value of the dispersion energy in the cis WC/SE base pairs are enhanced compared to the standard base pairs. This may by an important factor contributing to the strength of such interactions when RNA folds in its polar environment. The calculations further demonstrate that the Cornell et al. force field commonly used in molecular modeling and simulations provides satisfactory performance for this type of RNA interactions. PMID:16838999

  2. Structural Implications of Homopyrimidine Base Pairs in the Parallel-Stranded d(YGA) Motif.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Paukstelis, Paul J

    2016-06-16

    DNA can adopt many other structures beyond the canonical B-form double helix. These alternative DNA structures have become increasingly significant as new biological roles are found for them. Additionally, there has been a growing interest in using non-canonical base pairs to provide structural diversity for designing DNA architectures for nanotechnology applications. We recently described the crystal structure of d(ACTCGGATGAT), which forms a tetraplex through parallel-stranded homo-base pairs and nucleobase intercalation. The homoduplex region contains a d(YGA⋅YGA) motif observed in crystal and solution structures. Here, we examine the structural implications of the homopyrimidine base pair within this motif. We determined crystal structures of two variants that differ from the original structure in the homopyrimidine base pairs and number of d(YGA) motifs. Our results show that the intercalation-locked tetraplex motif is predictable in these different sequence contexts and that substituting C⋅C base pairs for T⋅T base pairs introduces asymmetry to the homoduplex. These results have important implications for utilizing d(YGA) motifs in DNA crystal design and could provide a basis for understanding how local structures could be associated with repeat expansions. PMID:26629965

  3. Effect of single mismatches at 3′–end of primers on polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Simsek, M; Adnan, H

    2000-01-01

    Objective and Method To investigate the effect of three different mismatches (G/T, G/A or G/G) at the 3′–end of a primer to amplify a 268 bp (base pair) region of the human β–globin gene using different annealing temperatures (45 to 65°C). Results The primer with the G/T mismatch was as efficient as the normal primer (G/C match) in the amplification of a 268 bp product at all temperatures tested. However, the primers having G/A or G/G mismatches at the 3′-end did not produce any specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment at all the annealing temperatures used, except a barely detectable 268 bp product for the G/G mismatch at 45 and 50°C. Conclusion We conclude that our PCR system was refractory to amplification when one of the primers contained a G/A or G/G mismatch at the 3′–end with template DNA. PMID:24019700

  4. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, John K; Okely, Ewa A; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K; Leach, David R F

    2010-12-28

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  5. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  6. The Kub5-Hera/RPRD1B interactome: a novel role in preserving genetic stability by regulating DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Patidar, Praveen L.; Motea, Edward A.; Fattah, Farjana J.; Zhou, Yunyun; Morales, Julio C.; Xie, Yang; Garner, Harold R.; Boothman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Ku70-binding protein 5 (Kub5)-Hera (K-H)/RPRD1B maintains genetic integrity by concomitantly minimizing persistent R-loops and promoting repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We used tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, co-immunoprecipitation and gel-filtration chromatography to define higher-order protein complexes containing K-H scaffolding protein to gain insight into its cellular functions. We confirmed known protein partners (Ku70, RNA Pol II, p15RS) and discovered several novel associated proteins that function in RNA metabolism (Topoisomerase 1 and RNA helicases), DNA repair/replication processes (PARP1, MSH2, Ku, DNA-PKcs, MCM proteins, PCNA and DNA Pol δ) and in protein metabolic processes, including translation. Notably, this approach directed us to investigate an unpredicted involvement of K-H in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) where K-H depletion led to concomitant MMR deficiency and compromised global microsatellite stability. Mechanistically, MMR deficiency in K-H-depleted cells was a consequence of reduced stability of the core MMR proteins (MLH1 and PMS2) caused by elevated basal caspase-dependent proteolysis. Pan-caspase inhibitor treatment restored MMR protein loss. These findings represent a novel mechanism to acquire MMR deficiency/microsatellite alterations. A significant proportion of colon, endometrial and ovarian cancers exhibit k-h expression/copy number loss and may have severe mutator phenotypes with enhanced malignancies that are currently overlooked based on sporadic MSI+ screening. PMID:26819409

  7. The Kub5-Hera/RPRD1B interactome: a novel role in preserving genetic stability by regulating DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Praveen L; Motea, Edward A; Fattah, Farjana J; Zhou, Yunyun; Morales, Julio C; Xie, Yang; Garner, Harold R; Boothman, David A

    2016-02-29

    Ku70-binding protein 5 (Kub5)-Hera (K-H)/RPRD1B maintains genetic integrity by concomitantly minimizing persistent R-loops and promoting repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We used tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, co-immunoprecipitation and gel-filtration chromatography to define higher-order protein complexes containing K-H scaffolding protein to gain insight into its cellular functions. We confirmed known protein partners (Ku70, RNA Pol II, p15RS) and discovered several novel associated proteins that function in RNA metabolism (Topoisomerase 1 and RNA helicases), DNA repair/replication processes (PARP1, MSH2, Ku, DNA-PKcs, MCM proteins, PCNA and DNA Pol δ) and in protein metabolic processes, including translation. Notably, this approach directed us to investigate an unpredicted involvement of K-H in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) where K-H depletion led to concomitant MMR deficiency and compromised global microsatellite stability. Mechanistically, MMR deficiency in K-H-depleted cells was a consequence of reduced stability of the core MMR proteins (MLH1 and PMS2) caused by elevated basal caspase-dependent proteolysis. Pan-caspase inhibitor treatment restored MMR protein loss. These findings represent a novel mechanism to acquire MMR deficiency/microsatellite alterations. A significant proportion of colon, endometrial and ovarian cancers exhibit k-h expression/copy number loss and may have severe mutator phenotypes with enhanced malignancies that are currently overlooked based on sporadic MSI+ screening. PMID:26819409

  8. Genome filtering using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes with six-base pair recognition sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large fraction of repetitive DNA in many plant genomes has complicated all aspects of DNA sequencing and assembly, and thus techniques that enrich for genes and low-copy sequences have been employed to isolate gene space. Methyl sensitive restriction enzymes with six base pair recognition sites...

  9. DNA sensor's selectivity enhancement and protection from contaminating nucleases due to a hydrated ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Pramanik, Smritimoy; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-07-01

    The thermodynamic stability of certain mismatched base pairs has made the development of DNA sequence sensing systems challenging. Thus, the stability of fully matched and mismatched DNA oligonucleotides in the hydrated ionic liquid choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) was investigated. Mismatched base pairs were significantly destabilized in choline dhp relative to those in aqueous buffer. A molecular beacon that forms a triplex with a conserved HIV-1 sequence was then designed and tested in choline dhp. The molecular beacon specifically detected the target duplex via triplex formation at concentrations as low as 1 pmol per 10 μL with 10,000-fold sequence selectivity. Moreover, the molecular beacon was protected from a contaminating nuclease in choline dhp, and DNAs in aqueous solutions were not sufficiently stable for practical use. PMID:25919083

  10. Comparable Stability of Hoogsteen and Watson–Crick Base Pairs in Ionic Liquid Choline Dihydrogen Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Miki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson–Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson–Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs was found to be comparable with that of Watson–Crick base pairs in the hydrated IL. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA triplex in the presence of choline ions revealed that the DNA triplex was stabilized because of the binding of choline ion around the third strand in the grooves. Our finding will facilitate the development of new DNA materials. Our data also indicate that triplex formation may be stabilized inside cells where choline ions and their derivatives are abundant in vivo. PMID:24399194

  11. Comparable stability of Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs in ionic liquid choline dihydrogen phosphate.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Miki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson-Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson-Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs was found to be comparable with that of Watson-Crick base pairs in the hydrated IL. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA triplex in the presence of choline ions revealed that the DNA triplex was stabilized because of the binding of choline ion around the third strand in the grooves. Our finding will facilitate the development of new DNA materials. Our data also indicate that triplex formation may be stabilized inside cells where choline ions and their derivatives are abundant in vivo. PMID:24399194

  12. The Structure of a High Fidelity DNA Polymerase Bound to a Mismatched Nucleotide Reveals an ;Ajar; Intermediate Conformation in the Nucleotide Selection Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Eugene Y.; Beese, Lorena S.

    2011-10-10

    To achieve accurate DNA synthesis, DNA polymerases must rapidly sample and discriminate against incorrect nucleotides. Here we report the crystal structure of a high fidelity DNA polymerase I bound to DNA primer-template caught in the act of binding a mismatched (dG:dTTP) nucleoside triphosphate. The polymerase adopts a conformation in between the previously established 'open' and 'closed' states. In this 'ajar' conformation, the template base has moved into the insertion site but misaligns an incorrect nucleotide relative to the primer terminus. The displacement of a conserved active site tyrosine in the insertion site by the template base is accommodated by a distinctive kink in the polymerase O helix, resulting in a partially open ternary complex. We suggest that the ajar conformation allows the template to probe incoming nucleotides for complementarity before closure of the enzyme around the substrate. Based on solution fluorescence, kinetics, and crystallographic analyses of wild-type and mutant polymerases reported here, we present a three-state reaction pathway in which nucleotides either pass through this intermediate conformation to the closed conformation and catalysis or are misaligned within the intermediate, leading to destabilization of the closed conformation.

  13. An essential non-Watson-Crick base pair motif in 3'UTR to mediate selenoprotein translation.

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, R; Carbon, P; Krol, A

    1998-01-01

    The SECIS element is an RNA hairpin in the 3'UTR of selenoprotein mRNAs required for decoding UGA selenocysteine codons. Our experimentally derived 2D structure model for the SECIS RNA revealed the conservation of four consecutive non-Watson-Crick base pairs, with a central G.A/A.G tandem. The present study was dedicated to gaining insight into the role of this quartet of base pairs. The effects of mutations introduced into the SECIS quartet of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) cDNA, an enzyme with selenocysteine in its active center, were reported in vivo by the GPx activity. The detrimental consequence of an all-Watson-Crick mutant quartet disclosed the paramount importance of the non-Watson-Crick base pairs for GPx activity. Next, structure probing established that base pair changes in the central G.A/A.G tandem, predicted by the model to be structurally unfavorable, effectively led to local opening of the helix at the quartet. A concomitant abolition of GPx activity was observed, arising from translational impairment of full-length GPx. In contrast, an isosteric base pair replacement in the tandem did not affect base pairing in the quartet, leading to an almost wt GPx activity. Collectively, the data provided conclusive evidence for the functional relevance of these non-Watson-Crick base pairs in vivo, thus identifying a noncanonical RNA motif crucial to SECIS function in mediating selenoprotein translation. Within the quartet, the prominent requirement for the central G.A/A.G tandem is highlighted, our previous structural model and the mutagenesis data presented here strongly arguing in favor of a sheared arrangement for the G.A base pairs. The SECIS RNA is therefore another member to be added to the growing list of RNAs containing building blocks of non-Watson-Crick base pairs, required for structure and/or function. PMID:9436910

  14. Base pairing properties of O/sup 6/-methylguanine

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.D.; Shaw, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    Alkyl adducts at the O/sup 6/ position of guanine are understood to be particularly important in the process of mutagenesis. The hydrogen bonding interactions of O/sup 6/-methylguanine (O/sup 6/MeG) with potential base complements in chloroform-d have been investigated by /sup 1/H NMR. For these studies, the authors have employed nucleosides with ribose hydroxyls blocked by triisopropylsilyl groups. The authors have seen that O/sup 6/MeG forms a mispair with thymine (T). However, only under certain circumstances does O/sup 6/MeG interact with cytosine (C). Although no observable interaction occurs between unprotonated C and O/sup 6/MeG, protonated C does base pair with O/sup 6/MeG. Assuming that RNA and DNA polymerases incorporate the physiologically predominant (unionized) form of each base, which may then be protonated, the data accounts both for the coding preference of O/sup 6/MeG for T and for the relatively high stability of the O/sup 6/MeG:C base pair in oligonucleotides.

  15. Self-assembly of cholesterol DNA at liquid crystal/aqueous interface and its application for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Siok Lian; Hartono, Deny; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2009-10-01

    In this letter, we report a strategy of detecting the DNA targets by using a thin layer of self-assembled cholesterol-labeled DNA probes at the liquid crystal (LC)/aqueous interface. When the system is exposed to 51 μg/ml of complementary DNA targets, the optical appearance of LC shows a continuous change from dark to bright under the crossed polars within 15 min. No obvious change can be observed when the system is exposed to one or two base-pair mismatch DNA targets. This system provides a principle for label-free and real-time detection of DNA targets without any fluorescent labeling.

  16. Tumor Mismatch Repair Immunohistochemistry and DNA MLH1 Methylation Testing of Patients With Endometrial Cancer Diagnosed at Age Younger Than 60 Years Optimizes Triage for Population-Level Germline Mismatch Repair Gene Mutation Testing

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Daniel D.; Tan, Yen Y.; Walsh, Michael D.; Clendenning, Mark; Metcalf, Alexander M.; Ferguson, Kaltin; Arnold, Sven T.; Thompson, Bryony A.; Lose, Felicity A.; Parsons, Michael T.; Walters, Rhiannon J.; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Cummings, Margaret; Oehler, Martin K.; Blomfield, Penelope B.; Quinn, Michael A.; Kirk, Judy A.; Stewart, Colin J.; Obermair, Andreas; Young, Joanne P.; Webb, Penelope M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinicopathologic data from a population-based endometrial cancer cohort, unselected for age or family history, were analyzed to determine the optimal scheme for identification of patients with germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Patients and Methods Endometrial cancers from 702 patients recruited into the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study (ANECS) were tested for MMR protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and for MLH1 gene promoter methylation in MLH1-deficient cases. MMR mutation testing was performed on germline DNA of patients with MMR-protein deficient tumors. Prediction of germline mutation status was compared for combinations of tumor characteristics, age at diagnosis, and various clinical criteria (Amsterdam, Bethesda, Society of Gynecologic Oncology, ANECS). Results Tumor MMR-protein deficiency was detected in 170 (24%) of 702 cases. Germline testing of 158 MMR-deficient cases identified 22 truncating mutations (3% of all cases) and four unclassified variants. Tumor MLH1 methylation was detected in 99 (89%) of 111 cases demonstrating MLH1/PMS2 IHC loss; all were germline MLH1 mutation negative. A combination of MMR IHC plus MLH1 methylation testing in women younger than 60 years of age at diagnosis provided the highest positive predictive value for the identification of mutation carriers at 46% versus ≤ 41% for any other criteria considered. Conclusion Population-level identification of patients with MMR mutation-positive endometrial cancer is optimized by stepwise testing for tumor MMR IHC loss in patients younger than 60 years, tumor MLH1 methylation in individuals with MLH1 IHC loss, and germline mutations in patients exhibiting loss of MSH6, MSH2, or PMS2 or loss of MLH1/PMS2 with absence of MLH1 methylation. PMID:24323032

  17. Altered minor-groove hydrogen bonds in DNA block transcription elongation by T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Tanasova, Marina; Goeldi, Silvan; Meyer, Fabian; Hanawalt, Philip C; Spivak, Graciela; Sturla, Shana J

    2015-05-26

    DNA transcription depends upon the highly efficient and selective function of RNA polymerases (RNAPs). Modifications in the template DNA can impact the progression of RNA synthesis, and a number of DNA adducts, as well as abasic sites, arrest or stall transcription. Nonetheless, data are needed to understand why certain modifications to the structure of DNA bases stall RNA polymerases while others are efficiently bypassed. In this study, we evaluate the impact that alterations in dNTP/rNTP base-pair geometry have on transcription. T7 RNA polymerase was used to study transcription over modified purines and pyrimidines with altered H-bonding capacities. The results suggest that introducing wobble base-pairs into the DNA:RNA heteroduplex interferes with transcriptional elongation and stalls RNA polymerase. However, transcriptional stalling is not observed if mismatched base-pairs do not H-bond. Together, these studies show that RNAP is able to discriminate mismatches resulting in wobble base-pairs, and suggest that, in cases of modifications with minor steric impact, DNA:RNA heteroduplex geometry could serve as a controlling factor for initiating transcription-coupled DNA repair. PMID:25881991

  18. Base pair analogs in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, Joseph R; Pratt, David W

    2003-11-25

    A rotationally resolved electronic spectrum of the gas-phase dimer 2-aminopyridine.2-pyridone, an analog of the adenine.thymine base pair, has been observed and assigned, leading to precise measurements of its moments of inertia and preliminary determinations of its structure. A Watson-Crick configuration results, with N...H-N and N-H...O hydrogen bond lengths of 2.898 and 2.810 A, respectively. The two bases are found not to be coplanar; a dihedral angle of 6.1 degrees between the base planes is also estimated from the measured moments of inertia. Possible chemical and biological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:14612563

  19. Looped out and perpendicular: deformation of Watson-Crick base pair associated with actinomycin D binding.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chen, Fu-Ming

    2002-05-14

    Many anticancer drugs interact directly with DNA to exert their biological functions. To date, all noncovalent, intercalating drugs interact with DNA exclusively by inserting their chromophores into base steps to form elongated and unwound duplex structures without disrupting the flanking base pairs. By using actinomycin D (ActD)-5'-GXC/CYG-5' complexes as examples, we have found a rather unusual interaction mode for the intercalated drug; the central Watson-Crick X/Y base pairs are looped out and displaced by the ActD chromophore. The looped-out bases are not disordered but interact perpendicularly with the base/chromophore and form specific H bonds with DNA. Such a complex structure provides intriguing insights into how ligand interacts with DNA and enlarges the repertoires for sequence-specific DNA recognition. PMID:12011426

  20. Looped out and perpendicular: Deformation of Watson–Crick base pair associated with actinomycin D binding

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chen, Fu-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs interact directly with DNA to exert their biological functions. To date, all noncovalent, intercalating drugs interact with DNA exclusively by inserting their chromophores into base steps to form elongated and unwound duplex structures without disrupting the flanking base pairs. By using actinomycin D (ActD)-5′-GXC/CYG-5′ complexes as examples, we have found a rather unusual interaction mode for the intercalated drug; the central Watson–Crick X/Y base pairs are looped out and displaced by the ActD chromophore. The looped-out bases are not disordered but interact perpendicularly with the base/chromophore and form specific H bonds with DNA. Such a complex structure provides intriguing insights into how ligand interacts with DNA and enlarges the repertoires for sequence-specific DNA recognition. PMID:12011426

  1. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  2. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair.

    PubMed

    Gao, K; Orgel, L E

    1999-12-21

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure. PMID:10611299

  3. High Fidelity of Base Paring by 2-Selenothymidine in DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, A.; Sheng, J; Zhang, W; Huang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The base pairs are the contributors to the sequence-dependent recognition of nucleic acids, genetic information storage, and high fidelity of DNA polymerase replication. However, the wobble base pairing, where T pairs with G instead of A, reduces specific base-pairing recognition and compromises the high fidelity of the enzymatic polymerization. Via the selenium atomic probing at the 2-position of thymidine, we have investigated the wobble discrimination by manipulating the steric and electronic effects at the 2-exo position, providing a unique chemical strategy to enhance the base pair specificity. We report here the first synthesis of the novel 2-Se-thymidine ({sup Se}T) derivative, its phosphoramidite, and the Se-DNAs. Our biophysical and structural studies of the 2-Se-T DNAs reveal that the bulky 2-Se atom with a weak hydrogen-bonding ability can largely increase mismatch discriminations (including T/G wobble and T/C mismatched base pairs) while maintaining the {sup Se}T/A virtually identical to the native T/A base pair. The 2-Se atom bulkiness and the electronic effect are probably the main factors responsible for the discrimination against the formation of the wobble {sup Se}T/G base pair. Our investigations provide a potential novel tool to investigate the specific recognition of base pairs, which is the basis of high fidelity during replication, transcription, and translation. Furthermore, this Se-atom-specific substitution and probing are useful for X-ray crystal structure and function studies of nucleic acids.

  4. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: Unusual DNA duplex and hairpin motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2003-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA or double-stranded DNA has the potential to adopt a wide variety of unusual duplex and hairpin motifs in the presence (trans) or absence (cis) of ligands. Several principles for the formation of those unusual structures have been established through the observation of a number of recurring structural motifs associated with different sequences. These include: (i) internal loops of consecutive mismatches can occur in a B-DNA duplex when sheared base pairs are adjacent to each other to confer extensive cross- and intra-strand base stacking; (ii) interdigitated (zipper-like) duplex structures form instead when sheared G·A base pairs are separated by one or two pairs of purine·purine mismatches; (iii) stacking is not restricted to base, deoxyribose also exhibits the potential to do so; (iv) canonical G·C or A·T base pairs are flexible enough to exhibit considerable changes from the regular H-bonded conformation. The paired bases become stacked when bracketed by sheared G·A base pairs, or become extruded out and perpendicular to their neighboring bases in the presence of interacting drugs; (v) the purine-rich and pyrimidine-rich loop structures are notably different in nature. The purine-rich loops form compact triloop structures closed by a sheared G·A, A·A, A·C or sheared-like Ganti·Csyn base pair that is stacked by a single residue. On the other hand, the pyrimidine-rich loops with a thymidine in the first position exhibit no base pairing but are characterized by the folding of the thymidine residue into the minor groove to form a compact loop structure. Identification of such diverse duplex or hairpin motifs greatly enlarges the repertoire for unusual DNA structural formation. PMID:12736295

  5. Differential Stabilities and Sequence-Dependent Base Pair Opening Dynamics of Watson–Crick Base Pairs with 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-Formylcytosine, or 5-Carboxylcytosine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) form during active demethylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and are implicated in epigenetic regulation of the genome. They are differentially processed by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), an enzyme involved in active demethylation of 5mC. Three modified Dickerson–Drew dodecamer (DDD) sequences, amenable to crystallographic and spectroscopic analyses and containing the 5′-CG-3′ sequence associated with genomic cytosine methylation, containing 5hmC, 5fC, or 5caC placed site-specifically into the 5′-T8X9G10-3′ sequence of the DDD, were compared. The presence of 5caC at the X9 base increased the stability of the DDD, whereas 5hmC or 5fC did not. Both 5hmC and 5fC increased imino proton exchange rates and calculated rate constants for base pair opening at the neighboring base pair A5:T8, whereas 5caC did not. At the oxidized base pair G4:X9, 5fC exhibited an increase in the imino proton exchange rate and the calculated kop. In all cases, minimal effects to imino proton exchange rates occurred at the neighboring base pair C3:G10. No evidence was observed for imino tautomerization, accompanied by wobble base pairing, for 5hmC, 5fC, or 5caC when positioned at base pair G4:X9; each favored Watson–Crick base pairing. However, both 5fC and 5caC exhibited intranucleobase hydrogen bonding between their formyl or carboxyl oxygens, respectively, and the adjacent cytosine N4 exocyclic amines. The lesion-specific differences observed in the DDD may be implicated in recognition of 5hmC, 5fC, or 5caC in DNA by TDG. However, they do not correlate with differential excision of 5hmC, 5fC, or 5caC by TDG, which may be mediated by differences in transition states of the enzyme-bound complexes. PMID:25632825

  6. Base Pair Opening in a Deoxynucleotide Duplex Containing a cis-syn Thymine Cyclobutane Dimer Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Wenke, Belinda B.; Huiting, Leah N.; Frankel, Elisa B.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Núñez, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    The cis-syn thymine cyclobutane dimer is a DNA photoproduct implicated in skin cancer. We compared the stability of individual base pairs in thymine dimer-containing duplexes to undamaged parent 10-mer duplexes. UV melting thermodynamic measurements, CD spectroscopy, and 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy confirm that the thymine dimer lesion is locally and moderately destabilizing within an overall B-form duplex conformation. We measured the rates of exchange of individual imino protons by NMR using magnetization transfer from water and determined the equilibrium constant for the opening of each base pair Kop. In the normal duplex Kop decreases from the frayed ends of the duplex toward the center, such that the central TA pair is the most stable with a Kop of 8×10−7. In contrast, base pair opening at the 5’T of the thymine dimer is facile. The 5’T of the dimer has the largest equilibrium constant (Kop =3×10−4) in its duplex, considerably larger than even the frayed penultimate base pairs. Notably, base pairing by the 3’T of the dimer is much more stable than by the 5’T, indicating that the predominant opening mechanism for the thymine dimer lesion is not likely to be flipping out into solution as a single unit. The dimer asymmetrically affects the stability of the duplex in its vicinity, destabilizing base pairing on its 5’ side more than on the 3’ side. The striking differences in base pair opening between parent and dimer duplexes occur independently of the duplex-single strand melting transitions. PMID:24328089

  7. Single and double stranded DNA detection using locked nucleic acid (LNA) functionalized nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Fiona; Stokes, Robert; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2008-08-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides can be used for the detection of specific sequences of DNA. We show that gold nanoparticles modified with locked nucleic acid (LNA) form stronger duplexes with a single stranded DNA target and offer better discrimination against single base pair mismatches than analogous DNA probes. Our LNA nanoparticle probes have also been used to detect double stranded DNA through triplex formation, whilst still maintaining selectivity for only complementary targets. Nanoparticle conjugates embedded with suitable surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) labels have been synthesized enabling simultaneous detection and identification of multiple DNA targets.

  8. ssDNA Pairing Accuracy Increases When Abasic Sites Divide Nucleotides into Small Groups

    PubMed Central

    Peacock-Villada, Alexandra; Coljee, Vincent; Danilowicz, Claudia; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Accurate sequence dependent pairing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules plays an important role in gene chips, DNA origami, and polymerase chain reactions. In many assays accurate pairing depends on mismatched sequences melting at lower temperatures than matched sequences; however, for sequences longer than ~10 nucleotides, single mismatches and correct matches have melting temperature differences of less than 3°C. We demonstrate that appropriately grouping of 35 bases in ssDNA using abasic sites increases the difference between the melting temperature of correct bases and the melting temperature of mismatched base pairings. Importantly, in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites mismatches near one end of a long dsDNA destabilize the annealing at the other end much more effectively than in systems without the abasic sites, suggesting that the dsDNA melts more uniformly in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites. In sum, the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites allows temperature to more accurately discriminate correct base pairings from incorrect ones. PMID:26115175

  9. Identification of signature and primers specific to genus Pseudomonas using mismatched patterns of 16S rDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, HJ; Raje, DV; Kapley, A

    2003-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas, a soil bacterium, has been observed as a dominant genus that survives in different habitats with wide hostile conditions. We had a basic assumption that the species level variation in 16S rDNA sequences of a bacterial genus is mainly due to substitutions rather than insertion or deletion of bases. Keeping this in view, the aim was to identify a region of 16S rDNA sequence and within that focus on substitution prone stretches indicating species level variation and to derive patterns from these stretches that are specific to the genus. Results Repeating elements that are highly conserved across different species of Pseudomonas were considered as guiding markers to locate a region within the 16S gene. Four repeating patterns showing more than 80% consistency across fifty different species of Pseudomonas were identified. The sub-sequences between the repeating patterns yielded a continuous region of 495 bases. The sub-sequences after alignment and using Shanon's entropy measure yielded a consensus pattern. A stretch of 24 base positions in this region, showing maximum variations across the sampled sequences was focused for possible genus specific patterns. Nine patterns in this stretch showed nearly 70% specificity to the target genus. These patterns were further used to obtain a signature that is highly specific to Pseudomonas. The signature region was used to design PCR primers, which yielded a PCR product of 150 bp whose specificity was validated through a sample experiment. Conclusions The developed approach was successfully applied to genus Pseudomonas. It could be tried in other bacterial genera to obtain respective signature patterns and thereby PCR primers, for their rapid tracking in the environmental samples. PMID:12769821

  10. Glucose-Nucleobase Pseudo Base Pairs: Biomolecular Interactions within DNA.

    PubMed

    Vengut-Climent, Empar; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Lucas, Ricardo; Peñalver, Pablo; Aviñó, Anna; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Eritja, Ramón; González, Carlos; Morales, Juan C

    2016-07-18

    Noncovalent forces rule the interactions between biomolecules. Inspired by a biomolecular interaction found in aminoglycoside-RNA recognition, glucose-nucleobase pairs have been examined. Deoxyoligonucleotides with a 6-deoxyglucose insertion are able to hybridize with their complementary strand, thus exhibiting a preference for purine nucleobases. Although the resulting double helices are less stable than natural ones, they present only minor local distortions. 6-Deoxyglucose stays fully integrated in the double helix and its OH groups form two hydrogen bonds with the opposing guanine. This 6-deoxyglucose-guanine pair closely resembles a purine-pyrimidine geometry. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that glucose-purine pairs are as stable as a natural T-A pair. PMID:27328804

  11. An Attempt to Detect siRNA-Mediated Genomic DNA Modification by Artificially Induced Mismatch siRNA in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Yosuke; Ogawa, Jun; Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu; Mishiba, Kei-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Although tremendous progress has been made in recent years in identifying molecular mechanisms of small interfering RNA (siRNA) functions in higher plants, the possibility of direct interaction between genomic DNA and siRNA remains an enigma. Such an interaction was proposed in the ‘RNA cache’ hypothesis, in which a mutant allele is restored based on template-directed gene conversion. To test this hypothesis, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants conditionally expressing a hairpin dsRNA construct of a mutated acetolactate synthase (mALS) gene coding sequence, which confers chlorsulfuron resistance, in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX). In the transgenic plants, suppression of the endogenous ALS mRNA expression as well as 21-nt mALS siRNA expression was detected after DEX treatment. After screening >100,000 progeny of the mALS siRNA-induced plants, no chlorsulfuron-resistant progeny were obtained. Further experiments using transgenic calli also showed that DEX-induced expression of mALS siRNA did not affect the number of chlorsulfuron-resistant calli. No trace of cytosine methylation of the genomic ALS region corresponding to the dsRNA region was observed in the DEX-treated calli. These results do not necessarily disprove the ‘RNA cache’ hypothesis, but indicate that an RNAi machinery for ALS mRNA suppression does not alter the ALS locus, either genetically or epigenetically. PMID:24278423

  12. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  13. Reliability and Efficiency of a DNA-Based Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deaton, R.; Garzon, M.; Murphy, R. C.; Rose, J. A.; Franceschetti, D. R.; Stevens, S. E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    DNA-based computing uses the tendency of nucleotide bases to bind (hybridize) in preferred combinations to do computation. Depending on reaction conditions, oligonucleotides can bind despite noncomplementary base pairs. These mismatched hybridizations are a source of false positives and negatives, which limit the efficiency and scalability of DNA-based computing. The ability of specific base sequences to support error-tolerant Adleman-style computation is analyzed, and criteria are proposed to increase reliability and efficiency. A method is given to calculate reaction conditions from estimates of DNA melting.

  14. Euler buckling and nonlinear kinking of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander P; Meyer, Elisabeth A; Cohen, Adam E

    2013-11-01

    The bending stiffness of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) at high curvatures is fundamental to its biological activity, yet this regime has been difficult to probe experimentally, and literature results have not been consistent. We created a 'molecular vise' in which base-pairing interactions generated a compressive force on sub-persistence length segments of dsDNA. Short dsDNA strands (<41 base pairs) resisted this force and remained straight; longer strands became bent, a phenomenon called 'Euler buckling'. We monitored the buckling transition via Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between appended fluorophores. For low-to-moderate concentrations of monovalent salt (up to ∼150 mM), our results are in quantitative agreement with the worm-like chain (WLC) model of DNA elasticity, without the need to invoke any 'kinked' states. Greater concentrations of monovalent salts or 1 mM Mg(2+) induced an apparent softening of the dsDNA, which was best accounted for by a kink in the region of highest curvature. We tested the effects of all single-nucleotide mismatches on the DNA bending. Remarkably, the propensity to kink correlated with the thermodynamic destabilization of the mismatched DNA relative the perfectly complementary strand, suggesting that the kinked state is locally melted. The molecular vise is exquisitely sensitive to the sequence-dependent linear and nonlinear elastic properties of dsDNA. PMID:23956222

  15. A binding free energy decomposition approach for accurate calculations of the fidelity of DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, Robert; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Warshel, Arieh

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerase β (pol β) is a small eukaryotic enzyme with the ability to repair short single-stranded DNA gaps that has found use as a model system for larger replicative DNA polymerases. For all DNA polymerases, the factors determining their catalytic power and fidelity are the interactions between the bases of the base pair, amino acids near the active site, and the two magnesium ions. In this report, we study effects of all three aspects on human pol β transition state (TS) binding free energies by reproducing a consistent set of experimentally determined data for different structures. Our calculations comprise the combination of four different base pairs (incoming pyrimidine nucleotides incorporated opposite both matched and mismatched purines) with four different pol β structures (wild type and three separate mutations of ionized residues to alanine). We decompose the incoming deoxynucleoside 5′-triphosphate-TS, and run separate calculations for the neutral base part and the highly charged triphosphate part, using different dielectric constants in order to account for the specific electrostatic environments. This new approach improves our ability to predict the effect of matched and mismatched base pairing and of mutations in DNA polymerases on fidelity and may be a useful tool in studying the potential of DNA polymerase mutations in the development of cancer. It also supports our point of view with regards to the origin of the structural control of fidelity, allowing for a quantified description of the fidelity of DNA polymerases. PMID:19842163

  16. Recognition of base pair inversions in duplex by chimeric (alpha,beta) triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Edward N; Goryaeva, Baira V; Florentiev, Vladimir L

    2006-10-01

    DNA recognition by triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) is usually limited by homopurine-homopyrimidine sequence in duplexes. Modifications of the third strand may overcome this limitation. Chimeric alpha-beta TFOs are expected to form triplex DNA upon binding to non-regular sequence duplexes. In the present study we describe binding properties of chimeric alpha-beta oligodeoxynucleotides in the respect to short DNA duplexes with one, three, and five base pair inversions. Non-natural chimeric TFO's contained alpha-thymidine residues inside (GT) or (GA) core sequences. Modified residues were addressed to AT/TA inversions in duplexes. It was found in the non-denaturing gel-electrophoresis experiments that single or five adjacent base pair inversions in duplexes may be recognized by chimeric alpha-beta TFO's at 10 degrees C and pH 7.8. Three dispersed base pair inversions in the double stranded DNA prevented triplex formation by either (GT) or (GA) chimeras. Estimation of thermal stability of chimeric alpha-beta triplexes showed decrease in T(m) values as compared with unmodified complexes. PMID:16928141

  17. Role of the Closing Base Pair for d(GCA) Hairpin Stability: Free Energy Analysis and Folding Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2011-06-30

    Hairpin loops belong to the most important structural motifs in folded nucleic acids. The d(GNA) sequence in DNA can form very stable trinucleotide hairpin loops depending, however, strongly on the closing base pair. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) were employed to study hairpin folding of two DNA sequences, d(gcGCAgc) and d(cgGCAcg), with the same central loop motif but different closing base pairs starting from singlestranded structures. In both cases, conformations of the most populated conformational cluster at the lowest temperature showed close agreement with available experimental structures. For the loop sequence with the less stable G:C closing base pair, an alternative loop topology accumulated as second most populated conformational state indicating a possible loop structural heterogeneity. Comparative-free energy simulations on induced loop unfolding indicated higher stability of the loop with a C:G closing base pair by 3 kcal mol1 (compared to a G:C closing base pair) in very good agreement with experiment. The comparative energetic analysis of sampled unfolded, intermediate and folded conformational states identified electrostatic and packing interactions as the main contributions to the closing base pair dependence of the d(GCA) loop stability.

  18. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-12-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome.

  19. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-01-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome. PMID:25475788

  20. Mismatch Repair in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Requires the Mutl Homologous Gene Pms1: Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schar, P.; Baur, M.; Schneider, C.; Kohli, J.

    1997-01-01

    Homologues of the bacterial mutS and mutL genes involved in DNA mismatch repair have been found in organisms from bacteria to humans. Here, we describe the structure and function of a newly identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene that encodes a predicted amino acid sequence of 794 residues with a high degree of homology to MutL related proteins. On the basis of its closer relationship to the eukaryotic ``PMS'' genes than to the ``MLH'' genes, we have designated the S. pombe homologue pms1. Disruption of the pms1 gene causes a significant increase of spontaneous mutagenesis as documented by reversion rate measurements. Tetrad analyses of crosses homozygous for the pms1 mutation reveal a reduction of spore viability from >92% to 80% associated with a low proportion (~50%) of meioses producing four viable spores and a significant, allele-dependent increase of the level of post-meiotic segregation of genetic marker allele pairs. The mutant phenotypes are consistent with a general function of pms1 in correction of mismatched base pairs arising as a consequence of DNA polymerase errors during DNA synthesis, or of hybrid DNA formation between homologous but not perfectly complementary DNA strands during meiotic recombination. PMID:9258673

  1. A comprehensive classification of nucleic acid structural families based on strand direction and base pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, R; Zakrzewska, K; Sun, J S; Harvey, S C

    1992-01-01

    We propose a classification of DNA structures formed from 1 to 4 strands, based only on relative strand directions, base to strand orientation and base pairing geometries. This classification and its associated notation enable all nucleic acids to be grouped into structural families and bring to light possible structures which have not yet been observed experimentally. It also helps in understanding transitions between families and can assist in the design of multistrand structures. PMID:1383936

  2. Biophysical modeling of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie

    2009-03-01

    Mismatch repair proteins play a vital role in the bology of cancer due to their dual functions as repair proteins and as sensors of DNA damage. Computational modeling of mismatch repair proteins in conjunction with biological experimentation has demonstrated the role of long-range communication in the functions of these proteins. Furthermore, different conformations have been shown to be associated with different cellular functions, and these differences are being exploited in drug discovery. The latest results in this modeling will be presented.

  3. Body mass index in early adulthood and colorectal cancer risk for carriers and non-carriers of germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes

    PubMed Central

    Win, A K; Dowty, J G; English, D R; Campbell, P T; Young, J P; Winship, I; Macrae, F A; Lipton, L; Parry, S; Young, G P; Buchanan, D D; Martínez, M E; Jacobs, E T; Ahnen, D J; Haile, R W; Casey, G; Baron, J A; Lindor, N M; Thibodeau, S N; Newcomb, P A; Potter, J D; Le Marchand, L; Gallinger, S; Hopper, J L; Jenkins, M A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Carriers of germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the modifiers of this risk are not well established. We estimated an association between body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood and subsequent risk of CRC for carriers and, as a comparison, estimated the association for non-carriers. Methods: A weighted Cox regression was used to analyse height and weight at 20 years reported by 1324 carriers of MMR gene mutations (500 MLH1, 648 MSH2, 117 MSH6 and 59 PMS2) and 1219 non-carriers from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Results: During 122 304 person-years of observation, we observed diagnoses of CRC for 659 carriers (50%) and 36 non-carriers (3%). For carriers, the risk of CRC increased by 30% for each 5 kg m–2 increment in BMI in early adulthood (hazard ratio, HR: 1.30; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.08–1.58; P=0.01), and increased by 64% for non-carriers (HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.02–2.64; P=0.04) after adjusting for sex, country, cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking (and the MMR gene that was mutated in carriers). The difference in HRs for carriers and non-carriers was not statistically significant (P=0.50). For MLH1 and PMS2 (MutLα heterodimer) mutation carriers combined, the corresponding increase was 36% (HR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.05–1.76; P=0.02). For MSH2 and MSH6 (MutSα heterodimer) mutation carriers combined, the HR was 1.26 (95% CI: 0.96–1.65; P=0.09). There was no significant difference between the HRs for MutLα and MutSα heterodimer carriers (P=0.56). Conclusion: Body mass index in early adulthood is positively associated with risk of CRC for MMR gene mutation carriers and non-carriers. PMID:21559014

  4. Charge transport in DNA nanowires connected to carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bikan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, J.

    2015-08-01

    DNA is perhaps the worlds most controllable nanowire, with potential applications in nanoelectronics and sensing. However, understanding of its charge transport (CT) properties remains elusive, with experiments reporting a wide range of behaviors from insulating to superconductive. We report extensive first-principle simulations that account for DNA's high flexibility and its native solvent environment. The results show that the CT along the DNA's long axis is strongly dependent on DNA's instantaneous conformation varying over many orders of magnitude. In high CT conformations, delocalized conductive states extending over up to 10 base pairs are found. Their low exponential decay constants further indicate that coherent CT, which is assumed to be active only over 2-3 base pairs in the commonly accepted DNA CT models, can act over much longer length scales. We also identify a simple geometrical rule that predicts CT properties of a given conformation with high accuracy. The effect of mismatched base pairs is also considered: while they decrease conductivities of specific DNA conformations, thermally induced conformational fluctuations wash out this effect. Overall, our results indicate that an immobilized partially dried poly(G)-poly(C) B-DNA is preferable for nanowire applications.

  5. A mutate-and-map strategy accurately infers the base pairs of a 35-nucleotide model RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kladwang, Wipapat; Cordero, Pablo; Das, Rhiju

    2011-01-01

    We present a rapid experimental strategy for inferring base pairs in structured RNAs via an information-rich extension of classic chemical mapping approaches. The mutate-and-map method, previously applied to a DNA/RNA helix, systematically searches for single mutations that enhance the chemical accessibility of base-pairing partners distant in sequence. To test this strategy for structured RNAs, we have carried out mutate-and-map measurements for a 35-nt hairpin, called the MedLoop RNA, embedded within an 80-nt sequence. We demonstrate the synthesis of all 105 single mutants of the MedLoop RNA sequence and present high-throughput DMS, CMCT, and SHAPE modification measurements for this library at single-nucleotide resolution. The resulting two-dimensional data reveal visually clear, punctate features corresponding to RNA base pair interactions as well as more complex features; these signals can be qualitatively rationalized by comparison to secondary structure predictions. Finally, we present an automated, sequence-blind analysis that permits the confident identification of nine of the 10 MedLoop RNA base pairs at single-nucleotide resolution, while discriminating against all 1460 false-positive base pairs. These results establish the accuracy and information content of the mutate-and-map strategy and support its feasibility for rapidly characterizing the base-pairing patterns of larger and more complex RNA systems. PMID:21239468

  6. Binding energies of nucleobase complexes: Relevance to homology recognition of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Sergio Cruz; Prentiss, Mara; Fyta, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The binding energies of complexes of DNA nucleobase pairs are evaluated using quantum mechanical calculations at the level of dispersion corrected density functional theory. We begin with Watson-Crick base pairs of singlets, duplets, and triplets and calculate their binding energies. At a second step, mismatches are incorporated into the Watson-Crick complexes in order to evaluate the variation in the binding energy with respect to the canonical Watson-Crick pairs. A linear variation of this binding energy with the degree of mismatching is observed. The binding energies for the duplets and triplets containing mismatches are further compared to the energies of the respective singlets in order to assess the degree of collectivity in these complexes. This study also suggests that mismatches do not considerably affect the energetics of canonical base pairs. Our work is highly relevant to the recognition process in DNA promoted through the RecA protein and suggests a clear distinction between recognition in singlets, and recognition in duplets or triplets. Our work assesses the importance of collectivity in the homology recognition of DNA.

  7. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Bauer, Robert J; Nichols, Nicole M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C

    2016-01-29

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. PMID:26365241

  8. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Bauer, Robert J.; Nichols, Nicole M.; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. PMID:26365241

  9. How do base-pairing small RNAs evolve?

    PubMed Central

    Updegrove, Taylor B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    The increasing numbers of characterized base-pairing small RNAs (sRNAs) and the identification of these regulators in a broad range of bacteria are allowing comparisons between species and explorations of sRNA evolution. In this review, we describe some examples of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs that are species-specific and others that are more broadly distributed. We also describe examples of sRNA orthologs where different features are conserved. These examples provide the background for a discussion of mechanisms of sRNA evolution and selective pressures on the sRNAs and their mRNA target(s). PMID:25934120

  10. The thermodynamics and kinetics of a nucleotide base pair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Gong, Sha; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Wenbing

    2016-03-21

    The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of an RNA base pair were obtained through a long-time molecular dynamics simulation of the opening-closing switch process of the base pair near its melting temperature. The thermodynamic parameters were in good agreement with the nearest-neighbor model. The opening rates showed strong temperature dependence, however, the closing rates showed only weak temperature dependence. The transition path time was weakly temperature dependent and was insensitive to the energy barrier. The diffusion constant exhibited super-Arrhenius behavior. The free energy barrier of breaking a single base stack results from the enthalpy increase, ΔH, caused by the disruption of hydrogen bonding and base-stacking interactions. The free energy barrier of base pair closing comes from the unfavorable entropy loss, ΔS, caused by the restriction of torsional angles. These results suggest that a one-dimensional free energy surface is sufficient to accurately describe the dynamics of base pair opening and closing, and the dynamics are Brownian. PMID:27004898

  11. The thermodynamics and kinetics of a nucleotide base pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujie; Gong, Sha; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Wenbing

    2016-03-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of an RNA base pair were obtained through a long-time molecular dynamics simulation of the opening-closing switch process of the base pair near its melting temperature. The thermodynamic parameters were in good agreement with the nearest-neighbor model. The opening rates showed strong temperature dependence, however, the closing rates showed only weak temperature dependence. The transition path time was weakly temperature dependent and was insensitive to the energy barrier. The diffusion constant exhibited super-Arrhenius behavior. The free energy barrier of breaking a single base stack results from the enthalpy increase, ΔH, caused by the disruption of hydrogen bonding and base-stacking interactions. The free energy barrier of base pair closing comes from the unfavorable entropy loss, ΔS, caused by the restriction of torsional angles. These results suggest that a one-dimensional free energy surface is sufficient to accurately describe the dynamics of base pair opening and closing, and the dynamics are Brownian.

  12. Understanding the kinetic mechanism of RNA single base pair formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Yu, Tao; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    RNA functions are intrinsically tied to folding kinetics. The most elementary step in RNA folding is the closing and opening of a base pair. Understanding this elementary rate process is the basis for RNA folding kinetics studies. Previous studies mostly focused on the unfolding of base pairs. Here, based on a hybrid approach, we investigate the folding process at level of single base pairing/stacking. The study, which integrates molecular dynamics simulation, kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, and master equation methods, uncovers two alternative dominant pathways: Starting from the unfolded state, the nucleotide backbone first folds to the native conformation, followed by subsequent adjustment of the base conformation. During the base conformational rearrangement, the backbone either retains the native conformation or switches to nonnative conformations in order to lower the kinetic barrier for base rearrangement. The method enables quantification of kinetic partitioning among the different pathways. Moreover, the simulation reveals several intriguing ion binding/dissociation signatures for the conformational changes. Our approach may be useful for developing a base pair opening/closing rate model. PMID:26699466

  13. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  14. Does the tautomeric status of the adenine bases change upon the dissociation of the A*·A(syn) Topal-Fresco DNA mismatch? A combined QM and QTAIM atomistic insight.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2014-02-28

    We have scrupulously explored the tautomerisation mechanism via the double proton transfer of the A*·A(syn) Topal-Fresco base mispair (C(s) symmetry), formed by the imino and amino tautomers of the adenine DNA base in the anti- and syn-conformations, respectively, bridging quantum-mechanical calculations with Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. It was found that the A*·A(syn) ↔ A·A*(syn) tautomerisation is the asynchronous concerted process. It was established that the A*·A(syn) DNA mismatch is stabilized by the N6H···N6 (6.35) and N1H···N7 (6.17) hydrogen (H) bonds, whereas the A·A*(syn) base mispair (Cs) by the N6H···N6 (8.82) and N7H···N1 (9.78) H-bonds and the C8H···HC2 HH-bond (0.30 kcal mol(-1)). Using the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds, it was observed that the N6H···N6 and N1H···N7/N7H···N1 H-bonds are anti-cooperative and mutually weaken each other in the A*·A(syn) and A·A*(syn) mispairs. It was revealed that the A·A*(syn) DNA mismatch is a dynamically unstable structure with a short lifetime of 1.12 × 10(-13) s and any of its 6 low-frequency intermolecular vibrations can develop during this period of time. This observation makes it impossible to change the tautomeric status of the A bases upon the dissociation of the A*·A(syn) base mispair into the monomers during DNA replication. PMID:24418908

  15. DFT study on the attacking mechanisms of H and OH radicals to G-C and A-T base pairs in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutsu, N.; Shimamura, K.; Shimizu, E.; Shulga, S.; Danilov, V. I.; Kurita, N.

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the effect of radicals on DNA base pairs, we investigated the attacking mechanism of OH and H radicals to the G-C and A-T base pairs, using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations in water approximated by the continuum solvation model. The DFT calculations revealed that the OH radical abstracts the hydrogen atom of a NH2 group of G or A base and induces a tautomeric reaction for an A-T base pair more significantly than for a G-C base pair. On the other hand, the H radical prefers to bind to the Cytosine NH2 group of G-C base pair and induce a tautomeric reaction from G-C to G*-C*, whose activation free energy is considerably small (-0.1 kcal/mol) in comparison with that (42.9 kcal/mol) for the reaction of an A-T base pair. Accordingly, our DFT calculations elucidated that OH and H radicals have a significant effect on A-T and G-C base pairs, respectively. This finding will be useful for predicting the effect of radiation on the genetic information recorded in the base sequences of DNA duplexes.

  16. Binding discrimination of MutS to a set of lesions and compound lesions (base damage and mismatch) reveals its potential role as a cisplatin-damaged DNA sensing protein.

    PubMed

    Fourrier, Laurence; Brooks, Peter; Malinge, Jean-Marc

    2003-06-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a critical role in sensitizing both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to the clinically potent anticancer drug cisplatin. It is thought to mediate cytotoxicity through recognition of cisplatin DNA lesions. This drug generates a range of lesions that may also give rise to compound lesions resulting from the misincorporation of a base during translesion synthesis. Using gel mobility shift competition assays and surface plasmon resonance, we have analyzed the interaction of Escherichia coli MutS protein with site-specifically modified DNA oligonucleotides containing each of the four cisplatin cross-links or a set of compound lesions. The major 1,2-d(GpG) cisplatin intrastrand cross-link was recognized with only a 1.5-fold specificity, whereas a 47-fold specificity was found with a natural G/T containing DNA substrate. The rate of association, kon, for binding to the 1,2-d(GpG) adduct was 3.1 x 104 m-1 s-1 and the specificity of binding was essentially dependent on koff. DNA duplexes containing a single 1,2-d(ApG), 1,3-d(GpCpG) adduct, and an interstrand cross-link of cisplatin were not preferentially recognized. Among 12 DNA substrates, each containing a different cisplatin compound lesion derived from replicative misincorporation of one base opposite either of the 1,2-intrastrand adducts, 10 were specifically recognized including those that are more likely formed in vivo based on cisplatin mutation spectra. Moreover, among these lesions, two compound lesions formed when an adenine was misincorporated opposite a 1,2-d(GpG) adduct were not substrates for the MutY-dependent mismatch repair pathway. The ability of MutS to sense differentially various platinated DNA substrates suggests that cisplatin compound lesions formed during misincorporation of a base opposite either adducted base of both 1,2-intrastrand cross-links are more plausible critical lesions for MMR-mediated cisplatin cytotoxicity. PMID:12654906

  17. Configurations of base-pair complexes in solutions. [nucleotide chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Nir, S.; Rein, R.; Macelroy, R.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical search for the most stable conformations (i.e., stacked or hydrogen bonded) of the base pairs A-U and G-C in water, CCl4, and CHCl3 solutions is presented. The calculations of free energies indicate a significant role of the solvent in determining the conformations of the base-pair complexes. The application of the continuum method yields preferred conformations in good agreement with experiment. Results of the calculations with this method emphasize the importance of both the electrostatic interactions between the two bases in a complex, and the dipolar interaction of the complex with the entire medium. In calculations with the solvation shell method, the last term, i.e., dipolar interaction of the complex with the entire medium, was added. With this modification the prediction of the solvation shell model agrees both with the continuum model and with experiment, i.e., in water the stacked conformation of the bases is preferred.

  18. A polymorphism in the MSH3 mismatch repair gene is associated with the levels of somatic instability of the expanded CTG repeat in the blood DNA of myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fernando; Vásquez, Melissa; Santamaría, Carolina; Cuenca, Patricia; Corrales, Eyleen; Monckton, Darren G

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism of the expanded CTG repeat in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is age-dependent, tissue-specific and expansion-biased, contributing toward the tissue-specificity and progressive nature of the symptoms. Previously, using regression modelling of repeat instability we showed that variation in the rate of somatic expansion in blood DNA contributes toward variation in age of onset, directly implicating somatic expansion in the disease pathway. Here, we confirm these results using a larger more genetically homogenous Costa Rican DM1 cohort (p<0.001). Interestingly, we also provide evidence that supports subtle sex-dependent differences in repeat length-dependent age at onset and somatic mutational dynamics. Previously, we demonstrated that variation in the rate of somatic expansion was a heritable quantitative trait. Given the important role that DNA mismatch repair genes play in mediating expansions in mouse models, we tested for modifier gene effects with 13 DNA mismatch gene polymorphisms (one each in MSH2, PMS2, MSH6 and MLH1; and nine in MSH3). After correcting for allele length and age effects, we identified three polymorphisms in MSH3 that were associated with variation in somatic instability: Rs26279 (p=0.003); Rs1677658 (p=0.009); and Rs10168 (p=0.031). However, only the association with Rs26279 remained significant after multiple testing correction. Although we revealed a statistically significant association between Rs26279 and somatic instability, we did not detect an association with the age at onset. Individuals with the A/A genotype for Rs26279 tended to show a greater propensity to expand the CTG repeat than other genotypes. Interestingly, this SNP results in an amino acid change in the critical ATPase domain of MSH3 and is potentially functionally dimorphic. These data suggest that MSH3 is a key player in generating somatic variation in DM1 patients and further highlight MSH3 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26994442

  19. Cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte/molecular beacon complex for sensitive, sequence-specific, real-time DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuli; Duan, Xinrui; Liu, Libin; An, Lingling; Feng, Fude; Wang, Shu

    2008-11-01

    A new fluorescence method has been developed for DNA detection at room temperature in a sensitive, selective, economical, and real-time manner that interfaces the superiority of a molecular beacon in mismatch discrimination with the light-harvesting property of water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes. The probe solution contains a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte (PFP-NMe3+), a molecular beacon with a five base pairs double-stranded stem labeled at the 5'-terminus with fluorescein (DNA P-Fl), and ethidium bromide (EB, a specific intercalator of dsDNA). The electrostatic interactions between DNA P-Fl and PFP-NMe3+ keep them in close proximity, facilitating the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFP-NMe3+ to fluorescein. Upon adding a complementary strand to the probe solution, the conformation of DNA P-Fl transits into dsDNA followed by the intercalation of EB into the grooves. Two-step FRET, from PFP-NMe3+ to DNA P-Fl (FRET-1), followed by FRET from DNA P-Fl to EB (FRET-2) takes place. In view of the observed fluorescein or EB emission changes, DNA can be detected in aqueous solution. Because the base mismatch in target DNA inhibits the transition of DNA P-Fl from the stem-loop to duplex structure, single nucleotide mismatch can be clearly detected. PMID:18834161

  20. Effect of nucleobase sequence on the proton-transfer reaction and stability of the guanine-cytosine base pair radical anion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Yin; Yeh, Shu-Wen; Hsu, Sodio C N; Kao, Chai-Lin; Dong, Teng-Yuan

    2011-02-21

    The formation of base pair radical anions is closely related to many fascinating research fields in biology and chemistry such as radiation damage to DNA and electron transport in DNA. However, the relevant knowledge so far mainly comes from studies on isolated base pair radical anions, and their behavior in the DNA environment is less understood. In this study, we focus on how the nucleobase sequence affects the properties of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair radical anion. The energetic barrier and reaction energy for the proton transfer along the N(1)(G)-H···N(3)(C) hydrogen bond and the stability of GC˙(-) (i.e., electron affinity of GC) embedded in different sequences of base-pair trimer were evaluated using density functional theory. The computational results demonstrated that the presence of neighboring base pairs has an important influence on the behavior of GC˙(-) in the gas phase. The excess electron was found to be localized on the embedded GC and the charge leakage to neighboring base pairs was very minor in all of the investigated sequences. Accordingly, the sequence behavior of the proton-transfer reaction and the stability of GC˙(-) is chiefly governed by electrostatic interactions with adjacent base pairs. However, the effect of base stacking, due to its electrostatic nature, is severely screened upon hydration, and thus, the sequence dependence of the properties of GC˙(-) in aqueous environment becomes relatively weak and less than that observed in the gas phase. The effect of geometry relaxation associated with neighboring base pairs as well as the possibility of proton transfer along the N(2)(G)-H···O(2)(C) channel have also been investigated. The implications of the present findings to the electron transport and radiation damage of DNA are discussed. PMID:21152551

  1. Does a helicase activity help mismatch repair in eukaryotes?

    PubMed

    Song, Limin; Yuan, Fenghua; Zhang, Yanbin

    2010-07-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) corrects innate DNA replication infidelities. Many components of eukaryotic MMR have been identified, the molecular mechanism of MMR has been largely demonstrated, and furthermore the nick-directed MMR reactions have been reconstituted with purified human proteins in vitro. However, some fundamental questions still remain to be answered. One such question is whether a DNA helicase activity is required for MMR in eukaryotes. This short review presents an overview of the interactions between eukaryotic DNA helicases and MMR factors, and suggests a possible mechanism for how DNA helicases may be involved in repair of DNA mismatches. PMID:20552646

  2. Conditionally fluorescent molecular probes for detecting single base changes in double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Zhang, David Yu; Seelig, Georg

    2013-09-01

    Small variations in nucleic acid sequences can have far-reaching phenotypic consequences. Reliably distinguishing closely related sequences is therefore important for research and clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that conditionally fluorescent DNA probes are capable of distinguishing variations of a single base in a stretch of target DNA. These probes use a novel programmable mechanism in which each single nucleotide polymorphism generates two thermodynamically destabilizing mismatch bubbles rather than the single mismatch formed during typical hybridization-based assays. Up to a 12,000-fold excess of a target that contains a single nucleotide polymorphism is required to generate the same fluorescence as one equivalent of the intended target, and detection works reliably over a wide range of conditions. Using these probes we detected point mutations in a 198 base-pair subsequence of the Escherichia coli rpoB gene. That our probes are constructed from multiple oligonucleotides circumvents synthesis limitations and enables long continuous DNA sequences to be probed.

  3. Geometric nomenclature and classification of RNA base pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Leontis, N B; Westhof, E

    2001-01-01

    Non-Watson-Crick base pairs mediate specific interactions responsible for RNA-RNA self-assembly and RNA-protein recognition. An unambiguous and descriptive nomenclature with well-defined and nonoverlapping parameters is needed to communicate concisely structural information about RNA base pairs. The definitions should reflect underlying molecular structures and interactions and, thus, facilitate automated annotation, classification, and comparison of new RNA structures. We propose a classification based on the observation that the planar edge-to-edge, hydrogen-bonding interactions between RNA bases involve one of three distinct edges: the Watson-Crick edge, the Hoogsteen edge, and the Sugar edge (which includes the 2'-OH and which has also been referred to as the Shallow-groove edge). Bases can interact in either of two orientations with respect to the glycosidic bonds, cis or trans relative to the hydrogen bonds. This gives rise to 12 basic geometric types with at least two H bonds connecting the bases. For each geometric type, the relative orientations of the strands can be easily deduced. High-resolution examples of 11 of the 12 geometries are presently available. Bifurcated pairs, in which a single exocyclic carbonyl or amino group of one base directly contacts the edge of a second base, and water-inserted pairs, in which single functional groups on each base interact directly, are intermediate between two of the standard geometries. The nomenclature facilitates the recognition of isosteric relationships among base pairs within each geometry, and thus facilitates the recognition of recurrent three-dimensional motifs from comparison of homologous sequences. Graphical conventions are proposed for displaying non-Watson-Crick interactions on a secondary structure diagram. The utility of the classification in homology modeling of RNA tertiary motifs is illustrated. PMID:11345429

  4. A Jobs Mismatch. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marina, Brenda L. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the article "A Jobs Mismatch", Jaschik has compiled the findings of a new report that was released by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The Georgetown University report claims that there is a severe shortage of college graduates in America, and that this shortage has the United States on a "collision course with…

  5. Role of interaction energy in the specificity of transcription. I-The Watson Crick G-C base pair template.

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, N K; Kumar, U; Roychoudhury, M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to show that the selectivity of the nucleotide bases in RNA transcription c an be inferred, in principle, from the DNA base pair - RNA base interaction. The catalytic role of enzymes in this process is, therefore, only to form the sugar - phosphate backbone. A systematic study for the evaluation of the interaction energy of the DNA base pair with the enterant RNA bases have been undertaken to elucidate the aforesaid mechanism. Electrostatic hard sphere approximation of Nash and Bradley 1 has been employed. Non bonded induced dipole and London dispersion forces are not taken into account. The present communication gives the results of computations of the interaction energy of the four RNA bases. The results have been discussed with reference to Stent's and Zubay's schemes of RNA transcription. PMID:7443519

  6. Aberrant repair initiated by mismatch-specific thymine-DNA glycosylases provides a mechanism for the mutational bias observed in CpG islands

    PubMed Central

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Couve, Sophie; Gros, Laurent; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Matkarimov, Bakhyt; Saparbaev, Murat K.

    2014-01-01

    The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) initiates the base excision repair (BER) pathway to remove spontaneous and induced DNA base damage. It was first biochemically characterized for its ability to remove T mispaired with G in CpG context. TDG is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expressions by protecting CpG-rich promoters from de novo DNA methylation. Here we demonstrate that TDG initiates aberrant repair by excising T when it is paired with a damaged adenine residue in DNA duplex. TDG targets the non-damaged DNA strand and efficiently excises T opposite of hypoxanthine (Hx), 1,N6-ethenoadenine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine and abasic site in TpG/CpX context, where X is a modified residue. In vitro reconstitution of BER with duplex DNA containing Hx•T pair and TDG results in incorporation of cytosine across Hx. Furthermore, analysis of the mutation spectra inferred from single nucleotide polymorphisms in human population revealed a highly biased mutation pattern within CpG islands (CGIs), with enhanced mutation rate at CpA and TpG sites. These findings demonstrate that under experimental conditions used TDG catalyzes sequence context-dependent aberrant removal of thymine, which results in TpG, CpA→CpG mutations, thus providing a plausible mechanism for the putative evolutionary origin of the CGIs in mammalian genomes. PMID:24692658

  7. Femtosecond decay dynamics of intact adenine and thymine base pairs in a supersonic jet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Joon; Chang, Jinyoung; Kim, Hyung Min; Kang, Hyuk; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Heo, Jiyoung; Kim, Seong Keun

    2011-07-11

    We investigated the decay dynamics of the DNA base pairs adenine-adenine (A(2)), adenine-thymine (AT), and thymine-thymine (T(2)) produced in a supersonic jet by femtosecond (fs) time-resolved photoionization spectroscopy. The base pair was excited by a fs pump pulse at 267 nm and the population change of its excited state was monitored by non-resonant three-photon ionization using a fs probe pulse at 800 nm after a certain time delay. All of the transients recorded in the mass channel of the parent ion exhibited a tri-exponential decay, with time constants ranging from 100 fs to longer than 100 ps. Most of these time constants coincide well with the previous values deduced indirectly from the transients of protonated adenine (AH(+)) and thymine (TH(+)), which were assumed to be produced by fragmentation of the base-pair ions. Notably, for the transient of T(2), we observed a new decay component with a time constant of 2.3 ps, which was absent in the transient of TH(+). We suggest that the new decay component arises from the decay of stacked T(2) dimers that are mostly ionized to T(2)(+), whereas the decay signal recorded in the mass channel of TH(+) is merely from the relaxation of hydrogen-bonded T(2) dimers. From the amplitude of the new decay component, the population of the stacked T(2) dimers relative to the hydrogen-bonded dimers was estimated to be ∼2 % in the supersonic jet, which is about fifteen times higher than the theoretical value. PMID:21710523

  8. Imino proton NMR guides the reprogramming of A•T specific minor groove binders for mixed base pair recognition.

    PubMed

    Harika, Narinder K; Paul, Ananya; Stroeva, Ekaterina; Chai, Yun; Boykin, David W; Germann, Markus W; Wilson, W David

    2016-06-01

    Sequence-specific binding to DNA is crucial for targeting transcription factor-DNA complexes to modulate gene expression. The heterocyclic diamidine, DB2277, specifically recognizes a single G•C base pair in the minor groove of mixed base pair sequences of the type AAAGTTT. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence of major and minor species of the bound compound. To understand the principles that determine the binding affinity and orientation in mixed sequences of DNA, over thirty DNA hairpin substrates were examined by NMR and thermal melting. The NMR exchange dynamics between major and minor species shows that the exchange is much faster than compound dissociation determined from biosensor-surface plasmon resonance. Extensive modifications of DNA sequences resulted in a unique DNA sequence with binding site AAGATA that binds DB2277 in a single orientation. A molecular docking result agrees with the model representing rapid flipping of DB2277 between major and minor species. Imino spectral analysis of a (15)N-labeled central G clearly shows the crucial role of the exocyclic amino group of G in sequence-specific recognition. Our results suggest that this approach can be expanded to additional modules for recognition of more sequence-specific DNA complexes. This approach provides substantial information about the sequence-specific, highly efficient, dynamic nature of minor groove binding agents. PMID:27131382

  9. Imino proton NMR guides the reprogramming of A•T specific minor groove binders for mixed base pair recognition

    PubMed Central

    Harika, Narinder K.; Paul, Ananya; Stroeva, Ekaterina; Chai, Yun; Boykin, David W.; Germann, Markus W.; Wilson, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific binding to DNA is crucial for targeting transcription factor-DNA complexes to modulate gene expression. The heterocyclic diamidine, DB2277, specifically recognizes a single G•C base pair in the minor groove of mixed base pair sequences of the type AAAGTTT. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence of major and minor species of the bound compound. To understand the principles that determine the binding affinity and orientation in mixed sequences of DNA, over thirty DNA hairpin substrates were examined by NMR and thermal melting. The NMR exchange dynamics between major and minor species shows that the exchange is much faster than compound dissociation determined from biosensor–surface plasmon resonance. Extensive modifications of DNA sequences resulted in a unique DNA sequence with binding site AAGATA that binds DB2277 in a single orientation. A molecular docking result agrees with the model representing rapid flipping of DB2277 between major and minor species. Imino spectral analysis of a 15N-labeled central G clearly shows the crucial role of the exocyclic amino group of G in sequence-specific recognition. Our results suggest that this approach can be expanded to additional modules for recognition of more sequence-specific DNA complexes. This approach provides substantial information about the sequence-specific, highly efficient, dynamic nature of minor groove binding agents. PMID:27131382

  10. Rapid photometric detection of thymine residues partially flipped out of double helix as a method for direct scanning of point mutations and apurinic DNA sites.

    PubMed

    Logvina, N A; Yakubovskaya, M G; Dolinnaya, N G

    2011-02-01

    A spectroscopic assay for detection of extrahelical thymine residues in DNA heteroduplexes under their modification by potassium permanganate has been developed. The assay is based on increase in absorbance at 420 nm due to accumulation of thymidine oxidation intermediates and soluble manganese dioxide. The analysis was carried out using a set of 19-bp DNA duplexes containing unpaired thymidines opposite tetrahydrofuranyl derivatives mimicking a widespread DNA damage (apurinic (AP) sites) and a library of 50-bp DNA duplexes containing all types of base mismatches in different surroundings. The relation between the selectivity of unpaired T oxidation and the thermal stability of DNA double helix was investigated. The method described here was shown to discriminate between DNA duplexes with one or two AP sites and to reveal thymine-containing mismatches and all noncanonical base pairs in AT-surroundings. Comparative results of CCM analysis and the rapid photometric assay for mismatch detection are demonstrated for the first time in the same model system. The chemical reactivity of target thymines was shown to correlate with local disturbance of double helix at the mismatch site. As the spectroscopic assay does not require the DNA cleavage reaction and gel electrophoresis, it can be easily automated and used for primary screening of somatic mutations. PMID:21568858

  11. Oxygen Replacement with Selenium at the Thymidine 4-Position for the Se Base Pairing and Crystal Structure Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Salon,J.; Sheng, J.; Jiang, J.; Chen, G.; Caton-Williams, J.; Huang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The T-A and C-G base pairing and stacking allow the formation of the stable DNA duplex structure for genetic information storage, transcription, and replication. To replace the oxygen of the nucleotide nucleobases with selenium for the studies of the base-pair recognition, the duplex stability, and the nuclei acid crystal structures, we have synthesized for the first time the 4-Se thymidine phosphoramidite and incorporated it into oligonucleotides via solid-phase synthesis with high coupling yield (99%). The Se modification on the nucleobase is relatively stable under the elevated temperature. Using the dU{sub Se} (2'-Se-dU) to facilitate the crystallization, we have successfully crystallized the DNA containing the 4-Se-T substitution and determined its structure at 1.50 {angstrom} resolution. The UV-melting and X-ray crystal structure studies have indicated that the Se substitution on the nucleobase does not cause a significant structure perturbation, the large Se atom on the thymine can be successfully accommodated by the DNA duplex, and the Se-mediated hydrogen bond (longer than the usual hydrogen bond) is formed within the modified T-A base pair. In addition, the Se derivatization on the nucleobases further facilitates X-ray crystal structure determination of nucleic acids and their protein complexes via Se MAD phasing.

  12. Base pairing and structural insights into the 5-formylcytosine in RNA duplex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Luo, Zhipu; He, Kaizhang; Delaney, Michael O.; Chen, Doris; Sheng, Jia

    2016-01-01

    5-Formylcytidine (f5C), a previously discovered natural nucleotide in the mitochondrial tRNA of many species including human, has been recently detected as the oxidative product of 5-methylcytidine (m5C) through 5-hydroxymethylcytidine (hm5C) in total RNA of mammalian cells. The discovery indicated that these cytosine derivatives in RNA might also play important epigenetic roles similar as in DNA, which has been intensively investigated in the past few years. In this paper, we studied the base pairing specificity of f5C in different RNA duplex contexts. We found that the 5-formyl group could increase duplex thermal stability and enhance base pairing specificity. We present three high-resolution crystal structures of an octamer RNA duplex [5′-GUA(f5C)GUAC-3′]2 that have been solved under three crystallization conditions with different buffers and pH values. Our results showed that the 5-formyl group is located in the same plane as the cytosine base and forms an intra-residue hydrogen bond with the amino group in the N4 position. In addition, this modification increases the base stacking between the f5C and the neighboring bases while not causing significant global and local structure perturbations. This work provides insights into the effects of 5-formylcytosine on RNA duplex. PMID:27079978

  13. Base pairing and structural insights into the 5-formylcytosine in RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Luo, Zhipu; He, Kaizhang; Delaney, Michael O; Chen, Doris; Sheng, Jia

    2016-06-01

    5-Formylcytidine (f(5)C), a previously discovered natural nucleotide in the mitochondrial tRNA of many species including human, has been recently detected as the oxidative product of 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) through 5-hydroxymethylcytidine (hm(5)C) in total RNA of mammalian cells. The discovery indicated that these cytosine derivatives in RNA might also play important epigenetic roles similar as in DNA, which has been intensively investigated in the past few years. In this paper, we studied the base pairing specificity of f(5)C in different RNA duplex contexts. We found that the 5-formyl group could increase duplex thermal stability and enhance base pairing specificity. We present three high-resolution crystal structures of an octamer RNA duplex [5'-GUA(f(5)C)GUAC-3']2 that have been solved under three crystallization conditions with different buffers and pH values. Our results showed that the 5-formyl group is located in the same plane as the cytosine base and forms an intra-residue hydrogen bond with the amino group in the N4 position. In addition, this modification increases the base stacking between the f(5)C and the neighboring bases while not causing significant global and local structure perturbations. This work provides insights into the effects of 5-formylcytosine on RNA duplex. PMID:27079978

  14. Label-free DNA biosensor based on resistance change of platinum nanoparticles assemblies.

    PubMed

    Skotadis, Evangelos; Voutyras, Konstantinos; Chatzipetrou, Marianneza; Tsekenis, Georgios; Patsiouras, Lampros; Madianos, Leonidas; Chatzandroulis, Stavros; Zergioti, Ioanna; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2016-07-15

    A novel nanoparticle based biosensor for the fast and simple detection of DNA hybridization events is presented. The sensor utilizes hybridized DNA's charge transport properties, combining them with metallic nanoparticle networks that act as nano-gapped electrodes. The DNA hybridization events can be detected by a significant reduction in the sensor's resistance due to the conductive bridging offered by hybridized DNA. By modifying the nanoparticle surface coverage, which can be controlled experimentally being a function of deposition time, and the structural properties of the electrodes, an optimized biosensor for the in situ detection of DNA hybridization events is ultimately fabricated. The fabricated biosensor exhibits a wide response range, covering four orders of magnitude, a limit of detection of 1nM and can detect a single base pair mismatch between probe and complementary DNA. PMID:26995284

  15. On the absence of intra-helical DNA dynamics on the µs to ms timescale

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Roe, Daniel R.; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    DNA helices display a rich tapestry of motion on both short (< 100 ns) and long (> 1 ms) timescales. However, with the exception of mismatched or damaged DNA, experimental measures indicate that motions in the 1 µs to 1 ms range are effectively absent, which is often attributed to difficulties in measuring motions in this time range. We hypothesized that these motions have not been measured because there is effectively no motion on this timescale, as this provides a means to distinguish faithful Watson-Crick base paired DNA from damaged DNA. The absence of motion on this timescale would present a “static” DNA sequence-specific structure that matches the encounter timescales of proteins, thereby facilitating recognition. Here we report long timescale (~10-44 µs) molecular dynamics simulations of a B-DNA duplex structure that addresses this hypothesis using both an “Anton” machine and large ensembles of AMBER GPU simulations. PMID:25351257

  16. Wobble↔Watson-Crick tautomeric transitions in the homo-purine DNA mismatches: a key to the intimate mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic capability of the homo-purine DNA base mispairs to perform wobble↔Watson-Crick/Topal-Fresco tautomeric transitions via the sequential intrapair double proton transfer was discovered for the first time using QM (MP2/DFT) and QTAIM methodologies that are crucial for understanding the microstructural mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions. PMID:26237090

  17. DNA Diagnostics: Nanotechnology-enhanced Electrochemical Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Lillehoj, Peter B.; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mismatched base pairs in DNA plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of genetic-related diseases and conditions, especially for early stage treatment. Among the various biosensors that have been employed for DNA detection, electrochemical sensors show great promise since they are capable of precise DNA recognition and efficient signal transduction. Advancements in micro- and nanotechnologies, specifically fabrication techniques and new nanomaterials, have enabled for the development of highly sensitive, highly specific sensors making them attractive for the detection of small sequence variations. Furthermore, the integration of sensors with sample preparation and fluidic processes enables for rapid, multiplexed DNA detection for point-of-care (POC) clinical diagnostics. PMID:20075759

  18. Mutational spectrometry without phenotypic selection: human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Khrapko, K; Coller, H; André, P; Li, X C; Foret, F; Belenky, A; Karger, B L; Thilly, W G

    1997-01-01

    By first separating mutant from nonmutant DNA sequences on the basis of their melting temperatures and then increasing the number of copies by high-fidelity DNA amplification, we have developed a method that allows observation of point mutations in biological samples at fractions at or above 10-6. Using this method, we have observed the hotspot point mutations that lie in 100 base pairs of the mitochondrial genome in samples of cultured cells and human tissues. To date, 19 mutants have been isolated, their fractions ranging from 4x10-4 down to the limit of detection. We performed specific tests to determine if the observed signals were artefacts arising from contamination, polymerase errors during PCR or DNA adducts created during the procedure. We also tested the possibilities that DNA replication mismatch intermediates, or endogenous DNA adducts that were originally present in the cells, were included with true mutants in our separation steps and converted to mutants during PCR. We show that while most of the mutants behave as double-stranded point mutants in the cells, some appear to arise at least in part from mismatch intermediates or cellular DNA adducts. This technology is therefore sufficient for the observation of the spectrum of point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA and is a tool for discovering the primary causes of these mutations. PMID:9016616

  19. DNA-CNT nanowire networks for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Weizmann, Yossi; Chenoweth, David M; Swager, Timothy M

    2011-03-16

    The ability to detect biological analytes in a rapid, sensitive, operationally simple, and cost-effective manner will impact human health and safety. Hybrid biocatalyzed-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanowire-based detection methods offer a highly sensitive and specific platform for the fabrication of simple and effective conductometric devices. Here, we report a conductivity-based DNA detection method utilizing carbon nanotube-DNA nanowire devices and oligonucleotide-functionalized enzyme probes. Key to our sensor design is a DNA-linked-CNT wire motif, which forms a network of interrupted carbon nanotube wires connecting two electrodes. Sensing occurs at the DNA junctions linking CNTs, followed by amplification using enzymatic metalization leading to a conductimetric response. The DNA analyte detection limit is 10 fM with the ability to discriminate single, double, and triple base pair mismatches. DNA-CNT nanowires and device sensing gaps were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal Raman microscopy, supporting the enhanced conductometric response resulting from nanowire metallization. PMID:21341794

  20. Structure, stability and function of 5-chlorouracil modified A:U and G:U base pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Amritraj; Harp, Joel; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Zhao, Linlin; Abramov, Mikhail; Herdewijn, Piet; Egli, Martin

    2012-12-28

    The thymine analog 5-chlorouridine, first reported in the 1950s as anti-tumor agent, is known as an effective mutagen, clastogen and toxicant as well as an effective inducer of sister-chromatid exchange. Recently, the first microorganism with a chemically different genome was reported; the selected Escherichia coli strain relies on the four building blocks 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (ClU), A, C and G instead of the standard T, A, C, G alphabet [Marlière,P., Patrouix,J., Döring,V., Herdewijn,P., Tricot,S., Cruveiller,S., Bouzon,M. and Mutzel,R. (2011) Chemical evolution of a bacterium’s genome. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 50, 7109–7114]. The residual fraction of T in the DNA of adapted bacteria was <2% and the switch from T to ClU was accompanied by a massive number of mutations, including >1500 A to G or G to A transitions in a culture. The former is most likely due to wobble base pairing between ClU and G, which may be more common for ClU than T. To identify potential changes in the geometries of base pairs and duplexes as a result of replacement of T by ClU, we determined four crystal structures of a B-form DNA dodecamer duplex containing ClU:A or ClU:G base pairs. The structures reveal nearly identical geometries of these pairs compared with T:A or T:G, respectively, and no consequences for stability and cleavage by an endonuclease (EcoRI). The lack of significant changes in the geometry of ClU:A and ClU:G base pairs relative to the corresponding native pairs is consistent with the sustained unlimited self-reproduction of E. coli strains with virtually complete T→ClU genome substitution.

  1. Structure, stability, and dynamics of canonical and noncanonical base pairs: quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashim; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Malyasri; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2008-03-27

    The importance of non-Watson-Crick base pairs in the three-dimensional structure of RNA is now well established. The structure and stability of these noncanonical base pairs are, however, poorly understood. We have attempted to understand structural features of 33 frequently occurring base pairs using density functional theory. These are of three types, namely (i) those stabilized by two or more polar hydrogen bonds between the bases, (ii) those having one polar and another C-H...O/N type interactions, and (iii) those having one H-bond between the bases and another involving one of the sugars linked to the bases. We found that the base pairs having two polar H-bonds are very stable as compared to those having one C-H...O/N interaction. Our quantitatively analysis of structures of these optimized base pairs indicates that they possess a different amount of nonplanarity with large propeller or buckle values as also observed in the crystal structures. We further found that geometry optimization does not modify the hydrogen-bonding pattern, as values of shear and open angle of the base pairs remain conserved. The structures of initial crystal geometry and final optimized geometry of some base pairs having only one polar H-bond and a C-H...O/N interaction, however, are significantly different, indicating the weak nature of the nonpolar interaction. The base pair flexibility, as measured from normal-mode analysis, in terms of the intrinsic standard deviations of the base pair structural parameters are in conformity with those calculated from RNA crystal structures. We also noticed that deformation of a base pair along the stretch direction is impossible for all of the base pairs, and movements of the base pairs along shear and open are also quite restricted. The base pair opening mode through alteration of propeller or buckle is considerably less restricted for most of the base pairs. PMID:18318519

  2. Tunnel conductance of Watson-Crick nucleoside-base pairs from telegraph noise.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuai; He, Jin; Lin, Lisha; Zhang, Peiming; Liang, Feng; Young, Michael; Huang, Shuo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2009-05-01

    The use of tunneling signals to sequence DNA is presently hampered by the small tunnel conductance of a junction spanning an entire DNA molecule. The design of a readout system that uses a shorter tunneling path requires knowledge of the absolute conductance across base pairs. We have exploited the stochastic switching of hydrogen-bonded DNA base-nucleoside pairs trapped in a tunnel junction to determine the conductance of individual molecular pairs. This conductance is found to be sensitive to the geometry of the junction, but a subset of the data appears to come from unstrained molecular pairs. The conductances determined from these pairs are within a factor of two of the predictions of density functional calculations. The experimental data reproduces the counterintuitive theoretical prediction that guanine-deoxycytidine pairs (3 H-bonds) have a smaller conductance than adenine-thymine pairs (2 H-bonds). A bimodal distribution of switching lifetimes shows that both H-bonds and molecule-metal contacts break. PMID:19420603

  3. Tunnel Conductance of Watson-Crick Nucleoside-Base Pairs from Telegraph Noise

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shuai; He, Jin; Lin, Lisha; Zhang, Peiming; Liang, Feng; Young, Michael; Huang, Shuo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The use of tunneling signals to sequence DNA is presently hampered by the small tunnel conductance of a junction spanning an entire DNA molecule. The design of a readout system that uses a shorter tunneling path requires knowledge of the absolute conductance across base-pairs. We have exploited the stochastic switching of hydrogen-bonded DNA base-nucleoside pairs trapped in a tunnel junction to determine the conductance of individual molecular pairs. This conductance is found to be sensitive to the geometry of the junction, but a subset of the data appears to come from unstrained molecular pairs. The conductances determined from these pairs are within a factor two of the predictions of density functional calculations. The experimental data reproduces the counterintuitive theoretical prediction that guanine-deoxycytidine pairs (3 H-bonds) have a smaller conductance than adenine-thymine pairs (2 H-bonds). A bimodal distribution of switching lifetimes shows that both H-bonds and molecule-metal contacts break. PMID:19420603

  4. Reversible phospholipid nanogels for deoxyribonucleic acid fragment size determinations up to 1500 base pairs and integrated sample stacking.

    PubMed

    Durney, Brandon C; Bachert, Beth A; Sloane, Hillary S; Lukomski, Slawomir; Landers, James P; Holland, Lisa A

    2015-06-23

    Phospholipid additives are a cost-effective medium to separate deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments and possess a thermally-responsive viscosity. This provides a mechanism to easily create and replace a highly viscous nanogel in a narrow bore capillary with only a 10°C change in temperature. Preparations composed of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) self-assemble, forming structures such as nanodisks and wormlike micelles. Factors that influence the morphology of a particular DMPC-DHPC preparation include the concentration of lipid in solution, the temperature, and the ratio of DMPC and DHPC. It has previously been established that an aqueous solution containing 10% phospholipid with a ratio of [DMPC]/[DHPC]=2.5 separates DNA fragments with nearly single base resolution for DNA fragments up to 500 base pairs in length, but beyond this size the resolution decreases dramatically. A new DMPC-DHPC medium is developed to effectively separate and size DNA fragments up to 1500 base pairs by decreasing the total lipid concentration to 2.5%. A 2.5% phospholipid nanogel generates a resolution of 1% of the DNA fragment size up to 1500 base pairs. This increase in the upper size limit is accomplished using commercially available phospholipids at an even lower material cost than is achieved with the 10% preparation. The separation additive is used to evaluate size markers ranging between 200 and 1500 base pairs in order to distinguish invasive strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and Aspergillus species by harnessing differences in gene sequences of collagen-like proteins in these organisms. For the first time, a reversible stacking gel is integrated in a capillary sieving separation by utilizing the thermally-responsive viscosity of these self-assembled phospholipid preparations. A discontinuous matrix is created that is composed of a cartridge of highly viscous phospholipid assimilated into a separation matrix

  5. Real-time observation of DNA recognition and rejection by the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9.

    PubMed

    Singh, Digvijay; Sternberg, Samuel H; Fei, Jingyi; Doudna, Jennifer A; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-01-01

    Binding specificity of Cas9-guide RNA complexes to DNA is important for genome-engineering applications; however, how mismatches influence target recognition/rejection kinetics is not well understood. Here we used single-molecule FRET to probe real-time interactions between Cas9-RNA and DNA targets. The bimolecular association rate is only weakly dependent on sequence; however, the dissociation rate greatly increases from <0.006 s(-1) to >2 s(-1) upon introduction of mismatches proximal to protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM), demonstrating that mismatches encountered early during heteroduplex formation induce rapid rejection of off-target DNA. In contrast, PAM-distal mismatches up to 11 base pairs in length, which prevent DNA cleavage, still allow formation of a stable complex (dissociation rate <0.006 s(-1)), suggesting that extremely slow rejection could sequester Cas9-RNA, increasing the Cas9 expression level necessary for genome-editing, thereby aggravating off-target effects. We also observed at least two different bound FRET states that may represent distinct steps in target search and proofreading. PMID:27624851

  6. Insertion and Deletion Mismatches Distant from the Target Position Improve Gene Correction with a Tailed Duplex.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Natsuki; Ikeda, Akihiro; Yukawa, Seiya; Morita, Yukiko; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-01

    A 5'-tailed duplex (TD) DNA corrects a base-substitution mutation. In this study, the effects of insertion and deletion (indel) mismatches distant from the target position on the gene correction were examined. Three target plasmid DNAs with and without indel mismatches ∼330 bases distant from the correction target position were prepared, and introduced into HeLa cells together with the TD. The indel mismatches improved the gene correction efficiency and specificity without sequence conversions at the indel mismatch site. These results suggested that the gene correction efficiency and specificity are increased when an appropriate second mismatch is introduced into the TD fragment. PMID:27253876

  7. Mutagenic effects induced by the attack of NO2 radical to the guanine-cytosine base pair

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Zúñiga, José; Jacquemin, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the attack of the nitrogen dioxide radical (NO•2) to the guanine—cytosine (GC) base pair and the subsequent tautomeric reactions able to induce mutations, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The conducted simulations allow us to identify the most reactive sites of the GC base pair. Indeed, the computed relative energies demonstrate that the addition of the NO•2 radical to the C8 position of the guanine base forms to the most stable adduct. Although the initial adducts might evolve to non-canonical structures via inter-base hydrogen bonds rearrangements, the probability for the proton exchange to occur lies in the same range as that observed for undamaged DNA. As a result, tautomeric errors in NO2-attacked DNA arises at the same rate as in canonical DNA, with no macroscopic impact on the overall stability of DNA. The potential mutagenic effects of the GC–NO•2 radical adducts likely involve side reactions, e.g., the GC deprotonation to the solvent, rather than proton exchange between guanine and cytosine basis. PMID:25798437

  8. Comparative melting and healing of B-DNA and Z-DNA by an infrared laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Viet Hoang; Pan, Feng; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    We explore the use of a fast laser melting simulation approach combined with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the melting and healing responses of B-DNA and Z-DNA dodecamers with the same d(5'-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3')2 sequence. The frequency of the laser pulse is specifically tuned to disrupt Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, thus inducing melting of the DNA duplexes. Subsequently, the structures relax and partially refold, depending on the field strength. In addition to the inherent interest of the nonequilibrium melting process, we propose that fast melting by an infrared laser pulse could be used as a technique for a fast comparison of relative stabilities of same-sequence oligonucleotides with different secondary structures with full atomistic detail of the structures and solvent. This could be particularly useful for nonstandard secondary structures involving non-canonical base pairs, mismatches, etc.

  9. High Levels of Transcription Stimulate Transversions at GC Base Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Matthew P.; Begins, Kaitlyn J.; Crall, William C.; Holmes, Margaret P.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    High-levels of transcription through a gene stimulate spontaneous mutation rate, a phenomenon termed transcription-associated mutation (TAM). While transcriptional effects on specific mutation classes have been identified using forward mutation and frameshift-reversion assays, little is yet known about transcription-associated base substitutions in yeast. To address this issue, we developed a new base substitution reversion assay (the lys2-TAG allele). We report a 22-fold increase in overall reversion rate in the high- relative to the low-transcription strain (from 2.1- to 47- × 10−9). While all detectable base substitution types increased in the high-transcription strain, G→T and G→C transversions increased disproportionately by 58- and 52-fold, respectively. To assess a potential role of DNA damage in the TAM events, we measured mutation rates and spectra in individual strains defective in the repair of specific DNA lesions or null for the error-prone translesion DNA polymerase zeta (Pol zeta). Results exclude a role of 8-oxoGuanine, general oxidative damage, or apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in the generation of TAM G→T and G→C transversions. In contrast, the TAM transversions at GC base pairs depend on Pol zeta for occurrence implicating DNA damage, other than oxidative lesions or AP sites, in the TAM mechanism. Results further indicate that transcription-dependent G→T transversions in yeast differ mechanistically from equivalent events in E. coli reported by others. Given their occurrences in repair-proficient cells, transcription-associated G→T and G→C events represent a novel type of transcription-associated mutagenesis in normal cells with potentially important implications for evolution and genetic disease. PMID:23055242

  10. The crystal structure of N4-methylcytosine.guanosine base-pairs in the synthetic hexanucleotide d(CGCGm4CG).

    PubMed Central

    Cervi, A R; Guy, A; Leonard, G A; Téoule, R; Hunter, W N

    1993-01-01

    The structure of d(CGCGm4CG) were m4C = N4-methylcytosine has been determined by crystallographic methods. The crystals are multifaced prisms, with orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and unit cell dimensions of a = 17.98, b = 30.77 and c = 44.75A. The asymmetric unit consists of one duplex of hexanucleotide and 49 waters. The R-factor is 0.189 for 1495 reflections with F > or = sigma(F) to a resolution limit of 1.8A. The double helix has a Z-DNA type structure which appears to be intermediate in structure to the two previously characterised structure types for Z-DNA hexamers. The two m4C.G base-pairs adopt structures that are very similar to those of the equivalent base-pairs in the structure of the native sequence d(CGCGCG) except for the presence of the methyl groups which are trans to the N3 atoms of their parent nucleotides and protrude into the solvent region. The introduction of the modified base-pairs into the d(CGCGCG) duplex appears to have a minimal effect on the overall base-pair morphology of the Z-DNA duplex. Images PMID:8284207

  11. Solution structure of the ActD–5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ complex: drug interaction with tandem G·T mismatches and hairpin loop backbone

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chen, Fu-Ming; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Binding of actinomycin D (ActD) to the seemingly single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligomer 5′-CCGTT3 GTGG-3′ has been studied in solution using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. A strong binding constant (8 × 106 M–1) and high quality NMR spectra have allowed us to determine the initial DNA structure using distance geometry as well as the final ActD–5′-CCGTT3 GTGG-3′ complex structure using constrained molecular dynamics calculations. The DNA oligomer 5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ in the complex forms a hairpin structure with tandem G·T mismatches at the stem region next to a loop of three stacked thymine bases pointing toward the major groove. Bipartite T2O–GH1 and T2O–G2NH2 hydrogen bonds were detected for the G·T mismatches that further stabilize this unusual DNA hairpin. The phenoxazone chromophore of ActD intercalates nicely between the tandem G·T mismatches in essentially one major orientation. Additional hydrophobic interactions between the ActD quinoid amino acid residues with the loop T5–T6–T7 backbone protons were also observed. The hydrophobic G–phenoxazone–G interaction in the ActD–5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ complex is more robust than that of the classical ActD– 5′-CCGCT3GCGG-3′ complex, consistent with the roughly 2-fold stronger binding of ActD to the 5′-CCGTT3GTGG-3′ sequence than to its 5′-CCG CT3GCGG-3′ counterpart. Stabilization by ActD of a hairpin containing non-canonical stem base pairs further strengthens the notion that ActD or other related compounds may serve as a sequence- specific ssDNA-binding agent that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other retroviruses replicating through ssDNA intermediates. PMID:12736312

  12. A proposed mechanism of the influence of gold nanoparticles on DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H; Pekcevik, Idah C; Gates, Byron D

    2014-07-22

    A combination of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and nucleic acids has been used in biosensing applications. However, there is a poor fundamental understanding of how gold nanoparticle surfaces influence the DNA hybridization process. Here, we measured the rate constants of the hybridization and dehybridization of DNA on gold nanoparticle surfaces to enable the determination of activation parameters using transition state theory. We show that the target bases need to be detached from the gold nanoparticle surfaces before zipping. This causes a shift of the rate-limiting step of hybridization to the mismatch-sensitive zipping step. Furthermore, our results propose that the binding of gold nanoparticles to the single-stranded DNA segments (commonly known as bubbles) in the duplex DNA stabilizes the bubbles and accelerates the dehybridization process. We employ the proposed mechanism of DNA hybridization/dehybridization to explain the ability of 5 nm diameter gold nanoparticles to help discriminate between single base-pair mismatched DNA molecules when performed in a NanoBioArray chip. The mechanistic insight into the DNA-gold nanoparticle hybridization/dehybridization process should lead to the development of new biosensors. PMID:24965286

  13. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-05-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs—CG, GC and GG—could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region.

  14. A dynamic bead-based microarray for parallel DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochol, R. D.; Casavant, B. P.; Dueck, M. E.; Lee, L. P.; Lin, L.

    2011-05-01

    A microfluidic system has been designed and constructed by means of micromachining processes to integrate both microfluidic mixing of mobile microbeads and hydrodynamic microbead arraying capabilities on a single chip to simultaneously detect multiple bio-molecules. The prototype system has four parallel reaction chambers, which include microchannels of 18 × 50 µm2 cross-sectional area and a microfluidic mixing section of 22 cm length. Parallel detection of multiple DNA oligonucleotide sequences was achieved via molecular beacon probes immobilized on polystyrene microbeads of 16 µm diameter. Experimental results show quantitative detection of three distinct DNA oligonucleotide sequences from the Hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome with single base-pair mismatch specificity. Our dynamic bead-based microarray offers an effective microfluidic platform to increase parallelization of reactions and improve microbead handling for various biological applications, including bio-molecule detection, medical diagnostics and drug screening.

  15. Nanoparticle bridge DNA biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-Wen

    A new DNA sensing method is demonstrated in which DNA hybridization events lead to the formation of nanoparticle satellites that bridge two electrodes and are detected electrically. The hybridization events are exclusively carried out only on specific locations, the surfaces of C-ssDNA modified 50 nm GNPs. The uniqueness of this work is that only a small number of T-ccDNA molecules (<10) is required to form the nanoparticle satellites, allowing ultra-sensitive DNA sensing. The principle of this new DNA sensing technique has been demonstrated using target DNA and three-base-pair-mismatched DNA in 20nM concentrations. Three single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) system is used in our experiment which includes Capture-ssDNA (C-ssDNA), Target-ssDNA (T-ssDNA) and Probe-ssDNA (P-ssDNA). Both C-ssDNA and P-ssDNA are modified by a thiol group and can hybridize with different portions of T-ssDNA. T-ssDNA requires no modification in three ssDNA system, which is beneficial in many applications. C-ssDNA modified 50nm gold nanoparticle (C-50au) and P-ssDNA modified 30nm gold nanoparticle (P-30au) are prepared through the reaction of thiol-gold chemical bonding between thiolated ssDNA and gold nanoparticle (GNP) (C-ssDNA with 50nm GNP, P-ssDNA with 30nm GNP). We controllably place the C-50au only on the SiO2 band surface (˜ 90nm width) between two gold electrodes (source and drain electrodes) by forming positively- and negatively-charged self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on SiO2 and gold surface, respectively. DNA modified GNP is negatively charged due to ionization of phosphate group on DNA back bone. C-50au therefore is negatively charged and can only be attracted toward SiO2 area (repelled by negatively charged gold electrode surface). The amine group of positively-charged SAMs on SiO2 surface is then passivated by converting to non-polar methyl functional group after C-50au placement. P-30au is first hybridized with T-ssDNA in the solution phase (T-P- 30au formed) and is introduced

  16. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors. PMID:25711864

  17. An Abridged Transition State Model to Derive Structure, Dynamics and Energy Components of DNA Polymerase β Fidelity$

    PubMed Central

    Klvaňa, Martin; Jeřábek, Petr; Goodman, Myron F.; Florián, Jan

    2012-01-01

    We show how a restricted reaction surface can be used to facilitate the calculation of biologically important contributions of active site geometries and dynamics to DNA polymerase fidelity. Our analysis, using human DNA polymerase beta (pol β), is performed within the framework of an electrostatic linear free energy response (EFER) model. The structure, dynamics and energetics of pol β-DNA-dNTP interactions are computed between two points on the multidimensional reaction free energy surface. “Point 1” represents a ground state activation intermediate (GSA), which is obtained by deprotonating the terminal 3’OH group of the primer DNA strand. “Point 2” is the transition state (PTS) for the attack of the 3’O- (Onuc) on the Pα atom of dNTP substrate, having the electron density of a dianionic phosphorane intermediate. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to compute the geometric and dynamic contributions to the formation of right and wrong Onuc–P chemical bonds. Matched dCTP•G and mismatched dATP•G base pairs are used to illustrate the analysis. Compared to the dCTP•G base pair, the dATP•G mismatch has fewer GSA configurations with short distances between Onuc and Pα atoms, and between the oxygen in the scissile P-O bond (Olg) and the nearest structural water. The thumb subdomain conformation of the GSA complex is more open for the mismatch, and the H-bonds in the mispair become more extended during the nucleophilic attack than in the correct pair. The electrostatic contributions of pol β and DNA residues to catalysis of the right and wrong P-Onuc bond formation are 5.3 and 3.1 kcal/mol, respectively, resulting in an 80-fold contribution to fidelity. The EFER calculations illustrate the considerable importance of Arg183 and an Olg-proximal water molecule to pol β fidelity. PMID:21739967

  18. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed. PMID:26895074

  19. Adaptive Response Enzyme AlkB Preferentially Repairs 1-Methylguanine and 3-Methylthymine Adducts in Double-Stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangyi; Tang, Qi; Bian, Ke; Humulock, Zachary T; Yang, Xuedong; Jost, Marco; Drennan, Catherine L; Essigmann, John M; Li, Deyu

    2016-04-18

    The AlkB protein is a repair enzyme that uses an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent mechanism to repair alkyl DNA adducts. AlkB has been reported to repair highly susceptible substrates, such as 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine, more efficiently in ss-DNA than in ds-DNA. Here, we tested the repair of weaker AlkB substrates 1-methylguanine and 3-methylthymine and found that AlkB prefers to repair them in ds-DNA. We also discovered that AlkB and its human homologues, ABH2 and ABH3, are able to repair the aforementioned adducts when the adduct is present in a mismatched base pair. These observations demonstrate the strong adaptability of AlkB toward repairing various adducts in different environments. PMID:26919079

  20. Resolution of Specific Nucleotide Mismatches by Wild-Type and AZT-Resistant Reverse Transcriptases during HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; King, Steven R; Ndongmo, Clement B; Stilger, Krista L; An, Wenfeng; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2016-06-01

    A key contributor to HIV-1 genetic variation is reverse transcriptase errors. Some mutations result because reverse transcriptase (RT) lacks 3' to 5' proofreading exonuclease and can extend mismatches. However, RT also excises terminal nucleotides to a limited extent, and this activity contributes to AZT resistance. Because HIV-1 mismatch resolution has been studied in vitro but only indirectly during replication, we developed a novel system to study mismatched base pair resolution during HIV-1 replication in cultured cells using vectors that force template switching at defined locations. These vectors generated mismatched reverse transcription intermediates, with proviral products diagnostic of mismatch resolution mechanisms. Outcomes for wild-type (WT) RT and an AZT-resistant (AZT(R)) RT containing a thymidine analog mutation set-D67N, K70R, D215F, and K219Q-were compared. AZT(R) RT did not excise terminal nucleotides more frequently than WT, and for the majority of tested mismatches, both WT and AZT(R) RTs extended mismatches in more than 90% of proviruses. However, striking enzyme-specific differences were observed for one mispair, with WT RT preferentially resolving dC-rC pairs either by excising the mismatched base or switching templates prematurely, while AZT(R) RT primarily misaligned the primer strand, causing deletions via dislocation mutagenesis. Overall, the results confirmed HIV-1 RT's high capacity for mismatch extension during virus replication and revealed dramatic differences in aberrant intermediate resolution repertoires between WT and AZT(R) RTs on one mismatched replication intermediate. Correlating mismatch extension frequencies observed here with reported viral mutation rates suggests a complex interplay of nucleotide discrimination and mismatch extension drives HIV-1 mutagenesis. PMID:27075671

  1. Effects of primer-template mismatches on the polymerase chain reaction: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 model studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, S; Kellogg, D E; McKinney, N; Spasic, D; Goda, L; Levenson, C; Sninsky, J J

    1990-01-01

    We investigated the effects of various primer-template mismatches on DNA amplification of an HIV-1 gag region by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Single internal mismatches had no significant effect on PCR product yield while those at the 3'-terminal base had varied effects. A:G, G:A, and C:C mismatches reduced overall PCR product yield about 100-fold, A:A mismatches about 20-fold. All other 3'-terminal mismatches were efficiently amplified, although the G:G mismatches appeared to be more sensitive to sequence context and dNTP concentrations than other mismatches. It should be noted that mismatches of T with either G, C, or T had a minimal effect on PCR product yield. Double mismatches within the last four bases of a primer-template duplex where one of the mismatches is at the 3' terminal nucleotide, in general, reduced PCR product yield dramatically. The presence of a mismatched T at the 3'-terminus, however, allowed significant amplification even when coupled with an adjacent mismatch. Furthermore, even two mismatched Ts at the 3'-terminus allowed efficient amplification. Images PMID:2179874

  2. Intense charge transfer surface based on graphene and thymine-Hg(II)-thymine base pairs for detection of Hg(2.).

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Lu, Liping; Kang, Tianfang; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2016-03-15

    In this article, we developed an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor with a high-intensity charge transfer interface for Hg(2+) detection based on Hg(II)-induced DNA hybridization. The sensor was fabricated by the following simple method. First, graphene oxide (GO) was electrochemically reduced onto a glassy carbon electrode through cyclic voltammetry. Then, amino-labeled double-stranded (ds)DNA was assembled on the electrode surface using 1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide as a linker between GO and DNA. The other terminal of dsDNA, which was labeled with biotin, was linked to CdSe quantum dots via biotin-avidin interactions. Reduced graphene oxide has excellent electrical conductivity. dsDNA with T-Hg(II)-T base pairs exhibited more facile charge transfer. They both accelerate the electron transfer performance and sensitivity of the sensor. The increased ECL signals were logarithmically linear with the concentration of Hg(II) when Hg(2+) was present in the detection solution. The linear range of the sensor was 10(-11) to 10(-8)mol/L (R=0.9819) with a detection limit of 10(-11)mol/L. This biosensor exhibited satisfactory results when it was used to detect Hg(II) in real water samples. The biosensor with high-intense charge transfer performance is a prospect avenue to pursue more and more sensitive detection method. PMID:26499870

  3. Dynamic and Progressive Control of DNA Origami Conformation by Modulating DNA Helicity with Chemical Adducts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haorong; Zhang, Hanyu; Pan, Jing; Cha, Tae-Gon; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-05-24

    DNA origami has received enormous attention for its ability to program complex nanostructures with a few nanometer precision. Dynamic origami structures that change conformation in response to environmental cues or external signals hold great promises in sensing and actuation at the nanoscale. The reconfiguration mechanism of existing dynamic origami structures is mostly limited to single-stranded hinges and relies almost exclusively on DNA hybridization or strand displacement. Here, we show an alternative approach by demonstrating on-demand conformation changes with DNA-binding molecules, which intercalate between base pairs and unwind DNA double helices. The unwinding effect modulates the helicity mismatch in DNA origami, which significantly influences the internal stress and the global conformation of the origami structure. We demonstrate the switching of a polymerized origami nanoribbon between different twisting states and a well-constrained torsional deformation in a monomeric origami shaft. The structural transformation is shown to be reversible, and binding isotherms confirm the reconfiguration mechanism. This approach provides a rapid and reversible means to change DNA origami conformation, which can be used for dynamic and progressive control at the nanoscale. PMID:27057775

  4. Recognition of Watson-Crick base pairs: constraints and limits due to geometric selection and tautomerism

    PubMed Central

    Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2014-01-01

    The natural bases of nucleic acids have a strong preference for one tautomer form, guaranteeing fidelity in their hydrogen bonding potential. However, base pairs observed in recent crystal structures of polymerases and ribosomes are best explained by an alternative base tautomer, leading to the formation of base pairs with Watson-Crick-like geometries. These observations set limits to geometric selection in molecular recognition of complementary Watson-Crick pairs for fidelity in replication and translation processes. PMID:24765524

  5. Theoretical study of the protonation of the one-electron-reduced guanine-cytosine base pair by water.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sodio C N; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Kao, Chai-Lin; Chen, Hui-Fen; Yang, Po-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Yin

    2013-02-21

    Prototropic equilibria in ionized DNA play an important role in charge transport and radiation damage of DNA and, therefore, continue to attract considerable attention. Although it is well-established that electron attachment will induce an interbase proton transfer from N1 of guanine (G) to N3 of cytosine (C), the question of whether the surrounding water in the major and minor grooves can protonate the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair still remains open. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the energetics and mechanism for the protonation of the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair by water. Through the calculations of thermochemical cycles, the protonation free energies were estimated to be in the range of 11.6-14.2 kcal/mol. The calculations for the models of C(•-)(H(2)O)(8) and G(-H1)(-)(H(2)O)(16), which were used to simulate the detailed processes of protonation by water before and after the interbase proton transfer, respectively, revealed that the protonation proceeds through a concerted double proton transfer involving the water molecules in the first and second hydration shells. Comparing the present results with the rates of interbase proton transfer and charge transfer along DNA suggests that protonation on the C(•-) moiety is not competitive with interbase proton transfer, but the possibility of protonation on the G(-H1)(-) moiety after interbase proton transfer cannot be excluded. Electronic-excited-state calculations were also carried out by the time-dependent DFT approach. This information is valuable for experimental identification in the future. PMID:23363248

  6. Theoretical Studies on the Intermolecular Interactions of Potentially Primordial Base-Pair Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, Jerzy; Sponer, Judit; Sponer, Jiri; Sumpter, Bobby G; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental studies on the Watson Crick type base pairing of triazine and aminopyrimidine derivatives suggest that acid/base properties of the constituent bases might be related to the duplex stabilities measured in solution. Herein we use high-level quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the base pairing and stacking interactions of seven selected base pairs, which are common in that they are stabilized by two NH O hydrogen bonds separated by one NH N hydrogen bond. We show that neither the base pairing nor the base stacking interaction energies correlate with the reported pKa data of the bases and the melting points of the duplexes. This suggests that the experimentally observed correlation between the melting point data of the duplexes and the pKa values of the constituent bases is not rooted in the intrinsic base pairing and stacking properties. The physical chemistry origin of the observed experimental correlation thus remains unexplained and requires further investigations. In addition, since our calculations are carried out with extrapolation to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals and with inclusion of higher electron correlation effects, they provide reference data for stacking and base pairing energies of non-natural bases.

  7. An atlas of RNA base pairs involving modified nucleobases with optimal geometries and accurate energies.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Mohit; Oliva, Romina; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-08-18

    Posttranscriptional modifications greatly enhance the chemical information of RNA molecules, contributing to explain the diversity of their structures and functions. A significant fraction of RNA experimental structures available to date present modified nucleobases, with half of them being involved in H-bonding interactions with other bases, i.e. 'modified base pairs'. Herein we present a systematic investigation of modified base pairs, in the context of experimental RNA structures. To this end, we first compiled an atlas of experimentally observed modified base pairs, for which we recorded occurrences and structural context. Then, for each base pair, we selected a representative for subsequent quantum mechanics calculations, to find out its optimal geometry and interaction energy. Our structural analyses show that most of the modified base pairs are non Watson-Crick like and are involved in RNA tertiary structure motifs. In addition, quantum mechanics calculations quantify and provide a rationale for the impact of the different modifications on the geometry and stability of the base pairs they participate in. PMID:26117545

  8. Electrochemical Investigation of Interaction between a Bifunctional Probe and GG Mismatch Duplex.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Peng, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-01-01

    A bifunctional probe (FecNC), containing a recognition part and an electrochemical active center, was applied to electrochemical detection of GG mismatch duplexes. The preparation of gold electrodes modified by mismatch and complementatry duplexes was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and optimized for better detection in terms of self-assembly time, hybridization time, and incubation time. The interaction between FecNC and DNA duplexes modified on the surface of a gold electrode was explored by square wave voltammetry (SWV) and EIS. The results showed that the DNA duplexes with GG mismatch on the surface of a gold electrode was easily detected by the largest electrochemical signal of the bifunctional probe because of its selective binding to GG mismatches. The bifunctional probe could offer a simple, effective electrochemical detection of GG mismatches, and theoretical bases for development of electrochemical biosensors. Further, the method would be favorable for diagnosis of genetic diseases. PMID:26165289

  9. Infrared spectrum of the Ag(+)-(pyridine)2 ionic complex: probing interactions in artificial metal-mediated base pairing.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Dopfer, Otto

    2011-07-11

    The isolated pyridine-Ag(+)-pyridine unit (Py-Ag(+)-Py) is employed as a model system to characterize the recently observed Ag(+)-mediated base pairing in DNA oligonucleotides at the molecular level. The structure and infrared (IR) spectrum of the Ag(+)-Py(2) cationic complex are investigated in the gas phase by IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations to determine the preferred metal-ion binding site and other salient properties of the potential-energy surface. The IRMPD spectrum has been obtained in the 840-1720 cm(-1) fingerprint region by coupling the IR free electron laser at the Centre Laser Infrarouge d'Orsay (CLIO) with a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The spectroscopic results are interpreted with quantum chemical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The analysis of the IRMPD spectrum is consistent with a σ complex, in which the Ag(+) ion binds to the nitrogen lone pairs of the two Py ligands in a linear configuration. The binding motif of Py-Ag(+)-Py in the gas phase is the same as that observed in Ag(+)-mediated base pairing in solution. Ag(+) bonding to the π-electron system of the aromatic ring is predicted to be a substantially less-favorable binding motif. PMID:21442717

  10. DNA Charge Transport for Sensing and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sontz, Pamela A.; Muren, Natalie B.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus The DNA duplex is an exquisite macromolecular array that stores genetic information to encode proteins and regulate pathways, but its unique structure imparts chemical function that allows it also to mediate charge transport (CT). We have utilized diverse platforms to probe DNA CT, using spectroscopic, electrochemical, and even genetic methods. These studies have established powerful features of DNA CT chemistry. DNA CT can occur over long molecular distances as long as the bases are well stacked; perturbations in base stacking as arise with single base mismatches, DNA lesions, and the binding of some proteins that kink the DNA, all serve to inhibit DNA CT. Significantly, single molecule studies of DNA CT show that ground state CT can occur over 34 nm as long as the duplex is well stacked; one single base mismatch inhibits CT. The DNA duplex is an effective sensor for the integrity of the base pair stack. Moreover the efficiency of DNA CT is what one would expect for a stack of graphite sheets, equivalent to the stack of DNA base pairs, and independent of the sugar-phosphate backbone. Since DNA CT offers a means to carry out redox chemistry from a distance, we have considered how this chemistry might be used for long range signaling in a biological context. We have taken advantage of our chemical probes and platforms to characterize DNA CT also in the context of the cell. CT can occur over long distances, perhaps funneling damage to particular sites and insulating others from oxidative stress. Significantly, transcription factors that activate the genome to respond to oxidative stress can also be activated from a distance through DNA CT. Numerous proteins work to maintain the integrity of the genome and increasingly they have been found to contain [4Fe-4S] clusters that do not appear to carry out either structural or enzymatic roles. Using electrochemical methods, we find that DNA binding shifts the redox potentials of the clusters, activating them

  11. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the Immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood. PMID:22100214

  12. Structural basis of error-prone replication and stalling at a thymine base by human DNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Kirouac, Kevin N.; Ling, Hong

    2009-06-30

    Human DNA polymerase iota (pol iota) is a unique member of Y-family polymerases, which preferentially misincorporates nucleotides opposite thymines (T) and halts replication at T bases. The structural basis of the high error rates remains elusive. We present three crystal structures of pol complexed with DNA containing a thymine base, paired with correct or incorrect incoming nucleotides. A narrowed active site supports a pyrimidine to pyrimidine mismatch and excludes Watson-Crick base pairing by pol. The template thymine remains in an anti conformation irrespective of incoming nucleotides. Incoming ddATP adopts a syn conformation with reduced base stacking, whereas incorrect dGTP and dTTP maintain anti conformations with normal base stacking. Further stabilization of dGTP by H-bonding with Gln59 of the finger domain explains the preferential T to G mismatch. A template 'U-turn' is stabilized by pol and the methyl group of the thymine template, revealing the structural basis of T stalling. Our structural and domain-swapping experiments indicate that the finger domain is responsible for pol's high error rates on pyrimidines and determines the incorporation specificity.

  13. Sequence-selective single-molecule alkylation with a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide visualized in a DNA nanoscaffold.

    PubMed

    Yoshidome, Tomofumi; Endo, Masayuki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Hidaka, Kumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-03-14

    We demonstrate a novel strategy for visualizing sequence-selective alkylation of target double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using a synthetic pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide in a designed DNA origami scaffold. Doubly functionalized PI polyamide was designed by introduction of an alkylating agent 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI) and biotin for sequence-selective alkylation at the target sequence and subsequent streptavidin labeling, respectively. Selective alkylation of the target site in the substrate DNA was observed by analysis using sequencing gel electrophoresis. For the single-molecule observation of the alkylation by functionalized PI polyamide using atomic force microscopy (AFM), the target position in the dsDNA (∼200 base pairs) was alkylated and then visualized by labeling with streptavidin. Newly designed DNA origami scaffold named "five-well DNA frame" carrying five different dsDNA sequences in its cavities was used for the detailed analysis of the sequence-selectivity and alkylation. The 64-mer dsDNAs were introduced to five individual wells, in which target sequence AGTXCCA/TGGYACT (XY = AT, TA, GC, CG) was employed as fully matched (X = G) and one-base mismatched (X = A, T, C) sequences. The fully matched sequence was alkylated with 88% selectivity over other mismatched sequences. In addition, the PI polyamide failed to attach to the target sequence lacking the alkylation site after washing and streptavidin treatment. Therefore, the PI polyamide discriminated the one mismatched nucleotide at the single-molecule level, and alkylation anchored the PI polyamide to the target dsDNA. PMID:22320236

  14. Direct observation of DNA overwinding by reverse gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Taisaku; Yogo, Katsunori; Furuike, Shou; Sutoh, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Reverse gyrase, found in hyperthermophiles, is the only enzyme known to overwind (introduce positive supercoils into) DNA. The ATP-dependent activity, detected at >70 °C, has so far been studied solely by gel electrophoresis; thus, the reaction dynamics remain obscure. Here, we image the overwinding reaction at 71 °C under a microscope, using DNA containing consecutive 30 mismatched base pairs that serve as a well-defined substrate site. A single reverse gyrase molecule processively winds the DNA for >100 turns. Bound enzyme shows moderate temperature dependence, retaining significant activity down to 50 °C. The unloaded reaction rate at 71 °C exceeds five turns per second, which is >102-fold higher than hitherto indicated but lower than the measured ATPase rate of 20 s−1, indicating loose coupling. The overwinding reaction sharply slows down as the torsional stress accumulates in DNA and ceases at stress of mere ∼5 pN⋅nm, where one more turn would cost only sixfold the thermal energy. The enzyme would thus keep DNA in a slightly overwound state to protect, but not overprotect, the genome of hyperthermophiles against thermal melting. Overwinding activity is also highly sensitive to DNA tension, with an effective interaction length exceeding the size of reverse gyrase, implying requirement for slack DNA. All results point to the mechanism where strand passage relying on thermal motions, as in topoisomerase IA, is actively but loosely biased toward overwinding. PMID:26023188

  15. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5′-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:24135881

  16. Designing DNA interstrand lock for locus-specific methylation detection in a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Insoon; Wang, Yong; Reagan, Corbin; Fu, Yumei; Wang, Michael X.; Gu, Li-Qun

    2013-10-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Locus-specific DNA methylation can be used as biomarkers in various diseases including cancer. Many methods have been developed for genome-wide methylation analysis, but molecular diagnotics needs simple tools to determine methylation states at individual CpG sites in a gene fragment. In this report, we utilized the nanopore single-molecule sensor to investigate a base-pair specific metal ion/nucleic acids interaction, and explored its potential application in locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. We identified that divalent Mercury ion (Hg2+) can selectively bind a uracil-thymine mismatch (U-T) in a dsDNA. The Hg2+ binding creates a reversible interstrand lock, called MercuLock, which enhances the hybridization strength by two orders of magnitude. Such MercuLock cannot be formed in a 5-methylcytosine-thymine mismatch (mC-T). By nanopore detection of dsDNA stability, single bases of uracil and 5-methylcytosine can be distinguished. Since uracil is converted from cytosine by bisulfite treatment, cytosine and 5'-methylcytosine can be discriminated. We have demonstrated the methylation analysis of multiple CpGs in a p16 gene CpG island. This single-molecule assay may have potential in detection of epigenetic cancer biomarkers in biofluids, with an ultimate goal for early diagnosis of cancer.

  17. Stacking interactions and DNA intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Shen; Cooper, Valentino R; Thonhauser, Prof. Timo; Lundqvist, Prof. Bengt I.; Langreth, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between stacking interactions and the intercalation of proflavine and ellipticine within DNA is investigated using a nonempirical van der Waals density functional for the correlation energy. Our results, employing a binary stack model, highlight fundamental, qualitative differences between base-pair base-pair interactions and that of the stacked intercalator base pair system. Most notable result is the paucity of torque which so distinctively defines the Twist of DNA. Surprisingly, this model, when combined with a constraint on the twist of the surrounding base-pair steps to match the observed unwinding of the sugar-phosphate backbone, was sufficient for explaining the experimentally observed proflavine intercalator configuration. Our extensive mapping of the potential energy surface of base-pair intercalator interactions can provide valuable information for future nonempirical studies of DNA intercalation dynamics.

  18. Sequence context effect for hMSH2-hMSH6 mismatch-dependent activation

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Anthony; Johnson, Christopher N.; Germann, Markus W.; Fishel, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Numerous DNA mismatches and lesions activate MutS homologue (MSH) ATPase activity that is essential for mismatch repair (MMR). We have found that a mismatch embedded in a nearest-neighbor sequence context containing symmetric 3′-purines (2 × 3′-purines) enhanced, whereas symmetric 3′-pyrimidines (2 × 3′-pyrimidines) reduced, hMSH2-hMSH6 ATPase activation. The 3′-purine/pyrimidine effect was most evident for G-containing mispairs. A similar trend pervaded mismatch binding (KD) and the melting of unbound oligonucleotides (Tm; ΔG). However, these latter measures did not accurately predict the hierarchy of MSH ATPase activation. NMR studies of imino proton lifetime, solvent accessibility, and NOE connectivity suggest that sequence contexts that provoke improved MSH-activation displayed enhanced localized DNA flexibility: a dynamic DNA signature that may account for the wide range of lesions that activate MSH functions. PMID:19237577

  19. Premelting base pair opening probability and drug binding constant of a daunomycin-poly d(GCAT).poly d(ATGC) complex.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Z; Prohofsky, E W

    1994-01-01

    We calculate room temperature thermal fluctuational base pair opening probability of a daunomycin-poly d(GCAT).poly d(ATGC) complex. This system is constructed at an atomic level of detail based on x-ray analysis of a crystal structure. The base pair opening probabilities are calculated from a modified self-consistent phonon approach of anharmonic lattice dynamics theory. We find that daunomycin binding substantially enhances the thermal stability of one of the base pairs adjacent the drug because of strong hydrogen bonding between the drug and the base. The possible effect of this enhanced stability on the drug inhibition of DNA transcription and replication is discussed. We also calculate the probability of drug dissociation from the helix based on the selfconsistent calculation of the probability of the disruption of drug-base H-bonds and the unstacking probability of the drug. The calculations can be used to determine the equilibrium drug binding constant which is found to be in good agreement with observations on similar daunomycin-DNA systems. PMID:8011914

  20. An atlas of RNA base pairs involving modified nucleobases with optimal geometries and accurate energies

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Mohit; Oliva, Romina; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications greatly enhance the chemical information of RNA molecules, contributing to explain the diversity of their structures and functions. A significant fraction of RNA experimental structures available to date present modified nucleobases, with half of them being involved in H-bonding interactions with other bases, i.e. ‘modified base pairs’. Herein we present a systematic investigation of modified base pairs, in the context of experimental RNA structures. To this end, we first compiled an atlas of experimentally observed modified base pairs, for which we recorded occurrences and structural context. Then, for each base pair, we selected a representative for subsequent quantum mechanics calculations, to find out its optimal geometry and interaction energy. Our structural analyses show that most of the modified base pairs are non Watson–Crick like and are involved in RNA tertiary structure motifs. In addition, quantum mechanics calculations quantify and provide a rationale for the impact of the different modifications on the geometry and stability of the base pairs they participate in. PMID:26117545

  1. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: The non-Watson–Crick base pairs and their associated isostericity matrices

    PubMed Central

    Leontis, Neocles B.; Stombaugh, Jesse; Westhof, Eric

    2002-01-01

    RNA molecules exhibit complex structures in which a large fraction of the bases engage in non-Watson–Crick base pairing, forming motifs that mediate long-range RNA–RNA interactions and create binding sites for proteins and small molecule ligands. The rapidly growing number of three-dimensional RNA structures at atomic resolution requires that databases contain the annotation of such base pairs. An unambiguous and descriptive nomenclature was proposed recently in which RNA base pairs were classified by the base edges participating in the interaction (Watson–Crick, Hoogsteen/CH or sugar edge) and the orientation of the glycosidic bonds relative to the hydrogen bonds (cis or trans). Twelve basic geometric families were identified and all 12 have been observed in crystal structures. For each base pairing family, we present here the 4 × 4 ‘isostericity matrices’ summarizing the geometric relationships between the 16 pairwise combinations of the four standard bases, A, C, G and U. Whenever available, a representative example of each observed base pair from X-ray crystal structures (3.0 Å resolution or better) is provided or, otherwise, theoretically plausible models. This format makes apparent the recurrent geometric patterns that are observed and helps identify isosteric pairs that co-vary or interchange in sequences of homologous molecules while maintaining conserved three-dimensional motifs. PMID:12177293

  2. Educational Mismatch and Self-Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Roche, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on educational mismatch concentrates on estimating its labor market consequences but with a focus on wage and salary workers. This paper examines the far less studied influence of mismatch on the self-employed. Using a sample of workers in science and engineering fields, results show larger earnings penalties for mismatch among…

  3. Tools for the automatic identification and classification of RNA base pairs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanwang; Jossinet, Fabrice; Leontis, Neocles; Chen, Li; Westbrook, John; Berman, Helen; Westhof, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Three programs have been developed to aid in the classification and visualization of RNA structure. BPViewer provides a web interface for displaying three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of individual base pairs or base pair collections. A web server, RNAview, automatically identifies and classifies the types of base pairs that are formed in nucleic acid structures by various combinations of the three edges, Watson–Crick, Hoogsteen and the Sugar edge. RNAView produces two-dimensional (2D) diagrams of secondary and tertiary structure in either Postscript, VRML or RNAML formats. The application RNAMLview can be used to rearrange various parts of the RNAView 2D diagram to generate a standard representation (like the cloverleaf structure of tRNAs) or any layout desired by the user. A 2D diagram can be rapidly reformatted using RNAMLview since all the parts of RNA (like helices and single strands) are dynamically linked while moving the selected parts. With the base pair annotation and the 2D graphic display, RNA motifs are rapidly identified and classified. A survey has been carried out for 41 unique structures selected from the NDB database. The statistics for the occurrence of each edge and of each of the 12 bp families are given for the combinations of the four bases: A, G, U and C. The program also allows for visualization of the base pair interactions by using a symbolic convention previously proposed for base pairs. The web servers for BPViewer and RNAview are available at http://ndbserver.rutgers.edu/services/. The application RNAMLview can also be downloaded from this site. The 2D diagrams produced by RNAview are available for RNA structures in the Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) at http://ndbserver.rutgers.edu/atlas/. PMID:12824344

  4. On the connection between inherent DNA flexure and preferred binding of hydroxymethyluracil-containing DNA by the type II DNA-binding protein TF1.

    PubMed

    Grove, A; Galeone, A; Mayol, L; Geiduschek, E P

    1996-07-12

    TF1 is a member of the family of type II DNA-binding proteins, which also includes the bacterial HU proteins and the Escherichia coli integration host factor (IHF). Distinctive to TF1, which is encoded by the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage SPO1, is its preferential binding to DNA in which thymine is replaced by 5-hydroxymethyluracil (hmU), as it is in the phage genome. TF1 binds to preferred sites within the phage genome and generates pronounced DNA bending. The extent to which DNA flexibility contributes to the sequence-specific binding of TF1, and the connection between hmU preference and DNA flexibility has been examined. Model flexible sites, consisting of consecutive mismatches, increase the affinity of thymine-containing DNA for TF1. In particular, tandem mismatches separated by nine base-pairs generate an increase, by orders of magnitude, in the affinity of TF1 for T-containing DNA with the sequence of a preferred TF1 binding site, and fully match the affinity of TF1 for this cognate site in hmU-containing DNA (Kd approximately 3 nM). Other placements of loops generate suboptimal binding. This is consistent with a significant contribution of site-specific DNA flexibility to complex formation. Analysis of complexes with hmU-DNA of decreasing length shows that a major part of the binding affinity is generated within a central 19 bp segment (delta G0 = 41.7 kJ mol-1) with more-distal DNA contributing modestly to the affinity (delta delta G = -0.42 kJ mol-1 bp-1 on increasing duplex length to 37 bp). However, a previously characterised thermostable and more tightly binding mutant TF1, TF1(E15G/T32I), derives most of its extra affinity from interaction with flanking DNA. We propose that inherent but sequence-dependent deformability of hmU-containing DNA underlies the preferential binding of TF1 and that TF1-induced DNA bendings is a result of distortions at two distinct sites separated by 9 bp of duplex DNA. PMID:8764400

  5. Structural Properties of Mismatched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    The problem of understanding the local structure of disordered alloys has been around for a long time. In this thesis, I look more specifically at the effect of size-mismatch disorder in binary alloys under many forms: metallic and semiconductor alloys, bulk and surfaces, two and three dimensional systems. I have studied the limitations of a central-force model (CFM) and an embedded-atom potential (EAM) in describing the local structure of binary metallic alloys composed of Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, or Pt. Although an analytical model developed using the CFM explains qualitatively well the experimental and numerical results, in many cases, it is important to add electronic density effects through a more sophisticated potential like EAM in order to agree quantitatively with experiment. I have also looked at amorphous and crystalline silicon-germanium alloys. It turns out that the effect of size-mismatch is the same on a crystalline and an amorphous lattice. In the latter case, it can be seen as a perturbation of the much larger disorder due to the amorphisation process. However, the analytical predictions differ, for both the crystalline and amorphous alloys, from the experimental results. If one is to believe the data, there is only one possible explanation for this inconsistency: large amounts of hydrogen are present in the samples used for the measurements. Since the data analysis of EXAFS results is not always straightforward, I have proposed some experiments that could shed light on this problem. One of these experiments would be to look at the (111) surface of a Si-Ge alloy with a scanning tunneling microscope. I also present in this thesis the theoretical predictions for the height distribution at the surface as well as some more general structural information about the relaxation in the network as one goes away from the surface. Finally, I have studied the effect of size -mismatch in a purely two dimensional lattice, looking for mismatch-driven phase transitions

  6. Robust Detection of Rare Species Using Environmental DNA: The Importance of Primer Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Taylor M.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Young, Michael K.; Jane, Stephen F.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is being rapidly adopted as a tool to detect rare animals. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probe-based chemistries may represent a particularly powerful tool because of the method’s sensitivity, specificity, and potential to quantify target DNA. However, there has been little work understanding the performance of these assays in the presence of closely related, sympatric taxa. If related species cause any cross-amplification or interference, false positives and negatives may be generated. These errors can be disastrous if false positives lead to overestimate the abundance of an endangered species or if false negatives prevent detection of an invasive species. In this study we test factors that influence the specificity and sensitivity of TaqMan MGB assays using co-occurring, closely related brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and bull trout (S. confluentus) as a case study. We found qPCR to be substantially more sensitive than traditional PCR, with a high probability of detection at concentrations as low as 0.5 target copies/µl. We also found that number and placement of base pair mismatches between the Taqman MGB assay and non-target templates was important to target specificity, and that specificity was most influenced by base pair mismatches in the primers, rather than in the probe. We found that insufficient specificity can result in both false positive and false negative results, particularly in the presence of abundant related species. Our results highlight the utility of qPCR as a highly sensitive eDNA tool, and underscore the importance of careful assay design. PMID:23555689

  7. Robust detection of rare species using environmental DNA: the importance of primer specificity.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Taylor M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Jane, Stephen F; Lowe, Winsor H; Whiteley, Andrew R; Schwartz, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is being rapidly adopted as a tool to detect rare animals. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probe-based chemistries may represent a particularly powerful tool because of the method's sensitivity, specificity, and potential to quantify target DNA. However, there has been little work understanding the performance of these assays in the presence of closely related, sympatric taxa. If related species cause any cross-amplification or interference, false positives and negatives may be generated. These errors can be disastrous if false positives lead to overestimate the abundance of an endangered species or if false negatives prevent detection of an invasive species. In this study we test factors that influence the specificity and sensitivity of TaqMan MGB assays using co-occurring, closely related brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and bull trout (S. confluentus) as a case study. We found qPCR to be substantially more sensitive than traditional PCR, with a high probability of detection at concentrations as low as 0.5 target copies/µl. We also found that number and placement of base pair mismatches between the Taqman MGB assay and non-target templates was important to target specificity, and that specificity was most influenced by base pair mismatches in the primers, rather than in the probe. We found that insufficient specificity can result in both false positive and false negative results, particularly in the presence of abundant related species. Our results highlight the utility of qPCR as a highly sensitive eDNA tool, and underscore the importance of careful assay design. PMID:23555689

  8. DNA hybridization-induced reorientation of liquid crystal anchoring at the nematic liquid crystal/aqueous interface.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrew D; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2008-07-01

    Interactions between DNA and an adsorbed cationic surfactant at the nematic liquid crystal (LC)/aqueous interface were investigated using polarized and fluorescence microscopy. The adsorption of octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) surfactant to the LC/aqueous interface resulted in homeotropic (untilted) LC alignment. Subsequent adsorption of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to the surfactant-laden interface modified the interfacial structure, resulting in a reorientation of the LC from homeotropic alignment to an intermediate tilt angle. Exposure of the ssDNA/OTAB interfacial complex to its ssDNA complement induced a second change in the interfacial structure characterized by the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of lateral regions that induced homeotropic LC alignment. Fluorescence microscopy showed explicitly that the complement was colocalized in the same regions as the homeotropic domains. Exposure to noncomplementary ssDNA caused no such response, suggesting that the homeotropic regions were due to DNA hybridization. This hybridization occurred in the vicinity of the interface despite the fact that the conditions in bulk solution were such that hybridization did not occur (high stringency), suggesting that the presence of the cationic surfactant neutralized electrostatic repulsion and allowed for hydrogen bonding between DNA complements. This system has potential for label-less and portable DNA detection. Indeed, LC response to ssDNA target was detected with a lower limit of approximately 50 fmol of complement and was sufficiently selective to differentiate a one-base-pair mismatch in a 16-mer target. PMID:18528984

  9. The UvrD helicase and its modulation by the mismatch repair protein MutL.

    PubMed

    Matson, Steven W; Robertson, Adam B

    2006-01-01

    UvrD is a superfamily I DNA helicase with well documented roles in excision repair and methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) in addition to poorly understood roles in replication and recombination. The MutL protein is a homodimeric DNA-stimulated ATPase that plays a central role in MMR in Escherichia coli. This protein has been characterized as the master regulator of mismatch repair since it interacts with and modulates the activity of several other proteins involved in the mismatch repair pathway including MutS, MutH and UvrD. Here we present a brief summary of recent studies directed toward arriving at a better understanding of the interaction between MutL and UvrD, and the impact of this interaction on the activity of UvrD and its role in mismatch repair. PMID:16935885

  10. Imagery mismatch negativity in musicians.

    PubMed

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated musical imagery in musicians and nonmusicians by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). We used a new paradigm in which subjects had to continue familiar melodies in their mind and then judged if a further presented tone was a correct continuation of the melody. Incorrect tones elicited an imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN) in musicians but not in nonmusicians. This finding suggests that the MMN component can be based on an imagined instead of a sensory memory trace and that imagery of music is modulated by musical expertise. PMID:19673775

  11. Elastic mismatch enhances cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Yony; Palmieri, Benoit; Grant, Martin

    In recent years, the study of physics phenomena in cancer has drawn considerable attention. In cancer metastasis, a soft cancer cell leaves the tumor, and must pass through the endothelium before reaching the bloodstream. Using a phase-field model we have shown that the elasticity mismatch between cells alone is sufficient to enhance the motility of thesofter cancer cell by means of bursty migration, in agreement with experiment. We will present further characterization of these behaviour, as well as new possible applications for this model.

  12. Site-specific fluorescent probing of RNA molecules by unnatural base-pair transcription for local structural conformation analysis.

    PubMed

    Hikida, Yasushi; Kimoto, Michiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hirao, Ichiro

    2010-07-01

    Methods for fluorescent probing at a defined position of RNA provide powerful tools for analyzing the local structural conformation of functional RNA molecules by tracking fluorescence changes. In this article, we describe the site-specific fluorescent probing of RNA by transcription with an expanded genetic alphabet, using an extra, unnatural base pair between 2-amino-6-(2-thienyl)purine (s) and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa). The protocol comprises template DNA preparation containing Pa, transcription involving fluorescent s incorporation and structural analysis of transcripts. The s base is strongly fluorescent, and its nucleoside 5'-triphosphate is site-specifically incorporated into RNA transcripts, opposite Pa in DNA templates, by conventional T7 transcription. The fluorescent intensity of s changes depending on its environment around the probe site, providing clues about the local structural features of RNA molecules. This is the first protocol for RNA transcript preparation with fluorescent labeling at a desired position. The procedure for s-containing RNA preparation takes about 2-3 d. PMID:20595959

  13. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  14. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  15. Electrochemical properties of interstrand cross-linked DNA duplexes labeled with Nile blue.

    PubMed

    Mie, Yasuhiro; Kowata, Keiko; Kojima, Naoshi; Komatsu, Yasuo

    2012-12-11

    DNA molecules have attracted considerable attention as functional materials in various fields such as electrochemical sensors with redox-labeled DNA. However, the recently developed interstrand cross-link (ICL) technique for double-stranded DNA can adequately modify the electronic properties inside the duplex. Hence, the electrochemical investigation of ICL-DNA helps us to understand the electron transfer of redox-labeled DNA at an electrode surface, which would develop useful sensors. In this study, the first insight into this matter is presented. We prepared 17-mer DNA duplexes incorporating Nile blue (NB-DNA) at one end as a redox marker and a disulfide tether at the other end for immobilization onto an electrode. The duplexes were covalently cross-linked by bifunctional cross-linkers that utilize either a propyl or naphthalene residue to replace a base pair. Their electrochemical responses at the electrode surface were compared to evaluate the effect of the ICL on the electron-transfer reactions of the redox-labeled DNA duplexes. A direct transfer of electrons between NB and the electrode was observed for a standard DNA, as previously reported, whereas interstrand cross-linked DNA (CL-DNA) strands showed a decrease in the direct electron-transfer pathway. This is expected to result from constraining the elastic bending/flexibility of the duplex caused by the covalent cross-links. Interestingly, the CL-DNA incorporating naphthalene residues exhibited additional voltammetric peaks derived from DNA-mediated electron transfer (through base π stacking), which was not observed in the mismatched CL-DNA. The present results indicate that the ICL significantly affects electron transfer in the redox-labeled DNA at the electrode and can be an important determinant for electrochemical signaling in addition to its role in stabilizing the duplex structure. PMID:23153070

  16. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  17. Electrochemical DNA sensor for specific detection of picomolar Hg(II) based on exonuclease III-assisted recycling signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaorong; Zhao, Huimin; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2015-03-21

    An ultrasensitive methodology was successfully developed for the quantitative detection of picomolar Hg(2+) based on the combination of thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) coordination chemistry and exonuclease III-aided recycling signal amplification. Single-strand probe DNA was immobilized on an Au electrode via an Au-S bond. In the presence of Hg(2+), the probe DNA hybridized with the target DNA containing four thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatches via the Hg(2+)-mediated coordination of T-Hg(2+)-T base pairs. Then the probe DNA in the DNA duplex was specifically recognized and selectively digested by exonuclease III; in contrast the target DNA was safely dissociated from the DNA duplexes to subsequently hybridize with a new signal probe, leading to target recycling and signal amplification. As a result, the peak current caused by the electrostatic interactions of [Ru(NH3)6](3+) cations with the backbone of the probe DNA decreased by different degrees, corresponding to the Hg(2+) concentrations. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed electrochemical DNA biosensor showed a robust detection limit as low as 1 pM (S/N = 3), with a wide linear range from 0.01 to 500 nM and good selectivity. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to assay Hg(2+) in real environmental samples. PMID:25676090

  18. On the role of mercury in the non-covalent stabilisation of consecutive U-Hg(II)-U metal-mediated nucleic acid base pairs: metallophilic attraction enters the world of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Benda, Ladislav; Straka, Michal; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Metal atoms with a closed-shell electronic structure and positive charge as for example the Au(I), Pt(II), Ag(I), Tl(I) or Hg(II) atoms do not in some compounds repel each other due to the so-called metallophilic attraction (P. Pyykkö, Chem. Rev., 1997, 97, 597-636). Here we highlight the role of the Hg(II)Hg(II) metallophilic attraction between the consecutive metal-mediated mismatched base pairs of nucleic acids. Usually, the base stacking dominates the non-covalent interactions between steps of native nucleic acids. In the presence of metal-mediated base pairs these non-covalent interactions are enriched by the metal-base interactions and the metallophilic attraction. The two interactions arising due to the metal linkage of the mismatches were found in this study to have a stabilizing effect on nucleic acid structure. The calculated data are consistent with recent experimental observations. The stabilization due to the metallophilic attraction seems to be a generally important concept for the nucleic acids containing heavy metals with short contacts. PMID:21049099

  19. Hoogsteen base-pairing revisited: Resolving a role in normal biological processes and human diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Gargi; Muniyappa, K. . E-mail: kmbc@biochem.iisc.ernet.in

    2006-04-28

    For a long time since the discovery of an alternative type of hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymidine, termed Hoogsteen base-pairing, its biological role remained elusive. Recent experiments provide compelling evidence that Hoogsteen base pairs manifest in a gamut of nuclear processes encompassing gene expression, replication, recombination, and telomere length maintenance. An increasing number of proteins that have been shown to bind, unwind or cleave G-quadruplexes or triplexes with high specificity underscore their biological significance. In humans, the absence of these cellular factors or their dysfunction leads to a wide spectrum of genetic diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative syndromes, and a myriad of other disorders. Thus, development of clinically useful compounds that target G-quadruplexes or triplexes, and interfere with specific cellular processes, provides considerable promise for successful and improved treatment of human diseases.

  20. Spontaneous formation and base pairing of plausible prebiotic nucleotides in water.

    PubMed

    Cafferty, Brian J; Fialho, David M; Khanam, Jaheda; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V

    2016-01-01

    The RNA World hypothesis presupposes that abiotic reactions originally produced nucleotides, the monomers of RNA and universal constituents of metabolism. However, compatible prebiotic reactions for the synthesis of complementary (that is, base pairing) nucleotides and mechanisms for their mutual selection within a complex chemical environment have not been reported. Here we show that two plausible prebiotic heterocycles, melamine and barbituric acid, form glycosidic linkages with ribose and ribose-5-phosphate in water to produce nucleosides and nucleotides in good yields. Even without purification, these nucleotides base pair in aqueous solution to create linear supramolecular assemblies containing thousands of ordered nucleotides. Nucleotide anomerization and supramolecular assemblies favour the biologically relevant β-anomer form of these ribonucleotides, revealing abiotic mechanisms by which nucleotide structure and configuration could have been originally favoured. These findings indicate that nucleotide formation and selection may have been robust processes on the prebiotic Earth, if other nucleobases preceded those of extant life. PMID:27108699

  1. Spontaneous formation and base pairing of plausible prebiotic nucleotides in water

    PubMed Central

    Cafferty, Brian J.; Fialho, David M.; Khanam, Jaheda; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA World hypothesis presupposes that abiotic reactions originally produced nucleotides, the monomers of RNA and universal constituents of metabolism. However, compatible prebiotic reactions for the synthesis of complementary (that is, base pairing) nucleotides and mechanisms for their mutual selection within a complex chemical environment have not been reported. Here we show that two plausible prebiotic heterocycles, melamine and barbituric acid, form glycosidic linkages with ribose and ribose-5-phosphate in water to produce nucleosides and nucleotides in good yields. Even without purification, these nucleotides base pair in aqueous solution to create linear supramolecular assemblies containing thousands of ordered nucleotides. Nucleotide anomerization and supramolecular assemblies favour the biologically relevant β-anomer form of these ribonucleotides, revealing abiotic mechanisms by which nucleotide structure and configuration could have been originally favoured. These findings indicate that nucleotide formation and selection may have been robust processes on the prebiotic Earth, if other nucleobases preceded those of extant life. PMID:27108699

  2. Base-pairing promotes leader selection to prime in vitro influenza genome transcription.

    PubMed

    Geerts-Dimitriadou, Christina; Zwart, Mark P; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The requirements for alignment of capped leader sequences along the viral genome during influenza transcription initiation (cap-snatching) have long been an enigma. In this study, competition experiments using an in vitro transcription assay revealed that influenza virus transcriptase prefers leader sequences with base complementarity to the 3'-ultimate residues of the viral template, 10 or 11 nt from the 5' cap. Internal priming at the 3'-penultimate residue, as well as prime-and-realign was observed. The nucleotide identity immediately 5' of the base-pairing residues also affected cap donor usage. Application to the in vitro system of RNA molecules with increased base complementarity to the viral RNA template showed stronger reduction of globin RNA leader initiated influenza transcription compared to those with a single base-pairing possibility. Altogether the results indicated an optimal cap donor consensus sequence of (7m)G-(N)(7-8)-(A/U/G)-(A/U)-AGC-3'. PMID:21051068

  3. Single-Base Pair Genome Editing in Human Cells by Using Site-Specific Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with human diseases or phenotypes. However, causal relationships between most SNPs and the associated disease have not been established, owing to technical challenges such as unavailability of suitable cell lines. Recently, efficient editing of a single base pair in the genome was achieved using programmable site-specific nucleases. This technique enables experimental confirmation of the causality between SNPs and disease, and is potentially valuable in clinical applications. In this review, I introduce the molecular basis and describe examples of single-base pair editing in human cells. I also discuss the challenges associated with the technique, as well as possible solutions. PMID:26404258

  4. Direct Updating of an RNA Base-Pairing Probability Matrix with Marginal Probability Constraints

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A base-pairing probability matrix (BPPM) stores the probabilities for every possible base pair in an RNA sequence and has been used in many algorithms in RNA informatics (e.g., RNA secondary structure prediction and motif search). In this study, we propose a novel algorithm to perform iterative updates of a given BPPM, satisfying marginal probability constraints that are (approximately) given by recently developed biochemical experiments, such as SHAPE, PAR, and FragSeq. The method is easily implemented and is applicable to common models for RNA secondary structures, such as energy-based or machine-learning–based models. In this article, we focus mainly on the details of the algorithms, although preliminary computational experiments will also be presented. PMID:23210474

  5. Isoalloxazine derivatives promote photocleavage of natural RNAs at G.U base pairs embedded within helices.

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, P; Hermann, T; Huber, C; Westhof, E; Famulok, M

    1997-01-01

    We have recently shown that isoalloxazine derivatives are able to photocleave RNA specifically at G.U base pairs embedded within a helical stack. The reaction involves the selective molecular recognition of G.U base pairs by the isoalloxazine ring and the removal of one nucleoside downstream of the uracil residue. Divalent metal ions are absolutely required for cleavage. Here we extend our studies to complex natural RNA molecules with known secondary and tertiary structures, such as tRNAs and a group I intron (td). G.U pairs were cleaved in accordance with the phylogenetically and experimentally derived secondary and tertiary structures. Tandem G.U pairs or certain G.U pairs located at a helix extremity were not affected. These new cleavage data, together with the RNA crystal structure, allowed us to perform molecular dynamics simulations to provide a structural basis for the observed specificity. We present a stable structural model for the ternary complex of the G. U-containing helical stack, the isoalloxazine molecule and a metal ion. This model provides significant new insight into several aspects of the cleavage phenomenon, mechanism and specificity for G. U pairs. Our study shows that in large natural RNAs a secondary structure motif made of an unusual base pair can be recognized and cleaved with high specificity by a low molecular weight molecule. This photocleavage reaction thus opens up the possibility of probing the accessibility of G.U base pairs, which are endowed with specific structural and functional roles in numerous structured and catalytic RNAs and interactions of RNA with proteins, in folded RNAs. PMID:9321652

  6. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. PMID:26138135

  7. Does base-pairing strength play a role in microRNA repression?

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ido; Shomron, Noam; Heifetz, Yael

    2012-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, single-stranded RNAs that silence gene expression by either degrading mRNA or repressing translation. Each miRNA regulates a specific set of mRNA "targets" by binding to complementary sequences in their 3' untranslated region. In this study, we examined the importance of the base-pairing strength of the miRNA-target duplex to repression. We hypothesized that if base-pairing strength affects the functionality of miRNA repression, organisms with higher body temperature or that live at higher temperatures will have miRNAs with higher G/C content so that the miRNA-target complex will remain stable. In the nine model organisms examined, we found a significant correlation between the average G/C content of miRNAs and physiological temperature, supporting our hypothesis. Next, for each organism examined, we compared the average G/C content of miRNAs that are conserved among distant organisms and that of miRNAs that are evolutionarily recent. We found that the average G/C content of ancient miRNAs is lower than recent miRNAs in homeotherms, whereas the trend was inversed in poikilotherms, suggesting that G/C content is associated with temperature, thus further supporting our hypothesis. In the organisms examined, the average G/C content of miRNA "seed" sequences was higher than that of mature miRNAs, which was higher than pre-miRNA loops, suggesting an association between the degree of functionality of the sequence and its average G/C content. Our analyses show a possible association between the base-pairing strength of miRNA-targets and the temperature of an organism, suggesting that base-pairing strength plays a role in repression by miRNAs. PMID:23019592

  8. Cleavage at the twelve-base-pair sequence 5'-TCTAGATCTAGA-3' using M.Xbal (TCTAGm6A) methylation and DpnI (Gm6A/TC) cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Y; Van Cott, E; Wilson, G G; McClelland, M

    1990-01-01

    The DNA methylase M.Xbal was isolated from an E. coli recombinant clone. We deduce that the enzyme methylates at the sequence 5'-TCTAGm6A-3'. In combination with the methylation-dependent restriction endonuclease, DpnI (5'-Gm6A/TC-3'), DNA cleavage occurs at the sequence 5'-TCTAGA/TCTAGA-3'. This twelve-base-pair site should occur once every 16,000,000 base pairs in a random sequence of DNA. The exceptional rarity of the M.XbaI/DpnI sequence makes it an ideal candidate for transpositional integration of a unique cleavage site into bacterial genomes. Retrotransposition into mammalian genomes is also an attractive possibility. Images PMID:2158082

  9. Database of non-canonical base pairs found in known RNA structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaswamy, U.; Voss, N.; Zhang, Z.; Fox, G. E.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic resolution RNA structures are being published at an increasing rate. It is common to find a modest number of non-canonical base pairs in these structures in addition to the usual Watson-Crick pairs. This database summarizes the occurrence of these rare base pairs in accordance with standard nomenclature. The database, http://prion.bchs.uh.edu/, contains information such as sequence context, sugar pucker conformation, anti / syn base conformations, chemical shift, p K (a)values, melting temperature and free energy. Of the 29 anticipated pairs with two or more hydrogen bonds, 20 have been encountered to date. In addition, four unexpected pairs with two hydrogen bonds have been reported bringing the total to 24. Single hydrogen bond versions of five of the expected geometries have been encountered among the single hydrogen bond interactions. In addition, 18 different types of base triplets have been encountered, each of which involves three to six hydrogen bonds. The vast majority of the rare base pairs are antiparallel with the bases in the anti configuration relative to the ribose. The most common are the GU wobble, the Sheared GA pair, the Reverse Hoogsteen pair and the GA imino pair.

  10. Noncanonical registers and base pairs in human 5′ splice-site selection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jiazi; Ho, Jia Xin Jessie; Zhong, Zhensheng; Luo, Shufang; Chen, Gang; Roca, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Accurate recognition of splice sites is essential for pre-messenger RNA splicing. Mammalian 5′ splice sites are mainly recognized by canonical base-pairing to the 5′ end of U1 small nuclear RNA, yet we described multiple noncanonical base-pairing registers by shifting base-pair positions or allowing one-nucleotide bulges. By systematic mutational and suppressor U1 analyses, we prove three registers involving asymmetric loops and show that two-nucleotide bulges but not longer can form in this context. Importantly, we established that a noncanonical uridine-pseudouridine interaction in the 5′ splice site/U1 helix contributes to the recognition of certain 5′ splice sites. Thermal melting experiments support the formation of noncanonical registers and uridine-pseudouridine interactions. Overall, we experimentally validated or discarded the majority of predicted noncanonical registers, to derive a list of 5′ splice sites using such alternative mechanisms that is much different from the original. This study allows not only the mechanistic understanding of the recognition of a wide diversity of mammalian 5′ splice sites, but also the future development of better splice-site scoring methods that reliably predict the effects of disease-causing mutations at these sequences. PMID:26969736

  11. Noncanonical registers and base pairs in human 5' splice-site selection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiazi; Ho, Jia Xin Jessie; Zhong, Zhensheng; Luo, Shufang; Chen, Gang; Roca, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Accurate recognition of splice sites is essential for pre-messenger RNA splicing. Mammalian 5' splice sites are mainly recognized by canonical base-pairing to the 5' end of U1 small nuclear RNA, yet we described multiple noncanonical base-pairing registers by shifting base-pair positions or allowing one-nucleotide bulges. By systematic mutational and suppressor U1 analyses, we prove three registers involving asymmetric loops and show that two-nucleotide bulges but not longer can form in this context. Importantly, we established that a noncanonical uridine-pseudouridine interaction in the 5' splice site/U1 helix contributes to the recognition of certain 5' splice sites. Thermal melting experiments support the formation of noncanonical registers and uridine-pseudouridine interactions. Overall, we experimentally validated or discarded the majority of predicted noncanonical registers, to derive a list of 5' splice sites using such alternative mechanisms that is much different from the original. This study allows not only the mechanistic understanding of the recognition of a wide diversity of mammalian 5' splice sites, but also the future development of better splice-site scoring methods that reliably predict the effects of disease-causing mutations at these sequences. PMID:26969736

  12. Membrane protein crystallization in micelles conjugated by nucleoside base-pairing: A different concept.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, Basavaprabhu; Kale, Raju R; Sharma, Hemlata; Wachtel, Ellen; Kesselman, Ellina; Danino, Dganit; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai; Namboothiri, Irishi N N; Patchornik, Guy

    2016-09-01

    The dearth of high quality, three dimensional crystals of membrane proteins, suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis, constitutes a serious barrier to progress in structural biology. To address this challenge, we have developed a new crystallization medium that relies on the conjugation of surfactant micelles via base-pairing of complementary hydrophobic nucleosides. Base-pairs formed at the interface between micelles bring them into proximity with each other; and when the conjugated micelles contain a membrane protein, crystal nucleation centers can be stabilized, thereby promoting crystal growth. Accordingly, two hydrophobic nucleoside derivatives - deoxyguanosine (G) and deoxycytidine (C), each covalently bonded to a 10 carbon chain were synthesized and added to an aqueous solution containing octyl β-d-thioglucopyranoside micelles. These hydrophobic nucleosides induced the formation of oil-rich globules after 2days incubation at 19°C or after a few hours in the presence of ammonium sulfate; however, phase separation was inhibited by 100mM GMP. The presence of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin in the conjugated - micellar dispersion resulted in the growth within the colorless globules of a variety of purple crystals, the color indicating a functional protein. On this basis, we suggest that conjugation of micelles via base-pair complementarity may provide significant assistance to the structural determination of integral membrane proteins. PMID:27368128

  13. Evolutionary history of the COII/tRNALys intergenic 9 base pair deletion in human mitochondrial DNAs from the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Redd, A J; Takezaki, N; Sherry, S T; McGarvey, S T; Sofro, A S; Stoneking, M

    1995-07-01

    Length changes in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are potentially useful markers for inferring the evolutionary history of populations. One such length change is a nine base pair (9-bp) deletion that is located in the intergenic region between the COII gene and the Lysine tRNA gene (COII/tRNALys intergenic region). This deletion has been used as a genetic marker to trace descent from peoples of East Asian origin. A geographic cline of the deletion frequency across modern Pacific Islander populations suggests that the deletion may be useful for tracing prehistoric Polynesian origins and affinities. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation within two variable segments of the control region (CR) permits a number of inferences regarding the evolutionary history of the 9-bp deletion that cannot be determined from frequency data alone. We obtained CR sequences from 74 mtDNAs with the 9-bp deletion from Indonesia, coastal Papua New Guinea (PNG), and American Samoa. Phylogenetic and pairwise distribution analysis of these CR sequences pooled with previously published CR sequences reveals that the deletion arose independently in Africa and Asia and suggests possible multiple origins of the deletion in Asia. A clinal increase of the frequency of the 9-bp deletion across the three Pacific populations is associated with a decrease in CR sequence diversity, consistent with founder events. Furthermore, analysis of pairwise difference distributions indicates an expansion time of proto-Polynesians that began 5,500 yr ago from Southeast Asia. These results are consistent with the express train model of Polynesian origins. PMID:7659016

  14. The initial step of DNA hairpin folding: a kinetic analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides were studied in aqueous solution by monitoring contact-induced fluorescence quenching of the oxazine fluorophore MR121 by intrinsic guanosine residues (dG). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze kinetics of DNA hairpin folding. We first characterized the reporter system by investigating bimolecular quenching interactions between MR121 and guanosine monophosphate in aqueous solution estimating rate constants, efficiency and stability for formation of quenched complexes. We then studied the kinetics of complex formation between MR121 and dG residues site-specifically incorporated in DNA hairpins. To uncover the initial steps of DNA hairpin folding we investigated complex formation in ssDNA carrying one or two complementary base pairs (dC–dG pairs) that could hybridize to form a short stem. Our data show that incorporation of a single dC–dG pair leads to non-exponential decays for opening and closing kinetics and reduces rate constants by one to two orders of magnitude. We found positive activation enthalpies independent of the number of dC–dG pairs. These results imply that the rate limiting step of DNA hairpin folding is not determined by loop dynamics, or by mismatches in the stem, but rather by interactions between stem and loop nucleotides. PMID:16687657

  15. Mismatch Negativity: Translating the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Juanita; Harms, Lauren; Schall, Ulrich; Michie, Patricia T.

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential has become a valuable tool in cognitive neuroscience. Its reduced size in persons with schizophrenia is of unknown origin but theories proposed include links to problems in experience-dependent plasticity reliant on N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors. In this review we address the utility of this tool in revealing the nature and time course of problems in perceptual inference in this illness together with its potential for use in translational research testing animal models of schizophrenia-related phenotypes. Specifically, we review the reasons for interest in MMN in schizophrenia, issues pertaining to the measurement of MMN, its use as a vulnerability index for the development of schizophrenia, the pharmacological sensitivity of MMN and the progress in developing animal models of MMN. Within this process we highlight the challenges posed by knowledge gaps pertaining to the tool and the pharmacology of the underlying system. PMID:24391602

  16. Polymerase Interactions with Wobble Mismatches in Synthetic Genetic Systems and Their Evolutionary Implications.

    PubMed

    Winiger, Christian B; Kim, Myong-Jung; Hoshika, Shuichi; Shaw, Ryan W; Moses, Jennifer D; Matsuura, Mariko F; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Benner, Steven A

    2016-07-19

    In addition to completing the Watson-Crick nucleobase matching "concept" (big pairs with small, hydrogen bond donors pair with hydrogen bond acceptors), artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS) also challenge DNA polymerases with a complete set of mismatches, including wobble mismatches. Here, we explore wobble mismatches with AEGIS with DNA polymerase 1 from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we find that the polymerase tolerates an AEGIS:standard wobble that has the same geometry as the G:T wobble that polymerases have evolved to exclude but excludes a wobble geometry that polymerases have never encountered in natural history. These results suggest certain limits to "structural analogy" and "evolutionary guidance" as tools to help synthetic biologists expand DNA alphabets. PMID:27347689

  17. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization and single point mutations in a nano-gap biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaffino, R. L.; Mir, M.; Samitier, J.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a conductance-based biosensor that exploits DNA-mediated long-range electron transport for the label-free and direct electrical detection of DNA hybridization. This biosensor platform comprises an array of vertical nano-gap biosensors made of gold and fabricated through standard photolithography combined with focused ion beam lithography. The nano-gap walls are covalently modified with short, anti-symmetric thiolated DNA probes, which are terminated by 19 bases complementary to both the ends of a target DNA strand. The nano-gaps are separated by a distance of 50nm, which was adjusted to fit the length of the DNA target plus the DNA probes. The hybridization of the target DNA closes the gap circuit in a switch on/off fashion, in such a way that it is readily detected by an increase in the current after nano-gap closure. The nano-biosensor shows high specificity in the discrimination of base-pair mismatching and does not require signal indicators or enhancing molecules. The design of the biosensor platform is applicable for multiplexed detection in a straightforward manner. The platform is well-suited to mass production, point-of-care diagnostics, and wide-scale DNA analysis applications.

  18. Spatial Mismatch: A Third Generation Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, J. Vincent

    1999-01-01

    The spatial mismatch argument hypothesizes that racial discrimination in the housing market, together with the suburbanization of low skilled jobs, contributes significantly to the high unemployment and/or low wages of inner city minority workers. Surveys recent spatial mismatch literature and discusses policy alternatives, focusing on areas…

  19. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  20. Metamer mismatching in practice versus theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiandou; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza

    2016-03-01

    Metamer mismatching (the phenomenon that two objects matching in color under one illuminant may not match under a different illuminant) potentially has important consequences for color perception. Logvinenko et al. [PLoS ONE10, e0135029 (2015)] show that in theory the extent of metamer mismatching can be very significant. This paper examines metamer mismatching in practice by computing the volumes of the empirical metamer mismatch bodies and comparing them to the volumes of the theoretical mismatch bodies. A set of more than 25 million unique reflectance spectra is assembled using datasets from several sources. For a given color signal (e.g., CIE XYZ) recorded under a given first illuminant, its empirical metamer mismatch body for a change to a second illuminant is computed as follows: the reflectances having the same color signal when lit by the first illuminant (i.e., reflect metameric light) are computationally relit by the second illuminant, and the convex hull of the resulting color signals then defines the empirical metamer mismatch body. The volume of these bodies is shown to vary systematically with Munsell value and chroma. The empirical mismatch bodies are compared to the theoretical mismatch bodies computed using the algorithm of Logvinenko et al. [IEEE Trans. Image Process.23, 34 (2014)]. There are three key findings: (1) the empirical bodies are found to be substantially smaller than the theoretical ones; (2) the sizes of both the empirical and theoretical bodies show a systematic variation with Munsell value and chroma; and (3) applied to the problem of color-signal prediction, the centroid of the empirical metamer mismatch body is shown to be a better predictor of what a given color signal might become under a specified illuminant than state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26974929

  1. The simian varicella virus genome contains an invertible 665 base pair terminal element that is absent in the varicella zoster virus genome

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Ravi; Gray, Wayne L.

    2007-01-01

    Simian varicella virus (SVV) causes chickenpox in monkeys, establishes latency, and reactivates to produce zoster thus providing a model to study human varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection. Sequence analysis of a recombinant cosmid clone containing the left end of the SVV genome revealed a 665 base pair (bp) segment that is absent in VZV DNA. This segment inverts and contains 507 bp of unique sequences flanked on either side by 79 bp inverted repeats, making the SVV genome to be 124,785 bp in size. Part of the inverted repeat sequence (64 bp) is also present at the junction of the long and short segments of the SVV genome. The terminal DNA sequences are conserved among different SVV isolates and present in tissues from infected monkeys. The terminal region is transcriptionally active and is also present in the genomes of other animal varicelloviruses, but absent in the VZV genome. PMID:17555785

  2. A Thiazole Coumarin (TC) Turn-On Fluorescence Probe for AT-Base Pair Detection and Multipurpose Applications in Different Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Kumar, Manoj; Das, Sadhan; Sharma, Rahul; Samanta, Pralok K.; Pati, Swapan K.; Dhar, Suman K.; Kundu, Tapas K.; Govindaraju, T.

    2014-09-01

    Sequence-specific recognition of DNA by small turn-on fluorescence probes is a promising tool for bioimaging, bioanalytical and biomedical applications. Here, the authors report a novel cell-permeable and red fluorescent hemicyanine-based thiazole coumarin (TC) probe for DNA recognition, nuclear staining and cell cycle analysis. TC exhibited strong fluorescence enhancement in the presence of DNA containing AT-base pairs, but did not fluoresce with GC sequences, single-stranded DNA, RNA and proteins. The fluorescence staining of HeLa S3 and HEK 293 cells by TC followed by DNase and RNase digestion studies depicted the selective staining of DNA in the nucleus over the cytoplasmic region. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated the potential application of TC in cell cycle analysis in HEK 293 cells. Metaphase chromosome and malaria parasite DNA imaging studies further confirmed the in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic applications of probe TC. Probe TC may find multiple applications in fluorescence spectroscopy, diagnostics, bioimaging and molecular and cell biology.

  3. Intensified effects of multi-Cu modification on the electronic properties of the modified base pairs containing hetero-ring-expanded pyrimidine bases.

    PubMed

    Lu, Nan; Bu, Yuxiang; Wang, Huatian

    2016-01-28

    Novel DNA base pair derivatives (A2CunU, A2CunC, G3CunU, and G3CunC) are designed by aromatic expansion of pyrimidine bases with four kinds of hetero-rings (denoted by nC and nU, n = 1, 2, 3, and 4) and metal-decoration through Cu replacement of hydrogens in the Watson-Crick hydrogen bond region. Their structures and properties are calculated for examining the cooperative effects of the two modification ways. The calculated results reveal that multiple Cu decoration makes up the deficiencies of size-expansion, and exhibits not only increase of structural stability and reduction of ionization potentials, but also ideal shrink of the HOMO-LUMO gaps, notable enhancement of interbase coupling as well as remarkable redshifts of π → π* transitions for all M-x modified base pairs. The decrease extents of the gaps and ionization potentials follow the same order G3CunU > G3CunC > A2CunU > A2CunC, and in each series (denoted by different n), the gaps, ionization potentials and first π → π* transition energies have an order of 4 < 1 < 2 < 3. The Cu d orbitals function as bridges for π electron delocalization on the conjugated aromatic rings of two bases, leading to an enhancement of transverse electronic communication, as verified by spin density delocalization, orbital composition changes, redshift of the π → π* transition and also advocated by the electron-sharing indexes such as delocalization index, Mayer bond orders and multicenter bonding. Electron localization function ELF-π isosurfaces above the molecular plane further suggested that effective longitudinal conduction is closely relevant with the bicyclic domain involving good electron delocalization and strong π-π stacking between layers. This work presents theoretical evidence for the cooperative effects of metal decoration and ring-expansion modifications on the electronic properties of the modified base pairs and also proves that the base pairs designed here could be competent building blocks for

  4. Increasing Occurrences and Functional Roles for High Energy Purine-Pyrimidine Base-Pairs in Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Kimsey, Isaac; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    There are a growing number of studies reporting the observation of purine-pyrimidine base-pairs that are seldom observed in unmodified nucleic acids because they entail the loss of energetically favorable interactions or require energetically costly base ionization or tautomerization. These high energy purine-pyrimidine base-pairs include G•C+ and A•T Hoogsteen base-pairs, which entail ~180° rotation of the purine base in a Watson-Crick base-pair, protonation of cytosine N3, and constriction of the C1′–C1′ distance by ~2.5 Å. Other high energy pure-pyrimidine base-pairs include G•T, G•U, and A•C mispairs that adopt Watson-Crick like geometry through either base ionization or tautomerization. Although difficult to detect and characterize using biophysical methods, high energy purine-pyrimidine base-pairs appear to be more common than once thought. They further expand the structural and functional diversity of canonical and noncanonical nucleic acid base-pairs. PMID:24721455

  5. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene. PMID:25481659

  6. Preliminary studies on palladium nanoparticle as a novel label for DNA microarray and their corresponding detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifei; Li, Hongyin; Zhen, Shuang; Zhang, Yuanying; He, Nongyue

    2013-06-01

    This paper firstly describes the preliminary results achieved by using palladium nanoparticle (Pd NP) as a novel label for the detection of DNA hybridization in DNA microarray. And two signal amplification procedures based on "the silver staining" or "the cobalt staining" are presented during above analysis. The results show that the label Pd NP-ssDNA (target) (single strand DNA(target)) performs high single base pair mismatch-discrimination capability. The succeeding silver staining or cobalt staining procedure greatly amplifies such a signal through the catalysis of Pd. For "the silver staining:' the background staining is very low and the silver deposition only occurs around Pd NPs. So such a procedure provides a alternative for "Gold Label Silver Stain" presented by Mirkin C. A. For "the cobalt staining," not only a colorimetric array but also a magnetic sensor (such as Magnetic Tunnel Junction sensor, MTJ) can be used to detect the obtained cobalt dot due to its strong magnetic property, which provides a new strategy for DNA microarray detection. So as the proof-of-concept investigations, this work proved the feasibility of the application of Pd NPs as the label in DNA microarray assay. PMID:23858969

  7. Transcription of eucaryotic tRNA1met and 5SRNA genes by RNA polymerase III is blocked by base mismatches in the intragenic control regions.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Folk, W R

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed duplex DNAs containing single G-T or A-C mismatches in the X. laevis tRNA1met gene. Mismatches within regions of this gene which are bound by transcription factor TFIIIC prevent transcription by RNA polymerase III. Homoduplexes with G-C----A-T mutations at some of the same sites, however, are transcribed efficiently in oocytes. Mismatches outside of the tRNA1met gene have no effect upon transcription. A survey of several point mutants in the Syrian hamster 5SRNA gene indicates that mismatches outside the internal control region somewhat reduce transcription, but a mismatch within the internal control region blocks transcription. Thus, the presence of mismatched bases in the region of DNA which interacts with RNA polymerase III transcription factors blocks transcription, perhaps by interfering with DNA renaturation following transit of the RNA polymerase. Images PMID:3645544

  8. Triple helix structures: sequence dependence, flexibility and mismatch effects.

    PubMed

    Sun, J S; Mergny, J L; Lavery, R; Montenay-Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1991-12-01

    By means of molecular modelling, electrostatic interactions are shown to play an important role in the sequence-dependent structure of triple helices formed by a homopyrimidine oligonucleotide bound to a homopurine. homopyrimidine sequence on DNA. This is caused by the presence of positive charges due to the protonation of cytosines in the Hoogsteen-bonded strand, required in order to form C.GxC+ triplets. Energetic and conformational characteristics of triple helices with different sequences are analyzed and discussed. The effects of duplex mismatches on the triple helix stability are investigated via thermal dissociation using UV absorption. PMID:1815635

  9. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-01-01

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant colour change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10 pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays. PMID:25500528

  10. A Tester System for Detecting Each of the Six Base-Pair Substitutions in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae by Selecting for an Essential Cysteine in Iso-1-Cytochrome C

    PubMed Central

    Hampsey, M.

    1991-01-01

    A collection of isogenic yeast strains that is specifically diagnostic for the six possible base-pair substitutions is described. Each strain contains a single, unique base-pair substitution at the Cys-22 codon of the CYC1 gene, which codes for iso-1-cytochrome c. These mutations encode replacements of the functionally critical Cys-22 and render each strain unable to grow on media containing nonfermentable carbon sources (Cyc(-)). Specific base-pair substitutions, which restore the Cys-22 codon, can be monitored simply by scoring for reversion to the Cyc(+) phenotype. These strains revert spontaneously at very low frequencies and exhibit specific patterns of reversion in response to different mutagens. Only true (CYC1(+)) revertants were recovered after 7 days on selection medium. The following mutagen specificities were observed: ethyl methanesulfonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, G.C -> A.T; 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, G.C -> T.A and G.C -> A.T; diepoxybutane, A.T -> T.A, A.T -> G.C and G.C -> T.A; 5-azacytidine, G.C -> C.G. Methyl methanesulfonate induced all six mutations, albeit at relatively low frequencies, with preference for A.T -> T.A and A.T -> G.C. Ultraviolet light was the most inefficient mutagen used in this study, consistent with its preference for transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences reported in other systems. This tester system is valuable as a simple and reliable assay for specific mutations without DNA sequence analysis. PMID:1648005

  11. Eukaryotic TPP riboswitch regulation of alternative splicing involving long-distance base pairing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches are found in organisms from all three domains of life. Examples in bacteria commonly repress gene expression by terminating transcription or by blocking ribosome binding, whereas most eukaryotic TPP riboswitches are predicted to regulate gene expression by modulating RNA splicing. Given the widespread distribution of eukaryotic TPP riboswitches and the diversity of their locations in precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs), we sought to examine the mechanism of alternative splicing regulation by a fungal TPP riboswitch from Neurospora crassa, which is mostly located in a large intron separating protein-coding exons. Our data reveal that this riboswitch uses a long-distance (∼530-nt separation) base-pairing interaction to regulate alternative splicing. Specifically, a portion of the TPP-binding aptamer can form a base-paired structure with a conserved sequence element (α) located near a 5′ splice site, which greatly increases use of this 5′ splice site and promotes gene expression. Comparative sequence analyses indicate that many fungal species carry a TPP riboswitch with similar intron architecture, and therefore the homologous genes in these fungi are likely to use the same mechanism. Our findings expand the scope of genetic control mechanisms relying on long-range RNA interactions to include riboswitches. PMID:23376932

  12. Conserved arginines on the rim of Hfq catalyze base pair formation and exchange

    PubMed Central

    Panja, Subrata; Schu, Daniel J.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    The Sm-like protein Hfq is required for gene regulation by small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria and facilitates base pairing between sRNAs and their mRNA targets. The proximal and distal faces of the Hfq hexamer specifically bind sRNA and mRNA targets, but they do not explain how Hfq accelerates the formation and exchange of RNA base pairs. Here, we show that conserved arginines on the outer rim of the hexamer that are known to interact with sRNA bodies are required for Hfq’s chaperone activity. Mutations in the arginine patch lower the ability of Hfq to act in sRNA regulation of rpoS translation and eliminate annealing of natural sRNAs or unstructured oligonucleotides, without preventing binding to either the proximal or distal face. Stopped-flow FRET and fluorescence anisotropy show that complementary RNAs transiently form a ternary complex with Hfq, but the RNAs are not released as a double helix in the absence of rim arginines. RNAs bound to either face of Hfq quench the fluorescence of a tryptophan adjacent to the arginine patch, demonstrating that the rim can simultaneously engage two RNA strands. We propose that the arginine patch overcomes entropic and electrostatic barriers to helix nucleation and constitutes the active site for Hfq’s chaperone function. PMID:23771143

  13. Heterogeneous polymerase fidelity and mismatch repair bias genome variation and composition

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Scott A.; Clausen, Anders R.; Clark, Alan B.; MacAlpine, Heather K.; MacAlpine, David M.; Malc, Ewa P.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Gordenin, Dmitry A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutational heterogeneity must be taken into account when reconstructing evolutionary histories, calibrating molecular clocks, and predicting links between genes and disease. Selective pressures and various DNA transactions have been invoked to explain the heterogeneous distribution of genetic variation between species, within populations, and in tissue-specific tumors. To examine relationships between such heterogeneity and variations in leading- and lagging-strand replication fidelity and mismatch repair, we accumulated 40,000 spontaneous mutations in eight diploid yeast strains in the absence of selective pressure. We found that replicase error rates vary by fork direction, coding state, nucleosome proximity, and sequence context. Further, error rates and DNA mismatch repair efficiency both vary by mismatch type, responsible polymerase, replication time, and replication origin proximity. Mutation patterns implicate replication infidelity as one driver of variation in somatic and germline evolution, suggest mechanisms of mutual modulation of genome stability and composition, and predict future observations in specific cancers. PMID:25217194

  14. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  15. Analysis of siRNA specificity on targets with double-nucleotide mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Dahlgren, Cecilia; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Du, Quan; Grahn, Maria; Norstedt, Gunnar; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2008-01-01

    Although RNA interference as a tool for gene knockdown is a great promise for future applications, the specificity of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing needs to be thoroughly investigated. Most research regarding siRNA specificity has involved analysis of affected off-target genes instead of exploring the specificity of the siRNA itself. In this study we have developed an efficient method for generating a siRNA target library by combining a siRNA target validation vector with a nucleotide oligomix. We have used this library to perform an analysis of the silencing effects of a functional siRNA towards its target site with double-nucleotide mismatches. The results indicated that not only the positions of the mismatched base pair have an impact on silencing efficiency but also the identity of the mismatched nucleotide. Our data strengthen earlier observations of widespread siRNA off-target effects and shows that ∼35% of the double-mutated target sites still causes knockdown efficiency of >50%. We also provide evidence that there may be substantial differences in knockdown efficiency depending on whether the mutations are positioned within the siRNA itself or in the corresponding target site. PMID:18420656

  16. The Electronic Influence of Abasic Sites in DNA.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Marc A; Bhui, Rita; Taylor, David W; Slinker, Jason D

    2015-09-01

    Abasic sites in DNA are prevalent as both naturally forming defects and as synthetic inclusions for biosensing applications. The electronic impact of these defects in DNA sensor and device configurations has yet to be clarified. Here we report the effect of an abasic site on the rate and yield of charge transport through temperature-controlled analysis of DNA duplex monolayers on multiplexed devices. Transport yield through the abasic site monolayer strongly increases with temperature, but the yield relative to an undamaged monolayer decreases with temperature. This is opposite to the increasing relative yield with temperature from a mismatched base pair, and these effects are accounted for by the unique structural impact of each defect. Notably, the effect of the abasic site is nearly doubled when heated from room temperature to 37 °C. The rate of transport is largely unaffected by the abasic site, showing Arrhenius-type behavior with an activation energy of ∼300 meV. Detailed abasic site investigation elucidates the electrical impact of these biologically spontaneous defects and aids development of biological sensors. PMID:26280191

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Bacillus subtilis replication termination protein in complex with the 37-base-pair TerI-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Vivian, J. P.; Porter, C.; Wilce, J. A.; Wilce, M. C. J.

    2006-11-01

    A preparation of replication terminator protein (RTP) of B. subtilis and a 37-base-pair TerI sequence (comprising two binding sites for RTP) has been purified and crystallized. The replication terminator protein (RTP) of Bacillus subtilis binds to specific DNA sequences that halt the progression of the replisome in a polar manner. These terminator complexes flank a defined region of the chromosome into which they allow replication forks to enter but not exit. Forcing the fusion of replication forks in a specific zone is thought to allow the coordination of post-replicative processes. The functional terminator complex comprises two homodimers each of 29 kDa bound to overlapping binding sites. A preparation of RTP and a 37-base-pair TerI sequence (comprising two binding sites for RTP) has been purified and crystallized. A data set to 3.9 Å resolution with 97.0% completeness and an R{sub sym} of 12% was collected from a single flash-cooled crystal using synchrotron radiation. The diffraction data are consistent with space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 118.8, c = 142.6 Å.

  18. Visualization of mismatch repair complexes using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tobias T; Hombauer, Hans

    2016-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a surveillance mechanism present in most living organisms, which repairs errors introduced by DNA polymerases. Importantly, loss of MMR function due to inactivating mutations and/or epigenetic silencing results in the accumulation of mutations and as consequence increased cancer susceptibility, as observed in Lynch syndrome patients. During the past decades important progress has been made in the MMR field resulting in the identification and characterization of essential MMR components, culminating in the in vitro reconstitution of 5' and 3' nick-directed MMR. However, several mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction remain not fully understood, therefore alternative approaches and further investigations are needed. Recently, the use of imaging techniques and, more specifically, visualization of MMR components in living cells, has broadened our mechanistic understanding of the repair reaction providing more detailed information about the spatio-temporal organization of MMR in vivo. In this review we would like to comment on mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction in light of these and other recent findings. Moreover, we will discuss the current limitations and provide future perspectives regarding imaging of mismatch repair components in diverse organisms. PMID:26725956

  19. Base sequence dependence and backbone-induced effects on charge transport through DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Yong; Lee, Sun; Hedin, Eric

    2009-03-01

    We investigate quantum mechanical electron transmission along the long axis of the DNA molecule using a tight-binding model. Specifically, we use two different DNA models to study the charge transfer efficiency of synthetic ds-DNA. First, the generic form of a simple one-conduction channel model, called the fishbone model, is used. The sugar-phosphate backbone and the coupling amplitude between each site of the base and the backbone are incorporated into an energy-dependent on-site potential in the main DNA site. Here, individual sites represent a base-pair formed by either AT (TA) or GC (CG) pairs coupled via hydrogen bonds. Second, we employ a two-dimensional three-chain model where the backbone on-site energy, the coupling amplitude between the bases and the backbone, and a possible hopping of charge carriers between the successive backbone sites are used as key parameters. The overall transmission and the current-voltage characteristics are calculated to determine the influence of mismatch (impurity) effects in the DNA sequence. Finally, we discuss the transmission gap as a function of coupling between the bases and between the bases and the backbone. *One of the authors (E.R.H) is partially supported by a grant from the Center for Energy Research, Education, and Service (CERES) at Ball State University.

  20. An unprecedented nucleic acid capture mechanism for excision of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinson, Emily H.; Prakasha Gowda, A.S.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Gold, Barry; Eichmanbrand, Brandt F.

    2010-11-18

    DNA glycosylases that remove alkylated and deaminated purine nucleobases are essential DNA repair enzymes that protect the genome, and at the same time confound cancer alkylation therapy, by excising cytotoxic N3-methyladenine bases formed by DNA-targeting anticancer compounds. The basis for glycosylase specificity towards N3- and N7-alkylpurines is believed to result from intrinsic instability of the modified bases and not from direct enzyme functional group chemistry. Here we present crystal structures of the recently discovered Bacillus cereus AlkD glycosylase in complex with DNAs containing alkylated, mismatched and abasic nucleotides. Unlike other glycosylases, AlkD captures the extrahelical lesion in a solvent-exposed orientation, providing an illustration for how hydrolysis of N3- and N7-alkylated bases may be facilitated by increased lifetime out of the DNA helix. The structures and supporting biochemical analysis of base flipping and catalysis reveal how the HEAT repeats of AlkD distort the DNA backbone to detect non-Watson-Crick base pairs without duplex intercalation.

  1. Mismatch repair ensures fidelity of replication and recombination in the radioresistant organism Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Mennecier, S; Coste, G; Servant, P; Bailone, A; Sommer, S

    2004-11-01

    We have characterized the mismatch repair system (MMR) of the highly radiation-resistant type strain of Deinococcus radiodurans, ATCC 13939. We show that the MMR system is functional in this organism, where it participates in ensuring the fidelity of DNA replication and recombination. The system relies on the activity of two key proteins, MutS1 and MutL, which constitute a conserved core involved in mismatch recognition. Inactivation of MutS1 or MutL resulted in a seven-fold increase in the frequency of spontaneous RifR mutagenesis and a ten-fold increase in the efficiency of integration of a donor point-mutation marker during bacterial transformation. Inactivation of the mismatch repair-associated UvrD helicase increased the level of spontaneous mutagenesis, but had no effect on marker integration--suggesting that binding of MutS1 and MutL proteins to a mismatched heteroduplex suffices to inhibit recombination between non identical (homeologous) DNAs. In contrast, inactivation of MutS2, encoded by the second mutS -related gene present in D. radiodurans, had no effect on mutagenesis or recombination. Cells devoid of MutS1 or MutL proteins were as resistant to gamma-rays, mitomycin C and UV-irradiation as wild-type bacteria, suggesting that the mismatch repair system is not essential for the reconstitution of a functional genome after DNA damage. PMID:15503140

  2. The influence of arene-ring size on stacking interaction with canonical base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formánek, Martin; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2014-04-01

    Stacking interactions between aromatic molecules (benzene, p-cymene, biphenyl, and di- and tetra-hydrogen anthracene) and G.C and A.T canonical Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs are explored. Two functionals with dispersion corrections: ω-B97XD and B3LYP-D3 are used. For a comparison also the MP2 and B3LYP-D3/PCM methods were used for the most stable p-cymene…WC geometries. It was found that the stacking interaction increases with the size of π-conjugation system. Its extent is in agreement with experimental finding on anticancer activity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes where intercalation of these aromatic molecules should play an important role. The explored structures are considered as ternary system so that decomposition of the interaction energy to pairwise and non-additivity contributions is also examined.

  3. Single base pair differences in a shared motif determine differential Rhodopsin expression

    PubMed Central

    Rister, Jens; Razzaq, Ansa; Boodram, Pamela; Desai, Nisha; Tsanis, Cleopatra; Chen, Hongtao; Jukam, David; Desplan, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The final identity and functional properties of a neuron are specified by terminal differentiation genes, which are controlled by specific motifs in compact regulatory regions. To determine how these sequences integrate inputs from transcription factors that specify cell types, we compared the regulatory mechanism of Drosophila Rhodopsin genes that are expressed in subsets of photoreceptors to that of phototransduction genes that are expressed broadly, in all photoreceptors. Both sets of genes share an 11bp activator motif. Broadly expressed genes contain a palindromic version that mediates expression in all photoreceptors. In contrast, each Rhodopsin exhibits unique single bp substitutions that break the symmetry of the palindrome and generate activator or repressor motifs critical for restricting expression to photoreceptor subsets. Novel sensory neuron subtypes can therefore evolve through single base pair changes in short regulatory motifs, allowing the discrimination of a wide spectrum of stimuli. PMID:26785491

  4. Characterization of the Trans Watson-Crick GU Base Pair Located in the Catalytic Core of the Antigenomic HDV Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Dominique; Reymond, Cédric; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The HDV ribozyme’s folding pathway is, by far, the most complex folding pathway elucidated to date for a small ribozyme. It includes 6 different steps that have been shown to occur before the chemical cleavage. It is likely that other steps remain to be discovered. One of the most critical of these unknown steps is the formation of the trans Watson-Crick GU base pair within loop III. The U23 and G28 nucleotides that form this base pair are perfectly conserved in all natural variants of the HDV ribozyme, and therefore are considered as being part of the signature of HDV-like ribozymes. Both the formation and the transformation of this base pair have been studied mainly by crystal structure and by molecular dynamic simulations. In order to obtain physical support for the formation of this base pair in solution, a set of experiments, including direct mutagenesis, the site-specific substitution of chemical groups, kinetic studies, chemical probing and magnesium-induced cleavage, were performed with the specific goal of characterizing this trans Watson-Crick GU base pair in an antigenomic HDV ribozyme. Both U23 and G28 can be substituted for nucleotides that likely preserve some of the H-bond interactions present before and after the cleavage step. The formation of the more stable trans Watson-Crick base pair is shown to be a post-cleavage event, while a possibly weaker trans Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen interaction seems to form before the cleavage step. The formation of this unusually stable post-cleavage base pair may act as a driving force on the chemical cleavage by favouring the formation of a more stable ground state of the product-ribozyme complex. To our knowledge, this represents the first demonstration of a potential stabilising role of a post-cleavage conformational switch event in a ribozyme-catalyzed reaction. PMID:22768274

  5. RB69 DNA Polymerase Structure, Kinetics, and Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This review will summarize our structural and kinetic studies of RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69pol) as well as selected variants of the wild-type enzyme that were undertaken to obtain a deeper understanding of the exquisitely high fidelity of B family replicative DNA polymerases. We discuss how the structures of the various RB69pol ternary complexes can be used to rationalize the results obtained from pre-steady-state kinetic assays. Our main findings can be summarized as follows. (i) Interbase hydrogen bond interactions can increase catalytic efficiency by 5000-fold; meanwhile, base selectivity is not solely determined by the number of hydrogen bonds between the incoming dNTP and the templating base. (ii) Minor-groove hydrogen bond interactions at positions n – 1 and n – 2 of the primer strand and position n – 1 of the template strand in RB69pol ternary complexes are essential for efficient primer extension and base selectivity. (iii) Partial charge interactions among the incoming dNTP, the penultimate base pair, and the hydration shell surrounding the incoming dNTP modulate nucleotide insertion efficiency and base selectivity. (iv) Steric clashes between mismatched incoming dNTPs and templating bases with amino acid side chains in the nascent base pair binding pocket (NBP) as well as weak interactions and large gaps between the incoming dNTPs and the templating base are some of the reasons that incorrect dNTPs are incorporated so inefficiently by wild-type RB69pol. In addition, we developed a tC°–tCnitro Förster resonance energy transfer assay to monitor partitioning of the primer terminus between the polymerase and exonuclease subdomains. PMID:24720884

  6. DNA polymerases δ and λ cooperate in repairing double-strand breaks by microhomology-mediated end-joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Damon; Fu, Becky Xu Hua; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-12-15

    Maintenance of genome stability is carried out by a suite of DNA repair pathways that ensure the repair of damaged DNA and faithful replication of the genome. Of particular importance are the repair pathways, which respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and how the efficiency of repair is influenced by sequence homology. In this study, we developed a genetic assay in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to analyze DSBs requiring microhomologies for repair, known as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ). MMEJ repair efficiency increased concomitant with microhomology length and decreased upon introduction of mismatches. The central proteins in homologous recombination (HR), Rad52 and Rad51, suppressed MMEJ in this system, suggesting a competition between HR and MMEJ for the repair of a DSB. Importantly, we found that DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) is critical for MMEJ, independent of microhomology length and base-pairing continuity. MMEJ recombinants showed evidence that Pol δ proofreading function is active during MMEJ-mediated DSB repair. Furthermore, mutations in Pol δ and DNA polymerase 4 (Pol λ), the DNA polymerase previously implicated in MMEJ, cause a synergistic decrease in MMEJ repair. Pol λ showed faster kinetics associating with MMEJ substrates following DSB induction than Pol δ. The association of Pol δ depended on RAD1, which encodes the flap endonuclease needed to cleave MMEJ intermediates before DNA synthesis. Moreover, Pol δ recruitment was diminished in cells lacking Pol λ. These data suggest cooperative involvement of both polymerases in MMEJ. PMID:26607450

  7. Interaction of the type I methyltransferase M.EcoR124I with modified DNA substrates: sequence discrimination and base flipping.

    PubMed Central

    Mernagh, D R; Taylor, I A; Kneale, G G

    1998-01-01

    We have analysed the DNA-protein contacts made between the type I DNA methyltransferase M.EcoR124I and its recognition sequence. The effects of base modifications have been probed by measuring the affinity of M.EcoR124I for the modified sequences relative to that for the wild-type sequence by using gel-retardation competition assays. These results, along with those from methylation interference footprinting and photo-affinity cross-linking have identified the location of potential DNA contacts within the DNA recognition site. Substitution of 6-thioguanosine for each of the three specific guanines in the recognition sequence leads to a large (10-20-fold) decrease in the strength of DNA binding, indicating the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the major groove of DNA. In contrast, replacement of either (or both) of the adenines at the target site for methylation by the enzyme, to produce either a base pair mismatch or loss of the base, leads to a marked increase in DNA-binding affinity. The results strongly support the proposal that type I methyltransferases employ a base-flipping mechanism to methylate their target base. PMID:9841886

  8. DNA polymerases δ and λ cooperate in repairing double-strand breaks by microhomology-mediated end-joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Damon; Fu, Becky Xu Hua; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of genome stability is carried out by a suite of DNA repair pathways that ensure the repair of damaged DNA and faithful replication of the genome. Of particular importance are the repair pathways, which respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and how the efficiency of repair is influenced by sequence homology. In this study, we developed a genetic assay in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to analyze DSBs requiring microhomologies for repair, known as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ). MMEJ repair efficiency increased concomitant with microhomology length and decreased upon introduction of mismatches. The central proteins in homologous recombination (HR), Rad52 and Rad51, suppressed MMEJ in this system, suggesting a competition between HR and MMEJ for the repair of a DSB. Importantly, we found that DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) is critical for MMEJ, independent of microhomology length and base-pairing continuity. MMEJ recombinants showed evidence that Pol δ proofreading function is active during MMEJ-mediated DSB repair. Furthermore, mutations in Pol δ and DNA polymerase 4 (Pol λ), the DNA polymerase previously implicated in MMEJ, cause a synergistic decrease in MMEJ repair. Pol λ showed faster kinetics associating with MMEJ substrates following DSB induction than Pol δ. The association of Pol δ depended on RAD1, which encodes the flap endonuclease needed to cleave MMEJ intermediates before DNA synthesis. Moreover, Pol δ recruitment was diminished in cells lacking Pol λ. These data suggest cooperative involvement of both polymerases in MMEJ. PMID:26607450

  9. Functional features of crossmodal mismatch responses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Valentini, Elia; Hu, Li

    2015-02-01

    Research on brain mechanisms of deviance detection and sensory memory trace formation, best indexed by the mismatch negativity, mainly relied on the investigation of responses elicited by auditory stimuli. However, comparable less research reported the mismatch negativity elicited by somatosensory stimuli. More importantly, little is known on the functional features of mismatch deviant and standard responses across different sensory modalities. To directly compare different sensory modalities, we adopted a crossmodal roving paradigm and collected event-related potentials elicited by auditory, non-nociceptive somatosensory, and nociceptive trains of stimuli, during Active and Passive attentional conditions. We applied a topographical segmentation analysis to cluster successive scalp topographies with quasi-stable landscape of significant differences to extract crossmodal mismatch responses. We obtained three main findings. First, across different sensory modalities and attentional conditions, the formation of a standard sensory trace became robust mainly after the second stimulus repetition. Second, the neural representation of a modality deviant stimulus was influenced by the preceding sensory modality. Third, the mismatch negativity significantly covaried between Active and Passive attentional conditions within the same sensory modality, but not between different sensory modalities. These findings provide robust evidence that, while different modalities share a similar process of standard trace formation, the process of deviance detection is largely modality dependent. PMID:25398556

  10. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  11. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  12. Validation of doubled haploid plants by enzymatic mismatch cleavage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Doubled haploidy is a fundamental tool in plant breeding as it provides the fastest way to generate populations of meiotic recombinants in a genetically fixed state. A wide range of methods has been developed to produce doubled haploid (DH) plants and recent advances promise efficient DH production in otherwise recalcitrant species. Since the cellular origin of the plants produced is not always certain, rapid screening techniques are needed to validate that the produced individuals are indeed homozygous and genetically distinct from each other. Ideal methods are easily implemented across species and in crops where whole genome sequence and marker resources are limited. Results We have adapted enzymatic mismatch cleavage techniques commonly used for TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) for the evaluation of heterozygosity in parental, F1 and putative DH plants. We used barley as a model crop and tested 26 amplicons previously developed for TILLING. Experiments were performed using self-extracted single-strand-specific nuclease and standard native agarose gels. Eleven of the twenty-six tested primers allowed unambiguous assignment of heterozygosity in material from F1 crosses and loss of heterozygosity in the DH plants. Through parallel testing of previously developed Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers, we show that 3/32 SSR markers were suitable for screening. This suggests that enzymatic mismatch cleavage approaches can be more efficient than SSR based screening, even in species with well-developed markers. Conclusions Enzymatic mismatch cleavage has been applied for mutation discovery in many plant species, including those with little or no available genomic DNA sequence information. Here, we show that the same methods provide an efficient system to screen for the production of DH material without the need of specialized equipment. This gene target based approach further allows discovery of novel nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate

  13. Evidence for tautomerism in nucleic acid base pairs. 1H NMR study of 15N labeled tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Rüterjans, H; Kaun, E; Hull, W E; Limbach, H H

    1982-01-01

    The imino proton resonances of 15N labeled tRNA appear as asymmetric doublet signals, the asymmetry being dependent on the applied magnetic field strength. Assuming a tautomerism of the type N-H...N not equal to N...H-N in the base pairs the line shapes can be simulated. The most important parameters fitted in the simulation are the rate constants of the proton transfer and the mole fractions of either tautomeric state. The rate constants are of the order of 100s-1 and the mole fractions of the non dominant tautomer about 0.1 depending on the temperature and on the nature of the base pairing. The observations are attributed to a double proton transfer in the base pairs. The unexpectedly slow rates of the double proton transfer process may be connected with a concomitant conformational change of the duplex structure. PMID:7177856

  14. Hybrid simulation approach incorporating microscopic interaction along with rigid body degrees of freedom for stacking between base pairs.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Manas; Halder, Sukanya; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2016-04-01

    Stacking interaction between the aromatic heterocyclic bases plays an important role in the double helical structures of nucleic acids. Considering the base as rigid body, there are total of 18 degrees of freedom of a dinucleotide step. Some of these parameters show sequence preferences, indicating that the detailed atomic interactions are important in the stacking. Large variants of non-canonical base pairs have been seen in the crystallographic structures of RNA. However, their stacking preferences are not thoroughly deciphered yet from experimental results. The current theoretical approaches use either the rigid body degrees of freedom where the atomic information are lost or computationally expensive all atom simulations. We have used a hybrid simulation approach incorporating Monte-Carlo Metropolis sampling in the hyperspace of 18 stacking parameters where the interaction energies using AMBER-parm99bsc0 and CHARMM-36 force-fields were calculated from atomic positions. We have also performed stacking energy calculations for structures from Monte-Carlo ensemble by Dispersion corrected density functional theory. The available experimental data with Watson-Crick base pairs are compared to establish the validity of the method. Stacking interaction involving A:U and G:C base pairs with non-canonical G:U base pairs also were calculated and showed that these structures were also sequence dependent. This approach could be useful to generate multiscale modeling of nucleic acids in terms of coarse-grained parameters where the atomic interactions are preserved. This method would also be useful to predict structure and dynamics of different base pair steps containing non Watson-Crick base pairs, as found often in the non-coding RNA structures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 212-226, 2016. PMID:26600167

  15. Identification and purification of a Drosophila protein that binds to the terminal 31-base-pair inverted repeats of the P transposable element

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, D.C.; Rubin, G.M.

    1988-12-01

    We have used DNase I footprinting and partially fractionated nuclear extracts from Drosophila Kc tissue culture cells to identify DNA-binding proteins that interact with the terminal repeats of P transposable elements. We have identified a binding activity that interacts specifically with a region of the 31-base-pair terminal inverted repeats that is directly adjacent to the duplication of target site DNA. Binding occurs to both the 5' and 3' inverted terminal repeats irrespective of the sequence of the duplicated target DNA. UV photochemical crosslinking studies suggest that the binding activity resides in a polypeptide of 65-70 kDa. Biochemical fractionation and oligonucleotide affinity chromatography have been used to purify the binding activity to near homogeneity and identify a polypeptide of 66 kDa in the highly purified preparations. The site to which binding occurs is included in a region absolutely required for P element transposition, suggesting that this binding protein may be a cellular factor involved in P element transposition.

  16. Biomolecule Analogues 2-Hydroxypyridine and 2-Pyridone Base Pairing on Ice Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rubovič, Peter; Pysanenko, Andriy; Lengyel, Jozef; Nachtigallová, Dana; Fárník, Michal

    2016-07-14

    Ice nanoparticles (H2O)N, N ≈ 450 generated in a molecular beam experiment pick up individual gas phase molecules of 2-hydroxypyridine and 2-pyridone (HP) evaporated in a pickup cell at temperatures between 298 and 343 K. The mass spectra of the doped nanoparticles show evidence for generation of clusters of adsorbed molecules (HP)n up to n = 8. The clusters are ionized either by 70 eV electrons or by two photons at 315 nm (3.94 eV). The two ionization methods yield different spectra, and their comparison provides an insight into the neutral cluster composition, ionization and intracluster ion-molecule reactions, and cluster fragmentation. Quite a few molecules were reported not to coagulate on ice nanoparticles previously. The (HP)n cluster generation on ice nanoparticles represents the first evidence for coagulating of molecules and cluster formation on free ice nanoparticles. For comparison, we investigate the coagulation of HP molecules picked up on large clusters ArN, N ≈ 205, and also (HP)n clusters generated in supersonic expansions with Ar buffer gas. This comparison points to a propensity for the (HP)2 dimer generation on ice nanoparticles. This shows the feasibility of base pairing for model of biological molecules on free ice nanoparticles. This result is important for hypotheses of the biomolecule synthesis on ice grains in the space. We support our findings by theoretical calculations that show, among others, the HP dimer structures on water clusters. PMID:26785038

  17. The Simplified Aircraft-Based Paired Approach With the ALAS Alerting Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Raleigh B.; Madden, Michael M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Butler, Ricky W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of a proposed concept for closely spaced parallel runways called the Simplified Aircraft-based Paired Approach (SAPA). This procedure depends upon a new alerting algorithm called the Adjacent Landing Alerting System (ALAS). This study used both low fidelity and high fidelity simulations to validate the SAPA procedure and test the performance of the new alerting algorithm. The low fidelity simulation enabled a determination of minimum approach distance for the worst case over millions of scenarios. The high fidelity simulation enabled an accurate determination of timings and minimum approach distance in the presence of realistic trajectories, communication latencies, and total system error for 108 test cases. The SAPA procedure and the ALAS alerting algorithm were applied to the 750-ft parallel spacing (e.g., SFO 28L/28R) approach problem. With the SAPA procedure as defined in this paper, this study concludes that a 750-ft application does not appear to be feasible, but preliminary results for 1000-ft parallel runways look promising.

  18. Characterizing a Wake-Free Safe Zone for the Simplified Aircraft-Based Paired Approach Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Neitzke, Kurt W.; Johnson, Sally C.; Stough, H. Paul, III; McKissick, Burnell T.; Syed, Hazari I.

    2010-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed a concept of operations geared towards achieving increased arrival throughput at U.S. Airports, known as the Simplified Aircraft-based Paired Approach (SAPA) concept. In this study, a preliminary characterization of a wake-free safe zone (WFSZ) for the SAPA concept has been performed. The experiment employed Monte-Carlo simulations of varying approach profiles by aircraft pairs to closely-spaced parallel runways. Three different runway lateral spacings were investigated (750 ft, 1000 ft and 1400 ft), along with no stagger and 1500 ft stagger between runway thresholds. The paired aircraft were flown in a leader/trailer configuration with potential wake encounters detected using a wake detection surface translating with the trailing aircraft. The WFSZ is characterized in terms of the smallest observed initial in-trail distance leading to a wake encounter anywhere along the approach path of the aircraft. The results suggest that the WFSZ can be characterized in terms of two primary altitude regions, in ground-effect (IGE) and out of ground-effect (OGE), with the IGE region being the limiting case with a significantly smaller WFSZ. Runway stagger was observed to only modestly reduce the WFSZ size, predominantly in the OGE region.

  19. A CMOS cantilever-based label-free DNA SoC with improved sensitivity for hepatitis B virus detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Jie; Huang, Che-Wei; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lin, Chih-Ting; Chen, Li-Guang; Hsiao, Po-Yun; Wu, Bi-Ru; Hsueh, Hsiao-Ting; Kuo, Bing-Jye; Tsai, Hann-Huei; Liao, Hsin-Hao; Juang, Ying-Zong; Wang, Chorng-Kuang; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a highly-integrated DNA detection SoC, where several kinds of cantilever DNA sensors, a readout circuit, an MCU, voltage regulators, and a wireless transceiver, are integrated monolithically in a 0.35 μm CMOS Bio-MEMS process. The cantilever-based biosensors with embedded piezoresistors aim to transduce DNA hybridization into resistance variation without cumbersome labeling process. To improve detection sensitivity for low DNA concentration use, an oscillator-based self-calibrated readout circuit with high precision is proposed to convert small resistance variation ( of original resistance) of the sensor into adequate frequency variation and further into digital data. Moreover, its wireless capacity enables isolation of the sample solution from electrical wire lines and facilitates data transmission. To demonstrate the effectiveness of full system, it is applied to detect hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA. The experimental results show that it has the capability to distinguish between one base-pair (1-bp) mismatch DNAs and match DNAs and achieves a limit of detection (LOD) of less than 1 pM. PMID:24473546

  20. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  1. APC mutations in colorectal tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Papadopoulos, N; McKinley, A J; Farrington, S M; Curtis, L J; Wyllie, A H; Zheng, S; Willson, J K; Markowitz, S D; Morin, P; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B; Dunlop, M G

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of genetic instability [replication error (RER) phenotype] on APC (adenomatous polyposis coli), a gene thought to initiate colorectal tumorigenesis. The prevalence of APC mutations was similar in RER and non-RER tumors, indicating that both tumor types share this step in neoplastic transformation. However, in a total of 101 sequenced mutations, we noted a substantial excess of APC frameshift mutations in the RER cases (70% in RER tumors versus 47% in non-RER tumors, P < 0.04). These frameshifts were characteristic of mutations arising in cells deficient in DNA mismatch repair, with a predilection for mononucleotide repeats in the RER tumors (P < 0.0002), particularly (A)n tracts (P < 0.00007). These findings suggest that the genetic instability that is reflected by the RER phenotype precedes, and is responsible for, APC mutation in RER large bowel tumors and have important implications for understanding the very earliest stages of neoplasia in patients with tumors deficient in mismatch repair. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8799152

  2. Electrostatic readout of DNA microarrays with charged microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, Nathan G.; Salaita, Khalid; Groves, Jay T.

    2008-06-29

    DNA microarrays are used for gene-expression profiling, single-nucleotide polymorphism detection and disease diagnosis. A persistent challenge in this area is the lack of microarray screening technology suitable for integration into routine clinical care. In this paper, we describe a method for sensitive and label-free electrostatic readout of DNA or RNA hybridization on microarrays. The electrostatic properties of the microarray are measured from the position and motion of charged microspheres randomly dispersed over the surface. We demonstrate nondestructive electrostatic imaging with 10-μm lateral resolution over centimeter-length scales, which is four-orders of magnitude larger than that achievable with conventional scanning electrostatic force microscopy. Changes in surface charge density as a result of specific hybridization can be detected and quantified with 50-pM sensitivity, single base-pair mismatch selectivity and in the presence of complex background. Lastly, because the naked eye is sufficient to read out hybridization, this approach may facilitate broad application of multiplexed assays.

  3. Identification of two mismatch-binding activities in protein extracts of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, O; Schär, P; Kohli, J

    1994-01-01

    We have performed band-shift assays to identify mismatch-binding proteins in cell extracts of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. By testing heteroduplex DNA containing either a T/G or a C/C mismatch, two distinct band shifts were produced in the gels. A low mobility complex was observed with the T/G substrate, while a high mobility complex was present with C/C. Further analysis of the mismatch-binding specificities revealed that the T/G binding activity also binds to T/C, C/T, T/T, T/-, A/-, C/-, G/-, G/G, A/A, A/C, A/G, G/T, G/A, and C/A substrates with varying efficiencies, but not binds to C/C. The C/C binding activity efficiently binds to C/C, T/C, C/T, C/A, A/C, C/-, and weakly also to T/T, while all other mispairs are not recognized. Protein extracts of a mutant strain, defective in the mutS homologue swi4, displayed both mismatch-binding activities. Thus, swi4 does not encode for either one of the mismatch-binding proteins. Images PMID:7816618

  4. Excited state properties of naphtho-homologated xxDNA bases and effect of methanol solution, deoxyribose, and base pairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Ren, Tingqi; Tian, Jianxiang; Yang, Xiuqin; Zhou, Liuzhu; Li, Xiaoming

    2013-04-18

    Design and synthesis of fluorescent nucleobase analogues for studying structures and dynamics of nucleic acids have attracted much attention in recent years. In the present work, a comprehensive theoretical study of electronic transitions of naphtho-homologated base analogues, namely, xxC, xxT, xxA, and xxG, was performed. The nature of the low-lying excited states was discussed, and the results were compared with those of x-bases. Geometrical characteristics of the lowest excited singlet ππ* states were explored using the CIS method. The calculated excitation maxima are 423, 397, 383, and 357 nm for xxA, xxG, xxC, and xxT, respectively, and they are greatly red-shifted compared with x-bases and natural bases, allowing them to be selectively excited in the presence of the natural bases. In the gas phase, the fluorescence from them would be expected to occur around 497, 461, 457, and 417 nm, respectively. The effects of methanol solution, deoxyribose, and base paring with their complementary natural bases on the relevant absorption and emission spectra of these modified bases were also examined. PMID:23531077

  5. Overstretching of a 30 bp DNA duplex studied with steered molecular dynamics simulation: Effects of structural defects on structure and force-extension relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Gisler, T.

    2009-11-01

    Single-molecule experiments on polymeric DNA show that the molecule can be overstretched at nearly constant force by about 70% beyond its relaxed contour length. In this publication we use steered molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study the effect of structural defects on force-extension curves and structures at high elongation in a 30 base pair duplex pulled by its torsionally unconstrained 5' -5' ends. The defect-free duplex shows a plateau in the force-extension curve at 120pN in which large segments with inclined and paired bases (“S-DNA”) near both ends of the duplex coexist with a central B-type segment separated from the former by small denaturation bubbles. In the presence of a base mismatch or a nick, force-extension curves are very similar to the ones of the defect-free duplex. For the duplex with a base mismatch, S-type segments with highly inclined base pairs are not observed; rather, the overstretched duplex consists of B-type segments separated by denaturation bubbles. The nicked duplex evolves, via a two-step transition, into a two-domain structure characterized by a large S-type segment coexisting with several short S-type segments which are separated by short denaturation bubbles. Our results suggest that in the presence of nicks the force-extension curve of highly elongated duplex DNA might reflect locally highly inhomogeneous stretching. Supplementary material in the form of a PDF file available from the Journal web page at 10.1140/epje/i2009-10524-5 and is accessible for authorised users.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  7. Mismatch Repair and Colon Cancer: Mechanisms and Therapies Explored.

    PubMed

    Li, Stephen K H; Martin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. In sporadic CRC, mutations frequently occur in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In addition, germline MMR mutations have been linked to Lynch syndrome, the most common form of hereditary CRC. Although genetic mutations, diet, inflammation, and the gut microbiota can influence CRC, it is unclear how MMR deficiency relates to these factors to modulate disease. In this review, the association of MMR to the etiology of CRC is examined, particularly in the context of microRNAs (miRNAs), inflammation, and the microbiome. We also discuss the most current targeted therapies, methods of prevention, and molecular biomarkers against MMR-deficient CRC, all of which are encouraging advancements in the field. PMID:26970951

  8. Ultrafast IR pump-probe and 2D-IR photon echo spectroscopy of adenosine-thymidine base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Christian; Preketes, Nicholas K.; Costard, Rene.; Koeppe, Benjamin; Fidder, Henk; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Temps, Friedrich; Mukamel, Shaul; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We characterize diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicities of N-H stretching vibrations in adenosine and thymidine monomers and in A•T-base pairs in chloroform solution, showing the important role of coupling between vibrationally excited N-H stretching states.

  9. Relationship between the 19 base pair deletion polymorphism in DHFR and unmetabolized folic and in plasma and RBC folate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: A 19 base pair (bp) deletion allele of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme that makes folic acid metabolically active and reduces dihydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate to stimulate folate turnover, has been implicated in folate related health outcomes. Objective: Examine the effect ...

  10. Role of mismatch repair proteins in the processing of cisplatin interstrand cross-links.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Akshada; Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Sobol, Robert W; Patrick, Steve M

    2015-11-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency gives rise to cisplatin resistance and can lead to poor prognosis in cancers. Various models have been proposed to explain this low level of resistance caused due to loss of MMR proteins. We have shown that MMR proteins are required to maintain cisplatin interstrand cross-links (ICLs) on the DNA leading to increased cellular sensitivity. In our previous studies, we have shown that BER processing of the cisplatin ICLs is mutagenic. Polymerase β (Polβ) can generate mismatches which leads to the activation and the recruitment of mismatch repair proteins. In this paper, we distinguished between the requirement of different downstream MMR proteins for maintaining cisplatin sensitivity. We show that the MutSα (MSH2-MSH6) heterocomplex is required to maintain cisplatin sensitivity, whereas the Mutsβ complex has no effect. These results can be correlated with the increased repair of cisplatin ICLs and ICL induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in the resistant cells. Moreover, we show that MLH1 proficient cells displayed a cisplatin sensitive phenotype when compared with the MLH1 deficient cells and the ATPase activity of MLH1 is essential to mediate this effect. Based on these results, we propose that MutSα as well as the downstream MMR pathway proteins are essential to maintain a cisplatin sensitive phenotype as a consequence of processing Polβ induced mismatches at sites flanking cisplatin ICLs. PMID:26519826

  11. A Mutation in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene (Rad3) Required for Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription Increases the Efficiency of Mismatch Correction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Johnson, A. L.; Johnston, L. H.; Siede, W.; Friedberg, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Kunz, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequence of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency of mismatch correction was enhanced in the rad3-1 strain. This surprising result prompted us to examine expression of yeast mismatch repair genes. We determined that MSH2, but not MLH1, is transcriptionally regulated during the cell-cycle like PMS1, and that rad3-1 does not increase the transcript levels for these genes in log phase cells. These observations suggest that the rad3-1 mutation gives rise to an enhanced efficiency of mismatch correction via a process that does not involve transcriptional regulation of mismatch repair. Interestingly, mismatch repair also was more efficient when error-editing by yeast DNA polymerase δ was eliminated. We discuss our results in relation to possible mechanisms that may link the rad3-1 mutation to mismatch correction efficiency. PMID:8889512

  12. Laboratory evolution of Geobacter sulfurreducens for enhanced growth on lactate via a single-base-pair substitution in a transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Zarath M; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Ismail, Wael; Haveman, Shelley A; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-01-01

    The addition of organic compounds to groundwater in order to promote bioremediation may represent a new selective pressure on subsurface microorganisms. The ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens, which serves as a model for the Geobacter species that are important in various types of anaerobic groundwater bioremediation, to adapt for rapid metabolism of lactate, a common bioremediation amendment, was evaluated. Serial transfer of five parallel cultures in a medium with lactate as the sole electron donor yielded five strains that could metabolize lactate faster than the wild-type strain. Genome sequencing revealed that all five strains had non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the same gene, GSU0514, a putative transcriptional regulator. Introducing the single-base-pair mutation from one of the five strains into the wild-type strain conferred rapid growth on lactate. This strain and the five adaptively evolved strains had four to eight-fold higher transcript abundance than wild-type cells for genes for the two subunits of succinyl-CoA synthase, an enzyme required for growth on lactate. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the protein encoded by GSU0514 bound to the putative promoter of the succinyl-CoA synthase operon. The binding sequence was not apparent elsewhere in the genome. These results demonstrate that a single-base-pair mutation in a transcriptional regulator can have a significant impact on the capacity for substrate utilization and suggest that adaptive evolution should be considered as a potential response of microorganisms to environmental change(s) imposed during bioremediation. PMID:22113376

  13. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-05-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for 'lab-on-a-chip' type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  14. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  15. The role of N7 protonation of guanine in determining the structure, stability and function of RNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Halder, Antarip; Bhattacharya, Sohini; Datta, Ayan; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Mitra, Abhijit

    2015-10-21

    The roles of protonated nucleobases in stabilizing different structural motifs and in facilitating catalytic functions of RNA are well known. Among different polar sites of all the nucleobases, N7 of guanine has the highest protonation propensity at physiological pH. However, unlike other easily protonable sites such as N1 and N3 of adenine or N3 of cytosine, N7 protonation of guanine does not lead to the stabilization of base pairs involving its protonated Hoogsteen edge. It also does not facilitate its participation in any acid-base catalysis process. To explore the possible roles of N7 protonated guanine, we have studied its base pairing potentials involving WatsonCrick and sugar edges, which undergo major charge redistribution upon N7 protonation. We have carried out quantum chemical geometry optimization at the M05-2X/6-311G+(2d,2p) level, followed by interaction energy calculation at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level, along with the analysis of the context of occurrence for selected base pairs involving the sugar edge or the WatsonCrick edge of guanine within a non-redundant set of 167 RNA crystal structures. Our results suggest that, four base pairs - G:C W:W trans, G:rC W:S cis, G:G W:H cis and G:G S:H trans may involve N7 protonated guanine. These base pairs deviate significantly from their respective experimental geometries upon QM optimization, but they retain their experimental geometries if guanine N7 protonation is considered during optimization. Our study also reveals the role of guanine N7 protonation (i) in stabilizing important RNA structural motifs, (ii) in providing a framework for designing pH driven molecular motors and (iii) in providing an alternative strategy to mimic the effect of post-transcriptional changes. PMID:26382322

  16. Mechanistic insights into temperature-dependent regulation of the simple cyanobacterial hsp17 RNA thermometer at base-pair resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Dominic; Rinnenthal, Jörg; Narberhaus, Franz; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial hsp17 ribonucleicacid thermometer (RNAT) is one of the smallest naturally occurring RNAT. It forms a single hairpin with an internal 1×3-bulge separating the start codon in stem I from the ribosome binding site (RBS) in stem II. We investigated the temperature-dependent regulation of hsp17 by mapping individual base-pair stabilities from solvent exchange nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The wild-type RNAT was found to be stabilized by two critical CG base pairs (C14-G27 and C13-G28). Replacing the internal 1×3 bulge by a stable CG base pair in hsp17rep significantly increased the global stability and unfolding cooperativity as evidenced by circular dichroism spectroscopy. From the NMR analysis, remote stabilization and non-nearest neighbour effects exist at the base-pair level, in particular for nucleotide G28 (five nucleotides apart from the side of mutation). Individual base-pair stabilities are coupled to the stability of the entire thermometer within both the natural and the stabilized RNATs by enthalpy–entropy compensation presumably mediated by the hydration shell. At the melting point the Gibbs energies of the individual nucleobases are equalized suggesting a consecutive zipper-type unfolding mechanism of the RBS leading to a dimmer-like function of hsp17 and switch-like regulation behaviour of hsp17rep. The data show how minor changes in the nucleotide sequence not only offset the melting temperature but also alter the mode of temperature sensing. The cyanobacterial thermosensor demonstrates the remarkable adjustment of natural RNATs to execute precise temperature control. PMID:25940621

  17. The Prevention of Repeat-Associated Deletions in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae by Mismatch Repair Depends on Size and Origin of Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Tran, H. T.; Gordenin, D. A.; Resnick, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of mismatch repair on 1- to 61-bp deletions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The deletions are likely to involve unpaired loop intermediates resulting from DNA polymerase slippage. The mutator effects of mutations in the DNA polymerase δ (POL3) gene and the recombinational repair RAD52 gene were studied in combination with mismatch repair defects. The pol3-t mutation increased up to 1000-fold the rate of extended (7-61 bp) but not of 1-bp deletions. In a rad52 null mutant only the 1-bp deletions were increased (12-fold). The mismatch repair mutations pms1, msh2 and msh3 did not affect 31- and 61-bp deletions in the pol3-t but increased the rates of 7- and 1-bp deletions. We propose that loops less than or equal to seven bases generated during replication are subject to mismatch repair by the PMS1, MSH2, MSH3 system and that it cannot act on loops >=31 bases. In contrast to the pol3-t, the enhancement of 1-bp deletions in a rad52 mutant is not altered by a pms1 mutation. Thus, mismatch repair appears to be specific to errors of DNA synthesis generated during semiconservative replication. PMID:8844147

  18. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients. PMID:27022418

  19. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients. PMID:27022418

  20. Insights into protein -- DNA interactions, stability and allosteric communications: A computational study of MutS-DNA recognition complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie

    2012-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair proteins (MMR) maintain genetic stability by recognizing and repairing mismatched bases and insertion/deletion loops mistakenly incorporated during DNA replication, and initiate cellular response to certain types of DNA damage. The most abundant MMR mismatch-binding factor in eukaryotes, MutS, recognizes and initiates the repair of base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletions. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on mismatched and damaged MutS-DNA complexes. A comprehensive DNA binding site analysis of relevant conformations shows that MutS proteins recognize the mismatched and platinum cross-linked DNA substrates in significantly different modes. Distinctive conformational changes associated with MutS binding to mismatched and damaged DNA have been identified and they provide insight into the involvement of MMR proteins in DNA-repair and DNA-damage pathways. Stability and allosteric interactions at the heterodimer interface associated with the mismatch and damage recognition step allow for prediction of key residues in MMR cancer-causing mutations. A rigorous hydrogen bonding analysis for ADP molecules at the ATPase binding sites is also presented. A large number of known MMR cancer causing mutations among the residues were found.

  1. Beam halo in mismatched proton beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Allen, C. K.; Chan, D.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Crandall, K. R.; Qiang, J.; Garnett, R. W.; Lysenko, W. P.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Schneider, J. D.; Schulze, M. E.; Sheffield, R. L.; Smith, H. V.

    2002-01-01

    Progress was made during the past decade towards a better understanding of halo formation caused by beam mismatch in high-intensity beams. To test these ideas an experiment was carried out at Los Alamos with proton beams in a 52-quadrupole focusing channel. Rms emittances and beam widths were obtained from measured beam profiles for comparison with the maximum emittance growth predictions of a free-energy model and the maximum haloamplitude predictions of a particle-core model. The experimental results are also compared with multiparticle simulations. In this paper we will present the experimental results and discuss the implications with respect to the validity of both the models and the simulations. Keywords: beam halo, emittance growth, beam profiles, simulations, space charge, mismatch

  2. Dynamics of beam halo in mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Garnett, R.W.; Gray, E.R.; Ryne, R.D.; Wang, T.S.

    1996-09-01

    High-power proton linacs for nuclear materials transmutation and production, and new accelerator-driven neutron spallation sources must be designed to control beam-halo formation, which leads to beam loss. The study of particle-core models is leading to a better understanding of the causes and characteristics of beam halo produced by space-charge forces in rms mismatched beams. Detailed studies of the models have resulted in predictions of the dependence of the maximum amplitude of halo particles on a mismatch parameter and on the space-charge tune-depression ratio. Scaling formulas have been derived which will provide guidance for choosing the aperture radius to contain the halo without loss.

  3. Impact of the terminal bulges of HIV-1 cTAR DNA on its stability and the destabilizing activity of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

    PubMed

    Beltz, Hervé; Azoulay, Joel; Bernacchi, Serena; Clamme, Jean-Pierre; Ficheux, Damien; Roques, Bernard; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves

    2003-04-18

    Reverse transcription of HIV-1 genomic RNA to double-stranded DNA by reverse transcriptase (RT) is a critical step in HIV-1 replication. This process relies on two viral proteins, the RT enzyme and nucleocapsid protein NCp7 that has well documented nucleic acid chaperone properties. At the beginning of the linear DNA synthesis, the newly made minus-strand strong-stop DNA ((-)ssDNA) is transferred to the 3'end of the genomic RNA by means of an hybridization reaction between transactivation response element (TAR) RNA and cTAR DNA sequences. Since both TAR sequences exhibit stable hairpin structures, NCp7 needs to destabilize the TAR structures in order to chaperone their hybridization. To further characterize the relationships between TAR stability and NC-mediated destabilization, the role of the A(49) and G(52) bulged residues in cTAR DNA stability was investigated. The stability of cTAR and mutants where one or the two terminal bulges were replaced by base-pairs as well as the NCp7-mediated destabilization of these cTAR sequences were examined. Thermodynamic data indicate that the two bulges cooperatively destabilize cTAR by reducing the stacking interactions between the bases. This causes a free energy change of about 6.4 kcal/mol and seems to be critical for NC activity. Time-resolved fluorescence data of doubly labelled cTAR derivatives suggest that NC-mediated melting of cTAR ends propagates up to the 10C.A(44) mismatch or T(40) bulge. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation was also used to monitor cTAR ends fraying by NC. Results show that NC causes a very significant increase of cTAR ends fraying, probably limited to the terminal base-pair in the case of cTAR mutants. Since the TAR RNA and cTAR DNA bulges or mismatches appear well conserved among all HIV-1 strains, the present data support the notion of a co-evolutionary relationship between TAR and NC activity. PMID:12684000

  4. Reiterative dG addition by Euplotes crassus telomerase during extension of non-telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bednenko, J; Melek, M; Shippen, D E

    1998-01-01

    Telomerase from the ciliate Euplotes crassus incorporates G4T4telomeric repeats onto both telomeric and non-telomeric single-stranded DNA 3'-ends via reverse transcription of a templating domain in its RNA subunit. Here we describe an unusual mode of template copying that is characteristic of DNA synthesis onto non-telomeric 3'-ends in vitro . When dTTP was eliminated from telomerase reactions, telomeric primers or DNA products generated from the telomerase endonuclease were extended by precise copying of the RNA template. In contrast, telomerase catalyzed the addition of up to 13 dG residues onto primers with non-telomeric 3'-ends under the same reaction conditions. Introducing mismatches in the 3'-terminus of telomeric primers that reduced primer complementarity to the RNA template induced reiterative dG incorporation, indicating that the reaction is influenced by Watson-Crick base pair formation between the primer and the RNA template. Unexpectedly, the reiterative dG addition mode was confined to telomerase derived from developing cells that undergo new telomere formation. This reaction was not observed in vegetatively growing cells. We postulate that indiscriminate dG addition by telomerase occurs by reiterative copying of C residues in the telomerase RNA templating domain and reflects lateral instability of the primer-template interaction during de novo telomere formation. PMID:9705511

  5. Infrequent identity mismatches are frequently undetected

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately match faces to photographs bears critically on many domains, from controlling purchase of age-restricted goods to law enforcement and airport security. Despite its pervasiveness and importance, research has shown that face matching is surprisingly error prone. The majority of face-matching research is conducted under idealized conditions (e.g., using photographs of individuals taken on the same day) and with equal proportions of match and mismatch trials, a rate that is likely not observed in everyday face matching. In four experiments, we presented observers with photographs of faces taken an average of 1.5 years apart and tested whether face-matching performance is affected by the prevalence of identity mismatches, comparing conditions of low (10 %) and high (50 %) mismatch prevalence. Like the low-prevalence effect in visual search, we observed inflated miss rates under low-prevalence conditions. This effect persisted when participants were allowed to correct their initial responses (Experiment 2), when they had to verify every decision with a certainty judgment (Experiment 3) and when they were permitted “second looks” at face pairs (Experiment 4). These results suggest that, under realistic viewing conditions, the low-prevalence effect in face matching is a large, persistent source of errors. PMID:24500751

  6. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gstoettner, Michaela; Michaela, Gstoettner; Heider, Denise; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian Michael; Michael, Bach Christian

    2008-11-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  7. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  8. Mismatch correction modulates mutation frequency and pilus phase and antigenic variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Criss, Alison K; Bonney, Kevin M; Chang, Rhoda A; Duffin, Paul M; LeCuyer, Brian E; Seifert, H Steven

    2010-01-01

    The mismatch correction (MMC) system repairs DNA mismatches and single nucleotide insertions or deletions postreplication. To test the functions of MMC in the obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, homologues of the core MMC genes mutS and mutL were inactivated in strain FA1090. No mutH homologue was found in the FA1090 genome, suggesting that gonococcal MMC is not methyl directed. MMC mutants were compared to a mutant in uvrD, the helicase that functions with MMC in Escherichia coli. Inactivation of MMC or uvrD increased spontaneous resistance to rifampin and nalidixic acid, and MMC/uvrD double mutants exhibited higher mutation frequencies than any single mutant. Loss of MMC marginally enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA carrying a single nucleotide mismatch but not that of DNA with a 1-kb insertion. Unlike the exquisite UV sensitivity of the uvrD mutant, inactivating MMC did not affect survival after UV irradiation. MMC and uvrD mutants exhibited increased PilC-dependent pilus phase variation. mutS-deficient gonococci underwent an increased frequency of pilin antigenic variation, whereas uvrD had no effect. Recombination tracts in the mutS pilin variants were longer than in parental gonococci but utilized the same donor pilS loci. These results show that gonococcal MMC repairs mismatches and small insertion/deletions in DNA and also affects the recombination events underlying pilin antigenic variation. The differential effects of MMC and uvrD in gonococci unexpectedly reveal that MMC can function independently of uvrD in this human-specific pathogen. PMID:19854909

  9. Quantum dot-based isothermal chain elongation for fluorescence detection of specific DNA sequences via template-dependent surface-hybridization.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqing; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2012-04-01

    A new quantum dot-based method to detect specific sequences of DNA is proposed. The capture and reporter probes do not hybridize to each other, but in the presence of a template they can anneal to each other via the formation of a stable ternary complex. Because of the specific design of the capture and reporter probes, the 5' end of the template target DNA remains free to hybridize with another reporter. In this way, each capture DNA is an initiator strand that triggers a cascade of hybridization events between the target DNA and the reporter probe. This forms a superstructure, enhances base stacking, and produces a strong fluorescent signal. The introduction of T4 DNA ligase further stabilizes the superstructure and greatly increases the fluorescence intensity, and the detection limit is as low as 10 fM. This fluorescence method is advantageous over conventional techniques because of its excellent ability to discriminate single base-pair mismatches and single nucleotide gap or flap. This simple technique is promising for improving medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22343986

  10. Deconstructing the Polymerase Chain Reaction: Understanding and Correcting Bias Associated with Primer Degeneracies and Primer-Template Mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stefan J.; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3–12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled “Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR”, in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3’ end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers

  11. Physical and functional interactions between Werner syndrome helicase and mismatch-repair initiation factors

    PubMed Central

    Saydam, Nurten; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Dietschy, Tobias; Garcia, Patrick L.; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Shevelev, Igor; Stagljar, Igor; Janscak, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a severe recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, cancer predisposition and genomic instability. The gene mutated in WS encodes a bi-functional enzyme called WRN that acts as a RecQ-type DNA helicase and a 3′-5′ exonuclease, but its exact role in DNA metabolism is poorly understood. Here we show that WRN physically interacts with the MSH2/MSH6 (MutSα), MSH2/MSH3 (MutSβ) and MLH1/PMS2 (MutLα) heterodimers that are involved in the initiation of mismatch repair (MMR) and the rejection of homeologous recombination. MutSα and MutSβ can strongly stimulate the helicase activity of WRN specifically on forked DNA structures with a 3′-single-stranded arm. The stimulatory effect of MutSα on WRN-mediated unwinding is enhanced by a G/T mismatch in the DNA duplex ahead of the fork. The MutLα protein known to bind to the MutS α–heteroduplex complexes has no effect on WRN-mediated DNA unwinding stimulated by MutSα, nor does it affect DNA unwinding by WRN alone. Our data are consistent with results of genetic experiments in yeast suggesting that MMR factors act in conjunction with a RecQ-type helicase to reject recombination between divergent sequences. PMID:17715146

  12. Comparison of Three Cre-LoxP Based Paired-End Library Construction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ze; Nath, Nandita; Tritt, Andrew; Liang, Shoudan; Han, James; Pennacchio, Len; Chen, Feng

    2013-03-26

    Paired-end library sequencing has been proven useful in scaffold construction during de novo whole genome shotgun assembly. The ability of generating mate pairs with > 8 Kb insert sizes is especially important for genomes containing long repeats. To make mate paired libraries for next generation sequencing, DNA fragments need to be circularized to bring the ends together. There are several methods that can be used for DNA circulation, namely ligation, hybridization and Cre-LoxP recombination. With higher circularization efficiency with large insert DNA fragments, Cre-LoxP recombination method generally has been used for constructing >8 kb insert size paired-end libraries. Second fragmentation step is also crucial for maintaining high library complexity and uniform genome coverage. Here we will describe the following three fragmentation methods: restriction enzyme digestion, random shearing and nick translation. We will present the comparison results for these three methods. Our data showed that all three methods are able to generate paired-end libraries with greater than 20 kb insert. Advantages and disadvantages of these three methods will be discussed as well.

  13. Efficient aminoacylation of the tRNA(Ala) acceptor stem: dependence on the 2:71 base pair.

    PubMed Central

    Beuning, Penny J; Nagan, Maria C; Cramer, Christopher J; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Gelpí, Josep-Lluis; Bashford, Donald

    2002-01-01

    Specific aminoacylation by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases requires accurate recognition of cognate tRNA substrates. In the case of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS), RNA duplexes that mimic the acceptor stem of the tRNA are efficient substrates for aminoacylation in vitro. It was previously shown that recognition by AlaRS is severely affected by a simple base pair transversion of the G2:C71 pair at the second position in the RNA helix. In this study, we determined the aminoacylation efficiencies of 50 variants of the tRNA(Ala) acceptor stem containing substitutions at the 2:71 position. We find that there is not a single functional group of the wild-type G2:C71 base pair that is critical for positive recognition. Rather, we observed that base-pair orientation plays an important role in recognition. In particular, pyrimidine2:purine71 combinations generally resulted in decreased aminoacylation efficiency compared to the corresponding purine:pyrimidine pair. Moreover, the activity of a pyrimidine:purine variant could be partially restored by the presence of a major groove amino group at position 71. In an attempt to understand this result further, dielectric continuum electrostatic calculations were carried out, in some cases with additional inclusion of van der Waals interaction energies, to determine interaction potentials of the wild-type duplexAla and seven 2:71 variants. This analysis revealed a positive correlation between major groove negative electrostatic potential in the vicinity of the 3:70 base pair and measured aminoacylation efficiency. PMID:12022232

  14. 5S rRNA sequences from four marine invertebrates and implications for base pairing models of metazoan sequences.

    PubMed

    Walker, W F; Doolittle, W F

    1983-08-11

    The nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNAs from the starfish Asterias vulgaris, the squid Illex illecebrosus, the sipunculid Phascolopsis gouldii and the jellyfish Aurelia aurita were determined. The sequence from Asterias lends support for one of two previous base pairing models for helix E in metazoan sequences. The Aurelia sequence differs by five nucleotides from that previously reported and does not violate the consensus secondary structure model for eukaryotic 5S rRNA. PMID:6136024

  15. Structure of a DNA glycosylase searching for lesions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anirban; Santos, Webster L; Verdine, Gregory L

    2006-02-24

    DNA glycosylases must interrogate millions of base pairs of undamaged DNA in order to locate and then excise one damaged nucleobase. The nature of this search process remains poorly understood. Here we report the use of disulfide cross-linking (DXL) technology to obtain structures of a bacterial DNA glycosylase, MutM, interrogating undamaged DNA. These structures, solved to 2.0 angstrom resolution, reveal the nature of the search process: The protein inserts a probe residue into the helical stack and severely buckles the target base pair, which remains intrahelical. MutM therefore actively interrogates the intact DNA helix while searching for damage. PMID:16497933

  16. Can an Excess Electron Localise on a Purine Moiety in the Adenine-thymine Watson-Crick Base Pair? A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurkiewicz, Kamil; Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Rak, Janusz

    2007-04-17

    The electron affinity and the propensity to electron-induced proton transfer (PT) of hydrogen-bonded complexes between the Watson–Crick adenine–thymine pair (AT) and simple organic acid (HX), attached to adenine in the Hoogsteen-type configuration, were studied at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level. Although the carboxyl group is deprotonated at physiological pH, its neutral form, COOH, resembles the peptide bond or the amide fragment in the side chain of asparagine (Asn) or glutamine (Gln). Thus, these complexes mimic the interaction between the DNA environment (e.g., proteins) and nucleobase pairs incorporated in the biopolymer. Electron attachment is thermodynamically feasible and adiabatic electron affinities range from 0.41 to 1.28 eV, while the vertical detachment energies of the resulting anions span the range of 0.39 –2.88 eV. Low-energy activation barriers separate the anionic minima: aHX(AT) from the more stable single-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-SPT, and aHX(AT)-SPT from the double-PT anionic geometry, aHX(AT)-DPT. Interaction between the adenine of the Watson–Crick AT base pair with an acidic proton donor probably counterbalances the larger EA of isolated thymine, as SOMO is almost evenly delocalized over both types of nucleic bases in the aHX(AT) anions. Moreover, as a result of PT the excess electron localizes entirely on adenine. Thus, in DNA interacting with its physiological environment, damage induced by low-energy electrons could begin, contrary to the current view, with the formation of purine anions, which are not formed in is