Science.gov

Sample records for dna damage tolerance

  1. DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Psakhye, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Accurate chromosomal DNA replication is fundamental for optimal cellular function and genome integrity. Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance pathways, which are crucial to complete genome duplication as well as to prevent formation of deleterious double strand breaks. Cells use two general strategies to tolerate lesions: recombination to a homologous template, and trans-lesion synthesis with specialized polymerases. While key players of these processes have been outlined, much less is known on their choreography and regulation. Recent advances have uncovered principles by which DNA damage tolerance is regulated locally and temporally - in relation to replication timing and cell cycle stage -, and are beginning to elucidate the DNA dynamics that mediate lesion tolerance and influence chromosome structure during replication. PMID:27060551

  2. DNA damage tolerance by recombination: Molecular pathways and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2016-08-01

    Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, which are crucial to promote replication completion and to prevent fork breakage, a leading cause of genome instability. One mode of DDT uses translesion synthesis polymerases, which however can also introduce mutations. The other DDT mode involves recombination-mediated mechanisms, which are generally accurate. DDT occurs prevalently postreplicatively, but in certain situations homologous recombination is needed to restart forks. Fork reversal can function to stabilize stalled forks, but may also promote error-prone outcome when used for fork restart. Recent years have witnessed important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and DNA structures that mediate recombination-mediated damage-bypass and highlighted principles that regulate DDT pathway choice locally and temporally. In this review we summarize the current knowledge and paradoxes on recombination-mediated DDT pathways and their workings, discuss how the intermediate DNA structures may influence genome integrity, and outline key open questions for future research. PMID:27236213

  3. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  4. DNA damage tolerance branches out toward sister chromatid cohesion

    PubMed Central

    Branzei, Dana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome duplication is temporarily coordinated with sister chromatid cohesion and DNA damage tolerance. Recently, we found that replication fork-coupled repriming is important for both optimal cohesion and error-free replication by recombination. The mechanism involved has implications for the etiology of replication-based genetic diseases and cancer. PMID:27308553

  5. DNA replication: damage tolerance at the assembly line.

    PubMed

    Blastyák, András

    2014-07-01

    Damage tolerance mechanisms ensure resumption of DNA synthesis at damage-replisome encounters. Replication fork reversal (RFR) is one such widely recognized mechanism that acts on replisomes where lagging strand synthesis continues upon leading strand synthesis block. The possibility to form such a structure is highly counter to our current understanding of the replisome dynamics of single replisomes. Here, I suggest a model that takes coupled bidirectional replisome organization into account to solve this apparent contradiction. PMID:24957737

  6. DNA bending facilitates the error-free DNA damage tolerance pathway and upholds genome integrity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Huici, Victor; Szakal, Barnabas; Urulangodi, Madhusoodanan; Psakhye, Ivan; Castellucci, Federica; Menolfi, Demis; Rajakumara, Eerappa; Fumasoni, Marco; Bermejo, Rodrigo; Jentsch, Stefan; Branzei, Dana

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is sensitive to damage in the template. To bypass lesions and complete replication, cells activate recombination-mediated (error-free) and translesion synthesis-mediated (error-prone) DNA damage tolerance pathways. Crucial for error-free DNA damage tolerance is template switching, which depends on the formation and resolution of damage-bypass intermediates consisting of sister chromatid junctions. Here we show that a chromatin architectural pathway involving the high mobility group box protein Hmo1 channels replication-associated lesions into the error-free DNA damage tolerance pathway mediated by Rad5 and PCNA polyubiquitylation, while preventing mutagenic bypass and toxic recombination. In the process of template switching, Hmo1 also promotes sister chromatid junction formation predominantly during replication. Its C-terminal tail, implicated in chromatin bending, facilitates the formation of catenations/hemicatenations and mediates the roles of Hmo1 in DNA damage tolerance pathway choice and sister chromatid junction formation. Together, the results suggest that replication-associated topological changes involving the molecular DNA bender, Hmo1, set the stage for dedicated repair reactions that limit errors during replication and impact on genome stability. PMID:24473148

  7. Phosphorylation of human INO80 is involved in DNA damage tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Dai; Waki, Mayumi; Umezawa, Masaki; Aoki, Yuka; Utsugi, Takahiko; Ohtsu, Masaya; Murakami, Yasufumi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced PCNA ubiquitination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced nuclear dots intensity of RAD18 after UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Western blot analyses showed phosphorylated hINO80 C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of phosphorylation mutant hINO80 reduced PCNA ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious type of DNA damage. DSBs can be generated directly by exposure to ionizing radiation or indirectly by replication fork collapse. The DNA damage tolerance pathway, which is conserved from bacteria to humans, prevents this collapse by overcoming replication blockages. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex plays an important role in the DNA damage response. The yeast INO80 complex participates in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. The mechanisms regulating yINO80 complex are not fully understood, but yeast INO80 complex are necessary for efficient proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination and for recruitment of Rad18 to replication forks. In contrast, the function of the mammalian INO80 complex in DNA damage tolerance is less clear. Here, we show that human INO80 was necessary for PCNA ubiquitination and recruitment of Rad18 to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the C-terminal region of human INO80 was phosphorylated, and overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of human INO80 resulted in decreased ubiquitination of PCNA during DNA replication. These results suggest that the human INO80 complex, like the yeast complex, was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway and that phosphorylation of human INO80 was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. These findings provide new insights into the DNA damage tolerance pathway in mammalian cells.

  8. DNA damage tolerance: a double-edged sword guarding the genome

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Gargi; Chen, Junjie

    2013-01-01

    Preservation of genome integrity is an essential process for cell homeostasis. During the course of life of a single cell, the genome is constantly damaged by endogenous and exogenous agents. To ensure genome stability, cells use a global signaling network, namely the DNA damage response (DDR) to sense and repair DNA damage. DDR senses different types of DNA damage and coordinates a response that includes activation of transcription, cell cycle control, DNA repair pathways, apoptosis, senescence, and cell death. Despite several repair mechanisms that repair different types of DNA lesions, it is likely that the replication machinery would still encounter lesions that are mis-repaired or not repaired. Replication of damaged genome would result in high frequency of fork collapse and genome instability. In this scenario, the cells employ the DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathway that recruits a specialized low fidelity translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase to bypass the lesions for repair at a later time point. Thus, DDT is not a repair pathway per se, but provides a mechanism to tolerate DNA lesions during replication thereby increasing survival and preventing genome instability. Paradoxically, DDT process is also associated with increased mutagenesis, which can in turn drive the cell to cancer development. Thus, DDT process functions as a double-edged sword guarding the genome. In this review, we will discuss the replication stress induced DNA damage-signaling cascade, the stabilization and rescue of stalled replication forks by the DDT pathway and the effect of the DDT pathway on cancer. PMID:24058901

  9. Genomic assay reveals tolerance of DNA damage by both translesion DNA synthesis and homology-dependent repair in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Izhar, Lior; Ziv, Omer; Cohen, Isadora S; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Livneh, Zvi

    2013-04-16

    DNA lesions can block replication forks and lead to the formation of single-stranded gaps. These replication complications are mitigated by DNA damage tolerance mechanisms, which prevent deleterious outcomes such as cell death, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis. The two main tolerance strategies are translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which low-fidelity DNA polymerases bypass the blocking lesion, and homology-dependent repair (HDR; postreplication repair), which is based on the homologous sister chromatid. Here we describe a unique high-resolution method for the simultaneous analysis of TLS and HDR across defined DNA lesions in mammalian genomes. The method is based on insertion of plasmids carrying defined site-specific DNA lesions into mammalian chromosomes, using phage integrase-mediated integration. Using this method we show that mammalian cells use HDR to tolerate DNA damage in their genome. Moreover, analysis of the tolerance of the UV light-induced 6-4 photoproduct, the tobacco smoke-induced benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adduct, and an artificial trimethylene insert shows that each of these three lesions is tolerated by both TLS and HDR. We also determined the specificity of nucleotide insertion opposite these lesions during TLS in human genomes. This unique method will be useful in elucidating the mechanism of DNA damage tolerance in mammalian chromosomes and their connection to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis. PMID:23530190

  10. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker–induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress. PMID:27407148

  11. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression.

    PubMed

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-07-26

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker-induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress. PMID:27407148

  12. The Regulation of DNA Damage Tolerance by Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-Like Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Lina; Maffia, Antonio; Bertoletti, Federica; Sabbioneda, Simone

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is an extremely complex process that needs to be executed in a highly accurate manner in order to propagate the genome. This task requires the coordination of a number of enzymatic activities and it is fragile and prone to arrest after DNA damage. DNA damage tolerance provides a last line of defense that allows completion of DNA replication in the presence of an unrepaired template. One of such mechanisms is called post-replication repair (PRR) and it is used by the cells to bypass highly distorted templates caused by damaged bases. PRR is extremely important for the cellular life and performs the bypass of the damage both in an error-free and in an error-prone manner. In light of these two possible outcomes, PRR needs to be tightly controlled in order to prevent the accumulation of mutations leading ultimately to genome instability. Post-translational modifications of PRR proteins provide the framework for this regulation with ubiquitylation and SUMOylation playing a pivotal role in choosing which pathway to activate, thus controlling the different outcomes of damage bypass. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the DNA clamp for replicative polymerases, plays a central role in the regulation of damage tolerance and its modification by ubiquitin, and SUMO controls both the error-free and error-prone branches of PRR. Furthermore, a significant number of polymerases are involved in the bypass of DNA damage possess domains that can bind post-translational modifications and they are themselves target for ubiquitylation. In this review, we will focus on how ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications can regulate the DNA damage tolerance systems and how they control the recruitment of different proteins to the replication fork. PMID:27379156

  13. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction. PMID:27357950

  14. Shared Genetic Pathways Contribute to the Tolerance of Endogenous and Low-Dose Exogenous DNA Damage in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Kevin; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage that escapes repair and blocks replicative DNA polymerases is tolerated by bypass mechanisms that fall into two general categories: error-free template switching and error-prone translesion synthesis. Prior studies of DNA damage responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have demonstrated that repair mechanisms are critical for survival when a single, high dose of DNA damage is delivered, while bypass/tolerance mechanisms are more important for survival when the damage level is low and continuous (acute and chronic damage, respectively). In the current study, epistatic interactions between DNA-damage tolerance genes were examined and compared when haploid yeast cells were exposed to either chronic ultraviolet light or chronic methyl methanesulfonate. Results demonstrate that genes assigned to error-free and error-prone bypass pathways similarly promote survival in the presence of each type of chronic damage. In addition to using defined sources of chronic damage, rates of spontaneous mutations generated by the Pol ζ translesion synthesis DNA polymerase (complex insertions in a frameshift-reversion assay) were used to infer epistatic interactions between the same genes. Similar epistatic interactions were observed in analyses of spontaneous mutation rates, suggesting that chronic DNA-damage responses accurately reflect those used to tolerate spontaneous lesions. These results have important implications when considering what constitutes a safe and acceptable level of exogenous DNA damage. PMID:25060101

  15. Pro-oxidant Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells: Homeostatic Mechanisms of Genotoxic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Seager, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to many disease etiologies including ageing, neurodegeneration, and cancer, partly through DNA damage induction (genotoxicity). Understanding the i nteractions of free radicals with DNA is fundamental to discern mutation risks. In genetic toxicology, regulatory authorities consider that most genotoxins exhibit a linear relationship between dose and mutagenic response. Yet, homeostatic mechanisms, including DNA repair, that allow cells to tolerate low levels of genotoxic exposure exist. Acceptance of thresholds for genotoxicity has widespread consequences in terms of understanding cancer risk and regulating human exposure to chemicals/drugs. Three pro-oxidant chemicals, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), potassium bromate (KBrO3), and menadione, were examined for low dose-response curves in human lymphoblastoid cells. DNA repair and antioxidant capacity were assessed as possible threshold mechanisms. H2O2 and KBrO3, but not menadione, exhibited thresholded responses, containing a range of nongenotoxic low doses. Levels of the DNA glycosylase 8-oxoguanine glycosylase were unchanged in response to pro- oxidant stress. DNA repair–focused gene expression arrays reported changes in ATM and BRCA1, involved in double-strand break repair, in response to low-dose pro-oxidant exposure; however, these alterations were not substantiated at the protein level. Determination of oxidatively induced DNA damage in H2O2-treated AHH-1 cells reported accumulation of thymine glycol above the genotoxic threshold. Further, the H2O2 dose-response curve was shifted by modulating the antioxidant glutathione. Hence, observed pro- oxidant thresholds were due to protective capacities of base excision repair enzymes and antioxidants against DNA damage, highlighting the importance of homeostatic mechanisms in “genotoxic tolerance.” PMID:22539617

  16. Coordination of DNA damage tolerance mechanisms with cell cycle progression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, A. John; Kelly, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA damage tolerance (DDT) mechanisms allow cells to synthesize a new DNA strand when the template is damaged. Many mutations resulting from DNA damage in eukaryotes are generated during DDT when cells use the mutagenic translesion polymerases, Rev1 and Polζ, rather than mechanisms with higher fidelity. The coordination among DDT mechanisms is not well understood. We used live-cell imaging to study the function of DDT mechanisms throughout the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We report that checkpoint-dependent mitotic delay provides a cellular mechanism to ensure the completion of high fidelity DDT, largely by homology-directed repair (HDR). DDT by mutagenic polymerases is suppressed during the checkpoint delay by a mechanism dependent on Rad51 recombinase. When cells pass the G2/M checkpoint and can no longer delay mitosis, they completely lose the capacity for HDR and simultaneously exhibit a requirement for Rev1 and Polζ. Thus, DDT is coordinated with the checkpoint response so that the activity of mutagenic polymerases is confined to a vulnerable period of the cell cycle when checkpoint delay and HDR are not possible. PMID:26652183

  17. Structural basis for cisplatin DNA damage tolerance by human polymerase η during cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ummat, Ajay; Rechkoblit, Olga; Jain, Rinku; Choudhary, Jayati R.; Johnson, Robert E.; Silverstein, Timothy D.; Buku, Angeliki; Lone, Samer; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2012-01-01

    A major clinical problem in the use of cisplatin to treat cancers is tumor resistance. DNA polymerase η (Polη) is a key polymerase that allows cancer cells to cope with cisplatin–DNA adducts formed during chemotherapy. We present here a structure of human Polη inserting dCTP opposite a cisplatin intrastrand cross-link (PtGpG). We show that specificity of human Polη for PtGpG derives from an active site that is open to permit Watson-Crick geometry of the nascent PtGpG•dCTP base pair and to accommodate the lesion without steric hindrance. The specificity is augmented by residues Gln38 and Ser62 that interact with PtGpG, and Arg61 that interacts with incoming dCTP. Collectively, the structure provides a basis for understanding how Polη in human cells can tolerate DNA damage caused by cisplatin chemotherapy and offers a framework for the design of inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:22562137

  18. The Functions of Serine 687 Phosphorylation of Human DNA Polymerase η in UV Damage Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoxia; You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-06-01

    DNA polymerase η (polη) is a Y-family translesion synthesis polymerase that plays a key role in the cellular tolerance toward UV irradiation-induced DNA damage. Here, we identified, for the first time, the phosphorylation of serine 687 (Ser(687)), which is located in the highly conserved nuclear localization signal (NLS) region of human polη and is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). We also showed that this phosphorylation is stimulated in human cells upon UV light exposure and results in diminished interaction of polη with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the phosphorylation of Ser(687) in polη confers cellular protection from UV irradiation and increases the efficiency in replication across a site-specifically incorporated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in human cells. Based on these results, we proposed a mechanistic model where Ser(687) phosphorylation functions in the reverse polymerase switching step of translesion synthesis: The phosphorylation brings negative charges to the NLS of polη, which facilitates its departure from PCNA, thereby resetting the replication fork for highly accurate and processive DNA replication. Thus, our study, together with previous findings, supported that the posttranslational modifications of NLS of polη played a dual role in polymerase switching, where Lys(682) deubiquitination promotes the recruitment of polη to PCNA immediately prior to lesion bypass and Ser(687) phosphorylation stimulates its departure from the replication fork immediately after lesion bypass. PMID:26988343

  19. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  20. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  1. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  2. Composites Damage Tolerance Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The Composite Damage Tolerance Workshop included participants from NASA, academia, and private industry. The objectives of the workshop were to begin dialogue in order to establish a working group within the Agency, create awareness of damage tolerance requirements for Constellation, and discuss potential composite hardware for the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage (US) and Crew Module. It was proposed that a composites damage tolerance working group be created that acts within the framework of the existing NASA Fracture Control Methodology Panel. The working group charter would be to identify damage tolerance gaps and obstacles for implementation of composite structures into manned space flight systems and to develop strategies and recommendations to overcome these obstacles.

  3. Rad18 confers hematopoietic progenitor cell DNA damage tolerance independently of the Fanconi Anemia pathway in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Poe, Jonathan C.; Yang, Lisong; Fedoriw, Andrew; Desai, Siddhi; Magnuson, Terry; Li, Zhiguo; Fedoriw, Yuri; Araki, Kimi; Gao, Yanzhe; Tateishi, Satoshi; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    In cultured cancer cells the E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 activates Trans-Lesion Synthesis (TLS) and the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway. However, physiological roles of Rad18 in DNA damage tolerance and carcinogenesis are unknown and were investigated here. Primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) co-expressed RAD18 and FANCD2 proteins, potentially consistent with a role for Rad18 in FA pathway function during hematopoiesis. However, hematopoietic defects typically associated with fanc-deficiency (decreased HSPC numbers, reduced engraftment potential of HSPC, and Mitomycin C (MMC) -sensitive hematopoiesis), were absent in Rad18−/− mice. Moreover, primary Rad18−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) retained robust Fancd2 mono-ubiquitination following MMC treatment. Therefore, Rad18 is dispensable for FA pathway activation in untransformed cells and the Rad18 and FA pathways are separable in hematopoietic cells. In contrast with responses to crosslinking agents, Rad18−/− HSPC were sensitive to in vivo treatment with the myelosuppressive agent 7,12 Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Rad18-deficient fibroblasts aberrantly accumulated DNA damage markers after DMBA treatment. Moreover, in vivo DMBA treatment led to increased incidence of B cell malignancy in Rad18−/− mice. These results identify novel hematopoietic functions for Rad18 and provide the first demonstration that Rad18 confers DNA damage tolerance and tumor-suppression in a physiological setting. PMID:26883629

  4. Rad18 confers hematopoietic progenitor cell DNA damage tolerance independently of the Fanconi Anemia pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Poe, Jonathan C; Yang, Lisong; Fedoriw, Andrew; Desai, Siddhi; Magnuson, Terry; Li, Zhiguo; Fedoriw, Yuri; Araki, Kimi; Gao, Yanzhe; Tateishi, Satoshi; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2016-05-19

    In cultured cancer cells the E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 activates Trans-Lesion Synthesis (TLS) and the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway. However, physiological roles of Rad18 in DNA damage tolerance and carcinogenesis are unknown and were investigated here. Primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) co-expressed RAD18 and FANCD2 proteins, potentially consistent with a role for Rad18 in FA pathway function during hematopoiesis. However, hematopoietic defects typically associated with fanc-deficiency (decreased HSPC numbers, reduced engraftment potential of HSPC, and Mitomycin C (MMC) -sensitive hematopoiesis), were absent in Rad18(-/-) mice. Moreover, primary Rad18(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) retained robust Fancd2 mono-ubiquitination following MMC treatment. Therefore, Rad18 is dispensable for FA pathway activation in untransformed cells and the Rad18 and FA pathways are separable in hematopoietic cells. In contrast with responses to crosslinking agents, Rad18(-/-) HSPC were sensitive to in vivo treatment with the myelosuppressive agent 7,12 Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Rad18-deficient fibroblasts aberrantly accumulated DNA damage markers after DMBA treatment. Moreover, in vivo DMBA treatment led to increased incidence of B cell malignancy in Rad18(-/-) mice. These results identify novel hematopoietic functions for Rad18 and provide the first demonstration that Rad18 confers DNA damage tolerance and tumor-suppression in a physiological setting. PMID:26883629

  5. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  6. Genetic analysis of repair and damage tolerance mechanisms for DNA-protein cross-links in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salem, Amir M H; Nakano, Toshiaki; Takuwa, Minako; Matoba, Nagisa; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamada, Masami; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ide, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) are unique among DNA lesions in their unusually bulky nature. We have recently shown that nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RecBCD-dependent homologous recombination (HR) collaboratively alleviate the lethal effect of DPCs in Escherichia coli. In this study, to gain further insight into the damage-processing mechanism for DPCs, we assessed the sensitivities of a panel of repair-deficient E. coli mutants to DPC-inducing agents, including formaldehyde (FA) and 5-azacytidine (azaC). We show here that the damage tolerance mechanism involving HR and subsequent replication restart (RR) provides the most effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Translesion synthesis does not serve as an alternative damage tolerance mechanism for DPCs in cell survival. Elimination of DPCs from the genome relies primarily on NER, which provides a second and moderately effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Interestingly, Cho rather than UvrC seems to be an effective nuclease for the NER of DPCs. Together with the genes responsible for HR, RR, and NER, the mutation of genes involved in several aspects of DNA repair and transactions, such as recQ, xth nfo, dksA, and topA, rendered cells slightly but significantly sensitive to FA but not azaC, possibly reflecting the complexity of DPCs or cryptic lesions induced by FA. UvrD may have an additional role outside NER, since the uvrD mutation conferred a slight azaC sensitivity on cells. Finally, DNA glycosylases mitigate azaC toxicity, independently of the repair of DPCs, presumably by removing 5-azacytosine or its degradation product from the chromosome. PMID:19617358

  7. Ultraviolet-B-induced DNA damage and ultraviolet-B tolerance mechanisms in species with different functional groups coexisting in subalpine moorlands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Wei; Kamiyama, Chiho; Hidema, Jun; Hikosaka, Kouki

    2016-08-01

    High doses of ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-315 nm) radiation can have detrimental effects on plants, and especially damage their DNA. Plants have DNA repair and protection mechanisms to prevent UV-B damage. However, it remains unclear how DNA damage and tolerance mechanisms vary among field species. We studied DNA damage and tolerance mechanisms in 26 species with different functional groups coexisting in two moorlands at two elevations. We collected current-year leaves in July and August, and determined accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) as UV-B damage and photorepair activity (PRA) and concentrations of UV-absorbing compounds (UACs) and carotenoids (CARs) as UV-B tolerance mechanisms. DNA damage was greater in dicot than in monocot species, and higher in herbaceous than in woody species. Evergreen species accumulated more CPDs than deciduous species. PRA was higher in Poaceae than in species of other families. UACs were significantly higher in woody than in herbaceous species. The CPD level was not explained by the mechanisms across species, but was significantly related to PRA and UACs when we ignored species with low CPD, PRA and UACs, implying the presence of another effective tolerance mechanism. UACs were correlated negatively with PRA and positively with CARs. Our results revealed that UV-induced DNA damage significantly varies among native species, and this variation is related to functional groups. DNA repair, rather than UV-B protection, dominates in UV-B tolerance in the field. Our findings also suggest that UV-B tolerance mechanisms vary among species under evolutionary trade-off and synergism. PMID:27139425

  8. Damage tolerance for commuter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The damage tolerance experience in the United States Air Force with military aircraft and in the commercial world with large transport category aircraft indicates that a similar success could be achieved in commuter aircraft. The damage tolerance process is described for the purpose of defining the approach that could be used for these aircraft to ensure structural integrity. Results of some of the damage tolerance assessments for this class of aircraft are examined to illustrate the benefits derived from this approach. Recommendations are given for future damage tolerance assessment of existing commuter aircraft and on the incorporation of damage tolerance capability in new designs.

  9. Micro(mi) RNA-34a targets protein phosphatase (PP)1γ to regulate DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yuko; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) triggers widespread changes in gene expression, mediated partly by alterations in micro(mi) RNA levels, whose nature and significance remain uncertain. Here, we report that miR-34a, which is upregulated during the DDR, modulates the expression of protein phosphatase 1γ (PP1γ) to regulate cellular tolerance to DNA damage. Multiple bio-informatic algorithms predict that miR-34a targets the PP1CCC gene encoding PP1γ protein. Ionising radiation (IR) decreases cellular expression of PP1γ in a dose-dependent manner. An miR-34a-mimic reduces cellular PP1γ protein. Conversely, an miR-34a inhibitor antagonizes IR-induced decreases in PP1γ protein expression. A wild-type (but not mutant) miR-34a seed match sequence from the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of PP1CCC when transplanted to a luciferase reporter gene makes it responsive to an miR-34a-mimic. Thus, miR-34a upregulation during the DDR targets the 3′ UTR of PP1CCC to decrease PP1γ protein expression. PP1γ is known to antagonize DDR signaling via the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase. Interestingly, we find that cells exposed to DNA damage become more sensitive – in an miR-34a-dependent manner – to a second challenge with damage. Increased sensitivity to the second challenge is marked by enhanced phosphorylation of ATM and p53, increased γH2AX formation, and increased cell death. Increased sensitivity can be partly recapitulated by a miR-34a-mimic, or antagonized by an miR-34a-inhibitor. Thus, our findings suggest a model in which damage-induced miR-34a induction reduces PP1γ expression and enhances ATM signaling to decrease tolerance to repeated genotoxic challenges. This mechanism has implications for tumor suppression and the response of cancers to therapeutic radiation. PMID:26111201

  10. Telomerase reverse transcriptase expression protects transformed human cells against DNA-damaging agents, and increases tolerance to chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, H B; Hukezalie, K R; Thompson, C A H; Au-Yeung, T T T; Ludlow, A T; Zhao, C R; Wong, J M Y

    2016-01-14

    Reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression is found in more than 85% of human cancers. The remaining cancers rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a recombination-based mechanism for telomere-length maintenance. Prevalence of TERT reactivation over the ALT mechanism was linked to secondary TERT function unrelated to telomere length maintenance. To characterize this non-canonical function, we created a panel of ALT cells with recombinant expression of TERT and TERT variants: TERT-positive ALT cells showed higher tolerance to genotoxic insults compared with their TERT-negative counterparts. We identified telomere synthesis-defective TERT variants that bestowed similar genotoxic stress tolerance, indicating that telomere synthesis activity is dispensable for this survival phenotype. TERT expression improved the kinetics of double-strand chromosome break repair and reduced DNA damage-related nuclear division abnormalities, a phenotype associated with ALT tumors. Despite this reduction in cytological abnormalities, surviving TERT-positive ALT cells were found to have gross chromosomal instabilities. We sorted TERT-positive cells with cytogenetic changes and followed their growth. We found that the chromosome-number changes persisted, and TERT-positive ALT cells surviving genotoxic events propagated through subsequent generations with new chromosome numbers. Our data confirm that telomerase expression protects against double-strand DNA (dsDNA)-damaging events, and show that this protective function is uncoupled from its role in telomere synthesis. TERT expression promotes oncogene-transformed cell growth by reducing the inhibitory effects of cell-intrinsic (telomere attrition) and cell-extrinsic (chemical- or metabolism-induced genotoxic stress) challenges. These data provide the impetus to develop new therapeutic interventions for telomerase-positive cancers through simultaneous targeting of multiple telomerase activities. PMID

  11. Essential Roles of the Smc5/6 Complex in Replication through Natural Pausing Sites and Endogenous DNA Damage Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Menolfi, Demis; Delamarre, Axel; Lengronne, Armelle; Pasero, Philippe; Branzei, Dana

    2015-12-17

    The essential functions of the conserved Smc5/6 complex remain elusive. To uncover its roles in genome maintenance, we established Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-cycle-regulated alleles that enable restriction of Smc5/6 components to S or G2/M. Unexpectedly, the essential functions of Smc5/6 segregated fully and selectively to G2/M. Genetic screens that became possible with generated alleles identified processes that crucially rely on Smc5/6 specifically in G2/M: metabolism of DNA recombination structures triggered by endogenous replication stress, and replication through natural pausing sites located in late-replicating regions. In the first process, Smc5/6 modulates remodeling of recombination intermediates, cooperating with dissolution activities. In the second, Smc5/6 prevents chromosome fragility and toxic recombination instigated by prolonged pausing and the fork protection complex, Tof1-Csm3. Our results thus dissect Smc5/6 essential roles and reveal that combined defects in DNA damage tolerance and pausing site-replication cause recombination-mediated DNA lesions, which we propose to drive developmental and cancer-prone disorders. PMID:26698660

  12. Replicating Damaged DNA in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail. PMID:24296172

  13. DNA polymerase X from Deinococcus radiodurans implicated in bacterial tolerance to DNA damage is characterized as a short patch base excision repair polymerase.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Misra, Hari S

    2009-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans R1 genome encodes an X-family DNA repair polymerase homologous to eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta. The recombinant deinococcal polymerase X (PolX) purified from transgenic Escherichia coli showed deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity. Unlike the Klenow fragment of E. coli, this enzyme showed short patch DNA synthesis activity on heteropolymeric DNA substrate. The recombinant enzyme showed 5'-deoxyribose phosphate (5'-dRP) lyase activity and base excision repair function in vitro, with the help of externally supplied glycosylase and AP endonuclease functions. A polX disruption mutant of D. radiodurans expressing 5'-dRP lyase and a truncated polymerase domain was comparatively less sensitive to gamma-radiation than a polX deletion mutant. Both mutants showed higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Excision repair mutants of E. coli expressing this polymerase showed functional complementation of UV sensitivity. These results suggest the involvement of deinococcal polymerase X in DNA-damage tolerance of D. radiodurans, possibly by contributing to DNA double-strand break repair and base excision repair. PMID:19542005

  14. Rad5 Template Switch Pathway of DNA Damage Tolerance Determines Synergism between Cisplatin and NSC109268 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dilip; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    The success of cisplatin (CP) based therapy is often hindered by acquisition of CP resistance. We isolated NSC109268 as a compound altering cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Previous investigation revealed an enhancement of CP sensitivity by NSC109268 in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae and CP-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines that correlated with a slower S phase traversal. Here, we extended these studies to determine the target pathway(s) of NSC109268 in mediating CP sensitization, using yeast as a model. We reasoned that mutants defective in the relevant target of NSC109268 should be hypersensitive to CP and the sensitization effect by NSC109268 should be absent or strongly reduced. A survey of various yeast deletion mutants converged on the Rad5 pathway of DNA damage tolerance by template switching as the likely target pathway of NSC109268 in mediating cellular sensitization to CP. Additionally, cell cycle delays following CP treatment were not synergistically influenced by NSC109268 in the CP hypersensitive rad5Δ mutant. The involvement of the known inhibitory activities of NSC109268 on 20S proteasome and phosphatases 2Cα and 2A was tested. In the CP hypersensitive ptc2Δptc3Δpph3Δ yeast strain, deficient for 2C and 2A-type phosphatases, cellular sensitization to CP by NSC109268 was greatly reduced. It is therefore suggested that NSC109268 affects CP sensitivity by inhibiting the activity of unknown protein(s) whose dephosphorylation is required for the template switch pathway. PMID:24130896

  15. Mdt1, a Novel Rad53 FHA1 Domain-Interacting Protein, Modulates DNA Damage Tolerance and G2/M Cell Cycle Progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Brietta L.; Yongkiettrakul, Suganya; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The Rad53 kinase plays a central role in yeast DNA damage checkpoints. Rad53 contains two FHA phosphothreonine-binding domains that are required for Rad53 activation and possibly downstream signaling. Here we show that the N-terminal Rad53 FHA1 domain interacts with the RNA recognition motif, coiled-coil, and SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein Mdt1 (YBl051C). The interaction of Rad53 and Mdt1 depends on the structural integrity of the FHA1 phosphothreonine-binding site as well as threonine-305 of Mdt1. Mdt1 is constitutively threonine phosphorylated and hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage in vivo. DNA damage-dependent Mdt1 hyperphosphorylation depends on the Mec1 and Tel1 checkpoint kinases, and Mec1 can directly phosphorylate a recombinant Mdt1 SQ/TQ domain fragment. MDT1 overexpression is synthetically lethal with a rad53 deletion, whereas mdt1 deletion partially suppresses the DNA damage hypersensitivity of checkpoint-compromised strains and generally improves DNA damage tolerance. In the absence of DNA damage, mdt1 deletion leads to delayed anaphase completion, with an elongated cell morphology reminiscent of that of G2/M cell cycle mutants. mdt1-dependent and DNA damage-dependent cell cycle delays are not additive, suggesting that they act in the same pathway. The data indicate that Mdt1 is involved in normal G2/M cell cycle progression and is a novel target of checkpoint-dependent cell cycle arrest pathways. PMID:15024067

  16. MELK-T1, a small-molecule inhibitor of protein kinase MELK, decreases DNA-damage tolerance in proliferating cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Beke, Lijs; Kig, Cenk; Linders, Joannes T M; Boens, Shannah; Boeckx, An; van Heerde, Erika; Parade, Marc; De Bondt, An; Van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Bashir, Tarig; Ogata, Souichi; Meerpoel, Lieven; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Johnson, Christopher N; Beullens, Monique; Brehmer, Dirk; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK), a serine/threonine protein kinase, has oncogenic properties and is overexpressed in many cancer cells. The oncogenic function of MELK is attributed to its capacity to disable critical cell-cycle checkpoints and reduce replication stress. Most functional studies have relied on the use of siRNA/shRNA-mediated gene silencing. In the present study, we have explored the biological function of MELK using MELK-T1, a novel and selective small-molecule inhibitor. Strikingly, MELK-T1 triggered a rapid and proteasome-dependent degradation of the MELK protein. Treatment of MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast adenocarcinoma cells with MELK-T1 induced the accumulation of stalled replication forks and double-strand breaks that culminated in a replicative senescence phenotype. This phenotype correlated with a rapid and long-lasting ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) activation and phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2). Furthermore, MELK-T1 induced a strong phosphorylation of p53 (cellular tumour antigen p53), a prolonged up-regulation of p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1) and a down-regulation of FOXM1 (Forkhead Box M1) target genes. Our data indicate that MELK is a key stimulator of proliferation by its ability to increase the threshold for DNA-damage tolerance (DDT). Thus, targeting MELK by the inhibition of both its catalytic activity and its protein stability might sensitize tumours to DNA-damaging agents or radiation therapy by lowering the DNA-damage threshold. PMID:26431963

  17. MELK-T1, a small-molecule inhibitor of protein kinase MELK, decreases DNA-damage tolerance in proliferating cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beke, Lijs; Kig, Cenk; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Boens, Shannah; Boeckx, An; van Heerde, Erika; Parade, Marc; De Bondt, An; Van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Bashir, Tarig; Ogata, Souichi; Meerpoel, Lieven; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beullens, Monique; Brehmer, Dirk; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK), a serine/threonine protein kinase, has oncogenic properties and is overexpressed in many cancer cells. The oncogenic function of MELK is attributed to its capacity to disable critical cell-cycle checkpoints and reduce replication stress. Most functional studies have relied on the use of siRNA/shRNA-mediated gene silencing. In the present study, we have explored the biological function of MELK using MELK-T1, a novel and selective small-molecule inhibitor. Strikingly, MELK-T1 triggered a rapid and proteasome-dependent degradation of the MELK protein. Treatment of MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast adenocarcinoma cells with MELK-T1 induced the accumulation of stalled replication forks and double-strand breaks that culminated in a replicative senescence phenotype. This phenotype correlated with a rapid and long-lasting ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) activation and phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2). Furthermore, MELK-T1 induced a strong phosphorylation of p53 (cellular tumour antigen p53), a prolonged up-regulation of p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1) and a down-regulation of FOXM1 (Forkhead Box M1) target genes. Our data indicate that MELK is a key stimulator of proliferation by its ability to increase the threshold for DNA-damage tolerance (DDT). Thus, targeting MELK by the inhibition of both its catalytic activity and its protein stability might sensitize tumours to DNA-damaging agents or radiation therapy by lowering the DNA-damage threshold. PMID:26431963

  18. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  19. Damage Tolerance of Large Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of large shell structures is investigated. A computer model is used for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture resistance, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Critical locations of a stiffened conical shell segment are identified. Defective and defect-free computer models are simulated to evaluate structural damage/defect tolerance. Safe pressurization levels are assessed for the retention of structural integrity at the presence of damage/ defects. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulations. Damage propagation and burst pressures for defective and defect-free shells are compared to evaluate damage tolerance. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of a large steel pressure vessel are examined.

  20. Certification of damage tolerant composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapoff, Andrew J.; Dill, Harold D.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    A reliability based certification testing methodology for impact damage tolerant composite structure was developed. Cocured, adhesively bonded, and impact damaged composite static strength and fatigue life data were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of test parameters on the data scatter. The impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of various structural configurations were characterized through the analysis of an industry wide database of impact test results. Realistic impact damage certification requirements were proposed based on actual fleet aircraft data. The capabilities of available impact damage analysis methods were determined through correlation with experimental data. Probabilistic methods were developed to estimate the reliability of impact damaged composite structures.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gyanesh; Pachouri, U C; Khaidem, Devika Chanu; Kundu, Aman; Chopra, Chirag; Singh, Pushplata

    2015-01-01

    Various endogenous and environmental factors can cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage.  One of the reasons for enhanced mtDNA damage could be its proximity to the source of oxidants, and lack of histone-like protective proteins. Moreover, mitochondria contain inadequate DNA repair pathways, and, diminished DNA repair capacity may be one of the factors responsible for high mutation frequency of the mtDNA. mtDNA damage might cause impaired mitochondrial function, and, unrepaired mtDNA damage has been frequently linked with several diseases. Exploration of mitochondrial perspective of diseases might lead to a better understanding of several diseases, and will certainly open new avenues for detection, cure, and prevention of ailments.

  2. Persistent damage induces mitochondrial DNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently toward understanding the processes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair. However, a paucity of information still exists regarding the physiological effects of persistent mtDNA damage. This is due, in part, to experimental difficulties associated with targeting mtDNA for damage, while sparing nuclear DNA. Here, we characterize two systems designed for targeted mtDNA damage based on the inducible (Tet-ON) mitochondrial expression of the bacterial enzyme, exonuclease III, and the human enzyme, uracil-N-glyosylase containing the Y147A mutation. In both systems, damage was accompanied by degradation of mtDNA, which was detectable by six hours after induction of mutant uracil-N-glycosylase and by twelve hours after induction of exoIII. Unexpectedly, increases in the steady-state levels of single-strand lesions, which led to degradation, were small in absolute terms indicating that both abasic sites and single-strand gaps may be poorly tolerated in mtDNA. mtDNA degradation was accompanied by the loss of expression of mtDNA-encoded COX2. After withdrawal of the inducer, recovery from mtDNA depletion occurred faster in the system expressing exonuclease III, but in both systems reduced mtDNA levels persisted longer than 144h after doxycycline withdrawal. mtDNA degradation was followed by reduction and loss of respiration, decreased membrane potential, reduced cell viability, reduced intrinsic reactive oxygen species production, slowed proliferation, and changes in mitochondrial morphology (fragmentation of the mitochondrial network, rounding and “foaming” of the mitochondria). The mutagenic effects of abasic sites in mtDNA were low, which indicates that damaged mtDNA molecules may be degraded if not rapidly repaired. This study establishes, for the first time, that mtDNA degradation can be a direct and immediate consequence of persistent mtDNA damage and that increased ROS production is not an invariant consequence

  3. Rotorcraft Damage Tolerance Evaluated by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon; Abdi, Frank

    2000-01-01

    An integrally stiffened graphite/epoxy composite rotorcraft structure is evaluated via computational simulation. A computer code that scales up constituent micromechanics level material properties to the structure level and accounts for all possible failure modes is used for the simulation of composite degradation under loading. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture are included in the simulation. Design implications with regard to defect and damage tolerance of integrally stiffened composite structures are examined. A procedure is outlined regarding the use of this type of information for setting quality acceptance criteria, design allowables, damage tolerance, and retirement-for-cause criteria.

  4. DNA damage checkpoints in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    DNA damage is a common event and probably leads to mutation or deletion within chromosomal DNA, which may cause cancer or premature aging. DNA damage induces several cellular responses including DNA repair, checkpoint activity and the triggering of apoptotic pathways. DNA damage checkpoints are associated with biochemical pathways that end delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression. These checkpoints engage damage sensor proteins, such as the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, and the Rad17-RFC complex, in the detection of DNA damage and transduction of signals to ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Chk1 and Chk2 kinases regulate Cdc25, Wee1 and p53 that ultimately inactivate cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which inhibit cell-cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which DNA damage is recognized by sensor proteins and signals are transmitted to Cdks. We classify the genes involved in checkpoint signaling into four categories, namely sensors, mediators, transducers and effectors, although their proteins have the broad activity, and thus this classification is for convenience and is not definitive. PMID:16314342

  5. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  6. Deciphering the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2015-09-10

    This year's Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award honors Evelyn Witkin and Stephen J. Elledge, two pioneers in elucidating the DNA damage response, whose contributions span more than 40 years. PMID:26359974

  7. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, which represent three of the most common neurodegenerative pathologies in humans. PMID:26255941

  8. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm

  9. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  10. A Novel Approach to Rotorcraft Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Everett, Richard A.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Damage-tolerance methodology is positioned to replace safe-life methodologies for designing rotorcraft structures. The argument for implementing a damage-tolerance method comes from the fundamental fact that rotorcraft structures typically fail by fatigue cracking. Therefore, if technology permits prediction of fatigue-crack growth in structures, a damage-tolerance method should deliver the most accurate prediction of component life. Implementing damage-tolerance (DT) into high-cycle-fatigue (HCF) components will require a shift from traditional DT methods that rely on detecting an initial flaw with nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods. The rapid accumulation of cycles in a HCF component will result in a design based on a traditional DT method that is either impractical because of frequent inspections, or because the design will be too heavy to operate efficiently. Furthermore, once a HCF component develops a detectable propagating crack, the remaining fatigue life is short, sometimes less than one flight hour, which does not leave sufficient time for inspection. Therefore, designing a HCF component will require basing the life analysis on an initial flaw that is undetectable with current NDI technology.

  11. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  12. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  13. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  14. 77 FR 4890 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation for Composite Rotorcraft Structures, and Damage Tolerance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Fatigue Evaluation for Metallic Structures'' (76 FR 75435), published December 2, 2011. In the ``Composite... Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation for Composite Rotorcraft Structures'' (76 FR 74655). On December 2, 2011... Fatigue Evaluation for Composite Rotorcraft Structures, and Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation...

  15. Overexpression of rice OsREX1-S, encoding a putative component of the core general transcription and DNA repair factor IIH, renders plant cells tolerant to cadmium- and UV-induced damage by enhancing DNA excision repair.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Shuta; Kowata, Hikaru; Kondou, Youichi; Takahashi, Shinya; Matsui, Minami; Berberich, Thomas; Youssefian, Shohab; Hidema, Jun; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-05-01

    Screening of 40,000 Arabidopsis FOX (Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressor gene hunting system) lines expressing rice full-length cDNAs brings us to identify four cadmium (Cd)-tolerant lines, one of which carried OsREX1-S as a transgene. OsREX1-S shows the highest levels of identity to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii REX1-S (referred to as CrREX1-S, in which REX denotes Required for Excision) and to yeast and human TFB5s (RNA polymerase II transcription factor B5), both of which are components of the general transcription and DNA repair factor, TFIIH. Transient expression of OsREX1-S consistently localized the protein to the nucleus of onion cells. The newly generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing OsREX1-S reproducibly displayed enhanced Cd tolerance, confirming that the Cd-tolerance of the initial identified line was conferred solely by OsREX1-S expression. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing OsREX1-S exhibited ultraviolet-B (UVB) tolerance by reducing the amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers produced by UVB radiation. Moreover, those transgenic OsREX1-S Arabidopsis plants became resistant to bleomycin (an inducer of DNA strand break) and mitomycin C (DNA intercalating activity), compared to wild type. Our results indicate that OsREX1-S renders host plants tolerant to Cd, UVB radiation, bleomycin and mitomycin C through the enhanced DNA excision repair. PMID:24563249

  16. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  17. Demonstrating damage tolerance of composite airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial transport aircraft operating in the United States are certified by the Federal Aviation Authority to be damage tolerant. On 28 April 1988, Aloha Airlines Flight 243, a Boeing 727-200 airplane, suffered an explosive decompression of the fuselage but landed safely. This event provides very strong justification for the damage tolerant design criteria. The likely cause of the explosive decompression was the linkup of numerous small fatigue cracks that initiated at adjacent fastener holes in the lap splice joint at the side of the body. Actually, the design should have limited the damage size to less than two frame spacings (about 40 inches), but this type of 'multi-site damage' was not originally taken into account. This cracking pattern developed only in the high-time airplanes (many flights). After discovery in the fleet, a stringent inspection program using eddy current techniques was inaugurated to discover these cracks before they linked up. Because of concerns about safety and the maintenance burden, the lap-splice joints of these high-time airplanes are being modified to remove cracks and prevent new cracking; newer designs account for 'multi-site damage'.

  18. Damage Tolerance of Composite Laminates from an Empirical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    Damage tolerance consists of analysis and experimentation working together. Impact damage is usually of most concern for laminated composites. Once impacted, the residual compression strength is usually of most interest. Other properties may be of more interest than compression (application dependent). A damage tolerance program is application specific (not everyone is building aircraft). The "Building Block Approach" is suggested for damage tolerance. Advantage can be taken of the excellent fatigue resistance of damaged laminates to save time and costs.

  19. Damage Tolerance of Integral Structure in Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Urban, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The rotorcraft industry has rapidly implemented integral structures into aircraft to benefit from the weight and cost advantages over traditionally riveted structure. The cost to manufacture an integral structure, where the entire component is machined from a single plate of material, is about one-fifth that of a riveted structure. Furthermore, the integral structure can weigh only one-half that of a riveted structure through optimal design of stiffening structure and part reduction. Finally, inspection and repair of damage in the field can be less costly than riveted structure. There are no rivet heads to inspect under, reducing inspection time, and damage can be removed or patched readily without altering the primary structure, reducing replacement or repair costs. In this paper, the authors will investigate the damage tolerance implications of fielding an integral structure manufactured from thick plate aluminum.

  20. Targeting DNA damage response in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hosoya, Noriko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy are designed to kill cancer cells mostly by inducing DNA damage. DNA damage is normally recognized and repaired by the intrinsic DNA damage response machinery. If the damaged lesions are successfully repaired, the cells will survive. In order to specifically and effectively kill cancer cells by therapies that induce DNA damage, it is important to take advantage of specific abnormalities in the DNA damage response machinery that are present in cancer cells but not in normal cells. Such properties of cancer cells can provide biomarkers or targets for sensitization. For example, defects or upregulation of the specific pathways that recognize or repair specific types of DNA damage can serve as biomarkers of favorable or poor response to therapies that induce such types of DNA damage. Inhibition of a DNA damage response pathway may enhance the therapeutic effects in combination with the DNA-damaging agents. Moreover, it may also be useful as a monotherapy when it achieves synthetic lethality, in which inhibition of a complementary DNA damage response pathway selectively kills cancer cells that have a defect in a particular DNA repair pathway. The most striking application of this strategy is the treatment of cancers deficient in homologous recombination by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors. In this review, we describe the impact of targeting the cancer-specific aberrations in the DNA damage response by explaining how these treatment strategies are currently being evaluated in preclinical or clinical trials. PMID:24484288

  1. DNA damage checkpoint, damage repair, and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Yu, Shan-Shan; Chen, Guan-Jun; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2006-05-01

    Genomic DNA is under constant attack from both endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damaging agents. Without proper care, the ensuing DNA damages would lead to alteration of genomic structure thus affecting the faithful transmission of genetic information. During the process of evolution, organisms have acquired a series of mechanisms responding to and repairing DNA damage, thus assuring the maintenance of genome stability and faithful transmission of genetic information. DNA damage checkpoint is one such important mechanism by which, in the face of DNA damage, a cell can respond to amplified damage signals, either by actively halting the cell cycle until it ensures that critical processes such as DNA replication or mitosis are complete or by initiating apoptosis as a last resort. Over the last decade, complex hierarchical interactions between the key components like ATM/ATR in the checkpoint pathway and various other mediators, effectors including DNA damage repair proteins have begun to emerge. In the meantime, an intimate relationship between mechanisms of damage checkpoint pathway, DNA damage repair, and genome stability was also uncovered. Reviewed herein are the recent findings on both the mechanisms of activation of checkpoint pathways and their coordination with DNA damage repair machinery as well as their effect on genomic integrity. PMID:16722332

  2. Low cost damage tolerant composite fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J.; Freeman, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    The resin transfer molding (RTM) process applied to composite aircraft parts offers the potential for using low cost resin systems with dry graphite fabrics that can be significantly less expensive than prepreg tape fabricated components. Stitched graphite fabric composites have demonstrated compression after impact failure performance that equals or exceeds that of thermoplastic or tough thermoset matrix composites. This paper reviews methods developed to fabricate complex shape composite parts using stitched graphite fabrics to increase damage tolerance with RTM processes to reduce fabrication cost.

  3. Damage-tolerance strategies for nacre tablets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengnan; Zhu, Xinqiao; Li, Qiyang; Wang, Rizhi; Wang, Xiaoxiang

    2016-05-01

    Nacre, a natural armor, exhibits prominent penetration resistance against predatory attacks. Unraveling its hierarchical toughening mechanisms and damage-tolerance design strategies may provide significant inspiration for the pursuit of high-performance artificial armors. In this work, relationships between the structure and mechanical performance of nacre were investigated. The results show that other than their brick-and-mortar structure, individual nacre tablets significantly contribute to the damage localization of nacre. Affected by intracrystalline organics, the tablets exhibit a unique fracture behavior. The synergistic action of the nanoscale deformation mechanisms increases the energy dissipation efficiency of the tablets and contributes to the preservation of the structural and functional integrity of the shell. PMID:26892674

  4. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro-chemo-mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  5. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries. PMID:26400671

  6. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro-chemo-mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries. PMID:26400671

  7. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratio is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.

  8. High damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xueju; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Wang, Haoran; Tao, Siyu; Yang, Avery; Liu, Yang; Beng Chew, Huck; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; et al

    2015-09-24

    Mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade in high-capacity electrode materials critically hinder their use in high-performance rechargeable batteries. Despite tremendous efforts devoted to the study of the electro–chemo–mechanical behaviours of high-capacity electrode materials, their fracture properties and mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report a nanomechanical study on the damage tolerance of electrochemically lithiated silicon. Our in situ transmission electron microscopy experiments reveal a striking contrast of brittle fracture in pristine silicon versus ductile tensile deformation in fully lithiated silicon. Quantitative fracture toughness measurements by nanoindentation show a rapid brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture as the lithium-to-silicon molar ratiomore » is increased to above 1.5. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of the brittle-to-ductile transition governed by atomic bonding and lithiation-induced toughening. Finally, our results reveal the high damage tolerance in amorphous lithium-rich silicon alloys and have important implications for the development of durable rechargeable batteries.« less

  9. MicroRNA response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guohui; Mathur, Rohit; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xinna; Lu, Xiongbin

    2011-01-01

    Faithful transmission of genetic material in eukaryotic cells requires not only accurate DNA replication and chromosome distribution, but also the ability to sense and repair spontaneous and induced DNA damage. To maintain genomic integrity, cells undergo a DNA damage response using a complex network of signaling pathways, composed of coordinate sensors, transducers and effectors in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair. Emerging evidence has suggested that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in regulation of DNA damage response. Here, we discuss the recent findings on how miRNAs interact with the canonical DNA damage response and how miRNA expression is regulated after DNA damage. PMID:21741842

  10. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  11. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  12. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  13. DNA Damage in Major Psychiatric Diseases.

    PubMed

    Raza, Muhammad Ummear; Tufan, Turan; Wang, Yan; Hill, Christopher; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Human cells are exposed to exogenous insults and continuous production of different metabolites. These insults and unwanted metabolic products might interfere with the stability of genomic DNA. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that different psychiatric disorders show substantially high levels of oxidative DNA damage in the brain accompanied with morphological and functional alterations. It reveals that damaged genomic DNA may contribute to the pathophysiology of these mental illnesses. In this article, we review the roles of oxidative damage and reduced antioxidant ability in some vastly studied psychiatric disorders and emphasize the inclusion of treatment options involving DNA repair. In addition, while most currently used antidepressants are based on the manipulation of the neurotransmitter regulation in managing different mental abnormalities, they are able to prevent or reverse neurotoxin-induced DNA damage. Therefore, it may be plausible to target on genomic DNA alterations for psychiatric therapies, which is of pivotal importance for future antipsychiatric drug development. PMID:27126805

  14. Damage Tolerance Analysis of a Pressurized Liquid Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Harvin, Stephen F.; Gregory, Peyton B.; Mason, Brian H.; Thompson, Joe E.; Hoffman, Eric K.

    2006-01-01

    A damage tolerance assessment was conducted of an 8,000 gallon pressurized Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank. The LOX tank is constructed of a stainless steel pressure vessel enclosed by a thermal-insulating vacuum jacket. The vessel is pressurized to 2,250 psi with gaseous nitrogen resulting in both thermal and pressure stresses on the tank wall. Finite element analyses were performed on the tank to characterize the stresses from operation. Engineering material data was found from both the construction of the tank and the technical literature. An initial damage state was assumed based on records of a nondestructive inspection performed on the tank. The damage tolerance analyses were conducted using the NASGRO computer code. This paper contains the assumptions, and justifications, made for the input parameters to the damage tolerance analyses and the results of the damage tolerance analyses with a discussion on the operational safety of the LOX tank.

  15. Damage-Tolerant Composites Made By Stitching Carbon Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Work conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate stitching combined with resin transfer molding to make composites more tolerant of damage and potentially cost competitive with metals. Composite materials tailored for damage tolerance by stitching layers of dry carbon fabric with closely spaced threads to provide reinforcement through thickness. Epoxy resin then infused into stitched preforms, and epoxy was cured. Various stitching patterns and thread materials evaluated by use of flat plate specimens. Also, blade-stiffened structural elements fabricated and tested. Stitched flat laminates showed outstanding damage tolerance, excellent compression strength in notched specimens, and acceptable fatigue behavior. Development of particular interest to aircraft and automotive industries.

  16. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica S.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Failure of accurate DNA damage sensing and repair mechanisms manifests as a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, immunodeficiency, infertility and cancer. The accuracy and efficiency of DNA damage detection and repair, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR), requires the recruitment and subsequent post-translational modification (PTM) of a complex network of proteins. Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) SUMO have established roles in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A role for other UBLs, such as NEDD8, is also now emerging. This article provides an overview of the DDR, discusses our current understanding of the process and function of PTM by ubiquitin and NEDD8, and reviews the literature surrounding the role of ubiquitylation and neddylation in DNA repair processes, focusing particularly on DNA DSB repair. PMID:25833379

  17. PCR-Based Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number, Mitochondrial DNA Damage, and Nuclear DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P; Rooney, John P; Ryde, Ian T; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role that DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit, we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  18. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  19. Survival of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria against DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Manoj; Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Misra, Hari S; D'Souza, S F

    2010-10-01

    Phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSBs) were isolated from different plant rhizosphere soils of various agroecological regions of India. These isolates showed synthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), production of gluconic acid, and release of phosphorus from insoluble tricalcium phosphate. The bacterial isolates synthesizing PQQ also showed higher tolerance to ultraviolet C radiation and mitomycin C as compared to Escherichia coli but were less tolerant than Deinococcus radiodurans. Unlike E. coli, PSB isolates showed higher tolerance to DNA damage when grown in the absence of inorganic phosphate. Higher tolerance to ultraviolet C radiation and oxidative stress in these PSBs grown under PQQ synthesis inducible conditions, namely phosphate starvation, might suggest the possible additional role of this redox cofactor in the survival of these isolates under extreme abiotic stress conditions. PMID:20962905

  20. Triplex-Induced DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Faye A.; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular DNA damage response is critical to preserving genomic integrity following exposure to genotoxic stress. A complex series of networks and signaling pathways become activated after DNA damage and trigger the appropriate cellular response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. The response elicited is dependent upon the type and extent of damage sustained, with the ultimate goal of preventing propagation of the damaged DNA. A major focus of our studies is to determine the cellular pathways involved in processing damage induced by altered helical structures, specifically triplexes. Our lab has demonstrated that the TFIIH factor XPD occupies a central role in triggering apoptosis in response to triplex-induced DNA strand breaks. We have shown that XPD co-localizes with γH2AX, and its presence is required for the phosphorylation of H2AX tyrosine142, which stimulates the signaling pathway to recruit pro-apoptotic factors to the damage site. Herein, we examine the cellular pathways activated in response to triplex formation and discuss our finding that suggests that XPD-dependent apoptosis plays a role in preserving genomic integrity in the presence of excessive structurally induced DNA damage. PMID:24348211

  1. Progressive Fracture and Damage Tolerance of Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Structural performance (integrity, durability and damage tolerance) of fiber reinforced composite pressure vessels, designed for pressured shelters for planetary exploration, is investigated via computational simulation. An integrated computer code is utilized for the simulation of damage initiation, growth, and propagation under pressure. Aramid fibers are considered in a rubbery polymer matrix for the composite system. Effects of fiber orientation and fabrication defect/accidental damages are investigated with regard to the safety and durability of the shelter. Results show the viability of fiber reinforced pressure vessels as damage tolerant shelters for planetary colonization.

  2. Age to survive: DNA damage and aging.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Björn; Garinis, George A; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2008-02-01

    Aging represents the progressive functional decline and increased mortality risk common to nearly all metazoans. Recent findings experimentally link DNA damage and organismal aging: longevity-regulating genetic pathways respond to the accumulation of DNA damage and other stress conditions and conversely influence the rate of damage accumulation and its impact for cancer and aging. This novel insight has emerged from studies on human progeroid diseases and mouse models that have deficient DNA repair pathways. Here we discuss a unified concept of an evolutionarily conserved 'survival' response that shifts the organism's resources from growth to maintenance as an adaptation to stresses, such as starvation and DNA damage. This shift protects the organism from cancer and promotes healthy aging. PMID:18192065

  3. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  4. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  5. DNA damage responses in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Collins, Josie K; Jones, Keith T

    2016-07-01

    DNA damage acquired during meiosis can lead to infertility and miscarriage. Hence, it should be important for an oocyte to be able to detect and respond to such events in order to make a healthy egg. Here, the strategies taken by oocytes during their stages of growth to respond to DNA damaging events are reviewed. In particular, recent evidence of a novel pathway in fully grown oocytes helps prevent the formation of mature eggs with DNA damage. It has been found that fully grown germinal vesicle stage oocytes that have been DNA damaged do not arrest at this point in meiosis, but instead undergo meiotic resumption and stall during the first meiotic division. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, which is a well-known mitotic pathway employed by somatic cells to monitor chromosome attachment to spindle microtubules, appears to be utilised by oocytes also to respond to DNA damage. As such maturing oocytes are arrested at metaphase I due to an active Spindle Assembly Checkpoint. This is surprising given this checkpoint has been previously studied in oocytes and considered to be weak and ineffectual because of its poor ability to be activated in response to microtubule attachment errors. Therefore, the involvement of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint in DNA damage responses of mature oocytes during meiosis I uncovers a novel second function for this ubiquitous cellular checkpoint. PMID:27069010

  6. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  7. Historical perspective on the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality. PMID:26507443

  8. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  9. Some Examples of the Relations Between Processing and Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2012-01-01

    Most structures made of laminated polymer matrix composites (PMCs) must be designed to some damage tolerance requirement that includes foreign object impact damage. Thus from the beginning of a part s life, impact damage is assumed to exist in the material and the part is designed to carry the required load with the prescribed impact damage present. By doing this, some processing defects may automatically be accounted for in the reduced design allowable due to these impacts. This paper will present examples of how a given level of impact damage and certain processing defects affect the compression strength of a laminate that contains both. Knowledge of the impact damage tolerance requirements, before processing begins, can broaden material options and processing techniques since the structure is not being designed to pristine properties.

  10. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades.

    PubMed

    McGugan, M; Pereira, G; Sørensen, B F; Toftegaard, H; Branner, K

    2015-02-28

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will be possible to combine damage tolerant structural design, monitoring systems, inspection techniques and modelling to manage the life cycle of the structures. This will allow an efficient operation of the wind turbine in terms of load alleviation, limited maintenance and repair leading to a more effective exploitation of offshore wind. PMID:25583858

  11. Damage tolerance and structural monitoring for wind turbine blades

    PubMed Central

    McGugan, M.; Pereira, G.; Sørensen, B. F.; Toftegaard, H.; Branner, K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a methodology for reliable design and maintenance of wind turbine rotor blades using a condition monitoring approach and a damage tolerance index coupling the material and structure. By improving the understanding of material properties that control damage propagation it will be possible to combine damage tolerant structural design, monitoring systems, inspection techniques and modelling to manage the life cycle of the structures. This will allow an efficient operation of the wind turbine in terms of load alleviation, limited maintenance and repair leading to a more effective exploitation of offshore wind. PMID:25583858

  12. Damage Tolerant Microstructures for Shock Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerreta, Ellen; Dennis-Koller, Darcie; Escobedo, Juan Pablo; Fensin, Saryu; Valone, Steve; Trujillo, Carl; Bronkhorst, Curt; Lebensohn, Ricardo

    While dynamic failure, due to shock loading, has been studied for many years, our current ability to predict and simulate evolving damage during dynamic loading remains limited. One reason for this is due to the lack of understanding for the linkages between process-induced as well as evolved microstructure and damage. To this end, the role of microstructure on the early stages of dynamic damage has been studied in high purity Ta and Cu. This work, which utilizes plate-impact experiments to interrogate these effects, has recently been extended to a subset to Cu-alloys (Cu-Pb, Cu-Nb, and Cu-Ag). These multi-length scale studies, have identified a number of linkages between damage nucleation and growth and microstructural features such as: grain boundary types, grain boundary orientation with respect to loading direction, grain orientation, and bi-metal interfaces. A combination of modeling and simulation techniques along with experimental observation has been utilized to examine the mechanisms for the ductile damage processes such as nucleation, growth and coalescence. This work has identified differing features of importance for damage nucleation in high purity and alloyed materials, lending insight into features of concern for mitigating shock induced damage in more complicated alloy systems.

  13. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. Images PMID:2513480

  14. Damage Tolerance Issues as Related to Metallic Rotorcraft Dynamic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Elber, W.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper issues related to the use of damage tolerance in life managing rotorcraft dynamic components are reviewed. In the past, rotorcraft fatigue design has combined constant amplitude tests of full-scale parts with flight loads and usage data in a conservative manner to provide "safe life" component replacement times. In contrast to the safe life approach over the past twenty years the United States Air Force and several other NATO nations have used damage tolerance design philosophies for fixed wing aircraft to improve safety and reliability. The reliability of the safe life approach being used in rotorcraft started to be questioned shortly after presentations at an American Helicopter Society's specialist meeting in 1980 showed predicted fatigue lives for a hypothetical pitch-link problem to vary from a low of 9 hours to a high in excess of 2594 hours. This presented serious cost, weight, and reliability implications. Somewhat after the U.S. Army introduced its six nines reliability on fatigue life, attention shifted towards using a possible damage tolerance approach to the life management of rotorcraft dynamic components. The use of damage tolerance in life management of dynamic rotorcraft parts will be the subject of this paper. This review will start with past studies on using damage tolerance life management with existing helicopter parts that were safe life designed. Also covered will be a successful attempt at certifying a tail rotor pitch rod using damage tolerance, which was designed using the safe life approach. The FAA review of rotorcraft fatigue design and their recommendations along with some on-going U.S. industry research in damage tolerance on rotorcraft will be reviewed.

  15. Damage Tolerance Issues as Related to Metallic Rotorcraft Dynamic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Elber, W.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper issues related to the use of damage tolerance in life managing rotorcraft dynamic components are reviewed. In the past, rotorcraft fatigue design has combined constant amplitude tests of full-scale parts with flight loads and usage data in a conservative manner to provide "safe life" component replacement times. In contrast to the safe life approach over the past twenty years the United States Air Force and several other NATO nations have used damage tolerance design philosophies for fixed wing aircraft to improve safety and reliability. The reliability of the safe life approach being used in rotorcraft started to be questioned shortly after presentations at an American Helicopter Society's specialist meeting in 1980 showed predicted fatigue lives for a hypothetical pitch-link problem to vary from a low of 9 hours to a high in excess of 2594 hours. This presented serious cost, weight, and reliability implications. Somewhat after the U.S. Army introduced its six nines reliability on fatigue life, attention shifted towards using a possible damage tolerance approach to the life management of rotorcraft dynamic components. The use of damage tolerance in life management of dynamic rotorcraft parts will be the subject of this paper. This review will start with past studies on using damage tolerance life management with existing helicopter parts that were safe life designed. Also covered will be a successful attempt at certifying a tail rotor pitch rod using damage tolerance, which was designed using the safe life approach. The FAA review of rotorcraft fatigue design and their recommendations along with some on-going U.S. industry research in damage tolerance on rotorcraft will be reviewed. Finally, possible problems and future needs for research will be highlighted.

  16. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  17. How oxygen damages microbes: oxygen tolerance and obligate anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Imlay, James A

    2002-01-01

    The orbital structure of molecular oxygen constrains it to accept electrons one at a time, and its unfavourable univalent reduction potential ensures that it can do so only with low-potential redox partners. In E. coli, this restriction prevents oxygen from oxidizing structural molecules. Instead, it primarily oxidizes reduced flavins, a reaction that is harmful only in that it generates superoxide and hydrogen peroxide as products. These species are stronger oxidants than is oxygen itself. They can oxidize dehydratase iron-sulphur clusters and sulphydryls, respectively, and thereby inactivate enzymes that are dependent upon these functional groups. Hydrogen peroxide also oxidizes free iron, generating hydroxyl radicals. Because hydroxyl radicals react with virtually any biomolecules they encounter, their reactivity is broadly dissipated, and only their reactions with DNA are known to have an important physiological impact. E. coli elaborates scavenging and repair systems to minimize the impact of this adventitious chemistry; mutants that lack these defences grow poorly in aerobic habitats. Some of the growth deficits of these mutants cannot be easily ascribed to sulphydryl, cluster, or DNA damage, indicating that important aspects of oxidative stress still lack a biochemical explanation. Obligate anaerobes cannot tolerate oxygen because they utilize metabolic schemes built around enzymes that react with oxidants. The reliance upon low-potential flavoproteins for anaerobic respiration probably causes substantial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide to be produced when anaerobes are exposed to air. These species then generate damage of the same type that they produce in aerotolerant bacteria. However, obligate anaerobes also utilize several classes of dioxygen-sensitive enzymes that are not needed by aerobes. These enzymes are used for processes that help maintain the redox balance during anaerobic fermentations. They catalyse reactions that are chemically difficult

  18. Delamination, durability, and damage tolerance of laminated composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1993-01-01

    Durability and damage tolerance may have different connotations to people from different industries and with different backgrounds. Damage tolerance always refers to a safety of flight issue where the structure must be able to sustain design limit loads in the presence of damage and return to base safely. Durability, on the other hand, is an economic issue where the structure must be able to survive a certain life under load before the initiation of observable damage. Delamination is typically the observable damage mechanism that is of concern for durability, and the growth and accumulation of delaminations through the laminate thickness is often the sequence of events that leads to failure and the loss of structural integrity.

  19. On the enhancement of impact damage tolerance of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a thin layer of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) on the outer surface of carbon/epoxy composite materials as a method of improving impact resistance and damage tolerance through hybridization. Flat 16-ply laminates as well as honeycomb sandwich structures with eight-ply facesheets were tested in this study. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing was used to inflict damage upon the specimens. Evaluation of damage resistance included instrumented impact data, visual examination, C-scanning and compression after impact (CAI) testing. The results show that only one lamina of UHMWPE did not improve the damage tolerance (strength retention) of the 16-ply flat laminate specimens or the honeycomb sandwich beams, however, a modest gain in impact resistance (detectable damage) was found for the honeycomb sandwich specimens that contained an outer layer of UHMWPE.

  20. DNA damage under simulated extraterrestrial conditions in bacteriophage T7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, A.; Kovács, G.; Hegedüs, M.; Módos, K.; Rontó, Gy.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    The experiment ``Phage and uracil response'' (PUR) will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the ISS aiming to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions on bacteriophage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films. To achieve this new method was elaborated for the preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein thin films (1). During the EXPOSE Experiment Verification Tests (EVT) the samples were exposed to vacuum (10 -6 Pa), to monochromatic (254 nm) and polychromatic (200-400 nm) UV radiation in air as well in simulated space vacuum. Using neutral density (ND) filters dose-effect curves were performed in order to define the maximum doses tolerated, and we also studied the effect of temperature in vacuum as well as the influence of temperature fluctuations. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions (e.g. strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, DNA-DNA cross-links) accumulate throughout exposure. DNA damage was determined by quantitative PCR using 555 bp and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA (2) and by neutral and alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis; the structural/chemical effects were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum, in the electrophoretic pattern of DNA and the decrease of the amount of the PCR products have been detected indicating the damage of isolated and intraphage DNA. Preliminary results suggest a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target. Fekete et al. J. Luminescence 102-103, 469-475, 2003 Hegedüs et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 78, 213-219, 2003

  1. Epigenome Maintenance in Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Dabin, Juliette; Fortuny, Anna; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-06-01

    Organism viability relies on the stable maintenance of specific chromatin landscapes, established during development, that shape cell functions and identities by driving distinct gene expression programs. Yet epigenome maintenance is challenged during transcription, replication, and repair of DNA damage, all of which elicit dynamic changes in chromatin organization. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the specialized mechanisms contributing to the restoration of epigenome structure and function after DNA damage in the mammalian cell nucleus. By drawing a parallel with epigenome maintenance during replication, we explore emerging concepts and highlight open issues in this rapidly growing field. In particular, we present our current knowledge of molecular players that support the coordinated maintenance of genome and epigenome integrity in response to DNA damage, and we highlight how nuclear organization impacts genome stability. Finally, we discuss possible functional implications of epigenome plasticity in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27259203

  2. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  3. Ontogenetic contingency of tolerance mechanisms in response to apical damage

    PubMed Central

    Gruntman, Michal; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are able to tolerate tissue loss through vigorous branching which is often triggered by release from apical dominance and activation of lateral meristems. However, damage-induced branching might not be a mere physiological outcome of released apical dominance, but an adaptive response to environmental signals, such as damage timing and intensity. Here, branching responses to both factors were examined in the annual plant Medicago truncatula. Methods Branching patterns and allocation to reproductive traits were examined in response to variable clipping intensities and timings in M. truncatula plants from two populations that vary in the onset of reproduction. Phenotypic selection analysis was used to evaluate the strength and direction of selection on branching under the damage treatments. Key Results Plants of both populations exhibited an ontogenetic shift in tolerance mechanisms: while early damage induced greater meristem activation, late damage elicited investment in late-determined traits, including mean pod and seed biomass, and supported greater germination rates. Severe damage mostly elicited simultaneous development of multiple-order lateral branches, but this response was limited to early damage. Selection analyses revealed positive directional selection on branching in plants under early- compared with late- or no-damage treatments. Conclusions The results demonstrate that damage-induced meristem activation is an adaptive response that could be modified according to the plant's developmental stage, severity of tissue loss and their interaction, stressing the importance of considering these effects when studying plastic responses to apical damage. PMID:21873259

  4. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields. PMID:26979557

  5. Mechanical Data for Use in Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Newman, John A.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a research program to determine the damage tolerance properties of metallic propeller materials. Three alloys were selected for investigation: 2025-T6 Aluminum, D6AC Steel and 4340 Steel. Mechanical response, fatigue (S-N) and fatigue crack growth rate data are presented for all of the alloys. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this study are as follows. The damage tolerant design of a propeller system will require a complete understanding of the fatigue crack growth threshold. There exists no experimental procedure to reliably develop the fatigue crack growth threshold data that is needed for damage tolerant design methods. Significant research will be required to fully understand the fatigue crack growth threshold. The development of alternative precracking methods, evaluating the effect of specimen configuration and attempting to identify micromechanical issues are simply the first steps to understanding the mechanics of the threshold.

  6. Detection of Damaged DNA Bases by DNA Glycosylase Enzymes†

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Stivers, James T.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental and shared process in all forms of life is the use of DNA glycosylase enzymes to excise rare damaged bases from genomic DNA. Without such enzymes, the highly-ordered primary sequences of genes would rapidly deteriorate. Recent structural and biophysical studies are beginning to reveal a fascinating multistep mechanism for damaged base detection that begins with short-range sliding of the glycosylase along the DNA chain in a distinct conformation we refer to as the search complex (SC). Sliding is frequently punctuated by the formation of a transient “interrogation” complex (IC) where the enzyme extrahelically inspects both normal and damaged bases in an exosite pocket that is distant from the active site. When normal bases are presented in the exosite, the IC rapidly collapses back to the SC, while a damaged base will efficiently partition forward into the active site to form the catalytically competent excision complex (EC). Here we review the unique problems associated with enzymatic detection of rare damaged DNA bases in the genome, and emphasize how each complex must have specific dynamic properties that are tuned to optimize the rate and efficiency of damage site location. PMID:20469926

  7. UV damage in DNA promotes nucleosome unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2010-08-20

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA damage by UV radiation. We find that FRET efficiency is reduced in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the presence of UV photoproducts enhances spontaneous unwrapping of DNA from histones. Furthermore, this UV-induced shift in unwrapping dynamics is associated with increased restriction enzyme accessibility of histone-bound DNA after UV treatment. Surprisingly, the increased unwrapping dynamics is even observed in nucleosome core particles containing a single UV lesion at a specific site. These results highlight the potential for increased "intrinsic exposure" of nucleosome-associated DNA lesions in chromatin to repair proteins. PMID:20562439

  8. Oxidation of DNA: damage to nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Kanvah, Sriram; Joseph, Joshy; Schuster, Gary B; Barnett, Robert N; Cleveland, Charles L; Landman, Uzi

    2010-02-16

    All organisms store the information necessary to maintain life in their DNA. Any process that damages DNA, causing a loss or corruption of that information, jeopardizes the viability of the organism. One-electron oxidation is such a process. In this Account, we address three of the central features of one-electron oxidation of DNA: (i) the migration of the radical cation away from the site of its formation; (ii) the electronic and structural factors that determine the nucleobases at which irreversible reactions most readily occur; (iii) the mechanism of reaction for nucleobase radical cations. The loss of an electron (ionization) from DNA generates an electron "hole" (a radical cation), located most often on its nucleobases, that migrates reversibly through duplex DNA by hopping until it is trapped in an irreversible chemical reaction. The particular sequence of nucleobases in a DNA oligomer determines both the efficiency of hopping and the specific location and nature of the damaging chemical reaction. In aqueous solution, DNA is a polyanion because of the negative charge carried by its phosphate groups. Counterions to the phosphate groups (typically Na(+)) play an important role in facilitating both hopping and the eventual reaction of the radical cation with H(2)O. Irreversible reaction of a radical cation with H(2)O in duplex DNA occurs preferentially at the most reactive site. In normal DNA, comprising the four common DNA nucleobases G, C, A, and T, reaction occurs most commonly at a guanine, resulting in its conversion primarily to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-OxoG). Both electronic and steric effects control the outcome of this process. If the DNA oligomer does not contain a suitable guanine, then reaction of the radical cation occurs at the thymine of a TT step, primarily by a tandem process. The oxidative damage of DNA is a complex process, influenced by charge transport and reactions that are controlled by a combination of enthalpic, entropic, steric, and

  9. An Experimental Investigation of Damage Resistances and Damage Tolerance of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.

    2003-01-01

    The project included three lines of investigation, aimed at a better understanding of the damage resistance and damage tolerance of pultruded composites. The three lines of investigation were: (i) measurement of permanent dent depth after transverse indentation at different load levels, and correlation with other damage parameters such as damage area (from x-radiography) and back surface crack length, (ii) estimation of point stress and average stress characteristic dimensions corresponding to measured damage parameters, and (iii) an attempt to measure the damage area by a reflection photoelastic technique. All the three lines of investigation were pursued.

  10. Damage tolerant composite wing panels for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter J.; Wilson, Robert D.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial aircraft advanced composite wing surface panels were tested for durability and damage tolerance. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using grahite-epoxy materials. The damage tolerance program was structured to allow a systematic progression from material evaluations to the optimized large panel verification tests. The program included coupon testing to evaluate toughened material systems, static and fatigue tests of compression coupons with varying amounts of impact damage, element tests of three-stiffener panels to evaluate upper wing panel design concepts, and the wing structure damage environment was studied. A series of technology demonstration tests of large compression panels is performed. A repair investigation is included in the final large panel test.

  11. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  12. DNA Damage and Aging Around the Clock.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Rossi, Derrick J; Beerman, Isabel

    2016-08-01

    The hematopoietic system undergoes many changes during aging, but the causes and molecular mechanisms behind these changes are not well understood. Wang et al. have recently implicated a circadian rhythm gene, Per2, as playing a role in the DNA damage response and in the expression of lymphoid genes in aged hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27345866

  13. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  14. 75 FR 11734 - Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and Alterations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on December 12, 2007. That final rule required holders of design approvals to make damage tolerance data for repairs and alterations to fatigue critical airplane structure available to operators. After issuing the final rule, the FAA determined that further changes were......

  15. Heat tolerance of higher plants cenosis to damaging air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Shklavtsova, Ekaterina

    Designing sustained biological-technical life support systems (BTLSS) including higher plants as a part of a photosynthesizing unit, it is important to foresee the multi species cenosis reaction on either stress-factors. Air temperature changing in BTLSS (because of failure of a thermoregulation system) up to the values leading to irreversible damages of photosynthetic processes is one of those factors. However, it is possible to increase, within the certain limits, the plant cenosis tolerance to the unfavorable temperatures’ effect due to the choice of the higher plants possessing resistance both to elevated and to lowered air temperatures. Besides, the plants heat tolerance can be increased when subjecting them during their growing to the hardening off temperatures’ effect. Thus, we have come to the conclusion that it is possible to increase heat tolerance of multi species cenosis under the damaging effect of air temperature of 45 (°) СC.

  16. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  17. Oxidative DNA damage accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Farinati, F; Cardin, R; Degan, P; Rugge, M; Di, M; Bonvicini, P; Naccarato, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gastric carcinogenesis is a multifactorial, multistep process, in which chronic inflammation plays a major role. 
Aims—In order to ascertain whether free radical mediated oxidative DNA damage is involved in such a process, concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), a mutagenic/carcinogenic adduct, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as an indirect measure of free radical mediated damage, were determined in biopsy specimens from patients undergoing endoscopy. 
Patients—Eighty eight patients were divided into histological subgroups as follows: 27 with chronic non-atrophic gastritis, 41 with atrophic gastritis, six with gastric cancer, and 14 unaffected controls. 
Methods—Intestinal metaplasia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and disease activity were semiquantitatively scored. 8OHdG concentrations were assessed by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and TBARS concentrations were fluorimetrically assayed. 
Results—8OHdG concentrations (mean number of adducts/105 dG residues) were significantly higher in chronic atrophic gastritis (p=0.0009). Significantly higher concentrations were also detected in the presence of severe disease activity (p=0.02), intestinal metaplasia (p=0.035), and H pylori infection (p=0.001). TBARS concentrations were also higher in atrophic gastritis, though not significantly so. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, 8OHdG concentrations correlated best with the presence and severity of H pylori infection (r=0.53, p=0.002). 
Conclusions—Chronic gastritis is characterised by the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage with mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. H pylori infection is the major determinant for DNA adduct formation. 

 Keywords: free radicals; oxidative DNA damage; gastric carcinogenesis; precancerous changes; peroxidative damage PMID:9577340

  18. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  19. Heat Stress-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kantidze, O.L.; Velichko, A.K.; Luzhin, A.V.; Razin, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Although the heat-stress response has been extensively studied for decades, very little is known about its effects on nucleic acids and nucleic acid-associated processes. This is due to the fact that the research has focused on the study of heat shock proteins and factors (HSPs and HSFs), their involvement in the regulation of transcription, protein homeostasis, etc. Recently, there has been some progress in the study of heat stress effects on DNA integrity. In this review, we summarize and discuss well-known and potential mechanisms of formation of various heat stress-induced DNA damage. PMID:27437141

  20. DNA Damage, Homology-Directed Repair, and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Pardo, Alba Di; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-01-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%–4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, ~50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  1. Optimization of Aerospace Structure Subject to Damage Tolerance Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgun, Mehmet A.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this cooperative agreement was to seek computationally efficient ways to optimize aerospace structures subject to damage tolerance criteria. Optimization was to involve sizing as well as topology optimization. The work was done in collaboration with Steve Scotti, Chauncey Wu and Joanne Walsh at the NASA Langley Research Center. Computation of constraint sensitivity is normally the most time-consuming step of an optimization procedure. The cooperative work first focused on this issue and implemented the adjoint method of sensitivity computation in an optimization code (runstream) written in Engineering Analysis Language (EAL). The method was implemented both for bar and plate elements including buckling sensitivity for the latter. Lumping of constraints was investigated as a means to reduce the computational cost. Adjoint sensitivity computation was developed and implemented for lumped stress and buckling constraints. Cost of the direct method and the adjoint method was compared for various structures with and without lumping. The results were reported in two papers. It is desirable to optimize topology of an aerospace structure subject to a large number of damage scenarios so that a damage tolerant structure is obtained. Including damage scenarios in the design procedure is critical in order to avoid large mass penalties at later stages. A common method for topology optimization is that of compliance minimization which has not been used for damage tolerant design. In the present work, topology optimization is treated as a conventional problem aiming to minimize the weight subject to stress constraints. Multiple damage configurations (scenarios) are considered. Each configuration has its own structural stiffness matrix and, normally, requires factoring of the matrix and solution of the system of equations. Damage that is expected to be tolerated is local and represents a small change in the stiffness matrix compared to the baseline (undamaged

  2. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Yu, K Y; Liu, Y; Shao, S; Wang, H; Kirk, M A; Wang, J; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  3. Damage Tolerance and Reliability of Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a formal method to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of a multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the material behavior level where primitive variables with their respective scatter ranges are used to describe behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate the uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from this method demonstrate that it is mature and that it can be used to probabilistically evaluate turbine engine structural components. It may be inferred from the results that the method is suitable for probabilistically predicting the remaining life in aging or deteriorating structures, for making strategic projections and plans, and for achieving better, cheaper, faster products that give competitive advantages in world markets.

  4. Damage Tolerance and Reliability of Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1998-01-01

    A formal method is described to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the materials behavior level where primitive variables with their respective scatters are used to describe that behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate those uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from these methods demonstrate that the methods are mature and that they can be used for future strategic projections and planning to assure better, cheaper, faster products for competitive advantages in world markets. These results also indicate that the methods are suitable for predicting remaining life in aging or deteriorating structures.

  5. Damage Tolerance and Reliability of Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    A formal method is described to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the materials behaviour level where primitive variables with their respective scatters are used to describe the behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate those uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from these methods demonstrate that the methods are mature and that they can be used for future strategic projections and planning to assure better, cheaper, faster, products for competitive advantages in world markets. These results also indicate that the methods are suitable for predicting remaining life in aging or deteriorating structures.

  6. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  7. The research and development of damage tolerant carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, John Armando

    This record of study takes a first hand look at corporate research and development efforts to improve the damage tolerance of two unique composite materials used in high performance aerospace applications. The professional internship with The Dow Chemical Company---Dow/United Technologies joint venture describes the intern's involvement in developing patentable process technologies for interleave toughening of high temperature resins and their composites. The subsequent internship with Hexcel Corporation describes the intern's involvement in developing the damage tolerance of novel and existing honeycomb sandwich structure technologies. Through the Doctor of Engineering professional internship experience this student exercised fundamental academic understanding and methods toward accomplishing the corporate objectives of the internship sponsors in a resource efficient and cost-effective manner. Also, the student gained tremendous autonomy through exceptional training in working in focused team environments with highly trained engineers and scientists in achieving important corporate objectives.

  8. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from highmore » density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.« less

  9. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA damage and efficiency of ATP biosynthesis: mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Beregovskaya, N; Maiboroda, R

    1995-01-21

    The role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ageing processes and in malignant transformation of a cell is discussed. A mathematical model of the mtDNA population in a cell and in tissue is constructed. The model describes the effects of mtDNA damages accumulated during ageing and some features of malignant transformation and regeneration. PMID:7891454

  11. DNA-damaging autoantibodies and cancer: the lupus butterfly theory.

    PubMed

    Noble, Philip W; Bernatsky, Sasha; Clarke, Ann E; Isenberg, David A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Hansen, James E

    2016-07-01

    Autoantibodies reactive against host DNA are detectable in the circulation of most people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The long-held view that antibodies cannot penetrate live cells has been disproved. A subset of lupus autoantibodies penetrate cells, translocate to nuclei, and inhibit DNA repair or directly damages DNA. The result of these effects depends on the microenvironment and genetic traits of the cell. Some DNA-damaging antibodies alone have little impact on normal cells, but in the presence of other conditions, such as pre-existing DNA-repair defects, can become highly toxic. These findings raise new questions about autoimmunity and DNA damage, and reveal opportunities for new targeted therapies against malignancies particularly vulnerable to DNA damage. In this Perspectives article, we review the known associations between SLE, DNA damage and cancer, and propose a theory for the effects of DNA-damaging autoantibodies on SLE pathophysiology and cancer risk. PMID:27009542

  12. Design of Composite Structures for Reliability and Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, Masoud

    1999-01-01

    A summary of research conducted during the first year is presented. The research objectives were sought by conducting two tasks: (1) investigation of probabilistic design techniques for reliability-based design of composite sandwich panels, and (2) examination of strain energy density failure criterion in conjunction with response surface methodology for global-local design of damage tolerant helicopter fuselage structures. This report primarily discusses the efforts surrounding the first task and provides a discussion of some preliminary work involving the second task.

  13. The civil Damage Tolerance Requirements in theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broek, David

    This paper presents a brief review of the Damage Tolerance Requirements (DTR) for civil aircraft, and of their impact and significance for both newly developed and aging aircraft. Some improvements to the DTR are suggested. In principle, fracture control of aircraft is ensured by non-destructive inspection, although destructive inspection has been suggested for certain aging aircraft, as will be discussed briefly as well.

  14. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  15. Elastic properties, strength and damage tolerance of pultruded composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Mrinal Chandra

    Pultruded composites are candidate materials for civil engineering infrastructural applications due their higher corrosion resistance and lower life cycle cost. Efficient use of materials like structural members requires thorough understanding of the mechanism that affects their response. The present investigation addresses the modeling and characterization of E-glass fiber/polyester resin matrix pultruded composites in the form of sheets of various thicknesses. The elastic constants were measured using static, vibration and ultrasonic methods. Two types of piezoelectric crystals were used in ultrasonic measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using a single specimen, in the form of a circular disk, was shown in measuring all the elastic constants using ultrasonic technique. The effects of stress gradient on tensile strength were investigated. A large number of specimens, parallel and transverse to the pultrusion direction, were tested in tension, 3-point flexure, and 4-point flexure. A 2-parameter Weibull model was applied to predict the tensile strength from the flexure tests. The measured and Weibull-predicted ratios did not show consistent agreement. Microstructural observations suggested that the flaw distribution in the material was not uniform, which appears to be a basic requirement for the Weibull distribution. Compressive properties were measured using a short-block compression test specimen of 44.4-mm long and 25.4-mm wide. Specimens were tested at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° orientations. The compression test specimen was modeled using 4-noded isoparametric layered plate and shell elements. The predicted elastic properties for the roving layer and the continuous strand mat layer was used for the finite element study. The damage resistance and damage tolerance were investigated experimentally. Using a quasi-static indentation loading, damage was induced at various incrementally increased force levels to investigate the damage growth process. Damage

  16. Sexes show differential tolerance to spittlebug damage and consequences of damage for multi-species interactions.

    PubMed

    Cole, Denise H; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2005-10-01

    Antagonists can play a role in sexual system evolution if tolerance or resistance is sex-dependent. Our understanding of this role will be enhanced by consideration of the effects of antagonists on other plant-animal interactions. This study determined whether the sex morphs of a gynodioecious Fragaria virginiana differ in their susceptibility and response to damage by spittlebugs and whether damage altered pollinator attraction traits or interactions with other antagonists. Tolerance, but not resistance, to spittlebugs differed between the sexes. Generally, spittlebugs were more damaging to hermaphrodites than females, a finding in accord with the hypothesis that the pollen-bearing morph is less tolerant of source-damage than the pollen-sterile morph when damage is incurred during flowering. In both sex morphs, spittlebugs reduced inflorescence height, increased petal size, but did not affect the number of open flowers per day, suggesting that the net effect of damage may be to increase pollinator attraction. Spittlebug infestation modified interactions with other antagonists in a sex-dependent manner: spittlebugs reduced attack by bud-clipping weevils in hermaphrodites but increased infection by leaf fungi in females. The complex interactions between plant sex, antagonists, and pollinator attraction documented here emphasize the importance of considering sex-differential multi-species interactions in plant sexual evolution. PMID:21646088

  17. Mitochondrial DNA damage induced autophagy, cell death, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, Bennett; Hunter, Senyene E.; Meyer, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria contain multiple small genomes. While these organelles have efficient base excision removal of oxidative DNA lesions and alkylation damage, many DNA repair systems that work on nuclear DNA damage are not active in mitochondria. What is the fate of DNA damage in the mitochondria that cannot be repaired or that overwhelms the repair system? Some forms of mitochondrial DNA damage can apparently trigger mitochondrial DNA destruction, either via direct degradation or through specific forms of autophagy, such as mitophagy. However, accumulation of certain types of mitochondrial damage, in the absence of DNA ligase III (Lig3) or exonuclease G (EXOG), enzymes required for repair, can directly trigger cell death. This review examines the cellular effects of persistent damage to mitochondrial genomes and discusses the very different cell fates that occur in response to different kinds of damage. PMID:26709760

  18. Direct Detection and Sequencing of Damaged DNA Bases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Products of various forms of DNA damage have been implicated in a variety of important biological processes, such as aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, there exists great interest to develop methods for interrogating damaged DNA in the context of sequencing. Here, we demonstrate that single-molecule, real-time (SMRT®) DNA sequencing can directly detect damaged DNA bases in the DNA template - as a by-product of the sequencing method - through an analysis of the DNA polymerase kinetics that are altered by the presence of a modified base. We demonstrate the sequencing of several DNA templates containing products of DNA damage, including 8-oxoguanine, 8-oxoadenine, O6-methylguanine, 1-methyladenine, O4-methylthymine, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-hydroxyuracil, 5-hydroxymethyluracil, or thymine dimers, and show that these base modifications can be readily detected with single-modification resolution and DNA strand specificity. We characterize the distinct kinetic signatures generated by these DNA base modifications. PMID:22185597

  19. Influenza infection induces host DNA damage and dynamic DNA damage responses during tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Parrish, Marcus; Chan, Tze Khee; Yin, Lu; Rai, Prashant; Yoshiyuki, Yamada; Abolhassani, Nona; Tan, Kong Bing; Kiraly, Orsolya; Chow, Vincent TK; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses account for significant morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory responses, including excessive generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), mediate lung injury in severe Influenza infections. However, the molecular basis of inflammation-induced lung damage is not fully understood. Here, we studied influenza H1N1 infected cells in vitro, as well as H1N1 infected mice, and we monitored molecular and cellular responses over the course of two weeks in vivo. We show that influenza induces DNA damage both when cells are directly exposed to virus in vitro (measured using the comet assay) and also when cells are exposed to virus in vivo (estimated via γH2AX foci). We show that DNA damage, as well as responses to DNA damage, persist in vivo until long after virus has been cleared, at times when there are inflammation associated RONS (measured by xanthine oxidase activity and oxidative products). The frequency of lung epithelial and immune cells with increased γH2AX foci is elevated in vivo, especially for dividing cells (Ki-67 positive) exposed to oxidative stress during tissue regeneration. Additionally, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as well as increased levels of DSB repair proteins Ku70, Ku86 and Rad51 during the regenerative phase. In conclusion, results show that influenza induces DNA both in vitro and in vivo, and that DNA damage responses are activated, raising the possibility that DNA repair capacity may be a determining factor for tissue recovery and disease outcome. PMID:25809161

  20. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  1. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  2. Yap1: a DNA damage responder in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Lori A; Degtyareva, Natalya; Doetsch, Paul W

    2012-04-01

    Activation of signaling pathways in response to genotoxic stress is crucial for cells to properly repair DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species increase. One important function of such a response could be to initiate signal transduction processes. We have employed the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae to delineate DNA damage sensing mechanisms. We report a novel, unanticipated role for the transcription factor Yap1 as a DNA damage responder, providing direct evidence that reactive oxygen species are an important component of the DNA damage signaling process. Our findings reveal an epistatic link between Yap1 and the DNA base excision repair pathway. Corruption of the Yap1-mediated DNA damage response influences cell survival and genomic stability in response to exposure to genotoxic agents. PMID:22433435

  3. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fasullo, Michael; Endres, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases. PMID:25923076

  4. Damage tolerance of a composite sandwich with interleaved foam core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishai, Ori; Hiel, Clement

    1992-01-01

    A composite sandwich panel consisting of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) skins and a syntactic foam core was selected as an appropriate structural concept for the design of wind tunnel compressor blades. Interleaving of the core with tough interlayers was done to prevent core cracking and to improve damage tolerance of the sandwich. Simply supported sandwich beam specimens were subjected to low-velocity drop-weight impacts as well as high velocity ballistic impacts. The performance of the interleaved core sandwich panels was characterized by localized skin damage and minor cracking of the core. Residual compressive strength (RCS) of the skin, which was derived from flexural test, shows the expected trend of decreasing with increasing size of the damage, impact energy, and velocity. In the case of skin damage, RCS values of around 50 percent of the virgin interleaved reference were obtained at the upper impact energy range. Based on the similarity between low-velocity and ballistic-impact effects, it was concluded that impact energy is the main variable controlling damage and residual strength, where as velocity plays a minor role.

  5. Mus308 Processes Oxygen and Nitrogen Ethylation DNA Damage in Germ Cells of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Comendador, Miguel A.; Sierra, L. María

    2010-01-01

    The D. melanogaster mus308 gene, highly conserved among higher eukaryotes, is implicated in the repair of cross-links and of O-ethylpyrimidine DNA damage, working in a DNA damage tolerance mechanism. However, despite its relevance, its possible role on the processing of different DNA ethylation damages is not clear. To obtain data on mutation frequency and on mutation spectra in mus308 deficient (mus308−) conditions, the ethylating agent diethyl sulfate (DES) was analysed in postmeiotic male germ cells. These data were compared with those corresponding to mus308 efficient conditions. Our results indicate that Mus308 is necessary for the processing of oxygen and N-ethylation damage, for the survival of fertilized eggs depending on the level of induced DNA damage, and for an influence of the DNA damage neighbouring sequence. These results support the role of mus308 in a tolerance mechanism linked to a translesion synthesis pathway and also to the alternative end-joinig system. PMID:20936147

  6. A preliminary damage tolerance methodology for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The certification experience for the primary, safety-of-flight composite structure applications on the F-16 is discussed. The rationale for the selection of delamination as the major issue for damage tolerance is discussed, as well as the modeling approach selected. The development of the necessary coupon-level data base is briefly summarized. The major emphasis is on the description of a full-scale fatigue test where delamination growth was obtained to demonstrate the validity of the selected approach. A summary is used to review the generic features of the methodology.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  8. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  9. Damage-Tolerant Fan Casings for Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    All turbofan engines work on the same principle. A large fan at the front of the engine draws air in. A portion of the air enters the compressor, but a greater portion passes on the outside of the engine this is called bypass air. The air that enters the compressor then passes through several stages of rotating fan blades that compress the air more, and then it passes into the combustor. In the combustor, fuel is injected into the airstream, and the fuel-air mixture is ignited. The hot gasses produced expand rapidly to the rear, and the engine reacts by moving forward. If there is a flaw in the system, such as an unexpected obstruction, the fan blade can break, spin off, and harm other engine components. Fan casings, therefore, need to be strong enough to contain errant blades and damage-tolerant to withstand the punishment of a loose blade-turned-projectile. NASA has spearheaded research into improving jet engine fan casings, ultimately discovering a cost-effective approach to manufacturing damage-tolerant fan cases that also boast significant weight reduction. In an aircraft, weight reduction translates directly into fuel burn savings, increased payload, and greater aircraft range. This technology increases safety and structural integrity; is an attractive, viable option for engine manufacturers, because of the low-cost manufacturing; and it is a practical alternative for customers, as it has the added cost saving benefits of the weight reduction.

  10. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  11. Decoupling of DNA damage response signaling from DNA damages underlies temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Bo; Johnson, Stewart P.; Bullock, Nancy; Ali-Osman, Francis; Bigner, Darell D.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Current therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ). Major determinants of clinical response to TMZ include methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter and mismatch repair (MMR) status. Though the MGMT promoter is methylated in 45% of cases, for the first nine months of follow-up, TMZ does not change survival outcome. Furthermore, MMR deficiency makes little contribution to clinical resistance, suggesting that there exist unrecognized mechanisms of resistance. We generated paired GBM cell lines whose resistance was attributed to neither MGMT nor MMR. We show that, responding to TMZ, these cells exhibit a decoupling of DNA damage response (DDR) from ongoing DNA damages. They display methylation-resistant synthesis in which ongoing DNA synthesis is not inhibited. They are also defective in the activation of the S and G2 phase checkpoint. DDR proteins ATM, Chk2, MDC1, NBS1 and gammaH2AX also fail to form discrete foci. These results demonstrate that failure of DDR may play an active role in chemoresistance to TMZ. DNA damages by TMZ are repaired by MMR proteins in a futile, reiterative process, which activates DDR signaling network that ultimately leads to the onset of cell death. GBM cells may survive genetic insults in the absence of DDR. We anticipate that our findings will lead to more studies that seek to further define the role of DDR in ultimately determining the fate of a tumor cell in response to TMZ and other DNA methylators. PMID:23554659

  12. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  13. Durability and Damage Tolerance of High Temperature Polymeric Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Scott W.; Reifsnider, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    Modern durability and damage tolerance predictions for composite material systems rely on accurate estimates of the local stress and material states for each of the constituents, as well as the manner in which the constituents interact. In this work, an number of approaches to estimating the stress states and interactions are developed. First, an elasticity solution is presented for the problem of a penny-shaped crack in an N-phase composite material system opened by a prescribed normal pressure. The stress state around such a crack is then used to estimate the stress concentrations due to adjacent fiber fractures in composite materials. The resulting stress concentrations are then used to estimate the tensile strength of the composite. The predicted results are compared with experimental values. In addition, a cumulative damage model for fatigue is presented. Modifications to the model are made to include the effects of variable amplitude loading. These modifications are based upon the use of remaining strength as a damage metric and the definition of an equivalent generalized time. The model is initially validated using results from the literature. Also, experimental data from APC-2 laminates and IM7/K3B laminates are used in the model. The use of such data for notched laminates requires the use of an effective hole size, which is calculated based upon strain distribution measurements. Measured remaining strengths after fatigue loading are compared with the predicted values for specimens fatigued at room temperature and 350 F (177 C).

  14. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin

    1990-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  15. Towards a damage tolerance philosophy for composite materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1988-01-01

    A damage-threshold/fail-safe approach is proposed to ensure that composite structures are both sufficiently durable for economy of operation, as well as adequately fail-safe or damage tolerant for flight safety. Matrix cracks are assumed to exist throughout the off-axis plies. Delamination onset is predicted using a strain energy release rate characterization. Delamination growth is accounted for in one of three ways: either analytically, using delamination growth laws in conjunction with strain energy release rate analyses incorporating delamination resistance curves; experimentally, using measured stiffness loss; or conservatively, assuming delamination onset corresponds to catastrophic delamination growth. Fail-safety is assessed by accounting for the accumulation of delaminations through the thickness. A tension fatigue life prediction for composite laminates is presented as a case study to illustrate how this approach may be implemented. Suggestions are made for applying the damage-threshold/fail-safe approach to compression fatigue, tension/compression fatigue, and compression strength following low velocity impact.

  16. Maintenance of the DNA-Damage Checkpoint Requires DNA-Damage-Induced Mediator Protein Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Takehiko; Foster, Steven S.; Petrini, John H.J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Oligomeric assembly of Brca1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain-containing mediator proteins occurs at sites of DNA damage. However, the functional significance and regulation of such assemblies are not well understood. In this study, we defined the molecular mechanism of DNA-damage-induced oligomerization of the S. cerevisiae BRCT protein Rad9. Our data suggest that Rad9’s tandem BRCT domain mediates Rad9 oligomerization via its interaction with its own Mec1/Tel1-phosphorylated SQ/TQ cluster domain (SCD). Rad53 activation is unaffected by mutations that impair Rad9 oligomerization, but checkpoint maintenance is lost, indicating that oligomerization is required to sustain checkpoint signaling. Once activated, Rad53 phosphorylates the Rad9 BRCT domain, which attenuates the BRCT-SCD interaction. Failure to phosphorylate the Rad9 BRCT results in cytologically visible Rad9 foci. This suggests a feedback loop wherein Rad53 activity and Rad9 oligomerization are regulated to tune the DNA-damage response. PMID:19187758

  17. Advanced information processing system - Status report. [for fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing for aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, L. D.; Lala, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is designed to provide a fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing architecture for a broad range of aerospace vehicles. The AIPS architecture also has attributes to enhance system effectiveness such as graceful degradation, growth and change tolerance, integrability, etc. Two key building blocks being developed by the AIPS program are a fault and damage tolerant processor and communication network. A proof-of-concept system is now being built and will be tested to demonstrate the validity and performance of the AIPS concepts.

  18. A putative Leishmania DNA polymerase theta protects the parasite against oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Orgiler, Abel; Martínez-Jiménez, María I.; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro J.; Requena, Jose M.; Thomas, María C.; Blanco, Luis; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is a protozoan parasite that is phagocytized by human macrophages. The host macrophages kill the parasite by generating oxidative compounds that induce DNA damage. We have identified, purified and biochemically characterized a DNA polymerase θ from L. infantum (LiPolθ), demonstrating that it is a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase involved in translesion synthesis of 8oxoG, abasic sites and thymine glycol lesions. Stably transfected L. infantum parasites expressing LiPolθ were significantly more resistant to oxidative and interstrand cross-linking agents, e.g. hydrogen peroxide, cisplatin and mitomycin C. Moreover, LiPolθ-overexpressing parasites showed an increased infectivity toward its natural macrophage host. Therefore, we propose that LiPolθ is a translesion synthesis polymerase involved in parasite DNA damage tolerance, to confer resistance against macrophage aggression. PMID:27131366

  19. A putative Leishmania DNA polymerase theta protects the parasite against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Orgiler, Abel; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro J; Requena, Jose M; Thomas, María C; Blanco, Luis; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmania infantum is a protozoan parasite that is phagocytized by human macrophages. The host macrophages kill the parasite by generating oxidative compounds that induce DNA damage. We have identified, purified and biochemically characterized a DNA polymerase θ from L. infantum (LiPolθ), demonstrating that it is a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase involved in translesion synthesis of 8oxoG, abasic sites and thymine glycol lesions. Stably transfected L. infantum parasites expressing LiPolθ were significantly more resistant to oxidative and interstrand cross-linking agents, e.g. hydrogen peroxide, cisplatin and mitomycin C. Moreover, LiPolθ-overexpressing parasites showed an increased infectivity toward its natural macrophage host. Therefore, we propose that LiPolθ is a translesion synthesis polymerase involved in parasite DNA damage tolerance, to confer resistance against macrophage aggression. PMID:27131366

  20. Fuel containment and damage tolerance for large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 1: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft were identified. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The test results, the test techniques, and the test data are presented.

  1. Oxidative DNA damage stalls the human mitochondrial replisome

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Makarova, Alena V.; Wanrooij, Paulina H.; Forslund, Josefin; Burgers, Peter M.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is capable of causing damage to various cellular constituents, including DNA. There is however limited knowledge on how oxidative stress influences mitochondrial DNA and its replication. Here, we have used purified mtDNA replication proteins, i.e. DNA polymerase γ holoenzyme, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein mtSSB, the replicative helicase Twinkle and the proposed mitochondrial translesion synthesis polymerase PrimPol to study lesion bypass synthesis on oxidative damage-containing DNA templates. Our studies were carried out at dNTP levels representative of those prevailing either in cycling or in non-dividing cells. At dNTP concentrations that mimic those in cycling cells, the replication machinery showed substantial stalling at sites of damage, and these problems were further exacerbated at the lower dNTP concentrations present in resting cells. PrimPol, the translesion synthesis polymerase identified inside mammalian mitochondria, did not promote mtDNA replication fork bypass of the damage. This argues against a conventional role for PrimPol as a mitochondrial translesion synthesis DNA polymerase for oxidative DNA damage; however, we show that Twinkle, the mtDNA replicative helicase, is able to stimulate PrimPol DNA synthesis in vitro, suggestive of an as yet unidentified role of PrimPol in mtDNA metabolism. PMID:27364318

  2. DNA damage and neurotoxicity of chronic alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kruman, Inna I; Henderson, George I; Bergeson, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse results in a variety of pathological effects including damage to the brain. The causes of alcohol-induced brain pathology are presently unclear. Several mechanisms of pathogenicity of chronic alcoholism have been proposed, including accumulation of DNA damage in the absence of repair, resulting in genomic instability and death of neurons. Genomic instability is a unified genetic mechanism leading to a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Ethanol also likely interacts with various metabolic pathways, including one-carbon metabolism (OCM). OCM is critical for the synthesis of DNA precursors, essential for DNA repair, and as a methyl donor for various methylation events, including DNA methylation. Both DNA repair and DNA methylation are critical for maintaining genomic stability. In this review, we outline the role of DNA damage and DNA repair dysfunction in chronic alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:22829701

  3. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  4. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  5. Metabolic activation of carcinogenic ethylbenzene leads to oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Uchida, Takafumi; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Toda, Chitose; Sakai, Yoshie; Ueda, Koji; Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Kojima, Nakao

    2004-12-01

    Ethylbenzene is carcinogenic to rats and mice, while it has no mutagenic activity. We have investigated whether ethylbenzene undergoes metabolic activation, leading to DNA damage. Ethylbenzene was metabolized to 1-phenylethanol, acetophenone, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol by rat liver microsomes. Furthermore, 2-ethylphenol and 4-ethylphenol were metabolically transformed to ring-dihydroxylated metabolites such as ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol, respectively. Experiment with 32P-labeled DNA fragment revealed that both ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II). These dihydroxylated compounds also induced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in calf thymus DNA in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase, methional and Cu(I)-specific chelator, bathocuproine, significantly (P<0.05) inhibited oxidative DNA damage, whereas free hydroxyl radical scavenger and superoxide dismutase did not. These results suggest that Cu(I) and H2O2 produced via oxidation of ethylhydroquinone and 4-ethylcatechol are involved in oxidative DNA damage. Addition of an endogenous reductant NADH dramatically enhanced 4-ethylcatechol-induced oxidative DNA damage, whereas ethylhydroquinone-induced DNA damage was slightly enhanced. Enhancing effect of NADH on oxidative DNA damage by 4-ethylcatechol may be explained by assuming that reactive species are generated from the redox cycle. In conclusion, these active dihydroxylated metabolites would be involved in the mechanism of carcinogenesis by ethylbenzene. PMID:15560893

  6. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  7. Pseudo-DNA damage response in senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Pospelova, Tatyana V.; Demidenko, Zoya N.; Bukreeva, Elena I.; Pospelov, Valery A.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is currently viewed as a response to DNA damage. In this report, we showed that non-damaging agents such as sodium butyrate-induced p21 and ectopic expression of either p21 or p16 cause cellular senescence without detectable DNA breaks. Nevertheless, senescent cells displayed components of DNA damage response (DDR) such as γH2AX foci and uniform nuclear staining for p-ATM. Importantly, there was no accumulation of 53BP1 in γH2AX foci of senescent cells. Consistently, comet assay failed to detect DNA damage. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, which was shown to suppress cellular senescence, decreased γH2AX foci formation. Thus, cellular senescence leads to activation of atypical DDR without detectable DNA damage. Pseudo-DDR may be a marker of general over-activation of senescent cells. PMID:19946210

  8. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers' exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  9. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers’ exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  10. Intraspecific competition facilitates the evolution of tolerance to insect damage in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense.

    PubMed

    McNutt, David W; Halpern, Stacey L; Barrows, Kahaili; Underwood, Nora

    2012-12-01

    Tolerance to herbivory (the degree to which plants maintain fitness after damage) is a key component of plant defense, so understanding how natural selection and evolutionary constraints act on tolerance traits is important to general theories of plant-herbivore interactions. These factors may be affected by plant competition, which often interacts with damage to influence trait expression and fitness. However, few studies have manipulated competitor density to examine the evolutionary effects of competition on tolerance. In this study, we tested whether intraspecific competition affects four aspects of the evolution of tolerance to herbivory in the perennial plant Solanum carolinense: phenotypic expression, expression of genetic variation, the adaptive value of tolerance, and costs of tolerance. We manipulated insect damage and intraspecific competition for clonal lines of S. carolinense in a greenhouse experiment, and measured tolerance in terms of sexual and asexual fitness components. Compared to plants growing at low density, plants growing at high density had greater expression of and genetic variation in tolerance, and experienced greater fitness benefits from tolerance when damaged. Tolerance was not costly for plants growing at either density, and only plants growing at low density benefited from tolerance when undamaged, perhaps due to greater intrinsic growth rates of more tolerant genotypes. These results suggest that competition is likely to facilitate the evolution of tolerance in S. carolinense, and perhaps in other plants that regularly experience competition, while spatio-temporal variation in density may maintain genetic variation in tolerance. PMID:22684886

  11. Synthetic lethal approaches exploiting DNA damage in aggressive myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Francesca; Hideshima, Teru; Suzuki, Rikio; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Richardson, Paul G.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Tonon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing DNA damage is a common feature of epithelial cancers. Here we show that tumor cells derived from multiple myeloma (MM), a disease of clonal plasma cells, demonstrate DNA replicative stress leading to DNA damage. We identified a poor prognosis subset of MM with extensive chromosomal instability and replicative stress which rely on ATR to compensate for DNA replicative stress; conversely, silencing of ATR or treatment with a specific ATR inhibitor triggers MM cell apoptosis. We show that oncogenes such as MYC induce DNA damage in MM cells not only by increased replicative stress, but also via increased oxidative stress, and that ROS-inducer piperlongumine triggers further DNA damage and apoptosis. Importantly, ATR inhibition combined with piperlongumine triggers synergistic MM cytotoxicity. This synthetic lethal approach, enhancing oxidative stress while concomitantly blocking replicative stress response, provides a novel combination targeted therapy to address an unmet medical need in this subset of MM. PMID:26080835

  12. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  13. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  14. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Marder, B A; Morgan, W F

    1993-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation can result in gene mutation, gene amplification, chromosome rearrangements, cellular transformation, and cell death. Although many of these changes may be induced directly by the radiation, there is accumulating evidence for delayed genomic instability following X-ray exposure. We have investigated this phenomenon by studying delayed chromosomal instability in a hamster-human hybrid cell line by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. We examined populations of metaphase cells several generations after expanding single-cell colonies that had survived 5 or 10 Gy of X rays. Delayed chromosomal instability, manifested as multiple rearrangements of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes, was observed in 29% of colonies surviving 5 Gy and in 62% of colonies surviving 10 Gy. A correlation of delayed chromosomal instability with delayed reproductive cell death, manifested as reduced plating efficiency in surviving clones, suggests a role for chromosome rearrangements in cytotoxicity. There were small differences in chromosome destabilization and plating efficiencies between cells irradiated with 5 or 10 Gy of X rays after a previous exposure to 10 Gy and cells irradiated only once. Cell clones showing delayed chromosomal instability had normal frequencies of sister chromatid exchange formation, indicating that at this cytogenetic endpoint the chromosomal instability was not apparent. The types of chromosomal rearrangements observed suggest that chromosome fusion, followed by bridge breakage and refusion, contributes to the observed delayed chromosomal instability. Images PMID:8413263

  15. Direct visualization of a DNA glycosylase searching for damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwei; Haushalter, Karl A; Lieber, Charles M; Verdine, Gregory L

    2002-03-01

    DNA glycosylases preserve the integrity of genetic information by recognizing damaged bases in the genome and catalyzing their excision. It is unknown how DNA glycosylases locate covalently modified bases hidden in the DNA helix amongst vast numbers of normal bases. Here we employ atomic-force microscopy (AFM) with carbon nanotube probes to image search intermediates of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) scanning DNA. We show that hOGG1 interrogates DNA at undamaged sites by inducing drastic kinks. The sharp DNA bending angle of these non-lesion-specific search intermediates closely matches that observed in the specific complex of 8-oxoguanine-containing DNA bound to hOGG1. These findings indicate that hOGG1 actively distorts DNA while searching for damaged bases. PMID:11927259

  16. Design, testing, and damage tolerance study of bonded stiffened composite wing cover panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Ram C.; Sutton, Jason O.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of damage tolerance criteria for composite panels to multistringer composite wing cover panels developed under NASA's Composite Transport Wing Technology Development contract. This conceptual wing design integrated aeroelastic stiffness constraints with an enhanced damage tolerance material system, in order to yield optimized producibility and structural performance. Damage tolerance was demonstrated in a test program using full-sized cover panel subcomponents; panel skins were impacted at midbay between stiffeners, directly over a stiffener, and over the stiffener flange edge. None of the impacts produced visible damage. NASTRAN analyses were performed to simulate NDI-detected invisible damage.

  17. The combined effect of glass buffer strips and stitching on the damage tolerance of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullerd, Susan M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that through-the-thickness stitching provides major improvements in the damage tolerance of composite laminates loaded in compression. However, the brittle nature of polymer matrix composites makes them susceptible to damage propagation, requiring special material applications and designs to limit damage growth. Glass buffer strips, embedded within laminates, have shown the potential for improving the damage tolerance of unstitched composite laminates loaded in tension. The glass buffer strips, less stiff than the surrounding carbon fibers, arrest crack growth in composites under tensile loads. The present study investigates the damage tolerance characteristics of laminates that contain both stitching and glass buffer strips.

  18. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  19. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  20. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  1. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Kastan, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response

  2. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response

  3. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  4. DNA damage responsive microRNAs misexpressed in human cancer modulate therapy sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    van Jaarsveld, Marijn T.M.; Wouters, Maikel D.; Boersma, Antonius W.M.; Smid, Marcel; van IJcken, Wilfred F.J.; Mathijssen, Ron H.J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Martens, John W. M.; van Laere, Steven; Wiemer, Erik A.C.; Pothof, Joris

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon DNA damage and prevents accumulation of mutations and chromosomal rearrangements, both driving carcinogenesis. Tumor cells often have defects in the DDR, which in combination with continuous cell proliferation are exploited by genotoxic cancer therapies. Most cancers, overcome initial sensitivity and develop drug resistance, e.g. by modulation of the DDR. Not much is known, however, about DNA damage responsive microRNAs in cancer therapy resistance. Therefore, we mapped temporal microRNA expression changes in primary breast epithelial cells upon low and high dose exposure to the DNA damaging agents ionizing radiation and cisplatin. A third of all DDR microRNAs commonly regulated across all treatments was also misexpressed in breast cancer, indicating a DDR defect. We repeated this approach in primary lung epithelial cells and non-small cell lung cancer samples and found that more than 40% of all DDR microRNAs was deregulated in non-small cell lung cancer. Strikingly, the microRNA response upon genotoxic stress in primary breast and lung epithelial cells was markedly different, although the biological outcome of DNA damage signaling (cell death/senescence or survival) was similar. Several DDR microRNAs deregulated in cancer modulated sensitivity to anti-cancer agents. In addition we were able to distinguish between microRNAs that induced resistance by potentially inducing quiescence (miR-296-5p and miR-382) or enhancing DNA repair or increased DNA damage tolerance (miR-21). In conclusion, we provide evidence that DNA damage responsive microRNAs are frequently misexpressed in human cancer and can modulate chemotherapy sensitivity. PMID:24462518

  5. At a crossroads: human DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Pavel A; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-07-01

    Human DNA tumor viruses induce host cell proliferation in order to establish the necessary cellular milieu to replicate viral DNA. The consequence of such viral-programmed induction of proliferation coupled with the introduction of foreign replicating DNA structures makes these viruses particularly sensitive to the host DNA damage response machinery. In fact, sensors of DNA damage are often activated and modulated by DNA tumor viruses in both latent and lytic infection. This article focuses on the role of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human DNA tumor viruses, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the DNA damage response in EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human papillomavirus infection. PMID:21927617

  6. The effect of resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the matrix resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy composite laminates was investigated. The materials were evaluated on the basis of the damage incurred due to local impact and on their ability to retain compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Twenty-four different resin systems were evaluated. Five of the systems demonstrated substantial improvements compared to the baseline system including retention of compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Examination of the neat resin mechanical properties indicates the resin tensile properties influence significantly the laminate damage tolerance and that improvements in laminate damage tolerance are not necessarily made at the expense of room temperature mechanical properties. Preliminary results indicate a resin volume fraction on the order of 40 percent or greater may be required to permit the plastic flow between fibers necessary for improved damage tolerance.

  7. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Pi, Jingbo; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The role of metallothionein (MT) in mitigation of oxidative DNA damage (ODD) induced either by cadmium (Cd) or the direct oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was systematically examined by using MT-I/II double knockout (MT-null) or MT-competent wild-type (WT) cells. Both toxicants were much more lethal to MT-null cells (Cd LC50 = 6.6 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 550 μM) than WT cells (Cd LC50 = 16.5 μM; H2O2 LC50 = 930 μM). Cd induced concentration-related MT increases in WT cells, while the basal levels were undetectable and not increased by Cd in MT-null cells. ODD, measured by the immuno-spin trapping method, was minimally induced by sub-toxic Cd levels (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) in WT cells, but markedly increased in MT-null cells (> 430%). Similarly, ODD was induced to higher levels by lower concentrations of H2O2 in MT-null cells than WT cells. Transfection of MT-I into MT-null cells reduced both Cd- and H2O2-induced cytolethality and ODD. Cd increased expression of the oxidant defense genes, HO-1 and GSTa2 to a much greater extent in MT-null cells than WT. Cd or H2O2 exposure increased expression of key transport genes, Mrp1 and Mrp2, in WT cells but not in MT-null cells. MT protects against Cd- and H2O2-induced ODD in MT competent cells possibly by multiple mechanisms, potentially including direct metal ion sequestration and sequestration of oxidant radicals by MT. MT-deficient cells appear to adapt to Cd primarily by turning on oxidant response systems, while MT-competent cells activate MT and transport systems. PMID:22914987

  8. Inflammation-induced DNA damage and damage-induced inflammation: a vicious cycle.

    PubMed

    Pálmai-Pallag, Timea; Bachrati, Csanád Z

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation is the ultimate response to the constant challenges of the immune system by microbes, irritants or injury. The inflammatory cascade initiates with the recognition of microorganism-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and host cell-derived damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) by the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). DNA as a molecular PAMP or DAMP is sensed directly or via specific binding proteins to instigate pro-inflammatory response. Some of these DNA binding proteins also participate in canonical DNA repair pathways and recognise damaged DNA to initiate DNA damage response. In this review we aim to capture the essence of the complex interplay between DNA damage response and the pro-inflammatory signalling through representative examples. PMID:25449753

  9. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  10. 14 CFR 27.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of... Requirements Fatigue Evaluation § 27.573 Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft... practice, the applicant must do a fatigue evaluation in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section....

  11. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  12. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  13. 14 CFR 29.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of... Requirements Fatigue Evaluation § 29.573 Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft... practice, the applicant must do a fatigue evaluation in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section....

  14. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  15. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  16. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... evaluation of commuter category airplanes. 23.574 Section 23.574 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes. For commuter category airplanes— (a) Metallic damage tolerance....

  17. 75 FR 793 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ...This proposal would revise airworthiness standards for type certification requirements of normal and transport category rotorcraft. The amendment would require evaluation of fatigue and residual static strength of composite rotorcraft structures using a damage tolerance evaluation, or a fatigue evaluation, if the applicant establishes that a damage tolerance evaluation is impractical. The......

  18. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, K. Gh. M.; El-Sokary, A. A. E.; Abdel-Ghaffar, A. E.; Abou El-Roos, M. E. A.; Ahmed, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (P<0.001) in chromatin integrity were observed between fresh and frozen semen. For the fresh semen, there was no significant difference between the bulls for chromatin integrity; however, a significant variation (P<0.05) was detected in their frozen semen. No DNA fragmentation was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The percentage of sperm with damaged DNA detected by comet assay differed significantly between fresh and frozen semen. A significant negative correlation was recorded between motility and DNA damage (r=-0.68, P<0.05). Sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation were significantly positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.05). In conclusion, DNA damage evaluation can provide reassurance about genomic normalcy and guide the development of improved methods of selecting spermatozoa with intact DNA to be used in artificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  19. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P; Chow, Vincent T K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  20. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K Gh M; El-Sokary, A A E; Abdel-Ghaffar, A E; Abou El-Roos, M E A; Ahmed, Y F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (P<0.001) in chromatin integrity were observed between fresh and frozen semen. For the fresh semen, there was no significant difference between the bulls for chromatin integrity; however, a significant variation (P<0.05) was detected in their frozen semen. No DNA fragmentation was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The percentage of sperm with damaged DNA detected by comet assay differed significantly between fresh and frozen semen. A significant negative correlation was recorded between motility and DNA damage (r=-0.68, P<0.05). Sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation were significantly positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.05). In conclusion, DNA damage evaluation can provide reassurance about genomic normalcy and guide the development of improved methods of selecting spermatozoa with intact DNA to be used in artificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  1. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P.; Chow, Vincent T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  2. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  3. p53 and Cell Cycle Effects After DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Senturk, Emir; Manfredi, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry, a valuable technique that employs the principles of light scattering, light excitation, and emission of fluorochrome molecules, can be used to assess the cell cycle position of individual cells based on DNA content. After the permeabilization of cells, the DNA can be stained with a fluorescent dye. Cells which have a 2N amount of DNA can be distinguished from cells with a 4N amount of DNA, making flow cytometry a very useful tool for the analysis of cell cycle checkpoints following DNA damage. A critical feature of the cellular response to DNA damage is the ability to pause and repair the damage so that consequential mutations are not passed along to daughter generations of cells. If cells arrest prior to DNA replication, they will contain a 2N amount of DNA, whereas arrest after replication but before mitosis will result in a 4N amount of DNA. Using this technique, the role that p53 plays in cell cycle checkpoints following DNA damage can be evaluated based on changes in the profile of the G1, S, and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. PMID:23150436

  4. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Gallagher, David C.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  5. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    SciTech Connect

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Gallagher, David C.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-11-15

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  6. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  7. DNA damage in cancer therapeutics: a boon or a curse?

    PubMed

    Khanna, Anchit

    2015-06-01

    Millions of DNA-damaging lesions occur every day in each cell of our bodies due to various stresses. The failure to detect and accurately repair these lesions can give rise to cells with high levels of endogenous DNA damage, deleterious mutations, or genomic aberrations. Such genomic instability can lead to the activation of specific signaling pathways, including the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Constitutive activation of DDR proteins has been observed in human tumor specimens from different cancer stages, including precancerous and metastatic cancers, although not in normal tissues. The tumor-suppressive role of DDR activity during the premalignant stage has been studied, and strong evidence is emerging for an oncogenic role for DDR proteins such as DNA-PK and CHK1 during the later stages of tumor development. However, the majority of current cancer therapies induce DNA damage, potentially exacerbating protumorigenic genomic instability and enabling the development of resistance. Therefore, elucidating the molecular basis of DNA damage-mediated genomic instability and its role in tumorigenesis is critical. Finally, I discuss the potential existence of distinct DNA damage thresholds at various stages of tumorigenesis and what the ramifications of such thresholds would be, including the ambiguous role of the DDR pathway in human cancers, therapy-induced malignancies, and enhanced therapies. PMID:25931285

  8. The DNA damage response: the omics era and its impact

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Kasper W.J.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Pothof, Joris

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of high density technologies monitoring the genome, transcriptome and proteome in relation to genotoxic stress have tremendously enhanced our knowledge on global responses and dynamics in the DNA damage response, including its relation with cancer and aging. Moreover, ‘-omics’ technologies identified many novel factors, their post-translational modifications, pathways and global responses in the cellular response to DNA damage. Based on omics, it is currently estimated that thousands of gene(product)s participate in the DNA damage response, recognizing complex networks that determine cell fate after damage to the most precious cellular molecule, DNA. The development of next generation sequencing technology and associated specialized protocols can quantitatively monitor RNA and DNA at unprecedented single nucleotide resolution. In this review we will discuss the contribution of omics technologies and in particular next generation sequencing to our understanding of the DNA damage response and the future prospective of next generation sequencing, its single cell application and omics dataset integration in unraveling intricate DNA damage signaling networks. PMID:24794401

  9. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA. PMID:25486562

  10. Structurally Integrated, Damage-Tolerant, Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Thermal spray coatings are used extensively for the protection and life extension of engineering components exposed to harsh wear and/or corrosion during service in aerospace, energy, and heavy machinery sectors. Cermet coatings applied via high-velocity thermal spray are used in aggressive wear situations almost always coupled with corrosive environments. In several instances (e.g., landing gear), coatings are considered as part of the structure requiring system-level considerations. Despite their widespread use, the technology has lacked generalized scientific principles for robust coating design, manufacturing, and performance analysis. Advances in process and in situ diagnostics have provided significant insights into the process-structure-property-performance correlations providing a framework-enhanced design. In this overview, critical aspects of materials, process, parametrics, and performance are discussed through exemplary studies on relevant compositions. The underlying connective theme is understanding and controlling residual stresses generation, which not only addresses process dynamics but also provides linkage for process-property relationship for both the system (e.g., fatigue) and the surface (wear and corrosion). The anisotropic microstructure also invokes the need for damage-tolerant material design to meet future goals.

  11. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process developed and patented by The Welding Institute in Cambridge, England. Friction stir welding has been implemented in the aerospace industry in the fabrication of longitudinal welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks. As the industry looks to implement friction stir welding in circumferential welds in pressurized cryogenic propellant tanks, techniques to close out the termination hole associated with retracting the pin tool are being evaluated. Friction pull plug welding is under development as a one means of closing out the termination hole. A friction pull plug weld placed in a friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite, plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size in the test or service environments. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in two aluminum alloy friction plug weld configurations is presented.

  12. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  13. Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Oh, D H; King, B A; Boxer, S G; Hanawalt, P C

    2001-09-25

    Psoralens linked to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (psoTFOs) have been used in conjunction with laser-induced two-photon excitation (TPE) to damage a specific DNA target sequence. To demonstrate that TPE can initiate photochemistry resulting in psoralen-DNA photoadducts, target DNA sequences were incubated with psoTFOs to form triple-helical complexes and then irradiated in liquid solution with pulsed 765-nm laser light, which is half the quantum energy required for conventional one-photon excitation, as used in psoralen + UV A radiation (320-400 nm) therapy. Target DNA acquired strand-specific psoralen monoadducts in a light dose-dependent fashion. To localize DNA damage in a model tissue-like medium, a DNA-psoTFO mixture was prepared in a polyacrylamide gel and then irradiated with a converging laser beam targeting the rear of the gel. The highest number of photoadducts formed at the rear while relatively sparing DNA at the front of the gel, demonstrating spatial localization of sequence-specific DNA damage by TPE. To assess whether TPE treatment could be extended to cells without significant toxicity, cultured monolayers of normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with tritium-labeled psoralen without TFO to maximize detectable damage and irradiated by TPE. DNA from irradiated cells treated with psoralen exhibited a 4- to 7-fold increase in tritium activity relative to untreated controls. Functional survival assays indicated that the psoralen-TPE treatment was not toxic to cells. These results demonstrate that DNA damage can be simultaneously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimensions. This approach for targeting photochemical DNA damage may have photochemotherapeutic applications in skin and other optically accessible tissues. PMID:11572980

  14. Topoisomerase I-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Pourquier, P; Pommier, Y

    2001-01-01

    Topoisomerase I is a ubiquitous and essential enzyme in multicellular organisms. It is involved in multiple DNA transactions including DNA replication, transcription, chromosome condensation and decondensation, and probably DNA recombination. Besides its activity of DNA relaxation necessary to eliminate torsional stresses associated with these processes, topoisomerase I may have other functions related to its interaction with other cellular proteins. Topoisomerase I is the target of the novel anticancer drugs, the camptothecins. Recently a broad range of physiological and environmentally-induced DNA modifications have also been shown to poison topoisomerases. This review summarizes the various factors that enhance or suppress top1 cleavage complexes and discusses the significance of such effects. We also review the different mechanisms that have been proposed for the repair of topoisomerase I-mediated DNA lesions. PMID:11034544

  15. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  16. DNA Damage Responses Are Induced by tRNA Anticodon Nucleases and Hygromycin B

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, Anja; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed DNA damage to occur during the toxic action of PaT, a fungal anticodon ribonuclease (ACNase) targeting the translation machinery via tRNA cleavage. Here, we demonstrate that other translational stressors induce DNA damage-like responses in yeast as well: not only zymocin, another ACNase from the dairy yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also translational antibiotics, most pronouncedly hygromycin B (HygB). Specifically, DNA repair mechanisms BER (base excision repair), HR (homologous recombination) and PRR (post replication repair) provided protection, whereas NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) aggravated toxicity of all translational inhibitors. Analysis of specific BER mutants disclosed a strong HygB, zymocin and PaT protective effect of the endonucleases acting on apurinic sites. In cells defective in AP endonucleases, inactivation of the DNA glycosylase Ung1 increased tolerance to ACNases and HygB. In addition, Mag1 specifically contributes to the repair of DNA lesions caused by HygB. Consistent with DNA damage provoked by translation inhibitors, mutation frequencies were elevated upon exposure to both fungal ACNases and HygB. Since polymerase ζ contributed to toxicity in all instances, error-prone lesion-bypass probably accounts for the mutagenic effects. The finding that differently acting inhibitors of protein biosynthesis induce alike cellular responses in DNA repair mutants is novel and suggests the dependency of genome stability on translational fidelity. PMID:27472060

  17. Water availability limits tolerance of apical damage in the Chilean tarweed Madia sativa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzáles, Wilfredo L.; Suárez, Lorena H.; Molina-Montenegro, Marco A.; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2008-07-01

    Plant tolerance is the ability to reduce the negative impact of herbivory on plant fitness. Numerous studies have shown that plant tolerance is affected by nutrient availability, but the effect of soil moisture has received less attention. We evaluated tolerance of apical damage (clipping that mimicked insect damage) under two watering regimes (control watering and drought) in the tarweed Madia sativa (Asteraceae). We recorded number of heads with seeds and total number of heads as traits related to fitness. Net photosynthetic rate, water use efficiency, number of branches, shoot biomass, and the root:shoot biomass ratio were measured as traits potentially related to tolerance via compensatory responses to damage. In the drought treatment, damaged plants showed ≈43% reduction in reproductive fitness components in comparison with undamaged plants. In contrast, there was no significant difference in reproductive fitness between undamaged and damaged plants in the control watering treatment. Shoot biomass was not affected by apical damage. The number of branches increased after damage in both water treatments but this increase was limited by drought stress. Net photosynthetic rate increased in damaged plants only in the control watering treatment. Water use efficiency increased with drought stress and, in plants regularly watered, also increased after damage. Root:shoot ratio was higher in the low water treatment and damaged plants tended to reduce root:shoot ratio only in this water treatment. It is concluded that water availability limits tolerance to apical damage in M. sativa, and that putative compensatory mechanisms are differentially affected by water availability.

  18. Is DNA Damage Response Ready for Action Anywhere?

    PubMed Central

    Terradas, Mariona; Martín, Marta; Hernández, Laia; Tusell, Laura; Genescà, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Organisms are continuously exposed to DNA damaging agents, consequently, cells have developed an intricate system known as the DNA damage response (DDR) in order to detect and repair DNA lesions. This response has to be rapid and accurate in order to keep genome integrity. It has been observed that the condensation state of chromatin hinders a proper DDR. However, the condensation state of chromatin is not the only barrier to DDR. In this review, we have collected data regarding the presence of DDR factors on micronuclear DNA lesions that indicate that micronuclei are almost incapable of generating an effective DDR because of defects in their nuclear envelope. Finally, considering the recent observations about the reincorporation of micronuclei to the main bulk of chromosomes, we suggest that, under certain circumstances, micronuclei carrying DNA damage might be a source of chromosome instability. PMID:23109871

  19. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR)), and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, “sensor” proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)’s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner (unpublished data). DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP) ribose polymerase 1) makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR) network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as

  20. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Kai, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR)), and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, "sensor" proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)'s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner (unpublished data). DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP) ribose polymerase 1) makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR) network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as "liquid-demixing"). Among the

  1. Anhydrobiosis-Associated Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in the Sleeping Chironomid: Linkage with Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions (4He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3–4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  2. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  3. Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dennis H.; King, Brett A.; Boxer, Steven G.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Psoralens linked to triplex-forming oligonucleotides (psoTFOs) have been used in conjunction with laser-induced two-photon excitation (TPE) to damage a specific DNA target sequence. To demonstrate that TPE can initiate photochemistry resulting in psoralen–DNA photoadducts, target DNA sequences were incubated with psoTFOs to form triple-helical complexes and then irradiated in liquid solution with pulsed 765-nm laser light, which is half the quantum energy required for conventional one-photon excitation, as used in psoralen + UV A radiation (320–400 nm) therapy. Target DNA acquired strand-specific psoralen monoadducts in a light dose-dependent fashion. To localize DNA damage in a model tissue-like medium, a DNA–psoTFO mixture was prepared in a polyacrylamide gel and then irradiated with a converging laser beam targeting the rear of the gel. The highest number of photoadducts formed at the rear while relatively sparing DNA at the front of the gel, demonstrating spatial localization of sequence-specific DNA damage by TPE. To assess whether TPE treatment could be extended to cells without significant toxicity, cultured monolayers of normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with tritium-labeled psoralen without TFO to maximize detectable damage and irradiated by TPE. DNA from irradiated cells treated with psoralen exhibited a 4- to 7-fold increase in tritium activity relative to untreated controls. Functional survival assays indicated that the psoralen–TPE treatment was not toxic to cells. These results demonstrate that DNA damage can be simultaneously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimensions. This approach for targeting photochemical DNA damage may have photochemotherapeutic applications in skin and other optically accessible tissues. PMID:11572980

  4. Regulation of the DNA damage response by ubiquitin conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Kerstin; Schell, Michael; Hoppe, Thorsten; Kashkar, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate a highly conserved and complex kinase-based signaling network, commonly referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR), to safeguard genomic integrity. The DDR consists of a set of tightly regulated events, including detection of DNA damage, accumulation of DNA repair factors at the site of damage, and finally physical repair of the lesion. Upon overwhelming damage the DDR provokes detrimental cellular actions by involving the apoptotic machinery and inducing a coordinated demise of the damaged cells (DNA damage-induced apoptosis, DDIA). These diverse actions involve transcriptional activation of several genes that govern the DDR. Moreover, recent observations highlighted the role of ubiquitylation in orchestrating the DDR, providing a dynamic cellular regulatory circuit helping to guarantee genomic stability and cellular homeostasis (Popovic et al., 2014). One of the hallmarks of human cancer is genomic instability (Hanahan and Weinberg, 2011). Not surprisingly, deregulation of the DDR can lead to human diseases, including cancer, and can induce resistance to genotoxic anti-cancer therapy (Lord and Ashworth, 2012). Here, we summarize the role of ubiquitin-signaling in the DDR with special emphasis on its role in cancer and highlight the therapeutic value of the ubiquitin-conjugation machinery as a target in anti-cancer treatment strategy. PMID:25806049

  5. Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi present distinct DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Juliana B F; Rocha, João P Vieira da; Costa-Silva, Héllida M; Alves, Ceres L; Machado, Carlos R; Cruz, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi are medically relevant parasites and interesting model organisms, as they present unique biological processes. Despite increasing data regarding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, there is little information on how the DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in trypanosomatids. We found that L. major presented a higher radiosensitivity than T. cruzi. L. major showed G1 arrest and displayed high mortality in response to ionizing radiation as a result of the inefficient repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Conversely, T. cruzi exhibited arrest in the S/G2 cell cycle phase, was able to efficiently repair DSBs and did not display high rates of cell death after exposure to gamma irradiation. L. major showed higher resistance to alkylating DNA damage, and only L. major was able to promote DNA repair and growth recovery in the presence of MMS. ASF1c overexpression did not interfere with the efficiency of DNA repair in either of the parasites but did accentuate the DNA damage checkpoint response, thereby delaying cell fate after damage. The observed differences in the DNA damage responses of T. cruzi and L. major may originate from the distinct preferred routes of genetic plasticity of the two parasites, i.e., DNA recombination versus amplification. PMID:27188657

  6. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G.; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  7. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  8. DNA damage as an intermediate biomarker in intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Santella, R M

    1997-11-01

    The development of sensitive assays for measurement of DNA damage in humans has great potential for enhancing intervention studies. Methods for DNA adduct measurement include immunoassays, [32p] postlabeling, high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence or electrochemical detection, and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. It is now well established that DNA adducts are a marker of exposure to various environmental, lifestyle, or occupational chemical carcinogens. Our own studies concentrate on immunologic detection of adducts by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of isolated DNA or quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of intact cells. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts are elevated in blood cells of foundry and coke oven workers, individuals with high levels of exposure to environmental air pollution, and smokers. The study in smokers also found an inverse relationship between serum antioxidants and PAH-DNA, and is the basis for an ongoing antioxidant intervention. DNA adducts of PAH and 4-aminobiphenyl and oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-deoxyguanosine) are being measured in blood mononuclear cells and exfoliated oral and bladder cells from subjects on antioxidants or placebo. Data on published intervention studies investigating oxidative damage and general aromatic DNA adducts measured by postlabeling are also summarized. These studies have already demonstrated that DNA adducts can be modulated by interventions and suggest that they can provide important mechanistic information in support of larger scale studies. PMID:9349685

  9. The eucalyptus oil ingredient 1,8-cineol induces oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Wu, Ching-Fen; Efferth, Thomas; Kaina, Bernd; Fahrer, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The natural compound 1,8-cineol, also known as eucalyptol, is a major constituent of eucalyptus oil. This epoxy-monoterpene is used as flavor and fragrance in consumer goods as well as medical therapies. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, 1,8-cineol is also applied to treat upper and lower airway diseases. Despite its widespread use, only little is known about the genotoxicity of 1,8-cineol in mammalian cells. This study investigates the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of 1,8-cineol in human and hamster cells. First, we observed a significant and concentration-dependent increase in oxidative DNA damage in human colon cancer cells, as detected by the Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg)-modified alkaline comet assay. Pre-treatment of cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented the formation of Fpg-sensitive sites after 1,8-cineol treatment, supporting the notion that 1,8-cineol induces oxidative DNA damage. In the dose range of DNA damage induction, 1,8-cineol did neither reduce the viability of colon cancer cells nor affected their cell cycle distribution, suggesting that cells tolerate 1,8-cineol-induced oxidative DNA damage by engaging DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, hamster cell lines with defects in BRCA2 and Rad51, which are essentials players of homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair, were treated with 1,8-cineol. The monoterpene induced oxidative DNA damage and subsequent DNA double-strand breaks in the hamster cell lines tested. Intriguingly, we detected a significant concentration-dependent decrease in viability of the HR-defective cells, whereas the corresponding wild-type cell lines with functional HR were not affected. Based on these findings, we conclude that 1,8-cineol is weakly genotoxic, inducing primarily oxidative DNA damage, which is most likely tolerated in DNA repair proficient cells without resulting in cell cycle arrest and cell death. However, cells with deficiency in HR were compromised after 1,8-cineol

  10. Shuttle/Centaur G-prime composite adapters damage tolerance/repair test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollars, Teresa A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle/Centaur Composite Adapters Damage Tolerance/Repair Test program had as its goals the determination of probable and potentially critical defects or damages on the adapters' strength and stability, as well as the adequacy of repairs on significantly damaged areas and the generation of NDT data for the upgrading of acceptance criteria. Such rational accept/reject criteria and repair methods reduce both engineering liason costs and any unnecessary parts-scrapping. Successful 'damage tolerant' design ensures that degradations of strength and stability due to undetected defects or damage will not be catastrophic.

  11. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. PMID:26124332

  12. Comparison of DNA damage by methylmelamines and formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.E.; McMillan, D.R.; Ross, C.F.

    1981-07-01

    The cytotoxicity and DNA damaging activity of S9-activated hexamethylmelamine (HMM) and pentamethylmelamine (PMM) were compared with suspected active metabolites in mouse leukemia L1210 cells. Following treatment of L1210 cells with high concentrations of activated HMM and PMM, there were no DNA single-strand breaks or interstrand cross-links observed by DNA alkaline elution and only a low frequency of DNA-protein cross-links. Formaldehyde (FA) at nonlethal concentrations caused far greater DNA-protein cross-linking. The cytotoxicities of HMM and PMM were found unlikely to be related to extracellular or intracellular release of FA.

  13. Antioxidant Nutrients and Oxidative DNA Damage in Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases related to aging, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. When the excessive amount of reactive oxygen species accumulates in vivo, it can cause oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. In particular DNA is one of...

  14. DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Urushibara, A.; Akamatsu, K.; Watanabe, R.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation. The yields of single- (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB), base lesions and clustered damage were measured using the agarose gel electrophoresis method after exposing to various kinds of radiations to a simple model DNA molecule, fully hydrated closed-circular plasmid DNA (pUC18). The yield of SSB does not show significant dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) values. On the other hand, the yields of base lesions revealed by enzymatic probes, endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which excise base lesions and leave a nick at the damage site, strongly depend on LET values. Soft X-ray photon (150 kVp) irradiation gives a maximum yield of the base lesions detected by the enzymatic probes as SSB and clustered damage, which is composed of one base lesion and proximate other base lesions or SSBs. The clustered damage is visualized as an enzymatically induced DSB. The yields of the enzymatically additional damages strikingly decrease with increasing levels of LET. These results suggest that in higher LET regions, the repair enzymes used as probes are compromised because of the dense damage clustering. The studies using simple plasmid DNA as a irradiation sample, however, have a technical difficulty to detect multiple SSBs in a plasmid DNA. To detect the additional SSBs induced in opposite strand of the first SSB, we have also developed a novel technique of DNA-denaturation assay. This allows us to detect multiply induced SSBs in both strand of DNA, but not induced DSB.

  15. Recent Advances in Durability and Damage Tolerance Methodology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, I. S.; Harris, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) issues are critical to the development of lighter, safer and more efficient aerospace vehicles. Durability is largely an economic life-cycle design consideration whereas damage tolerance directly addresses the structural airworthiness (safety) of the vehicle. Both D&DT methodologies must address the deleterious effects of changes in material properties and the initiation and growth of damage that may occur during the vehicle s service lifetime. The result of unanticipated D&DT response is often manifested in the form of catastrophic and potentially fatal accidents. As such, durability and damage tolerance requirements must be rigorously addressed for commercial transport aircraft and NASA spacecraft systems. This paper presents an overview of the recent and planned future research in durability and damage tolerance analytical and experimental methods for both metallic and composite aerospace structures at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  16. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair.

    PubMed

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone; Risom, Lotte; Forchhammer, Lykke; Møller, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation, which is less likely to occur with methods such as the comet assay, which are based on nicking of the DNA strand at modified bases, but offer less specificity. The European Standards Committee on Oxidative DNA Damage has concluded that the true levels of the most widely studied lesion, 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine), in cellular DNA is between 0.5 and 5 lesions per 10(6) dG bases. Base excision repair of oxidative damage to DNA can be assessed by nicking assays based on oligonucleotides with lesions or the comet assay, by mRNA expression levels or, in the case of, e.g., OGG1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1), responsible for repair of 8-oxodG, by genotyping. Products of repair in DNA or the nucleotide pool, such as 8-oxodG, excreted into the urine can be assessed by MS-based methods and generally reflects the rate of damage. Experimental and population-based studies indicate that many environmental factors, including particulate air pollution, cause oxidative damage to DNA, whereas diets rich in fruit and vegetables or antioxidant supplements may reduce the levels and enhance repair. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG, genotype and expression of OGG1 have been associated with risk of cancer in cohort settings, whereas altered levels of damage, repair or urinary excretion in case-control settings may be a consequence rather than the cause of the disease. PMID:18793191

  17. Inhibition of transcription by oxidative DNA damage products

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, S.; Reines, D.; Doetsch, P.W. )

    1991-03-11

    Thymine glycol is a major oxidative DNA base damage product that can be produced spontaneously in normal cells or by certain chemicals and ionizing radiation. This lesion as well as other oxidatively damaged bases are recognized and removed in eukaryotic cells by the DNA repair enzyme redoxyendonuclease which the authors have identified in a variety of cell types. Transcriptional regulation is a key element in the control of gene expression. Deficiencies in the various steps of transcription of an essential gene may have catastrophic effects for a cell. In terminally differentiated cells, the removal of RNA-polymerase blocking lesions could be viewed as a critical function for DNA repair systems in such cells. Very little information exists on the effects of oxidative base damage products on the process of transcription. The authors show here that thymine glycol containing DNA templates can inhibit transcriptional elongation when these lesions are chemically introduced into a DNA template. A DNA segment containing a region of the human H3.3 histone gene was utilized to determine the effects of oxidative DNA base damage on transcription by pure E. coli core RNA polymerase and rat liver RNA polymerase II. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic RNA polymerases are blocked by the presence of thymine glycols appearing in certain clusters of thymines in the oxidatively damaged transcription template. To obtain quantitative efficiencies of transcriptional arrest, the authors are engineering a DNA template containing a single defined oxidatively damaged residue. The authors' results support the idea that an important function of DNA repair systems in terminally differentiated cells is to ensure the efficient transcription of genes necessary for normal cellular function.

  18. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known ‘restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these ‘bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase–DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly. PMID:26675048

  19. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  20. GOLPH3 Links the Golgi, DNA Damage, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buschman, Matthew D.; Rahajeng, Juliati; Field, Seth J.

    2014-01-01

    GOLPH3 is the first example of an oncogene that functions in secretory trafficking at the Golgi. The discovery of GOLPH3’s roles in both cancer and Golgi trafficking raises questions about how GOLPH3 and the Golgi contribute to cancer. Our recent investigation of the regulation of GOLPH3 revealed a surprising response by the Golgi upon DNA damage that is mediated by DNA-PK and GOLPH3. These results provide new insight into the DNA damage response with important implications for understanding the cellular response to standard cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:25634214

  1. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling. PMID:26906421

  2. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling. PMID:26906421

  3. DNA damage in dihydroartemisinin-resistant Molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoo; Lai, Henry C; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin generates carbon-based free radicals when it reacts with iron, and induces molecular damage and apoptosis. Its toxicity is more selective toward cancer cells because cancer cells contain a higher level of intracellular free iron. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an analog of artemisinin, has selective cytotoxicity toward Molt-4 human lymphoblastoid cells. A major concern is whether cancer cells could develop resistance to DHA, thus limiting its therapeutic efficacy. We have developed a DHA-resistant Molt-4 cell line (RTN) and found out that these cells exhibited resistance to DHA but no significant cross- resistance to artemisinin-tagged holotransferrin (ART-TF), a synthetic artemisinin compound. In the present study, we investigated DNA damage induced by DHA and ART-TF in both Molt-4 and RTN cells using the comet assay. RTN cells exhibited a significantly lower level of basal and X-ray-induced DNA damage compared to Molt-4 cells. Both DHA and ART-TF induced DNA damage in Molt-4 cells, whereas DNA damage was induced in RTN cells by ART-TF, and not DHA. The result of this study shows that by the cell selection method, it is possible to generate a Molt-4 cell line which is not sensitive to DHA, but sensitive to ART-TF, as measured by DNA damage. PMID:25750283

  4. MERIT40 facilitates BRCA1 localization and DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Huang, Jun; Chen, Junjie

    2009-01-01

    The product of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1, BRCA1, plays pivotal roles in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Mounting evidence indicates that BRCA1 associates with many proteins or protein complexes to regulate diverse processes important for the cellular response to DNA damage. One of these complexes, which mediates the accumulation of BRCA1 at sites of DNA breaks, involves the ubiquitin-binding motif (UIM)-containing protein RAP80, a coiled-coil domain protein CCDC98/Abraxas, and a deubiquitinating enzyme BRCC36. Here we describe the characterization of a novel component of this complex, MERIT40 (Mediator of Rap80 Interactions and Targeting 40 kd), which together with an adaptor protein BRE/BRCC45, enforces the BRCA1-dependent DNA damage response. MERIT40 is assembled into this RAP80/CCDC98-containing complex via its direct interaction with BRE/BRCC45. Importantly, MERIT40 regulates BRCA1 retention at DNA breaks and checkpoint function primarily via a role in maintaining the stability of BRE and this five-subunit protein complex at sites of DNA damage. Together, our study reveals that a stable complex containing MERIT40 acts early in DNA damage response and regulates damage-dependent BRCA1 localization. PMID:19261748

  5. Quality control mechanisms in cellular and systemic DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Dakhovnik, Alexander; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of the genome is of pivotal importance for the functional integrity of cells and tissues. The gradual accumulation of DNA damage is thought to contribute to the functional decline of tissues and organs with ageing. Defects in multiple genome maintenance systems cause human disorders characterized by cancer susceptibility, developmental failure, and premature ageing. The complex pathological consequences of genome instability are insufficiently explained by cell-autonomous DNA damage responses (DDR) alone. Quality control pathways play an important role in DNA repair and cellular DDR pathways. Recent years have revealed non-cell autonomous effects of DNA damage that impact the physiological adaptations during ageing. We will discuss the role of quality assurance pathways in cell-autonomous and systemic responses to genome instability. PMID:25560147

  6. Quantitative PCR for detection of DNA damage in mitochondrial DNA of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Senoo, Takanori; Yamanaka, Mayumi; Nakamura, Atori; Terashita, Tomoki; Kawano, Shinji; Ikeda, Shogo

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) has been employed to detect DNA damage and repair in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of human and several model organisms. The assay also permits the quantitation of relative mtDNA copy number in cells. Here, we developed the QPCR assay primers and reaction conditions for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an important model of eukaryote biology, not previously described. Under these conditions, long targets (approximately 10kb) in mtDNA were quantitatively amplified using 0.1ng of crude DNA templates without isolation of mitochondria and mtDNA. Quantitative detection of oxidative DNA damage in mtDNA was illustrated by using a DNA template irradiated with UVA in the presence of riboflavin. The damage to mtDNA in S. pombe cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and paraquat was also quantitatively measured. Finally, we found that mtDNA copy number in S. pombe cells increased after transition into a stationary phase and that the damage to mtDNA due to endogenous cellular processes accumulated during chronological aging. PMID:27236021

  7. Mouse zygotes respond to severe sperm DNA damage by delaying paternal DNA replication and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Gawecka, Joanna E; Marh, Joel; Ortega, Michael; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Ward, Monika A; Ward, W Steven

    2013-01-01

    Mouse zygotes do not activate apoptosis in response to DNA damage. We previously reported a unique form of inducible sperm DNA damage termed sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF mirrors some aspects of somatic cell apoptosis in that the DNA degradation is mediated by reversible double strand breaks caused by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B) followed by irreversible DNA degradation by a nuclease(s). Here, we created zygotes using spermatozoa induced to undergo SCF (SCF zygotes) and tested how they responded to moderate and severe paternal DNA damage during the first cell cycle. We found that the TUNEL assay was not sensitive enough to identify the breaks caused by SCF in zygotes in either case. However, paternal pronuclei in both groups stained positively for γH2AX, a marker for DNA damage, at 5 hrs after fertilization, just before DNA synthesis, while the maternal pronuclei were negative. We also found that both pronuclei in SCF zygotes with moderate DNA damage replicated normally, but paternal pronuclei in the SCF zygotes with severe DNA damage delayed the initiation of DNA replication by up to 12 hrs even though the maternal pronuclei had no discernable delay. Chromosomal analysis of both groups confirmed that the paternal DNA was degraded after S-phase while the maternal pronuclei formed normal chromosomes. The DNA replication delay caused a marked retardation in progression to the 2-cell stage, and a large portion of the embryos arrested at the G2/M border, suggesting that this is an important checkpoint in zygotic development. Those embryos that progressed through the G2/M border died at later stages and none developed to the blastocyst stage. Our data demonstrate that the zygote responds to sperm DNA damage through a non-apoptotic mechanism that acts by slowing paternal DNA replication and ultimately leads to arrest in embryonic development. PMID:23431372

  8. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (p<0.05). XPG 1104His homozygotes appeared more vulnerable to DNA damage accumulation (p=0.001). Sex and individual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and α-carotene (p<0.05). We have determined genetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. PMID:24674629

  9. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences. PMID:21501652

  10. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2011-08-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences. PMID:21501652

  11. NBS1 and multiple regulations of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response is finely tuned, with several pathways including those for DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and cell cycle checkpoint, although most studies to date have focused on single pathways. Genetic diseases characterized by genome instability have provided novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of DNA damage response. NBS1, a protein responsible for the radiation-sensitive autosomal recessive disorder Nijmegen breakage syndrome, is one of the first factors to accumulate at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS1 binds to at least five key proteins, including ATM, RPA, MRE11, RAD18 and RNF20, in the conserved regions within a limited span of the C terminus, functioning in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair in response to DSBs. In this article, we reviewed the functions of these binding proteins and their comprehensive association with NBS1. PMID:27068998

  12. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new "dots" are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  13. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new “dots” are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  14. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  15. Modulation of irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage by theanine.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry

    2012-05-01

    The possible chemoprotective activity of theanine against irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage towards mouse bone marrow cells was investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, micronuclei formation and mitotic activity were studied in the current study as markers of genomic damage. Oxidative DNA stress markers such as 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione levels were assessed as a possible mechanism underlying this amelioration. Theanine was neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic in mice at doses equivalent to 30 or 60 mg/kg for 12 days. Pretreatment of mice with theanine significantly reduced irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells and these effects were dose dependent. Irinotecan induced marked biochemical alterations characteristic of oxidative DNA stress, including increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, enhanced lipid peroxidation and reduction in the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Prior administration of theanine ahead of irinotecan challenge ameliorated these oxidative DNA stress markers. Overall, this study provides for the first time that theanine has a protective role in the abatement of irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells of mice that resides, at least in part, on its ability to modulate the cellular antioxidant levels and consequently protect bone marrow from irinotecan genotoxicity. PMID:22414655

  16. An Evaluation of the Applicability of Damage Tolerance to Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Le, Dy; Turnberg, Jay

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the aircraft industry have teamed together to develop methods and guidance for the safe life-cycle management of dynamic systems. Based on the success of the United States Air Force damage tolerance initiative for airframe structure, a crack growth based damage tolerance approach is being examined for implementation into the design and management of dynamic systems. However, dynamic systems accumulate millions of vibratory cycles per flight hour, more than 12,000 times faster than an airframe system. If a detectable crack develops in a dynamic system, the time to failure is extremely short, less than 100 flight hours in most cases, leaving little room for error in the material characterization, life cycle analysis, nondestructive inspection and maintenance processes. In this paper, the authors review the damage tolerant design process focusing on uncertainties that affect dynamic systems and evaluate the applicability of damage tolerance on dynamic systems.

  17. Involvement of DNA Damage Response Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wei, Ren-Jie; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been known as one of the most lethal human malignancies, due to the difficulty of early detection, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, and is characterized by active angiogenesis and metastasis, which account for rapid recurrence and poor survival. Its development has been closely associated with multiple risk factors, including hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol consumption, obesity, and diet contamination. Genetic alterations and genomic instability, probably resulted from unrepaired DNA lesions, are increasingly recognized as a common feature of human HCC. Dysregulation of DNA damage repair and signaling to cell cycle checkpoints, known as the DNA damage response (DDR), is associated with a predisposition to cancer and affects responses to DNA-damaging anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that various HCC-associated risk factors are able to promote DNA damages, formation of DNA adducts, and chromosomal aberrations. Hence, alterations in the DDR pathways may accumulate these lesions to trigger hepatocarcinogenesis and also to facilitate advanced HCC progression. This review collects some of the most known information about the link between HCC-associated risk factors and DDR pathways in HCC. Hopefully, the review will remind the researchers and clinicians of further characterizing and validating the roles of these DDR pathways in HCC. PMID:24877058

  18. Copper oxide nanoparticle mediated DNA damage in terrestrial plant models.

    PubMed

    Atha, Donald H; Wang, Huanhua; Petersen, Elijah J; Cleveland, Danielle; Holbrook, R David; Jaruga, Pawel; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Xing, Baoshan; Nelson, Bryant C

    2012-02-01

    Engineered nanoparticles, due to their unique electrical, mechanical, and catalytic properties, are presently found in many commercial products and will be intentionally or inadvertently released at increasing concentrations into the natural environment. Metal- and metal oxide-based nanomaterials have been shown to act as mediators of DNA damage in mammalian cells, organisms, and even in bacteria, but the molecular mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly understood. For the first time, we report that copper oxide nanoparticles induce DNA damage in agricultural and grassland plants. Significant accumulation of oxidatively modified, mutagenic DNA lesions (7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine; 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine; 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine) and strong plant growth inhibition were observed for radish (Raphanus sativus), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) under controlled laboratory conditions. Lesion accumulation levels mediated by copper ions and macroscale copper particles were measured in tandem to clarify the mechanisms of DNA damage. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of multiple DNA lesion formation and accumulation in plants. These findings provide impetus for future investigations on nanoparticle-mediated DNA damage and repair mechanisms in plants. PMID:22201446

  19. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Ellis L; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  20. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  1. DNA damage and L1 retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Farkash, Evan A; Luning Prak, Eline T

    2006-01-01

    Barbara McClintock was the first to suggest that transposons are a source of genome instability and that genotoxic stress assisted in their mobilization. The generation of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) is a severe form of genotoxic stress that threatens the integrity of the genome, activates cell cycle checkpoints, and, in some cases, causes cell death. Applying McClintock's stress hypothesis to humans, are L1 retrotransposons, the most active autonomous mobile elements in the modern day human genome, mobilized by DSBs? Here, evidence that transposable elements, particularly retrotransposons, are mobilized by genotoxic stress is reviewed. In the setting of DSB formation, L1 mobility may be affected by changes in the substrate for L1 integration, the DNA repair machinery, or the L1 element itself. The review concludes with a discussion of the potential consequences of L1 mobilization in the setting of genotoxic stress. PMID:16877815

  2. Parvovirus Diversity and DNA Damage Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Parvoviruses have a linear single-stranded DNA genome, around 5 kb in length, with short imperfect terminal palindromes that fold back on themselves to form duplex hairpin telomeres. These contain most of the cis-acting information required for viral “rolling hairpin” DNA replication, an evolutionary adaptation of rolling-circle synthesis in which the hairpins create duplex replication origins, prime complementary strand synthesis, and act as hinges to reverse the direction of the unidirectional cellular fork. Genomes are packaged vectorially into small, rugged protein capsids ∼260 Å in diameter, which mediate their delivery directly into the cell nucleus, where they await their host cell’s entry into S phase under its own cell cycle control. Here we focus on genus-specific variations in genome structure and replication, and review host cell responses that modulate the nuclear environment. PMID:23293137

  3. Parvovirus diversity and DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parvoviruses have a linear single-stranded DNA genome, around 5 kb in length, with short imperfect terminal palindromes that fold back on themselves to form duplex hairpin telomeres. These contain most of the cis-acting information required for viral "rolling hairpin" DNA replication, an evolutionary adaptation of rolling-circle synthesis in which the hairpins create duplex replication origins, prime complementary strand synthesis, and act as hinges to reverse the direction of the unidirectional cellular fork. Genomes are packaged vectorially into small, rugged protein capsids ~260 Å in diameter, which mediate their delivery directly into the cell nucleus, where they await their host cell's entry into S phase under its own cell cycle control. Here we focus on genus-specific variations in genome structure and replication, and review host cell responses that modulate the nuclear environment. PMID:23293137

  4. Ubiquitin-family modifications in the replication of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Alan R

    2011-09-16

    The cell uses specialised Y-family DNA polymerases or damage avoidance mechanisms to replicate past damaged sites in DNA. These processes are under complex regulatory systems, which employ different types of post-translational modification. All the Y-family polymerases have ubiquitin binding domains that bind to mono-ubiquitinated PCNA to effect the switching from replicative to Y-family polymerase. Ubiquitination and de-ubiquitination of PCNA are tightly regulated. There is also evidence for another as yet unidentified ubiquitinated protein being involved in recruitment of Y-family polymerases to chromatin. Poly-ubiquitination of PCNA stimulates damage avoidance, and, at least in yeast, PCNA is SUMOylated to prevent unwanted recombination events at the replication fork. The Y-family polymerases themselves can be ubiquitinated and, in the case of DNA polymerase η, this results in the polymerase being excluded from chromatin. PMID:21704031

  5. Concepts for improving the damage tolerance of composite compression panels. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The residual strength of specimens with damage and the sensitivity to damage while subjected to an applied inplane compression load were determined for flatplate specimens and blade-stiffened panels. The results suggest that matrix materials that fail by delamination have the lowest damage tolerance capability. Alternate matrix materials or laminates which are transversely reinforced suppress the delamination mode of failure and change the failure mode to transverse shear crippling which occurs at a higher strain value. Several damage-tolerant blade-stiffened panel design concepts are evaluated. Structural efficiency studies conducted show only small mass penalties may result from incorporating these damage-tolerant features in panel design. The implication of test results on the design of aircraft structures was examined with respect to FAR requirements.

  6. DNA Damage to a Single Chromosome End Delays Anaphase Onset*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Stambaugh, Jessica R.; Yokomori, Kyoko; Shah, Jagesh V.; Berns, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome ends contain nucleoprotein structures known as telomeres. Damage to chromosome ends during interphase elicits a DNA damage response (DDR) resulting in cell cycle arrest. However, little is known regarding the signaling from damaged chromosome ends (designated here as “TIPs”) during mitosis. In the present study, we investigated the consequences of DNA damage induced at a single TIP in mitosis. We used laser microirradiation to damage mitotic TIPs or chromosome arms (non-TIPs) in PtK2 kidney epithelial cells. We found that damage to a single TIP, but not a non-TIP, delays anaphase onset. This TIP-specific checkpoint response is accompanied by differential recruitment of DDR proteins. Although phosphorylation of H2AX and the recruitment of several repair factors, such as Ku70-Ku80, occur in a comparable manner at both TIP and non-TIP damage sites, DDR factors such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), MDC1, WRN, and FANCD2 are specifically recruited to TIPs but not to non-TIPs. In addition, Nbs1, BRCA1, and ubiquitin accumulate at damaged TIPs more rapidly than at damaged non-TIPs. ATR and 53BP1 are not detected at either TIPs or non-TIPs in mitosis. The observed delay in anaphase onset is dependent on the activity of DDR kinases ATM and Chk1, and the spindle assembly checkpoint kinase Mps1. Cells damaged at a single TIP or non-TIP eventually exit mitosis with unrepaired lesions. Damaged TIPs are segregated into micronuclei at a significantly higher frequency than damaged non-TIPs. Together, these findings reveal a mitosis-specific DDR uniquely associated with chromosome ends. PMID:24982423

  7. Can graphene quantum dots cause DNA damage in cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Lin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems.Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01734c

  8. Spectrum of complex DNA damages depends on the incident radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, M.; Sutherland, B.

    Ionizing radiation induces clustered DNA damages in DNA-two or more abasic sites oxidized bases and strand breaks on opposite DNA strands within a few helical turns Clustered damages are considered to be difficult to repair and therefore potentially lethal and mutagenic damages Although induction of single strand breaks and isolated lesions has been studied extensively little is known of factors affecting induction of clusters other than double strand breaks DSB The aim of the present study was to determine whether the type of incident radiation could affect yield or spectra of specific clusters Genomic T7 DNA a simple 40 kbp linear blunt-ended molecule was irradiated in non-scavenging buffer conditions with Fe 970 MeV n Ti 980 MeV n C 293 MeV n Si 586 MeV n ions or protons 1 GeV n at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory or with 100 kVp X-rays Irradiated DNA was treated with homogeneous Fpg or Nfo proteins or without enzyme treatment for DSB quantitation then electrophoresed in neutral agarose gels DSB Fpg-OxyPurine clusters and Nfo-Abasic clusters were quantified by number average length analysis The results show that the yields of all these complex damages depend on the incident radiation Although LETs are similar protons induced twice as many DSBs than did X-rays Further the spectrum of damage also depends on the radiation The yield damage Mbp Gy of all damages decreased with increasing linear energy transfer LET of the radiation The relative frequencies of DSBs to Abasic- and OxyBase clusters were higher

  9. DNA damage and cell killing. Cause and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Elkind, M.M.

    1985-11-15

    The evidence supporting a cause and effect relationship between DNA damage and cell killing is examined in the light of what is currently known about the organization and replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells and the radio-energetics of DNA breakage. A large disparity is identified between characteristic doses for cell killing and for the production of DNA lesions (i.e., single- or double-strand breaks). In contrast, the sensitive phase of the inhibition of DNA synthesis has a dependence on dose quantitatively similar to that of cell killing. A model is developed in which single- and double-strand breaks are associated with the inhibition of replicon initiation, whereas only double-strand breaks are primarily responsible for strand elongation. Furthermore, the model points to the replisome and the region of replicated DNA just downstream from the fork as the locus of radiation action.

  10. Tolerance of lesions in E. coli: Chronological competition between Translesion Synthesis and Damage Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Robert P

    2016-08-01

    Lesion tolerance pathways allow cells to proceed with replication despite the presence of replication-blocking lesions in their genome. Following transient fork stalling, replication resumes downstream leaving daughter strand gaps opposite replication-blocking lesions. The existence and repair of these gaps have been know for decades and are commonly referred to as postreplicative repair [39,38] (Rupp, 2013; Rupp and Howard-Flanders, 1968). This paper analyzes the interaction of the pathways involved in the repair of these gaps. A key repair intermediated is formed when RecA protein binds to these gaps forming ssDNA.RecA filaments establishing the so-called SOS signal. The gaps are either "repaired" by Translesion Synthesis (TLS), a process that involves the transient recruitment of a specialized DNA polymerase that copies the lesion with an intrinsic risk of fixing a mutation opposite the lesion site, or by Damage Avoidance, an error-free pathway that involves homologous recombination with the sister chromatid (Homology Directed Gap Repair: HDGR). We have developed an assay that allows one to study the partition between TLS and HDGR in the context of a single replication-blocking lesion present in the E. coli chromosome. The level of expression of the TLS polymerases controls the extent of TLS. Our data show that TLS is implemented first with great parsimony, followed by abundant recombination-based tolerance events. Indeed, the substrate for TLS, i.e., the ssDNA.RecA filament, persists for only a limited amount of time before it engages in an early recombination intermediates (D-loop) with the sister chromatid. Time-based competition between TLS and HDGR is set by mere sequestration of the TLS substrates into early recombination intermediates. Most gaps are subsequently repaired by Homology Directed Gap Repair (HDGR), a pathway that involves RecA. Surprisingly, however, in the absence of RecA, some cells manage to divide and form colonies at the expense of losing

  11. Specificity of damage recognition and catalysis of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Osman, R; Fuxreiter, M; Luo, N

    2000-05-01

    A common feature of DNA repair enzymes is their ability to recognize the damage independently of sequence in which they are found. The presence of a flipped out base inserted into the protein in several DNA-enzyme complexes suggests a contribution to enzyme specificity. Molecular simulations of damaged DNA indicate that the damage produces changes in DNA structure and changes the dynamics of DNA bending. The reduced bending force constant can be used by the enzyme to induce DNA bending and facilitate base flipping. We show that a thymine dimer (TD) containing DNA requires less energy to bend, lowering the barrier for base flipping. On the other hand, bending in DNA with U-G mismatch is affected only by a small amount and flipping is not enhanced significantly. T4 endonuclease V (endoV), which recognizes TD, utilizes the reduced barrier for flipping as a specific recognition element. In uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), which recognizes U-G mismatches, base flipping is not enhanced and recognition is encoded in a highly specific binding pocket for the flipped base. Simulations of UDG and endoV in complex with damaged DNA provide insight into the essential elements of the catalytic mechanism. Calculations of pKas of active site residues in endoV and endoV-DNA complex show that the pKa, of the N-terminus is reduced from 8.01 to 6.52 while that of Glu-23 increases from 1.52 to 7.82. Thus, the key catalytic residues are in their neutral form. The simulations also show that Glu-23 is also H-bonded to O4' of the 5'-TD enhancing the nucleophilic attack on Cl and that Arg-26 enhances the hydrolysis by electrostatic stabilization but does not participate in proton transfer. In the enzyme-substrate complex of UDG, the role of electrostatic stabilization is played by His-268, whose pKa increases to 7.1 from 4.9 in the free enzyme. The pKa of Asp-145, the other important catalytic residue, remains around 4.2 in the free enzyme and in the complex. Thus, it can not act as a proton

  12. Tyrosine 370 phosphorylation of ATM positively regulates DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-Jen; Lan, Li; Peng, Guang; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Ying-Nai; Cheng, Chien-Chia; Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Chang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Hsin-Wei; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Lavin, Martin; Ang, K Kian; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) mediates DNA damage response by controling irradiation-induced foci formation, cell cycle checkpoint, and apoptosis. However, how upstream signaling regulates ATM is not completely understood. Here, we show that upon irradiation stimulation, ATM associates with and is phosphorylated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Tyr370 (Y370) at the site of DNA double-strand breaks. Depletion of endogenous EGFR impairs ATM-mediated foci formation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. Moreover, pretreatment with an EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, blocks EGFR and ATM association, hinders CHK2 activation and subsequent foci formation, and increases radiosensitivity. Thus, we reveal a critical mechanism by which EGFR directly regulates ATM activation in DNA damage response, and our results suggest that the status of ATM Y370 phosphorylation has the potential to serve as a biomarker to stratify patients for either radiotherapy alone or in combination with EGFR inhibition. PMID:25601159

  13. Nuclear DNA damage signalling to mitochondria in ageing.

    PubMed

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Chua, Katrin F; Mattson, Mark P; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of ageing, and mitochondrial maintenance may lead to increased healthspan. Emerging evidence suggests a crucial role for signalling from the nucleus to mitochondria (NM signalling) in regulating mitochondrial function and ageing. An important initiator of NM signalling is nuclear DNA damage, which accumulates with age and may contribute to the development of age-associated diseases. DNA damage-dependent NM signalling constitutes a network that includes nuclear sirtuins and controls genomic stability and mitochondrial integrity. Pharmacological modulation of NM signalling is a promising novel approach for the prevention and treatment of age-associated diseases. PMID:26956196

  14. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  15. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. PMID:26519467

  16. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Nicholas C.; Corbett, Anita H.; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. PMID:26519467

  17. DNA damage under simulated extraterrestrial conditions in bacteriophage T7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, A.; Módos, K.; Hegedüs, M.; Kovács, G.; Rontó, Gy.; Péter, Á.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    The experiment "Phage and Uracil response" will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the International Space Station. Its objective is to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions on nucleic acid models, especially on bacteriophage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films. In order to define the environmental and technical requirements of the EXPOSE, the samples were subjected to the experiment verification test (EVT). During EVT, the samples were exposed to vacuum (10 -4-10 -6 Pa) and polychromatic UV-radiation (200-400 nm) in air, in inert atmosphere, as well as in simulated space vacuum. The effect of extreme temperature in vacuum and the influence of temperature fluctuations around 0 °C were also studied. The total intraphage/isolated DNA damage was determined by quantitative PCR using 555 and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA. The type of the damage was resolved using a combination of enzymatic probes and neutral and alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis; the structural/chemical effects were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions accumulate throughout exposure, but the amount of damage depends on the thickness of the layers. According to our preliminary results, the damages by exposure to conditions of dehydration and UV-irradiation are larger than the sum of vacuum alone, or radiation alone case, suggesting a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target.

  18. Anthracyclines Induce DNA Damage Response-Mediated Protection against Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Soares, Miguel P.; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J. Pedro; Huber, Tobias B.; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R.; Ferreira, João A.; Moita, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fancony Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  19. Anthracyclines induce DNA damage response-mediated protection against severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L; Soares, Miguel P; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J Pedro; Huber, Tobias B; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R; Ferreira, João A; Moita, Luis F

    2013-11-14

    Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fanconi Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  20. Glycosylases utilize ``stop and go'' motion to locate DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA results in alterations that are mutagenic or even cytotoxic. Base excision repair is a mechanism that functions to identify and correct these lesions, and is present in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. DNA glycosylases are the first enzymes in this pathway and function to locate and remove oxidatively damaged bases, and do so utilizing only thermal energy. However, the question remains of how these enzymes locate and recognize a damaged base among millions of undamaged bases. Utilizing fluorescence video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution, we have observed a number of different fluorescently labeled glycosylases (including bacterial FPG, NEI, and NTH as well as mammalian MutyH and OGG). These enzymes diffuse along DNA tightropes at approximately 0.01 +/- 0.005 μm2/s with binding lifetimes ranging from one second to several minutes. Chemically induced damage to the DNA substrate causes a ~ 50% reduction in diffusion coefficients and a ~ 400% increase in binding lifetimes, while mutation of the key ``wedge residue'' - which has been shown to be responsible for damage detection - results in a 200% increase in the diffusion coefficient. Utilizing a sliding window approach to measure diffusion coefficients within individual trajectories, we observe that distributions of diffusion coefficients are bimodal, consistent with periods of diffusive motion interspersed with immobile periods. Utilizing a unique chemo-mechanical simulation approach, we demonstrate that the motion of these glycosylases can be explained as free diffusion along the helical pitch of the DNA, punctuated with two different types of pauses: 1) rapid, short-lived pauses as the enzyme rapidly probes DNA bases to interrogate for damage and, 2) less frequent, longer lived pauses that reflect the enzyme bound to and catalytically removing a damaged base. These simulations also indicate that the wedge residue is critical for interrogation and recognition of

  1. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimir; Sakakibara, Yogo; Brzakova, Adela; Ferencova, Ivana; Motlik, Jan; Kitajima, Tomoya S; Schultz, Richard M; Solc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Because low levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) appear not to activate the ATM-mediated prophase I checkpoint in full-grown oocytes, there may exist mechanisms to protect chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. Using live imaging we demonstrate that low levels of DSBs induced by the radiomimetic drug Neocarzinostatin (NCS) increase the incidence of chromosome fragments and lagging chromosomes but do not lead to APC/C activation and anaphase onset delay. The number of DSBs, represented by γH2AX foci, significantly decreases between prophase I and metaphase II in both control and NCS-treated oocytes. Transient treatment with NCS increases >2-fold the number of DSBs in prophase I oocytes, but less than 30% of these oocytes enter anaphase with segregation errors. MRE11, but not ATM, is essential to detect DSBs in prophase I and is involved in H2AX phosphorylation during metaphase I. Inhibiting MRE11 by mirin during meiotic maturation results in anaphase bridges and also increases the number of γH2AX foci in metaphase II.  Compromised DNA integrity in mirin-treated oocytes indicates a role for MRE11 in chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. PMID:26745237

  2. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yahua

    cationic polyelectrolytes to have a positive surface charge and then dipped into diluted, negatively-charged AlPO4 colloidal suspension (0.05M) at pH 7.5. Amorphous AlPO4 (crystallizes to tridymite- and cristobalite-forms at 1080°C) nano particles were coated on fibers layer-by-layer using an electrostatic attraction protocol. A uniform and smooth coating was formed which allowed fiber pullout from the matrix of a Nextel 720/alumina mini-composite hot-pressed at 1250°C/20MPa. Reaction-bonded mullite (RBM), with low formation temperature and sintering shrinkage was synthesized by incorporation of mixed-rare-earth-oxide (MREO) and mullite seeds. Pure mullite formed with 7.5wt% MREO at 1300°C. Introduction of 5wt% mullite seeds gave RBM with less than 3% shrinkage and 20% porosity. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720/RBM composites were successful fabricated by EPID and pressureless sintering at 1300°C. Significant fiber pullout occurred and the 4-point bend strength was around 170MPa (with 25-30vol% fibers) at room temperature and 1100°C and a Work-of-Fracture 7KJ/m2. At 1200°C, the composite failed in shear due to the MREO-based glassy phase in the matrix. AlPO4-coated Nextel 720 fiber/aluminosilicate (no MREO) showed damage tolerance at 1200°C with a bend strength 170MPa.

  3. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kiminezhadmalaie, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers. PMID:26539245

  4. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kiminezhadmalaie, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers. PMID:26539245

  5. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  6. Use of a New Portable Instrumented Impactor on the NASA Composite Crew Module Damage Tolerance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Polis, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Damage tolerance performance is critical to composite structures because surface impacts at relatively low energies may result in a significant strength loss. For certification, damage tolerance criteria require aerospace vehicles to meet design loads while containing damage at critical locations. Data from standard small coupon testing are difficult to apply to larger more complex structures. Due to the complexity of predicting both the impact damage and the residual properties, damage tolerance is demonstrated primarily by testing. A portable, spring-propelled, impact device was developed which allows the impact damage response to be investigated on large specimens, full-scale components, or entire vehicles. During impact, both the force history and projectile velocity are captured. The device was successfully used to demonstrate the damage tolerance performance of the NASA Composite Crew Module. The impactor was used to impact 18 different design features at impact energies up to 35 J. Detailed examples of these results are presented, showing impact force histories, damage inspection results, and response to loading.

  7. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., manufacturing defects, or accidental damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the...

  8. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the airplane. This evaluation must...

  9. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., manufacturing defects, or accidental damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the...

  10. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., manufacturing defects, or accidental damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the...

  11. CHROMOTHRIPSIS FROM DNA DAMAGE IN MICRONUCLEI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Spektor, Alexander; Cornils, Hauke; Francis, Joshua M.; Jackson, Emily K.; Liu, Shiwei; Meyerson, Matthew; Pellman, David

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequencing has uncovered a new mutational phenomenon in cancer and congenital disorders called chromothripsis. Chromothripsis is characterized by extensive genomic rearrangements and an oscillating pattern of DNA copy number levels, all curiously restricted to one or a few chromosomes. The mechanism for chromothripsis is unknown, but we previously proposed that it could occur through the physical isolation of chromosomes in aberrant nuclear structures called micronuclei. Here, using a combination of live-cell imaging and single-cell genome sequencing, we demonstrate that micronucleus formation can indeed generate a spectrum of genomic rearrangements, some of which recapitulate all known features of chromothripsis. These events are restricted to the missegregated chromosome and occur within one cell division. We demonstrate that the mechanism for chromothripsis can involve the fragmentation and subsequent reassembly of a single chromatid from a micronucleus. Collectively, these experiments establish a new mutational process of which chromothripsis is one extreme outcome. PMID:26017310

  12. Role of Schizosaccharomyces pombe RecQ homolog, recombination, and checkpoint genes in UV damage tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J M; Lindsay, H D; Munday, C A; Carr, A M

    1997-01-01

    The cellular responses to DNA damage are complex and include direct DNA repair pathways that remove the damage and indirect damage responses which allow cells to survive DNA damage that has not been, or cannot be, removed. We have identified the gene mutated in the rad12.502 strain as a Schizosaccharomyces pombe recQ homolog. The same gene (designated rqh1) is also mutated in the hus2.22 mutant. We show that Rqhl is involved in a DNA damage survival mechanism which prevents cell death when UV-induced DNA damage cannot be removed. This pathway also requires the correct functioning of the recombination machinery and the six checkpoint rad gene products plus the Cdsl kinase. Our data suggest that Rqh1 operates during S phase as part of a mechanism which prevents DNA damage causing cell lethality. This process may involve the bypass of DNA damage sites by the replication fork. Finally, in contrast with the reported literature, we do not find that rqh1 (rad12) mutant cells are defective in UV dimer endonuclease activity. PMID:9372918

  13. Analysis of alcohol-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli by visualizing single genomic DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yujin; Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Jisoo; Oh, Yeeun; Kim, Dogeun; Lee, Jungyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-07-21

    Consumption of alcohol injures DNA, and such damage is considered to be a primary cause for the development of cancer and many other diseases essentially due to reactive oxygen species generated from alcohol. To sensitively detect alcohol-induced DNA lesions in a biological system, we introduced a novel analytical platform for visualization of single genomic DNA molecules using E. coli. By fluorescently labelling the DNA lesions, our approach demonstrated, with the highest sensitivity, that we could count the number of DNA lesions induced by alcohol metabolism in a single bacterial cell. Moreover, our results showed a linear relationship between ethanol concentration and the number of DNA lesions: 0.88 lesions per 1% ethanol. Using this approach, we quantitatively analysed the DNA damage induced by exposure to alcoholic beverages such as beer (5% ethanol), rice wine (13%), soju (20%), and whisky (40%). PMID:27186604

  14. No Ancient DNA Damage in Actinobacteria from the Neanderthal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba-Niedźwiedzka, Katarzyna; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Neanderthal genome was recently sequenced using DNA extracted from a 38,000-year-old fossil. At the start of the project, the fraction of mammalian and bacterial DNA in the sample was estimated to be <6% and 9%, respectively. Treatment with restriction enzymes prior to sequencing increased the relative proportion of mammalian DNA to 15%, but the large majority of sequences remain uncharacterized. Principal Findings Our taxonomic profiling of 3.95 Gb of Neanderthal DNA isolated from the Vindija Neanderthal Vi33.16 fossil showed that 90% of about 50,000 rRNA gene sequence reads were of bacterial origin, of which Actinobacteria accounted for more than 75%. Actinobacteria also represented more than 80% of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences from a cave sediment sample taken from the same G layer as the Neanderthal bone. However, phylogenetic analyses did not identify any sediment clones that were closely related to the bone-derived sequences. We analysed the patterns of nucleotide differences in the individual sequence reads compared to the assembled consensus sequences of the rRNA gene sequences. The typical ancient nucleotide substitution pattern with a majority of C to T changes indicative of DNA damage was observed for the Neanderthal rRNA gene sequences, but not for the Streptomyces-like rRNA gene sequences. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses suggest that the Actinobacteria, and especially members of the Streptomycetales, contribute the majority of sequences in the DNA extracted from the Neanderthal fossil Vi33.16. The bacterial DNA showed no signs of damage, and we hypothesize that it was derived from bacteria that have been enriched inside the bone. The bioinformatic approach used here paves the way for future studies of microbial compositions and patterns of DNA damage in bacteria from archaeological bones. Such studies can help identify targeted measures to increase the relative amount of endogenous DNA in the sample. PMID:23658776

  15. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  16. Effect of braiding process on the damage tolerance of 3-D braided graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Shiekh, Aly; Li, Wei; Hammad, Mohamed

    1989-01-01

    One of the key advantages of three-dimensional braided composite materials is their high impact damage tolerance comparing with laminated composites, due to their fully integrated fibrous substrates. In this paper, the effect of different processing methods on the impact damage tolerance of braided graphite/epoxy composite is experimentally assessed. The test specimens are prepared using both of the two existing three-dimensional braiding techniques (the 4-step and the 2-step processes). After the specimens are impacted under controlled impact energy, the damage introduced is studied. Then a compression test is conducted to evaluate the compression strength of the specimens after impact.

  17. Complexities of the DNA Base Excision Repair Pathway for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sankar; Boldogh, Istvan; Izumi, Tadahide; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage represents the most significant insult to organisms because of continuous production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo. Oxidative damage in DNA, a critical target of ROS, is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway which appears to be the simplest among the three excision repair pathways. However, it is now evident that although BER can be carried with four or five enzymes in vitro, a large number of proteins, including some required for nucleotide excision repair (NER), are needed for in vivo repair of oxidative damage. Furthermore, BER in transcribed vs. nontranscribed DNA regions requires distinct sets of proteins, as in the case of NER. We propose an additional complexity in repair of replicating vs. nonreplicating DNA. Unlike DNA bulky adducts, the oxidized base lesions could be incorporated in the nascent DNA strand, repair of which may share components of the mismatch repair process. Distinct enzyme specificities are thus warranted for repair of lesions in the parental vs. nascent DNA strand. Repair synthesis may be carried out by DNA polymerase β or replicative polymerases δ and ε. Thus, multiple subpathways are needed for repairing oxidative DNA damage, and the pathway decision may require coordination of the successive steps in repair. Such coordination includes transfer of the product of a DNA glycosylase to AP-endonuclease, the next enzyme in the pathway. Interactions among proteins in the pathway may also reflect such coordination, characterization of which should help elucidate these subpathways and their in vivo regulation. PMID:11746753

  18. Tempol inhibits neutrophil and hydrogen peroxide-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hahn, S M; Mitchell, J B; Shacter, E

    1997-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions characterized by neutrophil activation are associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Reactive oxygen species are produced by activated neutrophils and produce DNA damage which may lead to tissue damage. Previous studies have shown that activated murine neutrophils induce DNA strand breaks in a target plasmacytoma cell, RIMPC 2394. We studied the effect of a water soluble nitroxide anti-oxidant, Tempol, on murine neutrophil induction of DNA strand breaks in this system. Murine neutrophils were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of BALB/cAn mice after an i.p. injection of pristane oil. Neutrophils were activated by the phorbol ester PMA and co-incubated with RIMPC 2394 cells. Control alkaline elution studies revealed progressive DNA strand breaks in RIMPC cells with time. The addition of Tempol to the incubation mixture prevented DNA damage in a dose dependent fashion. Five mM Tempol provided complete protection. Tempol protection against DNA strand breaks was similar for both stimulated neutrophils and exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide produced by stimulated neutrophils demonstrated that Tempol did not decrease hydrogen peroxide concentration. Oxidation of reduced metals, thereby interfering with the production of hydroxyl radical, is the most likely mechanism of nitroxide protection, although superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity and scavenging of carbon-based free radicals may also account for a portion of the observed protection. The anti-oxidant activity of Tempol inhibited DNA damage by activated neutrophils. The nitroxides as a class of compounds may have a role in the investigation and modification of inflammatory conditions. PMID:9378367

  19. Colocalization of Sensors Is Sufficient to Activate the DNA Damage Checkpoint in the Absence of Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Carla Yaneth; Melo, Justine Amy

    2010-01-01

    Summary Previous work on the DNA damage checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that two complexes independently sense DNA lesions: the kinase Mec1-Ddc2 and the PCNA-like 9-1-1 complex. To test whether colocalization of these components is sufficient for checkpoint activation, we fused these checkpoint proteins to the LacI repressor and artificially colocalized these fusions by expressing them in cells harboring Lac operator arrays. We observed Rad53 and Rad9 phosphorylation, Sml1 degradation, and metaphase delay, demonstrating that colocalization of these sensors is sufficient to activate the checkpoint in the absence of DNA damage. Our tethering system allowed us to establish that CDK functions in the checkpoint pathway downstream of damage processing and checkpoint protein recruitment. This CDK dependence is likely, at least in part, through Rad9, since mutation of CDK consensus sites compromised its checkpoint function. PMID:18471973

  20. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting. PMID:25099886

  1. Chemistry and Structural Biology of DNA Damage and Biological Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael P.; Huang, Hai; Brown, Kyle L.; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    The formation of adducts by the reaction of chemicals with DNA is a critical step for the initiation of carcinogenesis. The structural analysis of various DNA adducts reveals that conformational and chemical rearrangements and interconversions are a common theme. Conformational changes are modulated both by the nature of adduct and the base sequences neighboring the lesion sites. Equilibria between conformational states may modulate both DNA repair and error-prone replication past these adducts. Likewise, chemical rearrangements of initially formed DNA adducts are also modulated both by the nature of adducts and the base sequences neighboring the lesion sites. In this review, we focus on DNA damage caused by a number of environmental and endogenous agents, and biological consequences. PMID:21922653

  2. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin1

    PubMed Central

    Donà, Mattia; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  3. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Donà, Mattia; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-08-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  4. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  5. Pluripotent stem cells and DNA damage response to ionizing radiations

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Butler, E. Brian; Pandita, Raj K.; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, functional genomics, toxicological studies and cell-based therapeutics due to their unique characteristics of self-renewal and pluripotency. Novel methods for generation of pluripotent stem cells and their differentiation to the specialized cell types such as neuronal cells, myocardial cells, hepatocytes, and beta cells of the pancreas and many other cells of the body are constantly being refined. Pluripotent stem cell derived differentiated cells, including neuronal cells or cardiac cells are ideal for stem cell transplantation as autologous or allogeneic cells from healthy donors due to their minimum risks of rejection. DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet (UV) light, genotoxic stress, and other intrinsic and extrinsic factors trigger a series of biochemical reactions termed as DNA damage response (DDR). In order to maintain genomic stability, and avoid transmission of mutations into progenitors cells, stem cells have robust DNA damage response signaling – a contrast to somatic cells. Stem cell transplantation may over come the late effects related to radiation. This review will particularly focus on differential DNA damage response between stem cells and derived differentiated cells and the possible pathways that determine such differences. PMID:27332952

  6. Mechanism study of goldenseal-associated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Wan, Liqing; Couch, Letha; Lin, Haixia; Li, Yan; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei

    2013-07-31

    Goldenseal has been used for the treatment of a wide variety of ailments including gastrointestinal disturbances, urinary tract disorders, and inflammation. The five major alkaloid constituents in goldenseal are berberine, palmatine, hydrastine, hydrastinine, and canadine. When goldenseal was evaluated by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in the standard 2-year bioassay, goldenseal induced an increase in liver tumors in rats and mice; however, the mechanism of goldenseal-associated liver carcinogenicity remains unknown. In this study, the toxicity of the five goldenseal alkaloid constituents was characterized, and their toxic potencies were compared. As measured by the Comet assay and the expression of γ-H2A.X, berberine, followed by palmatine, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Berberine and palmatine suppressed the activities of both topoisomerase (Topo) I and II. In berberine-treated cells, DNA damage was shown to be directly associated with the inhibitory effect of Topo II, but not Topo I by silencing gene of Topo I or Topo II. In addition, DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available goldenseal extracts and the extent of DNA damage was positively correlated to the berberine content. Our findings suggest that the Topo II inhibitory effect may contribute to berberine- and goldenseal-induced genotoxicity and tumorigenicity. PMID:23747414

  7. Modeling the Study of DNA Damage Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Specks, Julia; Nieto-Soler, Maria; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Damaged DNA has a profound impact on mammalian health and overall survival. In addition to being the source of mutations that initiate cancer, the accumulation of toxic amounts of DNA damage can cause severe developmental diseases and accelerate ageing. Therefore, understanding how cells respond to DNA damage has become one of the most intense areas of biomedical research in the recent years. However, whereas most mechanistic studies derive from in vitro or in cellulo work, the impact of a given mutation on a living organism is largely unpredictable. For instance, why BRCA1 mutations preferentially lead to breast cancer whereas mutations compromising mismatch repair drive colon cancer is still not understood. In this context, evaluating the specific physiological impact of mutations that compromise genome integrity has become crucial for a better dimensioning of our knowledge. We here describe the various technologies that can be used for modeling mutations in mice, and provide a review of the genes and pathways that have been modeled so far in the context of DNA damage responses. PMID:25636482

  8. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  9. Pluripotent Stem Cells and DNA Damage Response to Ionizing Radiations.

    PubMed

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Butler, E Brian; Pandita, Raj K; Hunt, Clayton R; Pandita, Tej K

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, functional genomics, toxicological studies and cell-based therapeutics due to their unique characteristics of self-renewal and pluripotency. Novel methods for generation of pluripotent stem cells and their differentiation to the specialized cell types such as neuronal cells, myocardial cells, hepatocytes and beta cells of the pancreas and many other cells of the body are constantly being refined. Pluripotent stem cell derived differentiated cells, including neuronal cells or cardiac cells, are ideal for stem cell transplantation as autologous or allogeneic cells from healthy donors due to their minimal risk of rejection. Radiation-induced DNA damage, ultraviolet light, genotoxic stress and other intrinsic and extrinsic factors triggers a series of biochemical reactions known as DNA damage response. To maintain genomic stability and avoid transmission of mutations into progenitors cells, stem cells have robust DNA damage response signaling, a contrast to somatic cells. Stem cell transplantation may protect against radiation-induced late effects. In particular, this review focuses on differential DNA damage response between stem cells and derived differentiated cells and the possible pathways that determine such differences. PMID:27332952

  10. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R

    2012-07-01

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and DNA-protein crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. These structural modifications are involved in mutation, cancer and many other diseases. As it has the least oxidation potential among all the DNA bases, guanine is frequently attacked by reactive species, producing a plethora of lethal lesions. Fortunately, living cells are evolved with intelligent enzymes that continuously protect DNA from such damages. This review provides an overview of different guanine lesions formed due to reactions of guanine with different reactive species. Involvement of these lesions in inter- and intra-strand crosslinks, DNA-protein crosslinks and mutagenesis are discussed. How certain enzymes recognize and repair different guanine lesions in DNA are also presented. PMID:22750987

  11. Dissection of DNA Damage Responses Using Multiconditional Genetic Interaction Maps

    PubMed Central

    Guénolé, Aude; Srivas, Rohith; Vreeken, Kees; Wang, Ze Zhong; Wang, Shuyi; Krogan, Nevan J.; Ideker, Trey; van Attikum, Haico

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY To protect the genome, cells have evolved a diverse set of pathways designed to sense, signal, and repair multiple types of DNA damage. To assess the degree of coordination and crosstalk among these pathways, we systematically mapped changes in the cell's genetic network across a panel of different DNA-damaging agents, resulting in ~1,800,000 differential measurements. Each agent was associated with a distinct interaction pattern, which, unlike single-mutant phenotypes or gene expression data, has high statistical power to pinpoint the specific repair mechanisms at work. The agent-specific networks revealed roles for the histone acetyltranferase Rtt109 in the mutagenic bypass of DNA lesions and the neddylation machinery in cell-cycle regulation and genome stability, while the network induced by multiple agents implicates Irc21, an uncharacterized protein, in checkpoint control and DNA repair. Our multiconditional genetic interaction map provides a unique resource that identifies agent-specific and general DNA damage response pathways. PMID:23273983

  12. Initiation of DNA damage responses through XPG-related nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Karen; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2013-01-23

    Lesion-specific enzymes repair different forms of DNA damage, yet all lesions elicit the same checkpoint response. The common intermediate required to mount a checkpoint response is thought to be single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), coated by replication protein A (RPA) and containing a primer-template junction. To identify factors important for initiating the checkpoint response, we screened for genes that, when overexpressed, could amplify a checkpoint signal to a weak allele of chk1 in fission yeast. We identified Ast1, a novel member of the XPG-related family of endo/exonucleases. Ast1 promotes checkpoint activation caused by the absence of the other XPG-related nucleases, Exo1 and Rad2, the homologue of Fen1. Each nuclease is recruited to DSBs, and promotes the formation of ssDNA for checkpoint activation and recombinational repair. For Rad2 and Exo1, this is independent of their S-phase role in Okazaki fragment processing. This XPG-related pathway is distinct from MRN-dependent responses, and each enzyme is critical for damage resistance in MRN mutants. Thus, multiple nucleases collaborate to initiate DNA damage responses, highlighting the importance of these responses to cellular fitness. PMID:23211746

  13. Quantitative Profiling of DNA Damage and Apoptotic Pathways in UV Damaged Cells Using PTMScan Direct

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Jia, Xiaoying; Lee, Kimberly A.; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Comb, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods for analysis of peptides using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) lack the specificity to comprehensively monitor specific biological processes due to the inherent duty cycle limitations of the MS instrument and the stochastic nature of the analytical platform. PTMScan Direct is a novel, antibody-based method that allows quantitative LC-MS/MS profiling of specific peptides from proteins that reside in the same signaling pathway. New PTMScan Direct reagents have been produced that target peptides from proteins involved in DNA Damage/Cell Cycle and Apoptosis/Autophagy pathways. Together, the reagents provide access to 438 sites on 237 proteins in these signaling cascades. These reagents have been used to profile the response to UV damage of DNA in human cell lines. UV damage was shown to activate canonical DNA damage response pathways through ATM/ATR-dependent signaling, stress response pathways and induce the initiation of apoptosis, as assessed by an increase in the abundance of peptides corresponding to cleaved, activated caspases. These data demonstrate the utility of PTMScan Direct as a multiplexed assay for profiling specific cellular responses to various stimuli, such as UV damage of DNA. PMID:23344034

  14. Phototoxicity mechanisms: chlorpromazine photosensitized damage to DNA and cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, K.E.

    1981-07-01

    Photosensitized damage to biological molecules is the initial process in phototoxic responses. It is now recognized that many phototoxic compounds can photosensitize damage to more than one type of biological substrate. The in vitro light-initiated reactions of phototoxic compounds with DNA, soluble proteins and membrane components can be classified by their molecular mechanisms: (1) those in which an excited state of the phototoxic compound (or an unstable species derived from it) reacts directly with the biological substrate and (2) those in which a molecule derived from the phototoxic compound (a photoproduct or an activated oxygen species) reacts with the biological substrate. This paper describes the mechanisms by which chlorpromazine photosensitizes damage to membranes, protein and DNA and compares them to the mechanisms of photosensitization by psoralens, porphyrins, dyes, and other molecules.

  15. How do male germ cells handle DNA damage?

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Ann-Karin; Lindeman, Birgitte; Wiger, Richard; Duale, Nur; Brunborg, Gunnar . E-mail: gunnar.brunborg@fhi.no

    2005-09-01

    Male reproductive health has received considerable attention in recent years. In addition to declining sperm quality, fertility problems and increased incidence of testicular cancer, there is accumulating evidence that genetic damage, in the form of unrepaired DNA lesions or de novo mutations, may be transmitted via sperm to the offspring. Such genetic damage may arise from environmental exposure or via endogenously formed reactive species, in stem cells or during spermatogenesis. Damaged testicular cells not removed by apoptosis rely on DNA repair for their genomic integrity to be preserved. To identify factors with potentially harmful effects on testicular cells and to characterise associated risk, a thorough understanding of repair mechanisms in these cells is of particular importance. Based on results from our own and other laboratories, we discuss the current knowledge of different pathways of excision repair in rodent and human testicular cells. It has become evident that, in human spermatogenic cells, some repair functions are indeed non-functional.

  16. Exercise as Gene Therapy: BDNF and DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robin H; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is a common feature of neurodegenerative illnesses, and the ability to repair DNA strand breaks and lesions is crucial for neuronal survival, reported by Jeppesen et al (Prog Neurobiol. 2011;94:166-200) and Shiwaku et al (Curr Mol Med. 2015;15:119-128). Interventions aimed at repairing these lesions, therefore, could be useful for preventing or delaying the progression of disease. One potential strategy for promoting DNA damage repair (DDR) is exercise. Although the role of exercise in DDR is not understood, there is increasing evidence that simple physical activity may impact clinical outcomes for neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and how these mechanisms might influence the DDR process. PMID:27488073

  17. Proton-induced direct and indirect damage of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Vyšín, Luděk; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Štěpán, Václav; Moretto-Capelle, Patrick; Bugler, Beatrix; Legube, Gaelle; Cafarelli, Pierre; Casta, Romain; Champeaux, Jean Philippe; Sence, Martine; Vlk, Martin; Wagner, Richard; Štursa, Jan; Zach, Václav; Incerti, Sebastien; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie

    2015-08-01

    Clustered DNA damage induced by 10, 20 and 30 MeV protons in pBR322 plasmid DNA was investigated. Besides determination of strand breaks, additional lesions were detected using base excision repair enzymes. The plasmid was irradiated in dry form, where indirect radiation effects were almost fully suppressed, and in water solution containing only minimal residual radical scavenger. Simultaneous irradiation of the plasmid DNA in the dry form and in the solution demonstrated the contribution of the indirect effect as prevalent. The damage composition slightly differed when comparing the results for liquid and dry samples. The obtained data were also subjected to analysis concerning different methodological approaches, particularly the influence of irradiation geometry, models used for calculation of strand break yields and interpretation of the strand breaks detected with the enzymes. It was shown that these parameters strongly affect the results. PMID:26007308

  18. Diseases Associated with Defective Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, multiple novel congenital human disorders have been described with genetic defects in known and/or novel components of several well-known DNA repair and damage response pathways. Examples include disorders of impaired nucleotide excision repair, DNA double-strand and single-strand break repair, as well as compromised DNA damage-induced signal transduction including phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These conditions further reinforce the importance of multiple genome stability pathways for health and development in humans. Furthermore, these conditions inform our knowledge of the biology of the mechanics of genome stability and in some cases provide potential routes to help exploit these pathways therapeutically. Here, I will review a selection of these exciting findings from the perspective of the disorders themselves, describing how they were identified, how genotype informs phenotype, and how these defects contribute to our growing understanding of genome stability pathways. PMID:23209155

  19. Hyperactivation of DNA-PK by Double-Strand Break Mimicking Molecules Disorganizes DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Quanz, Maria; Chassoux, Danielle; Berthault, Nathalie; Agrario, Céline; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Cellular response to DNA damage involves the coordinated activation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. The early steps of DNA damage recognition and signaling in mammalian cells are not yet fully understood. To investigate the regulation of the DNA damage response (DDR), we designed short and stabilized double stranded DNA molecules (Dbait) mimicking double-strand breaks. We compared the response induced by these molecules to the response induced by ionizing radiation. We show that stable 32-bp long Dbait, induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of DDR components such as H2AX, Rpa32, Chk1, Chk2, Nbs1 and p53 in various cell lines. However, individual cell analyses reveal that differences exist in the cellular responses to Dbait compared to irradiation. Responses to Dbait: (i) are dependent only on DNA-PK kinase activity and not on ATM, (ii) result in a phosphorylation signal lasting several days and (iii) are distributed in the treated population in an “all-or-none” pattern, in a Dbait-concentration threshold dependant manner. Moreover, despite extensive phosphorylation of the DNA-PK downstream targets, Dbait treated cells continue to proliferate without showing cell cycle delay or apoptosis. Dbait treatment prior to irradiation impaired foci formation of Nbs1, 53BP1 and Rad51 at DNA damage sites and inhibited non-homologous end joining as well as homologous recombination. Together, our results suggest that the hyperactivation of DNA-PK is insufficient for complete execution of the DDR but induces a “false” DNA damage signaling that disorganizes the DNA repair system. PMID:19621083

  20. DNA and chromosomal damage in coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mohd Akbar; Mahajan, Naresh; Gandhi, Gursatej

    2013-01-01

    DNA and chromosomal damage in peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) were investigated by using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay /comet and cytokinesis- block micronucleus (CBMN) assays, respectively. The case-control study comprised patients with CAD (n = 46; average age 53.0 ± 1.27 y) undergoing treatment at local hospitals, and healthy age-and sex-matched controls (n = 19; average age 54.21 ± 0.91 y) from the general population. The results of the comet assay revealed that the mean values of DNA damage were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in CAD patients than in controls (Tail DNA% 11.55 ± 0.38 vs. 5.31 ± 0.44; Tail moment 6.17 ± 0.31 vs. 2.93 ± 0.21 AU; Olive tail moment 3.52 ± 0.23 vs. 1.25 ± 0.11 AU). The mean values of chromosomal damage were also significantly higher (p < 0.001) in CAD patients than in controls (Binucleated cells with MN- 28.15 ± 1.18 vs. 18.16 ± 2.59; micronuclei 29.52 ± 1.21 vs. 18.68 ± 2.64, respectively) while nuclear division index (1.48 ± 0.01 vs. 1.63 ± 0.01) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in controls. The results of the present study indicate that coronary artery disease patients had increased levels of both, unrepaired (DNA) and repaired (chromosomal) genetic damage which may be a pathological consequence of the disease and/or the drug-treatment. This accumulation of DNA/chromosomal damage is of concern as it can lead to the development of cancer with increased chances of morbidity and mortality in the CAD patients. PMID:26535030

  1. The DNA damage and the DNA replication checkpoints converge at the MBF transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Tsvetomira; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Dutta, Chaitali; DeCaprio, James A; Rhind, Nick; Hidalgo, Elena; Ayté, José

    2013-11-01

    In fission yeast cells, Cds1 is the effector kinase of the DNA replication checkpoint. We previously showed that when the DNA replication checkpoint is activated, the repressor Yox1 is phosphorylated and inactivated by Cds1, resulting in activation of MluI-binding factor (MBF)-dependent transcription. This is essential to reinitiate DNA synthesis and for correct G1-to-S transition. Here we show that Cdc10, which is an essential part of the MBF core, is the target of the DNA damage checkpoint. When fission yeast cells are treated with DNA-damaging agents, Chk1 is activated and phosphorylates Cdc10 at its carboxy-terminal domain. This modification is responsible for the repression of MBF-dependent transcription through induced release of MBF from chromatin. This inactivation of MBF is important for survival of cells challenged with DNA-damaging agents. Thus Yox1 and Cdc10 couple normal cell cycle regulation in unperturbed conditions and the DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoints into a single transcriptional complex. PMID:24006488

  2. The DNA damage and the DNA replication checkpoints converge at the MBF transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Tsvetomira; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Dutta, Chaitali; DeCaprio, James A.; Rhind, Nick; Hidalgo, Elena; Ayté, José

    2013-01-01

    In fission yeast cells, Cds1 is the effector kinase of the DNA replication checkpoint. We previously showed that when the DNA replication checkpoint is activated, the repressor Yox1 is phosphorylated and inactivated by Cds1, resulting in activation of MluI-binding factor (MBF)–dependent transcription. This is essential to reinitiate DNA synthesis and for correct G1-to-S transition. Here we show that Cdc10, which is an essential part of the MBF core, is the target of the DNA damage checkpoint. When fission yeast cells are treated with DNA-damaging agents, Chk1 is activated and phosphorylates Cdc10 at its carboxy-terminal domain. This modification is responsible for the repression of MBF-dependent transcription through induced release of MBF from chromatin. This inactivation of MBF is important for survival of cells challenged with DNA-damaging agents. Thus Yox1 and Cdc10 couple normal cell cycle regulation in unperturbed conditions and the DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoints into a single transcriptional complex. PMID:24006488

  3. High-resolution genomic assays provide insight into the division of labor between TLS and HDR in mammalian replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Zvi; Cohen, Isadora S; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Davidovsky, Dana; Carmi, Dalit; Swain, Umakanta; Mirlas-Neisberg, Nataly

    2016-08-01

    The multitude of DNA lesions that continuously form in DNA cannot all be detected and removed prior to replication. Thus, encounters of the replication fork with DNA damage become inevitable. Such encounters inhibit fork progression, leading to replication fork arrest or to replication re-priming downstream of the damage site. Either of these events will result in the formation of gap-lesion structures, in which a damaged base is located in a single stranded stretch of DNA, that is vulnerable to subsequent nicking. The double strand break that would ensue if ssDNA becomes nicked constitutes escalation of the damage from nucleotide(s)-specific to chromosomal scale. Cells employ two universal DNA damage tolerance (DDT) strategies to resolve these situations, by converting the gap-lesion structures into dsDNA without repairing the damage. The first is translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which a specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerase inserts a nucleotide opposite the damaged one. TLS is inherently mutagenic, due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. The second strategy is homology-dependent repair (HDR), which relies on the presence of an identical intact sister chromatid. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the division of labor between these pathways are poorly understood. This review focuses on the balance between TLS and HDR in mammalian cells, discussing recent findings that were made possible thanks to newly developed high resolution genomic assays, and highlighting the role of the DNA lesion's properties in DDT pathway choice. PMID:27262613

  4. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E; Danser, A H Jan; Roks, Anton J M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  5. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K.; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Danser, A. H. Jan; Roks, Anton J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  6. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA damage is associated with damage accrual and disease duration in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Linnette; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Castro, María del R.; Font, Yvonne M.; Torres-Ramos, Carlos; Vilá, Luis M.; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared to healthy subjects and to determine the factors associated with mtDNA damage among SLE patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in 86 SLE patients (per American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) and 86 healthy individuals matched for age and gender. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from subjects to assess the relative amounts of mtDNA damage. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was used to measure the frequency of mtDNA lesions and mtDNA abundance. Socioeconomic-demographic features, clinical manifestations, pharmacologic treatment, disease activity, and damage accrual were determined. Statistical analyses were performed using t test, pairwise correlation, and Pearson’s chi-square test (or Fisher’s exact test) as appropriate. Results Among SLE patients, 93.0% were women. The mean (SD) age was 38.0 (10.4) years and the mean (SD) disease duration was 8.7 (7.5) years. SLE patients exhibited increased levels of mtDNA damage as shown by higher levels of mtDNA lesions and decreased mtDNA abundance as compared to healthy individuals. There was a negative correlation between disease damage and mtDNA abundance and a positive correlation between mtDNA lesions and disease duration. No association was found between disease activity and mtDNA damage. Conclusion PBMCs from SLE patients exhibited more mtDNA damage compared to healthy subjects. Higher levels of mtDNA damage were observed among SLE patients with major organ involvement and damage accrual. These results suggest that mtDNA damage have a potential role in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:24899636

  8. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  9. Interactions and Localization of Escherichia coli Error-Prone DNA Polymerase IV after DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Sarita; Popodi, Ellen M.; Hanson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli's DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB), a member of the Y family of error-prone polymerases, is induced during the SOS response to DNA damage and is responsible for translesion bypass and adaptive (stress-induced) mutation. In this study, the localization of Pol IV after DNA damage was followed using fluorescent fusions. After exposure of E. coli to DNA-damaging agents, fluorescently tagged Pol IV localized to the nucleoid as foci. Stepwise photobleaching indicated ∼60% of the foci consisted of three Pol IV molecules, while ∼40% consisted of six Pol IV molecules. Fluorescently tagged Rep, a replication accessory DNA helicase, was recruited to the Pol IV foci after DNA damage, suggesting that the in vitro interaction between Rep and Pol IV reported previously also occurs in vivo. Fluorescently tagged RecA also formed foci after DNA damage, and Pol IV localized to them. To investigate if Pol IV localizes to double-strand breaks (DSBs), an I-SceI endonuclease-mediated DSB was introduced close to a fluorescently labeled LacO array on the chromosome. After DSB induction, Pol IV localized to the DSB site in ∼70% of SOS-induced cells. RecA also formed foci at the DSB sites, and Pol IV localized to the RecA foci. These results suggest that Pol IV interacts with RecA in vivo and is recruited to sites of DSBs to aid in the restoration of DNA replication. IMPORTANCE DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB) is an error-prone DNA polymerase capable of bypassing DNA lesions and aiding in the restart of stalled replication forks. In this work, we demonstrate in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged Pol IV to the nucleoid after DNA damage and to DNA double-strand breaks. We show colocalization of Pol IV with two proteins: Rep DNA helicase, which participates in replication, and RecA, which catalyzes recombinational repair of stalled replication forks. Time course experiments suggest that Pol IV recruits Rep and that RecA recruits Pol IV. These findings

  10. Hypervelocity impact damage tolerance of fused silica glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    A test program was conducted at the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) concerning hypervelocity impact damage in fused silica glass. The objectives of this test program were: to expand the penetration equation data base in the velocity range between 2 and 8 km/s; to determine how much strength remains in a glass pane that has sustained known impact damage; and to develop a relationship between crater measurements and residual strength predictions that can be utilized in the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs. The results and conclusions of the residual strength testing are discussed below. Detailed discussion of the penetration equation studies will follow in future presentations.

  11. DNA damage and radiocesium in channel catfish from Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Sugg, D.W.; Brooks, J.A.; Jagoe, C.H.; Smith, M.H.; Chesser, R.K.; Bickham, J.W.; Lomakin, M.D.; Dallas, C.E.; Baker, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    The explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant resulted in some of the most radioactively contaminated habitats on earth. Despite evacuation of all human inhabitants from the most contaminated areas, animals and plants continue to thrive in these areas. This study examines the levels of contamination and genetic damage associated with cesium-137 in catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) from the cooling pond and a control site. In general, catfish from the cooling pond exhibit greater genetic damage, and the amount of damage is related to the concentration of radiocesium in individual fish. Genetic damage is primarily in the form of DNA strand breaks, with few micronuclei being observed in contaminated fish. The possible roles that acclimation and adaption play in the response to high levels of radiation exposure are discussed.

  12. Stem cells: Balancing resistance and sensitivity to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Julia C.; Lerou, Paul H.; Lahav, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are known to be very sensitive to DNA damage and undergo rapid apoptosis even after low damage doses. In contrast, adult stem cells show variable sensitivity to damage. Here we describe the multiple pathways that have been proposed to affect the sensitivity of stem cells to damage, including proximity to the apoptotic threshold (mitochondrial priming) and the p53 signaling pathway, through activation of transcription or direct interaction with pro apoptotic proteins in the cytoplasm. We also discuss which cellular factors might connect mitochondrial priming with pluripotency and the potential therapeutic advances that can be achieved by better understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to sensitivity or resistance of embryonic or adult stem cells from different tissues. PMID:24721782

  13. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells. PMID:26666690

  14. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells. PMID:26666690

  15. Impact of sperm DNA damage and oocyte-repairing capacity on trout development.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Díez, C; González-Rojo, S; Lombó, M; Herráez, M P

    2016-07-01

    Zygotic repair of paternal DNA is essential during embryo development. In spite of the interest devoted to sperm DNA damage, its combined effect with defect-repairing oocytes has not been analyzed. Modification of the breeding season is a common practice in aquaculture. This practice reduces developmental success and could affect the both factors: sperm DNA integrity and oocyte repair capacity. To evaluate the maternal role, we analyzed the progeny outcome after fertilizing in-season trout oocytes with untreated and with UV-irradiated sperm. We also analyzed the offspring obtained out of season with untreated sperm. The analysis of the number of lesions in 4 sperm nuclear genes revealed an increase of 1.22-11.18 lesions/10 kb in out-of-season sperm, similar to that obtained after sperm UV irradiation (400 µW/cm(2)5 min). Gene expression showed in out-of-season oocytes the overexpression of repair genes (ogg1, ung, lig3, rad1) and downregulation of tp53, indicating an enhanced repairing activity and reduced capacity to arrest development upon damage. The analysis of the progeny in out-of-season embryos revealed a similar profile tolerant to DNA damage, leading to a much lower apoptotic activity at organogenesis, lower hatching rates and increased rate of malformations. The effects were milder in descendants from in-season-irradiated sperm, showing an enhanced repairing activity at epibolia. Results point out the importance of the repairing machinery provided by the oocyte and show how susceptible it is to environmental changes. Transcripts related to DNA damage signalization and repair could be used as markers of oocyte quality. PMID:27071918

  16. Uridine homeostatic disorder leads to DNA damage and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhe; Ma, Jun; Chen, Xinchun; Zhou, Boping; Cai, Chuan; Huang, Dan; Zhang, Xuewen; Cao, Deliang

    2016-03-28

    Uridine is a natural nucleoside precursor of uridine monophosphate in organisms and thus is considered to be safe and is used in a wide range of clinical settings. The far-reaching effects of pharmacological uridine have long been neglected. Here, we report that the homeostatic disorder of uridine is carcinogenic. Targeted disruption (-/-) of murine uridine phosphorylase (UPase) disrupted the homeostasis of uridine and increased spontaneous tumorigenesis by more than 3-fold. Multiple tumors (e.g., lymphoma, hepatoma and lung adenoma) occurred simultaneously in some UPase deficient mice, but not in wild-type mice raised under the same conditions. In the tissue from UPase -/- mice, the 2'-deoxyuridine,5'-triphosphate (dUTP) levels and uracil DNA were increased and p53 was activated with an increased phospho-Ser18 p53 level. Exposing cell lines (e.g., MCF-7, RKO, HCT-8 and NCI-H460) to uridine (10 or 30 µM) led to uracil DNA damage and p53 activation, which in turn triggered the DNA damage response. In these cells, phospho-ATM, phospho-CHK2, and phospho-γH2AX were increased by uridine. These data suggest that uridine homeostatic disorder leads to uracil DNA damage and that pharmacological uridine may be carcinogenic. PMID:26801745

  17. Chromatin Compaction Protects Genomic DNA from Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 5–50-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:24130727

  18. p53 in the DNA-Damage-Repair Process.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ashley B; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA-damage-response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA-repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in providing protection from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  19. Reduction in oxidatively generated DNA damage following smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a known cause of cancer, and cancer may be in part due to effects of oxidative stress. However, whether smoking cessation reverses oxidatively induced DNA damage unclear. The current study sought to examine the extent to which three DNA lesions showed significant reductions after participants quit smoking. Methods Participants (n = 19) in this study were recruited from an ongoing 16-week smoking cessation clinical trial and provided blood samples from which leukocyte DNA was extracted and assessed for 3 DNA lesions (thymine glycol modification [d(TgpA)]; formamide breakdown of pyrimidine bases [d(TgpA)]; 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine [d(Gh)]) via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Change in lesions over time was assessed using generalized estimating equations, controlling for gender, age, and treatment condition. Results Overall time effects for the d(TgpA) (χ2(3) = 8.068, p < 0.045), d(PfpA) (χ2(3) = 8.477, p < 0.037), and d(Gh) (χ2(3) = 37.599, p < 0.001) lesions were seen, indicating levels of each decreased significantly after CO-confirmed smoking cessation. The d(TgpA) and d(PfpA) lesions show relatively greater rebound at Week 16 compared to the d(Gh) lesion (88% of baseline for d(TgpA), 64% of baseline for d(PfpA), vs 46% of baseline for d(Gh)). Conclusions Overall, results from this analysis suggest that cigarette smoking contributes to oxidatively induced DNA damage, and that smoking cessation appears to reduce levels of specific damage markers between 30-50 percent in the short term. Future research may shed light on the broader array of oxidative damage influenced by smoking and over longer durations of abstinence, to provide further insights into mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis. PMID:21569419

  20. Collection, processing, and reporting of damage tolerant design data for non-aerospace structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, P. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the organization, format and content of the NASA Johnson damage tolerant database which was created to store damage tolerant property data for non aerospace structural materials. The database is designed to store fracture toughness data (K(sub IC), K(sub c), J(sub IC) and CTOD(sub IC)), resistance curve data (K(sub R) VS. delta a (sub eff) and JR VS. delta a (sub eff)), as well as subcritical crack growth data (a vs. N and da/dN vs. delta K). The database contains complementary material property data for both stainless and alloy steels, as well as for aluminum, nickel, and titanium alloys which were not incorporated into the Damage Tolerant Design Handbook database.

  1. Damage tolerance of candidate thermoset composites for use on single stage to orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D.; Hodge, A.

    1994-01-01

    Four fiber/resin systems were compared for resistance to damage and damage tolerance. One toughened epoxy and three toughened bismaleimide (BMI) resins were used, all with IM7 carbon fiber reinforcement. A statistical design of experiments technique was used to evaluate the effects of impact energy, specimen thickness, and impactor diameter on the damage area, as computed by C-scans, and residual compression-after-impact (CAI) strength. Results showed that two of the BMI systems sustained relatively large damage zones yet had an excellent retention of CAI strength.

  2. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huselton, C.A.; Hill, H.Z. )

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals.

  3. Preservation of ancient DNA in thermally damaged archaeological bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottoni, Claudio; Koon, Hannah E. C.; Collins, Matthew J.; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.; Rickards, Olga; Craig, Oliver E.

    2009-02-01

    Evolutionary biologists are increasingly relying on ancient DNA from archaeological animal bones to study processes such as domestication and population dispersals. As many animal bones found on archaeological sites are likely to have been cooked, the potential for DNA preservation must be carefully considered to maximise the chance of amplification success. Here, we assess the preservation of mitochondrial DNA in a medieval cattle bone assemblage from Coppergate, York, UK. These bones have variable degrees of thermal alterations to bone collagen fibrils, indicative of cooking. Our results show that DNA preservation is not reliant on the presence of intact collagen fibrils. In fact, a greater number of template molecules could be extracted from bones with damaged collagen. We conclude that moderate heating of bone may enhance the retention of DNA fragments. Our results also indicate that ancient DNA preservation is highly variable, even within a relatively recent assemblage from contexts conducive to organic preservation, and that diagenetic parameters based on protein diagenesis are not always useful for predicting ancient DNA survival.

  4. DNA damage profiles induced by sunlight at different latitudes.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André Passaglia; Yagura, Teiti; Makita, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; MacMahon, Ricardo Monreal; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2012-04-01

    Despite growing knowledge on the biological effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health and ecosystems, it is still difficult to predict the negative impacts of the increasing incidence of solar UV radiation in a scenario of global warming and climate changes. Hence, the development and application of DNA-based biological sensors to monitor the solar UV radiation under different environmental conditions is of increasing importance. With a mind to rendering a molecular view-point of the genotoxic impact of sunlight, field experiments were undertaken with a DNA-dosimeter system in parallel with physical photometry of solar UVB/UVA radiation, at various latitudes in South America. On applying biochemical and immunological approaches based on specific DNA-repair enzymes and antibodies, for evaluating sunlight-induced DNA damage profiles, it became clear that the genotoxic potential of sunlight does indeed vary according to latitude. Notwithstanding, while induction of oxidized DNA bases is directly dependent on an increase in latitude, the generation of 6-4PPs is inversely so, whereby the latter can be regarded as a biomolecular marker of UVB incidence. This molecular DNA lesion-pattern largely reflects the relative incidence of UVA and UVB energy at any specific latitude. Hereby is demonstrated the applicability of this DNA-based biosensor for additional, continuous field experiments, as a means of registering variations in the genotoxic impact of solar UV radiation. PMID:22674547

  5. Damage tolerance design procedures for an automotive composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.

    1998-11-01

    Among the durability issues of concern in the use of composites in automobile structures is the damaging effects that low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) might have on strength and stiffness. This issue was experimentally investigated, and recommended design evaluation procedures were developed for a candidate automotive structural composite--a structural reaction injection-molded polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. Two test facilities were built to cover the range of impacts of interest--a pendulum device to characterize the effects of relative heavy objects at low velocities and an air gun to characterize the effects of relatively light objects at higher velocities. In all cases, the test specimen was a 9 x 9 x 1/8-in.-thick plate clamped on an 8-in.-diam circle. Sixty-five impact tests were performed. Included were tests using various impactor sizes and weights, tests at {minus}40 F, and tests on specimens that has been presoaked in water or exposed to battery acid. Damage areas were determined using ultrasonic C-scans, and the resulting areas were found to correlate with the quantity impactor mass to a power times velocity. A design curve was derived from the correlation and validated using dropped brick tests. To evaluate strength and stiffness reductions, the impacted plate specimens were cut into tensile, compressive, and fatigue test specimens that were used to determine reductions as a function of damage area. It was found that for design purposes, the strength reduction could be determined by representing the damage area by a circular hole of equivalent area.

  6. Effect of resin on impact damage tolerance of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four different epoxy resin systems were evaluated by a variety of test techniques to identify materials that exhibited improved impact damage tolerance in graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Forty-eight-ply composite panels of five of the material systems were able to sustain 100 m/s impact by a 1.27-cm-diameter aluminum projectile while statically loaded to strains of 0.005. Of the five materials with the highest tolerance to impact, two had elastomeric additives, two had thermoplastic additives, and one had a vinyl modifier; all the five systems used bisphenol A as the base resin. An evaluation of test results shows that the laminate damage tolerance is largely determined by the resin tensile properties, and that improvements in laminate damage tolerance are not necessarily made at the expense of room-temperature mechanical properties. The results also suggest that a resin volume fraction of 40 percent or greater may be required to permit the plastic flow between fibers necessary for improved damage tolerance.

  7. DNA damage in mammalian cells following heavy-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosander, K.; Frankel, K.A.; Cerda, H.; Phillips, M.H.; Lo, E.H.; Fabrikant, I.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.

    1989-09-01

    In our laboratory we have been investigating DNA damage and repair in the endothelial and oligodendroglial cells of the mouse brain after irradiation using two different types of heavy ions, helium and neon. The method used, the unwinding technique with subsequent staining of the DNA with acridine orange, has been proven to be useful for nondividing cells and analysis using a microscope photometric technique. Our primary goal has been to obtain a measure of RBE, in the dose range used in clinical treatment of various brain disorders using heavy charged particle radiosurgery. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Safe-life and damage-tolerant design approaches for helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddick, H. K., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The safe-life and damage-tolerant design approaches discussed apply to both metallic and fibrous composite helicopter structures. The application of these design approaches to fibrous composite structures is emphasized. Safe-life and damage-tolerant criteria are applied to all helicopter flight critical components, which are generally categorized as: dynamic components with a main and tail rotor system, which includes blades, hub and rotating controls, and drive train which includes transmission, and main and interconnecting rotor shafts; and the airframe, composed of the fuselage, aerodynamic surfaces, and landing gear.

  9. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Miguel P.; Ribeiro, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner. PMID:26551709

  10. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection.

    PubMed

    Soares, Miguel P; Ribeiro, Ana M

    2015-08-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner. PMID:26551709

  11. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  12. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  13. Applications of a damage tolerance analysis methodology in aircraft design and production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, M. R.; Owens, S. D.; Law, G. E.; Mignery, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Objectives of customer mandated aircraft structural integrity initiatives in design are to guide material selection, to incorporate fracture resistant concepts in the design, to utilize damage tolerance based allowables and planned inspection procedures necessary to enhance the safety and reliability of manned flight vehicles. However, validated fracture analysis tools for composite structures are needed to accomplish these objectives in a timely and economical manner. This paper briefly describes the development, validation, and application of a damage tolerance methodology for composite airframe structures. A closed-form analysis code, entitled SUBLAM was developed to predict the critical biaxial strain state necessary to cause sublaminate buckling-induced delamination extension in an impact damaged composite laminate. An embedded elliptical delamination separating a thin sublaminate from a thick parent laminate is modelled. Predicted failure strains were correlated against a variety of experimental data that included results from compression after impact coupon and element tests. An integrated analysis package was developed to predict damage tolerance based margin-of-safety (MS) using NASTRAN generated loads and element information. Damage tolerance aspects of new concepts are quickly and cost-effectively determined without the need for excessive testing.

  14. Non-coding RNAs in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunhua; Lu, Xiongbin

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide studies have revealed that human and other mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed and produce thousands of regulatory non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including miRNAs, siRNAs, piRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Emerging evidences suggest that these ncRNAs also play a pivotal role in genome integrity and stability via the regulation of DNA damage response (DDR). In this review, we discuss the recent finding on the interplay of ncRNAs with the canonical DDR signaling pathway, with a particular emphasis on miRNAs and lncRNAs. While the expression of ncRNAs is regulated in the DDR, the DDR is also subjected to regulation by those DNA damage-responsive ncRNAs. In addition, the roles of those Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs produced in the vicinity of double-strand breaks sites are also described. PMID:23226613

  15. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  16. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties. PMID:27135971

  17. Fuel containment, lightning protection and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Charles F.; James, Arthur M.

    1985-01-01

    The damage-tolerance characteristics of high strain-to-failure graphite fibers and toughened resins were evaluated. Test results show that conventional fuel tank sealing techniques are applicable to composite structures. Techniques were developed to prevent fuel leaks due to low-energy impact damage. For wing panels subjected to swept stroke lightning strikes, a surface protection of graphite/aluminum wire fabric and a fastener treatment proved effective in eliminating internal sparking and reducing structural damage. The technology features developed were incorporated and demonstrated in a test panel designed to meet the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance requirements of a large commercial transport aircraft. The panel test results exceeded design requirements for all test conditions. Wing surfaces constructed with composites offer large weight savings if design allowable strains for compression can be increased from current levels.

  18. Oxidative DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of coal workers.

    PubMed

    Schins, R P; Schilderman, P A; Borm, P J

    1995-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are important mediators of both mineral dust-induced (malignant) lung disease and in vitro DNA damage. Therefore, we studied in vivo oxidative DNA damage in coal workers who had been chronically exposed to silica-containing dust. In peripheral blood lymphocytes of 38 retired coal miners (eight with coal workers pneumoconiosis, 30 references) and 24 age-matched, non-dust-exposed controls 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) was determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The ratio of 8-oxodG residues to deoxyguanosine (dG) was related to individual cumulative dust exposure estimates and pneumoconiotic stage as established by chest radiography. The ratio of 8-oxodG to dG(x 10(-5)) in lymphocytes did not differ between miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (2.61 +/- 0.44) and miners without coal workers' pneumoconiosis (2.96 +/- 1.86). However, oxidative DNA damage in all miners was higher than in the non-dust-exposed controls (1.67 +/- 1.31). 8-oxodG/dG ratio was not related to individual cumulative coal dust exposure, age or smoking (pack years) when evaluated by multiple linear regression. We suggest that oxidative damage to the DNA of peripheral blood lymphocytes may be introduced by increased oxidative stress responses in subjects chronically exposed to mineral dusts. Whether this is an important pathway in the suggested carcinogenicity of silica is still an open question. PMID:7591172

  19. Level of DNA damage in lead-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Olewińska, Elżbieta; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Kapka, Lucyna; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Pawlas, Natalia; Dobrakowski, Michał; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    Lead plays a significant role in modern industry. This metal is related to a broad range of physiological, biochemical and behavioural dysfunctions. The genotoxic effects of lead have been studied both in animals and humans in in vitro systems but results were contradictory. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between DNA damage and occupational exposure to lead in workers. The study population consisted of 62 employees of metalworks exposed to lead in the southern region of Poland. The control group consisted of 26 office workers with no history of occupational exposure to lead. The concentration of lead (PbB) and zincprotoporphyrin (ZPP) in blood samples were measured. The DNA damage was analyzed in blood lymphocytes using alkaline comet assay. The level of DNA damage was determined as the percentage of DNA in the tail, tail length and tail moment. The lead exposure indicators were significantly higher in lead exposed group: PbB about 8.5 times and ZPP 3.3 times. Also, the percentage of DNA in the tail (60.3 ± 14 vs. 37.1 ± 17.6), comet tail length (86.9 ± 15.49 vs. 73.8 ± 19.12) and TM (57.8 ± 17.82 vs. 33.2 ± 19.13) were significantly higher in the study group when compared with the controls; however, the difference between the subgroups was only 5-10%. Years of lead exposure positively correlated with all comet assay parameters (R = 0.21-0.41). Both mean and current PbB and ZPP were correlated with tail DNA % and TM (R = 0.32; R = 0.33; R = 0.24; R = 0.26 and R = 0.34; R = 0.33; R = 0.28 and R = 0.28, respectively). This study shows that occupational exposure to lead is associated with DNA damage and confirmed that comet assay is a rapid, sensitive method suitable for biomonitoring studies. PMID:21186764

  20. Prevention of oxidative DNA damage in rats by brussels sprouts.

    PubMed

    Deng, X S; Tuo, J; Poulsen, H E; Loft, S

    1998-03-01

    The alleged cancer preventive effects of cruciferous vegetables could be related to protection from mutagenic oxidative DNA damage. We have studied the effects of Brussels sprouts, some non-cruciferous vegetables and isolated glucosinolates on spontaneous and induced oxidative DNA damage in terms of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in groups of 6-8 male Wistar rats. Excess oxidative DNA damage was induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP 100 mg/kg). Four days oral administration of 3 g of cooked Brussels sprouts homogenate reduced the spontaneous urinary 8-oxodG excretion by 31% (p<0.05) whereas raw sprouts, beans and endive (1:1), isolated indolyl glucosinolates and breakdown products had no significant effect. An aqueous extract of cooked Brussels sprouts (corresponding to 6.7 g vegetable per day for 4 days) decreased the spontaneous 8-oxodG excretion from 92 +/- 12 to 52 +/- 15 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). After 2-NP administration the 8-oxodG excretion was increased to 132 +/- 26 pmol/24 h (p<0.05) whereas pretreatment with the sprouts extract reduced this to 102 +/- 30 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). The spontaneous level of 8-oxodG in nuclear DNA from liver and bone marrow was not significantly affected by the sprouts extract whereas the level decreased by 27% in the kidney (p<0.05). In the liver 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels in nuclear DNA 8.7 and 3.8 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. The sprouts extract reduced this increase by 57% (p<0.05) at 6 h whereas there was no significant effect at 24 h. In the kidneys 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels 2.2 and 1.2 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. Pretreatment with the sprouts extract abolished these increases (p<0.05). Similarly, in the bone marrow the extract protected completely (p<0.05) against a 4.9-fold 2-NP induced increase (p<0.05) in the 8-oxodG level. These findings demonstrate that cooked Brussels sprouts contain bioactive substance(s) with a potential for reducing the physiological

  1. Fungicide prochloraz induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, J; Hellman, B; Oskarsson, A

    2016-05-01

    Prochloraz is widely used in horticulture and agriculture, e.g. as a post-harvest anti-mold treatment. Prochloraz is a known endocrine disruptor causing developmental toxicity with multiple mechanisms of action. However, data are scarce concerning other toxic effects. Since oxidative stress response, with formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a common mechanism for different toxic endpoints, e.g. genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity, the aim of this study was to investigate if prochloraz can induce oxidative stress and/or DNA damage in human cells. A cell culture based in vitro model was used to study oxidative stress response by prochloraz, as measured by the activity of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key molecule in oxidative defense mechanisms. It was observed that prochloraz induced oxidative stress in cultured human adrenocortical H295R and hepatoma HepG2 cells at non-toxic concentrations. Further, we used Comet assay to investigate the DNA damaging potential of prochloraz, and found that non-toxic concentrations of prochloraz induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells. These are novel findings, contradicting previous studies in the field of prochloraz and genotoxicity. This study reports a new mechanism by which prochloraz may exert toxicity. Our findings suggest that prochloraz might have genotoxic properties. PMID:26945613

  2. Reversal of DNA damage induced Topoisomerase 2 DNA-protein crosslinks by Tdp2.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Perera, Lalith; Strom, Christina N; Waters, Crystal A; Monian, Brinda; Appel, C Denise; Vilas, Caroline K; Williams, Jason G; Ramsden, Dale A; Williams, R Scott

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2) reverses Topoisomerase 2 (Top2) DNA-protein crosslinks triggered by Top2 engagement of DNA damage or poisoning by anticancer drugs. Tdp2 deficiencies are linked to neurological disease and cellular sensitivity to Top2 poisons. Herein, we report X-ray crystal structures of ligand-free Tdp2 and Tdp2-DNA complexes with alkylated and abasic DNA that unveil a dynamic Tdp2 active site lid and deep substrate binding trench well-suited for engaging the diverse DNA damage triggers of abortive Top2 reactions. Modeling of a proposed Tdp2 reaction coordinate, combined with mutagenesis and biochemical studies support a single Mg(2+)-ion mechanism assisted by a phosphotyrosyl-arginine cation-π interface. We further identify a Tdp2 active site SNP that ablates Tdp2 Mg(2+) binding and catalytic activity, impairs Tdp2 mediated NHEJ of tyrosine blocked termini, and renders cells sensitive to the anticancer agent etoposide. Collectively, our results provide a structural mechanism for Tdp2 engagement of heterogeneous DNA damage that causes Top2 poisoning, and indicate that evaluation of Tdp2 status may be an important personalized medicine biomarker informing on individual sensitivities to chemotherapeutic Top2 poisons. PMID:27060144

  3. Damage tolerance of woven graphite-epoxy buffer strip panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy panels with S glass buffer strips were tested in tension and shear to measure their residual strengths with crack-like damage. The buffer strips were regularly spaced narrow strips of continuous S glass. Panels were made with a uniweave graphite cloth where the S glass buffer material was woven directly into the cloth. Panels were made with different width and thickness buffer strips. The panels were loaded to failure while remote strain, strain at the end of the slit, and crack opening displacement were monitoring. The notched region and nearby buffer strips were radiographed periodically to reveal crack growth and damage. Except for panels with short slits, the buffer strips arrested the propagating crack. The strength (or failing strain) of the panels was significantly higher than the strength of all-graphite panels with the same length slit. Panels with wide, thick buffer strips were stronger than panels with thin, narrow buffer strips. A shear-lag model predicted the failing strength of tension panels with wide buffer strips accurately, but over-estimated the strength of the shear panels and the tension panels with narrow buffer strips.

  4. DNA damage in leukocytes of mice treated with copper sulfate.

    PubMed

    Saleha Banu, B; Ishaq, Mohd; Danadevi, K; Padmavathi, P; Ahuja, Y R

    2004-12-01

    Single stranded DNA breaks induced by copper sulfate (CuSO(4)) in mice has been studied in vivo using Alkaline Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet assay). Mice were administered orally with doses of 0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.00, 7.50, 10.00 and 12.50 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) of CuSO4 respectively. The samples of whole blood were collected at 24, 48, 72 h, first week and second week post-treatment and the assay was carried out to determine single strand DNA breaks as represented by comet tail-length. In addition, the sample was used to study the repair efficiency by incubating the samples with RPMI medium for 2 h. Results indicated a significant DNA damage at all the doses after treatment with CuSO4 when compared to controls showing a clear dose-dependent response (p < 0.05). A gradual decrease in the tail-lengths from 48 h post-treatment was observed and by second week, the values returned to control levels at all doses. The study on the repair efficiency indicated that mice treated with all the doses of CuSO4 showed decrease in mean comet tail-length indicating repair efficiency capacity but less when compared to those of controls. The study also reveals that comet assay is a sensitive and rapid method for detecting DNA damage caused by trace metals such as copper (Cu). PMID:15500930

  5. Increase in the frequency of hepadnavirus DNA integrations by oxidative DNA damage and inhibition of DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J; Dandri, M; Bürkle, A; Zhang, L; Rogler, C E

    1997-01-01

    Persistent hepadnavirus infection leads to oxidative stress and DNA damage through increased production of toxic oxygen radicals. In addition, hepadnaviral DNA integrations into chromosomal DNA can promote the process of hepatocarcinogenesis (M. Feitelson, Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 5:275-301, 1992). While previous studies have identified preferred integration sites in hepadnaviral genomes and suggested integration mechanisms (M. A. Buendia, Adv. Cancer Res. 59:167-226, 1992; C. E. Rogler, Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 168:103-141, 1991; C. Shih et al., J. Virol. 61:3491-3498, 1987), very little is known about the effects of agents which damage chromosomal DNA on the frequency of hepadnaviral DNA integrations. Using a recently developed subcloning approach to detect stable new integrations of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) (S. S. Gong, A. D. Jensen, and C. E. Rogler, J. Virol. 70:2000-2007, 1996), we tested the effects of increased chromosomal DNA damage induced by H2O2, or of the disturbance in DNA repair due to the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), on the frequency of DHBV DNA integrations. Subclones of LMH-D21-6 cells, which replicate DHBV, were grown in the presence of various H2O2 concentrations and exhibited up to a threefold increase in viral DNA integration frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, inhibition of PARP, which plays a role in cellular responses to DNA breakage, by 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) resulted in a sevenfold increase in the total number of new DHBV DNA integrations into host chromosomal DNA. Removal of either H2O2 or 3-AB from the culture medium in a subsequent cycle of subcloning was accompanied by a reversion back towards the original lower frequency of stable DHBV DNA integrations for LMH-D21-6 cells. These data support the hypothesis that DNA damage sites can serve as sites for hepadnaviral DNA integration, and that increasing the number of DNA damage sites dramatically increases viral integration frequency. PMID

  6. SUMO-mediated regulation of DNA damage repair and responses

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation plays important roles during DNA damage repair and responses. Recent broad-scope and substrate-based studies have shed light on the regulation and significance of sumoylation during these processes. An emerging paradigm is that sumoylation of many DNA metabolism proteins is controlled by DNA engagement. Such “on-site modification” can explain low substrate modification levels and has important implications in sumoylation mechanisms and effects. New studies also suggest that sumoylation can regulate a process through an ensemble effect or via major substrates. Additionally, we describe new trends in the functional effects of sumoylation, such as bi-directional changes in biomolecule binding and multi-level coordination with other modifications. These emerging themes and models will stimulate our thinking and research in sumoylation and genome maintenance. PMID:25778614

  7. Inhibition of Topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1): DNA Damage Repair and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Her, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    Most chemotherapy regimens contain at least one DNA-damaging agent that preferentially affects the growth of cancer cells. This strategy takes advantage of the differences in cell proliferation between normal and cancer cells. Chemotherapeutic drugs are usually designed to target rapid-dividing cells because sustained proliferation is a common feature of cancer [1,2]. Rapid DNA replication is essential for highly proliferative cells, thus blocking of DNA replication will create numerous mutations and/or chromosome rearrangements—ultimately triggering cell death [3]. Along these lines, DNA topoisomerase inhibitors are of great interest because they help to maintain strand breaks generated by topoisomerases during replication. In this article, we discuss the characteristics of topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1) and its inhibitors, as well as the underlying DNA repair pathways and the use of TOP1 inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:26287259

  8. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  9. Increasing the FOD tolerance of composites. [gas turbine engine blade foreign object damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted for the purpose of increasing the foreign object damage tolerance of resin matrix composites in gas turbine engine fan blade applications. The superhybrid concept consisting of a resin matrix composite core surrounded by a sheath of boron/aluminum and titanium was found to be the most promising approach.

  10. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  11. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  12. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  13. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  14. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  15. 14 CFR 27.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. 27.573 Section 27.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Fatigue Evaluation §...

  16. 14 CFR 29.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. 29.573 Section 29.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Fatigue Evaluation...

  17. Inhibition of DNA damage repair by artificial activation of PARP with siDNA.

    PubMed

    Croset, Amelie; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Berthault, Nathalie; Buhler, Cyril; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Quanz, Maria; Dutreix, Marie

    2013-08-01

    One of the major early steps of repair is the recruitment of repair proteins at the damage site, and this is coordinated by a cascade of modifications controlled by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases and/or poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We used short interfering DNA molecules mimicking double-strand breaks (called Dbait) or single-strand breaks (called Pbait) to promote DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and PARP activation. Dbait bound and induced both PARP and DNA-PK activities, whereas Pbait acts only on PARP. Therefore, comparative study of the two molecules allows analysis of the respective roles of the two signaling pathways: both recruit proteins involved in single-strand break repair (PARP, XRCC1 and PCNA) and prevent their recruitment at chromosomal damage. Dbait, but not Pbait, also inhibits recruitment of proteins involved in double-strand break repair (53BP1, NBS1, RAD51 and DNA-PK). By these ways, Pbait and Dbait disorganize DNA repair, thereby sensitizing cells to various treatments. Single-strand breaks repair inhibition depends on direct trapping of the main proteins on both molecules. Double-strand breaks repair inhibition may be indirect, resulting from the phosphorylation of double-strand breaks repair proteins and chromatin targets by activated DNA-PK. The DNA repair inhibition by both molecules is confirmed by their synthetic lethality with BRCA mutations. PMID:23761435

  18. Assessment of the Damage Tolerance of Postbuckled Hat-Stiffened Panels Using Single-Stringer Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisagni, Chiara; Vescovini, Riccardo; Davila, Carlos G.

    2010-01-01

    A procedure is proposed for the assessment of the damage tolerance and collapse of stiffened composite panels using a single-stringer compression specimen. The dimensions of the specimen are determined such that the specimen s nonlinear response and collapse are representative of an equivalent multi-stringer panel in compression. Experimental tests are conducted on specimens with and without an embedded delamination. A shell-based finite element model with intralaminar and interlaminar damage capabilities is developed to predict the postbuckling response as well as the damage evolution from initiation to collapse.

  19. DNA damage response in peripheral nervous system: coping with cancer therapy-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    In the absence of blood brain barrier (BBB) the DNA of peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons is exposed to a broader spectrum of endogenous and exogenous threats compared to that of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, while CNS and PNS neurons cope with many similar challenges inherent to their high oxygen consumption and vigorous metabolism, PNS neurons are also exposed to circulating toxins and inflammatory mediators due to relative permeability of PNS blood nerve barrier (BNB). Consequently, genomes of PNS neurons incur greater damage and the question awaiting investigation is whether specialized repair mechanisms for maintenance of DNA integrity have evolved to meet the additional needs of PNS neurons. Here, I review data showing how PNS neurons manage collateral DNA damage incurred in the course of different anti-cancer treatments designed to block DNA replication in proliferating tumor cells. Importantly, while PNS neurotoxicity and concomitant chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are among major dose limiting barriers in achieving therapy goals, CIPN is partially reversible during post-treatment nerve recovery. Clearly, cell recovery necessitates mobilization of the DNA damage response and underscores the need for systematic investigation of the scope of DNA repair capacities in the PNS to help predict post-treatment risks to recovering neurons. PMID:23684797

  20. DNA Damage Response in Peripheral Nervous System: Coping with Cancer Therapy-Induced DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Ella W

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of blood brain barrier (BBB) the DNA of peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons is exposed to a broader spectrum of endogenous and exogenous threats compared to that of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, while CNS and PNS neurons cope with many similar challenges inherent to their high oxygen consumption and vigorous metabolism, PNS neurons are also exposed to circulating toxins and inflammatory mediators due to relative permeability of PNS blood nerve barrier (BNB). Consequently, genomes of PNS neurons incur greater damage and the question awaiting investigation is whether specialized repair mechanisms for maintenance of DNA integrity have evolved to meet the additional needs of PNS neurons. Here, I review data showing how PNS neurons manage collateral DNA damage incurred in the course of different anti-cancer treatments designed to block DNA replication in proliferating tumor cells. Importantly, while PNS neurotoxicity and concomitant chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are among major dose limiting barriers in achieving therapy goals, CIPN is partially reversible during post-treatment nerve recovery. Clearly, cell recovery necessitates mobilization of the DNA damage response and underscores the need for systematic investigation of the scope of DNA repair capacities in the PNS to help predict post-treatment risks to recovering neurons. PMID:23684797

  1. Virus-derived DNA drives mosquito vector tolerance to arboviral infection.

    PubMed

    Goic, Bertsy; Stapleford, Kenneth A; Frangeul, Lionel; Doucet, Aurélien J; Gausson, Valérie; Blanc, Hervé; Schemmel-Jofre, Nidia; Cristofari, Gael; Lambrechts, Louis; Vignuzzi, Marco; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes develop long-lasting viral infections without substantial deleterious effects, despite high viral loads. This makes mosquitoes efficient vectors for emerging viral diseases with enormous burden on public health. How mosquitoes resist and/or tolerate these viruses is poorly understood. Here we show that two species of Aedes mosquitoes infected with two arboviruses from distinct families (dengue or chikungunya) generate a viral-derived DNA (vDNA) that is essential for mosquito survival and viral tolerance. Inhibition of vDNA formation leads to extreme susceptibility to viral infections, reduction of viral small RNAs due to an impaired immune response, and loss of viral tolerance. Our results highlight an essential role of vDNA in viral tolerance that allows mosquito survival and thus may be important for arbovirus dissemination and transmission. Elucidating the mechanisms of mosquito tolerance to arbovirus infection paves the way to conceptualize new antivectorial strategies to selectively eliminate arbovirus-infected mosquitoes. PMID:27580708

  2. Evidence for DNA Damage as a Biological Link Between Diabetes and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shao Chin; Chan, Juliana CN

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review examines the evidence that: Diabetes is a state of DNA damage; pathophysiological factors in diabetes can cause DNA damage; DNA damage can cause mutations; and DNA mutation is linked to carcinogenesis. Data Sources: We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to January, 2014, using various search terms and their combinations including DNA damage, diabetes, cancer, high glucose, hyperglycemia, free fatty acids, palmitic acid, advanced glycation end products, mutation and carcinogenesis. Study Selection: We included data from peer-reviewed journals and a textbook printed in English on relationships between DNA damage and diabetes as well as pathophysiological factors in diabetes. Publications on relationships among DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, were also reviewed. We organized this information into a conceptual framework to explain the possible causal relationship between DNA damage and carcinogenesis in diabetes. Results: There are a large amount of data supporting the view that DNA mutation is a typical feature in carcinogenesis. Patients with type 2 diabetes have increased production of reactive oxygen species, reduced levels of antioxidant capacity, and increased levels of DNA damage. The pathophysiological factors and metabolic milieu in diabetes can cause DNA damage such as DNA strand break and base modification (i.e., oxidation). Emerging experimental data suggest that signal pathways (i.e., Akt/tuberin) link diabetes to DNA damage. This collective evidence indicates that diabetes is a pathophysiological state of oxidative stress and DNA damage which can lead to various types of mutation to cause aberration in cells and thereby increased cancer risk. Conclusions: This review highlights the interrelationships amongst diabetes, DNA damage, DNA mutation and carcinogenesis, which suggests that DNA damage can be a biological link between diabetes and cancer. PMID:26021514

  3. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Kennedy, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy panels with buffer strips were tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels were made with 45/0/-45/90(2S) and 45/0/450(2S) layups. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading directions. They were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of either 0 deg S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on either a one for one or a two for one basis. In a third case, O deg graphite/epoxy was used as the buffer material and thin, perforated Mylar strips were placed between the 0 deg piles and the cross-plies to weaken the interfaces and thus to isolate the 0 deg plies. Some panels were made with buffer strips of different widths and spacings. The buffer strips arrested the cracks and increased the residual strengths significantly over those plain laminates without buffer strips. A shear-lag type stress analysis correctly predicted the effects of layups, buffer material, buffer strip width and spacing, and the number of plies of buffer material.

  4. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. PMID:24746923

  5. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W Matthew

    2016-06-17

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes. PMID:27129245

  6. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylatedmore » CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.« less

  7. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Freudenthal, Bret D; Beard, William A; Cuneo, Matthew J; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-11-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  8. Capturing Snapshots of APE1 Processing DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent non-coding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive due in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1:DNA structures that divulge novel features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal binding site, nucleophile, and arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1:DNA structures with a T:G mismatch 5′ to the AP-site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These reveal that APE1 molds the T:G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick like geometry that distorts the active site reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1, while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  9. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.

  10. Application of damage tolerance methodology in certification of the Piaggio P-180 Avanti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    The Piaggio P-180 Avanti, a twin pusher-prop engine nine-passenger business aircraft was certified in 1990, to the requirements of FAR Part 23 and Associated Special Conditions for Composite Structure. Certification included the application of a damage tolerant methodology to the design of the composite forward wing and empennage (vertical fin, horizontal stabilizer, tailcone, and rudder) structure. This methodology included an extensive analytical evaluation coupled with sub-component and full-scale testing of the structure. The work from the Damage Tolerance Analysis Assessment was incorporated into the full-scale testing. Damage representing hazards such as dropped tools, ground equipment, handling, and runway debris, was applied to the test articles. Additional substantiation included allowing manufacturing discrepancies to exist unrepaired on the full-scale articles and simulated bondline failures in critical elements. The importance of full-scale testing in the critical environmental conditions and the application of critical damage are addressed. The implication of damage tolerance on static and fatigue testing is discussed. Good correlation between finite element solutions and experimental test data was observed.

  11. Durability and damage tolerance of Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structure (LCPAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, John E.; Roeseler, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis and testing addressing the key technology areas of durability and damage tolerance were completed for wing surface panels. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger commercial transport airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using graphite-epoxy materials. Coupons of various layups used in the wing sizing were tested in tension, compression, and spectrum fatigue with typical fastener penetrations. The compression strength after barely visible impact damage was determined from coupon and structural element tests. One current material system and one toughened system were evaluated by coupon testing. The results of the coupon and element tests were used to design three distinctly different compression panels meeting the strength, stiffness, and damage-tolerance requirements of the upper wing panels. These three concepts were tested with various amounts of damage ranging from barely visible impact to through-penetration. The results of this program provide the key technology data required to assess the durability and damage-tolerance capability or advanced composites for use in commercial aircraft wing panel structure.

  12. Increased Sensitivity of DNA Damage Response-Deficient Cells to Stimulated Microgravity-Induced DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; An, Lili; Hang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG). In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES) and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR) defects. PMID:25915950

  13. Changes in DNA damage, molecular integrity, and copy number for plastid DNA and mitochondrial DNA during maize development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rachana A; Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2014-12-01

    The amount and structural integrity of organellar DNAs change during plant development, although the mechanisms of change are poorly understood. Using PCR-based methods, we quantified DNA damage, molecular integrity, and genome copy number for plastid and mitochondrial DNAs of maize seedlings. A DNA repair assay was also used to assess DNA impediments. During development, DNA damage increased and molecules with impediments that prevented amplification by Taq DNA polymerase increased, with light causing the greatest change. DNA copy number values depended on the assay method, with standard real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) values exceeding those determined by long-PCR by 100- to 1000-fold. As the organelles develop, their DNAs may be damaged in oxidative environments created by photo-oxidative reactions and photosynthetic/respiratory electron transfer. Some molecules may be repaired, while molecules with unrepaired damage may be degraded to non-functional fragments measured by standard qPCR but not by long-PCR. PMID:25261192

  14. Changes in DNA damage, molecular integrity, and copy number for plastid DNA and mitochondrial DNA during maize development

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rachana A.; Oldenburg, Delene J.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    The amount and structural integrity of organellar DNAs change during plant development, although the mechanisms of change are poorly understood. Using PCR-based methods, we quantified DNA damage, molecular integrity, and genome copy number for plastid and mitochondrial DNAs of maize seedlings. A DNA repair assay was also used to assess DNA impediments. During development, DNA damage increased and molecules with impediments that prevented amplification by Taq DNA polymerase increased, with light causing the greatest change. DNA copy number values depended on the assay method, with standard real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) values exceeding those determined by long-PCR by 100- to 1000-fold. As the organelles develop, their DNAs may be damaged in oxidative environments created by photo-oxidative reactions and photosynthetic/respiratory electron transfer. Some molecules may be repaired, while molecules with unrepaired damage may be degraded to non-functional fragments measured by standard qPCR but not by long-PCR. PMID:25261192

  15. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, K.D.; Holman, M.A.; Mitchell, D.

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlated with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Malloy, K D; Holman, M A; Mitchell, D; Detrich, H W

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlate with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. PMID:9037040

  17. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  18. Materials and processes laboratory composite materials characterization task, part 1. Damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Tucker, D. S.; Patterson, W. J.; Franklin, S. W.; Gordon, G. H.; Hart, L.; Hodge, A. J.; Lance, D. G.; Russel, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    A test run was performed on IM6/3501-6 carbon-epoxy in which the material was processed, machined into specimens, and tested for damage tolerance capabilities. Nondestructive test data played a major role in this element of composite characterization. A time chart was produced showing the time the composite material spent within each Branch or Division in order to identify those areas which produce a long turnaround time. Instrumented drop weight testing was performed on the specimens with nondestructive evaluation being performed before and after the impacts. Destructive testing in the form of cross-sectional photomicrography and compression-after-impact testing were used. Results show that the processing and machining steps needed to be performed more rapidly if data on composite material is to be collected within a reasonable timeframe. The results of the damage tolerance testing showed that IM6/3501-6 is a brittle material that is very susceptible to impact damage.

  19. Maintaining Genome Stability in Defiance of Mitotic DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Stefano; Gentili, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of decisions affecting cell viability and proliferation is based on prompt detection of the issue to be addressed, formulation and transmission of a correct set of instructions and fidelity in the execution of orders. While the first and the last are purely mechanical processes relying on the faithful functioning of single proteins or macromolecular complexes (sensors and effectors), information is the real cue, with signal amplitude, duration, and frequency ultimately determining the type of response. The cellular response to DNA damage is no exception to the rule. In this review article we focus on DNA damage responses in G2 and Mitosis. First, we set the stage describing mitosis and the machineries in charge of assembling the apparatus responsible for chromosome alignment and segregation as well as the inputs that control its function (checkpoints). Next, we examine the type of issues that a cell approaching mitosis might face, presenting the impact of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the correct and timely functioning of pathways correcting errors or damage before chromosome segregation. We conclude this essay with a perspective on the current status of mitotic signaling pathway inhibitors and their potential use in cancer therapy. PMID:27493659

  20. Accommodation of pyrimidine dimers during replication of UV-damaged simian virus 40 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Stacks, P C; White, J H; Dixon, K

    1983-01-01

    UV irradiation of simian virus 40-infected cells at fluences between 20 and 60 J/m2, which yield one to three pyrimidine dimers per simian virus 40 genome, leads to a fluence-dependent progressive decrease in simian virus 40 DNA replication as assayed by incorporation of [3H]deoxyribosylthymine into viral DNA. We used a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques to show that this decrease is due to a block in the progression of replicative-intermediate molecules to completed form I molecules, with a concomitant decrease in the entry of molecules into the replicating pool. Despite this UV-induced inhibition of replication, some pyrimidine dimer-containing molecules become fully replicated after UV irradiation. The fraction of completed molecules containing dimers goes up with time such that by 3 h after a UV fluence of 40 J/m2, more than 50% of completed molecules contain pyrimidine dimers. We postulate that the cellular replication machinery can accommodate limited amounts of UV-induced damage and that the progressive decrease in simian virus 40 DNA synthesis after UV irradiation is due to the accumulation in the replication pool of blocked molecules containing levels of damage greater than that which can be tolerated. PMID:6621531

  1. Personal Exposure to Ultrafine Particles and Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vinzents, Peter S.; Møller, Peter; Sørensen, Mette; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Hertel, Ole; Jensen, Finn Palmgren; Schibye, Bente; Loft, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFPs) from vehicle exhaust has been related to risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease and cancer, even though exposure assessment is difficult. We studied personal exposure in terms of number concentrations of UFPs in the breathing zone, using portable instruments in six 18-hr periods in 15 healthy nonsmoking subjects. Exposure contrasts of outdoor pollution were achieved by bicycling in traffic for 5 days and in the laboratory for 1 day. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed as strand breaks and oxidized purines in mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood the morning after exposure measurement. Cumulated outdoor and cumulated indoor exposures to UFPs each were independent significant predictors of the level of purine oxidation in DNA but not of strand breaks. Ambient air concentrations of particulate matter with an aero-dynamic diameter of ≤10 μm (PM10), nitrous oxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and/or number concentration of UFPs at urban background or busy street monitoring stations was not a significant predictor of DNA damage, although personal UFP exposure was correlated with urban background concentrations of CO and NO2, particularly during bicycling in traffic. The results indicate that biologic effects of UFPs occur at modest exposure, such as that occurring in traffic, which supports the relationship of UFPs and the adverse health effects of air pollution. PMID:16263500

  2. ERK3 regulates TDP2-mediated DNA damage response and chemoresistance in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ka; Muppani, Naveen Reddy; Elkhadragy, Lobna; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Tenghui; Jung, Sungyun; Seternes, Ole Morten; Long, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs), such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, play critical regulatory roles in the assembly of DNA damage response proteins on the DNA damage site and their activities in DNA damage repair. Tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) repairs Topoisomerase 2 (Top2)-linked DNA damage, thereby protecting cancer cells against Top2 inhibitors-induced growth inhibition and cell death. The regulation of TDP2 activity by post-translational modifications in DNA repair, however, remains unclear. In the current study, we have found that ERK3, an atypical MAPK, phosphorylates TDP2 at S60 and regulates TDP2's phosphodiesterase activity, thereby cooperatively protecting lung cancer cells against Top2 inhibitors-induced DNA damage and growth inhibition. As such, our study revealed a post-translational regulation of TDP2 activity and discovered a new role of ERK3 in increasing cancer cells’ DNA damage response and chemoresistance to Top2 inhibitors. PMID:26701725

  3. The DNA damage checkpoint allows recombination between divergent DNA sequences in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    George, Carolyn M.; Lyndaker, Amy M.; Alani, Eric

    2011-01-01

    In the early steps of homologous recombination, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) from a broken chromosome invades homologous sequence located in a sister or homolog donor. In genomes that contain numerous repetitive DNA elements or gene paralogs, recombination can potentially occur between non-allelic/divergent (homeologous) sequences that share sequence identity. Such recombination events can lead to lethal chromosomal deletions or rearrangements. However, homeologous recombination events can be suppressed through rejection mechanisms that involve recognition of DNA mismatches in heteroduplex DNA by mismatch repair factors, followed by active unwinding of the heteroduplex DNA by helicases. Because factors required for heteroduplex rejection are hypothesized to be targets and/or effectors of the DNA damage response (DDR), a cell cycle control mechanism that ensures timely and efficient repair, we tested whether the DDR, and more specifically, the RAD9 gene, had a role in regulating rejection. We performed these studies using a DNA repair assay that measures repair by single-strand annealing (SSA) of a double-strand break (DSB) using homeologous DNA templates. We found that repair of homeologous DNA sequences, but not identical sequences, induced a RAD9- dependent cell cycle delay in the G2 stage of the cell cycle. Repair through a divergent DNA template occurred more frequently in RAD9 compared to rad9Δ strains. However, repair in rad9Δ mutants could be restored to wild-type levels if a G2 delay was induced by nocodazole. These results suggest that cell cycle arrest induced by the Rad9-dependent DDR allows repair between divergent DNA sequences despite the potential for creating deleterious genome rearrangements, and illustrates the importance of additional cellular mechanisms that act to suppress recombination between divergent DNA sequences. PMID:21978436

  4. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  5. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  6. Chemical and Biological Consequences of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Sarah; Jarem, Daniel A.; Volle, Catherine B.; Yennie, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Of the four native nucleosides, 2′-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) is most easily oxidized. Two lesions derived from dGuo are 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (Fapy)·dGuo. Furthermore, while steady-state levels of 8-oxodGuo can be detected in genomic DNA, it is also known that 8-oxodGuo is more easily oxidized than dGuo. Thus, 8-oxodGuo is susceptible to further oxidation to form several hyperoxidized dGuo products. This review addresses the structural impact, the mutagenic and genotoxic potential, and biological implications of oxidatively damaged DNA, in particular 8-oxodGuo, Fapy·dGuo, and the hyperoxidized dGuo products. PMID:22239655

  7. DNA damage as an indicator of pollutant-induced genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Biological monitoring is an approach of considerable interest to scientists in the field of environmental genotoxicity who are investigating the effects of hazardous substances on the biota. In essence the technique involves an evaluation of various types of responses in living organisms for their potential to identify exposure to dangerous substances and to define or to predict subsequent deleterious effects. The rationale for the selection of DNA damage as an indicator of exposure to genotoxic agents is based mainly on the mechanisms of action of chemicals that are known mutagens and carcinogens. An alkaline unwinding assay that detects excess strand breakage within the DNA polymer was applied to sunfish in a local stream as a biological monitor for environmental genotoxicity due to industrial pollution. The study was conducted over a period of 15 months and the temporal and spatial aspects of the data were evaluated for the effect of remedial action. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Genotoxicity of refinery waste assessed by some DNA damage tests.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Masood

    2015-04-01

    Refinery waste effluent is well known to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heavy metals as potentially genotoxic substances. The aim of the present study was to assess the genotoxic potential of Mathura refinery wastewater (MRWW) by various in vitro tests including the single cell gel electrophoresis, plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Treatment of human lymphocytes to different MRWW concentrations (0.15×, 0.3×, 0.5× and 0.78×) caused the formation of comets of which the mean tail lengths increased proportionately and differed significantly from those of unexposed controls. The toxic effect of MRWW on DNA was also studied by plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Strand breaks formation in the MRWW treated pBR322 plasmid confirmed its genotoxic effect. Moreover, a dose dependent increase in cleavage of calf thymus DNA in S1 nuclease assay was also suggestive of the DNA damaging potential of MRWW. A higher level of ROS generation in the test water sample was recorded which might be contributing to its genotoxicity. Interaction between the constituents of MRWW and calf thymus DNA was also ascertained by UV-visible spectroscopy. PMID:24836934

  9. Sumoylation regulates EXO1 stability and processing of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bologna, Serena; Altmannova, Veronika; Valtorta, Emanuele; Koenig, Christiane; Liberali, Prisca; Gentili, Christian; Anrather, Dorothea; Ammerer, Gustav; Pelkmans, Lucas; Krejci, Lumir; Ferrari, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair by the error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR) requires the concerted action of several factors. Among these, EXO1 and DNA2/BLM are responsible for the extensive resection of DNA ends to produce 3′-overhangs, which are essential intermediates for downstream steps of HR. Here we show that EXO1 is a SUMO target and that sumoylation affects EXO1 ubiquitylation and protein stability. We identify an UBC9-PIAS1/PIAS4-dependent mechanism controlling human EXO1 sumoylation in vivo and demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in yeast by the Ubc9-Siz1/Siz2 using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we show physical interaction between EXO1 and the de-sumoylating enzyme SENP6 both in vitro and in vivo, promoting EXO1 stability. Finally, we identify the major sites of sumoylation in EXO1 and show that ectopic expression of a sumoylation-deficient form of EXO1 rescues the DNA damage-induced chromosomal aberrations observed upon wt-EXO1 expression. Thus, our study identifies a novel layer of regulation of EXO1, making the pathways that regulate its function an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26083678

  10. Association between copper deficiency and DNA damage in cattle.

    PubMed

    Picco, S J; Abba, M C; Mattioli, G A; Fazzio, L E; Rosa, D; De Luca, J C; Dulout, F N

    2004-11-01

    Cattle hypocuprosis is the second most widespread mineral deficiency affecting grazing cattle. The consequences of hypocuprosis include a failure of copper metalloenzymes, many of which form part of the antioxidant defence system. This work focuses on the association between copper (Cu) plasma concentration and DNA damage in Aberdeen Angus cattle. Two-hundred and ninety-nine heparinized blood samples from 2-year-old Aberdeen Angus cows were obtained from different farms located in the Salado River basin, Argentina. Plasma copper level analysis was carried out in whole samples, while cytogenetic analysis and single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) were carried out in 82 and 217 samples, respectively. Cytogenetic analysis showed a significant increase in the frequency of abnormal metaphases in moderate/severe hypocupremic groups (groups B and C) in relation to the normocupremic group (group A) (4.5 and 1.5 abnormal metaphases/100 cells, respectively, P < 0.01). The Spearman correlation test showed a negative association between cupremic values and the yield of chromosomal aberrations (r = -0.708, P < 0.0001). In the comet assay greater migration was observed in cells from the hypocupremic group, from a median of 54 in the severe hypocupremic group to 31 in the normocupremic group (P < 0.01). Accordingly, the Spearman correlation test showed a significant positive relationship between copper levels and cells without DNA migration and a significant negative relationship between copper levels and cells with a tiny tail (P < 0.0001 in both cases). The results obtained show that hypocupremia in cattle is associated with an increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations as well as in DNA migration as assessed by the comet assay. Whereas the comet assay could differentiate copper plasma level groups, chromosomal aberrations only detected differences between normal and hypocupremic animals. The increase of DNA damage found in hypocupremic animals could be

  11. USING THE DNA ALKALINE UNWINDING ASSAY TO DETECT DNA DAMAGE IN LABORATORY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY EXPOSED CELLS AND TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA alkaline unwinding assay is being evaluated for use in the detection of DNA damage in marine animals exposed to environmental pollutants. n preliminary work, DNA unwinding methods were used with in vitro cell systems to demonstrate DNA strand breaks. ultured mammalian fib...

  12. The dynamic behavior of Ect2 in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Xiang, Jinnan; Li, Baojie; Liu, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    Ect2 is a BRCT-containing guanidine exchange factor for Rho GTPases. It is essential for cytokinesis and is also involved in tumorigenesis. Since most BRCT-containing proteins are involved in DNA damage response and/or DNA repair, we tested whether Ect2 plays similar roles. We report that in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), DNA damage quickly led to Ect2 relocalization to the chromatin and DNA damage foci-like structures. Ect2 knockdown did not affect foci localization of γH2AX, TopBP1, or Brca1, or activation of Atm, yet it impeded p53 Ser15 phosphorylation and activation, and resulted in defects in apoptosis and activation of S and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. These results suggest that Ect2 plays a role in DNA damage response. Interestingly, Ect2 is down-regulated at late stages of DNA damage response. Although p53 and E2F1 have been shown to regulate Ect2 transcription, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation occurred in p53−/− or Atm−/− MEFs and E2F1 knockdown cells. Instead, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation is mainly attributable to decreased protein stability. Like Ect2 knockdown, Ect2 destabilization may help the cell to recover from DNA damage response. These results suggest that Ect2 plays roles in multiple aspects of DNA damage response. PMID:27074761

  13. Reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage underlies the reduced vulnerability of excitotoxicity-tolerant hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Watts, Charlotte A; Brantner, Christine A; Smith, Carolyn L; Andrews, S Brian

    2008-03-01

    In central neurons, over-stimulation of NMDA receptors leads to excessive mitochondrial calcium accumulation and damage, which is a critical step in excitotoxic death. This raises the possibility that low susceptibility to calcium overload-induced mitochondrial damage might characterize excitotoxicity-resistant neurons. In this study, we have exploited two complementary models of preconditioning-induced excitotoxicity resistance to demonstrate reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage in NMDA-tolerant hippocampal neurons. We have further identified adaptations in mitochondrial calcium handling that account for enhanced mitochondrial integrity. In both models, enhanced tolerance was associated with improved preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential and structure. In the first model, which exhibited modest neuroprotection, mitochondria-dependent calcium deregulation was delayed, even though cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium loads were quantitatively unchanged, indicating that enhanced mitochondrial calcium capacity accounts for reduced injury. In contrast, the second model, which exhibited strong neuroprotection, displayed further delayed calcium deregulation and reduced mitochondrial damage because downregulation of NMDA receptor surface expression depressed calcium loading. Reducing calcium entry also modified the chemical composition of the calcium-buffering precipitates that form in calcium-loaded mitochondria. It thus appears that reduced mitochondrial calcium loading is a major factor underlying the robust neuroprotection seen in highly tolerant cells. PMID:18036152

  14. Damage Tolerance Testing of a NASA TransHab Derivative Woven Inflatable Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgecombe, John; delaFuente, Horacio; Valle, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Current options for Lunar habitat architecture include inflatable habitats and airlocks. Inflatable structures can have mass and volume advantages over conventional structures. However, inflatable structures carry different inherent risks and are at a lower Technical Readiness Level (TRL) than more conventional metallic structures. One of the risks associated with inflatable structures is in understanding the tolerance to induced damage. The Damage Tolerance Test (DTT) is designed to study the structural integrity of an expandable structure. TransHab (Figure 1) was an experimental inflatable module developed at the NASA/Johnson Space Center in the 1990 s. The TransHab design was originally envisioned for use in Mars Transits but was also studied as a potential habitat for the International Space Station (ISS). The design of the TransHab module was based on a woven design using an Aramid fabric. Testing of this design demonstrated a high level of predictability and repeatability with analytical predictions of stresses and deflections. Based on JSC s experience with the design and analysis of woven inflatable structures, the Damage Tolerance Test article was designed and fabricated using a woven design. The DTT article was inflated to 45 psig, representing 25% of the ultimate burst pressure, and one of the one-inch wide longitudinal structural members was severed by initiating a Linear Shaped Charge (LSC). Strain gage measurements, at the interface between the expandable elements (straps) and the nonexpandable metallic elements for pre-selected longitudinal straps, were taken throughout pressurization of the module and strap separation. Strain gage measurements show no change in longitudinal strap loading at the bulkhead interface after strap separation indicating loads in the restraint layer were re-distributed local to the damaged area due to the effects of friction under high internal pressure loading. The test completed all primary objectives with better than

  15. Oxidative DNA damage is instrumental in hyperreplication stress-induced inviability of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Charbon, Godefroid; Bjørn, Louise; Mendoza-Chamizo, Belén; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, an increase in the ATP bound form of the DnaA initiator protein results in hyperinitiation and inviability. Here, we show that such replication stress is tolerated during anaerobic growth. In hyperinitiating cells, a shift from anaerobic to aerobic growth resulted in appearance of fragmented chromosomes and a decrease in terminus concentration, leading to a dramatic increase in ori/ter ratio and cessation of cell growth. Aerobic viability was restored by reducing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or by deleting mutM (Fpg glycosylase). The double-strand breaks observed in hyperinitiating cells therefore results from replication forks encountering single-stranded DNA lesions generated while removing oxidized bases, primarily 8-oxoG, from the DNA. We conclude that there is a delicate balance between chromosome replication and ROS inflicted DNA damage so the number of replication forks can only increase when ROS formation is reduced or when the pertinent repair is compromised. PMID:25389264

  16. FUS is phosphorylated by DNA-PK and accumulates in the cytoplasm after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiudong; Holler, Christopher J; Taylor, Georgia; Hudson, Kathryn F; Watkins, William; Gearing, Marla; Ito, Daisuke; Murray, Melissa E; Dickson, Dennis W; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Kukar, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal cytoplasmic accumulation of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) in neurons defines subtypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). FUS is a member of the FET protein family that includes Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 2N (TAF15). FET proteins are predominantly localized to the nucleus, where they bind RNA and DNA to modulate transcription, mRNA splicing, and DNA repair. In ALS cases with FUS inclusions (ALS-FUS), mutations in the FUS gene cause disease, whereas FTLD cases with FUS inclusions (FTLD-FUS) do not harbor FUS mutations. Notably, in FTLD-FUS, all FET proteins accumulate with their nuclear import receptor Transportin 1 (TRN1), in contrast ALS-FUS inclusions are exclusively positive for FUS. In the present study, we show that induction of DNA damage replicates several pathologic hallmarks of FTLD-FUS in immortalized human cells and primary human neurons and astrocytes. Treatment with the antibiotic calicheamicin γ1, which causes DNA double-strand breaks, leads to the cytoplasmic accumulation of FUS, TAF15, EWS, and TRN1. Moreover, cytoplasmic translocation of FUS is mediated by phosphorylation of its N terminus by the DNA-dependent protein kinase. Finally, we observed elevated levels of phospho-H2AX in FTLD-FUS brains, indicating that DNA damage occurs in patients. Together, our data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for FUS localization in cells and suggest that DNA damage may contribute to the accumulation of FET proteins observed in human FTLD-FUS cases, but not in ALS-FUS. PMID:24899704

  17. Functional specialization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cytosolic thioredoxin h1 in the response to alkylation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Nandita; Lemaire, Stéphane; Wu-Scharf, Danxia; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2005-02-01

    DNA damage occurs as a by-product of intrinsic cellular processes, like DNA replication, or as a consequence of exposure to genotoxic agents. Organisms have evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid, tolerate, or repair DNA lesions. To gain insight into these processes, we have isolated mutants hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. One mutant, Ble-1, showed decreased survival when it was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), bleomycin, or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but behaved like the wild type when it was exposed to UVC irradiation. Ble-1 carries an extensive chromosomal deletion that includes the gene encoding cytosolic thioredoxin h1 (Trxh1). Transformation of Ble-1 with a wild-type copy of Trxh1 fully corrected the MMS hypersensitivity and partly restored the tolerance to bleomycin. Trxh1 also complemented a defect in the repair of MMS-induced DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. In addition, a Trxh1-beta-glucuronidase fusion protein translocated to the nucleus in response to treatment with MMS. However, somewhat surprisingly, Trxh1 failed to correct the Ble-1 hypersensitivity to H2O2. Moreover, Trxh1 suppression by RNA interference in a wild-type strain resulted in enhanced sensitivity to MMS and DNA repair defects but no increased cytotoxicity to H2O2. Thioredoxins have been implicated in oxidative-stress responses in many organisms. Yet our results indicate a specific role of Chlamydomonas Trxh1 in the repair of MMS-induced DNA damage, whereas it is dispensable for the response to H2O2. These observations also suggest functional specialization among cytosolic thioredoxins since another Chlamydomonas isoform (Trxh2) does not compensate for the lack of Trxh1. PMID:15701788

  18. A role for MHR1, a gene required for mitochondrial genetic recombination, in the repair of damage spontaneously introduced in yeast mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Feng; Morioka, Hiroshi; Ohtsuka, Eiko; Shibata, Takehiko

    2000-01-01

    A nuclear recessive mutant in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mhr1-1, is defective in mitochondrial genetic recombination at 30°C and shows extensive vegetative petite induction by UV irradiation at 30°C or when cultivated at a higher temperature (37°C). It has been postulated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is oxidatively damaged by by-products of oxidative respiration. Since genetic recombination plays a critical role in DNA repair in various organisms, we tested the possibility that MHR1 plays a role in the repair of oxidatively damaged mtDNA using an enzyme assay. mtDNA isolated from cells grown under standard (aerobic) conditions contained a much higher level of DNA lesions compared with mtDNA isolated from anaerobically grown cells. Soon after a temperature shift from 30 to 37°C the number of mtDNA lesions increased 2-fold in mhr1-1 mutant cells but not in MHR1 cells. Malonic acid, which decreased the oxidative stress in mitochondria, partially suppressed both petite induction and the temperature-induced increase in the amount of mtDNA damage in mhr1-1 cells at 37°C. Thus, functional mitochondria require active MHR1, which keeps the extent of spontaneous oxidative damage in mtDNA within a tolerable level. These observations are consistent with MHR1 having a possible role in mtDNA repair. PMID:11121487

  19. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single delta rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA (see the accompanying paper: W.R. Holley and A. Chatterjee, Radiat. Res. 145, 188-199, 1996). In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [3H]thymidine and exposed at 0 degrees C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/microns. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated "regionally multiply damaged sites." Postirradiation incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown.

  20. Histone ubiquitylation and its roles in transcription and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Meas, Rithy; Mao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    DNA in human cells is constantly assaulted by endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. It is vital for the cell to respond rapidly and precisely to DNA damage to maintain genome integrity and reduce the risk of mutagenesis. Sophisticated reactions occur in chromatin surrounding the damaged site leading to the activation of DNA damage response (DDR), including transcription reprogramming, cell cycle checkpoint, and DNA repair. Histone proteins around the DNA damage play essential roles in DDR, through extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs) by a variety of modifying enzymes. One PTM on histones, mono-ubiquitylation, has emerged as a key player in cellular response to DNA damage. In this review, we will (1) briefly summarize the history of histone H2A and H2B ubiquitylation (H2Aub and H2Bub, respectively), (2) discuss their roles in transcription, and (3) their functions in DDR. PMID:26422137

  1. 3D view of chromosomes, DNA damage, and translocations.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Hakim, Ofir

    2014-04-01

    The cell nucleus is a busy and organized organelle. In this megalopolis made of billions of nucleotides, protein factors find their target loci to exert nuclear functions such as transcription and replication. Remarkably, despite the lack of internal membrane barrier, the interlinked and tightly regulated nuclear processes occur in spatially organized fashion. These processes can lead to double-strand breaks (DSBs) that compromise the integrity of the genome. Moreover, in some cells like lymphocytes, DNA damage is also targeted within the context of immunoglobulin gene recombination. If not repaired correctly, DSBs can cause chromosomal rearrangements, including translocations which are etiological in numerous tumors. Therefore, the chromosomal locations of DSBs, as well as their spatial positioning, are important contributors to formation of chromosomal translocations at specific genomic loci. To obtain a mechanistic understanding of chromosomal translocations these parameters should be accounted for in a global and integrative fashion. In this review we will discuss recent findings addressing how genome architecture, DNA damage, and repair contribute to the genesis of chromosomal translocations. PMID:24632298

  2. The Yeast Copper Response Is Regulated by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G.; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast. PMID:23959798

  3. DNA damage response and sphingolipid signaling in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Matsuda, Yasunobu; Moro, Kazuki; Tsuchida, Junko; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cannot generally be cured by systemic chemotherapy or radiotherapy due to their poor response to conventional therapeutic agents. The development of novel and efficient targeted therapies to increase their treatment options depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HCC. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a network of cell-signaling events that are triggered by DNA damage. Its dysregulation is thought to be one of the key mechanisms underlying the generation of HCC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator, has emerged as an important signaling molecule that has been found to be involved in many cellular functions. In the liver, the alteration of S1P signaling potentially affects the DDR pathways. In this review, we explore the role of the DDR in hepatocarcinogenesis of various etiologies, including hepatitis B and C infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolism and functions of S1P that may affect the hepatic DDR. The elucidation of the pathogenic role of S1P may create new avenues of research into therapeutic strategies for patients with HCC. PMID:26514817

  4. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  5. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  6. Sumoylation of MDC1 is important for proper DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kuntian; Zhang, Haoxing; Wang, Liewei; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2012-06-29

    In response to DNA damage, many DNA damage factors, such as MDC1 and 53BP1, redistribute to sites of DNA damage. The mechanism governing the turnover of these factors at DNA damage sites, however, remains enigmatic. Here, we show that MDC1 is sumoylated following DNA damage, and the sumoylation of MDC1 at Lys1840 is required for MDC1 degradation and removal of MDC1 and 53BP1 from sites of DNA damage. Sumoylated MDC1 is recognized and ubiquitinated by the SUMO-targeted E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF4. Mutation of the MDC1 Lys 1840 (K1840R) results in impaired CtIP, replication protein A, and Rad51 accumulation at sites of DNA damage and defective homologous recombination (HR). The HR defect caused by MDC1K1840R mutation could be rescued by 53BP1 downregulation. These results reveal the intricate dynamics governing the assembly and disassembly of DNA damage factors at sites of DNA damage for prompt response to DNA damage. PMID:22635276

  7. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. PMID:24861204

  8. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  9. Quantitative PCR-Based Measurement of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Repair in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Furda, Amy; Santos, Janine H.; Meyer, Joel N.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe a gene-specific quantitative PCR (QPCR)-based assay for the measurement of DNA damage, using amplification of long DNA targets. This assay has been used extensively to measure the integrity of both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes exposed to different genotoxins and has proven to be particularly valuable in identifying reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial DNA damage. QPCR can be used to quantify both the formation of DNA damage as well as the kinetics of damage removal. One of the main strengths of the assay is that it permits monitoring the integrity of mtDNA directly from total cellular DNA without the need for isolating mitochondria or a separate step of mitochondrial DNA purification. Here we discuss advantages and limitations of using QPCR to assay DNA damage in mammalian cells. In addition, we give a detailed protocol of the QPCR assay that helps facilitate its successful deployment in any molecular biology laboratory. PMID:24623245

  10. Damage tolerance of wrought alloy 718 Ni-Fe-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Koul, A.K.; Au, P.; Terada, T. . Structures and Materials Lab.)

    1994-06-01

    The influence of a modified heat treatment (MHT) and the standard heat treatment (SHT) on the damage tolerance of alloy 718 turbine disk material has been studied over a range of temperature -- from room temperature to 650 C. The influence of these heats treatments on creep, low-cycle fatigue (LCF), notch sensitivity, cyclic stability, and fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties has been studied. The microstructure developed through the MHT sequence is shown to be damage tolerant over the temperature range studied. Shot peening leads to a marked improvement in the LCF crack initiation life of the MHT material relative to the SHT material at 650 C. Serrated grain boundaries formed through controlled precipitation of grain-boundary [delta] phase are beneficial to elevated-temperature FCGRs. The [delta]-phase precipitates formed at an angle to the grain boundaries do not make the material notch sensitive.

  11. Damage tolerance of wrought alloy 718 Ni- Fe-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M.; Koul, A. K.; Au, P.; Terada, T.

    1994-06-01

    The influence of a modified heat treatment (MHT) and the standard heat treatment (SHT) on the damage tolerance of alloy 718 turbine disk material has been studied over a range of temperatures— from room temperature to 650 °. The influence of these heat treatments on creep, low-cycle fatigue (LCF), notch sensitivity, cyclic stability, and fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties has been studied. The microstructure developed through the MHT sequence is shown to be damage tolerant over the temperature range studied. Shot peening leads to a marked improvement in the LCF crack initiation life of the MHT material relative to the SHT material at 650 °. Serrated grain boundaries formed through controlled precipitation of grain-boundary 5 phase are beneficial to elevated- temperature FCGRs. The S-phase precipitates formed at an angle to the grain boundaries do not make the material notch sensitive.

  12. An Approach to Risk-Based Design Incorporating Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Sleight, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Incorporating risk-based design as an integral part of spacecraft development is becoming more and more common. Assessment of uncertainties associated with design parameters and environmental aspects such as loading provides increased knowledge of the design and its performance. Results of such studies can contribute to mitigating risk through a system-level assessment. Understanding the risk of an event occurring, the probability of its occurrence, and the consequences of its occurrence can lead to robust, reliable designs. This paper describes an approach to risk-based structural design incorporating damage-tolerance analysis. The application of this approach to a candidate Earth-entry vehicle is described. The emphasis of the paper is on describing an approach for establishing damage-tolerant structural response inputs to a system-level probabilistic risk assessment.

  13. Advanced Damage Tolerance Analysis of International Space Station Pressure Wall Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    EM20/MSFC has sponsored technology in the area of advanced damage tolerance analysis tools used to analyze the International Space Station (ISS) pressure wall welds. The ISS European modules did not receive non-destructive evaluation (NDE) inspection after proof test. In final assembly configuration, most welds could only be inspected from one side, and some welds were uninspectible. Therefore, advanced damage tolerance analysis was required to determine the critical initial flaw sizes and predicted safe life for the pressure wall welds. EM20 sponsored the development of a new finite element tools using FEA-Crack and WARP3D to solve the problem. This presentation gives a brief overview of the new analytical tools and the analysis results.

  14. FAA/NASA International Symposium on Advanced Structural Integrity Methods for Airframe Durability and Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    International technical experts in durability and damage tolerance of metallic airframe structures were assembled to present and discuss recent research findings and the development of advanced design and analysis methods, structural concepts, and advanced materials. The symposium focused on the dissemination of new knowledge and the peer-review of progress on the development of advanced methodologies. Papers were presented on: structural concepts for enhanced durability, damage tolerance, and maintainability; new metallic alloys and processing technology; fatigue crack initiation and small crack effects; fatigue crack growth models; fracture mechanics failure, criteria for ductile materials; structural mechanics methodology for residual strength and life prediction; development of flight load spectra for design and testing; and advanced approaches to resist corrosion and environmentally assisted fatigue.

  15. Garlic supplementation prevents oxidative DNA damage in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Veena; Jain, Sanjay

    2005-07-01

    Oxygen-free radicals and other oxygen/nitrogen species are constantly generated in the human body. Most are intercepted by antioxidant defences and perform useful metabolic roles, whereas others escape to damage biomolecules like DNA, lipids and proteins. Garlic has been shown to contain antioxidant phytochemicals that prevent oxidative damage. These include unique water-soluble organosulphur compounds, lipid-soluble organosulphur compounds and flavonoids. Therefore, in the present study, we have tried to explore the antioxidant effect of garlic supplementation on oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide generation and on the total antioxidant status (TAS) in patients of essential hypertension (EH). Twenty patients of EH as diagnosed by JNC VI criteria (Group I) and 20 age and sex-matched normotensive controls (Group II) were enrolled in the study. Both groups were given garlic pearls (GP) in a dose of 250 mg per day for 2 months. Baseline samples were taken at the start of the study, i.e. 0 day, and thereafter 2 months follow-up. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), lipids, lipid peroxidation (MDA), NO and antioxidant vitamins A, E and C were determined. A moderate decline in blood pressure (BP) and a significant reduction in 8-OHdG, NO levels and lipid peroxidation were observed in Group I subjects with GP supplementation. Further, a significant increase in vitamin levels and TAS was also observed in this group as compared to the control subjects. These findings point out the beneficial effects of garlic supplementation in reducing blood pressure and counteracting oxidative stress, and thereby, offering cardioprotection in essential hypertensives. PMID:16335787

  16. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY STYRENE OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple assay to detect DNA damage to calf thymus DNA caused by styrene oxide (SO) is reported. This assay is based on changes observed in the melting and annealing behavior of the damaged DNA. The melting annealing process was monitored using a fluorescence indicat...

  17. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the reported effects for exposure to many of the toxic industrial chemicals is DNA damage. The present study describes a simple, rapid and innovative assay to detect DNA damage resulting from exposure of surrogate DNA to toxic industrial chemicals (acrolein, allylamine, ch...

  18. Neutron energy-dependent initial DNA damage and chromosomal exchange.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Gajendiran, N; Endo, S; Komatsu, K; Hoshi, M; Kamada, N

    1999-12-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the biological effect of monoenergetic neutrons on human lymphocyte DNA and chromosomes. Monoenergetic neutrons of 2.3, 1.0, 0.79, 0.57, 0.37 and 0.186 MeV were generated, and 252Cf neutrons and 60Co gamma-rays were also used for comparison. Biological effect was evaluated two ways. The RBE values with the comet assay were estimated as 6.3 and 5.4 at 0.37 MeV and 0.57 MeV relative to that of 60Co gamma-rays, and chromosome aberration rates were also observed in these different levels of monoenergetic neutrons. The yield of chromosome aberrations per unit dose was high at lower neutron energies with a gradual decline with 0.186 MeV neutron energy. The RBE was increased to 10.7 at 0.57 MeV from 3.9 at 252Cf neutrons and reached 16.4 as the highest RBE at 0.37 MeV, but the value decreased to 11.2 at 0.186 MeV. The response patterns of initial DNA damage and chromosome exchange were quite similar to that of LET. These results show that the intensity of DNA damage and chromosomal exchange is LET dependent. RBE of low energy neutrons is higher than that of fission neutrons. Low energy neutrons containing Hiroshima atomic bomb radiation may have created a significantly higher incidence of biological effect in atomic bomb survivors. PMID:10804992

  19. Thioredoxin-dependent regulation of AIF-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Shelar, Sandeep B; Kaminska, Kamila K; Reddy, Shridhivya A; Kumar, Dilip; Tan, Chong-Teik; Yu, Victor C; Lu, Jun; Holmgren, Arne; Hagen, Thilo; Chew, Eng-Hui

    2015-10-01

    The thioredoxin (Trx) system is one major redox system in mammalian cells. One of its component, Trx, is involved in redox homeostasis and many cellular biological processes through participating in disulfide reduction, S-nitrosylation/S-denitrosylation reactions and protein-protein interactions. In this study, we report the identification of a novel interaction between cytosolic/nuclear Trx1 and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), and the redox sensitivity and biological significance of the Trx-AIF interaction was characterized. Cytosolic Trx1 but not mitochondrial Trx2 was observed to interact with AIF under physiological conditions and Trx1's active site cysteines were crucial for the interaction. Under oxidative stress conditions, Trx-AIF interaction was disrupted. When the treated cells were allowed to recover from oxidative stress by means of removal of the oxidants, interaction between Trx1 and AIF was re-established time-dependently, which underpins the biological relevance of a Trx-dependent redox regulation of AIF-mediated cell death. Indeed, in times of oxidative stress, nuclear translocation of AIF was found to occur concurrently with perturbations to the Trx-AIF interaction. Once localized in the nucleus, reduced Trx1 hindered the interaction between AIF and DNA, thereby bringing about an attenuation of AIF-mediated DNA damage. In conclusion, characterization of the Trx-AIF interaction has led to an understanding of the effect of reduced Trx1 on possibly regulating AIF-dependent cell death through impeding AIF-mediated DNA damage. Importantly, identification of the novel interaction between Trx1 and AIF has provided opportunities to design and develop therapeutically relevant strategies that either promote or prevent this protein-protein interaction for the treatment of different disease states. PMID:26119781

  20. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M; Finch-Savage, William E; West, Christopher E

    2016-08-23

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  1. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds

    PubMed Central

    Waterworth, Wanda M.; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M.; Finch-Savage, William E.; West, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  2. Advanced Durability and Damage Tolerance Design and Analysis Methods for Composite Structures: Lessons Learned from NASA Technology Development Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are designed to be durable and damage tolerant. Durability is largely an economic life-cycle design consideration whereas damage tolerance directly addresses the structural airworthiness (safety) of the vehicle. However, both durability and damage tolerance design methodologies must address the deleterious effects of changes in material properties and the initiation and growth of microstructural damage that may occur during the service lifetime of the vehicle. Durability and damage tolerance design and certification requirements are addressed for commercial transport aircraft and NASA manned spacecraft systems. The state-of-the-art in advanced design and analysis methods is illustrated by discussing the results of several recently completed NASA technology development programs. These programs include the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program demonstrating technologies for large transport aircraft and the X-33 hypersonic test vehicle demonstrating technologies for a single-stage-to-orbit space launch vehicle.

  3. Characterization of DNA recognition by the human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Y; Masutani, C; Mizukoshi, T; Kondo, J; Hanaoka, F; Iwai, S

    1999-07-01

    The UV-damaged DNA-binding (UV-DDB) protein is the major factor that binds DNA containing damage caused by UV radiation in mammalian cells. We have investigated the DNA recognition by this protein in vitro, using synthetic oligonucleotide duplexes and the protein purified from a HeLa cell extract. When a 32P-labeled 30-mer duplex containing the (6-4) photoproduct at a single site was used as a probe, only a single complex was detected in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. It was demonstrated by Western blotting that both of the subunits (p48 and p127) were present in this complex. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using various duplexes showed that the UV-DDB protein formed a specific, high affinity complex with the duplex containing an abasic site analog, in addition to the (6-4) photoproduct. By circular permutation analyses, these DNA duplexes were found to be bent at angles of 54 degrees and 57 degrees in the complexes with this protein. From the previously reported NMR studies and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments in the present study, it can be concluded that the UV-DDB protein binds DNA that can be bent easily at the above angle. PMID:10391953

  4. Antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials of selected phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Kemal; Tepe, Bektas; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz

    2015-03-01

    In this study, ten different phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, cinnamic, ferulic, gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, rosmarinic, syringic, and vanillic acids) were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using four different test systems named as β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power and chelating effect. In all test systems, rosmarinic acid showed the maximum activity potential, while protocatechuic acid was determined as the weakest antioxidant in β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, and chelating effect assays. Phenolic acids were also screened for their protective effects on pBR322 plasmid DNA against the mutagenic and toxic effects of UV and H2O2. Ferulic acid was found as the most active phytochemical among the others. Even at the lowest concentration value (0.002 mg/ml), ferulic acid protected all of the bands in the presence of H2O2 and UV. It is followed by caffeic, rosmarinic, and vanillic acids. On the other hand, cinnamic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), gallic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml), and protocatechuic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml) could not protect plasmid DNA. PMID:25542528

  5. Variation and fitness costs for tolerance to different types of herbivore damage in Boechera stricta genotypes with contrasting glucosinolate structures

    PubMed Central

    Manzaneda, Antonio J.; Prasad, Kasavajhala V. S. K.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Summary Analyses of plant tolerance in response to different modes of herbivory are essential to understand plant defense evolution, yet are still scarce. Allocation costs and trade-offs between tolerance and plant chemical defenses may influence genetic variation for tolerance. However, variation in defenses occurs also for presence or absence of discrete chemical structures, yet, effects of intra-specific polymorphisms on tolerance to multiple herbivores have not been evaluated.Here, in a glasshouse experiment, we investigated variation for tolerance to different types of herbivory damage, and direct allocation costs in 10 genotypes of Boechera stricta (Brassicaceae), a wild relative of Arabidopsis, with contrasting foliar glucosinolate chemical structures (methionine-derived glucosinolates vs glucosinolates derived from branched-chain amino acids).We found significant genetic variation for tolerance to different types of herbivory. Structural variations in the glucosinolate profile did not influence tolerance to damage, but predicted plant fitness. Levels of constitutive and induced glucosinolates varied between genotypes with different structural profiles, but we did not detect any cost of tolerance explaining genetic variation in tolerance among genotypes.Trade-offs among plant tolerance to multiple herbivores may not explain the existence of intermediate levels of tolerance to damage in plants with contrasting chemical defensive profiles. PMID:20663059

  6. DNA damage and repair in plants – from models to crops

    PubMed Central

    Manova, Vasilissa; Gruszka, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The genomic integrity of every organism is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors. Mutagenic agents cause reduced stability of plant genome and have a deleterious effect on development, and in the case of crop species lead to yield reduction. It is crucial for all organisms, including plants, to develop efficient mechanisms for maintenance of the genome integrity. DNA repair processes have been characterized in bacterial, fungal, and mammalian model systems. The description of these processes in plants, in contrast, was initiated relatively recently and has been focused largely on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Consequently, our knowledge about DNA repair in plant genomes - particularly in the genomes of crop plants - is by far more limited. However, the relatively small size of the Arabidopsis genome, its rapid life cycle and availability of various transformation methods make this species an attractive model for the study of eukaryotic DNA repair mechanisms and mutagenesis. Moreover, abnormalities in DNA repair which proved to be lethal for animal models are tolerated in plant genomes, although sensitivity to DNA damaging agents is retained. Due to the high conservation of DNA repair processes and factors mediating them among eukaryotes, genes and proteins that have been identified in model species may serve to identify homologous sequences in other species, including crop plants, in which these mechanisms are poorly understood. Crop breeding programs have provided remarkable advances in food quality and yield over the last century. Although the human population is predicted to “peak” by 2050, further advances in yield will be required to feed this population. Breeding requires genetic diversity. The biological impact of any mutagenic agent used for the creation of genetic diversity depends on the chemical nature of the induced lesions and on the efficiency and accuracy of their repair. More recent targeted mutagenesis

  7. Ametabolic embryos of Artemia franciscana accumulate DNA damage during prolonged anoxia.

    PubMed

    McLennan, Alexander G

    2009-03-01

    Encysted embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana are able to survive prolonged periods of anoxia even when fully hydrated. During this time there is no metabolism, raising the question of how embryos tolerate spontaneous, hydrolytic DNA damage such as depurination. When incubated at 28 degrees C and 40 degrees C for several weeks, hydrated anoxic embryos were found to accumulate abasic sites in their DNA with k=5.8x10(-11) s(-1) and 2.8x10(-10) s(-1), respectively. In both cases this is about 3-fold slower than expected from published observations on purified DNA. However, purified calf thymus DNA incubated under similar anoxic conditions at pH 6.3, the intracellular pH of anoxic cysts, also depurinated more slowly than predicted (about 1.7-fold), suggesting that cysts may in fact accumulate abasic sites only slightly more slowly than purified DNA. Upon reoxygenation of cysts stored under N(2) for 30 weeks at 28 degrees C, the number of abasic sites per 10(4) bp DNA fell from 21.1+/-4.0 to 9.8+/-2.0 by 12 h and to 6.2+/-2.1 by 24 h. Larvae hatched after 48 h and 72 h had only 0.59+/-0.17 and 0.48+/-0.07 abasic sites per 10(4) bp, respectively, suggesting that repair of these lesions had largely taken place before hatching commenced. Thus, unlike bacterial spores, Artemia cysts appear to have no specific protective mechanism beyond what might be afforded by chromatin structure to limit spontaneous depurination, and rely on the repair of accumulated lesions during the period between reoxygenation and hatching. PMID:19251993

  8. Damage Tolerance of Pre-Stressed Composite Panels Under Impact Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alastair F.; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Schueler, Dominik

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign studied the structural integrity of carbon fibre/epoxy panels preloaded in tension or compression then subjected to gas gun impact tests causing significant damage. The test programme used representative composite aircraft fuselage panels composed of aerospace carbon fibre toughened epoxy prepreg laminates. Preload levels in tension were representative of design limit loads for fuselage panels of this size, and maximum compression preloads were in the post-buckle region. Two main impact scenarios were considered: notch damage from a 12 mm steel cube projectile, at velocities in the range 93-136 m/s; blunt impact damage from 25 mm diameter glass balls, at velocities 64-86 m/s. The combined influence of preload and impact damage on panel residual strengths was measured and results analysed in the context of damage tolerance requirements for composite aircraft panels. The tests showed structural integrity well above design limit loads for composite panels preloaded in tension and compression with visible notch impact damage from hard body impact tests. However, blunt impact tests on buckled compression loaded panels caused large delamination damage regions which lowered plate bending stiffness and reduced significantly compression strengths in buckling.

  9. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  10. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  11. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  12. The activation of DNA damage detection and repair responses in cleavage-stage rat embryos by a damaged paternal genome.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Lisanne; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F

    2012-06-01

    Male germ cell DNA damage, after exposure to radiation, exogenous chemicals, or chemotherapeutic agents, is a major cause of male infertility. DNA-damaged spermatozoa can fertilize oocytes; this is of concern because there is limited information on the capacity of early embryos to repair a damaged male genome or on the fate of these embryos if repair is inadequate. We hypothesized that the early activation of DNA damage response in the early embryo is a critical determinant of its fate. The objective of this study was to assess the DNA damage response and mitochondrial function as a measure of the energy supply for DNA repair and general health in cleavage-stage embryos sired by males chronically exposed to an anticancer alkylating agent, cyclophosphamide. Male rats were treated with saline or cyclophosphamide (6 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks and mated to naturally cycling females. Pronuclear two- and eight-cell embryos were collected for immunofluorescence analysis of mitochondrial function and biomarkers of the DNA damage response: γH2AX foci, 53BP1 reactivity, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymer formation. Mitochondrial activities did not differ between embryos sired by control- and cyclophosphamide-exposed males. At the two-cell stage, there was no treatment-related increase in DNA double-strand breaks; by the eight-cell stage, a significant increase was noted, as indicated by increased medium and large γH2AX foci. This was accompanied by a dampened DNA repair response, detected as a decrease in the nuclear intensity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymers. The micronuclei formed in cyclophosphamide-sired embryos contained large γH2AX foci and enhanced poly(ADP-ribose) polymer and 53BP1 reactivity compared with their nuclear counterparts. Thus, paternal cyclophosphamide exposure activated a DNA damage response in cleavage-stage embryos. Furthermore, this damage response may be useful in assessing embryo quality and developmental competence. PMID:22454429

  13. Oxidative DNA damage induced by a metabolite of 2-naphthylamine, a smoking-related bladder carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Shiho; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2002-07-01

    2-Naphthylamine (2-NA), a bladder carcinogen, is contained in cigarette smoke. DNA adduct formation is thought to be a major cause of DNA damage by carcinogenic aromatic amines. We have investigated whether a metabolite of 2-NA, 2-nitroso-1-naphthol (NO-naphthol) causes oxidative DNA damage, using (32)P-labeled DNA fragments. We compared the mechanism of DNA damage induced by NO-naphthol with that by N-hydroxy-4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP(NHOH)), a metabolite of 4-aminobiphenyl, another smoking-related bladder carcinogen. NO-naphthol caused Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage at T > C > G residues, with non-enzymatic reduction by NADH. Catalase and bathocuproine, a Cu(I)-specific chelator, inhibited the DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of H(2)O(2) and Cu(I). Some free. OH scavengers also attenuated NO-naphthol-induced DNA damage, while free. OH scavengers had no effect on the DNA damage induced by 4-ABP(NHOH). This difference suggests that the reactive species formed by NO-naphthol has more free. OH-character than that by 4-ABP(NHOH). A high-pressure liquid chromatograph equipped with an electrochemical detector showed that NO-naphthol induced 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine formation in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). The oxidative DNA damage by these amino-aromatic compounds may participate in smoking-related bladder cancer, in addition to DNA adduct formation. PMID:12149138

  14. Plasmid DNA damage caused by stibine and trimethylstibine.

    PubMed

    Andrewes, Paul; Kitchin, Kirk T; Wallace, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Antimony is classified as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" and there is also sufficient evidence for antimony carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Stibine is a volatile inorganic antimony compound to which humans can be exposed in occupational settings (e.g., lead-acid battery charging). Because it is highly toxic, stibine is considered a significant health risk; however, its genotoxicity has received little attention. For the work reported here, stibine was generated by sodium borohydride reduction of potassium antimony tartrate. Trimethylstibine is a volatile organometallic antimony compound found commonly in landfill and sewage fermentation gases at concentrations ranging between 0.1 and 100 microg/m3. Trimethylstibine is generally considered to pose little environmental or health risk. In the work reported here, trimethylstibine was generated by reduction of trimethylantimony dichloride using either sodium borohydride or the thiol compounds, dithioerythritol (DTE), L-cysteine, and glutathione. Here we report the evaluation of the in vitro genotoxicities of five antimony compounds-potassium antimony tartrate, stibine, potassium hexahydroxyantimonate, trimethylantimony dichloride, and trimethylstibine-using a plasmid DNA-nicking assay. Of these five antimony compounds, only stibine and trimethylstibine were genotoxic (significant nicking to pBR 322 plasmid DNA). We found stibine and trimethylstibine to be about equipotent with trimethylarsine using this plasmid DNA-nicking assay. Reaction of trimethylantimony dichloride with either glutathione or L-cysteine to produce DNA-damaging trimethylstibine was observed with a trimethylantimony dichloride concentration as low as 50 microM and L-cysteine or glutathione concentrations as low as 500 and 200 microM, respectively, for a 24 h incubation. PMID:14728978

  15. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Josie K.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Merriman, Julie A.; Jones, Keith T.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule–kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  16. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Collins, Josie K; Lane, Simon I R; Merriman, Julie A; Jones, Keith T

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule-kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  17. Changing the ubiquitin landscape during viral manipulation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Matthew D.; Lilley, Caroline E.; Chaurushiya, Mira S.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses often induce signaling through the same cellular cascades that are activated by damage to the cellular genome. Signaling triggered by viral proteins or exogenous DNA delivered by viruses can be beneficial or detrimental to viral infection. Viruses have therefore evolved to dissect the cellular DNA damage response pathway during infection, often marking key cellular regulators with ubiquitin to induce their degradation or change their function. Signaling controlled by ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins has recently emerged as key regulator of the cellular DNA damage response. Situated at the interface between DNA damage signaling and the ubiquitin system, viruses can reveal key convergence points in this important cellular pathway. In this review, we examine how viruses harness the diversity of the cellular ubiquitin system to modulate the DNA damage signaling pathway. We discuss the implications of viral infiltration of this pathway for both the transcriptional program of the virus and for the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:21549706

  18. Hyperglycemia Differentially Affects Maternal and Fetal DNA Integrity and DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreli, Jusciele B.; Santos, Janine H.; Lorenzon-Ojea, Aline Rodrigues; Corrêa-Silva, Simone; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rudge, Marilza V.; Damasceno, Débora C.; Bevilacqua, Estela; Calderon, Iracema M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Investigate the DNA damage and its cellular response in blood samples from both mother and the umbilical cord of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia. Methods: A total of 144 subjects were divided into 4 groups: normoglycemia (ND; 46 cases), mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH; 30 cases), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; 45 cases) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2; 23 cases). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) isolation and/or leukocytes from whole maternal and umbilical cord blood were obtained from all groups at delivery. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage were measured by gene-specific quantitative PCR, and the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway were assessed by real-time qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Apoptosis was measured in vitro experiments by caspase 3/7 activity and ATP levels. Results: GDM and DM2 groups were characterized by an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers, an increase in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and decreased expression of mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1) involved in BER. The levels of hyperglycemia were associated with the in vitro apoptosis pathway. Blood levels of DNA damage in umbilical cord were similar among the groups. Newborns of diabetic mothers had increased expression of BER mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1, POLβ and FEN1). A diabetes-like environment was unable to induce apoptosis in the umbilical cord blood cells. Conclusions: Our data show relevant asymmetry between maternal and fetal blood cell susceptibility to DNA damage and apoptosis induction. Maternal cells seem to be more predisposed to changes in an adverse glucose environment. This may be due to differential ability in upregulating multiple genes involved in the activation of DNA repair response, especially the BER mechanism. However if this study shows a more effective adaptive response by the fetal organism, it also calls for

  19. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. PMID:27452406

  20. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  1. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  2. DNA damage action spectroscopy and DNA repair in intact organisms: Alfalfa seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Quaite, F.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Understanding the effects of UV, and increased levels of UV, on DNA in living organisms requires knowledge of both the frequency of damages induced by the quantities and quality (wavelength composition) of the damaging radiation, and of the capacity of the organisms to carry out efficient and accurate repair. The major levels of uncertainty in understanding the responses of intact organisms, both plant and animal, to UV indicates that we cannot assess accurately the impact of stratospheric ozone depletion without major increases in knowledge of DNA damage and repair. What repair paths does alfalfa use for dealing with UV damages? The rate of pyrimidine dimers induced at a low exposure of 280 nm radiation to alfalfa seedlings, was observed to be about 8 dimers/million bases. After UV exposure, the seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to blue light filtered by a yellow. filter which excluded wavelengths shorter than about 405 nm. Seedlings so exposed carry out photorepair, but do not seem to remove dimers by excision.

  3. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  4. DDRprot: a database of DNA damage response-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Arcas, Aida; Rojas, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Damage Response (DDR) signalling network is an essential system that protects the genome’s integrity. The DDRprot database presented here is a resource that integrates manually curated information on the human DDR network and its sub-pathways. For each particular DDR protein, we present detailed information about its function. If involved in post-translational modifications (PTMs) with each other, we depict the position of the modified residue/s in the three-dimensional structures, when resolved structures are available for the proteins. All this information is linked to the original publication from where it was obtained. Phylogenetic information is also shown, including time of emergence and conservation across 47 selected species, family trees and sequence alignments of homologues. The DDRprot database can be queried by different criteria: pathways, species, evolutionary age or involvement in (PTM). Sequence searches using hidden Markov models can be also used. Database URL: http://ddr.cbbio.es. PMID:27577567

  5. DDRprot: a database of DNA damage response-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Arcas, Aida; Rojas, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Damage Response (DDR) signalling network is an essential system that protects the genome's integrity. The DDRprot database presented here is a resource that integrates manually curated information on the human DDR network and its sub-pathways. For each particular DDR protein, we present detailed information about its function. If involved in post-translational modifications (PTMs) with each other, we depict the position of the modified residue/s in the three-dimensional structures, when resolved structures are available for the proteins. All this information is linked to the original publication from where it was obtained. Phylogenetic information is also shown, including time of emergence and conservation across 47 selected species, family trees and sequence alignments of homologues. The DDRprot database can be queried by different criteria: pathways, species, evolutionary age or involvement in (PTM). Sequence searches using hidden Markov models can be also used.Database URL: http://ddr.cbbio.es. PMID:27577567

  6. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance of composite laminates at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Buffer strips greatly improve the damage tolerance of graphite/epoxy laminates loaded in tension. Graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels were made and tested to determine their residual strength at ambient and elevated (177 C) temperature. Each panel was cut in the center to represent damage. Panels were radiographed and crack-opening displacements were recorded to indicate fracture, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after arrest. All panels had the same buffer strip spacing and width. The buffer strip material was 0 deg S-glass/PMR-15. The buffer strips were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of the 0 deg S-glass on either a one-for-one or a two-for-one basis. Half of the panels were heated to 177 + or - 3 C before and during the testing. Elevated temperature did not alter the fracture behavior of the buffer configuration.

  7. Paternal DNA damage resulting from various sperm treatments persists after fertilization and is similar before and after DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Ward, Monika A

    2012-01-01

    In spite of its highly condensed state, sperm DNA is vulnerable to damage that can originate from oxidative stress, the activity of sperm-specific nucleases, or both. After fertilization, in the oocyte, paternal chromatin undergoes dramatic changes, and during this extensive remodeling, it can be both repaired and degraded, and these processes can be linked to DNA synthesis. Here, we analyzed sperm response to damage-inducing treatments both before and after fertilization and before or after zygotic DNA replication. Epididymal mouse spermatozoa were either frozen without cryoprotection (FT) or treated with detergent Triton X-100 coupled with dithiothreitol (TX+DTT) to induce DNA damage. Fresh, untreated sperm served as control. Immediately after preparation, spermatozoa from 3 groups were taken for comet assay, or for intracytoplasmic sperm injection into prometaphase I oocytes to visualize prematurely condensed single-chromatid chromosomes, or into mature metaphase II oocytes to visualize chromosomes after DNA replication. Comet assay revealed increased DNA fragmentation in treated sperm when compared with control, with FT sperm more severely affected. Chromosome analysis demonstrated paternal DNA damage in oocytes injected with treated, but not with fresh, sperm, with FT and TX+DTT groups now yielding similar damage. There were no differences in the incidence of abnormal paternal karyoplates before and after DNA synthesis in all examined groups. This study provides evidence that subjecting sperm to DNA damage-inducing treatments results in degradation of highly condensed sperm chromatin when it is still packed within the sperm head, and that this DNA damage persists after fertilization. The difference in DNA damage in sperm subjected to 2 treatments was ameliorated in the fertilized oocytes, suggesting that some chromatin repair might have occurred. This process, however, was independent of DNA synthesis and took place during oocyte maturation. PMID:21546611

  8. Assessment of the role of DNA repair in damaged forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Ambers, Angie; Turnbough, Meredith; Benjamin, Robert; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies on DNA damage and repair have involved in vitro laboratory procedures that induce a single type of lesion in naked templates. Although repair of singular, sequestered types of DNA damage has shown some success, forensic and ancient specimens likely contain a number of different types of lesions. This study sought to (1) develop protocols to damage DNA in its native state, (2) generate a pool of candidate samples for repair that more likely emulate authentic forensic samples, and (3) assess the ability of the PreCR(TM) Repair Mix to repair the resultant lesions. Complexed, native DNA is more difficult to damage than naked DNA. Modified procedures included the use of higher concentrations and longer exposure times. Three types of samples, those that demonstrated damage based on short tandem repeat (STR) profile signals, were selected for repair experiments: environmentally damaged bloodstains, bleach-damaged whole blood, and human skeletal remains. Results showed trends of improved performance of STR profiling of bleach-damaged DNA. However, the repair assay did not improve DNA profiles from environmentally damaged bloodstains or bone, and in some cases resulted in lower RFU values for STR alleles. The extensive spectrum of DNA damage and myriad combinations of lesions that can be present in forensic samples appears to pose a challenge for the in vitro PreCR(TM) assay. The data suggest that the use of PreCR in casework should be considered with caution due to the assay's varied results. PMID:24792635

  9. Gene polymorphisms and increased DNA damage in morbidly obese women.

    PubMed

    Luperini, B C O; Almeida, D C; Porto, M P; Marcondes, J P C; Prado, R P; Rasera, I; Oliveira, M R M; Salvadori, D M F

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is characterized by increased adipose tissue mass resulting from a chronic imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. Furthermore, there is a clearly defined relationship among fat mass expansion, chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation; leading to ROS-related pathological events. In the past years, genome-wide association studies have generated convincing evidence associating genetic variation at multiple regions of the genome with traits that reflect obesity. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the relationships among the gene polymorphisms ghrelin (GHRL-rs26802), ghrelin receptor (GHSR-rs572169), leptin (LEP-rs7799039), leptin receptor (LEPR-rs1137101) and fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO-rs9939609) and obesity. The relationships among these gene variants and the amount of DNA damage were also investigated. Three hundred Caucasian morbidly obese and 300 eutrophic (controls) women were recruited. In summary, the results demonstrated that the frequencies of the GHRL, GHSR, LEP and LEPR polymorphisms were not different between Brazilian white morbidly obese and eutrophic women. Exceptions were the AA-FTO genotype and allele A, which were significantly more frequent in obese women than in the controls (0.23% vs. 0.10%; 0.46 vs. 0.36, respectively), and the TT-FTO genotype and the T allele, which were less frequent in morbidly obese women (p<0.01). Furthermore, significant differences in the amount of genetic lesions associated with FTO variants were observed only in obese women. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the analyzed SNPs were not closely associated with morbid obesity, suggesting they are not the major contributors to obesity. Therefore, our data indicated that these gene variants are not good biomarkers for predicting risk susceptibility for obesity, whereas ROS generated by the inflammatory status might be one of the causes of DNA damage in obese women, favoring

  10. STRUCTURALLY DISTINCT UBIQUITIN- AND SUMO-MODIFIED PCNA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR DISTINCT ROLES IN THE DNA DAMAGE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Weinacht, Christopher P.; Freudenthal, Bret D.; Yang, Kun; Zhuang, Zhihao; Washington, M. Todd; Tainer, John A.; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a pivotal replication protein, which also controls cellular responses to DNA damage. Posttranslational modification of PCNA by SUMO and ubiquitin modulate these responses. How the modifiers alter PCNA-dependent DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways is largely unknown. We used hybrid methods to identify atomic models of PCNAK107-Ub and PCNAK164-SUMO consistent with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data of these complexes in solution. We show that SUMO and ubiquitin have distinct modes of association to PCNA. Ubiquitin adopts discrete docked binding positions. By contrast, SUMO associates by simple tethering and adopts extended flexible conformations. These structural differences are the result of the opposite electrostatic potentials of SUMO and Ub. The unexpected contrast in conformational behavior of Ub-PCNA and SUMO-PCNA has implications for interactions with partner proteins, interacting surfaces accessibility, and access points for pathway regulation. PMID:25773143

  11. Modeling continuous-fiber reinforced polymer composites for exploration of damage tolerant concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Peter J.

    This work aims to improve the predictive capability for fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite laminates using the finite element method. A new tool for modeling composite damage was developed which considers important modes of failure. Well-known micromechanical models were implemented to predict material values for material systems of interest to aerospace applications. These generated material values served as input to intralaminar and interlaminar damage models. A three-dimensional in-plane damage material model was implemented and behavior verified. Deficiencies in current state-of-the-art interlaminar capabilities were explored using the virtual crack closure technique and the cohesive zone model. A user-defined cohesive element was implemented to discover the importance of traction-separation material constitutive behavior. A novel method for correlation of traction-separation parameters was created. This new damage modeling tool was used for evaluation of novel material systems to improve damage tolerance. Classical laminate plate theory was used in a full-factorial study of layerwise-hybrid laminates. Filament-wound laminated composite cylindrical shells were subjected to quasi-static loading to validate the finite element computational composite damage model. The new tool for modeling provides sufficient accuracy and generality for use on a wide-range of problems.

  12. Targeted DNA damage at individual telomeres disrupts their integrity and triggers cell death

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Luxi; Tan, Rong; Xu, Jianquan; LaFace, Justin; Gao, Ying; Xiao, Yanchun; Attar, Myriam; Neumann, Carola; Li, Guo-Min; Su, Bing; Liu, Yang; Nakajima, Satoshi; Levine, Arthur S.; Lan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Cellular DNA is organized into chromosomes and capped by a unique nucleoprotein structure, the telomere. Both oxidative stress and telomere shortening/dysfunction cause aging-related degenerative pathologies and increase cancer risk. However, a direct connection between oxidative damage to telomeric DNA, comprising <1% of the genome, and telomere dysfunction has not been established. By fusing the KillerRed chromophore with the telomere repeat binding factor 1, TRF1, we developed a novel approach to generate localized damage to telomere DNA and to monitor the real time damage response at the single telomere level. We found that DNA damage at long telomeres in U2OS cells is not repaired efficiently compared to DNA damage in non-telomeric regions of the same length in heterochromatin. Telomeric DNA damage shortens the average length of telomeres and leads to cell senescence in HeLa cells and cell death in HeLa, U2OS and IMR90 cells, when DNA damage at non-telomeric regions is undetectable. Telomere-specific damage induces chromosomal aberrations, including chromatid telomere loss and telomere associations, distinct from the damage induced by ionizing irradiation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxidative damage induces telomere dysfunction and underline the importance of maintaining telomere integrity upon oxidative damage. PMID:26082495

  13. Mitotic entry in the presence of DNA damage is a widespread property of aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Heidi M.; Sheltzer, Jason M.; Meehl, Colleen M.; Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of aneuploidy in budding and fission yeast. All aneuploid yeast strains analyzed to date harbor elevated levels of Rad52-GFP foci, a sign of DNA damage. Here we investigate how continuously elevated levels of DNA damage affect aneuploid cells. We show that Rad52-GFP foci form during S phase, consistent with the observation that DNA replication initiation and elongation are impaired in some aneuploid yeast strains. We furthermore find that although DNA damage is low in aneuploid cells, it nevertheless has dramatic consequences. Many aneuploid yeast strains adapt to DNA damage and undergo mitosis despite the presence of unrepaired DNA leading to cell death. Wild-type cells exposed to low levels of DNA damage exhibit a similar phenotype, indicating that adaptation to low levels of unrepaired DNA is a general property of the cell's response to DNA damage. Our results indicate that by causing low levels of DNA damage, whole-chromosome aneuploidies lead to DNA breaks that persist into mitosis. Such breaks provide the substrate for translocations and deletions that are a hallmark of cancer. PMID:25694455

  14. DNA damage by smoke: Protection by turmeric and other inhibitors of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, L.; Shalini, V.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Twigs-dry leaves smoke condensate (TDS), as a source of clastogenic ROS and carcinogenic PAH, was investigated for its in vitro DNA-damaging effect in calf thymus DNA and human peripheral lymphocytes. An aqueous turmeric component--Aq.T--with an established antioxidant activity, was tested as a DNA protectant. TDS induced 13-fold damage to calf thymus DNA as judged by the emergence of a DNA damage specific, fluorescent product (em: 405 nm). Aq.T at 800 ng/microL extended 69% protection to calf thymus DNA and was comparable to the other protectants such as curcumin, BHA, vitamin E, SOD, and CAT. In human peripheral lymphocytes, TDS induced extensive DNA damage in comparison with the tumor promoter TPA, as judged by FADU. Aq.T at 300 ng/microL extended 90% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TDS-induced damage, and was more effective than the other protectants--DABCO, D-mannitol, sodium benzoate, vitamin E (ROS quenchers), SOD, CAT (antioxidant enzymes), tannic acid, flufenamic acid, BHA, BHT, n-PG, curcumin and quercetin (antioxidants). Aq.T offered 65% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TPA-induced damage and was comparable to SOD. The above results indicate that TDS induces substantial DNA damage in calf thymus DNA and human lymphocytes and Aq.T is an efficient protectant.

  15. Flow cytometric detection of oxidative DNA damage in fish spermatozoa exposed to cadmium - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Szabolcs; Kakasi, Balázs; Bercsényi, Miklós

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to apply a flow cytometric assay, the so-called OxyDNA test, to determine the level of oxidative DNA damage in fish spermatozoa exposed to different concentrations (0.01-10,000 mg/L) of cadmium. Milt was collected from three randomly selected Prussian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio) males. Oxidative DNA damage was assessed with the OxyDNA kit and using flow cytometry. The ratio of OxyDNA-positive events increased significantly at higher cadmium concentrations. The results indicate that direct contact of fish spermatozoa with cadmium-polluted water initiates genotoxic damage. PMID:26919149

  16. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing. PMID:27221660

  17. DNA damage-induced type I interferon promotes senescence and inhibits stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Christopher J.; Zhao, Bin; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V.; Zheng, Hui; Guha, Manti; Li, Ning; Chen, Qijun; Yang, Ting; Lengner, Christopher J.; Greenberg, Roger A.; Johnson, F. Brad; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of type I interferons (IFN) can be induced by DNA damaging agents but the mechanisms and significance of this regulation are not completely understood. We found that the transcription factor IRF3, activated in an ATM-IKKα/β dependent manner, stimulates cell-autonomous IFNβ expression in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. Cells and tissues with accumulating DNA damage produce endogenous IFNβ and stimulate IFN signaling in vitro and in vivo. In turn, IFN acts to amplify DNA damage responses, activate the p53 pathway, promote senescence and inhibit stem cells function in response to telomere shortening. Inactivation of the IFN pathway abrogates the development of diverse progeric phenotypes and extends the life span of Terc knockout mice. These data identify DNA damage response-induced IFN signaling as a critical mechanism that links accumulating DNA damage with senescence and premature aging. PMID:25921537

  18. Mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates for aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guocai

    This study systematically explores the mechanical behavior, damage tolerance and durability of fiber metal laminates, a promising candidate materials system for next generation aerospace structures. The experimental results indicated that GLARE laminates exhibited a bilinear deformation behavior under static in-plane loading. Both an analytical constitutive model based on a modified classical lamination theory which incorporates the elasto-plastic behavior of aluminum alloy and a numerical simulation based on finite element modeling are used to predict the nonlinear stress-strain response and deformation behavior of GLARE laminates. The blunt notched strength of GLARE laminates increased with decreasing specimen width and decreasing hole diameter. The notched strength of GLARE laminates was evaluated based on a modified point stress criterion. A computer simulation based on finite element method was performed to study stress concentration and distribution around the notch and verify the analytical and experimental results of notched strength. Good agreement is obtained between the model predictions and experimental results. Experimental results also indicate that GLARE laminates exhibited superior impact properties to those of monolithic 2024-T3 aluminum alloy at low velocity impact loading. The GLARE 5-2/1 laminate with 0°/90°/90°/0° fiber configuration exhibits a better impact resistance than the GLARE 4-3/2 laminate with 0°/90°/0° fiber orientation. The characteristic impact energies, the damage area, and the permanent deflection of laminates are used to evaluate the impact damage resistance. The post-impact residual tensile strength under various damage states ranging from the plastic dent, barely visible impact damage (BVID), clearly visible impact damage (CVID) up to the complete perforation was also measured and compared. The post-impact fatigue behavior under various stress levels and impact damage states was extensively explored. The damage

  19. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  20. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  1. WDR76 Co-Localizes with Heterochromatin Related Proteins and Rapidly Responds to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Joshua M.; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Groppe, Brad D.; Thornton, Janet L.; Liu, Xingyu; Dayebgadoh, Gerald; Banks, Charles A.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Workman, Jerry L.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that respond to DNA damage play critical roles in normal and diseased states in human biology. Studies have suggested that the S. cerevisiae protein CMR1/YDL156w is associated with histones and is possibly associated with DNA repair and replication processes. Through a quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity purifications here we show that the human homologue of this protein, WDR76, shares multiple protein associations with the histones H2A, H2B, and H4. Furthermore, our quantitative proteomic analysis of WDR76 associated proteins demonstrated links to proteins in the DNA damage response like PARP1 and XRCC5 and heterochromatin related proteins like CBX1, CBX3, and CBX5. Co-immunoprecipitation studies validated these interactions. Next, quantitative imaging studies demonstrated that WDR76 was recruited to laser induced DNA damage immediately after induction, and we compared the recruitment of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage to known DNA damage proteins like PARP1, XRCC5, and RPA1. In addition, WDR76 co-localizes to puncta with the heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX5, which are also recruited to DNA damage but much less intensely than WDR76. This w