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Sample records for dna constant-force unzipping

  1. Pause Point Spectra in DNA Constant-Force Unzipping

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, J. D.; Lucks, J. B.; Kafri, Y.; Danilowicz, C.; Nelson, D. R.; Prentiss, M.

    2005-01-01

    Under constant applied force, the separation of double-stranded DNA into two single strands is known to proceed through a series of pauses and jumps. Given experimental traces of constant-force unzipping, we present a method whereby the locations of pause points can be extracted in the form of a pause point spectrum. A simple theoretical model of DNA constant-force unzipping is presented, which generates theoretical pause point spectra through Monte Carlo simulation of the unzipping process. The locations of peaks in the experimental and theoretical pause point spectra are found to be nearly coincident below 6000 basepairs for unzipping the bacteriophage λ-genome. The model only requires the sequence, temperature, and a set of empirical basepair binding and stacking energy parameters, and the good agreement with experiment suggests that pause point locations are primarily determined by the DNA sequence. The model is also used to predict pause point spectra for the bacteriophage φX174 genome. The algorithm for extracting the pause point spectrum might also be useful for studying related systems which exhibit pausing behavior such as molecular motors. PMID:15695634

  2. Probing the mechanical unzipping of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, Nikos K.; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim O.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have made a systematic study of local melting in DNA possible. This provide new insight into important biological processes as replication and transcription. In this work, we present an extensive study of the micromechanical unzipping of DNA in the framework of the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model. The force required to separate the doubled strand is derived through analysis of the force-extension curve, while an estimation of the nucleation bubble size of the unzipping process is obtained by the distribution of the rapture force. Our findings are in very good agreement with existing experimental results; for example the force-temperature phase diagram obtained by the PBD model agrees excellently with recent constant-force experimental measurements of the lambda-phage DNA. Fundamental differences between the in vivo and vitro DNA unzipping, as predicted by the PBD model, are also discussed.

  3. Nanopore Unzipping of Individual DNA Hairpin Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mathé, Jérôme; Visram, Hasina; Viasnoff, Virgile; Rabin, Yitzhak; Meller, Amit

    2004-01-01

    We have used the nanometer scale α-Hemolysin pore to study the unzipping kinetics of individual DNA hairpins under constant force or constant loading rate. Using a dynamic voltage control method, the entry rate of polynucleotides into the pore and the voltage pattern applied to induce hairpin unzipping are independently set. Thus, hundreds of unzipping events can be tested in a short period of time (few minutes), independently of the unzipping voltage amplitude. Because our method does not entail the physical coupling of the molecules under test to a force transducer, very high throughput can be achieved. We used our method to study DNA unzipping kinetics at small forces, which have not been accessed before. We find that in this regime the static unzipping times decrease exponentially with voltage with a characteristic slope that is independent of the duplex region sequence, and that the intercept depends strongly on the duplex region energy. We also present the first nanopore dynamic force measurements (time varying force). Our results are in agreement with the ∼log(\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\dot {V}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) dependence at high \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\dot {V}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}(where \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\dot {V}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} is the loading rate) observed by other methods

  4. Probing the Mechanical Unzipping of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, N. K.; Redondo, A.; Bishop, A. R.; Rasmussen, K. Ø.

    2006-06-01

    A study of the micromechanical unzipping of DNA in the framework of the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model is presented. We introduce a Monte Carlo technique that allows accurate determination of the dependence of the unzipping forces on unzipping speed and temperature. Our findings agree quantitatively with experimental results for homogeneous DNA, and for λ-phage DNA we reproduce the recently obtained experimental force-temperature phase diagram. Finally, we argue that there may be fundamental differences between in vivo and in vitro DNA unzipping.

  5. Measurements of the hysteresis in unzipping and rezipping double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, K.; Danilowicz, C.; Coljee, V.; Prentiss, M.

    2007-05-01

    Complete unzipping and rezipping of λ -phage double-stranded DNA is achieved by applying a constant force. A strong hysteresis is observed at all tested time scales and temperatures. Hysteresis also occurs for partial unzipping, indicating stability for the partially open state over a force range of 2- 5pN . Results are compared to nearest-neighbor model simulations, and reasonable agreement is found.

  6. Probing Protein-DNA Interactions by Unzipping DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle

    2003-03-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are essential to cellular processes. In replication, transcription, recombination, DNA repair, and DNA packaging, proteins bind to DNA as activators or repressors, to recruit other proteins, or to carry out various catalytic activities. I will present Unzipping Force Analysis of Protein Association (UFAPA) as a novel and versatile method for detection of the position and dynamic nature of protein-DNA interactions. A single DNA double helix was unzipped in the presence of DNA-binding proteins using a feedback-enhanced optical trap. When the unzipping fork in a DNA reached a bound protein molecule, we observed a dramatic increase in the tension in the DNA, followed by a sudden tension reduction. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout an unbinding "event" revealed information about the spatial location and dynamic nature of the protein-DNA complex.

  7. Impacts of magnesium ions on the unzipping of λ-phage DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Danilowicz, C.; Conroy, R. S.; Coljee, V. W.; Prentiss, M.

    2006-04-01

    We used magnetic tweezers to exert a constant force to separate double stranded λ-phage DNA as a function of temperature and buffer content. The separation was performed at temperatures ranging from 20 to 50 °C in various Mg2+ buffers, including a T4 ligase buffer and a PCR buffer. At 30 °C and pH 7.4 (10 mM Tris), we measured the unzipping force as a function of concentration for Mg2+ concentrations between 0.2 and 50 mM, and determined that the unzipping force is proportional to the logarithm of concentration. For comparison, we performed the analogous experiment as a function of Na+ concentration and found that the unzipping force is also proportional to the log of concentration, but requires a much higher cation concentration to achieve the same unzipping force as in Mg2+ buffer. We also constructed the phase diagram in the force-temperature plane for the unzipping in 10 and 50 mM MgCl2 at pH 7.4 (10 mM Tris). The phase diagram for 10 mM Mg2+ is similar to the one measured previously for phosphate buffer saline (PBS) but the phase diagram for 50 mM Mg2+ deviates significantly from those for 10 mM Mg2+ and PBS at temperatures between 20 and 35 °C.

  8. Diffusive dynamics of DNA unzipping in a nanopore.

    PubMed

    Stachiewicz, Anna; Molski, Andrzej

    2016-02-15

    When an electric field is applied to an insulating membrane, movement of charged particles through a nanopore is induced. The measured ionic current reports on biomolecules passing through the nanopore. In this work, we explored the kinetics of DNA unzipping in a nanopore using our coarse-grained model (Stachiewicz and Molski, J. Comput. Chem. 2015, 36, 947). Coarse graining allowed a more detailed analysis for a wider range of parameters than all-atom simulations. Dependence of the translocation mode (unzipping or distortion) on the pore diameter was examined, and the threshold voltages were estimated. We determined the potential of mean force, position-dependent diffusion coefficient, and position-dependent effective charge for the DNA unzipping. The three molecular profiles were correlated with the ionic current and molecular events. On the unzipping/translocation force profile, two energy maxima were found, one of them corresponding to the unzipping, and the other to the translocation barriers. The unzipping kinetics were further explored using Brownian dynamics. PMID:26519865

  9. Probing Nucleosome Remodeling by Unzipping Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    At the core of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.65 turns around an octamer of histone proteins. Even this lowest level of genomic compaction presents a strong barrier to DNA-binding cellular factors that are required for essential processes such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Chromatin remodeling enzymes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to regulate accessibility of the genetic code by altering chromatin structure. While remodeling enzymes have been the subject of extensive research in recent years, their precise mechanism remains unclear. In order to probe the structure of individual nucleosomes and their remodeling, we assembled a histone octamer onto a DNA segment containing a strong nucleosome positioning sequence. As the DNA double helix was unzipped through the nucleosome using a feedback-enhanced optical trap, the presence of the nucleosome was detected as a series of dramatic increases in the tension in the DNA, followed by sudden tension reductions. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout the disruption accurately revealed the spatial location and fine structure of the nucleosome to near base pair precision. Using this approach, we investigate how remodeling enzymes may alter the location and structure of a nucleosome.

  10. Internal vs Fishhook Hairpin DNA: Unzipping Locations and Mechanisms in the α-Hemolysin Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the interaction of hairpin DNA with the α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore have determined hairpin unzipping kinetics, thermodynamics, and sequence-dependent DNA/protein interactions. Missing from these results is a systematic study comparing the unzipping process for fishhook (one-tail) vs internal (two-tail) hairpins when they are electrophoretically driven from the cis to the trans side of α-HL via a 30-mer single-stranded tail. In the current studies, fishhook hairpins showed long unzipping times with one deep blockage current level. In contrast, the internal hairpins demonstrated relatively fast unzipping and a characteristic pulse-like current pattern. These differences were further explored with respect to stem length and sequence context. Further, a series of internal hairpins with asymmetric tails were studied, for which it was determined that a second tail longer than 12 nucleotides results in internal hairpin unzipping behavior, while tail lengths of 6 nucleotides behaved like fishhook hairpins. Interestingly, these studies were able to resolve a current difference of ∼6% between hairpin DNA immobilized in the nanopore waiting to unzip vs the translocating unzipped DNA, with the latter showing a deeper current blockage level. This demonstration of different currents for immobilized and translocating DNA has not been described previously. These results were interpreted as fishhook hairpins unzipping inside the vestibule, while the internal hairpins unzip outside the vestibule of α-HL. Lastly, we used this knowledge to study the unzipping of a long double-stranded DNA (>50 base pairs) outside the vestibule of α-HL. The conclusions drawn from these studies are anticipated to be beneficial in future application of nanopore analysis of nucleic acids. PMID:25333648

  11. Free-energy landscape and characteristic forces for the initiation of DNA unzipping.

    PubMed

    Mentes, Ahmet; Florescu, Ana Maria; Brunk, Elizabeth; Wereszczynski, Jeff; Joyeux, Marc; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2015-04-01

    DNA unzipping, the separation of its double helix into single strands, is crucial in modulating a host of genetic processes. Although the large-scale separation of double-stranded DNA has been studied with a variety of theoretical and experimental techniques, the minute details of the very first steps of unzipping are still unclear. Here, we use atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations, coarse-grained simulations, and a statistical-mechanical model to study the initiation of DNA unzipping by an external force. Calculation of the potential of mean force profiles for the initial separation of the first few terminal basepairs in a DNA oligomer revealed that forces ranging between 130 and 230 pN are needed to disrupt the first basepair, and these values are an order of magnitude larger than those needed to disrupt basepairs in partially unzipped DNA. The force peak has an echo of ∼50 pN at the distance that unzips the second basepair. We show that the high peak needed to initiate unzipping derives from a free-energy basin that is distinct from the basins of subsequent basepairs because of entropic contributions, and we highlight the microscopic origin of the peak. To our knowledge, our results suggest a new window of exploration for single-molecule experiments. PMID:25863064

  12. Free-Energy Landscape and Characteristic Forces for the Initiation of DNA Unzipping

    PubMed Central

    Mentes, Ahmet; Florescu, Ana Maria; Brunk, Elizabeth; Wereszczynski, Jeff; Joyeux, Marc; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    DNA unzipping, the separation of its double helix into single strands, is crucial in modulating a host of genetic processes. Although the large-scale separation of double-stranded DNA has been studied with a variety of theoretical and experimental techniques, the minute details of the very first steps of unzipping are still unclear. Here, we use atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations, coarse-grained simulations, and a statistical-mechanical model to study the initiation of DNA unzipping by an external force. Calculation of the potential of mean force profiles for the initial separation of the first few terminal basepairs in a DNA oligomer revealed that forces ranging between 130 and 230 pN are needed to disrupt the first basepair, and these values are an order of magnitude larger than those needed to disrupt basepairs in partially unzipped DNA. The force peak has an echo of ∼50 pN at the distance that unzips the second basepair. We show that the high peak needed to initiate unzipping derives from a free-energy basin that is distinct from the basins of subsequent basepairs because of entropic contributions, and we highlight the microscopic origin of the peak. To our knowledge, our results suggest a new window of exploration for single-molecule experiments. PMID:25863064

  13. Unzipping of A-Form DNA-RNA, A-Form DNA-PNA, and B-Form DNA-DNA in the α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Perera, Rukshan T; Fleming, Aaron M; Peterson, Amberlyn M; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2016-01-19

    Unzipping of double-stranded nucleic acids by an electric field applied across a wild-type α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore provides structural information about different duplex forms. In this work, comparative studies on A-form DNA-RNA duplexes and B-form DNA-DNA duplexes with a single-stranded tail identified significant differences in the blockage current and the unzipping duration between the two helical forms. We observed that the B-form duplex blocks the channel 1.9 ± 0.2 pA more and unzips ∼15-fold more slowly than an A-form duplex at 120 mV. We developed a model to describe the dependence of duplex unzipping on structure. We demonstrate that the wider A-form duplex (d = 2.4 nm) is unable to enter the vestibule opening of αHL on the cis side, leading to unzipping outside of the nanopore with higher residual current and faster unzipping times. In contrast, the smaller B-form duplexes (d = 2.0 nm) enter the vestibule of αHL, resulting in decreased current blockages and slower unzipping. We investigated the effects of varying the length of the single-stranded overhang, and studied A-form DNA-PNA duplexes to provide additional support for the proposed model. This study identifies key differences between A- and B-form duplex unzipping that will be important in the design of future probe-based methods for detecting DNA or RNA. PMID:26789754

  14. Conformational Changes Followed by Complete Unzipping of DNA Double Helix by Charge-Tuned Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bera, Subhas C; Sanyal, Kasturi; Senapati, Dulal; Mishra, Padmaja P

    2016-05-12

    The complete unzipping of DNA double helix by small size gold nanoparticles having weakly positive surface charge has been monitored using ensemble and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) techniques. We believe, as the gold nanoparticles have positive charge on the surface, the DNA and nanoparticles were pulled together to form two single strands. The positively charged ligands on the nanoparticles attached to the DNA, and the hydrophobic ligands of the nanoparticles became tangled with each other, pulling the nanoparticles into clusters. At the same time, the nanoparticles pulled the DNA apart. The conformational changes followed by unzipping have been investigated for long DNA (calf thymus DNA) as well as for short DNA (∼40 base pair) using ensemble methods like circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence intercalation assay, viscometric method, and single molecule FRET imaging. This observation not only reveals a new aspect in the field of nano-bio interface but also provides additional information about DNA dynamics. PMID:27082012

  15. Extracting Kinetics from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy: Nanopore Unzipping of DNA Hairpins

    PubMed Central

    Dudko, Olga K.; Mathé, Jérôme; Szabo, Attila; Meller, Amit; Hummer, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Single-molecule force experiments provide powerful new tools to explore biomolecular interactions. Here, we describe a systematic procedure for extracting kinetic information from force-spectroscopy experiments, and apply it to nanopore unzipping of individual DNA hairpins. Two types of measurements are considered: unzipping at constant voltage, and unzipping at constant voltage-ramp speeds. We perform a global maximum-likelihood analysis of the experimental data at low-to-intermediate ramp speeds. To validate the theoretical models, we compare their predictions with two independent sets of data, collected at high ramp speeds and at constant voltage, by using a quantitative relation between the two types of measurements. Microscopic approaches based on Kramers theory of diffusive barrier crossing allow us to estimate not only intrinsic rates and transition state locations, as in the widely used phenomenological approach based on Bell's formula, but also free energies of activation. The problem of extracting unique and accurate kinetic parameters of a molecular transition is discussed in light of the apparent success of the microscopic theories in reproducing the experimental data. PMID:17384066

  16. Measurement of the Phase Diagram of DNA Unzipping in the Temperature-Force Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilowicz, C.; Kafri, Y.; Conroy, R. S.; Coljee, V. W.; Weeks, J.; Prentiss, M.

    2004-08-01

    We separate double stranded lambda phage DNA by applying a fixed force at a constant temperature ranging from 15 to 50 °C, and measure the minimum force required to separate the two strands. The measurements also offer information on the free energy of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) at temperatures where dsDNA does not thermally denature in the absence of force. While parts of the phase diagram can be explained using existing models and free energy parameters, others deviate significantly. Possible reasons for the deviations between theory and experiment are considered.

  17. Probing molecular pathways for DNA orientational trapping, unzipping and translocation in nanopores by using a tunable overhang sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Kai; Hunter, Lehr L.; Ritzo, Brandon; Gu, Li-Qun

    2014-09-01

    Nanopores provide a unique single-molecule platform for genetic and epigenetic detection. The target nucleic acids can be accurately analyzed by characterizing their specific electric fingerprints or signatures in the nanopore. Here we report a series of novel nanopore signatures generated by target nucleic acids that are hybridized with a probe. A length-tunable overhang appended to the probe functions as a sensor to specifically modulate the nanopore current profile. The resulting signatures can reveal multiple mechanisms for the orientational trapping, unzipping, escaping and translocation of nucleic acids in the nanopore. This universal approach can be used to program various molecular movement pathways, elucidate their kinetics, and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the nanopore sensor for nucleic acid detection.Nanopores provide a unique single-molecule platform for genetic and epigenetic detection. The target nucleic acids can be accurately analyzed by characterizing their specific electric fingerprints or signatures in the nanopore. Here we report a series of novel nanopore signatures generated by target nucleic acids that are hybridized with a probe. A length-tunable overhang appended to the probe functions as a sensor to specifically modulate the nanopore current profile. The resulting signatures can reveal multiple mechanisms for the orientational trapping, unzipping, escaping and translocation of nucleic acids in the nanopore. This universal approach can be used to program various molecular movement pathways, elucidate their kinetics, and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the nanopore sensor for nucleic acid detection. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03195d

  18. Unzipping bird feathers

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Alexander; Filippov, Alexander E.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    The bird feather vane can be separated into two parts by pulling the barbs apart. The original state can be re-established easily by lightly stroking through the feather. Hooklets responsible for holding vane barbs together are not damaged by multiple zipping and unzipping cycles. Because numerous microhooks keep the integrity of the feather, their properties are of great interest for understanding mechanics of the entire feather structure. This study was undertaken to estimate the separation force of single hooklets and their arrays using force measurement of an unzipping feather vane. The hooklets usually separate in some number synchronously (20 on average) with the highest observed separation force of 1.74 mN (average force 0.27 mN), whereas the single hooklet separation force was 14 μN. A simple numerical model was suggested for a better understanding of zipping and unzipping behaviour in feathers. The model demonstrates features similar to those observed in experiments. PMID:24352674

  19. Unzipping bird feathers.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Alexander; Filippov, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-03-01

    The bird feather vane can be separated into two parts by pulling the barbs apart. The original state can be re-established easily by lightly stroking through the feather. Hooklets responsible for holding vane barbs together are not damaged by multiple zipping and unzipping cycles. Because numerous microhooks keep the integrity of the feather, their properties are of great interest for understanding mechanics of the entire feather structure. This study was undertaken to estimate the separation force of single hooklets and their arrays using force measurement of an unzipping feather vane. The hooklets usually separate in some number synchronously (20 on average) with the highest observed separation force of 1.74 mN (average force 0.27 mN), whereas the single hooklet separation force was 14 μN. A simple numerical model was suggested for a better understanding of zipping and unzipping behaviour in feathers. The model demonstrates features similar to those observed in experiments. PMID:24352674

  20. Single molecule statistics and the polynucleotide unzipping transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubensky, David K.; Nelson, David R.

    2002-03-01

    We present an extensive theoretical investigation of the mechanical unzipping of double-stranded DNA under the influence of an applied force. In the limit of long polymers, there is a thermodynamic unzipping transition at a critical force value of order 10 pN, with different critical behavior for homopolymers and for random heteropolymers. We extend results on the disorder-averaged behavior of DNA's with random sequences [D. K. Lubensky and D. R. Nelson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1572 (2000)] to the more experimentally accessible problem of unzipping a single DNA molecule. As the applied force approaches the critical value, the double-stranded DNA unravels in a series of discrete, sequence-dependent steps that allow it to reach successively deeper energy minima. Plots of extension versus force thus take the striking form of a series of plateaus separated by sharp jumps. Similar qualitative features should reappear in micromanipulation experiments on proteins and on folded RNA molecules. Despite their unusual form, the extension versus force curves for single molecules still reveal remnants of the disorder-averaged critical behavior. Above the transition, the dynamics of the unzipping fork is related to that of a particle diffusing in a random force field; anomalous, disorder-dominated behavior is expected until the applied force exceeds the critical value for unzipping by roughly 5 pN.

  1. Constant-force approach to discontinuous potentials.

    PubMed

    Orea, Pedro; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2013-06-01

    Aiming to approach the thermodynamical properties of hard-core systems by standard molecular dynamics simulation, we propose setting a repulsive constant-force for overlapping particles. That is, the discontinuity of the pair potential is replaced by a linear function with a large negative slope. Hence, the core-core repulsion, usually modeled with a power function of distance, yields a large force as soon as the cores slightly overlap. This leads to a quasi-hardcore behavior. The idea is tested for a triangle potential of short range. The results obtained by replica exchange molecular dynamics for several repulsive forces are contrasted with the ones obtained for the discontinuous potential and by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo. We found remarkable agreements for the vapor-liquid coexistence densities as well as for the surface tension. PMID:23758356

  2. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  3. A Constant-Force Resistive Exercise Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Paul; Ruttley, Tara

    2010-01-01

    A constant-force resistive exercise unit (CFREU) has been invented for use in both normal gravitational and microgravitational environments. In comparison with a typical conventional exercise machine, this CFREU weighs less and is less bulky: Whereas weight plates and associated bulky supporting structures are used to generate resistive forces in typical conventional exercise machines, they are not used in this CFREU. Instead, resistive forces are generated in this CFREU by relatively compact, lightweight mechanisms based on constant-torque springs wound on drums. Each such mechanism is contained in a module, denoted a resistive pack, that includes a shaft for making a torque connection to a cable drum. During a stroke of resistive exercise, the cable is withdrawn from the cable drum against the torque exerted by the resistance pack. The CFREU includes a housing, within which can be mounted one or more resistive pack(s). The CFREU also includes mechanisms for engaging any combination of (1) one or more resistive pack(s) and (2) one or more spring(s) within each resistive pack to obtain a desired level of resistance.

  4. Unzipping a Functional Microbial Amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Alsteens, David; Ramsook, Caleen B.; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial and fungal species produce some of the best-characterized functional amyloids, i.e. extracellular fibres that play key roles in mediating adhesion and biofilm formation. Yet, the molecular details underlying their mechanical strength remain poorly understood. Here, we use single-molecule atomic force microscopy to measure the mechanical properties of amyloids formed by Als cell adhesion proteins from the pathogen Candida albicans. We show that stretching Als proteins through their amyloid sequence yields characteristic force signatures corresponding to the mechanical unzipping of β-sheet interactions formed between surfacearrayed Als proteins. The unzipping probability increases with contact time, reflecting the time necessary for optimal inter β-strand associations. These results demonstrate that amyloid interactions provide cohesive strength to a major adhesion protein from a microbial pathogen, thereby strengthening cell adhesion. We suggest that such functional amyloids may represent a generic mechanism for providing mechanical strength to cell adhesion proteins. In nanotechnology, these single-molecule manipulation experiments provide new opportunities to understand the molecular mechanisms driving the cohesion of functional amyloid-based nanostructures. PMID:22924880

  5. Carbon nanoelectronics: unzipping tubes into graphene ribbons.

    PubMed

    Santos, H; Chico, L; Brey, L

    2009-08-21

    We report on the transport properties of novel carbon nanostructures made of partially unzipped carbon nanotubes, which can be regarded as a seamless junction of a tube and a nanoribbon. We find that graphene nanoribbons act at certain energy ranges as perfect valley filters for carbon nanotubes, with the maximum possible conductance. Our results show that a partially unzipped carbon nanotube is a magnetoresistive device, with a very large value of magnetoresistance. We explore the properties of several structures combining nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, demonstrating that they behave as optimal contacts for each other, and opening a new route for the design of mixed graphene-nanotube devices. PMID:19792746

  6. Carbon Nanoelectronics: Unzipping Tubes into Graphene Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, H.; Chico, L.; Brey, L.

    2009-08-01

    We report on the transport properties of novel carbon nanostructures made of partially unzipped carbon nanotubes, which can be regarded as a seamless junction of a tube and a nanoribbon. We find that graphene nanoribbons act at certain energy ranges as perfect valley filters for carbon nanotubes, with the maximum possible conductance. Our results show that a partially unzipped carbon nanotube is a magnetoresistive device, with a very large value of magnetoresistance. We explore the properties of several structures combining nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, demonstrating that they behave as optimal contacts for each other, and opening a new route for the design of mixed graphene-nanotube devices.

  7. Aromatizing unzipping polyester for EUV photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzawa, Kensuke; Mesch, Ryan; Olah, Mike; Wang, Wade; Phillips, Scott T.; Willson, C. Grant

    2015-03-01

    New "self-immolating" or "unzipping" polymers, materials that depolymerize in response to irradiation, were designed and prepared successfully. We studied several candidate polymers and ultimately chose two of them for further development. One is a polyester that aromatizes upon depolymerization. The unzipping reaction initiated by UV exposure in solution was confirmed. The polymer was then studied in thin films to assess its potential for use in formulating photoresists. The neat polymer was tested as a blend with novolac resin. The effect of unzipping polyester loading in novolac on the rate of dissolution of films in TMAH was studied. Inhibition occurs at 20-30% loading. The films were exposed with DUV light and patterning was observed. The sensitivity of the unzipping polyester formulation is low in part due to the low absorption of the polymer for UV light. However, the polymer showed higher sensitivity with EUV exposure and first contrast curves show sensitivity in the range of 20-25mJ/cm2.

  8. Gravity-independent constant force resistive exercise unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Jr., Paul E. (Inventor); Ruttley, Tara M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention describes a novel gravity-independent exercise unit designed for use in microgravity, or on the ground, as a means by which to counter muscle atrophy and bone degradation due to disuse or underuse. Modular resistive packs comprising constant torque springs provide constant force opposing the withdrawal of an exercise cable from the device. In addition to uses within the space program, the compact resistive packs of the CFREU allow the unit to be small enough for easy use as a home gym for personal use, or as a supplement for rehabilitation programs. Resistive packs may be changed conveniently out of the CFREU according to the desired exercise regimen. Thus, the resistive packs replace the need for expensive, heavy, and bulky traditional weight plates. The CFREU may be employed by hospitals, rehabilitation and physical therapy clinics, and other related professional businesses.

  9. Unzipping of carbon nanotubes is geometry-dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhigong; Mu, Xin; Luo, Tengfei; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) unzipping is a facile and efficient technique to produce narrow graphene nanoribbons. The diameter and chirality of CNTs control the geometry of the unzipped nanoribbons. In this work, we analyze the energetics of oxidation- and hydrogenation-induced unzipping processes. Empirical reactive potential-based energy calculations show that there is a geometry-dependent energy barrier for oxidation-induced unzipping, which is absent in the exothermal hydrogenation process. These results are discussed by considering the unzipping process as crack nucleation and propagation processes in a pre-stressed cylindrical shell. Fitting our simulation data through the theoretical model provides a quantitative way to estimate the key parameters in CNT unzipping that can be used to optimize the experimental procedure.

  10. Unzipping of carbon nanotubes is geometry-dependent.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhigong; Mu, Xin; Luo, Tengfei; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) unzipping is a facile and efficient technique to produce narrow graphene nanoribbons. The diameter and chirality of CNTs control the geometry of the unzipped nanoribbons. In this work, we analyze the energetics of oxidation- and hydrogenation-induced unzipping processes. Empirical reactive potential-based energy calculations show that there is a geometry-dependent energy barrier for oxidation-induced unzipping, which is absent in the exothermal hydrogenation process. These results are discussed by considering the unzipping process as crack nucleation and propagation processes in a pre-stressed cylindrical shell. Fitting our simulation data through the theoretical model provides a quantitative way to estimate the key parameters in CNT unzipping that can be used to optimize the experimental procedure. PMID:26597779

  11. Vacuum-Assisted, Constant-Force Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Christopher P.; Jensen, Scott

    2006-01-01

    The vacuum-assisted, constant-force exercise device (VAC-FED) has been proposed to fill a need for a safe, reliable exercise machine that would provide constant loads that could range from 20 to 250 lb (0.09 to 1.12 kN) with strokes that could range from 6 to 36 in. (0.15 to 0.91 m). The VAC-FED was originally intended to enable astronauts in microgravity to simulate the lifting of free weights, but it could just as well be used on Earth for simulated weight lifting and other constant-force exercises. Because the VAC-FED would utilize atmospheric/vacuum differential pressure instead of weights to generate force, it could weigh considerably less than either a set of free weights or a typical conventional exercise machine based on weights. Also, the use of atmospheric/ vacuum differential pressure to generate force would render the VAC-FED inherently safer, relative to free weights and to conventional exercise machines that utilize springs to generate forces. The overall function of the VAC-FED would be to generate a constant tensile force in an output cable, which would be attached to a bar, handle, or other exercise interface. The primary force generator in the VAC-FED would be a piston in a cylinder. The piston would separate a volume vented to atmosphere at one end of the cylinder from an evacuated volume at the other end of the cylinder (see figure). Hence, neglecting friction at the piston seals, the force generated would be nearly constant equal to the area of the piston multiplied by the atmospheric/vacuum differential pressure. In the vented volume in the cylinder, a direct-force cable would be looped around a pulley on the piston, doubling the stroke and halving the tension. One end of the direct-force cable would be anchored to a cylinder cap; the other end of the direct-force cable would be wrapped around a variable-ratio pulley that would couple tension to the output cable. As its name suggests, the variable-ratio pulley would contain a mechanism that

  12. Unzipping and binding of small interfering RNA with single walled carbon nanotube: A platform for small interfering RNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Sood, A. K.; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to design efficient platform for siRNA delivery, we combine all atom classical and quantum simulations to study the binding of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by pristine single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Our results show that siRNA strongly binds to SWCNT surface via unzipping its base-pairs and the propensity of unzipping increases with the increase in the diameter of the SWCNTs. The unzipping and subsequent wrapping events are initiated and driven by van der Waals interactions between the aromatic rings of siRNA nucleobases and the SWCNT surface. However, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of double strand DNA (dsDNA) of the same sequence show that the dsDNA undergoes much less unzipping and wrapping on the SWCNT in the simulation time scale of 70 ns. This interesting difference is due to smaller interaction energy of thymidine of dsDNA with the SWCNT compared to that of uridine of siRNA, as calculated by dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT) methods. After the optimal binding of siRNA to SWCNT, the complex is very stable which serves as one of the major mechanisms of siRNA delivery for biomedical applications. Since siRNA has to undergo unwinding process with the effect of RNA-induced silencing complex, our proposed delivery mechanism by SWCNT possesses potential advantages in achieving RNA interference.

  13. Long range constant force profiling for measurement of engineering surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, L. P.; Smith, S. T.

    1992-10-01

    A new instrument bridging the gap between atomic force microscopes (AFMs) and stylus profiling instruments is described. The constant force profiler is capable of subnanometer resolution over a 15-μm vertical range with a horizontal traverse length of 50 mm. This long traverse length, coupled with the possibilities of utilizing standard radius, diamond measurement styli, make the force profiler more compatible with existing profiling instrument standards. The forces between the specimen and a diamond stylus tipped cantilever spring are sensed as displacements using a capacitance bridge. This displacement signal is then fed through a proportional plus integral controller to a high stability piezoelectric actuator to maintain a constant tip-to-sample force of approximately 100 nN. Much of the sensor head and traverse mechanism is made of Zerodur glass-ceramic to provide the thermal stability needed for long travel measurements. Profiles of a 30-nm silica step height standard and an 8.5-μm step etched on Zerodur are presented.

  14. Zipping and unzipping of cosmic string loops in collision

    SciTech Connect

    Firouzjahi, H.; Karouby, J.; Khosravi, S.; Brandenberger, R.

    2009-10-15

    In this paper the collision of two cosmic string loops is studied. After collision junctions are formed and the loops are entangled. We show that after their formation the junctions start to unzip and the loops disentangle. This analysis provides a theoretical understanding of the unzipping effect observed in numerical simulations of a network of cosmic strings with more than one type of cosmic strings. The unzipping phenomena have important effects in the evolution of cosmic string networks when junctions are formed upon collision, such as in a network of cosmic superstrings.

  15. Oxidative unzipping of stacked nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haifeng; Zhao, Yong; Tang, Yifan; Burkert, Seth C; Star, Alexander

    2015-05-27

    We demonstrate a facile synthesis of different nanostructures by oxidative unzipping of stacked nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube cups (NCNCs). Depending on the initial number of stacked-cup segments, this method can yield graphene nanosheets (GNSs) or hybrid nanostructures comprised of graphene nanoribbons partially unzipped from a central nanotube core. Due to the stacked-cup structure of as-synthesized NCNCs, preventing complete exposure of graphitic planes, the unzipping mechanism is hindered, resulting in incomplete unzipping; however, individual, separated NCNCs are completely unzipped, yielding individual nitrogen-doped GNSs. Graphene-based materials have been employed as electrocatalysts for many important chemical reactions, and it has been proposed that increasing the reactive edges results in more efficient electrocatalysis. In this paper, we apply these graphene conjugates as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to determine how the increase in reactive edges affects the electrocatalytic activity. This investigation introduces a new method for the improvement of ORR electrocatalysts by using nitrogen dopants more effectively, allowing for enhanced ORR performance with lower overall nitrogen content. Additionally, the GNSs were functionalized with gold nanoparticles (GNPs), resulting in a GNS/GNP hybrid, which shows efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering and expands the scope of its application in advanced device fabrication and biosensing. PMID:25946723

  16. Mechanism of carbon nanotubes unzipping into graphene ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, Norma L.; Sotelo, Juan C.; Seminario, Jorge M.

    2009-07-01

    The fabrication of graphene nanoribbons from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) treated with potassium permanganate in a concentrated sulfuric acid solution has been reported by Kosynkin et al. [Nature (London) 458, 872 (2009)]. Here we report ab initio density functional theory calculations of such unzipping process. We find that the unzipping starts with the potassium permanganate attacking one of the internal C-C bonds of the CNT, stretching and breaking it. The created defect weakens neighboring bonds along the length of the CNT, making them energetically prone to be attacked too.

  17. Chemical Sharpening, Shortening, and Unzipping of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfang; Connell, John W.; Fay, Catharine C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), the one-dimensional member of the boron nitride nanostructure family, are generally accepted to be highly inert to oxidative treatments and can only be covalently modifi ed by highly reactive species. Conversely, it is discovered that the BNNTs can be chemically dispersed and their morphology modifi ed by a relatively mild method: simply sonicating the nanotubes in aqueous ammonia solution. The dispersed nanotubes are significantly corroded, with end-caps removed, tips sharpened, and walls thinned. The sonication treatment in aqueous ammonia solution also removes amorphous BN impurities and shortened BNNTs, resembling various oxidative treatments of carbon nanotubes. Importantly, the majority of BNNTs are at least partially longitudinally cut, or "unzipped". Entangled and freestanding BN nanoribbons (BNNRs), resulting from the unzipping, are found to be approximately 5-20 nm in width and up to a few hundred nanometers in length. This is the fi rst chemical method to obtain BNNRs from BNNT unzipping. This method is not derived from known carbon nanotube unzipping strategies, but is unique to BNNTs because the use of aqueous ammonia solutions specifi cally targets the B-N bond network. This study may pave the way for convenient processing of BNNTs, previously thought to be highly inert, toward controlling their dispersion, purity, lengths, and electronic properties.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of the morphology transformations in unzipped carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiafang; Zhang, Yingnan; Wang, Tao; Zheng, Xin; Li, Wen; Dong, Zihan; Wang, Wensen

    2016-08-01

    Tuning the assembly of carbon nanomaterials to obtain a kaleidoscope of carbon nanostructures is very important and challenging for the development of nanotechnology. Using molecular dynamics simulations method, we studied the morphology transformations of unzipped CNTs with different unzipping patterns. By modulating the unzipping patterns, the CNTs could self-assemble forming graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanoscrolls. From the energy analyzation, we find that the van der Waals interactions are responsible for the assembly of the unzipped CNTs. This unusual self-assembling method for CNTs could provide clues for further studies on the design of novel nanostructures.

  19. Practical Considerations for Using Constant Force Springs in Space-Based Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. Brett; Fisher, Charles D.; Gallon, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical springs are a common element in mechanism from all walks of life; cars, watches, appliances, and many others. These springs generally exhibit a linear relationship between force and deflection. In small mechanisms, deflections are small so the variation in spring force between one position and another are generally small and do not influence the design or functionality of the device. However, as the spacecraft industry drives towards larger, deployable satellites, the distances a spring or springs must function over can become considerable so much so that the structural integrity of the device may be impacted. As such, an increasingly common mechanism element is the constant force spring- one that provides a constant force regardless of deflection. These elements are commonly in the conceptual design phase to deal with system-level large deflections, but in the detailed design or integration test phase they can pose significant implementation issues. This article addresses some of the detailed issues in order for these constant force springs to be properly designed into space systems.

  20. Coalescence of droplets due to a constant force interaction in a quiescent viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostad, John M.; Paul, Alexandra; Leal, L. Gary

    2016-07-01

    A cantilevered-capillary force apparatus is used to study the time scale for the coalescence of two droplets compressed together with a constant force. Power-law trends for the coalescence time as a function of droplet radius and compression force are experimentally measured. The measurements are compared against several different scaling theories from the literature. One of the existing theories is found to correctly predict the dependence on the droplet radius, but all of the theories overpredict the dependence on the force. A transition is also observed in the measured drainage time from a small variation around a single deterministic value for droplets with a radius of 125 µ m or less to a broad distribution of drainage times for droplets with a radius of 150 µ m . A qualitative explanation for this transition is provided via scaling arguments.

  1. Coalescence of Drops Due to a Constant Force Interaction in a Viscous Quiescent Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostad, John; Paul, Alexandra; Leal, Gary

    2014-11-01

    A Cantilevered-Capillary Force Apparatus is used to study the time scale for the coalescence of two droplets compressed together with a constant force. Power-law trends for the coalescence time as a function of droplet radius and compression force are measured. The measurements are compared against several different scaling theories from the literature. One of the existing theories is found to correctly predict the dependence on the droplet radius, but all of the theories over-predict the dependence on the force. A transition is also measured in the coalescence process from a predominately deterministic to a predominately stochastic process. A qualitative explanation for this transition is provided via scaling arguments.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of dextran extension by constant force in single molecule AFM.

    PubMed

    Neelov, Igor M; Adolf, David B; McLeish, Tom C B; Paci, Emanuele

    2006-11-15

    The extension of 1-6 polysaccharides has been studied in a series of recent single molecule AFM experiments. For dextran, a key finding was the existence of a plateau in the force-extension curve at forces between 700 and 1000 pN. We studied the extension of the dextran 10-mer under constant force using atomistic simulation with various force fields. All the force fields reproduce the experimental plateau on the force-extension curve. With AMBER94 and AMBER-GLYCAM04 force fields the plateau can be explained by a transition of the glucopyranose rings in the dextran monomers from the chair ((4)C(1)) to the inverted chair ((1)C(4)) conformation while other processes occur at smaller (rotation around C5-C6 bond) or higher (chairs to boat transitions) forces. The CHARMM force field provides a different picture which associates the occurrence of the plateau to chair-boat transitions of the glucopyranose rings. PMID:16950842

  3. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of -85° of phase angle at 120 Hz.

  4. Dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes for intact crystalline graphene nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Joonwon; Narayan Maiti, Uday; Kim, Na-Young; Narayan, Rekha; Jun Lee, Won; Sung Choi, Dong; Oh, Youngtak; Min Lee, Ju; Yong Lee, Gil; Hun Kang, Seok; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ouk Kim, Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atomic level engineering of graphene-based materials is in high demand to enable customize structures and properties for different applications. Unzipping of the graphene plane is a potential means to this end, but uncontrollable damage of the two-dimensional crystalline framework during harsh unzipping reaction has remained a key challenge. Here we present heteroatom dopant-specific unzipping of carbon nanotubes as a reliable and controllable route to customized intact crystalline graphene-based nanostructures. Substitutional pyridinic nitrogen dopant sites at carbon nanotubes can selectively initiate the unzipping of graphene side walls at a relatively low electrochemical potential (0.6 V). The resultant nanostructures consisting of unzipped graphene nanoribbons wrapping around carbon nanotube cores maintain the intact two-dimensional crystallinity with well-defined atomic configuration at the unzipped edges. Large surface area and robust electrical connectivity of the synergistic nanostructure demonstrate ultrahigh-power supercapacitor performance, which can serve for AC filtering with the record high rate capability of −85° of phase angle at 120 Hz. PMID:26796993

  5. Hierarchical Cascades of Instability Govern the Mechanics of Coiled Coils: Helix Unfolding Precedes Coil Unzipping

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Elham; Keten, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Coiled coils are a fundamental emergent motif in proteins found in structural biomaterials, consisting of α-helical secondary structures wrapped in a supercoil. A fundamental question regarding the thermal and mechanical stability of coiled coils in extreme environments is the sequence of events leading to the disassembly of individual oligomers from the universal coiled-coil motifs. To shed light on this phenomenon, here we report atomistic simulations of a trimeric coiled coil in an explicit water solvent and investigate the mechanisms underlying helix unfolding and coil unzipping in the assembly. We employ advanced sampling techniques involving steered molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations to obtain the free-energy landscapes of single-strand unfolding and unzipping in a three-stranded assembly. Our comparative analysis of the free-energy landscapes of instability pathways shows that coil unzipping is a sequential process involving multiple intermediates. At each intermediate state, one heptad repeat of the coiled coil first unfolds and then unzips due to the loss of contacts with the hydrophobic core. This observation suggests that helix unfolding facilitates the initiation of coiled-coil disassembly, which is confirmed by our 2D metadynamics simulations showing that unzipping of one strand requires less energy in the unfolded state compared with the folded state. Our results explain recent experimental findings and lay the groundwork for studying the hierarchical molecular mechanisms that underpin the thermomechanical stability/instability of coiled coils and similar protein assemblies. PMID:25028889

  6. A glucose biosensor based on partially unzipped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huifang; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing

    2015-08-15

    An amperometric glucose biosensor based on direct electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOD) self-assembled on the surface of partially unzipped carbon nanotubes (PUCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) has been successfully fabricated. PUCNTs were synthesized via a facile chemical oxidative etching CNTs and used as a novel immobilization matrix for GOD. The cyclic voltammetric result of the PUCNT/GOD/GCE showed a pair of well-defined and quasi-reversible redox peaks with a formal potential of -0.470V and a peak to peak separation of 37mV, revealing that the fast direct electron transfer between GOD and the electrode has been achieved. It is notable that the glucose determination has been achieved in mediator-free condition. The developed biosensor displayed satisfactory analytical performance toward glucose including high sensitivity (19.50μA mM(-1)cm(-2)), low apparent Michaelis-Menten (5.09mM), a wide linear range of 0-17mM, and also preventing the interference from ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine usually coexisting with glucose in human blood. In addition, the biosensor acquired excellent storage stabilities. This facile, fast, environment-friendly and economical preparation strategy of PUCNT-GOD may provide a new platform for the fabrication of biocompatible glucose biosensors and other types of biosensors. PMID:25966382

  7. Switchable polarization in an unzipped graphene oxide monolayer.

    PubMed

    Noor-A-Alam, Mohammad; Shin, Young-Han

    2016-08-14

    Ferroelectricity in low-dimensional oxide materials is generally suppressed at the scale of a few nanometers, and has attracted considerable attention from both fundamental and technological aspects. Graphene is one of the thinnest materials (one atom thick). Therefore, engineering switchable polarization in non-polar pristine graphene could potentially lead to two-dimensional (2D) ferroelectric materials. In the present study, based on density functional theory, we show that an unzipped graphene oxide (UGO) monolayer can exhibit switchable polarization due to its foldable bonds between the oxygen atom and two carbon atoms underneath the oxygen. We find that a free standing UGO monolayer exhibits antiferroelectric switchable polarization. A UGO monolayer can be obtained as an intermediate product during the chemical exfoliation process of graphene. Interestingly, despite its dimensionality, our estimated polarization in a UGO monolayer is comparable to that in bulk ferroelectric materials (e.g., ferroelectric polymers). Our calculations could help realize antiferroelectric switchable polarization in 2D materials, which could find various potential applications in nanoscale devices such as sensors, actuators, and capacitors with high energy-storage density. PMID:27401944

  8. Controllable purification, cutting and unzipping of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with a microwave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelalak, R.; Baniadam, M.; Maghrebi, M.

    2013-06-01

    A rapid microwave-assisted method was developed for the purification, cutting and unzipping of arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using a mixture of KMnO4 and H2SO4. To harness the extent of treatment, MWCNT products were fully characterized at different reaction times by UV-visible and Raman spectroscopies as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The results show that the carbon nanoparticles and the amorphous carbon which coated the MWCNTs were removed after about 10 minutes. The excessive oxidation of MWCNTs then leads to cutting and unzipping of graphitic walls. Moreover, while the catalyst residues outside the MWCNTs were rapidly extracted up to 10 minutes, the removal of catalyst residues inside the MWCNTs did not begin before 20 minutes. This method can be considered as an efficient route for the purification, cutting and unzipping of MWCNTs due to its fast and controllable procedure.

  9. Natural fire-defense of raw white and brown cotton fibers evidenced by suppressed unzipping depolymerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-cleaned (scoured or scoured/bleached), cotton-based materials, whose utilization has greatly been enhanced in support of environmental sustainability, burn rapidly, causing a difficulty in controlling the spread of fire. This high burning rate is primarily associated with the unzipping depolymer...

  10. Sequential electrochemical unzipping of single-walled carbon nanotubes to graphene ribbons revealed by in situ Raman spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    John, Robin; Shinde, Dhanraj B; Liu, Lili; Ding, Feng; Xu, Zhiping; Vijayan, Cherianath; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-01-28

    We report an in situ Raman spectroscopic and microscopic investigation of the electrochemical unzipping of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Observations of the radial breathing modes (RBMs) using Raman spectral mapping reveal that metallic SWNTs are opened up rapidly followed by gradual unzipping of semiconducting SWNTs. Consideration of the resonant Raman scattering theory suggests that two metallic SWNTs with chiralities (10, 4) and (12, 0) get unzipped first at a lower electrode potential (0.36 V) followed by the gradual unzipping of another two metallic tubes, (9, 3) and (10, 1), at a relatively higher potential (1.16 V). The semiconducting SWNTs with chiralities (11, 7) and (12, 5), however, get open up gradually at ±1.66 V. A rapid decrease followed by a subsequent gradual decrease in the metallicity of the SWNT ensemble as revealed from a remarkable variation of the peak width of the G band complies well with the variations of RBM. Cyclic voltammetry also gives direct evidence for unzipping in terms of improved capacitance after oxidation followed by more important removal of oxygen functionalities during the reduction step, as reflected in subtle changes of the morphology confirming the formation of graphene nanoribbons. The density functional-based tight binding calculations show additional dependence of chirality and diameter of nanotubes on the epoxide binding energies, which is in agreement with the Raman spectroscopic results and suggests a possible mechanism of unzipping determined by combined effects of the structural characteristics of SWNTs and applied field. PMID:24308315

  11. Unzipped Nanotube Sheet Films Converted from Spun Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by O2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Jangr, Hoon-Sik; Jeon, Sang Koo; Shim, Dae Seob; Lee, Nam Hee; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale graphene or carbon nanotube (CNT) films are good candidates for transparent flexible electrodes, and the strong interest in graphene and CNT films has motivated the scalable production of a good-conductivity and an optically transmitting film. Unzipping techniques for converting CNTs to graphene are especially worthy of notice. Here, we performed nanotube unzipping of the spun multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce networked graphene nanoribbon (GNR) sheet films using an 02 plasma etching method, after which we produced the spun MWCNT film by continually pulling MWCNTs down from the vertical well aligned MWCNTs on the substrate. The electrical resistance was slightly decreased and the optical transmittance was significantly increased when the spun MWCNT films were etched for 20 min by O2 plasma of 100 mA. Plasma etching for the optimized time, which does not change the thickness of the spun MWCNT films, improved the electrical resistance and the optical transmittance. PMID:26726645

  12. Helical and Dendritic Unzipping of Carbon Nanotubes: A Route to Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Zehtab Yazdi, Alireza; Chizari, Kambiz; Jalilov, Almaz S; Tour, James; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman

    2015-06-23

    Bamboo structured nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN(x)-MWCNTs) have been successfully unzipped by a chemical oxidation route, resulting in nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons (CN(x)-GNRs) with a multifaceted microstructure. The oxidation of CN(x)-MWCNTs was carried out using potassium permanganate in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid or phosphoric acid. On the basis of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy studies, the bamboo compartments were unzipped via helical or dendritic mechanisms, which are different from the longitudinal unzipping of open channel MWCNTs. The product graphene oxide nanoribbons were simultaneously reduced and doped with nitrogen by thermal annealing in an ammonia atmosphere. The effects of the annealing temperature, time, and atmosphere on the doping level and types of the nitrogen functional groups have been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that a wide range of doping levels can be achieved (4-9 at %) simply by changing the annealing conditions. Pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen functional groups were the dominant species that were attached to the edges of the CN(x)-GNRs. The GNRs, with a faceted structure and pyridinic and pyrrolic groups on their edges, have abundant nitrogen sites. These active sites could play a vital role in enhancing the electrocatalytic performance of GNRs. PMID:26028162

  13. Clean Nanotube Unzipping by Abrupt Thermal Expansion of Molecular Nitrogen: Graphene Nanoribbons with Atomically Smooth Edges

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Terrones, M.; Endo, M; Munoz-Sandoval, Emilio; Kim, Y A; Morelos-Bomez, Aaron; Vega-Diaz, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel physicochemical route to produce highly crystalline nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons. The technique consists of an abrupt N2 gas expansion within the hollow core of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNx-MWNTs) when exposed to a fast thermal shock. The multiwalled nanotube unzipping mechanism is rationalized using molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations, which highlight the importance of open-ended nanotubes in promoting the efficient introduction of N2 molecules by capillary action within tubes and surface defects, thus triggering an efficient and atomically smooth unzipping. The so-produced nanoribbons could be few-layered (from graphene bilayer onward) and could exhibit both crystalline zigzag and armchair edges. In contrast to methods developed previously, our technique presents various advantages: (1) the tubes are not heavily oxidized; (2) the method yields sharp atomic edges within the resulting nanoribbons; (3) the technique could be scaled up for the bulk production of crystalline nanoribbons from available MWNT sources; and (4) this route could eventually be used to unzip other types of carbon nanotubes or intercalated layered materials such as BN, MoS2, WS2, etc.

  14. Clean nanotube unzipping by abrupt thermal expansion of molecular nitrogen: graphene nanoribbons with atomically smooth edges.

    PubMed

    Morelos-Gómez, Aarón; Vega-Díaz, Sofia Magdalena; González, Viviana Jehová; Tristán-López, Ferdinando; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Mi, Xi; Shi, Yunfeng; Sakamoto, Hirotoshi; Khoerunnisa, Fitri; Kaneko, Katsumi; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Meunier, Vincent; Endo, Morinobu; Muñoz-Sandoval, Emilio; Terrones, Mauricio

    2012-03-27

    We report a novel physicochemical route to produce highly crystalline nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons. The technique consists of an abrupt N(2) gas expansion within the hollow core of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN(x)-MWNTs) when exposed to a fast thermal shock. The multiwalled nanotube unzipping mechanism is rationalized using molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations, which highlight the importance of open-ended nanotubes in promoting the efficient introduction of N(2) molecules by capillary action within tubes and surface defects, thus triggering an efficient and atomically smooth unzipping. The so-produced nanoribbons could be few-layered (from graphene bilayer onward) and could exhibit both crystalline zigzag and armchair edges. In contrast to methods developed previously, our technique presents various advantages: (1) the tubes are not heavily oxidized; (2) the method yields sharp atomic edges within the resulting nanoribbons; (3) the technique could be scaled up for the bulk production of crystalline nanoribbons from available MWNT sources; and (4) this route could eventually be used to unzip other types of carbon nanotubes or intercalated layered materials such as BN, MoS(2), WS(2), etc. PMID:22360783

  15. Effect of Insoluble Surfactants on Drainage and Rupture of a Film between Drops Interacting under a Constant Force.

    PubMed

    Chesters; Bazhlekov

    2000-10-15

    The deformation, drainage, and rupture of an axisymmetrical film between colliding drops in the presence of insoluble surfactants under the influence of van der Waals forces is studied numerically at small capillary and Reynolds numbers and small surfactant concentrations. Constant-force collisions of Newtonian drops in another Newtonian fluid are considered. The mathematical model is based on the lubrication equations in the gap between drops and the creeping flow approximation of Navier-Stokes equations in the drops, coupled with velocity and stress boundary conditions at the interfaces. A nonuniform surfactant concentration on the interfaces, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, leads to a gradient of the interfacial tension which in turn leads to additional tangential stress on the interfaces (Marangoni effects). The mathematical problem is solved by a finite-difference method on a nonuniform mesh at the interfaces and a boundary-integral method in the drops. The whole range of the dispersed to continuous-phase viscosity ratios is investigated for a range of values of the dimensionless surfactant concentration, Peclét number, and dimensionless Hamaker constant (covering both "nose" and "rim" rupture). In the limit of the large Peclét number and the small dimensionless Hamaker constant (characteristic of drops in the millimeter size range) a fair approximation to the results is provided by a simple expression for the critical surfactant concentration, drainage being virtually uninfluenced by the surfactant for concentrations below the critical surfactant concentration and corresponding to that for immobile interfaces for concentrations above it. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:11017729

  16. Dynamical role of phosphorylation on serine/threonine-proline Pin1 substrates from constant force molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Hector A.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2015-02-01

    Cis-trans isomerization of peptidyl-prolyl bonds of the protein backbone plays an important role in numerous biological processes. Cis-trans isomerization can be the rate-limiting step due its extremely slow dynamics, compared to the millisecond time scale of many processes, and is catalyzed by a widely studied family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase enzymes. Also, mechanical forces along the peptide chain can speed up the rate of isomerization, resulting in "mechanical catalysis," and have been used to study peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerization and other mechanical properties of proteins. Here, we use constant force molecular dynamics simulations to study the dynamical effects of phosphorylation on serine/threonine-proline protein motifs that are involved in the function of many proteins and have been implicated in many aberrant biological processes. We show that the rate of cis-trans isomerization is slowed down by phosphorylation, in excellent agreement with experiments. We use a well-grounded theory to describe the force dependent rate of isomerization. The calculated rates at zero force are also in excellent agreement with experimentally measured rates, providing additional validation of the models and force field parameters. Our results suggest that the slowdown in the rate upon phosphorylation is mainly due to an increase in the friction along the peptidyl-prolyl bond angle during isomerization. Our results provide a microscopic description of the dynamical effects of post-translational phosphorylation on cis-trans isomerization and insights into the properties of proteins under tension.

  17. Lower edge of locked Main Himalayan Thrust unzipped by the 2015 Gorkha earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Meng, Lingsen; Wei, Shengji; Wang, Teng; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-01

    Large earthquakes are thought to release strain on previously locked faults. However, the details of how earthquakes are initiated, grow and terminate in relation to pre-seismically locked and creeping patches is unclear. The 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake occurred close to Kathmandu in a region where the prior pattern of fault locking is well documented. Here we analyse this event using seismological records measured at teleseismic distances and Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery. We show that the earthquake originated northwest of Kathmandu within a cluster of background seismicity that fringes the bottom of the locked portion of the Main Himalayan Thrust fault (MHT). The rupture propagated eastwards for about 140 km, unzipping the lower edge of the locked portion of the fault. High-frequency seismic waves radiated continuously as the slip pulse propagated at about 2.8 km s-1 along this zone of presumably high and heterogeneous pre-seismic stress at the seismic-aseismic transition. Eastward unzipping of the fault resumed during the Mw 7.3 aftershock on 12 May. The transfer of stress to neighbouring regions during the Gorkha earthquake should facilitate future rupture of the areas of the MHT adjacent and updip of the Gorkha earthquake rupture.

  18. Intercalation-assisted longitudinal unzipping of carbon nanotubes for green and scalable synthesis of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Sheng; Liao, Jia-Liang; Wang, Shan-Yu; Chiang, Wei-Hung

    2016-03-01

    We have demonstrated an effective intercalation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for the green and scalable synthesis of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) using an intercalation-assisted longitudinal unzipping of MWCNTs. The key step is to introduce an intercalation treatment of raw MWCNTs with KNO3 and H2SO4, making it promising to decrease the strong van der Waals attractions in the MWCNTs bundles and between the coaxial graphene walls of CNTs. Systematic micro Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations suggest that potassium, nitrate, and sulfate ions play an important role in the CNT intertube and intratube intercalations during the pretreatment. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, XRD, and micro Raman characterizations indicate that the developed methodology possesses the ability to synthesis GNRs effectively with an improved CNT concentration in H2SO4 of 10 mg/ml at 70 °C, which is amenable to industrial-scale production because of the decreased amount of strong acid. Our work provides a scientific understanding how to enhance the GNR formation by accelerating the CNT longitudinal unzipping via suitable molecular intercalation.

  19. An overlooked riddle of life's origins: energy-dependent nucleic acid unzipping.

    PubMed

    Kovác, Ladislav; Nosek, Jozef; Tomáska, L'ubomír

    2003-01-01

    The imposing progress in understanding contemporary life forms on Earth and in manipulating them has not been matched by a comparable progress in understanding the origins of life. This paper argues that a crucial problem of unzipping of the double helix molecule of nucleic acid during its replication has been underrated, if not plainly overlooked, in the theories of life's origin and evolution. A model is presented of how evolution may have solved the problem in its early phase. Similar to several previous models, the model envisages the existence of a protocell, in which osmotic disbalance is being created by accumulation of synthetic products resulting in expansion and division of the protocell. Novel in the model is the presence in the protocell of a double-stranded nucleic acid, with each of its two strands being affixed by its 3'-terminus to the opposite sides of the membrane of a protocell. In the course of the protocell expansion, osmotic force is utilized to pull the two strands longitudinally in opposite directions, unzipping the helix and partitioning the strands between the two daughter protocells. The model is also being used as a background for arguments of why life need operate in cycles. Many formal models of life's origin and evolution have not taken into account the fact that logical possibility does not equal thermodynamic feasibility. A system of self-replication has to consist of both replicators and replicants. PMID:15008415

  20. Intercalation-assisted longitudinal unzipping of carbon nanotubes for green and scalable synthesis of graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Sheng; Liao, Jia-Liang; Wang, Shan-Yu; Chiang, Wei-Hung

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated an effective intercalation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for the green and scalable synthesis of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) using an intercalation-assisted longitudinal unzipping of MWCNTs. The key step is to introduce an intercalation treatment of raw MWCNTs with KNO3 and H2SO4, making it promising to decrease the strong van der Waals attractions in the MWCNTs bundles and between the coaxial graphene walls of CNTs. Systematic micro Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations suggest that potassium, nitrate, and sulfate ions play an important role in the CNT intertube and intratube intercalations during the pretreatment. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, XRD, and micro Raman characterizations indicate that the developed methodology possesses the ability to synthesis GNRs effectively with an improved CNT concentration in H2SO4 of 10 mg/ml at 70 °C, which is amenable to industrial-scale production because of the decreased amount of strong acid. Our work provides a scientific understanding how to enhance the GNR formation by accelerating the CNT longitudinal unzipping via suitable molecular intercalation. PMID:26948486

  1. Rigidity of melting DNA.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation. PMID:27300825

  2. Rigidity of melting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  3. Unzipped multiwalled carbon nanotube oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids for polymer reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Tian, Ming; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been widely used as nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. However, it has been restricted by the limited available interface area of MWNTs in the polymer matrices. Oxidation unzipping of MWNTs is an effective way to solve this problem. The unzipped multiwalled carbon nanotube oxides (UMCNOs) exhibit excellent enhancement effect with low weight fractions, but agglomeration of UMCNOs at a relatively higher loading still hampered the mechanical reinforcement of polymer composites. In this paper, we interestingly found that the dispersion of UMCNOs in polymer matrices can be significantly improved with the combination of pristine MWNTs. The hybrids of MWNTs and UMCNOs (U/Ms) can be easily obtained by adding the pristine MWNTs into the UMCNOs aqueous dispersion, followed by sonication. With a π-stacking interaction, the UMCNOs were attached onto the outwalls of MWNTs. The morphologies and structure of the U/Ms were characterized by several measurements. The mechanical testing of the resultant poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-based composites demonstrated that the U/Ms can be used as ideal reinforcing fillers. Compared to PVA, the yield strength and Young's modulus of U/M-PVA composites with a loading of 0.7 wt % of the U/Ms approached ∼145.8 MPa and 6.9 GPa, respectively, which are increases of ∼107.4% and ∼122.5%, respectively. The results of tensile tests demonstrated that the reinforcement effect of U/Ms is superior to the individual UMCNOs and MWNTs, because of the synergistic interaction of UMCNOs and MWNTs. PMID:23121120

  4. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  5. Oxidative Unzipping and Transformation of High Aspect Ratio Boron Nitride Nanotubes into "White Graphene Oxide" Platelets.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Agrawal, Richa; Boesl, Benjamin; Wang, Chunlei; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and chemical transformations in boron nitride nanotubes under high temperature atmospheric conditions is probed in this study. We report atmospheric oxygen induced cleavage of boron nitride nanotubes at temperatures exceeding 750 °C for the first time. Unzipping is then followed by coalescence of these densely clustered multiple uncurled ribbons to form stacks of 2D sheets. FTIR and EDS analysis suggest these 2D platelets to be Boron Nitride Oxide platelets, with analogous structure to Graphene Oxide, and therefore we term them as "White Graphene Oxide" (WGO). However, not all BNNTs deteriorate even at temperatures as high as 1000 °C. This leads to the formation of a hybrid nanomaterial system comprising of 1D BN nanotubes and 2D BN oxide platelets, potentially having advanced high temperature sensing, radiation shielding, mechanical strengthening, electron emission and thermal management applications due to synergistic improvement of multi-plane transport and mechanical properties. This is the first report on transformation of BNNT bundles to a continuous array of White Graphene Oxide nanoplatelet stacks. PMID:27388704

  6. Two heads are better than one: regulation of DNA replication by hexameric helicases

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Robert. A.; Fletcher, Ryan J.; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2008-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated in a cell cycle to ensure the integrity of genomic information during successive passages. The replication process can be divided into three major steps as follows: the initial assembly of prereplication complex (pre-RC) at the replication origin, the distortion of the origin (or origin melting) for replication initiation, and the elongation phase during DNA synthesis. In this process, long stretches of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) must be unzipped in a relatively short time window within a cell growth cycle. The daunting task of unzipping is carried out by a class of efficient molecular machines called helicases, which are shown to be ring-shaped oligomers. Here, we will focus on the current understanding of the replicative helicases involved in cellular and viral DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15342486

  7. DNA Y structure: a versatile, multidimensional single molecule assay.

    PubMed

    Inman, James T; Smith, Benjamin Y; Hall, Michael A; Forties, Robert A; Jin, Jing; Sethna, James P; Wang, Michelle D

    2014-11-12

    Optical trapping is a powerful single molecule technique used to study dynamic biomolecular events, especially those involving DNA and DNA-binding proteins. Current implementations usually involve only one of stretching, unzipping, or twisting DNA along one dimension. To expand the capabilities of optical trapping for more complex measurements would require a multidimensional technique that combines all of these manipulations in a single experiment. Here, we report the development and utilization of such a novel optical trapping assay based on a three-branch DNA construct, termed a "Y structure". This multidimensional assay allows precise, real-time tracking of multiple configurational changes. When the Y structure template is unzipped under both force and torque, the force and extension of all three branches can be determined simultaneously. Moreover, the assay is readily compatible with fluorescence, as demonstrated by unzipping through a fluorescently labeled, paused transcription complex. This novel assay thus allows for the visualization and precision mapping of complex interactions of biomechanical events. PMID:25291441

  8. Hydrogen-Driven Cage Unzipping of C60 into Nano-Graphenes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Annealing of C60 in hydrogen at temperatures above the stability limit of C–H bonds in C60Hx (500–550 °C) is found to result in direct collapse of the cage structure, evaporation of light hydrocarbons, and formation of solid mixture composed of larger hydrocarbons and few-layered graphene sheets. Only a minor part of this mixture is soluble; this was analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and found to be a rather complex mixture of hydrocarbon molecules composed of at least tens of different compounds. The sequence of most abundant peaks observed in MS, which corresponds to C2H2 mass difference, suggests a stepwise breakup of the fullerene cage into progressively smaller molecular fragments edge-terminated by hydrogen. A simple model of hydrogen-driven C60 unzipping is proposed to explain the observed sequence of fragmentation products. The insoluble part of the product mixture consists of large planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, as evidenced by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, and some larger sheets composed of few-layered graphene, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Hydrogen annealing of C60 thin films showed a thickness-dependent results with reaction products significantly different for the thinnest films compared to bulk powders. Hydrogen annealing of C60 films with the thickness below 10 nm was found to result in formation of nanosized islands with Raman spectra very similar to the spectra of coronene oligomers and conductivity typical for graphene. PMID:24695911

  9. Using DNA looping to measure sequence dependent DNA elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandinov, Alan; Raghunathan, Krishnan; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2012-10-01

    We are using tethered particle motion (TPM) microscopy to observe protein-mediated DNA looping in the lactose repressor system in DNA constructs with varying AT / CG content. We use these data to determine the persistence length of the DNA as a function of its sequence content and compare the data to direct micromechanical measurements with constant-force axial optical tweezers. The data from the TPM experiments show a much smaller sequence effect on the persistence length than the optical tweezers experiments.

  10. Boron/nitrogen co-doped helically unzipped multiwalled carbon nanotubes as efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Zehtab Yazdi, Alireza; Fei, Huilong; Ye, Ruquan; Wang, Gunuk; Tour, James; Sundararaj, Uttandaraman

    2015-04-15

    Bamboo structured nitrogen doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been helically unzipped, and nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (CNx-GONRs) with a multifaceted microstructure have been obtained. CNx-GONRs have then been codoped with nitrogen and boron by simultaneous thermal annealing in ammonia and boron oxide atmospheres, respectively. The effects of the codoping time and temperature on the concentration of the dopants and their functional groups have been extensively investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that pyridinic and BC3 are the main nitrogen and boron functional groups, respectively, in the codoped samples. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) properties of the samples have been measured in an alkaline electrolyte and compared with the state-of-the-art Pt/C (20%) electrocatalyst. The results show that the nitrogen/boron codoped graphene nanoribbons with helically unzipped structures (CNx/CBx-GNRs) can compete with the Pt/C (20%) electrocatalyst in all of the key ORR properties: onset potential, exchange current density, four electron pathway selectivity, kinetic current density, and stability. The development of such graphene nanoribbon-based electrocatalyst could be a harbinger of precious metal-free carbon-based nanomaterials for ORR applications. PMID:25793636

  11. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  12. Oxidative Unzipping and Transformation of High Aspect Ratio Boron Nitride Nanotubes into “White Graphene Oxide” Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Agrawal, Richa; Boesl, Benjamin; Wang, Chunlei; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and chemical transformations in boron nitride nanotubes under high temperature atmospheric conditions is probed in this study. We report atmospheric oxygen induced cleavage of boron nitride nanotubes at temperatures exceeding 750 °C for the first time. Unzipping is then followed by coalescence of these densely clustered multiple uncurled ribbons to form stacks of 2D sheets. FTIR and EDS analysis suggest these 2D platelets to be Boron Nitride Oxide platelets, with analogous structure to Graphene Oxide, and therefore we term them as “White Graphene Oxide” (WGO). However, not all BNNTs deteriorate even at temperatures as high as 1000 °C. This leads to the formation of a hybrid nanomaterial system comprising of 1D BN nanotubes and 2D BN oxide platelets, potentially having advanced high temperature sensing, radiation shielding, mechanical strengthening, electron emission and thermal management applications due to synergistic improvement of multi-plane transport and mechanical properties. This is the first report on transformation of BNNT bundles to a continuous array of White Graphene Oxide nanoplatelet stacks. PMID:27388704

  13. Oxidative Unzipping and Transformation of High Aspect Ratio Boron Nitride Nanotubes into “White Graphene Oxide” Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Agrawal, Richa; Boesl, Benjamin; Wang, Chunlei; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Morphological and chemical transformations in boron nitride nanotubes under high temperature atmospheric conditions is probed in this study. We report atmospheric oxygen induced cleavage of boron nitride nanotubes at temperatures exceeding 750 °C for the first time. Unzipping is then followed by coalescence of these densely clustered multiple uncurled ribbons to form stacks of 2D sheets. FTIR and EDS analysis suggest these 2D platelets to be Boron Nitride Oxide platelets, with analogous structure to Graphene Oxide, and therefore we term them as “White Graphene Oxide” (WGO). However, not all BNNTs deteriorate even at temperatures as high as 1000 °C. This leads to the formation of a hybrid nanomaterial system comprising of 1D BN nanotubes and 2D BN oxide platelets, potentially having advanced high temperature sensing, radiation shielding, mechanical strengthening, electron emission and thermal management applications due to synergistic improvement of multi-plane transport and mechanical properties. This is the first report on transformation of BNNT bundles to a continuous array of White Graphene Oxide nanoplatelet stacks.

  14. Cooperative effect of stress and ion displacement on the dynamics of cross-link unzipping and rupture of alginate gels.

    PubMed

    Baumberger, T; Ronsin, O

    2010-06-14

    We study the effect of nonbinding Na(+) ions on the kinetics of rupture of alginate gels cross-linked by Ca(2+). Wetting a crack tip with a saline solution at physiological concentrations is found to be able to induce a quasi-instantaneous, 10-fold velocity jump. This effect is analyzed with a phenomenological model for the rate-dependent fracture energy in physical gels, extended here to account for the role of ions on the rate of cross-link "unzipping". Ionic interaction is found to act cooperatively with mechanical tension, leading to an enhanced rate of rupture. The kinetics turns out to be second order in counterion concentration. The definition of the reference state requires to take into account counterion condensation due to long-range interactions in the polyelectrolyte gel. Surprisingly, the contribution of the Na(+) ions to the free energy of the activated state is essentially entropic, suggesting that the displacement of Ca(2+) is primarily a steric process, electrostatic interactions being reduced to the constraint of charge conservation. This phenomenon may have important consequences on the rate of degradation of alginate based scaffolds for in vivo tissue regeneration. PMID:20499914

  15. Understanding the physics of DNA using nanoscale single-molecule manipulation.

    PubMed

    Frey, Eric W; Gooding, Ashton A; Wijeratne, Sitara; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2012-10-01

    Processes for decoding the genetic information in cells, including transcription, replication, recombination and repair, involve the deformation of DNA from its equilibrium structures such as bending, stretching, twisting, and unzipping of the double helix. Single-molecule manipulation techniques have made it possible to control DNA conformation and simultaneously detect the induced changes, revealing a rich variety of mechanically-induced conformational changes and thermodynamic states. These single-molecule techniques helped us to reveal the physics of DNA and the processes involved in the passing on of the genetic code. PMID:23467419

  16. Understanding the physics of DNA using nanoscale single-molecule manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Eric W.; Gooding, Ashton A.; Wijeratne, Sitara; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Processes for decoding the genetic information in cells, including transcription, replication, recombination and repair, involve the deformation of DNA from its equilibrium structures such as bending, stretching, twisting, and unzipping of the double helix. Single-molecule manipulation techniques have made it possible to control DNA conformation and simultaneously detect the induced changes, revealing a rich variety of mechanically-induced conformational changes and thermodynamic states. These single-molecule techniques helped us to reveal the physics of DNA and the processes involved in the passing on of the genetic code. PMID:23467419

  17. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  18. Stretching and twisting of the DNA duplexes in coarse-grained dynamical models.

    PubMed

    Niewieczerzał, Szymon; Cieplak, Marek

    2009-11-25

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics models of the double-stranded DNA are proposed and compared in the context of single molecule mechanical manipulation such as twisting and various schemes of stretching-unzipping, shearing, two-strand stretching and stretching of only one strand. The models differ in the number of effective beads (between two and five) representing each nucleotide. They all show similar behaviour, but the bigger the resolution, the more details in the force patterns. The models incorporate the effective Lennard-Jones potentials in the couplings between two strands and harmonic potentials to describe the structure of a single strand. The force patterns are shown to depend on the sequence studied. In particular, both shearing and unzipping for an all-AT sequence lead to lower forces than for an all-CG sequence. The unzipping patterns and the corresponding scenario diagrams for the contact rupture events are found to reflect the sequential information if the temperature is moderate and initial transients are discarded. The derived torque-force phase diagram is found to be qualitatively consistent with experiments and all-atom simulations. PMID:21832500

  19. Stretching and twisting of the DNA duplexes in coarse-grained dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niewieczerzał, Szymon; Cieplak, Marek

    2009-11-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics models of the double-stranded DNA are proposed and compared in the context of single molecule mechanical manipulation such as twisting and various schemes of stretching—unzipping, shearing, two-strand stretching and stretching of only one strand. The models differ in the number of effective beads (between two and five) representing each nucleotide. They all show similar behaviour, but the bigger the resolution, the more details in the force patterns. The models incorporate the effective Lennard-Jones potentials in the couplings between two strands and harmonic potentials to describe the structure of a single strand. The force patterns are shown to depend on the sequence studied. In particular, both shearing and unzipping for an all-AT sequence lead to lower forces than for an all-CG sequence. The unzipping patterns and the corresponding scenario diagrams for the contact rupture events are found to reflect the sequential information if the temperature is moderate and initial transients are discarded. The derived torque-force phase diagram is found to be qualitatively consistent with experiments and all-atom simulations.

  20. Single-molecule derivation of salt dependent base-pair free energies in DNA.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Josep M; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Forns, Núria; Smith, Steven B; Bustamante, Carlos; Ritort, Felix

    2010-08-31

    Accurate knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids is crucial to predicting their structure and stability. To date most measurements of base-pair free energies in DNA are obtained in thermal denaturation experiments, which depend on several assumptions. Here we report measurements of the DNA base-pair free energies based on a simplified system, the mechanical unzipping of single DNA molecules. By combining experimental data with a physical model and an optimization algorithm for analysis, we measure the 10 unique nearest-neighbor base-pair free energies with 0.1 kcal mol(-1) precision over two orders of magnitude of monovalent salt concentration. We find an improved set of standard energy values compared with Unified Oligonucleotide energies and a unique set of 10 base-pair-specific salt-correction values. The latter are found to be strongest for AA/TT and weakest for CC/GG. Our unique energy values and salt corrections improve predictions of DNA unzipping forces and are fully compatible with melting temperatures for oligos. The method should make it possible to obtain free energies, enthalpies, and entropies in conditions not accessible by bulk methodologies. PMID:20716688

  1. Single-molecule derivation of salt dependent base-pair free energies in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Josep M.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Forns, Núria; Smith, Steven B.; Bustamante, Carlos; Ritort, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids is crucial to predicting their structure and stability. To date most measurements of base-pair free energies in DNA are obtained in thermal denaturation experiments, which depend on several assumptions. Here we report measurements of the DNA base-pair free energies based on a simplified system, the mechanical unzipping of single DNA molecules. By combining experimental data with a physical model and an optimization algorithm for analysis, we measure the 10 unique nearest-neighbor base-pair free energies with 0.1 kcal mol-1 precision over two orders of magnitude of monovalent salt concentration. We find an improved set of standard energy values compared with Unified Oligonucleotide energies and a unique set of 10 base-pair-specific salt-correction values. The latter are found to be strongest for AA/TT and weakest for CC/GG. Our unique energy values and salt corrections improve predictions of DNA unzipping forces and are fully compatible with melting temperatures for oligos. The method should make it possible to obtain free energies, enthalpies, and entropies in conditions not accessible by bulk methodologies. PMID:20716688

  2. Partly melted DNA conformations obtained with a probability peak finding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tøstesen, Eivind

    2005-06-01

    Peaks in the probabilities of loops or bubbles, helical segments, and unzipping ends in melting DNA are found in this article using a peak finding method that maps the hierarchical structure of certain energy landscapes. The peaks indicate the alternative conformations that coexist in equilibrium and the range of their fluctuations. This yields a representation of the conformational ensemble at a given temperature, which is illustrated in a single diagram called a stitch profile. This article describes the methodology and discusses stitch profiles vs the ordinary probability profiles using the phage lambda genome as an example.

  3. Vibrational structure of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez C, S.; Rey-González, R. R.

    2003-10-01

    DNA has been object of more extensive research in last years. Human genome may be the main work. On the other hand, DNA has been used as physical system in opposite to its biological character. Examples of this are electronic, thermally and Ramman spectroscopy studies, in others. However, some DNA physical features are unclear, they deserve more work in a effort to understand them. In this work we are interesting on the vibrational properties of DNA. We model it as a lineal chain constituted by three different mass. We use two different constant forces into the Dynamical Matrix formalism. Two masses represent the real mass of DNA bases plus the glucose mass and the third represents the phosphate mass. In this model, DNA unit cell is composed by four masses The dispersion relation shows one acoustical and three optical branches. Also, there is a wide gap between the first and second optical branches. These features are confirmed by the density of states. Also we consider disorder effects in the proposal to do a more realistic model. In this case our results suggest a behavior as diatomic chain where the central and wide gap is preserved.

  4. Slip pulse characteristics, Kathmandu basin resonance and high-frequency waves radiation during unzipping of locked MHT by the 2015, Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avouac, J. P.; Meng, L.; Melgar, D.; Wei, S.; Elliott, J. R.; Jolivet, R.; Wang, T.; Bock, Y.; Stevens, V.; Ampuero, J. P.; Galetzka, J.; Genrich, J. F.; Geng, J.; Owen, S. E.; Shrestha, P. L.; Moore, A. W.; Adhikari, L. B.; Hudnut, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use high-rate GPS, seismological and Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery (SAR) measurements to produce a detailed image of the seismic rupture during the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake, Nepal. The earthquake ruptured a 150x50km elliptical patch striking parallel to the Himalayan front located north of Kathmandu. This asperity represents only a small fraction of the previous locked portion of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) along which the Himalaya is thrust over India. The earthquake initiated at western end of the ruptured patch, 75km northwest of Kathmandu. It produced a slip pulse of ~20 km width, ~6 s duration with peak sliding velocity of ~1 m/s which propagated eastwards at ~2.8 km/s. High frequency seismic waves (~ 1 Hz) were radiated continuously as the earthquake unzipped the northern edge of the locked portion of the of the MHT, a zone of presumably high and heterogeneous pre-seismic stress. Most of the moment was actually released south, hence, updip, of the sources of high frequency seismic waves. The slip pulse there shows a remarkable smooth onset indicating a large effective slip-weakening distance of several meters. This smooth onset can explain the moderate ground shaking at high frequencies (>1Hz) and the limited damage to regular few-storey high dwellings within Kathmandu basin. By contrast, the entire basin resonated at ~4-5 s for 30s resulting in the collapse of some tall buildings. The study suggests a deterministic control, of probably structural origin, of the source characteristics and induced ground shaking.

  5. Ab initio bubble-driven denaturation of double-stranded DNA: Self-mechanical theory.

    PubMed

    Kuetche, Victor K

    2016-07-21

    Among the different theoretical models of the open-site-driven DNA-denaturation found in the literature, very few interests are actually paid to the fundamental unzipping process of the double-stranded DNA within the vicinity of its ground state condensate. In this paper, we address an alternative to better understand the process of denaturation of such a macromolecule by investigating the onset of its dynamics around its equilibrium state. We show that from the initiation of the transcription bubble by the promoter to the termination state, the open-states of the strands evolve dynamically while generating some localized waveguide channels with elastic scattering properties. We properly discuss the nonlinear dynamics of these structures within the viewpoint of the self-mechanical theory while inferring to the physical structure of the findings and their potential issues. PMID:27113786

  6. Spring operated accelerator and constant force spring mechanism therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillinger, G. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A spring assembly consisting of an elongate piece of flat spring material formed into a spiral configuration and a free running spool in circumscribing relation to which this spring is disposed was developed. The spring has a distal end that is externally accessible so that when the distal end is drawn along a path, the spring unwinds against a restoring force present in the portion of the spring that resides in a transition region between a relatively straight condition on the path and a fully wound condition on the spool. When the distal end is released, the distal end is accelerated toward the spool by the force existing at the transition region which force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the spring.

  7. Dynamics of the Competition Between Nucleosome Unwrapping and DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotic organisms DNA is tightly wrapped into nucleosomes. This bears the question how this DNA can be accessed in order to be copied, transcribed, or repaired. A process that allows access to the DNA is transient unwrapping of the DNA from the histone proteins. We have developed a quantitative model of this unwrapping process which we calibrate by comparison to nucleosome unzipping experiments by the Wang group. We then apply this model to quantitatively explain the dynamics of transcription factor binding within nucleosomal DNA. In this context, it has been well known that nucleosomes reduce the affinity for transcription factors to binding sites covered by the nucleosome. It has been assumed that this is due to a reduction in on-rate since a transcription factor can only bind when a rare thermal fluctuation of the nucleosome makes the DNA accessible. However, recent experimental data surprisingly shows that the off-rate of transcription factors is also strongly affected in the presence of a nucleosome. The application of our nucleosome unwrapping free energy landscape demonstrates that this increase in off-rate by several orders of magnitude is a consequence of a competition between partial binding events of dimeric transcription factors and the nucleosome. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. 1105458 and 1410172.

  8. Single-molecule kinetics and footprinting of DNA bis-intercalation: the paradigmatic case of Thiocoraline

    PubMed Central

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Manosas, Maria; Frutos, Silvia; Tulla-Puche, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; Ritort, Felix

    2015-01-01

    DNA bis-intercalators are widely used in molecular biology with applications ranging from DNA imaging to anticancer pharmacology. Two fundamental aspects of these ligands are the lifetime of the bis-intercalated complexes and their sequence selectivity. Here, we perform single-molecule optical tweezers experiments with the peptide Thiocoraline showing, for the first time, that bis-intercalation is driven by a very slow off-rate that steeply decreases with applied force. This feature reveals the existence of a long-lived (minutes) mono-intercalated intermediate that contributes to the extremely long lifetime of the complex (hours). We further exploit this particularly slow kinetics to determine the thermodynamics of binding and persistence length of bis-intercalated DNA for a given fraction of bound ligand, a measurement inaccessible in previous studies of faster intercalating agents. We also develop a novel single-molecule footprinting technique based on DNA unzipping and determine the preferred binding sites of Thiocoraline with one base-pair resolution. This fast and radiolabelling-free footprinting technique provides direct access to the binding sites of small ligands to nucleic acids without the need of cleavage agents. Overall, our results provide new insights into the binding pathway of bis-intercalators and the reported selectivity might be of relevance for this and other anticancer drugs interfering with DNA replication and transcription in carcinogenic cell lines. PMID:25690887

  9. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  10. Single-molecule kinetics and footprinting of DNA bis-intercalation: the paradigmatic case of Thiocoraline.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Manosas, Maria; Frutos, Silvia; Tulla-Puche, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; Ritort, Felix

    2015-03-11

    DNA bis-intercalators are widely used in molecular biology with applications ranging from DNA imaging to anticancer pharmacology. Two fundamental aspects of these ligands are the lifetime of the bis-intercalated complexes and their sequence selectivity. Here, we perform single-molecule optical tweezers experiments with the peptide Thiocoraline showing, for the first time, that bis-intercalation is driven by a very slow off-rate that steeply decreases with applied force. This feature reveals the existence of a long-lived (minutes) mono-intercalated intermediate that contributes to the extremely long lifetime of the complex (hours). We further exploit this particularly slow kinetics to determine the thermodynamics of binding and persistence length of bis-intercalated DNA for a given fraction of bound ligand, a measurement inaccessible in previous studies of faster intercalating agents. We also develop a novel single-molecule footprinting technique based on DNA unzipping and determine the preferred binding sites of Thiocoraline with one base-pair resolution. This fast and radiolabelling-free footprinting technique provides direct access to the binding sites of small ligands to nucleic acids without the need of cleavage agents. Overall, our results provide new insights into the binding pathway of bis-intercalators and the reported selectivity might be of relevance for this and other anticancer drugs interfering with DNA replication and transcription in carcinogenic cell lines. PMID:25690887

  11. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  12. Cleaving DNA with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Nir; Balkhi, Shameelah R.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1998-03-01

    A DNA structure is described that can cleave single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides in the presence of ionic copper. This ``deoxyribozyme'' can self-cleave or can operate as a bimolecular complex that simultaneously makes use of duplex and triplex interactions to bind and cleave separate DNA substrates. Bimolecular deoxyribozyme-mediated strand scission proceeds with a kobs of 0.2 min-1, whereas the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction could not be detected. The duplex and triplex recognition domains can be altered, making possible the targeted cleavage of single-stranded DNAs with different nucleotide sequences. Several small synthetic DNAs were made to function as simple ``restriction enzymes'' for the site-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA.

  13. Mechanics of Protein-Mediated DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of looped DNA-protein complexes in which a protein or protein assembly binds to multiple distant operator sites on the DNA is a common feature for many regulatory schemes on the transcriptional level. In a living cell, a multitude of mechanical forces and constraints act on these complexes, and it is imperative to understand their effects on biological function. For this aim, we study the lactose repressor as a model system for protein-mediated DNA looping in single-molecule experiments. Using a novel axial constant-force optical trapping scheme that allows us to manipulate sub-micron DNA fragments with well-controlled forces down to the 10 fN range, we show that mechanical tension in the substrate DNA of hundred femtonewton is sufficient to disrupt the loop formation process, which suggests that such mechanical tension may provide a mechanical pathway to controlling gene expression in vivo. From the force sensitivity of the loop formation process, we can also infer the topology of the looped complex; in our case an antiparallel conformation. In addition, we will present new tethered-particle microscopy data that shows lifetimes of the looped complexes that are two to three orders of magnitude shorter than those measured in biochemical competition assays and discuss possible interpretations, including the suggestion that operator binding of the lactose repressor tetramer leads to a destabilization of the dimer-dimer interface and that thus the loop breakdown process is mostly a dissociation of the tetramer into two dimers, instead, as widely assumed, an unbinding of the tetramer from the DNA.

  14. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  15. Drug-DNA interactions at single molecule level: A view with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Studies of small molecule--DNA interactions are essential for developing new drugs for challenging diseases like cancer and HIV. The main idea behind developing these molecules is to target and inhibit the reproduction of the tumor cells and infected cells. We mechanically manipulate single DNA molecule using optical tweezers to investigate two molecules that have complex and multiple binding modes. Mononuclear ruthenium complexes have been extensively studied as a test for rational drug design. Potential drug candidates should have high affinity to DNA and slow dissociation kinetics. To achieve this, motifs of the ruthenium complexes are altered. Our collaborators designed a dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex that can only intercalate DNA by threading through its bases. Studying the binding properties of this complex in bulk studies took hours. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to thread and make it fast compared to the bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different concentration of drug molecules and holding it at a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. By this we can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturated binding. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics of this complex process. The second complex discussed in this study is Actinomycin D (ActD), a well studied anti-cancer agent that is used as a prototype for developing new generations of drugs. However, the biophysical basis of its activity is still unclear. Because ActD is known to intercalate double stranded DNA (dsDNA), it was assumed to block replication by stabilizing dsDNA in front of the replication fork. However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to imperfect duplexes and some sequences of single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We directly measure the on and off rates by

  16. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Smoot, N. C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-02-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin.

  17. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  18. The Rate of Unzipping a Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, B. J.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Rates of landscape evolution tell us much about the history and processes of planetary surfaces. Particularly insightful are the quantifications of rate and timing of opening of canyons and valleys. Horizontal spatial gradients of in situ produced cosmogenic nuclide concentrations provide a framework by which the migration rates of these and similar topographic features can be quantified. We develop a theoretical model for the in situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in valley walls during retreat of a valley head. The rate of retreat is inversely proportional to the magnitude of the spatial gradient and proportional to local production rates corrected for nuclide decay By applying the chain rule to the differential equation that describes cosmogenic radionuclide concentration and solving for a spatial gradient in concentration along a valley parallel transect, we create an expression for the explicit determination of valley head retreat. In cases where the time since opening of the valley is small and accumulated concentrations are low, radionuclide decay can be neglected with only small errors, and only production needs to be accounted for. In contrast, when a valley has been open for many millions of years, the entire surface should be at equilibrium, and no spatial gradient should exist. We apply this model to the development of a seepage-derived drainage network near the Alum Bluff of the Apalachicola River, Florida, USA. The substrate in this area is a sequence of unconsolidated Plio-Pleistocene sands. A series of five samples were collected along a 400 m transect of a valley wall starting just below the valley head. A vertical profile through the upland surface was also collected. Sample concentrations vary systematically between 2.9 x 10^5 atoms/g and 3.5 x 10^5 atoms/g. With a calculated age of 570 kyr of the upland surface, nuclide decay can be neglected. This nuclide accumulation over the time span of the valley creation results in a gradient of 160 atoms/g/m. Using the locally scaled production rate of 4.1 atoms/g/yr and a measured bulk density of 1600 kg/m^3, we calculate a valley head retreat rate of 0.02 m/yr.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  20. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  1. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  2. Force-Induced Rupture of a DNA Duplex: From Fundamentals to Force Sensors.

    PubMed

    Mosayebi, Majid; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E

    2015-12-22

    The rupture of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article, we consider the shear-induced rupture of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that rupture must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to rupture a duplex depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to show that this approach naturally captures the observed dependence of the force required to rupture a duplex within a given time on duplex length. In particular, this critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. We demonstrate that our findings have important consequences for the behavior of a new force-sensing nanodevice, which operates in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. At a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing. PMID:26575598

  3. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  4. Threading moieties play a significant role in determining the DNA binding properties of binuclear ruthenium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Clark, Andrew; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; McCauley, Micah J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    Binuclear ruthenium complexes are of interest due to their selective DNA binding properties, which make them potential candidates for chemotherapy. These dumbbell shaped molecules have to thread through the DNA base pairs to reach their final threaded intercalation state. Here we study the binuclear ruthenium complex, ΔΔ -[ μ-bidppz(bpy)4Ru2]4+ and compare it with the previously studied ΔΔ -[ μ-bidppz(phen)4Ru2]4+. Both have the same intercalating bridge unit, but different threading moieties. In this study, we stretch a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers in the presence of the ligand at various concentrations and hold the DNA at constant force until an equilibrium DNA elongation is reached. The extension of the DNA obtained as a function of time during binding yields the kinetics and equilibrium binding properties of the ligand. The preliminary data suggests that the binuclear complex with bpy in the threading moiety shows stronger affinity and an order of magnitude faster on rate, compared to its counterpart with phen in the threading moiety. This confirms the hypothesis that the extra aromatic ring of phen interferes with the threading intercalation process.

  5. Quantifying the DNA binding characteristics of ruthenium based threading intercalator Λ Λ -P with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, Nicholas; McCauley, Micah; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Utilizing optical tweezers, biophysics researchers have been able to study drug-DNA interactions on the single molecule level. Binuclear ruthenium complexes are a particular type of drug molecule that have been found to have potential cancer-fighting qualities, due to their high binding affinity and low dissociation rates. These complexes are threading intercalators, meaning that they must thread their bulky side chains through DNA base pairs to allow the central planar moiety to intercalate between the bases. In this study, we explored the binding properties of the binuclear ruthenium complex, ΛΛ -P (ΛΛ -[µ-bidppz(phen)4Ru2]4+) . A single DNA molecule is held at a constant force and the ΛΛ -P solution introduced to the system in varying concentrations until equilibrium is reached. DNA extension data at various concentrations of ΛΛ -P recorded as a function of time provide the DNA binding kinetics and equilibrium binding affinity. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ΛΛ -P exhibits fast binding kinetics compared to the very similar ΔΔ -P. These complexes have the same chemical structure and only differ in their chirality, which suggests that the left handed (ΛΛ) threading moieties require less DNA structural distortion for threading compared with the right handed (ΔΔ) threading moieties.

  6. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  7. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  8. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  9. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  10. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  11. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  12. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  13. Statistics of time-dependent rupture of single ds-DNA.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hua; Severin, Nikolai; Fugmann, Simon; Sokolov, Igor M; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2013-07-25

    Double-stranded (ds-) DNA molecules were stretched and ruptured on molecularly modified graphite surfaces with a scanning force microscope (SFM) exerting a force parallel to the surface. The stretching force was either large enough to break the molecule immediately or compensated by the elastic restoring force of the DNA backbone, which stabilized the molecular length. However, the size-stabilized molecules broke gradually from longer molecules to shorter ones with time. The breakage of different lengths of stabilized molecules was recorded in order to study time-dependent mechanical properties of the molecules under constant forces. From these data, a relatively high rate constant, k0 = (2.2 ± 0.1) × 10(-7) s(-1), was calculated. Moreover, we found a nonlinear stress-strain dependence of DNA on the surface which we attributed to DNA conformational transition. Assuming that the structural transition on the surface is similar to that in solution we estimated the forces needed to stretch the molecules and thereby verify the estimation of the activation energy barrier. PMID:23829161

  14. DNA computing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, A; Amos, M; Hodgson, D

    1997-02-01

    DNA computation is a novel and exciting recent development at the interface of computer science and molecular biology. We describe the current activity in this field following the seminal work of Adleman, who recently showed how techniques of molecular biology may be applied to the solution of a computationally intractable problem. PMID:9013647

  15. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  16. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  17. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  18. Root elongation against a constant force: experiment with a computerized feedback-controlled device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzeja, P. S.; Lintilhac, P. M.; Wei, C.

    2001-01-01

    Axial force was applied to the root tip of corn (Zea mays L. cv. Merit) seedlings using a computerized, feedback-controlled mechanical device. The system's feedback capability allowed continuous control of a constant tip load, and the attached displacement transducer provided the time course of root elongation. Loads up to 7.5 g decreased the root elongation rate by 0.13 mm h-1 g-1, but loads 7.5 to 17.5 g decreased the growth rate by only 0.04 mm h-1 g-1. Loads higher than 18 g stopped root elongation completely. Measurement of the cross-sectional areas of the root tips indicated that the 18 g load had applied about 0.98 MPa of axial pressure to the root, thereby exceeding the root's ability to respond with increased turgor pressure. Recorded time-lapse images of loaded roots showed that radial thickening (swelling) occurred behind the root cap, whose cross-sectional area increased with tip load.

  19. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  20. Wrinkled DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, S; Chandrasekaran, R; Puigjaner, L C; Walker, J K; Hall, I H; Birdsall, D L; Ratliff, R L

    1983-01-01

    The B form of poly d(GC):poly d(GC) in orthorhombic microcrystallites in oriented fibers has a secondary structure in which a dinucleotide is the repeated motif rather than a mononucleotide as in standard, smooth B DNA. One set of nucleotides (probably GpC) has the same conformations as the smooth form but the alternate (CpG) nucleotides have a different conformation at C3'-O3'. This leads to a distinctive change in the orientation of the phosphate groups. Similar perturbations can be detected in other poly d(PuPy):poly d(PuPy) DNAs such as poly d(IC):poly d(IC) and poly d(AT):poly d(AT) in their D forms which have tetragonal crystal environments. This suggests that such perturbations are intrinsic to all stretches of duplex DNA where purines and pyrimidines alternate and may play a role in the detection and exploitation of such sequences by regulatory proteins. Images PMID:6572358

  1. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  2. DNA mimicry by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dryden, D T F; Tock, M R

    2006-04-01

    It has been discovered recently, via structural and biophysical analyses, that proteins can mimic DNA structures in order to inhibit proteins that would normally bind to DNA. Mimicry of the phosphate backbone of DNA, the hydrogen-bonding properties of the nucleotide bases and the bending and twisting of the DNA double helix are all present in the mimics discovered to date. These mimics target a range of proteins and enzymes such as DNA restriction enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, DNA gyrase and nucleosomal and nucleoid-associated proteins. The unusual properties of these protein DNA mimics may provide a foundation for the design of targeted inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:16545103

  3. Mitochondrial DNA replacement versus nuclear DNA persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serva, Maurizio

    2006-10-01

    In this paper we consider two populations whose generations are not overlapping and whose size is large. The number of males and females in both populations is constant. Any generation is replaced by a new one and any individual has two parents concerning nuclear DNA and a single one (the mother) concerning mtDNA. Moreover, at any generation some individuals migrate from the first population to the second. In a finite random time T, the mtDNA of the second population is completely replaced by the mtDNA of the first. In the same time, the nuclear DNA is not completely replaced and a fraction F of the ancient nuclear DNA persists. We compute both T and F. Since this study shows that complete replacement of mtDNA in a population is compatible with the persistence of a large fraction of nuclear DNA, it may have some relevance for the 'out of Africa'/multiregional debate in palaeoanthropology.

  4. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  5. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  6. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm

  7. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  8. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  9. DNA Nanotechnology-- Architectures Designed with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongran

    As the genetic information storage vehicle, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules are essential to all known living organisms and many viruses. It is amazing that such a large amount of information about how life develops can be stored in these tiny molecules. Countless scientists, especially some biologists, are trying to decipher the genetic information stored in these captivating molecules. Meanwhile, another group of researchers, nanotechnologists in particular, have discovered that the unique and concise structural features of DNA together with its information coding ability can be utilized for nano-construction efforts. This idea culminated in the birth of the field of DNA nanotechnology which is the main topic of this dissertation. The ability of rationally designed DNA strands to self-assemble into arbitrary nanostructures without external direction is the basis of this field. A series of novel design principles for DNA nanotechnology are presented here, from topological DNA nanostructures to complex and curved DNA nanostructures, from pure DNA nanostructures to hybrid RNA/DNA nanostructures. As one of the most important and pioneering fields in controlling the assembly of materials (both DNA and other materials) at the nanoscale, DNA nanotechnology is developing at a dramatic speed and as more and more construction approaches are invented, exciting advances will emerge in ways that we may or may not predict.

  10. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  11. LCAT DNA shearing.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yuka; Lee, Abraham P

    2014-04-01

    We present a novel method to fragment DNA by using lateral cavity acoustic transducers (LCATs). DNA solution is placed within a microfluidic device containing LCATs. The LCATs cause microstreaming, which fragments DNA within the solution without any need for purification or downstream processing. The LCAT-based DNA fragmentation method offers an easy-to-use, low-cost, low-energy way to fragment DNA that is amenable to integration on microfluidic platforms to further automate DNA processing. Furthermore, the LCAT microdevice requires less than 10 µL of sample, and no external equipment is needed besides a piezoelectric transducer. PMID:23850863

  12. Longitudinal unzipping of carbon nanotubes to form graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Higginbotham, Amanda L; Sinitskii, Alexander; Lomeda, Jay R; Dimiev, Ayrat; Price, B Katherine; Tour, James M

    2009-04-16

    Graphene, or single-layered graphite, with its high crystallinity and interesting semimetal electronic properties, has emerged as an exciting two-dimensional material showing great promise for the fabrication of nanoscale devices. Thin, elongated strips of graphene that possess straight edges, termed graphene ribbons, gradually transform from semiconductors to semimetals as their width increases, and represent a particularly versatile variety of graphene. Several lithographic, chemical and synthetic procedures are known to produce microscopic samples of graphene nanoribbons, and one chemical vapour deposition process has successfully produced macroscopic quantities of nanoribbons at 950 degrees C. Here we describe a simple solution-based oxidative process for producing a nearly 100% yield of nanoribbon structures by lengthwise cutting and unravelling of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) side walls. Although oxidative shortening of MWCNTs has previously been achieved, lengthwise cutting is hitherto unreported. Ribbon structures with high water solubility are obtained. Subsequent chemical reduction of the nanoribbons from MWCNTs results in restoration of electrical conductivity. These early results affording nanoribbons could eventually lead to applications in fields of electronics and composite materials where bulk quantities of nanoribbons are required. PMID:19370030

  13. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  14. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  15. HPV DNA test

    MedlinePlus

    The HPV DNA test is used to check for high-risk HPV infection in women. HPV infection around the genitals is ... warts spread when you have sex. The HPV-DNA test is generally not recommended for detecting low- ...

  16. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  17. Is DNA a language?

    PubMed

    Tsonis, A A; Elsner, J B; Tsonis, P A

    1997-01-01

    DNA sequences usually involve local construction rules that affect different scales. As such their "dictionary" may not follow Zipf's law (a power law) which is followed in every natural language. Indeed, analysis of many DNA sequences suggests that no linguistics connections to DNA exist and that even though it has structure DNA is not a language. Computer simulations and a biological approach to this problem further support these results. PMID:9039397

  18. DNAzymes in DNA Nanomachines and DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Tian, Ye; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde

    This chapter discusses our efforts in using DNAzymes in DNA nano-machines and DNA analysis systems. 10-23 DNAzymes can cleave specific phos-phodiester bonds in RNA. We use them to construct an autonomous DNA-RNA chimera nanomotor, which constantly extracts chemical energy from RNA substrates and transduces the energy into a mechanical motion: cycles of contraction and extension. The motor's motion can be reversibly turned on and off by a DNA analogue (brake) of the RNA substrate. Addition and removal of the brake stops and restarts, respectively, the motor's motion. Furthermore, when the RNA substrates are preorganized into a one-dimensional track, a DNAzyme can continuously move along the track so long as there are substrates available ahead. Based on a similar mechanism, a novel DNA detection system has been developed. A target DNA activates a DNAzyme to cleave RNA-containing molecular beacons (MB), which generates an enhanced fluorescence signal. A following work integrates two steps of signal amplifications: a rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to synthesize multiple copies of DNAzymes, and the DNAzymes catalyze a chemical reaction to generate a colorimetric signal. This method allows detection of DNA analytes whose concentration is as low as 1 pM.

  19. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  20. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  1. DNA in Nanoscale Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason

    2012-10-01

    DNA, the quintessential molecule of life, possesses a number of attractive properties for use in nanoscale circuits. Charge transport (CT) through DNA itself is of both fundamental and practical interest. Fundamentally, DNA has a unique configuration of π-stacked bases in a well ordered, double helical structure. Given its unparalleled importance to life processes and its arrangement of conjugated subunits, DNA has been a compelling target of conductivity studies. In addition, further understanding of DNA CT will elucidate the biological implications of this process and advance its use in sensing technologies. We have investigated the fundamentals of DNA CT by measuring the electrochemistry of DNA monolayers under biologically-relevant conditions. We have uncovered both fundamental kinetic parameters to distinguish between competing models of operation as well as the practical implications of DNA CT for sensing. Furthermore, we are leveraging our studies of DNA conductivity for the manufacture of nanoscale circuits. We are investigating the electrical properties and self-assembly of DNA nanowires containing artificial base pair surrogates, which can be prepared through low cost and high throughput automated DNA synthesis. This unique and economically viable approach will establish a new paradigm for the scalable manufacture of nanoscale semiconductor devices.

  2. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase. PMID:25903461

  3. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  4. DNA methylation in plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F

    2006-01-01

    DNA in plants is highly methylated, containing 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and N6-methyladenine (m6A); m5C is located mainly in symmetrical CG and CNG sequences but it may occur also in other non-symmetrical contexts. m6A but not m5C was found in plant mitochondrial DNA. DNA methylation in plants is species-, tissue-, organelle- and age-specific. It is controlled by phytohormones and changes on seed germination, flowering and under the influence of various pathogens (viral, bacterial, fungal). DNA methylation controls plant growth and development, with particular involvement in regulation of gene expression and DNA replication. DNA replication is accompanied by the appearance of under-methylated, newly formed DNA strands including Okazaki fragments; asymmetry of strand DNA methylation disappears until the end of the cell cycle. A model for regulation of DNA replication by methylation is suggested. Cytosine DNA methylation in plants is more rich and diverse compared with animals. It is carried out by the families of specific enzymes that belong to at least three classes of DNA methyltransferases. Open reading frames (ORF) for adenine DNA methyltransferases are found in plant and animal genomes, and a first eukaryotic (plant) adenine DNA methyltransferase (wadmtase) is described; the enzyme seems to be involved in regulation of the mitochondria replication. Like in animals, DNA methylation in plants is closely associated with histone modifications and it affects binding of specific proteins to DNA and formation of respective transcription complexes in chromatin. The same gene (DRM2) in Arabidopsis thaliana is methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues; thus, at least two different, and probably interdependent, systems of DNA modification are present in plants. Plants seem to have a restriction-modification (R-M) system. RNA-directed DNA methylation has been observed in plants; it involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues in a region of siRNA-DNA

  5. Forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jessica; Lehman, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    Before the routine use of DNA profiling, blood typing was an important forensic tool. However, blood typing was not very discriminating. For example, roughly 30% of the United States population has type A-positive blood. Therefore, if A-positive blood were found at a crime scene, it could have come from 30% of the population. DNA profiling has a much better ability for discrimination. Forensic laboratories no longer routinely determine blood type. If blood is found at a crime scene, DNA profiling is performed. From Jeffrey's discovery of DNA fingerprinting to the development of PCR of STRs to the formation of DNA databases, our knowledge of DNA and DNA profiling have expanded greatly. Also, the applications for which we use DNA profiling have increased. DNA profiling is not just used for criminal case work, but it has expanded to encompass paternity testing, disaster victim identification, monitoring bone marrow transplants, detecting fetal cells in a mother's blood, tracing human history, and a multitude of other areas. The future of DNA profiling looks expansive with the development of newer instrumentation and techniques. PMID:22693781

  6. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  7. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success. PMID:25391915

  8. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-12-14

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  9. DNA Media Storage

    PubMed Central

    Bogard, Christy M.; Rouchka, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA Computing. Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone. This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files. Through the use of Multiple Sequence Alignment combined with intelligent heuristics, the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors. PMID:20622994

  10. DNA Media Storage.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Christy M; Rouchka, Eric C

    2007-09-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA Computing. Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone. This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files. Through the use of Multiple Sequence Alignment combined with intelligent heuristics, the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors. PMID:20622994

  11. Ribonucleotides in Bacterial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Randall, Justin R.; Matthews, Lindsay A.; Simmons, Lyle A.

    2014-01-01

    In all living cells, DNA is the storage medium for genetic information. Being quite stable, DNA is well-suited for its role in storage and propagation of information, but RNA is also covalently included in DNA through various mechanisms. Recent studies also demonstrate useful aspects of including ribonucleotides in the genome during repair. Therefore, our understanding of the consequences of RNA inclusion into bacterial genomic DNA is just beginning, but with its high frequency of occurrence the consequences and potential benefits are likely to be numerous and diverse. In this review, we discuss the processes that cause ribonucleotide inclusion in genomic DNA, the pathways important for ribonucleotide removal and the consequences that arise should ribonucleotides remain nested in genomic DNA. PMID:25387798

  12. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  13. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications. PMID:24647836

  14. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  15. Tiny telomere DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang; Trent, John O.; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and biophysical characterization of a novel DNA construct in which a folded quadruplex structure is joined to a standard double helix. Circular dichroism, gel electrophoresis, three-dimensional UV melting and differential scanning calorimetry were all used to characterize the structure. Rigorous molecular dynamics simulations were used to build a plausible atomic-level structural model of the DNA construct. This novel DNA construct provides a model for the duplex–quadruplex junction region at the end of chromosomal DNA and offers a system for the study of structure-selective ligand binding. PMID:12034817

  16. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  17. Replicative DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Dixon, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    In 1959, Arthur Kornberg was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the principles by which DNA is duplicated by DNA polymerases. Since then, it has been confirmed in all branches of life that replicative DNA polymerases require a single-stranded template to build a complementary strand, but they cannot start a new DNA strand de novo. Thus, they also depend on a primase, which generally assembles a short RNA primer to provide a 3'-OH that can be extended by the replicative DNA polymerase. The general principles that (1) a helicase unwinds the double-stranded DNA, (2) single-stranded DNA-binding proteins stabilize the single-stranded DNA, (3) a primase builds a short RNA primer, and (4) a clamp loader loads a clamp to (5) facilitate the loading and processivity of the replicative polymerase, are well conserved among all species. Replication of the genome is remarkably robust and is performed with high fidelity even in extreme environments. Work over the last decade or so has confirmed (6) that a common two-metal ion-promoted mechanism exists for the nucleotidyltransferase reaction that builds DNA strands, and (7) that the replicative DNA polymerases always act as a key component of larger multiprotein assemblies, termed replisomes. Furthermore (8), the integrity of replisomes is maintained by multiple protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, many of which are inherently weak. This enables large conformational changes to occur without dissociation of replisome components, and also means that in general replisomes cannot be isolated intact. PMID:23732474

  18. Many Ways to Loop DNA

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, I developed methods for directly visualizing DNA and DNA-protein complexes using an electron microscope. This made it possible to examine the shape of DNA and to visualize proteins as they fold and loop DNA. Early applications included the first visualization of true nucleosomes and linkers and the demonstration that repeating tracts of adenines can cause a curvature in DNA. The binding of DNA repair proteins, including p53 and BRCA2, has been visualized at three- and four-way junctions in DNA. The trombone model of DNA replication was directly verified, and the looping of DNA at telomeres was discovered. PMID:24005675

  19. Nanoparticle bridge DNA biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-Wen

    A new DNA sensing method is demonstrated in which DNA hybridization events lead to the formation of nanoparticle satellites that bridge two electrodes and are detected electrically. The hybridization events are exclusively carried out only on specific locations, the surfaces of C-ssDNA modified 50 nm GNPs. The uniqueness of this work is that only a small number of T-ccDNA molecules (<10) is required to form the nanoparticle satellites, allowing ultra-sensitive DNA sensing. The principle of this new DNA sensing technique has been demonstrated using target DNA and three-base-pair-mismatched DNA in 20nM concentrations. Three single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) system is used in our experiment which includes Capture-ssDNA (C-ssDNA), Target-ssDNA (T-ssDNA) and Probe-ssDNA (P-ssDNA). Both C-ssDNA and P-ssDNA are modified by a thiol group and can hybridize with different portions of T-ssDNA. T-ssDNA requires no modification in three ssDNA system, which is beneficial in many applications. C-ssDNA modified 50nm gold nanoparticle (C-50au) and P-ssDNA modified 30nm gold nanoparticle (P-30au) are prepared through the reaction of thiol-gold chemical bonding between thiolated ssDNA and gold nanoparticle (GNP) (C-ssDNA with 50nm GNP, P-ssDNA with 30nm GNP). We controllably place the C-50au only on the SiO2 band surface (˜ 90nm width) between two gold electrodes (source and drain electrodes) by forming positively- and negatively-charged self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on SiO2 and gold surface, respectively. DNA modified GNP is negatively charged due to ionization of phosphate group on DNA back bone. C-50au therefore is negatively charged and can only be attracted toward SiO2 area (repelled by negatively charged gold electrode surface). The amine group of positively-charged SAMs on SiO2 surface is then passivated by converting to non-polar methyl functional group after C-50au placement. P-30au is first hybridized with T-ssDNA in the solution phase (T-P- 30au formed) and is introduced

  20. Curating DNA specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA data are used in a variety of ethnobiological disciplines including archaeology, conservation, ecology, medicinal plants and natural products research, taxonomy and systematics, crop evolution and domestication, and genetic diversity. It frequently is convenient to store and share DNA among coop...

  1. Routine DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine DNA testing. It’s done once you’ve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  2. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  3. MICROWAVE RESONANCES IN DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes spectroscopic studies of DNA which were undertaken to better understand a physical basis for microwave absorption by this molecule. hree types of studies are described. ) The low frequency scattered light spectrum of DNA was studied by two methods. irst, Ram...

  4. Replicating repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Silvia; Speck, Christian

    2016-05-27

    The function and regulation of repetitive DNA, the 'dark matter' of the genome, is still only rudimentarily understood. Now a study investigating DNA replication of repetitive centromeric chromosome segments has started to expose a fascinating replication program that involves suppression of ATR signalling, in particular during replication stress. PMID:27230530

  5. Hydrogels: DNA bulks up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labean, Thom

    2006-10-01

    Since the 1940s DNA has been known as the genetic material connected to heredity, and from the early 1980s it has also been considered as a potential structural material for nanoscale construction. Now, a hydrogel made entirely of DNA brings this molecule into the realm of bulk materials.

  6. Translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Alexandra; McDonald, John P.; Woodgate, Roger

    2014-01-01

    All living organisms are continually exposed to agents that damage their DNA, which threatens the integrity of their genome. As a consequence, cells are equipped with a plethora of DNA repair enzymes to remove the damaged DNA. Unfortunately, situations nevertheless arise where lesions persist, and these lesions block the progression of the cell’s replicase. Under these situations, cells are forced to choose between recombination-mediated “damage avoidance” pathways, or use a specialized DNA polymerase (pol) to traverse the blocking lesion. The latter process is referred to as Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS). As inferred by its name, TLS not only results in bases being (mis)incorporated opposite DNA lesions, but also downstream of the replicase-blocking lesion, so as to ensure continued genome duplication and cell survival. Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium possess five DNA polymerases, and while all have been shown to facilitate TLS under certain experimental conditions, it is clear that the LexA-regulated and damage-inducible pols II, IV and V perform the vast majority of TLS under physiological conditions. Pol V can traverse a wide range of DNA lesions and performs the bulk of mutagenic TLS, whereas pol II and pol IV appear to be more specialized TLS polymerases. PMID:26442823

  7. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  8. DNA as information.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter R

    2016-03-13

    This article reviews contributions to this theme issue covering the topic 'DNA as information' in relation to the structure of DNA, the measure of its information content, the role and meaning of information in biology and the origin of genetic coding as a transition from uninformed to meaningful computational processes in physical systems. PMID:26857666

  9. DNA-cell conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  10. Premeltons in DNA.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Henry M

    2016-03-01

    Premeltons are examples of emergent-structures (i.e., structural-solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear-excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally-nontopological, undergo breather-motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally-topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A-DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A-transition), which differs from either A- or B-DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible--and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer backbone combined with the partial unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every-other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A-DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical chemistry and molecular biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5' and 3' ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general-audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries with it a number of experimental predictions--all readily testable--as will be described in this review

  11. Advances in DNA photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Emily M.; Aga, Roberto S.; Fehrman Cory, Emily M.; Ouchen, Fahima; Lesko, Alyssa; Telek, Brian; Lombardi, Jack; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Grote, James G.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we present our current research in exploring a DNA biopolymer for photonics applications. A new processing technique has been adopted that employs a modified soxhlet-dialysis (SD) rinsing technique to completely remove excess ionic contaminants from the DNA biopolymer, resulting in a material with greater mechanical stability and enhanced performance reproducibility. This newly processed material has been shown to be an excellent material for cladding layers in poled polymer electro-optic (EO) waveguide modulator applications. Thin film poling results are reported for materials using the DNA biopolymer as a cladding layer, as are results for beam steering devices also using the DNA biopolymer. Finally, progress on fabrication of a Mach Zehnder EO modulator with DNA biopolymer claddings using nanoimprint lithography techniques is reported.

  12. Archaeal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed. PMID:25421597

  13. DNA Align Editor: DNA Alignment Editor Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SNPAlignEditor is a DNA sequence alignment editor that runs on Windows platforms. The purpose of the program is to provide an intuitive, user-friendly tool for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments by providing functions for input, editing, and output of nucleotide sequence alignments....

  14. Studying DNA in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarins, Silja

    1993-01-01

    Outlines a workshop for teachers that illustrates a method of extracting DNA and provides instructions on how to do some simple work with DNA without sophisticated and expensive equipment. Provides details on viscosity studies and breaking DNA molecules. (DDR)

  15. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  16. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  17. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  18. Tracking Mitochondrial DNA In Situ.

    PubMed

    Ligasová, Anna; Koberna, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The methods of the detection of (1) non-labeled and (2) BrdU-labeled mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are described. They are based on the production of singlet oxygen by monovalent copper ions and the subsequent induction of DNA gaps. The ends of interrupted DNA serve as origins for the labeling of mtDNA by DNA polymerase I or they are utilized by exonuclease that degrades DNA strands, unmasking BrdU in BrdU-labeled DNA. Both methods are sensitive approaches without the need of additional enhancement of the signal or the use of highly sensitive optical systems. PMID:26530676

  19. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  20. DNA-PK assay

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  1. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  2. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  3. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  4. Expansion of the DNA Alphabet beyond Natural DNA Recognition.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-07-15

    Simple and inexpensive DNA fibres: New, stable DNA structures are created by the binding of a small molecule to poly(A). Because these DNA fibres are formed from inexpensive materials by using very simple methods, DNA materials suitable for practical use such as information storage should be possible in the near future. PMID:27061868

  5. DNA computing in microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagler, Patrick; van Noort, Danny; McCaskill, John S.

    2001-11-01

    The goal of this research is to improve the modular stability and programmability of DNA-based computers and in a second step towards optical programmable DNA computing. The main focus here is on hydrodynamic stability. Clockable microreactors can be connected in various ways to solve combinatorial optimisation problems, such as Maximum Clique or 3-SAT. This work demonstrates by construction how one micro-reactor design can be programmed to solve any instance of Maximum Clique up to its given maximum size (N). It reports on an implementation of the architecture proposed previously. This contrasts with conventional DNA computing where the individual sequence of biochemical operations depends on the specific problem. In this pilot study we are tackling a graph for the Maximum Clique problem with NDNA solution space will be presented, which is symbolized by a set of bit-strings (words).

  6. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  7. Close encounters with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  8. FBI's DNA analysis program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, John R.

    1994-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling technology is a significant law enforcement tool due to its superior discriminating power. Applying the principles of population genetics to the DNA profile obtained in violent crime investigations results in low frequency of occurrence estimates for the DNA profile. These estimates often range from a frequency of occurrence of 1 in 50 unrelated individuals to 1 in a million unrelated individuals or even smaller. It is this power to discriminate among individuals in the population that has propelled forensic DNA technology to the forefront of forensic testing in violent crime cases. Not only is the technology extremely powerful in including or excluding a criminal suspect as the perpetrator, but it also gives rise to the potential of identifying criminal suspects in cases where the investigators of unknown suspect cases have exhausted all other available leads.

  9. Making DNA Fingerprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunley, Kathie F.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity to simulate electrophoresis using everyday items. Uses adding machine paper to construct a set of DNA fingerprints that can be used to solve crime cases designed by students in any biology class. (JRH)

  10. Harnessing DNA intercalation.

    PubMed

    Persil, Ozgül; Hud, Nicholas V

    2007-10-01

    Numerous small molecules are known to bind to DNA through base pair intercalation. Fluorescent dyes commonly used for nucleic acid staining, such as ethidium, are familiar examples. Biological and physical studies of DNA intercalation have historically been motivated by mutation and drug discovery research. However, this same mode of binding is now being harnessed for the creation of novel molecular assemblies. Recent studies have used DNA scaffolds and intercalators to construct supramolecular assemblies that function as fluorescent 'nanotags' for cell labeling. Other studies have demonstrated how intercalators can be used to promote the formation of otherwise unstable nucleic acid assemblies. These applications illustrate how intercalators can be used to facilitate and expand DNA-based nanotechnology. PMID:17825446

  11. DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Psakhye, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Accurate chromosomal DNA replication is fundamental for optimal cellular function and genome integrity. Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance pathways, which are crucial to complete genome duplication as well as to prevent formation of deleterious double strand breaks. Cells use two general strategies to tolerate lesions: recombination to a homologous template, and trans-lesion synthesis with specialized polymerases. While key players of these processes have been outlined, much less is known on their choreography and regulation. Recent advances have uncovered principles by which DNA damage tolerance is regulated locally and temporally - in relation to replication timing and cell cycle stage -, and are beginning to elucidate the DNA dynamics that mediate lesion tolerance and influence chromosome structure during replication. PMID:27060551

  12. Multiplex analysis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Kieffer-Higgins, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    This invention features vectors and a method for sequencing DNA. The method includes the steps of: a) ligating the DNA into a vector comprising a tag sequence, the tag sequence includes at least 15 bases, wherein the tag sequence will not hybridize to the DNA under stringent hybridization conditions and is unique in the vector, to form a hybrid vector, b) treating the hybrid vector in a plurality of vessels to produce fragments comprising the tag sequence, wherein the fragments differ in length and terminate at a fixed known base or bases, wherein the fixed known base or bases differs in each vessel, c) separating the fragments from each vessel according to their size, d) hybridizing the fragments with an oligonucleotide able to hybridize specifically with the tag sequence, and e) detecting the pattern of hybridization of the tag sequence, wherein the pattern reflects the nucleotide sequence of the DNA.

  13. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices to a length greater than

  14. Das DNA-Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  15. DNA-Nanoparticle Tinkertoys.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    2016-06-16

    Nanoparticle superlattices can be self-assembled by using DNA linkers, which gives control over their size, shape, and composition. Recently, such programmable atom equivalents have been tailored to respond to chemical stimuli and result in specific crystalline lattices. Moreover, the molecular recognition properties and the robustness of designed DNA nanostructures have been used in combination with metallic nanoparticles for the production of the elusive diamond superlattice. PMID:27080095

  16. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  17. DNA biosensors that reason.

    PubMed

    Sainz de Murieta, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2012-08-01

    Despite the many designs of devices operating with the DNA strand displacement, surprisingly none is explicitly devoted to the implementation of logical deductions. The present article introduces a new model of biosensor device that uses nucleic acid strands to encode simple rules such as "IF DNA_strand(1) is present THEN disease(A)" or "IF DNA_strand(1) AND DNA_strand(2) are present THEN disease(B)". Taking advantage of the strand displacement operation, our model makes these simple rules interact with input signals (either DNA or any type of RNA) to generate an output signal (in the form of nucleotide strands). This output signal represents a diagnosis, which either can be measured using FRET techniques, cascaded as the input of another logical deduction with different rules, or even be a drug that is administered in response to a set of symptoms. The encoding introduces an implicit error cancellation mechanism, which increases the system scalability enabling longer inference cascades with a bounded and controllable signal-noise relation. It also allows the same rule to be used in forward inference or backward inference, providing the option of validly outputting negated propositions (e.g. "diagnosis A excluded"). The models presented in this paper can be used to implement smart logical DNA devices that perform genetic diagnosis in vitro. PMID:22406690

  18. Ancient dirt DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willerslev, E.

    2007-12-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole genomic studies of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments, coprolites, and fossil ice (Ancient Dirt DNA). These findings promise to make possible the reconstructions of entire ecosystems through time and allow for studies of past population genetics in cases where fossils are rare. The advantages and pitfalls connected to the Ancient Dirt DNA approach will be discussed as will recently obtained data relating to Greenland environmental history, long-term bacterial survival and the first human migration into the Americas.

  19. Variations in brain DNA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain) of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain. PMID:25505410

  20. Supramolecular Complexes of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, G.; Scherman, D.

    Deoxyribose nucleic acid or DNA is a linear polymer in the form of a double strand, synthesised by sequential polymerisation of a large number of units chosen from among the nucleic bases called purines (adenosine A and guanosine G) and pyrimidines (cytosine C and thymidine T). DNA contains all the genetic information required for life. It exists in the form of a limited number (a few dozen) of very big molecules, called chromosomes. This genetic information is first of all transcribed. In this process, a restricted fragment of the DNA called a gene is copied in the form of ribonucleic acid, or RNA. This RNA is itself a polymer, but with a single strand in which the sequence of nucleic acids is schematically analogous to the sequence on one of the two strands of the transcribed DNA. Finally, this RNA is translated into a protein, yet another linear polymer. The proteins make up the main part of the active constituents ensuring the survival of the cell. Any loss of information, either by mutation or by deletion of the DNA, will cause an imbalance in the cell's metabolism that may in turn lead to incurable pathologies. Several strategies have been developed to reduce the consequences of such genetic deficiencies or, more generally, to act, by amplifying or suppressing them, on the mechanisms leading from the reading of the genetic information to the production of proteins: Strategies aiming to introduce synthetic DNA or RNA, which selectively block the expression of certain genes, are now being studied by an increasing number of research scientists and pharmacologists. They use antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides or interfering oligoribonucleotides and they already have clinical applications. This kind of therapy is often called gene pharmacology. Other, more ambitious strategies aim to repair in situ mutated or incomplete DNA within the chromosomes themselves, by introducing short sequences of DNA or RNA which recognise and take the place of mutations. This is the

  1. DNA Knots: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumners, D. W.

    Cellular DNA is a long, thread-like molecule with remarkably complex topology. Enzymes that manipulate the geometry and topology of cellular DNA perform many vital cellular processes (including segregation of daughter chromosomes, gene regulation, DNA repair, and generation of antibody diversity). Some enzymes pass DNA through itself via enzyme-bridged transient breaks in the DNA; other enzymes break the DNA apart and reconnect it to different ends. In the topological approach to enzymology, circular DNA is incubated with an enzyme, producing an enzyme signature in the form of DNA knots and links. By observing the changes in DNA geometry (supercoiling) and topology (knotting and linking) due to enzyme action, the enzyme binding and mechanism can often be characterized. This paper will discuss some personal research history, and the tangle model for the analysis of site-specific recombination experiments on circular DNA.

  2. Forensic DNA Profiling and Database

    PubMed Central

    Panneerchelvam, S.; Norazmi, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection. PMID:23386793

  3. Human DNA polymerase α in binary complex with a DNA:DNA template-primer

    PubMed Central

    Coloma, Javier; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2016-01-01

    The Polα/primase complex assembles the short RNA-DNA fragments for priming of lagging and leading strand DNA replication in eukaryotes. As such, the Polα polymerase subunit encounters two types of substrates during primer synthesis: an RNA:DNA helix and a DNA:DNA helix. The engagement of the polymerase subunit with the DNA:DNA helix has been suggested as the of basis for primer termination in eukaryotes. However, there is no structural information on how the Polα polymerase subunit actually engages with a DNA:DNA helix during primer synthesis. We present here the first crystal structure of human Polα polymerase subunit in complex with a DNA:DNA helix. Unexpectedly, we find that portion of the DNA:DNA helix in contact with the polymerase is not in a B-form but in a hybrid A-B form. Almost all of the contacts observed previously with an RNA primer are preserved with a DNA primer – with the same set of polymerase residues tracking the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA or RNA primer. Thus, rather than loss of specific contacts, the free energy cost of distorting DNA from B- to hybrid A-B form may augur the termination of primer synthesis in eukaryotes. PMID:27032819

  4. Dynamic Modulation of DNA Hybridization Using Allosteric DNA Tetrahedral Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Li, Min; Shen, Juwen; Pei, Hao; Chao, Jie; Su, Shao; Aldalbahi, Ali; Wang, Lihua; Shi, Jiye; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2016-08-16

    The fixed dynamic range of traditional biosensors limits their utility in several real applications. For example, viral load monitoring requires the dynamic range spans several orders of magnitude; whereas, monitoring of drugs requires extremely narrow dynamic range. To overcome this limitation, here, we devised tunable biosensing interface using allosteric DNA tetrahedral bioprobes to tune the dynamic range of DNA biosensors. Our strategy takes the advantage of the readily and flexible structure design and predictable geometric reconfiguration of DNA nanotechnology. We reconfigured the DNA tetrahedral bioprobes by inserting the effector sequence into the DNA tetrahedron, through which, the binding affinity of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes can be tuned. As a result, the detection limit of DNA biosensors can be programmably regulated. The dynamic range of DNA biosensors can be tuned (narrowed or extended) for up to 100-fold. Using the regulation of binding affinity, we realized the capture and release of biomolecules by tuning the binding behavior of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes. PMID:27435955

  5. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  6. Active DNA demethylation by DNA repair: Facts and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Schuermann, David; Weber, Alain R; Schär, Primo

    2016-08-01

    Pathways that control and modulate DNA methylation patterning in mammalian cells were poorly understood for a long time, although their importance in establishing and maintaining cell type-specific gene expression was well recognized. The discovery of proteins capable of converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to putative substrates for DNA repair introduced a novel and exciting conceptual framework for the investigation and ultimate discovery of molecular mechanisms of DNA demethylation. Against the prevailing notion that DNA methylation is a static epigenetic mark, it turned out to be dynamic and distinct mechanisms appear to have evolved to effect global and locus-specific DNA demethylation. There is compelling evidence that DNA repair, in particular base excision repair, contributes significantly to the turnover of 5mC in cells. By actively demethylating DNA, DNA repair supports the developmental establishment as well as the maintenance of DNA methylation landscapes and gene expression patterns. Yet, while the biochemical pathways are relatively well-established and reviewed, the biological context, function and regulation of DNA repair-mediated active DNA demethylation remains uncertain. In this review, we will thus summarize and critically discuss the evidence that associates active DNA demethylation by DNA repair with specific functional contexts including the DNA methylation erasure in the early embryo, the control of pluripotency and cellular differentiation, the maintenance of cell identity, and the nuclear reprogramming. PMID:27247237

  7. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology. PMID:27058370

  8. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-01-01

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation. PMID:20834225

  9. Dynamical Behavior of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shankar

    1990-01-01

    The crystal structure of the DNA-EcoRI complex (Kim et al., 1990) revealed the existence of a 'kink' (or a disruption of the helical symmetry) in the DNA. Part of this work was an investigation of whether or not the kinked structure is a physically meaningful metastable state that is intrinsic to DNA. By using the "All Atom" hamiltonian of Weiner et al (1986) it has been found that the kink is not a metastable feature of the DNA. Rapid scanning of conformational space is indispensable in statistical mechanical studies of proteins and DNA. The Quasi-Optimized-Monte-Carlo (or QOMC) method is more efficient than the conventional Metropolis Monte Carlo method in the simulated annealing calculations reported here. It is also shown here that using altered masses in Molecular Dynamics calculations enhances sampling efficiency. The Multiple Histogram technique (Ferrenberg, 1989) has been applied for the first time on complex biomolecular hamiltonians. This method is superior to the classical perturbation and multistage sampling techniques for calculating free energy differences and generating potential of mean force profiles for suitably chosen reaction coordinates. This was demonstrated by using the multiple histogram method to generate the potential of mean force for the pseudorotation phase angle of the sugar ring in adenosine.

  10. Chromatin and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    MacAlpine, David M; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program. PMID:23751185

  11. Tunnelling microscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selci, Stefano; Cricenti, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris (1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with a high resolution Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). The STM operated simultaneously in the constant-current and gap-modulated mode. Highly reproducible STM images have been obtained and interpreted in terms of expected DNA structure. The main periodicity, regularly presented in molecules several hundred Ångstrom long, ranges from 25 Å to 35 Å with an average diameter of 22 Å. Higher resolution images of the minor groove have revealed the phosphate groups along the DNA backbones. Constant-current images of TAPO deposited on gold show a crystalline structure of rows of molecules with a side-by-side spacing of 3 Å.

  12. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  13. DNA sequencing: chemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, B.J.B.; Pless, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Limited base-specific or base-selective cleavage of a defined DNA fragment yields polynucleotide products, the length of which correlates with the positions of the particular base (or bases) in the original fragment. Sverdlov and co-workers recognized the possibility of using this principle for the determination of DNA sequences. In 1977 a fully elaborated method was introduced based on this principle, which allowed routine analysis of DNA sequences over distances greater than 100 nucleotide unite from a defined, radiolabeled terminus. Six procedures for partial cleavage were described. Simultaneous parallel resolution of an appropriate set of partial cleavage mixtures by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, followed by visualization of the radioactive bands by autoradiography, allows the deduction of nucleotide sequence.

  14. [DNA methylation in obesity].

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Małgorzata; Kieć-Wilk, Beata; Polus, Anna; Wybrańska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes), have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA) synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described. PMID:25531701

  15. Electrochemical DNA sensor-based strategy for sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and DNA demethylase activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingming; Fan, Mengxing; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-31

    DNA demethylation and demethylase activity play important roles in DNA self-repair, and their detection is key to early diagnosis of fatal diseases. Herein, a facile electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor was developed for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and demethylase activity based on an enzyme cleavage strategy. The thiol modified hemi-methylated hairpin probe DNA (pDNA) was self-assembled on a Au electrode surface through the formation of AuS bonds. The hemi-methylated pDNA served as the substrate of DNA demethylase (using methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) as an example). Following demethylation, the hairpin stem was then recognized and cleaved by BstUI endonuclease. The ferrocene carboxylic acid (FcA)-tagged pDNA strands were released into the buffer solution from the electrode surface, resulting in a significant decrease of electrochemical signal and providing a means to observe DNA demethylation. The activity of DNA demethylase was analyzed in the concentration ranging from 0.5 to 500 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection as low as 0.17 ng mL(-1). With high specificity and sensitivity, rapid response, and low cost, this simple E-DNA sensor provides a unique platform for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation, DNA demethylase activity, and related molecular diagnostics and drug screening. PMID:27506345

  16. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  17. Automated DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Yvonne; Morrell, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent cycle sequencing of PCR products is a multistage process and several methodologies are available to perform each stage. This chapter will describe the more commonly utilised dye-terminator cycle sequencing approach using BigDye® terminator chemistry (Applied Biosystems) ready for analysis on a 3730 DNA genetic analyzer. Even though DNA sequencing is one of the most common and robust techniques performed in molecular laboratories it may not always produce desirable results. The causes of the most common problems will also be discussed in this chapter. PMID:20938839

  18. Ancient human DNA.

    PubMed

    Kirsanow, Karola; Burger, Joachim

    2012-01-20

    The contribution of palaeogenetic data to the study of various aspects of hominin biology and evolution has been significant, and has the potential to increase substantially with the widespread implementation of next generation sequencing techniques. Here we discuss the present state-of-the-art of ancient human DNA analysis and the characteristics of hominin aDNA that make sequence validation particularly complex. A brief overview of the development of anthropological palaeogenetic analysis is given to illustrate the technical challenges motivating recent technological advancements. PMID:22169595

  19. Extraktion von DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöpping, Bert; Unterberger, Claudia

    Eine DNA-gestützte Analytik spielt im Lebensmittelbereich eine große Rolle. So wird die PCR bzw. die Real Time PCR z. B. für den Nachweis von Krankheitserreger in Lebensmitteln, zur Tier- und Pflanzenartendifferenzierung und den Nachweis von gentechnologisch veränderten Organismen eingesetzt [1]. Grundvoraussetzung für die sehr sensitiven molekularbiologischen Methoden ist eine saubere und kontaminationsfreie Nukleinsäure [2]. Die Qualität der Nukleinsäure entscheidet über Erfolg und Misserfolg der anschließenden molekularbiologischen Analytik. Deshalb werden im Bereich der Lebensmittelanalytik hohe Anforderungen an das jeweilige DNA-Extraktionsprotokoll gestellt. Durch die Anwendung eines geeigneten Extraktionsverfahrens soll die nachzuweisende DNA möglichst in hochmolekularer Form und frei von die nachfolgende Analytik hemmenden Substanzen vorliegen [1]. Gerade hier stellt die Natur der Lebensmittelmatrix eine besondere Herausforderung dar. Matrixkomponenten wie Fette, Zucker, Proteine und sekundäre Inhaltsstoffe erschweren die DNA-Extraktion und können, wenn sie nicht durch die Extraktion vollständig entfernt werden, zu einer Inhibierung der PCR führen [3]. Des Weiteren müssen auf der Matrixoberfläche vorhandene DNA-abbauende Enzyme gehemmt werden [1]. Daneben spielt der Einfluss verschiedener chemischer und physikalischer Parameter (pH-Wert, Temperatur, Enzyme, Scherkräfte) bei der Lebensmittelproduktion eine große Rolle für die Qualität der extrahierten DNA. So führen z. B. hohe Temperaturen und saure pH-Werte während der Lebensmittelverarbeitung zu einer Fragmentierung der DNA. Auch die physikalischen und chemischen Bedingungen der verwendeten Extraktionsmethode beeinflussen die Qualität der DNA [2]. Bleiben nach der Extraktion organische Lösungsmittel (Phenol, Ethanol), Enzyme, Proteine oder Salze zurück, können diese ebenfalls eine nachfolgende PCR inhibieren. Um eine Inhibition der PCR auszuschließen, sollten in der

  20. DNA banking and DNA databanking by academic and commercial laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, J.E. |; Reilly, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    The advent of DNA-based testing is giving rise to DNA banking (the long-term storage of cells, transformed cell lines, or extracted DNA for subsequent retrieval and analysis) and DNA data banking (the indefinite storage of information derived from DNA analysis). Large scale acquisition and storage of DNA and DNA data has important implications for the privacy rights of individuals. A survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic laboratories was conducted to determine: (1) the extent of their DNA banking activities; (2) their policies and experiences regarding access to DNA samples and data; (3) the quality assurance measures they employ; and (4) whether they have written policies and/or depositor`s agreements addressing specific issues. These issues include: (1) who may have access to DNA samples and data; (2) whether scientists may have access to anonymous samples or data for research use; (3) whether they have plans to contact depositors or retest samples if improved tests for a disorder become available; (4) disposition of samples at the end of the contract period if the laboratory ceases operations, if storage fees are unpaid, or after a death or divorce; (5) the consequence of unauthorized release, loss, or accidental destruction of samples; and (6) whether depositors may share in profits from the commercialization of tests or treatments developed in part from studies of stored DNA. The results suggest that many laboratories are banking DNA, that many have already amassed a large number of samples, and that a significant number plan to further develop DNA banking as a laboratory service over the next two years. Few laboratories have developed written policies governing DNA banking, and fewer still have drafted documents that define the rights and obligations of the parties. There may be a need for increased regulation of DNA banking and DNA data banking and for better defined policies with respect to protecting individual privacy.

  1. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients. PMID:27022418

  2. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients. PMID:27022418

  3. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  4. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    PubMed

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust. PMID:21883207

  5. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  6. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  7. Towards a DNA Nanoprocessor: Reusable Tile-Integrated DNA Circuits.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2016-08-22

    Modern electronic microprocessors use semiconductor logic gates organized on a silicon chip to enable efficient inter-gate communication. Here, arrays of communicating DNA logic gates integrated on a single DNA tile were designed and used to process nucleic acid inputs in a reusable format. Our results lay the foundation for the development of a DNA nanoprocessor, a small and biocompatible device capable of performing complex analyses of DNA and RNA inputs. PMID:27430161

  8. DNA Methylation in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Wouter; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disease of articular joints and primarily characterized by degradation and calcification of articular cartilage. Presently, no effective treatment other than pain relief exists and patients ultimately need to undergo replacement surgery of the affected joint. During disease progression articular chondrocytes, the single cell type present in articular cartilage, show altered transcriptional profiles and undergo phenotypic changes that resemble the terminal differentiation route apparent in growth plate chondrocytes. Hence, given its prominent function in both regulating gene expression and maintaining cellular phenotypes, DNA methylation of CpG dinucleotides is intensively studied in the context of OA. An increasing number of studies have been published that employed a targeted approach on genes known to play a role in OA pathophysiology. As of such, it has become clear that OA responsive DNA methylation changes seem to mediate disease associated aberrant gene expression. Furthermore, established OA susceptibility alleles such as GDF5 and DIO2 appear to confer OA risk via DNA methylation and respective pathophysiological expression changes. In more recent years, genome wide profiling of DNA methylation in OA affected articular cartilage has emerged as a powerful tool to address the epigenetic changes in their entirety, which has resulted in the identification of putative patient subgroups as well as generic OA associated pathways. PMID:27019616

  9. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  10. TRANSFECTION WITH BACULOVIRUS DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified DNA from the nuclear polyhedrosis viruses of Autographa californica (AcM NPV) and Rachiplusia ou (RoM NPV) were found to be infectious in TN-368 cells employing the calcium phosphate precipitation technique (F.L. Graham and A.J. van der Eb, Virology, 52, 456-467, 1973). ...

  11. DNA Replication Origins

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Alan C.; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression. PMID:23838439

  12. DNA Methylation in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Wouter; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disease of articular joints and primarily characterized by degradation and calcification of articular cartilage. Presently, no effective treatment other than pain relief exists and patients ultimately need to undergo replacement surgery of the affected joint. During disease progression articular chondrocytes, the single cell type present in articular cartilage, show altered transcriptional profiles and undergo phenotypic changes that resemble the terminal differentiation route apparent in growth plate chondrocytes. Hence, given its prominent function in both regulating gene expression and maintaining cellular phenotypes, DNA methylation of CpG dinucleotides is intensively studied in the context of OA. An increasing number of studies have been published that employed a targeted approach on genes known to play a role in OA pathophysiology. As of such, it has become clear that OA responsive DNA methylation changes seem to mediate disease associated aberrant gene expression. Furthermore, established OA susceptibility alleles such as GDF5 and DIO2 appear to confer OA risk via DNA methylation and respective pathophysiological expression changes. In more recent years, genome wide profiling of DNA methylation in OA affected articular cartilage has emerged as a powerful tool to address the epigenetic changes in their entirety, which has resulted in the identification of putative patient subgroups as well as generic OA associated pathways. PMID:27019616

  13. DNA-coated microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, Michaela; Fuglevand, Geeta; Moore, Barry D; Parker, Marie-Claire

    2005-06-01

    Coprecipitation leads to self-assembly of bioactive DNA on the surface of salt, sugar or amino-acid crystals and provides a rapid inexpensive immobilization method suitable for preparing dry-powder formulations of nucleic acids, useful for storage, imaging and drug delivery. PMID:15917916

  14. Nutrients and DNA Methylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epigenetics is a new mechanism responsible for development, aging, and disease process such as cancer development. One major epigenetic phenomenon is DNA methylation, which attributes to gene expression and integrity. Deepening the knowledge on one-carbon metabolism is very important to understandin...

  15. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  16. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  17. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  18. Making environmental DNA count.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?' PMID:26768195

  19. Emerging roles of DNA-PK besides DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianming; Shen, Ying; Jiang, Na; Fei, Xin; Mi, Jun

    2011-08-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a DNA-activated serine/threonine protein kinase, and abundantly expressed in almost all mammalian cells. The roles of DNA-PK in DNA-damage repair pathways, including non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair and homologous recombinant (HR) repair, have been studied intensively. However, the high levels of DNA-PK in human cells are somewhat paradoxical in that it does not impart any increased ability to repair DNA damage. If DNA-PK essentially exceeds the demand for DNA damage repair, why do human cells universally express such high levels of this huge complex? DNA-PK has been recently reported to be involved in metabolic gene regulation in response to feeding/insulin stimulation; our studies have also suggested a role of DNA-PK in the regulation of the homeostasis of cell proliferation. These novel findings expand our horizons about the importance of DNA-PK. PMID:21514376

  20. Borrowing nuclear DNA helicases to protect mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases. PMID:25984607

  1. DNA computing on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinghua; Wang, Liman; Frutos, Anthony G.; Condon, Anne E.; Corn, Robert M.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA computing was proposed as a means of solving a class of intractable computational problems in which the computing time can grow exponentially with problem size (the `NP-complete' or non-deterministic polynomial time complete problems). The principle of the technique has been demonstrated experimentally for a simple example of the hamiltonian path problem (in this case, finding an airline flight path between several cities, such that each city is visited only once). DNA computational approaches to the solution of other problems have also been investigated. One technique involves the immobilization and manipulation of combinatorial mixtures of DNA on a support. A set of DNA molecules encoding all candidate solutions to the computational problem of interest is synthesized and attached to the surface. Successive cycles of hybridization operations and exonuclease digestion are used to identify and eliminate those members of the set that are not solutions. Upon completion of all the multi-step cycles, the solution to the computational problem is identified using a polymerase chain reaction to amplify the remaining molecules, which are then hybridized to an addressed array. The advantages of this approach are its scalability and potential to be automated (the use of solid-phase formats simplifies the complex repetitive chemical processes, as has been demonstrated in DNA and protein synthesis). Here we report the use of this method to solve a NP-complete problem. We consider a small example of the satisfiability problem (SAT), in which the values of a set of boolean variables satisfying certain logical constraints are determined.

  2. MAMMALIAN DNA IN PCR REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high- cycle PCR amplification t...

  3. Mouse models of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Miriam R; Sweasy, Joann B

    2012-12-01

    In 1956, Arthur Kornberg discovered the mechanism of the biological synthesis of DNA and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1959 for this contribution, which included the isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Now there are 15 known DNA polymerases in mammalian cells that belong to four different families. These DNA polymerases function in many different cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and damage tolerance. Several biochemical and cell biological studies have provoked a further investigation of DNA polymerase function using mouse models in which polymerase genes have been altered using gene-targeting techniques. The phenotypes of mice harboring mutant alleles reveal the prominent role of DNA polymerases in embryogenesis, prevention of premature aging, and cancer suppression. PMID:23001998

  4. The Dynamics of DNA Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morvillo, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a paper-and-pencil activity that helps students understand DNA sequencing and expands student understanding of DNA structure, replication, and gel electrophoresis. Appropriate for advanced biology students who are familiar with the Sanger method. (DDR)

  5. Structural diversity of supercoiled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Fogg, Jonathan M.; Catanese, Daniel J.; Sutthibutpong, Thana; Chen, Muyuan; Barker, Anna K.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Harris, Sarah A.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2015-10-01

    By regulating access to the genetic code, DNA supercoiling strongly affects DNA metabolism. Despite its importance, however, much about supercoiled DNA (positively supercoiled DNA, in particular) remains unknown. Here we use electron cryo-tomography together with biochemical analyses to investigate structures of individual purified DNA minicircle topoisomers with defined degrees of supercoiling. Our results reveal that each topoisomer, negative or positive, adopts a unique and surprisingly wide distribution of three-dimensional conformations. Moreover, we uncover striking differences in how the topoisomers handle torsional stress. As negative supercoiling increases, bases are increasingly exposed. Beyond a sharp supercoiling threshold, we also detect exposed bases in positively supercoiled DNA. Molecular dynamics simulations independently confirm the conformational heterogeneity and provide atomistic insight into the flexibility of supercoiled DNA. Our integrated approach reveals the three-dimensional structures of DNA that are essential for its function.

  6. An Introduction to DNA Fingerprinting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepfer, Carol Ely; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides background information on DNA fingerprinting, and describes exercises for introducing general biology students at the high school or college level to the methodology and applications of DNA fingerprinting. (PR)

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh; Pachouri, U C; Khaidem, Devika Chanu; Kundu, Aman; Chopra, Chirag; Singh, Pushplata

    2015-01-01

    Various endogenous and environmental factors can cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage.  One of the reasons for enhanced mtDNA damage could be its proximity to the source of oxidants, and lack of histone-like protective proteins. Moreover, mitochondria contain inadequate DNA repair pathways, and, diminished DNA repair capacity may be one of the factors responsible for high mutation frequency of the mtDNA. mtDNA damage might cause impaired mitochondrial function, and, unrepaired mtDNA damage has been frequently linked with several diseases. Exploration of mitochondrial perspective of diseases might lead to a better understanding of several diseases, and will certainly open new avenues for detection, cure, and prevention of ailments.

  8. Structural diversity of supercoiled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Fogg, Jonathan M.; Catanese, Daniel J.; Sutthibutpong, Thana; Chen, Muyuan; Barker, Anna K.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Harris, Sarah A.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    By regulating access to the genetic code, DNA supercoiling strongly affects DNA metabolism. Despite its importance, however, much about supercoiled DNA (positively supercoiled DNA, in particular) remains unknown. Here we use electron cryo-tomography together with biochemical analyses to investigate structures of individual purified DNA minicircle topoisomers with defined degrees of supercoiling. Our results reveal that each topoisomer, negative or positive, adopts a unique and surprisingly wide distribution of three-dimensional conformations. Moreover, we uncover striking differences in how the topoisomers handle torsional stress. As negative supercoiling increases, bases are increasingly exposed. Beyond a sharp supercoiling threshold, we also detect exposed bases in positively supercoiled DNA. Molecular dynamics simulations independently confirm the conformational heterogeneity and provide atomistic insight into the flexibility of supercoiled DNA. Our integrated approach reveals the three-dimensional structures of DNA that are essential for its function. PMID:26455586

  9. Chemical approaches to DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2009-10-12

    Due to its self-assembling nature, DNA is undoubtedly an excellent molecule for the creation of various multidimensional nanostructures and the placement of functional molecules and materials. DNA molecules behave according to the programs of their sequences. Mixtures of numbers of DNA molecules can be placed precisely and organized into single structures to form nanoarchitectures. Once the appropriate sequences for the target nanostructure are established, the predesigned structure can be built up by self-assembly of the designed DNA strands. DNA nanotechnology has already reached the stage at which the organization of desired functional molecules and nanomaterials can be programmed on a defined DNA scaffold. In this review, we will focus on DNA nanotechnology and describe the potential of synthetic chemistry to contribute to the further development of DNA nanomaterials. PMID:19714700

  10. Defined DNA/nanoparticle conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ackerson, Christopher J; Sykes, Michael T; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-09-20

    Glutathione monolayer-protected gold clusters were reacted by place exchange with 19- or 20-residue thiolated oligonucleotides. The resulting DNA/nanoparticle conjugates could be separated on the basis of the number of bound oligonucleotides by gel electrophoresis and assembled with one another by DNA-DNA hybridization. This approach overcomes previous limitations of DNA/nanoparticle synthesis and yields conjugates that are precisely defined with respect to both gold and nucleic acid content. PMID:16155122

  11. Introductory experiments in recombinant DNA.

    PubMed

    Tait, R C

    2000-07-01

    Nine practical exercises demonstrate the basic principles in recombinant DNA. The exercises explain the principles that DNA equals genes and that changes in DNA cause changes in genetic properties. The aim is to provide a teaching resource that can be used to illustrate the theory and applications of molecular biology to highschool students, undergraduate students, medics, dentists, doctors, nurses, life scientists, and anyone learning the basics of DNA technology. PMID:11471559

  12. DNA Electrophoresis on Nanopatterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haobin; Gersappe, Dilip

    2002-03-01

    Conventional electrophoretic methods for DNA separation use topological restriction such as the network point in a gel to separate DNA. Here, we present a new approach to DNA electrophoresis using a nanopatterned surface. We exploit the conformational differences that arise when chains of different length are adsorbed onto a flat nanopatterned surface. We use a MD simulation to determine conditions that will optimize separation and present guidelines for the design of nanopatterned surfaces that can separate DNA in a broad size range.

  13. A method to capture large DNA fragments from genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Ball, Geneviève; Filloux, Alain; Voulhoux, Romé

    2014-01-01

    The gene capture technique is a powerful tool that allows the cloning of large DNA regions (up to 80 kb), such as entire genomic islands, without using restriction enzymes or DNA amplification. This technique takes advantage of the high recombinant capacity of the yeast. A "capture" vector containing both ends of the target DNA region must first be constructed. The target region is then captured by co-transformation and recombination in yeast between the "capture" vector and appropriate genomic DNA. The selected recombinant plasmid can be verified by sequencing and transferred in the bacteria for multiple applications. This chapter describes a protocol specifically adapted for Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomic DNA capture. PMID:24818928

  14. DNA Oligonucleotide 3'-Phosphorylation by a DNA Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Camden, Alison J; Walsh, Shannon M; Suk, Sarah H; Silverman, Scott K

    2016-05-10

    T4 polynucleotide kinase is widely used for 5'-phosphorylation of DNA and RNA oligonucleotide termini, but no natural protein enzyme is capable of 3'-phosphorylation. Here, we report the in vitro selection of deoxyribozymes (DNA enzymes) capable of DNA oligonucleotide 3'-phosphorylation, using a 5'-triphosphorylated RNA transcript (pppRNA) as the phosphoryl donor. The basis of selection was the capture, during each selection round, of the 3'-phosphorylated DNA substrate terminus by 2-methylimidazole activation of the 3'-phosphate (forming 3'-MeImp) and subsequent splint ligation with a 5'-amino DNA oligonucleotide. Competing and precedented DNA-catalyzed reactions were DNA phosphodiester hydrolysis or deglycosylation, each also leading to a 3'-phosphate but at a different nucleotide position within the DNA substrate. One oligonucleotide 3'-kinase deoxyribozyme, obtained from an N40 random pool and named 3'Kin1, can 3'-phosphorylate nearly any DNA oligonucleotide substrate for which the 3'-terminus has the sequence motif 5'-NKR-3', where N denotes any oligonucleotide sequence, K = T or G, and R = A or G. These results establish the viabilty of in vitro selection for identifying DNA enzymes that 3'-phosphorylate DNA oligonucleotides. PMID:27063020

  15. Efficient Sleeping Beauty DNA Transposition From DNA Minicircles

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nynne; Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Jakobsen, Martin R; Schrøder, Lisbeth Dahl; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    DNA transposon-based vectors have emerged as new potential delivery tools in therapeutic gene transfer. Such vectors are now showing promise in hematopoietic stem cells and primary human T cells, and clinical trials with transposon-engineered cells are on the way. However, the use of plasmid DNA as a carrier of the vector raises safety concerns due to the undesirable administration of bacterial sequences. To optimize vectors based on the Sleeping Beauty (SB) DNA transposon for clinical use, we examine here SB transposition from DNA minicircles (MCs) devoid of the bacterial plasmid backbone. Potent DNA transposition, directed by the hyperactive SB100X transposase, is demonstrated from MC donors, and the stable transfection rate is significantly enhanced by expressing the SB100X transposase from MCs. The stable transfection rate is inversely related to the size of circular donor, suggesting that a MC-based SB transposition system benefits primarily from an increased cellular uptake and/or enhanced expression which can be observed with DNA MCs. DNA transposon and transposase MCs are easily produced, are favorable in size, do not carry irrelevant DNA, and are robust substrates for DNA transposition. In accordance, DNA MCs should become a standard source of DNA transposons not only in therapeutic settings but also in the daily use of the SB system. PMID:23443502

  16. DNA Sequential Logic Gate Using Two-Ring DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Linjing; Liang, Chao; Dong, Yafei; Yang, Jing; Xu, Jin

    2016-04-13

    Sequential DNA detection is a fundamental issue for elucidating the interactive relationships among complex gene systems. Here, a sequential logic DNA gate was achieved by utilizing the two-ring DNA structure, with the ability to recognize "before" and "after" triggering sequences of DNA signals. By taking advantage of a "loop-open" mechanism, separations of two-ring DNAs were controlled. Three triggering pathways with different sequential DNA treatments were distinguished by comparing fluorescent outputs. Programmed nanoparticle arrangement guided by "interlocked" two-ring DNA was also constructed to demonstrate the achievement of designed nanostrucutres. Such sequential logic DNA operation may guide future molecular sensors to monitor more complex gene network in biological systems. PMID:26990044

  17. Immobilization of DNA in polyacrylamide gel for the manufacture of DNA and DNA-oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Timofeev, E.; Mirzabekov, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    1998-05-15

    Activated DNA was immobilized in aldehyde-containing polyacrylamide gel for use in manufacturing the MAGIChip (microarrays of gel-immobilized compounds on a chip). First, abasic sites were generated in DNA by partial acidic depurination. Amino groups were then introduced into the abasic sites by reaction with ethylenediamine and reduction of the aldimine bonds formed. It was found that DNA could be fragmented at the site of amino group incorporation or preserved mostly unfragmented. In similar reactions, both amino-DNA and amino-oligonucleotides were attached through their amines to polyacrylamide gel derivatized with aldehyde groups. Single- and double-stranded DNA of 40 to 972 nucleotides or base pairs were immobilized on the gel pads to manufacture a DNA microchip. The microchip was hybridized with fluorescently labeled DNA-specific oligonucleotide probes. This procedure for immobilization of amino compounds was used to manufacture MAGIChips containing both DNA and oligonucleotides.

  18. Geant4-DNA simulations using complex DNA geometries generated by the DnaFabric tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meylan, S.; Vimont, U.; Incerti, S.; Clairand, I.; Villagrasa, C.

    2016-07-01

    Several DNA representations are used to study radio-induced complex DNA damages depending on the approach and the required level of granularity. Among all approaches, the mechanistic one requires the most resolved DNA models that can go down to atomistic DNA descriptions. The complexity of such DNA models make them hard to modify and adapt in order to take into account different biological conditions. The DnaFabric project was started to provide a tool to generate, visualise and modify such complex DNA models. In the current version of DnaFabric, the models can be exported to the Geant4 code to be used as targets in the Monte Carlo simulation. In this work, the project was used to generate two DNA fibre models corresponding to two DNA compaction levels representing the hetero and the euchromatin. The fibres were imported in a Geant4 application where computations were performed to estimate the influence of the DNA compaction on the amount of calculated DNA damage. The relative difference of the DNA damage computed in the two fibres for the same number of projectiles was found to be constant and equal to 1.3 for the considered primary particles (protons from 300 keV to 50 MeV). However, if only the tracks hitting the DNA target are taken into account, then the relative difference is more important for low energies and decreases to reach zero around 10 MeV. The computations were performed with models that contain up to 18,000 DNA nucleotide pairs. Nevertheless, DnaFabric will be extended to manipulate multi-scale models that go from the molecular to the cellular levels.

  19. Counterintuitive DNA Sequence Dependence in Supercoiling-Induced DNA Melting

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; v.d. Torre, Jaco; Dekker, Cees

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of DNA in cells relies on the balance between hybridized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and local de-hybridized regions of ssDNA that provide access to binding proteins. Traditional melting experiments, in which short pieces of dsDNA are heated up until the point of melting into ssDNA, have determined that AT-rich sequences have a lower binding energy than GC-rich sequences. In cells, however, the double-stranded backbone of DNA is destabilized by negative supercoiling, and not by temperature. To investigate what the effect of GC content is on DNA melting induced by negative supercoiling, we studied DNA molecules with a GC content ranging from 38% to 77%, using single-molecule magnetic tweezer measurements in which the length of a single DNA molecule is measured as a function of applied stretching force and supercoiling density. At low force (<0.5pN), supercoiling results into twisting of the dsDNA backbone and loop formation (plectonemes), without inducing any DNA melting. This process was not influenced by the DNA sequence. When negative supercoiling is introduced at increasing force, local melting of DNA is introduced. We measured for the different DNA molecules a characteristic force Fchar, at which negative supercoiling induces local melting of the dsDNA. Surprisingly, GC-rich sequences melt at lower forces than AT-rich sequences: Fchar = 0.56pN for 77% GC but 0.73pN for 38% GC. An explanation for this counterintuitive effect is provided by the realization that supercoiling densities of a few percent only induce melting of a few percent of the base pairs. As a consequence, denaturation bubbles occur in local AT-rich regions and the sequence-dependent effect arises from an increased DNA bending/torsional energy associated with the plectonemes. This new insight indicates that an increased GC-content adjacent to AT-rich DNA regions will enhance local opening of the double-stranded DNA helix. PMID:26513573

  20. Tops and Writhing DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Supurna

    2011-04-01

    The torsional elasticity of semiflexible polymers like DNA is of biological significance. A mathematical treatment of this problem was begun by Fuller using the relation between link, twist and writhe, but progress has been hindered by the non-local nature of the writhe. This stands in the way of an analytic statistical mechanical treatment, which takes into account thermal fluctuations, in computing the partition function. In this paper we use the well known analogy with the dynamics of tops to show that when subjected to stretch and twist, the polymer configurations which dominate the partition function admit a local writhe formulation in the spirit of Fuller and thus provide an underlying justification for the use of Fuller's "local writhe expression" which leads to considerable mathematical simplification in solving theoretical models of DNA and elucidating their predictions. Our result facilitates comparison of the theoretical models with single molecule micromanipulation experiments and computer simulations.

  1. Fleet DNA (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Walkokwicz, K.; Duran, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Fleet DNA project objectives include capturing and quantifying drive cycle and technology variation for the multitude of medium- and heavy-duty vocations; providing a common data storage warehouse for medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleet data across DOE activities and laboratories; and integrating existing DOE tools, models, and analyses to provide data-driven decision making capabilities. Fleet DNA advantages include: for Government - providing in-use data for standard drive cycle development, R&D, tech targets, and rule making; for OEMs - real-world usage datasets provide concrete examples of customer use profiles; for fleets - vocational datasets help illustrate how to maximize return on technology investments; for Funding Agencies - ways are revealed to optimize the impact of financial incentive offers; and for researchers -a data source is provided for modeling and simulation.

  2. DNA waves and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnier, L.; Aissa, J.; Del Giudice, E.; Lavallee, C.; Tedeschi, A.; Vitiello, G.

    2011-07-01

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  3. Hardware Controller DNA Synthesizer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-27

    The program controls the operation of various hardware components of an automatic 12-channel parrallel oligosynthesizer. This involves accepting information regarding the DNA sequence to be generated and converting this into a series of instructions to I/O ports to actuate the appropriate hardware components. The design and function of the software is specific to a particular hardware platform and has no utility for controlling other configurations.

  4. DNA degradation and its defects.

    PubMed

    Kawane, Kohki; Motani, Kou; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-06-01

    DNA is one of the most essential molecules in organisms, containing all the information necessary for organisms to live. It replicates and provides a mechanism for heredity and evolution. Various events cause the degradation of DNA into nucleotides. DNA also has a darker side that has only recently been recognized; DNA that is not properly degraded causes various diseases. In this review, we discuss four deoxyribonucleases that function in the nucleus, cytosol, and lysosomes, and how undigested DNA causes such diseases as cancer, cataract, and autoinflammation. Studies on the biochemical and physiological functions of deoxyribonucleases should continue to increase our understanding of cellular functions and human diseases. PMID:24890510

  5. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    PubMed

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. PMID:26773303

  6. DNA Degradation and Its Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kawane, Kohki; Motani, Kou; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    DNA is one of the most essential molecules in organisms, containing all the information necessary for organisms to live. It replicates and provides a mechanism for heredity and evolution. Various events cause the degradation of DNA into nucleotides. DNA also has a darker side that has only recently been recognized; DNA that is not properly degraded causes various diseases. In this review, we discuss four deoxyribonucleases that function in the nucleus, cytosol, and lysosomes, and how undigested DNA causes such diseases as cancer, cataract, and autoinflammation. Studies on the biochemical and physiological functions of deoxyribonucleases should continue to increase our understanding of cellular functions and human diseases. PMID:24890510

  7. Actions of human DNA glycosylases on uracil-containing DNA, methylated DNA and their reconstituted chromatins.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, K; Oikawa, A

    1979-07-26

    Extracts of human lymphoblastoid cells catalyzed complete release of uracil (Ura) from PBS1 DNA, which contains Ura instead of thymine as a normal component (Ura-DNA), and 3-methyladenine (3-MeAde) from DNA methylated with methyl methanesulfonate (Me-DNA). These two activities, Ura-DNA glycosylase and 3-MeAde-DNA glycosylase, differed in heat stability. Cell extracts released Ura more rapidly and 3-MeAde more slowly from alkali-denatured preparations of Ura- and Me-DNA, respectively, than from native DNA's. On incubation with reconstituted chromatins, prepared from Ura-DNA and Me-DNA, respectively, with calf thymus chromosomal protein by salt gradient dialysis, cell extracts released all the Ura but only about half of the 3-MeAde residues, although both these chromatins were degraded by micrococcal nuclease until about half of the nucleotides became acid soluble. The activities of Ura-DNA and 3-MeAde-DNA glycosylase of xeroderma pigmentosum cells were similar to those of normal cells. PMID:465495

  8. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs) are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS) principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed. PMID:19158952

  9. Breathing Dynamics in Heteropolymer DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Banik, Suman K.; Krichevsky, Oleg; Metzler, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    While the statistical mechanical description of DNA has a long tradition, renewed interest in DNA melting from a physics perspective is nourished by measurements of the fluctuation dynamics of local denaturation bubbles by single molecule spectroscopy. The dynamical opening of DNA bubbles (DNA breathing) is supposedly crucial for biological functioning during, for instance, transcription initiation and DNA's interaction with selectively single-stranded DNA binding proteins. Motivated by this, we consider the bubble breathing dynamics in a heteropolymer DNA based on a (2+1)-variable master equation and complementary stochastic Gillespie simulations, providing the bubble size and the position of the bubble along the sequence as a function of time. We utilize new experimental data that independently obtain stacking and hydrogen bonding contributions to DNA stability. We calculate the spectrum of relaxation times and the experimentally measurable autocorrelation function of a fluorophore-quencher tagged basepair, and demonstrate good agreement with fluorescence correlation experiments. A significant dependence of opening probability and waiting time between bubble events on the local DNA sequence is revealed and quantified for a promoter sequence of the T7 phage. The strong dependence on sequence, temperature and salt concentration for the breathing dynamics of DNA found here points at a good potential for nanosensing applications by utilizing short fluorophore-quencher dressed DNA constructs. PMID:17237209

  10. Reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holliger, Philipp; Flors, Cristina

    2012-08-30

    We describe the engineering of reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA with high-density substitution, and its applications in advanced fluorescence microscopy methods. High-density labeling of DNA with cyanine dyes can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction using a modified DNA polymerase that has been evolved to efficiently incorporate Cy3- and Cy5-labeled cytosine base analogues into double-stranded DNA. The resulting biopolymer, "CyDNA", displays hundreds of fluorophores per DNA strand and is strongly colored and highly fluorescent, although previous observations suggest that fluorescence quenching at such high density might be a concern, especially for Cy5. Herein, we first investigate the mechanisms of fluorescence quenching in CyDNA and we suggest that two different mechanisms, aggregate formation and resonance energy transfer, are responsible for fluorescence quenching at high labeling densities. Moreover, we have been able to re-engineer CyDNA into a reversible fluorescence photoswitchable biopolymer by using the properties of the Cy3-Cy5 pair. This novel biopolymer constitutes a new class of photoactive DNA-based nanomaterial and is of great interest for advanced microscopy applications. We show that reversible fluorescence photoswitching in CyDNA can be exploited in optical lock-in detection imaging. It also lays the foundations for improved and sequence-specific super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of DNA. PMID:22861666

  11. Archaeal DNA polymerases in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Yanchao

    2015-08-01

    DNA polymerase (pol) is a ubiquitous enzyme that synthesizes DNA strands in all living cells. In vitro, DNA pol is used for DNA manipulation, including cloning, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, sequencing, and several other applications. Family B archaeal DNA pols have been widely used for molecular biological methods. Biochemical and structural studies reveal that each archaeal DNA pol has different characteristics with respect to fidelity, processivity and thermostability. Due to their high fidelity and strong thermostability, family B archaeal DNA pols have the extensive application on high-fidelity PCR, DNA sequencing, and site-directed mutagenesis while family Y archaeal DNA pols have the potential for error-prone PCR and random mutagenesis because of their low fidelity and strong thermostability. This information combined with mutational analysis has been used to construct novel DNA pols with altered properties that enhance their use as biotechnological reagents. In this review, we focus on the development and use of family B archaeal DNA pols. PMID:26150245

  12. DNA adducts-chemical addons.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, T R; AravindhaBabu, N; Shanmugam, K T; Masthan, K M K

    2015-04-01

    DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde). This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers. PMID:26015708

  13. Cinnamate-based DNA photolithography

    PubMed Central

    Romulus, Joy; Li, Minfeng; Sha, Ruojie; Royer, John; Wu, Kun-Ta; Xu, Qin

    2013-01-01

    As demonstrated by means of DNA nanoconstructs[1], as well as DNA functionalization of nanoparticles[2-4] and micrometre-scale colloids[5-8], complex self-assembly processes require components to associate with particular partners in a programmable fashion. In many cases the reversibility of the interactions between complementary DNA sequences is an advantage[9]. However, permanently bonding some or all of the complementary pairs may allow for flexibility in design and construction[10]. Here, we show that the substitution of a pair of complementary bases by a cinnamate group provides an efficient, addressable, UV light-based method to covalently bond complementary DNA. To show the potential of this approach, we wrote micrometre-scale patterns on a surface via UV light and demonstrate the reversible attachment of conjugated DNA and DNA-coated colloids. Our strategy enables both functional DNA photolithography and multi-step, specific binding in self-assembly processes. PMID:23685865

  14. DNA Templating of Au Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, David; Braun, Gary; Inagaki, Katsuhiko

    2005-03-01

    We have developed a process for fabricating nanoscale wires using DNA templates. The templates were subsequently decorated with gold nanoparticles to make metallic wires. We have successfully deposited linear, straight sections of random (λ-phage) and regular-repeat sequences of DNA, of various lengths, on oxidized silicon substrates. We have also successfully deposited thiolated DNA on gold electrodes, allowing the DNA to electrically bridge gaps between electrode pairs. Electrode gaps ranged from 50 nm to 300 nm, fabricated using electron beam lithography. We decorated the DNA with gold nanoparticles with diameters in the range of 1-13 nm, and have used the nanoparticles as nucleation sites for the growth of continuous gold wires. We have performed AFM characterization of all surfaces and structures. In addition, we have performed current-voltage measurements on the undecorated DNA, the nanoparticle-decorated DNA, and the gold nanowires.

  15. Forensic trace DNA: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    DNA analysis is frequently used to acquire information from biological material to aid enquiries associated with criminal offences, disaster victim identification and missing persons investigations. As the relevance and value of DNA profiling to forensic investigations has increased, so too has the desire to generate this information from smaller amounts of DNA. Trace DNA samples may be defined as any sample which falls below recommended thresholds at any stage of the analysis, from sample detection through to profile interpretation, and can not be defined by a precise picogram amount. Here we review aspects associated with the collection, DNA extraction, amplification, profiling and interpretation of trace DNA samples. Contamination and transfer issues are also briefly discussed within the context of trace DNA analysis. Whilst several methodological changes have facilitated profiling from trace samples in recent years it is also clear that many opportunities exist for further improvements. PMID:21122102

  16. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, T. R.; AravindhaBabu, N.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Masthan, K. M. K.

    2015-01-01

    DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde). This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers. PMID:26015708

  17. [DNA biobanks. Establishment and maintenance].

    PubMed

    Henriksen, F L; Hørder, M

    1998-08-24

    The need for extraction, purification and storage of DNA in biobanks is increasing. DNA may be obtained from mouth brush water, guthrie cards, tissue biopsies or venous blood. Sampling conditions depend on the method used for procurement of DNA, e.g. DNA extraction or Ebstein Barr Virus transformation. Exact knowledge about the validity and stability of DNA stored in buffer is still insufficient. Biobanks at hospitals and at research departments are regulated by the Danish Private Registers, etc. Act. Research projects based on DNA biobanks should be notified to the Danish Data Protection Agency and approved by the local ethical committee. Discount, economic, and business class set-ups are different practical and financial models for the structure of DNA biobanking. PMID:9739602

  18. Sequence and Structure Dependent DNA-DNA Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopchick, Benjamin; Qiu, Xiangyun

    Molecular forces between dsDNA strands are largely dominated by electrostatics and have been extensively studied. Quantitative knowledge has been accumulated on how DNA-DNA interactions are modulated by varied biological constituents such as ions, cationic ligands, and proteins. Despite its central role in biology, the sequence of DNA has not received substantial attention and ``random'' DNA sequences are typically used in biophysical studies. However, ~50% of human genome is composed of non-random-sequence DNAs, particularly repetitive sequences. Furthermore, covalent modifications of DNA such as methylation play key roles in gene functions. Such DNAs with specific sequences or modifications often take on structures other than the canonical B-form. Here we present series of quantitative measurements of the DNA-DNA forces with the osmotic stress method on different DNA sequences, from short repeats to the most frequent sequences in genome, and to modifications such as bromination and methylation. We observe peculiar behaviors that appear to be strongly correlated with the incurred structural changes. We speculate the causalities in terms of the differences in hydration shell and DNA surface structures.

  19. Touch DNA-The prospect of DNA profiles from cables.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sharon; Subhani, Zuhaib; Daniel, Barbara; Frascione, Nunzianda

    2016-05-01

    Metal theft in the railroad industry poses significant challenges to transport investigators. Cable sheaths left behind at crime scenes, if appropriately analysed, could provide valuable evidence in a forensic investigation, but attempts at recovering DNA are not routinely made. Experiments were set up to ascertain the success in DNA recovery from the surface of cable sheaths after deposition of (a) sweat, (b) extracted DNA and (c) fingermarks. Since investigators try to collect fingermarks and often treat the cables with cyanoacrylate fuming (CNA fuming) or wet powder suspensions (WPS) to enhance the marks this study investigated the recovery of DNA from fingermarks pre- and post-enhancement. The double-swab technique and mini-taping were compared as options to recover DNA from the cable sheaths. Results demonstrate that generally, there is no significant difference between using swabs or mini-tapes to recover the DNA from the non-porous cables (p>0.05). It was also illustrated that CNA fuming performed better than WPS in terms of subsequent recovery and profiling of DNA. CNA fuming resulted in an average increase in DNA recovered via swabbing and taping (more than 4× and 8×, respectively), as compared to no treatment, with 50% of the DNA recovered after CNA fuming generating full DNA profiles. PMID:27162019

  20. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  1. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  2. Novel applications of DNA materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Naoya; Yamaoka, Kanji; Yoshida, Junichi

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes preparations of innovative photonic devices based on high purity DNA molecules which are obtained from Salmon roe. DNA molecules have characteristic features of double helical chain structures where aromatic compounds can intercalate into the stacked layers so that various optically active aromatic dyes indicate strong enhancement effects of photonic activities. Thus, various DNA photonic devices have been developed in the world in terms of optical switches, electro-luminescence (EL), lasers and so on. However, these DNA photonic devices adsorb moisture in the air because of hydrophilic character of DNA molecules, leading to decrease photonic activities. Nevertheless, it was found by my group that a novel hybridization method of the dye-intercalated DNA molecules by means of so-called so-gel process increased stabilities and durability of DNA photonic devices under environmental changes. Also, hybridization of dye-intercalated DNA devices with synthetic polymers including fluorinated poly(methylmethacrylate ) or polycarbonates was successfully carried out by solution blending method, followed by casting the solution to obtain these films which showed stability and durability increases of these DNA photonic devices. DNA-lipid complexes showed a very strong fluorescence amplification by chelating with rare earth metals such as Europium or Telbiumu compounds. This paper also describes the chelate effects of rare earth metal compounds for light amplifications.

  3. Topological Behavior of Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, N. Patrick; Vologodskii, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the B-form structure of DNA by Watson and Crick led to an explosion of research on nucleic acids in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, and genetics. Powerful techniques were developed to reveal a myriad of different structural conformations that change B-DNA as it is transcribed, replicated, and recombined and as sister chromosomes are moved into new daughter cell compartments during cell division. This article links the original discoveries of superhelical structure and molecular topology to non-B form DNA structure and contemporary biochemical and biophysical techniques. The emphasis is on the power of plasmids for studying DNA structure and function. The conditions that trigger the formation of alternative DNA structures such as left-handed Z-DNA, inter- and intra-molecular triplexes, triple-stranded DNA, and linked catenanes and hemicatenanes are explained. The DNA dynamics and topological issues are detailed for stalled replication forks and for torsional and structural changes on DNA in front of and behind a transcription complex and a replisome. The complex and interconnected roles of topoisomerases and abundant small nucleoid association proteins are explained. And methods are described for comparing in vivo and in vitro reactions to probe and understand the temporal pathways of DNA and chromosome chemistry that occur inside living cells. PMID:26104708

  4. DNA reviews: the national DNA database of the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Graham, E A M

    2007-12-01

    The national DNA database in United Kingdom has now been operational for over 10 years. This review looks at the history and development of this investigative resource. From the development of commercial DNA profiling kits to the current statistics for matches obtained in relation to criminal investigation in the United Kingdom, before moving onto discussing potential future direction that national DNA databases might take, including international collaboration on a European and global scale. PMID:25869270

  5. DNA-based watermarks using the DNA-Crypt algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Dominik; Barnekow, Angelika

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the application of watermarks based on DNA sequences to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) protected by patents. Predicted mutations in the genome can be corrected by the DNA-Crypt program leaving the encrypted information intact. Existing DNA cryptographic and steganographic algorithms use synthetic DNA sequences to store binary information however, although these sequences can be used for authentication, they may change the target DNA sequence when introduced into living organisms. Results The DNA-Crypt algorithm and image steganography are based on the same watermark-hiding principle, namely using the least significant base in case of DNA-Crypt and the least significant bit in case of the image steganography. It can be combined with binary encryption algorithms like AES, RSA or Blowfish. DNA-Crypt is able to correct mutations in the target DNA with several mutation correction codes such as the Hamming-code or the WDH-code. Mutations which can occur infrequently may destroy the encrypted information, however an integrated fuzzy controller decides on a set of heuristics based on three input dimensions, and recommends whether or not to use a correction code. These three input dimensions are the length of the sequence, the individual mutation rate and the stability over time, which is represented by the number of generations. In silico experiments using the Ypt7 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that the DNA watermarks produced by DNA-Crypt do not alter the translation of mRNA into protein. Conclusion The program is able to store watermarks in living organisms and can maintain the original information by correcting mutations itself. Pairwise or multiple sequence alignments show that DNA-Crypt produces few mismatches between the sequences similar to all steganographic algorithms. PMID:17535434

  6. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L

    2012-01-24

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA. PMID:22219368

  7. Mechanism for priming DNA synthesis by yeast DNA Polymerase α

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Rajika L; Torella, Rubben; Klinge, Sebastian; Kilkenny, Mairi L; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The DNA Polymerase α (Pol α)/primase complex initiates DNA synthesis in eukaryotic replication. In the complex, Pol α and primase cooperate in the production of RNA-DNA oligonucleotides that prime synthesis of new DNA. Here we report crystal structures of the catalytic core of yeast Pol α in unliganded form, bound to an RNA primer/DNA template and extending an RNA primer with deoxynucleotides. We combine the structural analysis with biochemical and computational data to demonstrate that Pol α specifically recognizes the A-form RNA/DNA helix and that the ensuing synthesis of B-form DNA terminates primer synthesis. The spontaneous release of the completed RNA-DNA primer by the Pol α/primase complex simplifies current models of primer transfer to leading- and lagging strand polymerases. The proposed mechanism of nucleotide polymerization by Pol α might contribute to genomic stability by limiting the amount of inaccurate DNA to be corrected at the start of each Okazaki fragment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00482.001 PMID:23599895

  8. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A. ); Arlinghaus, H.F. )

    1993-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  9. Applications of mass spectrometry to DNA fingerprinting and DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Buchanan, M.V.; Chen, C.H.; Doktycz, M.J.; McLuckey, S.A.; Arlinghaus, H.F.

    1993-06-01

    DNA fingerprinting and sequencing rely on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the sizes of the DNA fragments. Innovative altematives to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are under investigation for characterization of such fingerprinting and sequencing. One method uses stable isotopes of tin and other elements to label the DNAwhereas other procedures do not require labels. The detectors in each case are mass spectrometers that detect either the stable isotopes or the DNA fragments themselves. If successful, these methods will speed up the rate of DNA analysis by one or two orders of magnitude.

  10. Foldback intercoil DNA and the mechanism of DNA transposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Foldback intercoil (FBI) DNA is formed by the folding back at one point of a non-helical parallel track of double-stranded DNA at as sharp as 180° and the intertwining of two double helixes within each other's major groove to form an intercoil with a diameter of 2.2 nm. FBI DNA has been suggested to mediate intra-molecular homologous recombination of a deletion and inversion. Inter-molecular homologous recombination, known as site-specific insertion, on the other hand, is mediated by the direct perpendicular approach of the FBI DNA tip, as the attP site, onto the target DNA, as the attB site. Transposition of DNA transposons involves the pairing of terminal inverted repeats and 5-7-bp tandem target duplication. FBI DNA configuration effectively explains simple as well as replicative transposition, along with the involvement of an enhancer element. The majority of diverse retrotransposable elements that employ a target site duplication mechanism is also suggested to follow the FBI DNA-mediated perpendicular insertion of the paired intercoil ends by non-homologous end-joining, together with gap filling. A genome-wide perspective of transposable elements in light of FBI DNA is discussed. PMID:25317106

  11. Slowing DNA Transport Using Graphene–DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shouvik; Wilson, James; Shim, Jiwook; Shankla, Manish; Corbin, Elise A.

    2015-01-01

    Slowing down DNA translocation speed in a nanopore is essential to ensuring reliable resolution of individual bases. Thin membrane materials enhance spatial resolution but simultaneously reduce the temporal resolution as the molecules translocate far too quickly. In this study, the effect of exposed graphene layers on the transport dynamics of both single (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) through nanopores is examined. Nanopore devices with various combinations of graphene and Al2O3 dielectric layers in stacked membrane structures are fabricated. Slow translocations of ssDNA in nanopores drilled in membranes with layers of graphene are reported. The increased hydrophobic interactions between the ssDNA and the graphene layers could explain this phenomenon. Further confirmation of the hydrophobic origins of these interactions is obtained through reporting significantly faster translocations of dsDNA through these graphene layered membranes. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm the preferential interactions of DNA with the graphene layers as compared to the dielectric layer verifying the experimental findings. Based on our findings, we propose that the integration of multiple stacked graphene layers could slow down DNA enough to enable the identification of nucleobases. PMID:26167144

  12. The DNA Files

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-09

    The DNA Files is a radio documentary which disseminates genetics information over public radio. The documentaries explore subjects which include the following: How genetics affects society. How human life began and how it evolved. Could new prenatal genetic tests hold the key to disease prevention later in life? Would a national genetic data base sacrifice individual privacy? and Should genes that may lead to the cure for cancer be privately owned? This report serves as a project update for the second quarter of 1998. It includes the spring/summer 1998 newsletter, the winter 1998 newsletter, the program clock, and the latest flyer.

  13. DNA helicases: 'inching forward'.

    PubMed

    Soultanas, P; Wigley, D B

    2000-02-01

    Recently determined crystal structures of PcrA helicase complexed with a DNA substrate have revealed details of the helicase mechanism. PcrA and UvrD helicases have been shown to be functional as monomers, challenging previous suggestions that all helicases are required to be oligomeric. Crystal structures of the hexameric helicases RepA and T7 gene 4 explain the formation of hexameric assemblies from identical monomers with RecA-like folds, but their molecular mechanism remains elusive. PMID:10679457

  14. Switchable catalytic DNA catenanes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianzhe; Lu, Chun-Hua; Willner, Itamar

    2015-03-11

    Two-ring interlocked DNA catenanes are synthesized and characterized. The supramolecular catenanes show switchable cyclic catalytic properties. In one system, the catenane structure is switched between a hemin/G-quadruplex catalytic structure and a catalytically inactive state. In the second catenane structure the catenane is switched between a catalytically active Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-containing catenane and an inactive catenane state. In the third system, the interlocked catenane structure is switched between two distinct catalytic structures that include the Mg(2+)- and the Zn(2+)-dependent DNAzymes. PMID:25642796

  15. Ancient DNA and human history

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, Montgomery; Racimo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We review studies of genomic data obtained by sequencing hominin fossils with particular emphasis on the unique information that ancient DNA (aDNA) can provide about the demographic history of humans and our closest relatives. We concentrate on nuclear genomic sequences that have been published in the past few years. In many cases, particularly in the Arctic, the Americas, and Europe, aDNA has revealed historical demographic patterns in a way that could not be resolved by analyzing present-day genomes alone. Ancient DNA from archaic hominins has revealed a rich history of admixture between early modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans, and has allowed us to disentangle complex selective processes. Information from aDNA studies is nowhere near saturation, and we believe that future aDNA sequences will continue to change our understanding of hominin history. PMID:27274045

  16. Charge transport in desolvated DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Mario; Elstner, Marcus; Kubař, Tomáš

    2013-09-01

    The conductivity of DNA in molecular junctions is often probed experimentally under dry conditions, but it is unclear how much of the solvent remains attached to the DNA and how this impacts its structure, electronic states, and conductivity. Classical MD simulations show that DNA is unstable if the solvent is removed completely, while a micro-hydrated system with few water molecules shows similar charge transport properties as fully solvated DNA does. This surprising effect is analyzed in detail by mapping the density functional theory-based electronic structure to a tight-binding Hamiltonian, allowing for an estimate of conductivity of various DNA sequences with snapshot-averaged Landauer's approach. The characteristics of DNA charge transport turn out to be determined by the nearest hydration shell(s), and the removal of bulk solvent has little effect on the transport.

  17. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    PubMed

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'. PMID:10963862

  18. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials. PMID:25625927

  19. Ancient DNA and human history.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, Montgomery; Racimo, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    We review studies of genomic data obtained by sequencing hominin fossils with particular emphasis on the unique information that ancient DNA (aDNA) can provide about the demographic history of humans and our closest relatives. We concentrate on nuclear genomic sequences that have been published in the past few years. In many cases, particularly in the Arctic, the Americas, and Europe, aDNA has revealed historical demographic patterns in a way that could not be resolved by analyzing present-day genomes alone. Ancient DNA from archaic hominins has revealed a rich history of admixture between early modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans, and has allowed us to disentangle complex selective processes. Information from aDNA studies is nowhere near saturation, and we believe that future aDNA sequences will continue to change our understanding of hominin history. PMID:27274045

  20. DNA denaturation in ionic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Arghya; Singh, Amar; Singh, Navin

    2016-05-01

    Salt or cations, present in solution play an important role in DNA denaturation and folding kinetics of DNA helix. In this work we study the thermal melting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule using Peyrard Bishop Dauxois (PBD) model. We modify the potential of H-bonding between the bases of the complimentary strands to introduce the salt and solvent effect. We choose different DNA sequences having different contents of GC pairs and calculate the melting temperatures. The melting temperature increases logarithmically with the salt concentration of the solution. The more GC base pairs in the chain enhance the stability of DNA chain at a fix salt concentration. The obtained results are in good accordance with experimental findings.

  1. Interaction of chlorpromazine with DNA.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, N; Kamata, K; Meyer, R

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of the potential anticancer agent chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) with DNA was investigated by the techniques of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), viscosity and Raman spectroscopy. It has been suggested from HPLC work that DNA nucleotides (except nucleosides) from either a CPZ-DNA system or a CPZ-nucleotide system. Furthermore, the shear stress of the viscosity of the CPZ-DNA system and the CPZ-nucleotide systems ware shown to be apparently the higher increasing than that of DNA and nucleotide alone. These systems had non-Newtonian properties for the formation of the CPZ-DNA and the CPZ-nucleotide systems under experimental conditions. The Raman spectra showed a dramatic difference at 982 cm-1 due to the symmetric P-O stretching vibration of the PO4(2-) group between dGMP and the CPZ-dGMP system. PMID:2285233

  2. Methods of DNA methylation detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Wusi Chen (Inventor); Filanoski, Brian John (Inventor); Mishra, Nirankar (Inventor); Rastogi, Shiva (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides for methods of DNA methylation detection. The present invention provides for methods of generating and detecting specific electronic signals that report the methylation status of targeted DNA molecules in biological samples.Two methods are described, direct and indirect detection of methylated DNA molecules in a nano transistor based device. In the direct detection, methylated target DNA molecules are captured on the sensing surface resulting in changes in the electrical properties of a nano transistor. These changes generate detectable electronic signals. In the indirect detection, antibody-DNA conjugates are used to identify methylated DNA molecules. RNA signal molecules are generated through an in vitro transcription process. These RNA molecules are captured on the sensing surface change the electrical properties of nano transistor thereby generating detectable electronic signals.

  3. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  4. Human DNA ligase III recognizes DNA ends by dynamic switching between two DNA-bound states.

    PubMed

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A; Tomkinson, Alan E; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-07-27

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a "jackknife model" in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers. PMID:20518483

  5. Stability of mRNA/DNA and DNA/DNA Duplexes Affects mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kraeva, Rayna I.; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Roguev, Assen; Ivanova, Anna; Nedelcheva-Veleva, Marina N.; Stoynov, Stoyno S.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, due to their structural and chemical properties, can form double-stranded secondary structures that assist the transfer of genetic information and can modulate gene expression. However, the nucleotide sequence alone is insufficient in explaining phenomena like intron-exon recognition during RNA processing. This raises the question whether nucleic acids are endowed with other attributes that can contribute to their biological functions. In this work, we present a calculation of thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes across the genomes of four species in the genus Saccharomyces by nearest-neighbor method. The results show that coding regions are more thermodynamically stable than introns, 3′-untranslated regions and intergenic sequences. Furthermore, open reading frames have more stable sense mRNA/DNA duplexes than the potential antisense duplexes, a property that can aid gene discovery. The lower stability of the DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes of 3′-untranslated regions and the higher stability of genes correlates with increased mRNA level. These results suggest that the thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes affects mRNA transcription. PMID:17356699

  6. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  7. Exons, Introns, and DNA Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlon, Enrico; Malki, Mehdi Lejard; Blossey, Ralf

    2005-05-01

    The genes of eukaryotes are characterized by protein coding fragments, the exons, interrupted by introns, i.e., stretches of DNA which do not carry useful information for protein synthesis. We have analyzed the melting behavior of randomly selected human cDNA sequences obtained from genomic DNA by removing all introns. A clear correspondence is observed between exons and melting domains. This finding may provide new insights into the physical mechanisms underlying the evolution of genes.

  8. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  9. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  10. DNA Damage, Homology-Directed Repair, and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Pardo, Alba Di; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-01-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%–4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, ~50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  11. Intralymphatic immunization enhances DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Erdmann, Iris; Basch, Veronique; Sierro, Sophie; Kramps, Thomas A.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Oehen, Stefan; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2001-03-01

    Although DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit potent immune responses in animal models, initial clinical trials in humans have been disappointing, highlighting a need to optimize their immunogenicity. Naked DNA vaccines are usually administered either i.m. or intradermally. The current study shows that immunization with naked DNA by direct injection into a peripheral lymph node enhances immunogenicity by 100- to 1,000-fold, inducing strong and biologically relevant CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Because injection directly into a lymph node is a rapid and easy procedure in humans, these results have important clinical implications for DNA vaccination.

  12. Synthesis of chemically modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Shivalingam, Arun; Brown, Tom

    2016-06-15

    Naturally occurring DNA is encoded by the four nucleobases adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine. Yet minor chemical modifications to these bases, such as methylation, can significantly alter DNA function, and more drastic changes, such as replacement with unnatural base pairs, could expand its function. In order to realize the full potential of DNA in therapeutic and synthetic biology applications, our ability to 'write' long modified DNA in a controlled manner must be improved. This review highlights methods currently used for the synthesis of moderately long chemically modified nucleic acids (up to 1000 bp), their limitations and areas for future expansion. PMID:27284032

  13. DNA Methylation Screening and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Karilyn E.; Nahar, Muna S.; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic form of gene regulation that is universally important throughout the life course, especially during in utero and postnatal development. DNA methylation aids in cell cycle regulation and cellular differentiation processes. Previous studies have demonstrated that DNA methylation profiles may be altered by diet and the environment, and that these profiles are especially vulnerable during development. Thus, it is important to understand the role of DNA methylation in developmental governance and subsequent disease progression. A variety of molecular methods exist to assay for global, gene-specific, and epigenome-wide methylation. Here we describe these methods and discuss their relative strengths and limitations. PMID:22669678

  14. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. PMID:26212206

  15. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π–π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  16. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L.; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-09-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π-π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes.

  17. Piezoresistivity in single DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Bruot, Christopher; Palma, Julio L; Xiang, Limin; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Piezoresistivity is a fundamental property of materials that has found many device applications. Here we report piezoresistivity in double helical DNA molecules. By studying the dependence of molecular conductance and piezoresistivity of single DNA molecules with different sequences and lengths, and performing molecular orbital calculations, we show that the piezoresistivity of DNA is caused by force-induced changes in the π-π electronic coupling between neighbouring bases, and in the activation energy of hole hopping. We describe the results in terms of thermal activated hopping model together with the ladder-based mechanical model for DNA proposed by de Gennes. PMID:26337293

  18. Stabbing simulations and DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Samie, Lydie; Hicks, Tacha; Castella, Vincent; Taroni, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Technical developments have made it possible to analyze very low amounts of DNA. This has many advantages, but the drawback of this technological progress is that interpretation of the results becomes increasingly complex: the number of mixed DNA profiles increased relatively to single source DNA profiles and stochastic effects in the DNA profile, such as drop-in and drop-out, are more frequently observed. Moreover, the relevance of low template DNA material regarding the activities alleged is not as straightforward as it was a few years ago, when for example large quantities of blood were recovered. The possibility of secondary and tertiary transfer is now becoming an issue. The purpose of this research is twofold: first, to study the transfer of DNA from the handler and secondly, to observe if handlers would transfer DNA from persons closely connected to them. We chose to mimic cases where the offender would attack a person with a knife. As a first approach, we envisaged that the defense would not give an alternative explanation for the origin of the DNA. In our transfer experiments (4 donors, 16 experiments each, 64 traces), 3% of the traces were single DNA profiles. Most of the time, the DNA profile of the person handling the knife was present as the major profile: in 83% of the traces the major contributor profile corresponded to the stabber's DNA profile (in single stains and mixtures). Mixture with no clear major/minor fraction (12%) were observed. 5% of the traces were considered of insufficient quality (more than 3 contributors, presence of a few minor peaks). In that case, we considered that the stabber's DNA was absent. In our experiments, no traces allowed excluding the stabber, however it must be noted that precautions were taken to minimize background DNA as knives were cleaned before the experiments. DNA profiles of the stabber's colleagues were not observed. We hope that this study will allow for a better understanding of the transfer mechanism and

  19. Unusual monoclonal DNA binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Iijima, S; Kuwana, K; Nishinarita, S; Takeuchi, J; Shida, M; Karasaki, M; Amaki, I

    1983-03-01

    The monoclonal antibodies directed against DNA were produced by somatic cell hybridization with parental cells (SP-2) and spleen cells from nonimmunized autoimmune MRL/lpr mice. The immunoglobulins were recovered from the culture supernatant from hybridoma by a solid immunoadsorbent and antibody immunoprecipitation. The results from the specificities of DNA binding monoclonal immunoglobulins suggest that the antibodies to DNA have the antibody combining sites for both epitope of double stranded helix and base of DNA and support the concept of the multiple antigen binding potentials of the hybridoma autoantibodies. PMID:6857646

  20. Defined DNA/nanoparticle conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Sykes, Michael T.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2005-09-01

    Glutathione monolayer-protected gold clusters were reacted by place exchange with 19- or 20-residue thiolated oligonucleotides. The resulting DNA/nanoparticle conjugates could be separated on the basis of the number of bound oligonucleotides by gel electrophoresis and assembled with one another by DNA-DNA hybridization. This approach overcomes previous limitations of DNA/nanoparticle synthesis and yields conjugates that are precisely defined with respect to both gold and nucleic acid content. Freely available online through the PNAS open access option.

  1. DNA attachment to support structures

    DOEpatents

    Balhorn, Rodney L.; Barry, Christopher H.

    2002-01-01

    Microscopic beads or other structures are attached to nucleic acids (DNA) using a terminal transferase. The transferase adds labeled dideoxy nucleotide bases to the ends of linear strands of DNA. The labels, such as the antigens digoxigenin and biotin, bind to the antibody compounds or other appropriate complementary ligands, which are bound to the microscopic beads or other support structures. The method does not require the synthesis of a synthetic oligonucleotide probe. The method can be used to tag or label DNA even when the DNA has an unknown sequence, has blunt ends, or is a very large fragment (e.g., >500 kilobase pairs).

  2. ANIMAL DNA IN PCR REAGENTS PLAGUES ANCIENT DNA RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high-cycle PCR amplification targ...

  3. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  4. Enhancement of DNA vaccine potency through coadministration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines via gene gun.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daejin; Hoory, Talia; Monie, Archana; Ting, Jenny Pan-Yun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-05-15

    Administration of DNA vaccines via gene gun has emerged as an important form of Ag-specific immunotherapy. The MHC CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and also induces expression of class I molecules. We reasoned that the gene gun administration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines employing different strategies to improve MHC I and II processing could enhance DNA vaccine potency. We observed that DC-1 cells transfected with CIITA DNA lead to higher expression of MHC I and II molecules, leading to enhanced Ag presentation through the MHC I/II pathways. Furthermore, our data suggested that coadministration of DNA-encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 Ag (CRT/E6) with CIITA DNA leads to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. In addition, coadministration of the combination of CRT/E6 DNA with CIITA DNA and DNA encoding the invariant chain (Ii) linked to the pan HLA-DR-reactive epitope (Ii-PADRE) further enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. Treatment with the combination vaccine was also shown to enhance the antitumor effects and to prolong survival in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. Vaccination with the combination vaccine also led to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) memory T cells and to long-term protection against TC-1 tumors and prolonged survival in vaccinated mice. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of CIITA DNA with CRT/E6 and Ii-PADRE DNA vaccines represents a potentially effective means to combat tumors in the clinical setting. PMID:18453624

  5. Authentication of forensic DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Davidson, Ariane; Grafit, Arnon

    2010-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, DNA analysis has revolutionized forensic science, and has become a dominant tool in law enforcement. Today, DNA evidence is key to the conviction or exoneration of suspects of various types of crime, from theft to rape and murder. However, the disturbing possibility that DNA evidence can be faked has been overlooked. It turns out that standard molecular biology techniques such as PCR, molecular cloning, and recently developed whole genome amplification (WGA), enable anyone with basic equipment and know-how to produce practically unlimited amounts of in vitro synthesized (artificial) DNA with any desired genetic profile. This artificial DNA can then be applied to surfaces of objects or incorporated into genuine human tissues and planted in crime scenes. Here we show that the current forensic procedure fails to distinguish between such samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces with artificial DNA, and corresponding samples with in vivo generated (natural) DNA. Furthermore, genotyping of both artificial and natural samples with Profiler Plus((R)) yielded full profiles with no anomalies. In order to effectively deal with this problem, we developed an authentication assay, which distinguishes between natural and artificial DNA based on methylation analysis of a set of genomic loci: in natural DNA, some loci are methylated and others are unmethylated, while in artificial DNA all loci are unmethylated. The assay was tested on natural and artificial samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces, with complete success. Adopting an authentication assay for casework samples as part of the forensic procedure is necessary for maintaining the high credibility of DNA evidence in the judiciary system. PMID:20129467

  6. A chiroptical photoswitchable DNA complex.

    PubMed

    Mammana, Angela; Carroll, Gregory T; Areephong, Jetsuda; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-10-13

    The interesting structural, electronic, and optical properties of DNA provide fascinating opportunities for developing nanoscale smart materials by integrating DNA with opto-electronic components. In this article we demonstrate the electrostatic binding of an amine-terminated dithienylethene (DET) molecular switch to double-stranded synthetic polynucleotides. The DET switch can undergo photochemical ring-closure and opening reactions. Circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis spectroscopy show that both the open, 1o, and the closed, 1c, forms of the switch bind to DNA. Upon addition of DNA to a solution of 1o or 1c, the UV-vis spectrum displays a hypochromic effect, indicative of an interaction between the switch and the DNA. The chirality of the DNA double-helix is transmitted to the switching unit which displays a well-defined CD signal upon supramolecular complexation to the DNA. Additionally, the CD signal of the DNA attenuates, demonstrating that both components of the complex mutually influence each other's structure; the DNA induces chirality in the switch, and the switch modifies the structure of the DNA. Modulation of the chiroptical properties of the complex is achieved by photochemically switching the DET between its ring open and closed isomers. A pH dependence study of the binding shows that when the pH is increased the switches lose their binding ability, indicating that electrostatic interactions between protonated amines and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are the dominant driving force for binding to the DNA. A comparison of poly(deoxyguanylic-deoxycytidylic) acid [poly(dGdC)(2)] polynucleotides with poly(deoxyadenylic-deoxythymidylic) acid [poly(dAdT)(2)] shows distinct differences in the CD spectra of the complexes. PMID:21879715

  7. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  8. Chimeric DNA methyltransferases target DNA methylation to specific DNA sequences and repress expression of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Papworth, Monika; Minczuk, Michal; Rohde, Christian; Zhang, Yingying; Ragozin, Sergei; Jeltsch, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing by targeted DNA methylation has potential applications in basic research and therapy. To establish targeted methylation in human cell lines, the catalytic domains (CDs) of mouse Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b DNA methyltransferases (MTases) were fused to different DNA binding domains (DBD) of GAL4 and an engineered Cys2His2 zinc finger domain. We demonstrated that (i) Dense DNA methylation can be targeted to specific regions in gene promoters using chimeric DNA MTases. (ii) Site-specific methylation leads to repression of genes controlled by various cellular or viral promoters. (iii) Mutations affecting any of the DBD, MTase or target DNA sequences reduce targeted methylation and gene silencing. (iv) Targeted DNA methylation is effective in repressing Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in cell culture with the viral titer reduced by at least 18-fold in the presence of an MTase fused to an engineered zinc finger DBD, which binds a single site in the promoter of HSV-1 gene IE175k. In short, we show here that it is possible to direct DNA MTase activity to predetermined sites in DNA, achieve targeted gene silencing in mammalian cell lines and interfere with HSV-1 propagation. PMID:17151075

  9. DNA Extraction Techniques for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, R. P.; Arblaster, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction provides a hands-on introduction to DNA and enables students to gain real life experience and practical knowledge of DNA. Students gain a sense of ownership and are more enthusiastic when they use their own DNA. A cost effective, simple protocol for DNA extraction and visualization was devised. Buccal mucosal epithelia provide a…

  10. DNA: Polymer and molecular code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.

    1999-10-01

    The thesis work focusses upon two aspects of DNA, the polymer and the molecular code. Our approach was to bring single molecule micromanipulation methods to the study of DNA. It included a home built optical microscope combined with an atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer. This combined approach led to a novel method to graft a single DNA molecule onto a force cantilever using the optical tweezer and local heating. With this method, a force versus extension assay of double stranded DNA was realized. The resolution was about 10 picoN. To improve on this force measurement resolution, a simple light backscattering technique was developed and used to probe the DNA polymer flexibility and its fluctuations. It combined the optical tweezer to trap a DNA tethered bead and the laser backscattering to detect the beads Brownian fluctuations. With this technique the resolution was about 0.1 picoN with a millisecond access time, and the whole entropic part of the DNA force-extension was measured. With this experimental strategy, we measured the polymerization of the protein RecA on an isolated double stranded DNA. We observed the progressive decoration of RecA on the l DNA molecule, which results in the extension of l , due to unwinding of the double helix. The dynamics of polymerization, the resulting change in the DNA entropic elasticity and the role of ATP hydrolysis were the main parts of the study. A simple model for RecA assembly on DNA was proposed. This work presents a first step in the study of genetic recombination. Recently we have started a study of equilibrium binding which utilizes fluorescence polarization methods to probe the polymerization of RecA on single stranded DNA. In addition to the study of material properties of DNA and DNA-RecA, we have developed experiments for which the code of the DNA is central. We studied one aspect of DNA as a molecular code, using different techniques. In particular the programmatic use of template specificity makes

  11. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  12. Condensation of circular DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starostin, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    A simple model of a circularly closed double-stranded DNA in a poor solvent is considered as an example of a semi-flexible polymer with self-attraction. To find the ground states, the conformational energy is computed as a sum of the bending and torsional elastic components and the effective self-attraction energy. The model includes a relative orientation or sequence dependence of the effective attraction forces between different pieces of the polymer chain. Two series of conformations are analysed: a multicovered circle (a toroid) and a multifold two-headed racquet. The results are presented as a diagram of state. It is suggested that the stability of particular conformations may be controlled by proper adjustment of the primary structure. Application of the model to other semi-flexible polymers is considered.

  13. Sense antisense DNA strand?

    PubMed

    Boldogkói, Z; Kaliman, A V; Murvai, J; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that alphaherpesviruses express latency associated transcripts (LATs) from the antisense strand of immediate-early (IE) genes of the viral genome. It has been suggested that LATs containing extended open reading frames (ORFs), might be translated into (a) protein product(s). We found that a salient feature of some herpesvirus DNAs is a high GC preference at the third codon positions. The consequence of this feature is that the probability of a stop-codon appearing at two of the six reading frames of the DNA strand is very low. Therefore, the presence of an extended ORF does not necessarily mean that it is relevant to real translation. PMID:7810418

  14. DNA nanotechnology: a future perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, Muniza; Kim, Byeonghoon; Hussain, Rafaqat; Amin, Rashid; Park, Sung Ha

    2013-03-01

    In addition to its genetic function, DNA is one of the most distinct and smart self-assembling nanomaterials. DNA nanotechnology exploits the predictable self-assembly of DNA oligonucleotides to design and assemble innovative and highly discrete nanostructures. Highly ordered DNA motifs are capable of providing an ultra-fine framework for the next generation of nanofabrications. The majority of these applications are based upon the complementarity of DNA base pairing: adenine with thymine, and guanine with cytosine. DNA provides an intelligent route for the creation of nanoarchitectures with programmable and predictable patterns. DNA strands twist along one helix for a number of bases before switching to the other helix by passing through a crossover junction. The association of two crossovers keeps the helices parallel and holds them tightly together, allowing the assembly of bigger structures. Because of the DNA molecule's unique and novel characteristics, it can easily be applied in a vast variety of multidisciplinary research areas like biomedicine, computer science, nano/optoelectronics, and bionanotechnology.

  15. Isothermal amplification of insect DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification of DNA (LAMP) method can amplify a target DNA sequence at a constant temperature in about 1 hour. LAMP has broad application in agriculture and medicine because of the need for rapid and inexpensive diagnoses. The power of LAMP is being used by researchers ...

  16. Improved ethanol precipitation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Fregel, Rosa; González, Ana; Cabrera, Vicente M

    2010-04-01

    In this Short Communication, a shorter version of the standard DNA ethanol precipitation and purification protocol is described. It uses a mixture of 70% ethanol, 75 mM ammonium acetate and different concentrations of different carriers to perform DNA precipitation and washing in only one step. PMID:20336673

  17. Isothermal Amplification of Insect DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification of DNA (LAMP) method can amplify a target DNA sequence at a constant temperature in about one hour. LAMP has broad application in agriculture and medicine because of the need for rapid and inexpensive diagnoses. LAMP eliminates the need for temperature cycl...

  18. DNA repair in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Jaroudi, Souraya; SenGupta, Sioban

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian cells have developed complex mechanisms to identify DNA damage and activate the required response to maintain genome integrity. Those mechanisms include DNA damage detection, DNA repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which operate together to protect the conceptus from DNA damage originating either in parental gametes or in the embryo's somatic cells. DNA repair in the newly fertilized preimplantation embryo is believed to rely entirely on the oocyte's machinery (mRNAs and proteins deposited and stored prior to ovulation). DNA repair genes have been shown to be expressed in the early stages of mammalian development. The survival of the embryo necessitates that the oocyte be sufficiently equipped with maternal stored products and that embryonic gene expression commences at the correct time. A Medline based literature search was performed using the keywords 'DNA repair' and 'embryo development' or 'gametogenesis' (publication dates between 1995 and 2006). Mammalian studies which investigated gene expression were selected. Further articles were acquired from the citations in the articles obtained from the preliminary Medline search. This paper reviews mammalian DNA repair from gametogenesis to preimplantation embryos to late gestational stages. PMID:17141556

  19. Fabrication of patterned DNA surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Chrisey, L A; O'Ferrall, C E; Spargo, B J; Dulcey, C S; Calvert, J M

    1996-01-01

    Two photolithographic methods are described for the formation of patterned single or multiple DNA species on SiO2 substrates. In the first approach, substrates are treated with a photochemically labile organosilane monolayer film. Irradiation of these surfaces with patterned deep UV (193 nm) light results in patterned chemically reactive groups which are then reacted with heterobifunctional crosslinking molecules. Covalent attachment of modified synthetic DNA oligomers to the crosslinker results in stable DNA patterns. Alternatively, a photoresist is spin-coated over a silane film which had been previously modified with the heterobifunctional crosslinker. Upon patterned irradiation and subsequent development, the underlying crosslinker-modified layer is revealed, and is then reacted with a chemically modified DNA. Feature dimensions to 1 micron are observed when a single fluorescent DNA is attached to the surface. By performing sequential exposures, we have successfully immobilized two distinguishable DNA oligomers on a single surface. Synthetic DNA immobilized in this manner retains the ability to hybridize to its complementary strand, suggesting that these approaches may find utility in the development of miniaturized DNA-based biosensors. PMID:8760891

  20. DNA nanotechnology: a future perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its genetic function, DNA is one of the most distinct and smart self-assembling nanomaterials. DNA nanotechnology exploits the predictable self-assembly of DNA oligonucleotides to design and assemble innovative and highly discrete nanostructures. Highly ordered DNA motifs are capable of providing an ultra-fine framework for the next generation of nanofabrications. The majority of these applications are based upon the complementarity of DNA base pairing: adenine with thymine, and guanine with cytosine. DNA provides an intelligent route for the creation of nanoarchitectures with programmable and predictable patterns. DNA strands twist along one helix for a number of bases before switching to the other helix by passing through a crossover junction. The association of two crossovers keeps the helices parallel and holds them tightly together, allowing the assembly of bigger structures. Because of the DNA molecule's unique and novel characteristics, it can easily be applied in a vast variety of multidisciplinary research areas like biomedicine, computer science, nano/optoelectronics, and bionanotechnology. PMID:23497147

  1. Methods of DNA methylation analysis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this review was to provide guidance for investigators who are new to the field of DNA methylation analysis. Epigenetics is the study of mitotically heritable alterations in gene expression potential that are not mediated by changes in DNA sequence. Recently, it has become clear that n...

  2. DNA/chitosan electrostatic complex.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Anaya, Lourdes Mónica; Soltero, J F Armando; Rinaudo, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Up to now, chitosan and DNA have been investigated for gene delivery due to chitosan advantages. It is recognized that chitosan is a biocompatible and biodegradable non-viral vector that does not produce immunological reactions, contrary to viral vectors. Chitosan has also been used and studied for its ability to protect DNA against nuclease degradation and to transfect DNA into several kinds of cells. In this work, high molecular weight DNA is compacted with chitosan. DNA-chitosan complex stoichiometry, net charge, dimensions, conformation and thermal stability are determined and discussed. The influence of external salt and chitosan molecular weight on the stoichiometry is also discussed. The isoelectric point of the complexes was found to be directly related to the protonation degree of chitosan. It is clearly demonstrated that the net charge of DNA-chitosan complex can be expressed in terms of the ratio [NH3(+)]/[P(-)], showing that the electrostatic interactions between DNA and chitosan are the main phenomena taking place in the solution. Compaction of DNA long chain complexed with low molar mass chitosan gives nanoparticles with an average radius around 150nm. Stable nanoparticles are obtained for a partial neutralization of phosphate ionic sites (i.e.: [NH3(+)]/[P(-)] fraction between 0.35 and 0.80). PMID:27050113

  3. Wireframe and tensegrity DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Simmel, Stephanie S; Nickels, Philipp C; Liedl, Tim

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Not only can triangulated wireframe network and tensegrity design be found in architecture, but it is also essential for the stability and organization of biological matter. Whether the scaffolding material is metal as in Buckminster Fuller's geodesic domes and Kenneth Snelson's floating compression sculptures or proteins like actin or spectrin making up the cytoskeleton of biological cells, wireframe and tensegrity construction can provide great stability while minimizing the material required. Given the mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA, it is not surprising to find many variants of wireframe and tensegrity constructions in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology, in which structures of almost arbitrary shape can be built with nanometer precision. The success of DNA self-assembly relies on the well-controlled hybridization of complementary DNA strands. Consequently, understanding the fundamental physical properties of these molecules is essential. Many experiments have shown that double-stranded DNA (in its most commonly occurring helical form, the B-form) behaves in a first approximation like a relatively stiff cylindrical beam with a persistence length of many times the length of its building blocks, the base pairs. However, it is harder to assign a persistence length to single-stranded DNA. Here, normally the Kuhn length is given, a measure that describes the length of individual rigid segments in a freely jointed chain. This length is on the order of a few nucleotides. Two immediate and important consequences arise from this high flexibility: single-stranded DNA is almost always present in a coiled conformation, and it behaves, just like all flexible polymers in solution, as an entropic spring. In this Account, we review the relation between the mechanical properties of DNA and design considerations for wireframe and tensegrity structures built from DNA. We illustrate various aspects of the successful evolution of DNA

  4. DNA vaccines in veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Laurel; Werner, David B

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines represent a new frontier in vaccine technology. One important application of this technology is in the veterinary arena. DNA vaccines have already gained a foothold in certain fields of veterinary medicine. However, several important questions must be addressed when developing DNA vaccines for animals, including whether or not the vaccine is efficacious and cost effective compared with currently available options. Another important question to consider is how to apply this developing technology in a wide range of different situations, from the domestic pet to individual fish in fisheries with several thousand animals, to wildlife programs for disease control. In some cases, DNA vaccines represent an interesting option for vaccination, while in others, currently available options are sufficient. This review will examine a number of diseases of veterinary importance and the progress being made in DNA vaccine technology relevant to these diseases, and we compare these with the conventional treatment options available. PMID:19722897

  5. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Heerema, Stephanie J; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology. PMID:26839258

  6. Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerema, Stephanie J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-02-01

    Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

  7. DNA signals at isoform promoters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  8. Single-Molecule DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efcavitch, J. William; Thompson, John F.

    2010-07-01

    The ability to detect single molecules of DNA or RNA has led to an extremely rich area of exploration of the single most important biomolecule in nature. In cases in which the nucleic acid molecules are tethered to a solid support, confined to a channel, or simply allowed to diffuse into a detection volume, novel techniques have been developed to manipulate the DNA and to examine properties such as structural dynamics and protein-DNA interactions. Beyond the analysis of the properties of nucleic acids themselves, single-molecule detection has enabled dramatic improvements in the throughput of DNA sequencing and holds promise for continuing progress. Both optical and nonoptical detection methods that use surfaces, nanopores, and zero-mode waveguides have been attempted, and one optically based instrument is already commercially available. The breadth of literature related to single-molecule DNA analysis is vast; this review focuses on a survey of efforts in molecular dynamics and nucleic acid sequencing.

  9. Future of DNA diagnostic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Kurt E.

    2001-09-01

    Progress in sequencing the human genome and the DNA of other organisms is providing many opportunities for creating powerful systems for numerous and diverse applications in DNA testing. These systems and the chemical processes, such as PCR, which they are designed to carry out, have recently made great strides in miniaturization through advances in micro-fluidics and micro-optics. In addition, new techniques in biological processing, such as controlled ultrasonic lysis, are being applied to small, automated, integrated instruments designed to provide important DNA results in a timely and routine manner. These systems are bringing DNA identification out of the laboratory and into our daily lives. Instead of waiting for days or weeks for a result, we will have them in minutes. Instead of relying on the skills of molecular biologists, the average person will be able to run a DNA test. These new advances will widely impact many aspects of our medical practices, food processing, and public safety.

  10. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  11. DNA signals at isoform promoters.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  12. Overstretching of a 30 bp DNA duplex studied with steered molecular dynamics simulation: Effects of structural defects on structure and force-extension relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Gisler, T.

    2009-11-01

    Single-molecule experiments on polymeric DNA show that the molecule can be overstretched at nearly constant force by about 70% beyond its relaxed contour length. In this publication we use steered molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study the effect of structural defects on force-extension curves and structures at high elongation in a 30 base pair duplex pulled by its torsionally unconstrained 5' -5' ends. The defect-free duplex shows a plateau in the force-extension curve at 120pN in which large segments with inclined and paired bases (“S-DNA”) near both ends of the duplex coexist with a central B-type segment separated from the former by small denaturation bubbles. In the presence of a base mismatch or a nick, force-extension curves are very similar to the ones of the defect-free duplex. For the duplex with a base mismatch, S-type segments with highly inclined base pairs are not observed; rather, the overstretched duplex consists of B-type segments separated by denaturation bubbles. The nicked duplex evolves, via a two-step transition, into a two-domain structure characterized by a large S-type segment coexisting with several short S-type segments which are separated by short denaturation bubbles. Our results suggest that in the presence of nicks the force-extension curve of highly elongated duplex DNA might reflect locally highly inhomogeneous stretching. Supplementary material in the form of a PDF file available from the Journal web page at 10.1140/epje/i2009-10524-5 and is accessible for authorised users.

  13. Photoaddition of chlorpromazine to DNA.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, I E; Chung, F L; Jeffrey, A M

    1984-10-01

    Chlorpromazine, 2-chloro-N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)phenothiazine (CPZ), is a frequently prescribed antipsychotic drug that causes cutaneous photosensitivity in man. CPZ is also phototoxic and photomutagenic in vitro. We have investigated the photoaddition of CPZ to DNA as a possible mechanism for these photobiologic effects. Prior to irradiation, CPZ binds non-covalently to double-stranded calf thymus DNA. At high nucleotide to CPZ ratios, the CPZ absorption maximum shifts from 305 nm to 340 nm with an isosbestic point at 323 nm and 90% of the CPZ fluorescence at 455 nm is quenched. The excitation and emission spectra for the unquenchable fluorescence are the same as those for unbound CPZ. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of unbound CPZ are restored at 0.1 mM magnesium acetate or 100 mM sodium acetate. Non-covalent binding of CPZ to heat-denatured DNA does not shift the CPZ absorption spectrum but quenches 65% of the CPZ fluorescence. Photolytic decomposition of CPZ was inhibited by binding to DNA. In the presence of high concentrations of double-stranded DNA or denatured DNA the photolysis rates were reduced by greater than 98% and 65%, respectively, compared to free CPZ. Formation of covalent photoadducts between CPZ and denatured DNA was 10-fold more efficient than photoadduct formation with double-stranded DNA. Approximately 10% of the CPZ which photodecomposed upon irradiation at 323 nm photoadded to denatured DNA. These results indicate that formation of a complex between CPZ and double-stranded DNA absorbing at 340 nm protects CPZ from photodecomposition and inhibits covalent photoadduct formation. PMID:6488389

  14. DNA Topology and the Initiation of Virus DNA Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Choon Seok; Sippy, Jean; Charbonneau, Bridget; Crow Hutchinson, Jennifer; Mejia-Romero, Olga Esther; Barton, Michael; Patel, Priyal; Sippy, Rachel; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During progeny assembly, viruses selectively package virion genomes from a nucleic acid pool that includes host nucleic acids. For large dsDNA viruses, including tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, immature viral DNA is recognized and translocated into a preformed icosahedral shell, the prohead. Recognition involves specific interactions between the viral packaging enzyme, terminase, and viral DNA recognition sites. Generally, viral DNA is recognized by terminase’s small subunit (TerS). The large terminase subunit (TerL) contains translocation ATPase and endonuclease domains. In phage lambda, TerS binds a sequence repeated three times in cosB, the recognition site. TerS binding to cosB positions TerL to cut the concatemeric DNA at the adjacent nicking site, cosN. TerL introduces staggered nicks in cosN, generating twelve bp cohesive ends. Terminase separates the cohesive ends and remains bound to the cosB-containing end, in a nucleoprotein structure called Complex I. Complex I docks on the prohead’s portal vertex and translocation ensues. DNA topology plays a role in the TerSλ-cosBλ interaction. Here we show that a site, I2, located between cosN and cosB, is critically important for an early DNA packaging step. I2 contains a complex static bend. I2 mutations block DNA packaging. I2 mutant DNA is cut by terminase at cosN in vitro, but in vivo, no cos cleavage is detected, nor is there evidence for Complex I. Models for what packaging step might be blocked by I2 mutations are presented. PMID:27144448

  15. DNA Topology and the Initiation of Virus DNA Packaging.

    PubMed

    Oh, Choon Seok; Sippy, Jean; Charbonneau, Bridget; Crow Hutchinson, Jennifer; Mejia-Romero, Olga Esther; Barton, Michael; Patel, Priyal; Sippy, Rachel; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During progeny assembly, viruses selectively package virion genomes from a nucleic acid pool that includes host nucleic acids. For large dsDNA viruses, including tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, immature viral DNA is recognized and translocated into a preformed icosahedral shell, the prohead. Recognition involves specific interactions between the viral packaging enzyme, terminase, and viral DNA recognition sites. Generally, viral DNA is recognized by terminase's small subunit (TerS). The large terminase subunit (TerL) contains translocation ATPase and endonuclease domains. In phage lambda, TerS binds a sequence repeated three times in cosB, the recognition site. TerS binding to cosB positions TerL to cut the concatemeric DNA at the adjacent nicking site, cosN. TerL introduces staggered nicks in cosN, generating twelve bp cohesive ends. Terminase separates the cohesive ends and remains bound to the cosB-containing end, in a nucleoprotein structure called Complex I. Complex I docks on the prohead's portal vertex and translocation ensues. DNA topology plays a role in the TerSλ-cosBλ interaction. Here we show that a site, I2, located between cosN and cosB, is critically important for an early DNA packaging step. I2 contains a complex static bend. I2 mutations block DNA packaging. I2 mutant DNA is cut by terminase at cosN in vitro, but in vivo, no cos cleavage is detected, nor is there evidence for Complex I. Models for what packaging step might be blocked by I2 mutations are presented. PMID:27144448

  16. Convention on nomenclature for DNA cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hiddemann, W.; Schumann, J.; Andreeff, M.; Barlogie, B.; Herman, C.J.; Leif, R.C.; Mayall, B.H.; Murphy, R.F.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Committee on Nomenclature of the Society for Analytical Cytology presents guidelines for the analysis of DNA content by cytometry. These guidelines cover: staining of DNA; cytogenetic and cytometric terminology; DNA index; resolution of measurements; and cytometric standards.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Bacterial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, W. David; Davidson, Michael W.

    1979-01-01

    An inexpensive DNA preparation is presented which starts with commercially available frozen packed bacterial cells. Methods for analyzing the DNA are also presented, along with physical chemical experiments which can be done using the purified DNA. (BB)

  18. Preparation of genomic DNA from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Lefkothea-Vasiliki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this protocol is the isolation of bulk cellular DNA from bacteria (alternatively see Preparation of genomic DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Isolation of Genomic DNA from Mammalian Cells protocols). PMID:24011042

  19. The RecQ DNA helicases in DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kara A.; Gangloff, Serge; Rothstein, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    The RecQ helicases are conserved from bacteria to humans and play a critical role in genome stability. In humans, loss of RecQ gene function is associated with cancer predisposition and/or premature aging. Recent data have shown that the RecQ helicases function during two distinct steps during DNA repair; DNA end resection and resolution of double Holliday junctions (dHJs). RecQ functions in these different processing steps has important implications for its role in repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) that occur during DNA replication, meiosis and at specific genomic loci such as telomeres. PMID:21047263

  20. A reliable method to concentrate circulating DNA.

    PubMed

    Bryzgunova, Olga; Bondar, Anna; Morozkin, Evgeniy; Mileyko, Vladislav; Vlassov, Valentin; Laktionov, Pavel

    2011-01-15

    Concentration of circulating DNA probes is required to increase the amount of DNA involved in subsequent study (by polymerase chain reaction, sequencing, and microarray). This work was dedicated to the comparison of five different methods used for concentration of DNA circulating in blood. Precipitation of circulating DNA with acetone in the presence of triethylamine provides minimal DNA loss, high reproducibility, and at least three times higher DNA yield in comparison with the standard ethanol protocol. PMID:20828533

  1. Antimutator Variants of DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Alan J.; Williams, Lindsey N.; Preston, Bradley D.

    2011-01-01

    Evolution balances DNA replication speed and accuracy to optimize replicative fitness and genetic stability. There is no selective pressure to improve DNA replication fidelity beyond the background mutation rate from other sources, such as DNA damage. However, DNA polymerases remain amenable to amino-acid substitutions that lower intrinsic error rates. Here, we review these ‘antimutagenic’ changes in DNA polymerases and discuss what they reveal about mechanisms of replication fidelity. Pioneering studies with bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase (T4 Pol) established the paradigm that antimutator amino-acid substitutions reduce replication errors by increasing proofreading efficiency at the expense of polymerase processivity. The discoveries of antimutator substitutions in proofreading-deficient ‘mutator’ derivatives of bacterial Pols I and III and yeast Pol δ suggest there must be additional antimutagenic mechanisms. Remarkably, many of the affected amino-acid positions from Pol I, Pol III, and Pol δ are similar to the original T4 Pol substitutions. The locations of antimutator substitutions within DNA polymerase structures suggest that they may increase nucleotide selectivity and/or promote dissociation of primer termini from polymerases poised for misincorporation, leading to expulsion of incorrect nucleotides. If misincorporation occurs, enhanced primer dissociation from polymerase domains may improve proofreading in cis by an intrinsic exonuclease or in trans by alternate cellular proofreading activities. Together, these studies reveal that natural selection can readily restore replication error rates to sustainable levels following an adaptive mutator phenotype. PMID:21977975

  2. DNA damage checkpoints in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    DNA damage is a common event and probably leads to mutation or deletion within chromosomal DNA, which may cause cancer or premature aging. DNA damage induces several cellular responses including DNA repair, checkpoint activity and the triggering of apoptotic pathways. DNA damage checkpoints are associated with biochemical pathways that end delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression. These checkpoints engage damage sensor proteins, such as the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, and the Rad17-RFC complex, in the detection of DNA damage and transduction of signals to ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Chk1 and Chk2 kinases regulate Cdc25, Wee1 and p53 that ultimately inactivate cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which inhibit cell-cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which DNA damage is recognized by sensor proteins and signals are transmitted to Cdks. We classify the genes involved in checkpoint signaling into four categories, namely sensors, mediators, transducers and effectors, although their proteins have the broad activity, and thus this classification is for convenience and is not definitive. PMID:16314342

  3. Ancient and modern environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Ermini, Luca; Sarkissian, Clio Der; Haile, James; Hellstrom, Micaela; Spens, Johan; Thomsen, Philip Francis; Bohmann, Kristine; Cappellini, Enrico; Schnell, Ida Bærholm; Wales, Nathan A; Carøe, Christian; Campos, Paula F; Schmidt, Astrid M Z; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Hansen, Anders J; Orlando, Ludovic; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-01-19

    DNA obtained from environmental samples such as sediments, ice or water (environmental DNA, eDNA), represents an important source of information on past and present biodiversity. It has revealed an ancient forest in Greenland, extended by several thousand years the survival dates for mainland woolly mammoth in Alaska, and pushed back the dates for spruce survival in Scandinavian ice-free refugia during the last glaciation. More recently, eDNA was used to uncover the past 50 000 years of vegetation history in the Arctic, revealing massive vegetation turnover at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, with implications for the extinction of megafauna. Furthermore, eDNA can reflect the biodiversity of extant flora and fauna, both qualitatively and quantitatively, allowing detection of rare species. As such, trace studies of plant and vertebrate DNA in the environment have revolutionized our knowledge of biogeography. However, the approach remains marred by biases related to DNA behaviour in environmental settings, incomplete reference databases and false positive results due to contamination. We provide a review of the field. PMID:25487334

  4. DNA Polymerase β Ribonucleotide Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Nisha A.; Beard, William A.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymerases must select nucleotides that preserve Watson-Crick base pairing rules and choose substrates with the correct (deoxyribose) sugar. Sugar discrimination represents a great challenge because ribonucleotide triphosphates are present at much higher cellular concentrations than their deoxy-counterparts. Although DNA polymerases discriminate against ribonucleotides, many therapeutic nucleotide analogs that target polymerases have sugar modifications, and their efficacy depends on their ability to be incorporated into DNA. Here, we investigate the ability of DNA polymerase β to utilize nucleotides with modified sugars. DNA polymerase β readily inserts dideoxynucleoside triphosphates but inserts ribonucleotides nearly 4 orders of magnitude less efficiently than natural deoxynucleotides. The efficiency of ribonucleotide insertion is similar to that reported for other DNA polymerases. The poor polymerase-dependent insertion represents a key step in discriminating against ribonucleotides because, once inserted, a ribonucleotide is easily extended. Likewise, a templating ribonucleotide has little effect on insertion efficiency or fidelity. In contrast to insertion and extension of a ribonucleotide, the chemotherapeutic drug arabinofuranosylcytosine triphosphate is efficiently inserted but poorly extended. These results suggest that the sugar pucker at the primer terminus plays a crucial role in DNA synthesis; a 3′-endo sugar pucker facilitates nucleotide insertion, whereas a 2′-endo conformation inhibits insertion. PMID:20519499

  5. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  6. Ancient and modern environmental DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Ermini, Luca; Sarkissian, Clio Der; Haile, James; Hellstrom, Micaela; Spens, Johan; Thomsen, Philip Francis; Bohmann, Kristine; Cappellini, Enrico; Schnell, Ida Bærholm; Wales, Nathan A.; Carøe, Christian; Campos, Paula F.; Schmidt, Astrid M. Z.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Hansen, Anders J.; Orlando, Ludovic; Willerslev, Eske

    2015-01-01

    DNA obtained from environmental samples such as sediments, ice or water (environmental DNA, eDNA), represents an important source of information on past and present biodiversity. It has revealed an ancient forest in Greenland, extended by several thousand years the survival dates for mainland woolly mammoth in Alaska, and pushed back the dates for spruce survival in Scandinavian ice-free refugia during the last glaciation. More recently, eDNA was used to uncover the past 50 000 years of vegetation history in the Arctic, revealing massive vegetation turnover at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, with implications for the extinction of megafauna. Furthermore, eDNA can reflect the biodiversity of extant flora and fauna, both qualitatively and quantitatively, allowing detection of rare species. As such, trace studies of plant and vertebrate DNA in the environment have revolutionized our knowledge of biogeography. However, the approach remains marred by biases related to DNA behaviour in environmental settings, incomplete reference databases and false positive results due to contamination. We provide a review of the field. PMID:25487334

  7. Diatom DNA as historical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoof, K. R.; Epp, L. S.; Trauth, M. H.; Tiedemann, R.

    2009-04-01

    This survey is about the reconstruction of paleo environmental conditions in East Africa using recent and historic lakes sediments of shallow lakes in Kenya. This interdisciplinary approach combines the molecular analysis of ancient diatom DNA and the morphological analysis of diatom assemblages of short sediment cores to reveal the potential of molecular genetics in geosciences. This study comprises the investigation of two short sediment cores from Lake Naivasha (Kenya) taken in 2007, covering a stretch of ca. 80 years. Several sediment slices were analysed by molecular methods that concludes in species identification based on DNA fragments. Therefore total DNA was extracted and applied to a diatom DNA specific PCR amplifying a gene fragment that is frequently used for species identification. After cloning PCR products, clones were sequenced, sequences from different diatom species were analysed. As a comparison permanent slides were prepared for each sediment sample for counting diatom valves. The results suggest that DNA damage, perhaps species depended, and specific factors of PCR contribute to an overhang of two dominant diatom species (Aulacoseira ambigua and Aulacoseira granulata) represented by the molecular approach whereas rare species seen by light microscopy are not yet identifiable with molecular methods. Moreover changes in diatom assemblages and the reconstructed conductivity indicate a decrease of lake level around 1940. This shift seems to be also represented in the molecular approach as a decrease in the amount of diverse diatom DNA sequences found, what is probably caused by worse DNA preservation conditions at that time.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: DNA nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun; Cheng, Chuanding; Gonela, Ravikanth; Suryanarayanan, Shivashankar; Anabathula, Sathish; Dai, Kun; Haynie, Donald T.

    2006-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been a key building block in nanotechnology since the earliest work on what is now called DNA-templated self-assembly (Alivisatos et al 1996 Nature 382 609; Mirkin et al 1996 Nature 382 607; Braun et al 1998 Nature 391 775). A range of different nanoparticles and nanoclusters have been assembled on single DNA molecules for a variety of purposes (Braun et al 1998 Nature 391 775; Richter et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 536; Park et al 2002 Science 295 1503; Mirkin 2000 Inorg. Chem. 39 2258; Keren et al 2003 Science 302 1380). Electrically conductive silver (Braun et al 1998 Nature 391 775) and palladium (Richter et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 536) nanowires, for example, have been fabricated by DNA templating for the development of interconnection of nanoelectric elements, and field effect transistors have been built by assembly of a single carbon nanotube and DNA-templated nanowires (Keren et al 2003 Science 302 1380). DNA is well suited for nanowire assembly because of its size, well organized structure, and exquisite molecular-recognition-ability-specific base pairing. This property has been used to detect nucleic acids (Park et al 2002 Science 295 1503) and anthrax (Mirkin 2000 Inorg. Chem. 39 2258) with high sensitivity and specificity. Molecular recognition can also be used to localize nanowires in electronics. Various methods, for example molecular combing, electrophoretic stretching, and hydrodynamic stretching, have been developed to orient DNA molecules on a solid support. This review focuses on methods used to manipulate and metallize DNA in nanowire fabrication. A novel approach based on a single-stranded DNA template and molecular recognition is also discussed.

  9. The bacteriophage DNA packaging machine.

    PubMed

    Feiss, Michael; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    Large dsDNA bacteriophages and herpesviruses encode a powerful ATP-driven DNA-translocating machine that encapsidates a viral genome into a preformed capsid shell or prohead. The key components of the packaging machine are the packaging enzyme (terminase, motor) and the portal protein that forms the unique DNA entrance vertex of prohead. The terminase complex, comprised of a recognition subunit (small terminase) and an endonuclease/translocase subunit (large terminase), cuts viral genome concatemers. The terminase-viral DNA complex docks on the portal vertex, assembling a motor complex containing five large terminase subunits. The pentameric motor processively translocates DNA until the head shell is full with one viral genome. The motor cuts the DNA again and dissociates from the full head, allowing head-finishing proteins to assemble on the portal, sealing the portal, and constructing a platform for tail attachment. A body of evidence from molecular genetics and biochemical, structural, and biophysical approaches suggests that ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in the packaging motor (large terminase) power DNA motion. Various parts of the motor subunit, such as the ATPase, arginine finger, transmission domain, hinge, and DNA groove, work in concert to translocate about 2 bp of DNA per ATP hydrolyzed. Powerful single-molecule approaches are providing precise delineation of steps during each translocation event in a motor that has a speed as high as a millisecond/step. The phage packaging machine has emerged as an excellent model for understanding the molecular machines, given the mechanistic parallels between terminases, helicases, and numerous motor proteins. PMID:22297528

  10. DNA methylation in fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dowson, Christopher; O'Reilly, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Fibrosis is characterised by an exuberant wound healing response and the major cell type responsible is the myofibroblast. The myofibroblast is typified by excessive ECM production and contractile activity and is demarcated by alpha-smooth muscle actin expression. What has recently come to light is that the activation of the fibroblast to myofibroblast may be under epigenetic control, specifically methylation. Methylation of DNA is a conserved mechanism to precisely regulate gene expression in a specific context. Hypermethylation leads to gene repression and hypomethylation results in gene induction. Methylation abnormalities have recently been uncovered in fibrosis, both organ specific and widespread fibrosis. The fact that these methylation changes are rapid and reversible lends themselves amenable to therapeutic intervention. This review considers the role of methylation in fibrosis and the activation of the myofibroblasts and how this could be targeted for fibrosis. Fibrosis is of course currently intractable to therapeutics and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and is an urgent unmet clinical need. PMID:27346523

  11. Anomeric DNA quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Kolganova, Natalia A; Varizhuk, Anna M; Novikov, Roman A; Florentiev, Vladimir L; Pozmogova, Galina E; Borisova, Olga F; Shchyolkina, Anna K; Smirnov, Igor P; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Timofeev, Edward N

    2014-01-01

    Thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) is a 15-nt DNA oligomer that efficiently inhibits thrombin. It has been shown that TBA folds into an anti-parallel unimolecular G-quadruplex. Its three-dimensional chair-like structure consists of two G-tetrads connected by TT and TGT loops. TBA undergoes fast degradation by nucleases in vivo. To improve the nuclease resistance of TBA, a number of modified analogs have been proposed. Here, we describe anomeric modifications of TBA. Non-natural α anomers were used to replace selected nucleotides in the loops and core. Significant stabilization of the quadruplex was observed for the anomeric modification of TT loops at T4 and T13. Replacement of the core guanines either prevents quadruplex assembly or induces rearrangement in G-tetrads. It was found that the anticoagulant properties of chimeric aptamers could be retained only with intact TT loops. On the contrary, modification of the TGT loop was shown to substantially increase nuclease resistance of the chimeric aptamer without a notable disturbance of its anticoagulant activity. PMID:25483931

  12. Indexing Similar DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Songbo; Lam, T. W.; Sung, W. K.; Tam, S. L.; Yiu, S. M.

    To study the genetic variations of a species, one basic operation is to search for occurrences of patterns in a large number of very similar genomic sequences. To build an indexing data structure on the concatenation of all sequences may require a lot of memory. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to index highly similar sequences by taking advantage of the similarity among the sequences. To store r sequences with k common segments, our index requires only O(n + NlogN) bits of memory, where n is the total length of the common segments and N is the total length of the distinct regions in all texts. The total length of all sequences is rn + N, and any scheme to store these sequences requires Ω(n + N) bits. Searching for a pattern P of length m takes O(m + m logN + m log(rk)psc(P) + occlogn), where psc(P) is the number of prefixes of P that appear as a suffix of some common segments and occ is the number of occurrences of P in all sequences. In practice, rk ≤ N, and psc(P) is usually a small constant. We have implemented our solution and evaluated our solution using real DNA sequences. The experiments show that the memory requirement of our solution is much less than that required by BWT built on the concatenation of all sequences. When compared to the other existing solution (RLCSA), we use less memory with faster searching time.

  13. Ligation errors in DNA computing.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Y; Yoshinobu, T; Tanizawa, K; Kinoshita, K; Iwasaki, H

    1999-10-01

    DNA computing is a novel method of computing proposed by Adleman (1994), in which the data is encoded in the sequences of oligonucleotides. Massively parallel reactions between oligonucleotides are expected to make it possible to solve huge problems. In this study, reliability of the ligation process employed in the DNA computing is tested by estimating the error rate at which wrong oligonucleotides are ligated. Ligation of wrong oligonucleotides would result in a wrong answer in the DNA computing. The dependence of the error rate on the number of mismatches between oligonucleotides and on the combination of bases is investigated. PMID:10636043

  14. Theoretical and Experimental DNA Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Martyn

    This book provides a broad overview of the entire field of DNA computation, tracing its history and development. It contains detailed descriptions of all major theoretical models and experimental results to date, which are lacking in existing texts, and discusses potential future developments. It also provides a useful reference source for researchers and students, and an accessible introduction for people new to the field. The field of DNA computation has flourished since the publication of Adleman's seminal article, in which he demonstrated for the first time how a computation may be performed at a molecular level by performing standard operations on a tube of DNA strands.

  15. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  16. DNA UPTAKE BY TRANSFORMABLE BACTERIA

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    1999-09-07

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  17. DNA Uptake by Transformable Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1999-03-31

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  18. Self-similar mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, Nestor N; Glazier, James A

    2004-01-01

    We show that repeated sequences, like palindromes (local repetitions) and homologies between two different nucleotide sequences (motifs along the genome), compose a self-similar (fractal) pattern in mitochondrial DNA. This self-similarity comes from the looplike structures distributed along the genome. The looplike structures generate scaling laws in a pseudorandom DNA walk constructed from the sequence, called a Lévy flight. We measure the scaling laws from the generalized fractal dimension and singularity spectrum for mitochondrial DNA walks for 35 different species. In particular, we report characteristic loop distributions for mammal mitochondrial genomes. PMID:15371639

  19. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  20. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  1. Thermal trap for DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Mast, Christof B; Braun, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    The hallmark of living matter is the replication of genetic molecules and their active storage against diffusion. We implement both in the simple nonequilibrium environment of a temperature gradient. Convective flow both drives the DNA replicating polymerase chain reaction while concurrent thermophoresis accumulates the replicated 143 base pair DNA in bulk solution. The time constant for accumulation is 92 s while DNA is doubled every 50 s. The experiments explore conditions in pores of hydrothermal rock which can serve as a model environment for the origin of life. PMID:20482214

  2. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  3. Nanoelectronics of a DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.; Lyra, M. L.; Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the nanoelectronic properties of a double-strand quasiperiodic DNA molecule, modeled by a tight-binding effective Hamiltonian, which includes contributions from the nucleobasis system as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our theoretical approach makes use of Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, to investigate the electronic density of states, the electronic transmissivity, and the current-voltage characteristic curves of sequences of a DNA finite segment.We compared the electronic transport found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  4. Transcription rates in DNA brushes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Safran, S A

    2015-04-21

    We theoretically predict the rate of transcription (TX) in DNA brushes by introducing the concept of TX dipoles that takes into account the unidirectional motion of enzymes (RNAP) along DNA during transcription as correlated pairs of sources and sinks in the relevant diffusion equation. Our theory predicts that the TX rates dramatically change upon the inversion of the orientation of the TX dipoles relative to the substrate because TX dipoles modulate the concentrations of RNAP in the solution. Comparing our theory with experiments suggests that, in some cases, DNA chain segments are relatively uniformly distributed in the brush, in contrast to the parabolic profile expected for flexible polymer brushes. PMID:25736601

  5. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  6. Physical Interactions between Mcm10, DNA, and DNA Polymerase [alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Eric M.; Huang, Hao; Fanning, Ellen; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-10-21

    Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic protein required for the initiation and elongation phases of chromosomal replication. Specifically, Mcm10 is required for the association of several replication proteins, including DNA polymerase {alpha} (pol {alpha}), with chromatin. We showed previously that the internal (ID) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of Mcm10 physically interact with both single-stranded (ss) DNA and the catalytic p180 subunit of pol {alpha}. However, the mechanism by which Mcm10 interacts with pol {alpha} on and off DNA is unclear. As a first step toward understanding the structural details for these critical intermolecular interactions, x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy were used to map the binary interfaces between Mcm10-ID, ssDNA, and p180. The crystal structure of an Mcm10-ID {center_dot} ssDNA complex confirmed and extended our previous evidence that ssDNA binds within the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding-fold cleft of Mcm10-ID. We show using NMR chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence spectroscopy that p180 also binds to the OB-fold and that ssDNA and p180 compete for binding to this motif. In addition, we map a minimal Mcm10 binding site on p180 to a small region within the p180 N-terminal domain (residues 286-310). These findings, together with data for DNA and p180 binding to an Mcm10 construct that contains both the ID and CTD, provide the first mechanistic insight into how Mcm10 might use a handoff mechanism to load and stabilize pol {alpha} within the replication fork.

  7. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters for multiplexed fluorescent DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Changfeng; Zhang, Lei; Tan, Chaoliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Bo; Wang, Lianhui; Zhang, Hua

    2015-03-25

    Novel label-free/conjugation-free molecular beacons are designed based on DNA templated-silver nanoclusters for multiplexed DNA detection. The assay is implemented in solution, which makes it easy for the in-situ and real-time analysis. This study demonstrates a new method for multiplexd detection of biological molecules by using fluorescent Ag nanocluster-based molecular beacon probes. PMID:25491417

  8. [The effect of DNA supercoiling DNA on nucleosome structure].

    PubMed

    Sivolob, A V; Khrapunov, S N

    1991-01-01

    The circular DNA which contains nucleosomes and additional supercoils has been considered theoretically. The different possible effect of increased negative supercoiling on the nucleosome structure have been studied. According to the model proposed all supercoils in the nucleosome-containing circular DNA are realized as torsional deformations of the double helix. The free energy of both supercoiling (torsional deformations) and nucleosome stabilization have been taken into consideration to obtain the equation for free energy of nucleosome-containing circular DNA. The analysis of this equation and the experimental data by Garner et al. (II Psoc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 1987. P. 2620-2623) about the maximum amount of supercoiling obtained by DNA-topoisomerase II treatment of nucleosome-containing pBR322 plasmid has been performed. It has been shown that two possibilities are consistent with both the equation and experimental data. These are: (1) the increased supercoiling induces the torsional strains not only in linker regions but also in nucleosome DNA and thus supercoiling causes an instability on nucleosome structure; (2) increased supercoiling induces a structural change of nucleosome which is accompanied by nucleosome DNA unwinding and its transition into form with approximately 11 base pairs per turn of double helix. It has been evaluated that in the first case the average torsional rigidity of nucleosome DNA should be approximately 2.5 times as much and in the second case--much more than the rigidity of naked DNA. Both types of nucleosome structural changes may cause its transition to a potentially active state for transcription. It is suggested that increased supercoiling can be a switch mechanism of chromatin activation. PMID:1654518

  9. DNA-CNT nanowire networks for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Weizmann, Yossi; Chenoweth, David M; Swager, Timothy M

    2011-03-16

    The ability to detect biological analytes in a rapid, sensitive, operationally simple, and cost-effective manner will impact human health and safety. Hybrid biocatalyzed-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanowire-based detection methods offer a highly sensitive and specific platform for the fabrication of simple and effective conductometric devices. Here, we report a conductivity-based DNA detection method utilizing carbon nanotube-DNA nanowire devices and oligonucleotide-functionalized enzyme probes. Key to our sensor design is a DNA-linked-CNT wire motif, which forms a network of interrupted carbon nanotube wires connecting two electrodes. Sensing occurs at the DNA junctions linking CNTs, followed by amplification using enzymatic metalization leading to a conductimetric response. The DNA analyte detection limit is 10 fM with the ability to discriminate single, double, and triple base pair mismatches. DNA-CNT nanowires and device sensing gaps were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal Raman microscopy, supporting the enhanced conductometric response resulting from nanowire metallization. PMID:21341794

  10. Construction of DNA Hemicatenanes from Two Small Circular DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Claire; Strauss, François

    2015-01-01

    DNA hemicatenanes, one of the simplest possible junctions between two double stranded DNA molecules, have frequently been mentioned in the literature for their possible function in DNA replication, recombination, repair, and organization in chromosomes. They have been little studied experimentally, however, due to the lack of an appropriate method for their preparation. Here we have designed a method to build hemicatenanes from two small circular DNA molecules. The method involves, first, the assembly of two linear single strands and their circularization to form a catenane of two single stranded circles, and, second, the addition and base-pairing of the two single stranded circles complementary to the first ones, followed by their annealing using DNA topoisomerase I. The product was purified by gel electrophoresis and characterized. The arrangement of strands was as expected for a hemicatenane and clearly distinct from a full catenane. In addition, each circle was unwound by an average of half a double helical turn, also in excellent agreement with the structure of a hemicatenane. It was also observed that hemicatenanes are quickly destabilized by a single cut on either of the two strands passing inside the junction, strongly suggesting that DNA strands are able to slide easily inside the hemicatenane. This method should make it possible to study the biochemical properties of hemicatenanes and to test some of the hypotheses that have been proposed about their function, including a possible role for this structure in the organization of complex genomes in loops and chromosomal domains. PMID:25799010

  11. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  12. Synchronization of DNA array replication kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we discuss the features of the DNA replication kinetics at the case of multiplicity of simultaneously elongated DNA fragments. The interaction between replicated DNA fragments is carried out by free protons that appears at the every nucleotide attachment at the free end of elongated DNA fragment. So there is feedback between free protons concentration and DNA-polymerase activity that appears as elongation rate dependence. We develop the numerical model based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) for DNA elongation process with conditions pointed above and we study the possibility of the DNA polymerases movement synchronization. The results obtained numerically can be useful for DNA polymerase movement detection and visualization of the elongation process in the case of massive DNA replication, eg, under PCR condition or for DNA "sequencing by synthesis" sequencing devices evaluation.

  13. New insights on single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA library preparation for ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Wales, Nathan; Carøe, Christian; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Gamba, Cristina; Barnett, Ross; Samaniego, José Alfredo; Madrigal, Jazmín Ramos; Orlando, Ludovic; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    An innovative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method has sparked great interest among ancient DNA (aDNA) researchers, especially after reports of endogenous DNA content increases >20-fold in some samples. To investigate the behavior of this method, we generated ssDNA and conventional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) libraries from 23 ancient and historic plant and animal specimens. We found ssDNA library preparation substantially increased endogenous content when dsDNA libraries contained <3% endogenous DNA, but this enrichment is less pronounced when dsDNA preparations successfully recover short endogenous DNA fragments (mean size < 70 bp). Our findings can help researchers determine when to utilize the time- and resource-intensive ssDNA library preparation method. PMID:26651516

  14. Generation of supercoils in nicked and gapped DNA drives DNA unknotting and postreplicative decatenation

    PubMed Central

    Racko, Dusan; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Dorier, Julien; Burnier, Yannis; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Due to the helical structure of DNA the process of DNA replication is topologically complex. Freshly replicated DNA molecules are catenated with each other and are frequently knotted. For proper functioning of DNA it is necessary to remove all of these entanglements. This is done by DNA topoisomerases that pass DNA segments through each other. However, it has been a riddle how DNA topoisomerases select the sites of their action. In highly crowded DNA in living cells random passages between contacting segments would only increase the extent of entanglement. Using molecular dynamics simulations we observed that in actively supercoiled DNA molecules the entanglements resulting from DNA knotting or catenation spontaneously approach sites of nicks and gaps in the DNA. Type I topoisomerases, that preferentially act at sites of nick and gaps, are thus naturally provided with DNA–DNA juxtapositions where a passage results in an error-free DNA unknotting or DNA decatenation. PMID:26150424

  15. DNA Methylation and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Brim, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major cancers in the world and second death-causing cancer in the US. CRC development involves genetic and epigenetic alterations. Changes in DNA methylation status are believed to be involved at different stages of CRC. Promoter silencing via DNA methylation and hypomethylation of oncogenes alter genes’ expression, and can be used as a tool for the early detection of colonic lesions. DNA methylation use as diagnostic and prognostic marker has been described for many cancers including CRC. CpG Islands Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is one of the underlying CRC mechanisms. This review aims to define methylation signatures in CRC. The analysis of DNA methylation profile in combination with the pathological diagnosis would be useful in predicting CRC tumors’ evolution and their prognostic behavior. PMID:25580099

  16. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25596348

  17. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  18. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  19. Solvent resistant microfluidic DNA synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyi; Castrataro, Piero; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Quake, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    We fabricated a microfluidic DNA synthesizer out of perfluoropolyether (PFPE), an elastomer with excellent chemical compatibility which makes it possible to perform organic chemical reactions, and synthesized 20-mer oligonucleotides on chip. PMID:17180201

  20. Deciphering the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2015-09-10

    This year's Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award honors Evelyn Witkin and Stephen J. Elledge, two pioneers in elucidating the DNA damage response, whose contributions span more than 40 years. PMID:26359974

  1. Recombinant DNA means and method

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, B.L.; Mao, J.I.; Moir, D.T.; Taunton-Rigby, A.; Vovis, G.F.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a transformed living cell selected from the group consisting of fungi, yeast and bacteria, and containing genetic material derived from recombinant DNA material and coding for bovine rennin.

  2. Metastable Tight Knots in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Renner, C. Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Knotted structures can spontaneously occur in polymers such as DNA and proteins, and the formation of knots affects biological functions, mechanical strength and rheological properties. In this work, we calculate the equilibrium size distribution of trefoil knots in linear DNA using off-lattice simulations. We observe metastable knots on DNA, as predicted by Grosberg and Rabin. Furthermore, we extend their theory to incorporate the finite width of chains and show an agreement between our simulations and the modified theory for real chains. Our results suggest localized knots spontaneously occur in long DNA and the contour length in the knot ranges from 600 to 1800 nm. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 1335938).

  3. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  4. Antiparasitic Compounds That Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. David; Tanious, Farial A.; Mathis, Amanda; Tevis, Denise; Hall, James Edwin; Boykin, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Designed, synthetic heterocyclic diamidines have excellent activity against eukaryotic parasites that cause diseases such as sleeping sickness and leishmania and adversely affect millions of people each year. The most active compounds bind specifically and strongly in the DNA minor groove at AT sequences. The compounds enter parasite cells rapidly and appear first in the kinetoplast that contains the mitochondrial DNA of the parasite. With time the compounds are also generally seen in the cell nucleus but are not significantly observed in the cytoplasm. The kinetoplast decays over time and disappears from the mitochondria of treated cells. At this point the compounds begin to be observed in other regions of the cell, such as the acidocalcisomes. The cells typically die in 24–48 hours after treatment. Active compounds appear to selectively target extended AT sequences and induce changes in kinetoplast DNA minicircles that cause a synergistic destruction of the catenated kinetoplast DNA network and cell death. PMID:18343228

  5. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  6. When DNA Collides With Itself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Zubair; Riehn, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Long range interactions in large DNA molecules are typically modeled as self-avoiding random walks. While this is useful for understanding equilibrium configurations, dynamic behavior may include more complex polymer-polymer coupling. Here we explore the possibility of internal friction within hernias of DNA under nano-confinement and fluid flow. We study the rates at which DNA hernias form and recoil at various flow speeds and hernia sizes. The formation and recoil behaviors point to possible entanglement between two genetically distant regions of DNA as they flow in the same direction. To explore internal friction between two strands moving in opposite directions, we scan the two strands comprising the hernia as well as two independent molecules against each other. From these studies, we address the drag or friction forces on two molecules under confinement and compare to the analogous system of one nano-confined molecule.

  7. DNA charge transport within the cell.

    PubMed

    Grodick, Michael A; Muren, Natalie B; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-02-01

    The unique characteristics of DNA charge transport (CT) have prompted an examination of roles for this chemistry within a biological context. Not only can DNA CT facilitate long-range oxidative damage of DNA, but redox-active proteins can couple to the DNA base stack and participate in long-range redox reactions using DNA CT. DNA transcription factors with redox-active moieties such as SoxR and p53 can use DNA CT as a form of redox sensing. DNA CT chemistry also provides a means to monitor the integrity of the DNA, given the sensitivity of DNA CT to perturbations in base stacking as arise with mismatches and lesions. Enzymes that utilize this chemistry include an interesting and ever-growing class of DNA-processing enzymes involved in DNA repair, replication, and transcription that have been found to contain 4Fe-4S clusters. DNA repair enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters, that include endonuclease III (EndoIII), MutY, and DinG from bacteria, as well as XPD from archaea, have been shown to be redox-active when bound to DNA, share a DNA-bound redox potential, and can be reduced and oxidized at long-range via DNA CT. Interactions between DNA and these proteins in solution, in addition to genetics experiments within Escherichia coli, suggest that DNA-mediated CT can be used as a means of cooperative signaling among DNA repair proteins that contain 4Fe-4S clusters as a first step in finding DNA damage, even within cells. On the basis of these data, we can consider also how DNA-mediated CT may be used as a means of signaling to coordinate DNA processing across the genome. PMID:25606780

  8. DNA-PK is Involved in Repairing a Transient Surge of DNA BreaksInduced by Deceleration of DNA Replication.

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Martin, Melvenia M.; Torres, Michael J.; Gu,Cory; Pluth, Janice M.; DiBernardi, Maria A.; McDonald, Jeffrey S.; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2006-09-25

    ells that suffer substantial inhibition of DNA replication halt their cell cycle via a checkpoint response mediated by the PI3 kinases ATM and ATR. It is unclear how cells cope with milder replication insults, which are under the threshold for ATM and ATR activation. A third PI3 kinase, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), is also activated following replication inhibition, but the role DNA-PK might play in response to perturbed replication is unclear, since this kinase does not activate the signaling cascades involved in the S-phase checkpoint. Here we report that mild, transient drug-induced perturbation of DNA replication rapidly induced DNA breaks that promptly disappeared in cells that contained a functional DNA-PK whereas such breaks persisted in cells that were deficient in DNA-PK activity. After the initial transient burst of DNA breaks, cells with a functional DNA-PK did not halt replication and continued to synthesize DNA at a slow pace in the presence of replication inhibitors. In contrast, DNA-PK deficient cells subject to low levels of replication inhibition halted cell cycle progression via an ATR-mediated S-phase checkpoint. The ATM kinase was dispensable for the induction of the initial DNA breaks. These observations suggest that DNA-PK is involved in setting a high threshold for the ATR-Chkl-mediated S-phase checkpoint by promptly repairing DNA breaks that appear immediately following inhibition of DNA replication.

  9. A Drosophila complementary DNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Gerald M.; Hong, Ling; Brokstein, Peter; Evans-Holm, Martha; Frise, Erwin; Stapleton, Mark; Harvey, Damon A.

    2000-03-24

    Collections of nonredundant, full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for each of the model organisms and humans will be important resources for studies of gene structure and function. We describe a general strategy for producing such collections and its implementation, which so far has generated a set of cDNAs corresponding to over 40% of the genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

  10. Replicating Damaged DNA in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail. PMID:24296172

  11. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  12. Nonlinear focusing of DNA macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frumin, Leonid L.; Peltek, Sergey E.; Zilberstein, Gleb V.

    2001-08-01

    The present paper reports the nonlinear electrophoretic focusing techniques developed after an original idea by Chacron and Slater [Phys. Rev. E 56, 3436 (1997)]. Focusing of DNA molecules is achieved in an alternating nonuniform electric field, created in a wedge gel with hyperbolic boundaries. The fractions separated on such a wedge retained their rectilinear shape during the electrophoresis. Experiments with gel electrophoresis confirm the possibility of a noticeable nonlinear focusing of DNA molecules.

  13. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  14. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, which represent three of the most common neurodegenerative pathologies in humans. PMID:26255941

  15. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  16. Salmon redd identification using environmental DNA (eDNA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Laramie, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionThe purpose of this project was to develop a technique to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to distinguish between redds made by Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and redds made by Coho salmon (O. kisutch) and to distinguish utilized redds from test/abandoned redds or scours that have the appearance of redds. The project had two phases:Phase 1. Develop, test, and optimize a molecular assay for detecting and identifying Coho salmon DNA and differentiating it from Chinook salmon DNA.Phase 2. Demonstrate the efficacy of the technique.Collect and preserve water samples from the interstitial spaces of 10 known redds (as identified by expert observers) of each species and 10 gravel patches that do not include a redd of either species.Collect control samples from the water column adjacent to each redd to establish background eDNA levels.Analyze the samples using the developed molecular assays for Coho salmon (phase I) and Chinook salmon (Laramie and others, 2015).Evaluate whether samples collected from Chinook and Coho redds have significantly higher levels of eDNA of the respective species than background levels (that is, from gravel, water column).Evaluate whether samples collected from the interstitial spaces of gravel patches that are not redds are similar to background eDNA levels.The Sandy River is a large tributary of the Columbia River. The Sandy River meets the Columbia River approximately 23 km upstream of Portland, Oregon. The Sandy River Basin provides overlapping spawning habitat for both Chinook and Coho salmon.Samples provided by Portland Water Bureau for analysis were collected from the Bull Run River, Sixes Creek, Still Creek, Arrah Wanna Side Channel, and Side Channel 18.

  17. Coordinate expression of Escherichia coli dnaA and dnaN genes.

    PubMed

    Sako, T; Sakakibara, Y

    1980-01-01

    The defects of temperature-sensitive dnaA and dnaN mutants of Escherichia coli are complemented by a recombinant lambda phage, which carries the bacterial DNA segment composed of two EcoRI segments of 1.0 and 3.3 kilobases. Derivatives of the phage, which have an insertion segment of Tn3 in the dnaA gene, are much less active in expressing the dnaN gene function than the parent phage. The dnaN gene activity was determined as the efficiency of superinfecting phage to suppress loss of the viability of lambda lysogenic dnaN59 cells at the non-permissive temperature. Deletions that include the end of the dnaA gene distal to the dnaN gene also reduce the expression of the dnaN gene function. Deletion and insertion in the dnaN gene do not affect the expression of the dnaA gene function. The expression of the dnaN gene function by the dnaA- dnaN+ phages remains weak upon simultaneous infection with dnaA+ dnaN- phages. Thus the insertion and deletion of the dnaA gene influence in cis the expresion of the dnaN gene. We propose that the dnaA and dnaN genes constitute an operon, where the former is upstream to the latter. PMID:6449652

  18. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  19. Isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cheryl M

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells is a routine molecular biology laboratory technique with numerous downstream applications. The isolated DNA can be used as a template for PCR, cloning, and genotyping and to generate genomic DNA libraries. It can also be used for sequencing to detect mutations and other alterations, and for DNA methylation analyses. PMID:24011044

  20. DNA Fingerprinting in a Forensic Teaching Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Stacy A.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an experiment designed to provide students, in a classroom laboratory setting, a hands-on demonstration of the steps used in DNA forensic analysis by performing DNA extraction, DNA fingerprinting, and statistical analysis of the data. This experiment demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting is performed and how long it takes. It…

  1. DNA adsorption onto glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Krista Lynn

    Streaming potential measurements were performed on microspheres of silica, lime silicate (SLS) and calcium aluminate (CA) glasses containing silica and iron oxide (CASi and CAFe). The silicate based glasses exhibited acidic surfaces with isoelectric points (IEP) around a pH of 3 while the calcium aluminates displayed more basic surfaces with IEP ranging from 8--9.5. The surface of the calcium aluminate microspheres containing silica reacted with the background electrolyte, altering the measured zeta potential values and inhibiting electrolyte flow past the sample at ˜ pH 4 due to formation of a solid plug. DNA adsorption experiments were performed using the microspheres and a commercially available silicate based DNA isolation filter using a known quantity of DNA suspended in a chaotropic agent free 0.35 wt% Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) buffer solution. The microspheres and commercial filter were also used to isolate DNA from macrophage cells in the presence of chaotropic agents. UV absorbance at ˜260 nm and gel electrophoresis were used to quantify the amount and size of the DNA strands that adsorbed to the microsphere surfaces. In both experiments, the 43--106 microm CAFe microspheres adsorbed the largest quantity of DNA. However, the 43--106 microm SLS microspheres isolated more DNA from the cells than the <43 microm CAFe microspheres, indicating that microsphere size contributes to isolation ability. The UV absorbance of DNA at ˜260 nm was slightly altered due to the dissolution of the calcium aluminate glasses during the adsorption process. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) determined that calcium and aluminum ions leached from the CA and CAFe microsphere surfaces during these experiments. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the leached ions had no effect on the conformation of the DNA, and therefore would not be expected to interfere in downstream applications such as DNA replication. The 0.35 wt

  2. The Structure of DNA within Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Chad S.; Jas, Gouri S.; Choosakoonkriang, Sirirat; Koe, Gary S.; Smith, Janet G.; Middaugh, C. Russell

    2003-01-01

    The structure of DNA within CLDCs used for gene delivery is controversial. Previous studies using CD have been interpreted to indicate that the DNA is converted from normal B to C form in complexes. This investigation reexamines this interpretation using CD of model complexes, FTIR as well as Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to address this issue. CD spectra of supercoiled plasmid DNA undergo a significant loss of rotational strength in the signal near 275 nm upon interaction with either the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide or 1,2-dioleoyltrimethylammonium propane. This loss of rotational strength is shown, however, by both FTIR and Raman spectroscopy to occur within the parameters of the B-type conformation. Contributions of absorption flattening and differential scattering to the CD spectra of complexes are unable to account for the observed spectra. Model studies of the CD of complexes prepared from synthetic oligonucleotides of varying length suggest that significant reductions in rotational strength can occur within short stretches of DNA. Furthermore, some alteration in the hydrogen bonding of bases within CLDCs is indicated in the FTIR and Raman spectroscopy results. In addition, alterations in base stacking interactions as well as hydrogen bonding are suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. A global interpretation of all of the data suggests the DNA component of CLDCs remains in a variant B form in which base/base interactions are perturbed. PMID:12547792

  3. Mechanism of DNA loading by the DNA repair helicase XPD.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Diana; Petrovic-Stojanovska, Biljana; Penedo, J Carlos; White, Malcolm F; Naismith, James H

    2016-04-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH complex in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in DNA repair in the nucleotide excision repair pathway. XPD is a 5' to 3' helicase with an essential iron-sulfur cluster. Structural and biochemical studies of the monomeric archaeal XPD homologues have aided a mechanistic understanding of this important class of helicase, but several important questions remain open. In particular, the mechanism for DNA loading, which is assumed to require large protein conformational change, is not fully understood. Here, DNA binding by the archaeal XPD helicase fromThermoplasma acidophilumhas been investigated using a combination of crystallography, cross-linking, modified substrates and biochemical assays. The data are consistent with an initial tight binding of ssDNA to helicase domain 2, followed by transient opening of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains, allowing access to a second binding site on helicase domain 1 that directs DNA through the pore. A crystal structure of XPD fromSulfolobus acidocaldiariusthat lacks helicase domain 2 has an otherwise unperturbed structure, emphasizing the stability of the interface between the Arch and 4FeS domains in XPD. PMID:26896802

  4. The Sunscreen Octyl Methoxycinnamate Binds to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrell, Johannes; Vohra, Shikhar; Nordlund, T. M.

    2000-03-01

    Sunscreens are designed to prevent skin cancer by absorbing ultraviolet radiation from the sun before it gets to the DNA in skin cells. The purpose of this work is to determine whether or not octyl methoxycinnamate, an active ingredient in many sunscreens, will bind to DNA. If so, the sunscreen could transfer the energy it absorbed from the sun to the DNA and cause damage. To determine this, we prepared samples with varying concentrations of cinnamate added to herring sperm DNA, sonicating the mixture to disperse the hydrophobic sunscreen into solution. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the mixtures showed (i) much more sunscreen was dispersed into solution when DNA was present, and (ii) the spectra of both DNA and sunscreen differed from those of the separate solutions. We conclude that the octyl methoxycinnamate can indeed bind to DNA in aqueous solution. Energy transfer experiments from DNA to sunscreen and from sunscreen to 2-aminopurine- (a fluorescent DNA base) labeled DNA will be presented.

  5. Automated DNA extraction from pollen in honey.

    PubMed

    Guertler, Patrick; Eicheldinger, Adelina; Muschler, Paul; Goerlich, Ottmar; Busch, Ulrich

    2014-04-15

    In recent years, honey has become subject of DNA analysis due to potential risks evoked by microorganisms, allergens or genetically modified organisms. However, so far, only a few DNA extraction procedures are available, mostly time-consuming and laborious. Therefore, we developed an automated DNA extraction method from pollen in honey based on a CTAB buffer-based DNA extraction using the Maxwell 16 instrument and the Maxwell 16 FFS Nucleic Acid Extraction System, Custom-Kit. We altered several components and extraction parameters and compared the optimised method with a manual CTAB buffer-based DNA isolation method. The automated DNA extraction was faster and resulted in higher DNA yield and sufficient DNA purity. Real-time PCR results obtained after automated DNA extraction are comparable to results after manual DNA extraction. No PCR inhibition was observed. The applicability of this method was further successfully confirmed by analysis of different routine honey samples. PMID:24295710

  6. SA1 and TRF1 synergistically bind to telomeric DNA and promote DNA-DNA pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Pan, Hai; Parminder Kaur Team; Robert Riehn Team; Patricia Opresko Team; Jane Tao Team; Susan Smith Team

    Impaired telomere cohesion leads to increased aneuploidy and early onset of tumorigenesis. Cohesion is thought to occur through the entrapment of two DNA strands within tripartite cohesin ring(s), along with a fourth subunit (SA1/SA2). Surprisingly, cohesion rings are not essential for telomere cohesion, which instead requires SA1 and shelterin proteins including TRF1. However, neither this unique cohesion mechanism at telomeres or DNA-binding properties of SA1 is understood. Here, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging of quantum dot-labeled proteins on DNA we discover that while SA1 diffuses across multiple telomeric and non-telomeric regions, the diffusion mediated through its N-terminal domain is slower at telomeric regions. However, addition of TRF1 traps SA1 within telomeric regions, which form longer DNA-DNA pairing tracts than with TRF1 alone, as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Together, these experimental results and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest that TRF1 and SA1 synergistically interact with DNA to support telomere cohesion without cohesin rings.

  7. Priming DNA replication from triple helix oligonucleotides: possible threestranded DNA in DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Lestienne, Patrick P

    2011-01-01

    Triplex associate with a duplex DNA presenting the same polypurine or polypyrimidine-rich sequence in an antiparallel orientation. So far, triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are known to inhibit transcription, replication, and to induce mutations. A new property of TFO is reviewed here upon analysis of DNA breakpoint yielding DNA rearrangements; the synthesized sequence of the first direct repeat displays a skewed polypurine- rich sequence. This synthesized sequence can bind the second homologous duplex sequence through the formation of a triple helix, which is able to prime further DNA replication. In these case, the d(G)-rich Triple Helix Primers (THP) bind the homologous strand in a parallel manner, possibly via a RecA-like mechanism. This novel property is shared by all tested DNA polymerases: phage, retrovirus, bacteria, and human. These features may account for illegitimate initiation of replication upon single-strand breakage and annealing to a homologous sequence where priming may occur. Our experiments suggest that DNA polymerases can bind three instead of two polynucleotide strands in their catalytic centre. PMID:22229092

  8. Priming DNA Replication from Triple Helix Oligonucleotides: Possible Threestranded DNA in DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Lestienne, Patrick P.

    2011-01-01

    Triplex associate with a duplex DNA presenting the same polypurine or polypyrimidine-rich sequence in an antiparallel orientation. So far, triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are known to inhibit transcription, replication, and to induce mutations. A new property of TFO is reviewed here upon analysis of DNA breakpoint yielding DNA rearrangements; the synthesized sequence of the first direct repeat displays a skewed polypurine- rich sequence. This synthesized sequence can bind the second homologous duplex sequence through the formation of a triple helix, which is able to prime further DNA replication. In these case, the d(G)-rich Triple Helix Primers (THP) bind the homologous strand in a parallel manner, possibly via a RecA-like mechanism. This novel property is shared by all tested DNA polymerases: phage, retrovirus, bacteria, and human. These features may account for illegitimate initiation of replication upon single-strand breakage and annealing to a homologous sequence where priming may occur. Our experiments suggest that DNA polymerases can bind three instead of two polynucleotide strands in their catalytic centre. PMID:22229092

  9. DNA repair in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA repair is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all living beings. Genome size as well as the repertoire and abundance of DNA repair components may vary among prokaryotic species. The bacteria of the Mollicutes class feature a small genome size, absence of a cell wall, and a parasitic lifestyle. A small number of genes make Mollicutes a good model for a “minimal cell” concept. Results In this work we studied the DNA repair system of Mycoplasma gallisepticum on genomic, transcriptional, and proteomic levels. We detected 18 out of 22 members of the DNA repair system on a protein level. We found that abundance of the respective mRNAs is less than one per cell. We studied transcriptional response of DNA repair genes of M. gallisepticum at stress conditions including heat, osmotic, peroxide stresses, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin treatment, stationary phase and heat stress in stationary phase. Conclusions Based on comparative genomic study, we determined that the DNA repair system M. gallisepticum includes a sufficient set of proteins to provide a cell with functional nucleotide and base excision repair and mismatch repair. We identified SOS-response in M. gallisepticum on ciprofloxacin, which is a known SOS-inducer, tetracycline and heat stress in the absence of established regulators. Heat stress was found to be the strongest SOS-inducer. We found that upon transition to stationary phase of culture growth transcription of DNA repair genes decreases dramatically. Heat stress does not induce SOS-response in a stationary phase. PMID:24148612

  10. DIBER: protein, DNA or both?

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Bochtler, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    The program DIBER (an acronym for DNA and FIBER) requires only native diffraction data to predict whether a crystal contains protein, B-form DNA or both. In standalone mode, the classification is based on the cube root of the reciprocal unit-cell volume and the largest local average of diffraction intensities at 3.4 A resolution. In combined mode, the Phaser rotation-function score (for the 3.4 A shell and a canonical B-DNA search model) is also taken into account. In standalone (combined) mode, DIBER classifies 87.4 +/- 0.2% (90.2 +/- 0.3%) of protein, 69.1 +/- 0.3% (78.8 +/- 0.3%) of protein-DNA and 92.7 +/- 0.2% (90.0 +/- 0.2%) of DNA crystals correctly. Reliable predictions with a correct classification rate above 80% are possible for 36.8 +/- 1.0% (60.2 +/- 0.4%) of the protein, 43.6 +/- 0.5% (59.8 +/- 0.3%) of the protein-DNA and 83.3 +/- 0.3% (82.6 +/- 0.4%) of the DNA structures. Surprisingly, selective use of the diffraction data in the 3.4 A shell improves the overall success rate of the combined-mode classification. An open-source CCP4/CCP4i-compatible version of DIBER is available from the authors' website at http://www.iimcb.gov.pl/diber and is subject to the GNU Public License. PMID:20516617

  11. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  12. DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott; Cai, Hong

    2001-01-01

    DNA polymorphism identity determination using flow cytometry. Primers designed to be immobilized on microspheres are allowed to anneal to the DNA strand under investigation, and are extended by either DNA polymerase using fluorescent dideoxynucleotides or ligated by DNA ligase to fluorescent reporter oligonucleotides. The fluorescence of either the dideoxynucleotide or the reporter oligonucleotide attached to the immobilized primer is measured by flow cytometry, thereby identifying the nucleotide polymorphism on the DNA strand.

  13. Design and development of a long-travel positioning actuator and tandem constant force actuator safety system for the Hobby Eberly Telescope wide-field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollison, Nicholas T.; Mock, Jason R.; Soukup, Ian M.; Beets, Timothy A.; Good, John M.; Beno, Joseph H.; Kriel, Herman J.; Hinze, Sarah E.; Wardell, Douglas R.; Heisler, James T.

    2010-07-01

    The Wide Field Upgrade presents a five-fold increase in mass for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's* tracker system. The design of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope places the Prime Focus Instrument Package (PFIP) at a thirty-five degree angle from horizontal. The PFIP and its associated hardware have historically been positioned along this uphill axis (referred to as the telescope's Y-axis) by a single screw-type actuator. Several factors, including increased payload mass and design for minimal light obscuration, have led to the design of a new and novel configuration for the Y-axis screw-drive as part of the tracker system upgrade. Typical screw-drive designs in this load and travel class (approximately 50 kilonewtons traveling a distance of 4 meters) utilize a stationary screw with the payload translating with the moving nut component. The new configuration employs a stationary nut and translating roller screw affixed to the moving payload, resulting in a unique drive system design. Additionally, a second cable-actuated servo drive (adapted from a system currently in use on the Southern African Large Telescope) will operate in tandem with the screw-drive in order to significantly improve telescope safety through the presence of redundant load-bearing systems. Details of the mechanical design, analysis, and topology of each servo drive system are presented in this paper, along with discussion of the issues such a configuration presents in the areas of controls, operational and failure modes, and positioning accuracy. Findings and results from investigations of alternative telescope safety systems, including deformable crash barriers, are also included.

  14. DNA nanotechnology. Programming colloidal phase transitions with DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-02-01

    DNA-grafted nanoparticles have been called "programmable atom-equivalents": Like atoms, they form three-dimensional crystals, but unlike atoms, the particles themselves carry information (the sequences of the grafted strands) that can be used to "program" the equilibrium crystal structures. We show that the programmability of these colloids can be generalized to the full temperature-dependent phase diagram, not just the crystal structures themselves. We add information to the buffer in the form of soluble DNA strands designed to compete with the grafted strands through strand displacement. Using only two displacement reactions, we program phase behavior not found in atomic systems or other DNA-grafted colloids, including arbitrarily wide gas-solid coexistence, reentrant melting, and even reversible transitions between distinct crystal phases. PMID:25657244

  15. Engineered DNA polymerase improves PCR results for plastid DNA1

    PubMed Central

    Schori, Melanie; Appel, Maryke; Kitko, AlexaRae; Showalter, Allan M.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Secondary metabolites often inhibit PCR and sequencing reactions in extractions from plant material, especially from silica-dried and herbarium material. A DNA polymerase that is tolerant to inhibitors improves PCR results. • Methods and Results: A novel DNA amplification system, including a DNA polymerase engineered via directed evolution for improved tolerance to common plant-derived PCR inhibitors, was evaluated and PCR parameters optimized for three species. An additional 31 species were then tested with the engineered enzyme and optimized protocol, as well as with regular Taq polymerase. • Conclusions: PCR products and high-quality sequence data were obtained for 96% of samples for rbcL and 79% for matK, compared to 29% and 21% with regular Taq polymerase. PMID:25202519

  16. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J.

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  17. DNA damage tolerance by recombination: Molecular pathways and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2016-08-01

    Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, which are crucial to promote replication completion and to prevent fork breakage, a leading cause of genome instability. One mode of DDT uses translesion synthesis polymerases, which however can also introduce mutations. The other DDT mode involves recombination-mediated mechanisms, which are generally accurate. DDT occurs prevalently postreplicatively, but in certain situations homologous recombination is needed to restart forks. Fork reversal can function to stabilize stalled forks, but may also promote error-prone outcome when used for fork restart. Recent years have witnessed important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and DNA structures that mediate recombination-mediated damage-bypass and highlighted principles that regulate DDT pathway choice locally and temporally. In this review we summarize the current knowledge and paradoxes on recombination-mediated DDT pathways and their workings, discuss how the intermediate DNA structures may influence genome integrity, and outline key open questions for future research. PMID:27236213

  18. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  19. Abstractions for DNA circuit design

    PubMed Central

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Youssef, Simon; Cardelli, Luca; Phillips, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    DNA strand displacement techniques have been used to implement a broad range of information processing devices, from logic gates, to chemical reaction networks, to architectures for universal computation. Strand displacement techniques enable computational devices to be implemented in DNA without the need for additional components, allowing computation to be programmed solely in terms of nucleotide sequences. A major challenge in the design of strand displacement devices has been to enable rapid analysis of high-level designs while also supporting detailed simulations that include known forms of interference. Another challenge has been to design devices capable of sustaining precise reaction kinetics over long periods, without relying on complex experimental equipment to continually replenish depleted species over time. In this paper, we present a programming language for designing DNA strand displacement devices, which supports progressively increasing levels of molecular detail. The language allows device designs to be programmed using a common syntax and then analysed at varying levels of detail, with or without interference, without needing to modify the program. This allows a trade-off to be made between the level of molecular detail and the computational cost of analysis. We use the language to design a buffered architecture for DNA devices, capable of maintaining precise reaction kinetics for a potentially unbounded period. We test the effectiveness of buffered gates to support long-running computation by designing a DNA strand displacement system capable of sustained oscillations. PMID:21775321

  20. Conformational gating of DNA conductance

    PubMed Central

    Artés, Juan Manuel; Li, Yuanhui; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M. P.; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    DNA is a promising molecule for applications in molecular electronics because of its unique electronic and self-assembly properties. Here we report that the conductance of DNA duplexes increases by approximately one order of magnitude when its conformation is changed from the B-form to the A-form. This large conductance increase is fully reversible, and by controlling the chemical environment, the conductance can be repeatedly switched between the two values. The conductance of the two conformations displays weak length dependencies, as is expected for guanine-rich sequences, and can be fit with a coherence-corrected hopping model. These results are supported by ab initio electronic structure calculations that indicate that the highest occupied molecular orbital is more disperse in the A-form DNA case. These results demonstrate that DNA can behave as a promising molecular switch for molecular electronics applications and also provide additional insights into the huge dispersion of DNA conductance values found in the literature. PMID:26648400

  1. Statistical properties of DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing non-coding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, nucleotides thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene. We resolve the problem of the "non-stationarity" feature of the sequence of base pairs by applying a new algorithm called detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). We address the claim of Voss that there is no difference in the statistical properties of coding and non-coding regions of DNA by systematically applying the DFA algorithm, as well as standard FFT analysis, to every DNA sequence (33301 coding and 29453 non-coding) in the entire GenBank database. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work showing that the non-coding sequences have certain statistical features in common with natural and artificial languages. Specifically, we adapt to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts. These statistical properties of non-coding sequences support the possibility that non-coding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  2. The double life of DNA

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Cynthia T.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This issue of Current Opinions focuses on the dual role of DNA in life and death. In ancient Roman religion and myth, Janus is the god who looks both to the past and to the future. He guides the beginnings of life, its progression from one condition to another, and he foresees distant events. The analogy to DNA could not be stronger. Closely interacting with the environment, our basic genetics provides the origin of life, guides the quality of health with age, predicts disease, and ultimately foresees our end. A shared and deep interest in the origin of life has long prompted our desire to define aging, and, ultimately, to understand whether it can be reversed. In this special issue, the authors collectively review concepts of normative aging, DNA instability, DNA repair, the genetic contribution of age and diet to disease, and how the basic molecular transactions of DNA give it a double life that guides health and survival, as well as the transitions to death. PMID:25282314

  3. DNA methylation and cognitive aging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangru

    2015-01-01

    With ever-increasing elder population, the high incidence of age-related diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders has turned out to be a huge public concern. Especially the elders and their families dreadfully suffer from the learning, behavioral and cognitive impairments. The lack of effective therapies for such a horrible symptom makes a great demanding for biological mechanism study for cognitive aging. Epigenetics is an emerging field that broadens the dimensions of mammalian genome blueprint. It is, unlike genetics, not only inheritable but also reversible. Recent studies suggest that DNA methylation, one of major epigenetic mechanisms, plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerations and cognitive defects. In this review, the evolving knowledge of age-related cognitive functions and the potential DNA methylation mechanism of cognitive aging are discussed. That indicates the impairment of DNA methylation may be a crucial but reversible mechanism of behavioral and cognitive related neurodegeneration. The methods to examine the dynamics of DNA methylation patterns at tissue and single cell level and at the representative scale as well as the whole genome single base resolution are also briefly discussed. Importantly, the challenges of DNA methylation mechanism of cognitive aging research are brought up, and the possible solutions to tackle these difficulties are put forward. PMID:26015403

  4. DNA testing and domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Mellersh, Cathryn

    2012-02-01

    There are currently about 80 different DNA tests available for mutations that are associated with inherited disease in the domestic dog, and as the tools available with which to dissect the canine genome become increasingly sophisticated, this number can be expected to rise dramatically over the next few years. With unrelenting media pressure focused firmly on the health of the purebred domestic dog, veterinarians and dog breeders are turning increasingly to DNA tests to ensure the health of their dogs. It is ultimately the responsibility of the scientists who identify disease-associated genetic variants to make sensible choices about which discoveries are appropriate to develop into commercially available DNA tests for the lay dog breeder, who needs to balance the need to improve the genetic health of their breed with the need to maintain genetic diversity. This review discusses some of the factors that should be considered along the route from mutation discovery to DNA test and some representative examples of DNA tests currently available. PMID:22071879

  5. Nuclear entry of DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Nikta; Panté, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    DNA viruses undertake their replication within the cell nucleus, and therefore they must first deliver their genome into the nucleus of their host cells. Thus, trafficking across the nuclear envelope is at the basis of DNA virus infections. Nuclear transport of molecules with diameters up to 39 nm is a tightly regulated process that occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to the enormous diversity of virus size and structure, each virus has developed its own strategy for entering the nucleus of their host cells, with no two strategies alike. For example, baculoviruses target their DNA-containing capsid to the NPC and subsequently enter the nucleus intact, while the hepatitis B virus capsid crosses the NPC but disassembles at the nuclear side of the NPC. For other viruses such as herpes simplex virus and adenovirus, although both dock at the NPC, they have each developed a distinct mechanism for the subsequent delivery of their genome into the nucleus. Remarkably, other DNA viruses, such as parvoviruses and human papillomaviruses, access the nucleus through an NPC-independent mechanism. This review discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms used by DNA viruses to deliver their genome into the nucleus, and further presents the experimental evidence for such mechanisms. PMID:26029198

  6. Metal complex interactions with DNA.

    PubMed

    Pages, Benjamin J; Ang, Dale L; Wright, Elisé P; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2015-02-28

    Increasing numbers of DNA structures are being revealed using biophysical, spectroscopic and genomic methods. The diversity of transition metal complexes is also growing, as the unique contributions that transition metals bring to the overall structure of metal complexes depend on the various coordination numbers, geometries, physiologically relevant redox potentials, as well as kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics. The vast range of ligands that can be utilised must also be considered. Given this diversity, a variety of biological interactions is not unexpected. Specifically, interactions with negatively-charged DNA can arise due to covalent/coordinate or subtle non-coordinate interactions such as electrostatic attraction, groove binding and intercalation as well as combinations of all of these modes. The potential of metal complexes as therapeutic agents is but one aspect of their utility. Complexes, both new and old, are currently being utilised in conjunction with spectroscopic and biological techniques to probe the interactions of DNA and its many structural forms. Here we present a review of metal complex-DNA interactions in which several binding modes and DNA structural forms are explored. PMID:25427534

  7. A rapid DNA digestion system.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lung-Ming; Lin, Che-Hsin

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic DNA digestion system incorporating a high performance micro-mixer. Through the appropriate control of fixed and periodic switching DC electric fields, electrokinetic forces are established to mix the DNA and restriction enzyme samples and to drive them through the reaction column of the device. The experimental and numerical results show that a mixing performance of 98% can be achieved within a mixing channel of length 1.6 mm when a 150 V/cm driving voltage and a 5 Hz switching frequency are applied. The relationship between the mixing performance, switching frequency, and main applied electric field is derived. It is found that the optimal switching frequency depends upon the magnitude of the main applied electric field. The successful digestion of lambda-DNA using Eco RI restriction enzyme is demonstrated. The DNA-enzyme reaction is completed within 15 min in the proposed microfluidic system, compared to 50 min in a conventional large-scale system. Hence, the current device provides a valuable tool for rapid lambda-DNA digestion, while its mixer system delivers a simple yet effective solution for mixing problems in the micro-total-analysis-systems field. PMID:17195107

  8. Langevin Equation for DNA Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grych, David; Copperman, Jeremy; Guenza, Marina

    Under physiological conditions, DNA oligomers can contain well-ordered helical regions and also flexible single-stranded regions. We describe the site-specific motion of DNA with a modified Rouse-Zimm Langevin equation formalism that describes DNA as a coarse-grained polymeric chain with global structure and local flexibility. The approach has successfully described the protein dynamics in solution and has been extended to nucleic acids. Our approach provides diffusive mode analytical solutions for the dynamics of global rotational diffusion and internal motion. The internal DNA dynamics present a rich energy landscape that accounts for an interior where hydrogen bonds and base-stacking determine structure and experience limited solvent exposure. We have implemented several models incorporating different coarse-grained sites with anisotropic rotation, energy barrier crossing, and local friction coefficients that include a unique internal viscosity and our models reproduce dynamics predicted by atomistic simulations. The models reproduce bond autocorrelation along the sequence as compared to that directly calculated from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The Langevin equation approach captures the essence of DNA dynamics without a cumbersome atomistic representation.

  9. Electrochemical application of DNA biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascini, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Palchetti, I.; Marrazza, G.

    2001-09-01

    Disposable electrochemical DNA-based biosensors are reviewed; they have been used for the determination of low- molecular weight compounds with affinity for nucleic acids and for the detection of hybridization reaction. The first application is related to the molecular interaction between surface-linked DNA and pollutants or drugs, in order to develop a simple device for rapid screening of toxic compounds. The determination of such compounds was measured by their effect simple device for rapid screening of toxic compounds. The determination of such compounds was measured by their effect on the oxidation signal of the guanine peak of calf thymus DNA immobilized on the electrode surface and investigated by chronopotentiometric or voltammetric analysis. Applicability to river and wastewater sample is demonstrated. Moreover, disposable electrochemical sensors for the detection of a specific sequence of DNA were realized by immobilizing synthetic single-stranded oligonucleotides onto a graphite screen-printed electrode. The probes because hybridized with different concentrations of complementary sequences present in the sample. The hybrids formed on the electrode surface were evaluated by chronopotentiometric analysis using daunomycin as the indicator of the hybridization reaction. The hybridization was also performed using real samples. Application to apolipoprotein E is described, in this case samples have to be amplified by PCR and then analyzed by the DNA biosensor. The extension of such procedures to samples of environmental interest or to contamination of food is discussed.

  10. Statistical properties of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.-K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-02-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genese containing non-coding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range - indeed, nucleotides thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene. We resolve the problem of the “non-stationarity” feature of the sequence of base pairs by applying a new algorithm called detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). We address the claim of Voss that there is no difference in the statistical properties of coding and non-coding regions of DNA by systematically applying the DFA algorithm, as well as standard FFT analysis, to every DNA sequence (33 301 coding and 29 453 non-coding) in the entire GenBank database. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work showing that the non-coding sequences have certain statistical features in common with natural and artificial languages. Specifically, we adapt to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts. These statistical properties of non-coding sequences support the possibility that non-coding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  11. Conformational gating of DNA conductance.

    PubMed

    Artés, Juan Manuel; Li, Yuanhui; Qi, Jianqing; Anantram, M P; Hihath, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    DNA is a promising molecule for applications in molecular electronics because of its unique electronic and self-assembly properties. Here we report that the conductance of DNA duplexes increases by approximately one order of magnitude when its conformation is changed from the B-form to the A-form. This large conductance increase is fully reversible, and by controlling the chemical environment, the conductance can be repeatedly switched between the two values. The conductance of the two conformations displays weak length dependencies, as is expected for guanine-rich sequences, and can be fit with a coherence-corrected hopping model. These results are supported by ab initio electronic structure calculations that indicate that the highest occupied molecular orbital is more disperse in the A-form DNA case. These results demonstrate that DNA can behave as a promising molecular switch for molecular electronics applications and also provide additional insights into the huge dispersion of DNA conductance values found in the literature. PMID:26648400

  12. DNA repair in cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.C.; Parsons, S.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1983-07-01

    Most of our understanding of DNA repair mechanisms in human cells has come from the study of these processes in cultured fibroblasts. The unique properties of keratinocytes and their pattern of terminal differentiation led us to a comparative examination of their DNA repair properties. The relative repair capabilities of the basal cells and the differentiated epidermal keratinocytes as well as possible correlations of DNA repair capacity with respect to age of the donor have been examined. In addition, since portions of human skin are chronically exposed to sunlight, the repair response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (254 nm) when the cells are conditioned by chronic low-level UV irradiation has been assessed. The comparative studies of DNA repair in keratinocytes from infant and aged donors have revealed no significant age-related differences for repair of UV-induced damage to DNA. Sublethal UV conditioning of cells from infant skin had no appreciable effect on either the repair or normal replication response to higher, challenge doses of UVL. However, such conditioning resulted in attenuated repair in keratinocytes from adult skin after UV doses above 25 J/m2. In addition, a surprising enhancement in replication was seen in conditioned cells from adult following challenge UV doses.

  13. Micromanipulation Study of DNA, DNA-protein Interactions, and Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John F.

    2002-03-01

    Physical - and to a large degree mechanical - properties of nucleic acids and proteins are essential to their functions in living cells. Therefore understanding the micromechanics of biomolecules is important to understanding cell machinery. I will review the rapid progress that has been made over the last decade in studying physical properties of single DNA molecules using micromanipulation techniques, and the future research directions for this field. I will then discuss how our lab has started to study whole chromosomes from cells with micromanipulation techniques. I focus on the use of in-situ enzyme reactions to show that DNA itself is the contiguous load-bearing element of the folded chromosome.

  14. Replication of linear duplex DNA in vitro with bacteriophage T5 DNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, R. K.; Das, S. K.; Allison, D. P.; Roop, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    Two sets of experiments are presented that attempt to contribute to understanding the mechanisms of DNA replication. The specific areas discussed are fidelity of DNA replication and initiation of replication of duplex DNA. (ACR)

  15. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  16. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  17. High resolution optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baday, Murat

    Many types of diseases including cancer and autism are associated with copy-number variations in the genome. Most of these variations could not be identified with existing sequencing and optical DNA mapping methods. We have developed Multi-color Super-resolution technique, with potential for high throughput and low cost, which can allow us to recognize more of these variations. Our technique has made 10--fold improvement in the resolution of optical DNA mapping. Using a 180 kb BAC clone as a model system, we resolved dense patterns from 108 fluorescent labels of two different colors representing two different sequence-motifs. Overall, a detailed DNA map with 100 bp resolution was achieved, which has the potential to reveal detailed information about genetic variance and to facilitate medical diagnosis of genetic disease.

  18. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  19. Mosaic organization of DNA nucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Long-range power-law correlations have been reported recently for DNA sequences containing noncoding regions. We address the question of whether such correlations may be a trivial consequence of the known mosaic structure ("patchiness") of DNA. We analyze two classes of controls consisting of patchy nucleotide sequences generated by different algorithms--one without and one with long-range power-law correlations. Although both types of sequences are highly heterogenous, they are quantitatively distinguishable by an alternative fluctuation analysis method that differentiates local patchiness from long-range correlations. Application of this analysis to selected DNA sequences demonstrates that patchiness is not sufficient to account for long-range correlation properties.

  20. Graphene Nanopres for DNA Fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, J. T.; Schuller, Ivan K.; di Ventra, M.; Wikfeldt, K. T.

    2013-03-01

    The recent progress in nanopore experiments with transverse current is important for the development of fast, accurate and cheap finger-printing techniques for single nucleotide. Despite its enormous potential for the next generation DNA sequencing technology, the presence of large noise in the temporal spectrum of transverse current remains a big challenge for getting highly accurate interpretation of data. In this paper we present our abinitio calculations, and propose graphene based device for DNA fingerprinting. We calculate transmission current through graphene for each DNA base (A,C,G,T). As shown in our work, a proper time-series analysis of a signal provides a higher quality information in identifying single bio-molecule is translocating through the nanopores. This work is supported by LANL, Nordita, US DOE, AFOSR, and NIH.

  1. Stacking interactions and DNA intercalation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Shen; Cooper, Valentino R; Thonhauser, Prof. Timo; Lundqvist, Prof. Bengt I.; Langreth, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between stacking interactions and the intercalation of proflavine and ellipticine within DNA is investigated using a nonempirical van der Waals density functional for the correlation energy. Our results, employing a binary stack model, highlight fundamental, qualitative differences between base-pair base-pair interactions and that of the stacked intercalator base pair system. Most notable result is the paucity of torque which so distinctively defines the Twist of DNA. Surprisingly, this model, when combined with a constraint on the twist of the surrounding base-pair steps to match the observed unwinding of the sugar-phosphate backbone, was sufficient for explaining the experimentally observed proflavine intercalator configuration. Our extensive mapping of the potential energy surface of base-pair intercalator interactions can provide valuable information for future nonempirical studies of DNA intercalation dynamics.

  2. Simulation of DNA Supercoil Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ivenso, Ikenna D; Lillian, Todd D

    2016-05-24

    Several recent single-molecule experiments observe the response of supercoiled DNA to nicking endonucleases and topoisomerases. Typically in these experiments, indirect measurements of supercoil relaxation are obtained by observing the motion of a large micron-sized bead. The bead, which also serves to manipulate DNA, experiences significant drag and thereby obscures supercoil dynamics. Here we employ our discrete wormlike chain model to bypass experimental limitations and simulate the dynamic response of supercoiled DNA to a single strand nick. From our simulations, we make three major observations. First, extension is a poor dynamic measure of supercoil relaxation; in fact, the linking number relaxes so fast that it cannot have much impact on extension. Second, the rate of linking number relaxation depends upon its initial partitioning into twist and writhe as determined by tension. Third, the extensional response strongly depends upon the initial position of plectonemes. PMID:27224483

  3. DNA detection by THz pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Chernev, A. L.; Bagraev, N. T.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Emelyanov, A. K.; Dubina, M. V.

    2015-07-15

    DNA semiconductor detection and sequencing is considered to be the most promising approach for future discoveries in genome and proteome research which is dramatically dependent on the challenges faced by semiconductor nanotechnologies. DNA pH-sensing with ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) is well-known to be a successfully applied electronic platform for genetic research. However this method lacks fundamentally in chemical specificity. Here we develop the first ever silicon nanosandwich pump device, which provides both the excitation of DNA fragments’ self-resonant modes and the feedback for current-voltage measurements at room temperature. This device allows direct detection of singlestranded label-free oligonucleotides by measuring their THz frequency response in aqueous solution. These results provide a new insight into the nanobioelectronics for the future real-time technologies of direct gene observations.

  4. Apparatus for improved DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1996-05-07

    This invention is a means for the rapid sequencing of DNA samples. More specifically, it consists of a new design direct blotting electrophoresis unit. The DNA sequence is deposited on a membrane attached to a rotating drum. Initial data compaction is facilitated by the use of a machined multi-channeled plate called a ribbon channel plate. Each channel is an isolated mini gel system much like a gel filled capillary. The system as a whole, however, is in a slab gel like format with the advantages of uniformity and easy reusability. The system can be used in different embodiments. The drum system is unique in that after deposition the drum rotates the deposited DNA into a large non-buffer open space where processing and detection can occur. The drum can also be removed in toto to special workstations for downstream processing, multiplexing and detection. 18 figs.

  5. Apparatus for improved DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a means for the rapid sequencing of DNA samples. More specifically, it consists of a new design direct blotting electrophoresis unit. The DNA sequence is deposited on a membrane attached to a rotating drum. Initial data compaction is facilitated by the use of a machined multi-channeled plate called a ribbon channel plate. Each channel is an isolated mini gel system much like a gel filled capillary. The system as a whole, however, is in a slab gel like format with the advantages of uniformity and easy reusability. The system can be used in different embodiments. The drum system is unique in that after deposition the drum rotates the deposited DNA into a large non-buffer open space where processing and detection can occur. The drum can also be removed in toto to special workstations for downstream processing, multiplexing and detection.

  6. Modeling Inhomogeneous DNA Replication Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Michel G.; Norio, Paolo; Bechhoefer, John

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited. PMID:22412853

  7. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  8. The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Korn, D.; Wang, T.S.F. )

    1988-08-25

    The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase {alpha} was assessed by immunological and molecular genetic approaches. Four anti-human KB cell DNA polymerase {alpha} monoclonal antibodies were tested for their ability to recognize a phylogenetically broad array of eukaryotic DNA polymerases. While the single non-neutralizing antibody used in this study recognizes higher mammalian (human, simian, canine, and bovine) polymerases only, three neutralizing antibodies exhibit greater, but variable, extents of cross-reactivity among vertebrate species. Genomic Southern hybridization studies with the cDNA of the human DNA polymerase {alpha} catalytic polypeptide identify the existence of many consensus DNA sequences within the DNA polymerase genes of vertebrate, invertebrate, plant and unicellular organisms. These findings illustrate the differential evolutionary conservation of four unique epitopes on DNA sequences, presumably reflective of critical functional domains, in the DNA polymerase genes from a broad diversity of living forms.

  9. Fundamental research on scalable DNA molecular computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sixue

    Beginning with the ground-breaking work on DNA computation by Adleman in 1994 [2], the idea of using DNA molecules to perform computations has been explored extensively. In this thesis, a computation based on a scalable DNA neural network was discussed and a neuron model was partially implemented using DNA molecules. In order to understand the behavior of short DNA strands in a polyacrylamide gel, we have measured the mobilities of various short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) shorter than 100 bases. We found that sufficiently short lengths of ssDNA had a higher mobility than same lengths of dsDNA, with a crossover length Lx at which the mobilities are equal. The crossover length decreases approximately linearly with polyacrylamide gel acrylamide concentration. At the same time, the influence of DNA structure on its mobility was studied and the effect of single-stranded overhangs on dsDNA was discussed. The idea to make a scalable DNA neural network was discussed. To prepare our basis vector DNA oligomers, a 90 base DNA template with 50 base random strand in the middle and two 20 base primers on the ends was designed and purchased. By a series of dilutions, we obtained several aliquots, containing only 30 random sequence molecules each. These were amplified to roughly 5 pico mole quantities by 38 cycles of PCR with hot start DNA polymerase. We then used asymmetric PCR followed by polyacrylamide gel purification to get the necessary single-stranded basis vectors (ssDNA) and their complements. We tested the suitability of this scheme by adding two vectors formed from different linear of the basis vectors. The full scheme for DNA neural network computation was tested using two determinate ssDNA strands. We successfully transformed an input DNA oligomer to a different output oligomer using the polymerase reaction required by the proposed DNA neural network algorithm. Isothermal linear amplification was used to obtain a sufficient quantity of

  10. Nanopore DNA sequencing with MspA.

    PubMed

    Derrington, Ian M; Butler, Tom Z; Collins, Marcus D; Manrao, Elizabeth; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Niederweis, Michael; Gundlach, Jens H

    2010-09-14

    Nanopore sequencing has the potential to become a direct, fast, and inexpensive DNA sequencing technology. The simplest form of nanopore DNA sequencing utilizes the hypothesis that individual nucleotides of single-stranded DNA passing through a nanopore will uniquely modulate an ionic current flowing through the pore, allowing the record of the current to yield the DNA sequence. We demonstrate that the ionic current through the engineered Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A, MspA, has the ability to distinguish all four DNA nucleotides and resolve single-nucleotides in single-stranded DNA when double-stranded DNA temporarily holds the nucleotides in the pore constriction. Passing DNA with a series of double-stranded sections through MspA provides proof of principle of a simple DNA sequencing method using a nanopore. These findings highlight the importance of MspA in the future of nanopore sequencing. PMID:20798343

  11. Nanopore DNA sequencing with MspA

    PubMed Central

    Derrington, Ian M.; Butler, Tom Z.; Collins, Marcus D.; Manrao, Elizabeth; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Niederweis, Michael; Gundlach, Jens H.

    2010-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing has the potential to become a direct, fast, and inexpensive DNA sequencing technology. The simplest form of nanopore DNA sequencing utilizes the hypothesis that individual nucleotides of single-stranded DNA passing through a nanopore will uniquely modulate an ionic current flowing through the pore, allowing the record of the current to yield the DNA sequence. We demonstrate that the ionic current through the engineered Mycobacterium smegmatis porin A, MspA, has the ability to distinguish all four DNA nucleotides and resolve single-nucleotides in single-stranded DNA when double-stranded DNA temporarily holds the nucleotides in the pore constriction. Passing DNA with a series of double-stranded sections through MspA provides proof of principle of a simple DNA sequencing method using a nanopore. These findings highlight the importance of MspA in the future of nanopore sequencing. PMID:20798343

  12. Fabricating nanoscale DNA patterns with gold nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulin; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Taggart, David K; Halpern, Aaron R; Penner, Reginald M; Corn, Robert M

    2010-04-15

    Surface patterns of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) consisting of nanoscale lines as thin as 40 nm were fabricated on polymer substrates for nanotechnology and bioaffinity sensing applications. Large scale arrays (with areas up to 4 cm(2)) of ssDNA "nanolines" were created on streptavidin-coated polymer (PDMS) surfaces by transferring biotinylated ssDNA from a master pattern of gold nanowires attached to a glass substrate. The gold nano-wires were first formed on the glass substrate by the process of lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE), and then "inked" with biotinylated ssDNA by hybridization adsorption to a thiol-modified ssDNA monolayer attached to the gold nanowires. The transferred ssDNA nanolines were capable of hybridizing with ssDNA from solution to form double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) patterns; a combination of fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the dsDNA nanoline arrays. To demonstrate the utility of these surfaces for biosensing, optical diffraction measurements of the hybridization adsorption of DNA-coated gold nanoparticles onto the ssDNA nanoline arrays were used to detect a specific target sequence of unlabeled ssDNA in solution. PMID:20337428

  13. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes producing human phospholipase inhibitor polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, B.P.; Pepinsky, R.B.; Garwin, J.L.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes a recombinant DNA molecule. In comprises a DNA sequence coding for a phospholopase inhibitor polypeptide and being selected from the group consisting of: the cDNA insert of ALC, DNA sequences which code on expression for a phospholopase inhibitor, and DNA sequences which are degenerate as a result of the genetic code to either of the foregoing DNA sequences and which code on expression for a phospholipase inhibitor.

  14. Repetitive DNA in eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Olmo, Ettore; Heslop-Harrison, J S Pat

    2015-09-01

    Repetitive DNA--sequence motifs repeated hundreds or thousands of times in the genome--makes up the major proportion of all the nuclear DNA in most eukaryotic genomes. However, the significance of repetitive DNA in the genome is not completely understood, and it has been considered to have both structural and functional roles, or perhaps even no essential role. High-throughput DNA sequencing reveals huge numbers of repetitive sequences. Most bioinformatic studies focus on low-copy DNA including genes, and hence, the analyses collapse repeats in assemblies presenting only one or a few copies, often masking out and ignoring them in both DNA and RNA read data. Chromosomal studies are proving vital to examine the distribution and evolution of sequences because of the challenges of analysis of sequence data. Many questions are open about the origin, evolutionary mode and functions that repetitive sequences might have in the genome. Some, the satellite DNAs, are present in long arrays of similar motifs at a small number of sites, while others, particularly the transposable elements (DNA transposons and retrotranposons), are dispersed over regions of the genome; in both cases, sequence motifs may be located at relatively specific chromosome domains such as centromeres or subtelomeric regions. Here, we overview a range of works involving detailed characterization of the nature of all types of repetitive sequences, in particular their organization, abundance, chromosome localization, variation in sequence within and between chromosomes, and, importantly, the investigation of their transcription or expression activity. Comparison of the nature and locations of sequences between more, and less, related species is providing extensive information about their evolution and amplification. Some repetitive sequences are extremely well conserved between species, while others are among the most variable, defining differences between even closely relative species. These data suggest

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Evolution in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen D.; Sage, Richard D.; Prager, Ellen M.; Ritte, Uzi; Wilson, Allan C.

    1983-01-01

    This study extends knowledge of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity in mice to include 208 animals belonging to eight species in the subgenus Mus. Highly purified mtDNA from each has been subjected to high-resolution restriction mapping with respect to the known sequence of one mouse mtDNA. Variation attributed to base substitutions was encountered at about 200 of the 300 cleavage sites examined, and a length mutation was located in or near the displacement loop. The variability of different functional regions in this genome was as follows, from least to most: ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, known proteins, displacement loop and unidentified reading frames.—Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the utility of the Sage and Marshall revision of mouse classification, according to which there are at least four species of commensal mice and three species of aboriginal mice in the complex that was formerly considered to be one species. The most thoroughly studied of these species is Mus domesticus, the house mouse of Western Europe and the Mediterranean region, which is the mitochondrial source of all 50 of the laboratory strains examined and of the representatives of wild house mice introduced by Europeans to North and South America during the past few hundred years.—The level of mtDNA variation among wild representatives of (M. musculus) and several other mammalian species. By contrast, among the many laboratory strains that are known or suspected to stem from the pet mouse trade, there is little interstrain variation, most strains having the "old inbred" type of domesticus mtDNA, whose frequency in the 145 wild mice examined is low, about 0.04. Also notable is the apparent homogeneity of mtDNA in domesticus races that have fixed six or more fused chromosomes and the close relationship of some of these mtDNAs to those of karyotypically normal mice.—In addition, this paper discusses fossil and other evidence for the view that in mice, as in many other mammals, the average

  16. Molecularly Regulated Reversible DNA Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Niancao; Shi, Xuechen; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Natural polymers are synthesized and decomposed under physiological conditions. However, it is challenging to develop synthetic polymers whose formation and reversibility can be both controlled under physiological conditions. Here we show that both linear and branched DNA polymers can be synthesized via molecular hybridization in aqueous solutions, on the particle surface, and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) without the involvement of any harsh conditions. More importantly, these polymers can be effectively reversed to dissociate under the control of molecular triggers. Since nucleic acids can be conjugated with various molecules or materials, we anticipate that molecularly regulated reversible DNA polymerization holds potential for broad biological and biomedical applications. PMID:27100911

  17. Early Events of DNA Photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a leading external hazard to the integrity of DNA. Exposure to UV radiation triggers a cascade of chemical reactions, and many molecular products (photolesions) have been isolated that are potentially dangerous for the cellular system. The early steps that take place after UV absorption by DNA have been studied by ultrafast spectroscopy. The review focuses on the evolution of excited electronic states, the formation of photolesions, and processes suppressing their formation. Emphasis is placed on lesions involving two thymine bases, such as the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, the (6-4) lesion, and its Dewar valence isomer.

  18. Supercoiling in DNA and chromatin☆

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nick; Allan, James

    2014-01-01

    Supercoiling is a fundamental property of DNA and chromatin. It is modulated by polymerase and topoisomerase activities and, through regulated constraint, by DNA/chromatin binding proteins. As a non-covalent and elusive topological modification, supercoiling has proved intractable to research despite being a crucial regulator of nuclear structure and function. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the formation, regulation and organisation of supercoiling domains in vivo, and reinforce the prospect that the propagation of supercoiling can influence local and global chromatin structure. However, to further our understanding the development of new experimental tools and models are required to better dissect the mechanics of this key topological regulator. PMID:24584092

  19. Detection of Damaged DNA Bases by DNA Glycosylase Enzymes†

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Stivers, James T.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental and shared process in all forms of life is the use of DNA glycosylase enzymes to excise rare damaged bases from genomic DNA. Without such enzymes, the highly-ordered primary sequences of genes would rapidly deteriorate. Recent structural and biophysical studies are beginning to reveal a fascinating multistep mechanism for damaged base detection that begins with short-range sliding of the glycosylase along the DNA chain in a distinct conformation we refer to as the search complex (SC). Sliding is frequently punctuated by the formation of a transient “interrogation” complex (IC) where the enzyme extrahelically inspects both normal and damaged bases in an exosite pocket that is distant from the active site. When normal bases are presented in the exosite, the IC rapidly collapses back to the SC, while a damaged base will efficiently partition forward into the active site to form the catalytically competent excision complex (EC). Here we review the unique problems associated with enzymatic detection of rare damaged DNA bases in the genome, and emphasize how each complex must have specific dynamic properties that are tuned to optimize the rate and efficiency of damage site location. PMID:20469926

  20. DNA Polymorphism Among American Watermelon Cultivars Based on DNA Methylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    American watermelon heirlooms are diverse in their growth habits, fruit qualities and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Wide ranging DNA marker tools resolved a narrow molecular diversity among these collections. The current research explored additional insights such as extent of diversity a...

  1. Dark States in Single DNA Bases and DNA Base Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Bern; Hare, Patrick M.; Middleton, Chris T.

    2009-06-01

    DNA is vulnerable to photochemical modification by UV light. The excited electronic states that initiate DNA damage have been difficult to characterize due to their ultrashort lifetimes, and most excitations in single DNA bases decay to the electronic ground state in hundreds of femtoseconds. Although many workers have now located conical intersections between various electronic states of the nucleobases, there is still confusion over the precise dynamics that lead to deactivation. This is especially true for the pyrimidine bases where the initial Franck-Condon population bifurcates with some molecules decaying to the ground state and others relaxing to a relatively long-lived ^1nπ* state. Results from UV/UV and UV/mid-IR transient absorption experiments will be presented that illustrate these dual decay pathways. Evidence suggests that the ^1nπ* state mediates intersystem crossing to the triplet state. Finally, current understanding of how these single-base decay pathways are modified by interactions in DNA polymers will be discussed.

  2. [The identification of mouse cloned SFA DNA].

    PubMed

    Yi, Ning; Wu, Weng Qing; Ni, Zu Mei; Shi, Lu Ji

    2002-12-01

    For some basic investigation and the construction of artificial chromosomes, cloned centromeric DNAs identified on a firm ground are required. Thus, in the present work a preliminary screened clone of 13.5 kb DNA, 6# clone, form a mouse centromeric library contructed previously in our library was futher investigated by FISH and PCR. It was found that mouse 6# cloned SFA DNA, as shown by FISH is a fragment of mouse centromeric DNA. Evidence was also observed that 6# cloned SFA DNA consists of mouse minor satellite DNA and other DNA sequences. PMID:15346991

  3. DNA modifications in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaehoon; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a crucial epigenetic mark in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-inactivation, chromosomal stability and suppressing parasitic DNA elements. DNA methylation in neurons has also been suggested to play important roles for mammalian neuronal functions, and learning and memory. In this review, we first summarize recent discoveries and fundamental principles of DNA modifications in the general epigenetics field. We then describe the profiles of different DNA modifications in the mammalian brain genome. Finally, we discuss roles of DNA modifications in mammalian brain development and function. PMID:25135973

  4. Towards modeling DNA sequences as automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Christian; Farmer, Doyne

    1984-01-01

    We seek to describe a starting point for modeling the evolution and role of DNA sequences within the framework of cellular automata by discussing the current understanding of genetic information storage in DNA sequences. This includes alternately viewing the role of DNA in living organisms as a simple scheme and as a complex scheme; a brief review of strategies for identifying and classifying patterns in DNA sequences; and finally, notes towards establishing DNA-like automata models, including a discussion of the extent of experimentally determined DNA sequence data present in the database at Los Alamos.

  5. PCR-Based Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number, Mitochondrial DNA Damage, and Nuclear DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P; Rooney, John P; Ryde, Ian T; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role that DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit, we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  6. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  7. Structural and Thermodynamic Signatures of DNA Recognition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Biswas, Tapan

    2011-09-06

    An essential protein, DnaA, binds to 9-bp DNA sites within the origin of replication oriC. These binding events are prerequisite to forming an enigmatic nucleoprotein scaffold that initiates replication. The number, sequences, positions, and orientations of these short DNA sites, or DnaA boxes, within the oriCs of different bacteria vary considerably. To investigate features of DnaA boxes that are important for binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA (MtDnaA), we have determined the crystal structures of the DNA binding domain (DBD) of MtDnaA bound to a cognate MtDnaA-box (at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution) and to a consensus Escherichia coli DnaA-box (at 2.3 {angstrom}). These structures, complemented by calorimetric equilibrium binding studies of MtDnaA DBD in a series of DnaA-box variants, reveal the main determinants of DNA recognition and establish the [T/C][T/A][G/A]TCCACA sequence as a high-affinity MtDnaA-box. Bioinformatic and calorimetric analyses indicate that DnaA-box sequences in mycobacterial oriCs generally differ from the optimal binding sequence. This sequence variation occurs commonly at the first 2 bp, making an in vivo mycobacterial DnaA-box effectively a 7-mer and not a 9-mer. We demonstrate that the decrease in the affinity of these MtDnaA-box variants for MtDnaA DBD relative to that of the highest-affinity box TTGTCCACA is less than 10-fold. The understanding of DnaA-box recognition by MtDnaA and E. coli DnaA enables one to map DnaA-box sequences in the genomes of M. tuberculosis and other eubacteria.

  8. Mechanisms of DNA Motor Proteins (Helicases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    1996-03-01

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous motor proteins that couple the binding and hydrolysis of NTP to the unwinding of duplex (ds) DNA to form the single stranded (ss) DNA intermediates that are required for replication, recombination and repair. We are studying the DNA unwinding mechanisms catalyzed by two helicases from E. coli: Rep and Helicase II (UvrD) by examining the linkage of DNA binding, protein dimerization and nucleotide binding using both thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. A dimer of the Rep protein is the active form of the helicase; however, the dimer forms only upon binding either ss or ds DNA. There are significant cooperative interactions between the two DNA binding sites on the dimer and nucleotides (ATP, ADP) allosterically control the stabilities of the DNA ligation states of the Rep dimer. Based on these studies we have proposed an "active, rolling" mechanism for the Rep dimer unwinding of duplex DNA. An essential intermediate is a complex, in which ss- and ds-DNA bind simultaneously to each subunit of a Rep dimer. This model predicts that Rep helicase translocation along DNA is coupled to ATP binding, whereas ATP hydrolysis drives unwinding of multiple DNA base pairs for each catalytic event. Rapid chemical quench-flow and stopped-flow fluorescence studies of Rep and UvrD- catalyzed DNA unwinding of a series of non-natural DNA substrates support the "active, rolling" mechanism and rule out a strictly "passive" mechanism of unwinding. Kinetic studies of DNA and nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis by wild type and mutant Rep proteins will be discussed that bear on the coupling of ATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation along DNA and DNA unwinding.

  9. Photoelectrochemical synthesis of DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Brian Y.; Emig, Christopher J.; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Optical addressing of semiconductor electrodes represents a powerful technology that enables the independent and parallel control of a very large number of electrical phenomena at the solid-electrolyte interface. To date, it has been used in a wide range of applications including electrophoretic manipulation, biomolecule sensing, and stimulating networks of neurons. Here, we have adapted this approach for the parallel addressing of redox reactions, and report the construction of a DNA microarray synthesis platform based on semiconductor photoelectrochemistry (PEC). An amorphous silicon photoconductor is activated by an optical projection system to create virtual electrodes capable of electrochemically generating protons; these PEC-generated protons then cleave the acid-labile dimethoxytrityl protecting groups of DNA phosphoramidite synthesis reagents with the requisite spatial selectivity to generate DNA microarrays. Furthermore, a thin-film porous glass dramatically increases the amount of DNA synthesized per chip by over an order of magnitude versus uncoated glass. This platform demonstrates that PEC can be used toward combinatorial bio-polymer and small molecule synthesis. PMID:19706433

  10. The DNA of ciliated protozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, D M

    1994-01-01

    Ciliates contain two types of nuclei: a micronucleus and a macronucleus. The micronucleus serves as the germ line nucleus but does not express its genes. The macronucleus provides the nuclear RNA for vegetative growth. Mating cells exchange haploid micronuclei, and a new macronucleus develops from a new diploid micronucleus. The old macronucleus is destroyed. This conversion consists of amplification, elimination, fragmentation, and splicing of DNA sequences on a massive scale. Fragmentation produces subchromosomal molecules in Tetrahymena and Paramecium cells and much smaller, gene-sized molecules in hypotrichous ciliates to which telomere sequences are added. These molecules are then amplified, some to higher copy numbers than others. rDNA is differentially amplified to thousands of copies per macronucleus. Eliminated sequences include transposonlike elements and sequences called internal eliminated sequences that interrupt gene coding regions in the micronuclear genome. Some, perhaps all, of these are excised as circular molecules and destroyed. In at least some hypotrichs, segments of some micronuclear genes are scrambled in a nonfunctional order and are recorded during macronuclear development. Vegetatively growing ciliates appear to possess a mechanism for adjusting copy numbers of individual genes, which corrects gene imbalances resulting from random distribution of DNA molecules during amitosis of the macronucleus. Other distinctive features of ciliate DNA include an altered use of the conventional stop codons. Images PMID:8078435

  11. DNA methylation in endometriosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    KOUKOURA, OURANIA; SIFAKIS, STAVROS; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined by the presence and growth of functional endometrial tissue, outside the uterine cavity, primarily in the ovaries, pelvic peritoneum and rectovaginal septum. Although it is a benign disease, it presents with malignant characteristics, such as invasion to surrounding tissues, metastasis to distant locations and recurrence following treatment. Accumulating evidence suggests that various epigenetic aberrations may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Aberrant DNA methylation represents a possible mechanism repsonsible for this disease, linking gene expression alterations observed in endometriosis with hormonal and environmental factors. Several lines of evidence indicate that endometriosis may partially be due to selective epigenetic deregulations influenced by extrinsic factors. Previous studies have shed light into the epigenetic component of endometriosis, reporting variations in the epigenetic patterns of genes known to be involved in the aberrant hormonal, immunologic and inflammatory status of endometriosis. Although recent studies, utilizing advanced molecular techniques, have allowed us to further elucidate the possible association of DNA methylation with altered gene expression, whether these molecular changes represent the cause or merely the consequence of the disease is a question which remains to be answered. This review provides an overview of the current literature on the role of DNA methylation in the pathophysiology and malignant evolution of endometriosis. We also provide insight into the mechanisms through which DNA methylation-modifying agents may be the next step in the research of the pharmaceutical treatment of endometriosis. PMID:26934855

  12. DNA as a security marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outwater, Chris S.; Tullis, Rick

    2000-04-01

    DNA Technologies is harnessing the power of the genetic code to provide solutions to the problems of counterfeiting, forgery and product diversion. The Company intends to apply its enabling technology in the areas of fine-art authentication, fashion, currency and many other applications requiring essentially unbreakable encryption.

  13. Image analysis for DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Kannappan; Huang, Thomas S.

    1991-07-01

    There is a great deal of interest in automating the process of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequencing to support the analysis of genomic DNA such as the Human and Mouse Genome projects. In one class of gel-based sequencing protocols autoradiograph images are generated in the final step and usually require manual interpretation to reconstruct the DNA sequence represented by the image. The need to handle a large volume of sequence information necessitates automation of the manual autoradiograph reading step through image analysis in order to reduce the length of time required to obtain sequence data and reduce transcription errors. Various adaptive image enhancement, segmentation and alignment methods were applied to autoradiograph images. The methods are adaptive to the local characteristics of the image such as noise, background signal, or presence of edges. Once the two-dimensional data is converted to a set of aligned one-dimensional profiles waveform analysis is used to determine the location of each band which represents one nucleotide in the sequence. Different classification strategies including a rule-based approach are investigated to map the profile signals, augmented with the original two-dimensional image data as necessary, to textual DNA sequence information.

  14. DNA methylation in endometriosis (Review).

    PubMed

    Koukoura, Ourania; Sifakis, Stavros; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is defined by the presence and growth of functional endometrial tissue, outside the uterine cavity, primarily in the ovaries, pelvic peritoneum and rectovaginal septum. Although it is a benign disease, it presents with malignant characteristics, such as invasion to surrounding tissues, metastasis to distant locations and recurrence following treatment. Accumulating evidence suggests that various epigenetic aberrations may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Aberrant DNA methylation represents a possible mechanism repsonsible for this disease, linking gene expression alterations observed in endometriosis with hormonal and environmental factors. Several lines of evidence indicate that endometriosis may partially be due to selective epigenetic deregulations influenced by extrinsic factors. Previous studies have shed light into the epigenetic component of endometriosis, reporting variations in the epigenetic patterns of genes known to be involved in the aberrant hormonal, immunologic and inflammatory status of endometriosis. Although recent studies, utilizing advanced molecular techniques, have allowed us to further elucidate the possible association of DNA methylation with altered gene expression, whether these molecular changes represent the cause or merely the consequence of the disease is a question which remains to be answered. This review provides an overview of the current literature on the role of DNA methylation in the pathophysiology and malignant evolution of endometriosis. We also provide insight into the mechanisms through which DNA methylation-modifying agents may be the next step in the research of the pharmaceutical treatment of endometriosis. PMID:26934855

  15. DNA demethylation pathways: recent insights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic regulatory mechanism for gene expression and cell differentiation. While methyltransferases mediate cytosine methylation, until recently, it was still less clear how unmethylated regions in mammalian genomes are protected from de novo methylation and whether ac...

  16. DNA/SNLA commonality program

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, D. V.; Watts, A. J.; Rice, D. A.; Powe, J.; Beezhold, W.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the Commonality program, initiated by DNA in 1978, was to evaluate e-beam material testing procedures and techniques by comparing material stress and spall data from various US and UK e-beam facilities and experimenters. As part of this joint DNA/SNL/UK Commonality effort, Sandia and Ktech used four different electron-beam machines to investigate various aspects of e-beam energy deposition in three materials. The deposition duration and the deposition profiles were varied, and the resulting stresses were measured. The materials studied were: (1) a low-Z material (A1), (2) a high-Z material (Ta), and (3) a typical porous material, a cermet. Aluminium and tantalum were irradiated using the DNA Blackjack 3 accelerator (60 ns pulse width), the DNA Blackjack 3' accelerator (30 ns pulse width), and the SNLA REHYD accelerator (100 ns pulse width). Propagating stresses were measured using x-cut quartz gauges, carbon gauges, and laser interferometry techniques. Data to determine the influence of deposition duration were obtained over a wide range of energy loadings. The cermet material was studied using the SNLA REHYD and HERMES II accelerators. The e-beam from REHYD generated propagating stresses which were monitored with quartz gauges as a function of sample thickness and energy loadings. The HERMES II accelerator was used to uniformly heat the cermet to determine the Grueneisen parameter and identify the incipient spall condition. Results of these experiments are presented.

  17. DNA PURIFICATION BY POLYCARBONATE FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic solvent free procedure s are described for the purification of mammalian DNA from rat liver, kidney, spleen, lung and brain. he basis of the purification procedures are the use of the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and inert polycarbonate filters with 2 um pores w...

  18. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  19. DNA Technology in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, John H.; Campbell, A. Malcolm

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that gives students hands-on experience in generating a meaningful physical map of a circular molecule of DNA. Topics include agarose gel electrophoresis, logic of restriction maps, extracting data from an agarose gel, managing data from gels, experimental protocol, loading gels, electrophoresis, photographing gels, collecting…

  20. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).