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Sample records for dna extraction step

  1. Sampling, metadata and DNA extraction - important steps in metagenomic studies.

    PubMed

    Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Anna; Zieli?ska, Sylwia; ?o?, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic studies have become increasingly popular. They allow for the estimation of biodiversity in complex populations. This diversity presents an enormous but largely unexpected genetic and biological pool and can be exploited for the recovery of novel genes, entire metabolic pathways and their products. Generally metagenomic study is a genomic analysis of organisms by direct extraction and cloning of DNA from their natural environment. The most common problems of modern metagenomics are as follows: majority of the microorganisms present in the environment cannot be cultivated by standard techniques, DNA extraction methods are not very effective, isolated DNA is contaminated with various compounds, a choice for a screening method is not obvious. PMID:25680373

  2. An improved protocol and a new grinding device for extraction of genomic DNA from microorganisms by a two-step extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S S; Chen, D; Lu, Q

    2012-01-01

    Current protocols to extract genomic DNA from microorganisms are still laborious, tedious and costly, especially for the species with thick cell walls. In order to improve the effectiveness of extracting DNA from microbial samples, a novel protocol, defined as two-step extraction method, along with an improved tissue-grinding device, was developed. The protocol included two steps, disruption of microbial cells or spores by grinding the sample together with silica sand in a new device and extraction of DNA with an effective buffer containing cell lysis chemicals. The device was prepared by using a commercial electric mini-grinder, adapted with a grinding stone, and a sample cup processed by lathing from a polytetrafluoroethylene rod. We tested the method with vegetative cells of four microbial species and two microbial spores that have thick cell walls and are therefore hard to process; these included Escherichia coli JM109, Bacillus subtilis WB600, Sacchromyces cerevisiae INVSc1, Trichoderma viride AS3.3711, and the spores of S. cerevisiae and T. viride, respectively, representing Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, yeast, filamentous fungi. We found that this new method and device extracted usable quantities of genomic DNA from the samples. The DNA fragments that were extracted exceeded 23 kb. The target sequences up to about 5 kb were successfully and exclusively amplified by PCR using extracted DNA as the template. In addition, the DNA extraction was finalized within 1.5 h. Thus, we conclude that this two-step extraction method is an effective and improved protocol for extraction of genomic DNA from microbial samples. PMID:22653603

  3. Development of a rapid DNA extraction method and one-step nested PCR for the detection of Naegleria fowleri from the environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Arine Fadzlun; Lonnen, James; Andrew, Peter W; Kilvington, Simon

    2011-10-15

    Naegleria fowleri is a small free-living amoebo-flagellate found in natural and manmade thermal aquatic habitats worldwide. The organism is pathogenic to man causing fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Infection typically results from bathing in contaminated water and is usually fatal. It is, therefore, important to identify sites containing N. fowleri in the interests of preventive public health microbiology. Culture of environmental material is the conventional method for the isolation of N. fowleri but requires several days incubation and subsequent biochemical or molecular tests to confirm identification. Here, a nested one-step PCR test, in conjunction with a direct DNA extraction from water or sediment material, was developed for the rapid and reliable detection of N. fowleri from the environment. Here, the assay detected N, fowleri in 18/109 river water samples associated with a nuclear power plant in South West France and 0/10 from a similar site in the UK. Although culture of samples yielded numerous thermophilic free-living amoebae, none were N. fowleri or other thermophilic Naegleria spp. The availability of a rapid, reliable and sensitive one-step nested PCR method for the direct detection of N. fowleri from the environment may aid ecological studies and enable intervention to prevent PAM cases. PMID:21855956

  4. Exploring DNA Extraction Erica Butts

    E-print Network

    to release the proteins that protect the DNA) Removal of Lipids (By adding a detergent) Removal of Proteins chemicals such as phenol and chloroform · Liquid handling steps may increase risk for contamination and loss

  5. DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)

    Cancer.gov

    As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

  6. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for recovery of soil protist DNA.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana S; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars H; Winding, Anne

    2015-08-01

    The use of molecular methods to investigate protist communities in soil is in rapid development this decade. Molecular analysis of soil protist communities is usually dependant on direct genomic DNA extraction from soil and inefficient or differential DNA extraction of protist DNA can lead to bias in downstream community analysis. Three commonly used soil DNA extraction methods have been tested on soil samples from three European Long-Term Observatories (LTOs) with different land-use and three protist cultures belonging to different phylogenetic groups in different growth stages. The methods tested were: ISOm-11063 (a version of the ISO-11063 method modified to include a FastPrep ®-24 mechanical lysis step), GnS-GII (developed by the GenoSol platform to extract soil DNA in large-scale soil surveys) and a commercial DNA extraction kit - Power Lyzer™ PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio). DNA yield and quality were evaluated along with DNA suitability for amplification of 18S rDNA fragments by PCR. On soil samples, ISOm-11063 yields significantly higher DNA for two of the three soil samples, however, MoBio extraction favors DNA quality. This method was also more effective to recover copies of 18S rDNA numbers from all soil types. In addition and despite the lower yields, higher DNA quality was observed with DNA extracted from protist cultures with the MoBio method. Likewise, a bead-beating step shows to be a good solution for DNA extraction of soil protists, since the recovery of DNA from protist cultures and from the different soil samples with the ISOm method proved to be efficient in recovering PCR-amplifiable DNA. This study showed that soil DNA extraction methods provide biased results towards the cyst stages of protist organism. PMID:25966645

  7. Automated DNA extraction from pollen in honey.

    PubMed

    Guertler, Patrick; Eicheldinger, Adelina; Muschler, Paul; Goerlich, Ottmar; Busch, Ulrich

    2014-04-15

    In recent years, honey has become subject of DNA analysis due to potential risks evoked by microorganisms, allergens or genetically modified organisms. However, so far, only a few DNA extraction procedures are available, mostly time-consuming and laborious. Therefore, we developed an automated DNA extraction method from pollen in honey based on a CTAB buffer-based DNA extraction using the Maxwell 16 instrument and the Maxwell 16 FFS Nucleic Acid Extraction System, Custom-Kit. We altered several components and extraction parameters and compared the optimised method with a manual CTAB buffer-based DNA isolation method. The automated DNA extraction was faster and resulted in higher DNA yield and sufficient DNA purity. Real-time PCR results obtained after automated DNA extraction are comparable to results after manual DNA extraction. No PCR inhibition was observed. The applicability of this method was further successfully confirmed by analysis of different routine honey samples. PMID:24295710

  8. DNA Extraction Techniques for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, R. P.; Arblaster, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction provides a hands-on introduction to DNA and enables students to gain real life experience and practical knowledge of DNA. Students gain a sense of ownership and are more enthusiastic when they use their own DNA. A cost effective, simple protocol for DNA extraction and visualization was devised. Buccal mucosal epithelia provide a…

  9. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Miki?, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350-1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng ?l(-1) of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide. PMID:26635833

  10. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Miki?, Aleksandar M.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350–1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng ?l-1 of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide. PMID:26635833

  11. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanasundaram, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Yeo, W.-H.; Oh, K.; Lee, K.-H.; Kim, M.-H.; Ryew, S.-M.; Ahn, S.-G.; Gao, D.; Cangelosi, G. A.; Chung, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottle neck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab- and saliva samples. DNA is attracted on to a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle 4 microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for one month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol. PMID:23307121

  12. Monitoring of four DNA extraction methods upstream of high-throughput sequencing of Anisakidae nematodes.

    PubMed

    Seesao, Y; Audebert, C; Verrez-Bagnis, V; Merlin, S; Jérôme, M; Viscogliosi, E; Dei-Cas, E; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Gay, M

    2014-07-01

    Different methods were evaluated to extract DNA from pooled nematodes belonging to Anisakis, Contracaecum, Pseudoterranova and Hysterothylacium genera isolated from edible fish. Pooled DNA extraction is the first and compulsory step to allow the identification of a large number of samples through high-throughput DNA sequencing with drastic time and cost reductions. PMID:24845469

  13. PCR DNA typing of stamps: evaluation of the DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Fridez, F; Coquoz, R

    1996-04-01

    Today, the PCR analysis of DNA from the saliva deposited on a stamp of an anonymous letter can lead to an identification. However, this analysis still involves problems, and DNA extraction can be particularly difficult. A comparative study of two DNA extraction methods with two categories of postage stamps was carried out and a purification process was tested. This study shows that the extraction with phenol/chloroform gives much better results than Chelex extraction. A purification process such as the use of Centricon 100 microconcentrators is recommended when an inhibition of PCR is present. This operation, however, results in a large loss of material. PMID:8621117

  14. Extraction of Human DNA Replication Timing Patterns from Discrete Microarray Data

    E-print Network

    Robins, Gabriel

    Extraction of Human DNA Replication Timing Patterns from Discrete Microarray Data Anindya Dutta1 Microarrays are utilized to assay discrete pools of DNA replicated during different parts of the replication replication timing, DNA tiling microarrays 1 Introduction and Related Work DNA replication is a crucial step

  15. A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts using enzymatic laundry powder.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jinchuan; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Sicong; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2013-01-01

    A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts was developed by using enzymatic laundry powder at the first step of the process. The whole extraction can be finished in less than 2 hours. The simple extraction reagent proposed here contains only two cheap components: ordinary enzymatic laundry powder and PCR buffer. After extraction, an ultra sensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, PicoGreen, was used for quantifying trace amount of double-stranded DNA in the solution extracted. For further validation of DNA extraction, four primers were employed to amplify DNA microsatellite loci. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and PCR results suggested that this method can extract DNA from hair shafts with good efficiency and repeatability. The study will greatly facilitate the use of hair shafts in future for DNA analyses on genome-wide scale. PMID:23922747

  16. Plant and metagenomic DNA extraction of mucilaginous seeds.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Simone N M; Salazar, Marcela M; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Efraim, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The pulp surrounding the seeds of some fruits is rich in mucilage, carbohydrates, etc. Some seeds are rich in proteins and polyphenols. Fruit seeds, like cacao (Theobroma cacao) and cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum), are subjected to fermentation to develop flavor. During fermentation, ethanol is produced [2-6]. All of these compounds are considered as interfering substances that hinder the DNA extraction [4-8]. Protocols commonly used in the DNA extraction in samples of plant origin were used, but without success. Thus, a protocol for DNA samples under different conditions that can be used for similar samples was developed and applied with success. The protocol initially described for RNA samples by Zeng et al. [9] and with changes proposed by Provost et al. [5] was adapted for extracting DNA samples from those described. However, several modifications have been proposed:•Samples were initially washed with petroleum ether for fat phase removal.•RNAse was added to the extraction buffer, while spermidin was removed.•Additional steps of extraction with 5 M NaCl, saturated NaCl and CTAB (10%) were included and precipitation was carried out with isopropanol, followed by washing with ethanol. PMID:26150956

  17. Force steps during viral DNA packaging ?

    E-print Network

    Prashant K. Purohit; Jane' Kondev; Rob Phillips

    2003-09-22

    Biophysicists and structural biologists increasingly acknowledge the role played by the mechanical properties of macromolecules as a critical element in many biological processes. This change has been brought about, in part, by the advent of single molecule biophysics techniques that have made it possible to exert piconewton forces on key macromolecules and observe their deformations at nanometer length scales, as well as to observe the mechanical action of macromolecules such as molecular motors. This has opened up immense possibilities for a new generation of mechanical investigations that will respond to such measurements in an attempt to develop a coherent theory for the mechanical behavior of macromolecules under conditions where thermal and chemical effects are on an equal footing with deterministic forces. This paper presents an application of the principles of mechanics to the problem of DNA packaging, one of the key events in the life cycle of bacterial viruses with special reference to the nature of the internal forces that are built up during the DNA packaging process.

  18. The Critical Role of DNA Extraction for Detection of Mycobacteria in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Radomski, Nicolas; Kreitmann, Louis; McIntosh, Fiona; Behr, Marcel A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nucleic acid-based methods offer promise for both targeted and exploratory investigations of microbes in tissue samples. As the starting material for such studies is a mixture of host and microbial DNA, we have critically evaluated the DNA extraction step to determine the quantitative and qualitative parameters that permit faithful molecular detection of mycobacteria in infected tissue. Specifically, we assessed: 1) tissue disruption procedures; 2) DNA extraction protocols; and 3) inhibition of bacterial PCR by host DNA. Principal Findings Regarding DNA extraction, we found that 1) grinding was not necessary if bead-beating is done, 2) the reference mycobacterial DNA extraction method recovered more pure DNA than commercial spin column kits, 3) lysozyme digestion of 1 hour was sufficient, and 4) repeated steps of phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol offered minimal gain in DNA quality. By artificially mixing mycobacterial DNA with DNA extracted from uninfected mice, we found that bacterial real-time quantitative PCR was only reliable when the quantity of host DNA was < 3 µg in a final volume of 25 µl and the quality was high (260/280 nm ratio = 1.89±0.08). Findings from spiked DNA studies were confirmed using DNA extracted from mice infected with different intracellular pathogens (M. tuberculosis, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis). Conclusions Our findings point to the most appropriate methods for extracting DNA from tissue samples for the purpose of detecting and quantifying mycobacteria. These data also inform on the limits of detection for two mycobacterial species and indicate that increasing the sample mass to improve analytic sensitivity comes at the cost of inhibition of PCR by host DNA. PMID:24194951

  19. Single-step Charge Transport through DNA over Long Distances

    PubMed Central

    Genereux, Joseph C.; Wuerth, Stephanie M.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum yields for charge transport across adenine tracts of increasing length have been measured by monitoring hole transport in synthetic oligonucleotides between photoexcited 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analogue of adenine, and N2-cyclopropyl guanine. Using fluorescence quenching, a measure of hole injection, and hole trapping by the cyclopropyl guanine derivative, we separate the individual contributions of single- and multi-step channels to DNA charge transport, and find that with 7 or 8 intervening adenines the charge transport is a coherent, single-step process. Moreover, a transition occurs from multi-step to single-step charge transport with increasing donor/acceptor separation, opposite to that generally observed in molecular wires. These results establish that coherent transport through DNA occurs preferentially across 10 base pairs, favored by delocalization over a full turn of the helix. PMID:21348520

  20. COMPARISON OF DNA EXTRACTION METHODS ON DAIRY CONSTRUCTED WETLAND WASTEWATER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct DNA extraction from environmental samples is a useful and culture-independent method for the examination of microbial diversity. To date, there is little information on the effectiveness of commercial DNA extraction kits on wastewater. We compared two commercial DNA extraction kits for amount...

  1. Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua

    DOEpatents

    Warzinski, Robert P. (Venetia, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

  2. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile. PMID:26409535

  3. A rapid and efficient assay for extracting DNA from fungi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Peak, K.K.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A method for the rapid extraction of fungal DNA from small quantities of tissue in a batch-processing format was investigated. Methods and Results: Tissue (< 3.0 mg) was scraped from freshly-grown fungal isolates. The tissue was suspended in buffer AP1 and subjected to seven rounds of freeze/thaw using a crushed dry ice/ethanol bath and a boiling water bath. After a 30 min boiling step, the tissue was quickly ground against the wall of the microfuge tube using a sterile pipette tip. The Qiagen DNeasy Plant Tissue Kit protocol was then used to purify the DNA for PCR/ sequencing applications. Conclusions: The method allowed batch DNA extraction from multiple fungal isolates using a simple yet rapid and reliable assay. Significance and Impact of the Study: Use of this assay will allow researchers to obtain DNA from fungi quickly for use in molecular assays that previously required specialized instrumentation, was time-consuming or was not conducive to batch processing.

  4. Single-strand DNA translation initiation step analyzed by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, Luminita; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse; IUB, School of Engineering and Science, D-28727 Bremen ; Marty-Detraves, Claire; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse ; Winterhalter, Mathias; Fournier, Didier; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse ; Paquereau, Laurent; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse

    2009-07-31

    Is single-strand DNA translatable? Since the 60s, the question still remains whether or not DNA could be directly translated into protein. Some discrepancies in the results were reported about functional translation of single-strand DNA but all results converged on a similar behavior of RNA and ssDNA in the initiation step. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry method was used to determine thermodynamic constants of interaction between single-strand DNA and S30 extract of Escherichia coli. Our results showed that the binding was not affected by the nature of the template tested and the dissociation constants were in the same range when ssDNA (K{sub d} = 3.62 {+-} 2.1 x 10{sup -8} M) or the RNA corresponding sequence (K{sub d} = 2.7 {+-} 0.82 x 10{sup -8} M) bearing SD/ATG sequences were used. The binding specificity was confirmed by antibiotic interferences which block the initiation complex formation. These results suggest that the limiting step in translation of ssDNA is the elongation process.

  5. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  6. Forensic animal DNA analysis using economical two-step direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Linacre, Adrian; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol

    2014-03-01

    Wildlife forensic DNA analysis by amplification of a mitochondrial locus followed by DNA sequencing is routine, yet suffers from being costly and time-consuming. To address these disadvantages we report on a low-cost two-step direct PCR assay to efficiently analyze 12 forensically relevant mammalian sample types without DNA extraction. A cytochrome oxidase I degenerate-universal primer pair was designed and validated for the developed assay. The 12 sample types, which included bone, horn, feces, and urine, were amplified successfully by the assay using a pre-direct PCR dilution protocol. The average amplification success rate was as high as 92.5 % (n = 350), with an average PCR product concentration of 220.71 ± 180.84 ng/?L. Differences in amplification success rate and PCR product quantity between sample types were observed; however, most samples provided high quality sequences, permitting a 100 % nucleotide similarity to their respective species via BLAST database queries. The combination of PBS and Phire(®) Hot Start II DNA polymerase gave comparable amplification success rate and amplicon quantity with the proprietary commercial kits (P > 0.05, n = 350) but at considerably lower cost. The stability of the assay was tested by successfully amplifying samples that had been stored for up to 12 months. Our data indicate that this low-cost two-step direct amplification assay has the potential to be a valuable tool for the forensic DNA community. PMID:24435950

  7. Extraction of DNA from plant and fungus tissues in situ

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When samples are collected in the field and transported to the lab, degradation of the nucleic acids contained in the samples is frequently observed. Immediate extraction and precipitation of the nucleic acids reduces degradation to a minimum, thus preserving accurate sequence information. An extraction method to obtain high quality DNA in field studies is described. Findings DNA extracted immediately after sampling was compared to DNA extracted after allowing the sampled tissues to air dry at 21°C for 48 or 72 hours. While DNA extracted from fresh tissues exhibited little degradation, DNA extracted from all tissues exposed to 21°C air for 48 or 72 hours exhibited varying degrees of degradation. Yield was higher for extractions from fresh tissues in most cases. Four microcentrifuges were compared for DNA yield: one standard electric laboratory microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?16,000×g), two battery-operated microcentrifuges (max rcf?=?5,000 and 3,000 ×g), and one manually-operated microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?120×g). Yields for all centrifuges were similar. DNA extracted under simulated field conditions was similar in yield and quality to DNA extracted in the laboratory using the same equipment. Conclusions This CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) DNA extraction method employs battery-operated and manually-operated equipment to isolate high quality DNA in the field. The method was tested on plant and fungus tissues, and may be adapted for other types of organisms. The method produced high quality DNA in laboratory tests and under simulated field conditions. The field extraction method should prove useful for working in remote sites, where ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen are unavailable; where degradation is likely to occur due to the long distances between the sample site and the laboratory; and in instances where other DNA preservation and transportation methods have been unsuccessful. It may be possible to adapt this method for genomic, metagenomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic projects using samples collected in situ. PMID:22672795

  8. One-stop Genomic DNA Extraction by Salicylic Acid Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Kadam, Ulhas; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared via a modified, one-step synthesis and used for a one-stop extraction of genomic DNA from mammalian cells. The synthesized magnetic particles were used for magnetic separation of cells from the media by non-specific binding of the particles, as well as extraction of genomic DNA from the lysate. The quantity and quality were confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction. The entire process of extraction and isolation can be completed within 30 min. Compared to traditional methods based on centrifugation and filtration, the established method is fast, simple, reliable, and environmentally-friendly. PMID:23911528

  9. Loading and activation of DNA replicative helicases: the key step of initiation of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Evolution has led to diversification of all living organisms from a common ancestor. Consequently, all living organisms use a common method to duplicate their genetic information and thus pass on their inherited traits to their offspring. To duplicate chromosomal DNA, double-stranded DNA must first be unwound by helicase, which is loaded to replication origins and activated during the DNA replication initiation step. In this review, we discuss the common features of, and differences in, replicative helicases between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:23461534

  10. Thermodynamics of the DNA Damage Repair Steps of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van’t Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  11. A Simple Chelex Protocol for DNA Extraction from Anopheles spp.

    PubMed Central

    Musapa, Mulenga; Kumwenda, Taida; Mkulama, Mtawa; Chishimba, Sandra; Norris, Douglas E.; Thuma, Philip E.; Mharakurwa, Sungano

    2013-01-01

    Endemic countries are increasingly adopting molecular tools for efficient typing, identification and surveillance against malaria parasites and vector mosquitoes, as an integral part of their control programs1,2,3,4,5. For sustainable establishment of these accurate approaches in operations research to strengthen malaria control and elimination efforts, simple and affordable methods, with parsimonious reagent and equipment requirements are essential6,7,8. Here we present a simple Chelex-based technique for extracting malaria parasite and vector DNA from field collected mosquito specimens. We morphologically identified 72 Anopheles gambiae sl. from 156 mosquitoes captured by pyrethrum spray catches in sleeping rooms of households within a 2,000 km2 vicinity of the Malaria Institute at Macha. After dissection to separate the head and thorax from the abdomen for all 72 Anopheles gambiae sl. mosquitoes, the two sections were individually placed in 1.5 ml microcentrifuge tubes and submerged in 20 ?l of deionized water. Using a sterile pipette tip, each mosquito section was separately homogenized to a uniform suspension in the deionized water. Of the ensuing homogenate from each mosquito section, 10 ?l was retained while the other 10 ?l was transferred to a separate autoclaved 1.5 ml tube. The separate aliquots were subjected to DNA extraction by either the simplified Chelex or the standard salting out extraction protocol9,10. The salting out protocol is so-called and widely used because it employs high salt concentrations in lieu of hazardous organic solvents (such as phenol and chloroform) for the protein precipitation step during DNA extraction9. Extracts were used as templates for PCR amplification using primers targeting arthropod mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) subunit 4 gene (ND4) to check DNA quality11, a PCR for identification of Anopheles gambiae sibling species10 and a nested PCR for typing of Plasmodium falciparum infection12. Comparison using DNA quality (ND4) PCR showed 93% sensitivity and 82% specificity for the Chelex approach relative to the established salting out protocol. Corresponding values of sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 78%, respectively, using sibling species identification PCR and 92% and 80%, respectively for P. falciparum detection PCR. There were no significant differences in proportion of samples giving amplicon signal with the Chelex or the regular salting out protocol across all three PCR applications. The Chelex approach required three simple reagents and 37 min to complete, while the salting out protocol entailed 10 different reagents and 2 hr and 47 min' processing time, including an overnight step. Our results show that the Chelex method is comparable to the existing salting out extraction and can be substituted as a simple and sustainable approach in resource-limited settings where a constant reagent supply chain is often difficult to maintain. PMID:23328684

  12. Extraction of DNA from the plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Garcês, Helena; Sinha, Neelima

    2009-10-01

    This protocol describes how to isolate genomic DNA from leaves and stems of Kalanchoë daigremontiana. The procedure can be applied to adult leaves, but it is best to use younger leaves because they have fewer secondary metabolites and polysaccharides, which can interfere with the DNA extraction. The resulting DNA can be used for polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), Southern blots, or other applications. PMID:20147049

  13. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  14. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the recovery of DNA to 45% efficiency. Furthermore, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips recover more DNA than gold-coated microtips when the surface is washed. Heat-cured (225°C) PEI-coated microtips are used for the recovery of human genomic DNA from whole blood. A washing protocol is developed to remove inhibiting particles bound to the PEI-coated microtip surface after DNA extraction. From 1.25 muL of whole blood, an average of 1.83 ng of human genomic DNA is captured, purified, and released using a 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtip in less than 30 minutes. The extracted DNA is profiled by short tandem repeat analysis (STR). For forensic and medical applications, genomic DNA is extracted from dried samples using heat-cured PEI-coated microtips that are integrated into an automated device. DNA extraction from dried samples is critical for forensics. The use of dried samples in the medical field is increasing because dried samples are convenient for storage, biosafety, and contamination. The main challenge is the time required to properly extract DNA in a purified form. Typically, a 1 hour incubation period is required to complete this process. Overnight incubation is sometimes necessary. To address this challenge, a pre-extraction washing step is investigated to remove inhibiting particles from dried blood spots (DBS) before DNA is released from dried form into solution for microtip extraction. The developed protocol is expanded to extract DNA from a variety of dried samples including nasal swabs, buccal swabs, and other forensic samples. In comparison to a commercial kit, the microtip-based extraction reduced the processing time from 1.5 hours to 30 minutes or less with an equivalent concentration of extracted DNA from dried blood spots. The developed assay will benefit genetic studies on newborn screening, forensic investigation, and POC diagnostics.

  15. Comparison of microvolume DNA quantification methods for use with volume-sensitive environmental DNA extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate DNA concentration estimates from environmental samples using minimal sample volumes are essential for most downstream applications. To compare the efficacy of microvolume quantification methods, DNA was extracted from soil, compost, and pure culture samples, and quantified using two absorba...

  16. Optimization of DNA Extraction for RAPD and ISSR Analysis of Arbutus unedo L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Olga; Pereira, José Alberto; Baptista, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure DNA. For the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) this represents a great challenge since leaves can accumulate large amounts of polysaccharides, polyphenols and secondary metabolites, which co-purify with DNA. For this specie, standard protocols do not produce efficient yields of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Here, we present for the first time an improved leaf-tissue protocol, based on the standard cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide protocol, which yields large amounts of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Key steps in the optimized protocol are the addition of antioxidant compounds—namely polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT) and 2-mercaptoethanol, in the extraction buffer; the increasing of CTAB (3%, w/v) and sodium chloride (2M) concentration; and an extraction with organic solvents (phenol and chloroform) with the incubation of samples on ice. Increasing the temperature for cell lyses to 70 °C also improved both DNA quality and yield. The yield of DNA extracted was 200.0 ± 78.0 ?g/?L and the purity, evaluated by the ratio A260/A280, was 1.80 ± 0.021, indicative of minimal levels of contaminating metabolites. The quality of the DNA isolated was confirmed by random amplification polymorphism DNA and by inter-simple sequence repeat amplification, proving that the DNA can be amplified via PCR. PMID:21747730

  17. Hot-Alkaline DNA Extraction Method for Deep-Subseafloor Archaeal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Takeshi; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Inagaki, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    A prerequisite for DNA-based microbial community analysis is even and effective cell disruption for DNA extraction. With a commonly used DNA extraction kit, roughly two-thirds of subseafloor sediment microbial cells remain intact on average (i.e., the cells are not disrupted), indicating that microbial community analyses may be biased at the DNA extraction step, prior to subsequent molecular analyses. To address this issue, we standardized a new DNA extraction method using alkaline treatment and heating. Upon treatment with 1 M NaOH at 98°C for 20 min, over 98% of microbial cells in subseafloor sediment samples collected at different depths were disrupted. However, DNA integrity tests showed that such strong alkaline and heat treatment also cleaved DNA molecules into short fragments that could not be amplified by PCR. Subsequently, we optimized the alkaline and temperature conditions to minimize DNA fragmentation and retain high cell disruption efficiency. The best conditions produced a cell disruption rate of 50 to 80% in subseafloor sediment samples from various depths and retained sufficient DNA integrity for amplification of the complete 16S rRNA gene (i.e., ?1,500 bp). The optimized method also yielded higher DNA concentrations in all samples tested compared with extractions using a conventional kit-based approach. Comparative molecular analysis using real-time PCR and pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed that the new method produced an increase in archaeal DNA and its diversity, suggesting that it provides better analytical coverage of subseafloor microbial communities than conventional methods. PMID:24441163

  18. Optimization of DNA Extraction from Deep-sea Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Edwards, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Studies on the microorganisms that inhabit deep-sea basalt can provide information on this dark ecosystem, which will contribution to our understanding of mass transformation and energy flow in the deep ocean. However, molecular methods for use with metal- and clay-rich rock materials such as basalt have not been suitably developed at present, yet are critically required in order to be able to fully evaluate the basalt biotope. For example, inefficient DNA extraction might lead to loss of information about important components of this community, and misinterpretation about the total community diversity and function. In order to investigate the effects of sample pretreated method, particle size, different DNA extraction methods and cell density on extracted DNA yields, two basalt samples were collected from the East Pacific Rise 9° N during research cruise AT11- 20 in Nov 2004. Basalt samples were crushed to different particle size, washed with ddH2O and 100% ethanol respectively, and autoclaved. Marinobacter aquaeolei cultures with different cell densities were inoculated into differently treated basalt samples. Pure culture and basalt samples without inoculation were used as positive and negative control to evaluate the extracting efficiency. FastDNA spin for soil kit, GeneClean for ancient DNA kit and UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit are used for DNA extraction. Results showed that DNA yields increased with culture density. FastDNA spin for soil kit gave the highest DNA yields, which is almost 10 times more than that of UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit. Ethanol washing and ddH2O washing did not make big difference to DNA yields. Mineral composition and surface areas might also affect DNA yields.

  19. Extracting DNA of nematodes communities from Argentine Pampas agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Eduardo A; Covacevich, Fernanda; Studdert, Guillermo A; Pimentel, João P; Berbara, Ricardo L L

    2015-01-01

    We examined four strategies (Tris/EDTA, sodium dodecyl sulfate, Chelex 100 resin and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide -CTAB-) for extracting nucleic acid (DNA) from communities of nematodes. Nematodes were isolated from an agricultural area under different management of long-term crop rotation experiment from Argentina during three seasons. After DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction-amplifications were performed and considered as indicators of successful DNA extraction. The CTAB combined with proteinase K and phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol was the unique successful method because positive amplifications were obtained by using both eukaryotic and nematode specific primers. This work could contribute to biodiversity studies of nematodes on agroecosystems. PMID:26131632

  20. Extraction of DNA by magnetic ionic liquids: tunable solvents for rapid and selective DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin D; Nacham, Omprakash; Yu, Honglian; Li, Tianhao; Yamsek, Melissa M; Ronning, Donald R; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-02-01

    DNA extraction represents a significant bottleneck in nucleic acid analysis. In this study, hydrophobic magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) were synthesized and employed as solvents for the rapid and efficient extraction of DNA from aqueous solution. The DNA-enriched microdroplets were manipulated by application of a magnetic field. The three MILs examined in this study exhibited unique DNA extraction capabilities when applied toward a variety of DNA samples and matrices. High extraction efficiencies were obtained for smaller single-stranded and double-stranded DNA using the benzyltrioctylammonium bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL, while the dicationic 1,12-di(3-hexadecylbenzimidazolium)dodecane bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C16BnIM)2C12(2+)][NTf2(-), FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL produced higher extraction efficiencies for larger DNA molecules. The MIL-based method was also employed for the extraction of DNA from a complex matrix containing albumin, revealing a competitive extraction behavior for the trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium tetrachloroferrate(III) ([P6,6,6,14(+)][FeCl4(-)]) MIL in contrast to the [(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)] MIL, which resulted in significantly less coextraction of albumin. The MIL-DNA method was employed for the extraction of plasmid DNA from bacterial cell lysate. DNA of sufficient quality and quantity for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was recovered from the MIL extraction phase, demonstrating the feasibility of MIL-based DNA sample preparation prior to downstream analysis. PMID:25582771

  1. EXTRACTION AND PURIFICATION OF MICROBIAL DNA FROM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method for the isolation of intracellular and extracellular DNA from a range of sediment types has been developed. The method is based upon the direct lysis of cells in the sediment, extraction of released DNA from the sediments and its subsequent purification by CsC1-EtBr ...

  2. Extraction of High Quality DNA from Seized Moroccan Cannabis Resin (Hashish)

    PubMed Central

    El Alaoui, Moulay Abdelaziz; Melloul, Marouane; Alaoui Amine, Sanaâ; Stambouli, Hamid; El Bouri, Aziz; Soulaymani, Abdelmajid; El Fahime, Elmostafa

    2013-01-01

    The extraction and purification of nucleic acids is the first step in most molecular biology analysis techniques. The objective of this work is to obtain highly purified nucleic acids derived from Cannabis sativa resin seizure in order to conduct a DNA typing method for the individualization of cannabis resin samples. To obtain highly purified nucleic acids from cannabis resin (Hashish) free from contaminants that cause inhibition of PCR reaction, we have tested two protocols: the CTAB protocol of Wagner and a CTAB protocol described by Somma (2004) adapted for difficult matrix. We obtained high quality genomic DNA from 8 cannabis resin seizures using the adapted protocol. DNA extracted by the Wagner CTAB protocol failed to give polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase coding gene. However, the extracted DNA by the second protocol permits amplification of THCA synthase coding gene using different sets of primers as assessed by PCR. We describe here for the first time the possibility of DNA extraction from (Hashish) resin derived from Cannabis sativa. This allows the use of DNA molecular tests under special forensic circumstances. PMID:24124454

  3. Extracting biological knowledge from DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    De La Vega, F.M.; Thieffry, D.; Collado-Vides, J.

    1996-12-31

    This session describes the elucidation of information from dna sequences and what challenges computational biologists face in their task of summarizing and deciphering the human genome. Techniques discussed include methods from statistics, information theory, artificial intelligence and linguistics. 1 ref.

  4. Stepped electrophoresis for movement and concentration of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy Wei-Yun; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2005-03-15

    A fluidic channel patterned with a series of thin-film electrodes makes it possible to move and concentrate DNA in a fluid passing through the fluidic channel. The DNA has an inherent negative charge and by applying a voltage between adjacent electrodes the DNA is caused to move. By using a series of electrodes, when one electrode voltage or charge is made negative with respect to adjacent electrodes, the DNA is repelled away from this electrode and attached to a positive charged electrode of the series. By sequentially making the next electrode of the series negative, the DNA can be moved to and concentrated over the remaining positive electrodes.

  5. MATERIALS AND METHODS 1) DNA extraction

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    was extracted from ileo-cecal nodes using Ambion's MagMAX Total Nucleic Acid Isolation kit (Austin, TX, emaciation, poor milk production and reproductive performance, and ultimately death (Stabel, 1998). JD can

  6. DNA extraction from blood determination membrane card test.

    PubMed

    Ginestra, E; Trapani, C; Di Martino, D; Saravo, L

    2004-12-01

    Among the several techniques applied in our laboratory, in order to establish human nature of blood specimens we perform an immunodiagnostic analysis through a specific membrane test card, which is usually utilized as a fast screening test for human haemoglobin in diagnostic checks. This test works with a double-step method based upon solubilization of the sample in a proper buffer and its migration on a membrane monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific against haemoglobin are linked to. The complexes haemoglobin-antibodies migrate through the membrane and are revealed by an immunoreactive line turning reddish-coloured to show that the reaction took place and the system works. As this test can recognize both the whole haemoglobin molecule and the degraded one, it is usually exploited in forensic sciences to detect kind and species of blood specimens related to forensic case works. However, as a consequence of the small amounts of blood in the samples collected from the crime scene we often cannot perform this kind of analysis in order to save the sample and be able to genotype it. Then, we investigated the possibility to purify DNA from the blood specimens already dissolved in the extraction buffer and perform STR typing on it with several methods and after different storage conditions and time. PMID:15639562

  7. Automated DNA extraction of single dog hairs without roots for mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bekaert, Bram; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vanhove, Maarten P M; Opdekamp, Anouschka; Decorte, Ronny

    2012-03-01

    Dogs are intensely integrated in human social life and their shed hairs can play a major role in forensic investigations. The overall aim of this study was to validate a semi-automated extraction method for mitochondrial DNA analysis of telogenic dog hairs. Extracted DNA was amplified with a 95% success rate from 43 samples using two new experimental designs in which the mitochondrial control region was amplified as a single large (± 1260 bp) amplicon or as two individual amplicons (HV1 and HV2; ± 650 and 350 bp) with tailed-primers. The results prove that the extraction of dog hair mitochondrial DNA can easily be automated to provide sufficient DNA yield for the amplification of a forensically useful long mitochondrial DNA fragment or alternatively two short fragments with minimal loss of sequence in case of degraded samples. PMID:21531187

  8. Toenails as an alternative source material for the extraction of DNA from decomposed human remains.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Andrew; Grimble, Katelyn; Azim, Arani; Owen, Rebecca; Hartman, Dadna

    2016-01-01

    The DNA identification of decomposed human remains for coronial investigations at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine routinely requires the retrieval and processing of a bone sample obtained from the deceased. Bone is a difficult sample type to work with as it requires surgical removal from the deceased, refrigerated storage, and additional processing steps prior to DNA analysis in comparison to other samples types such as buccal swabs or blood stains. In an attempt to overcome the issues posed by bone, a DNA extraction method utilising toenails as an alternate source material was optimised and trialled. Two DNA extraction methods were optimised for digestion of toenail material, with the method utilising the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit selected for a casework trial. Single source DNA profiles, matching those of the conventional samples taken, were obtained for toenail samples collected from 28 of 30 coronial cases available for this study. Of these, 26 toenail samples produced full profiles. Although the overall DNA profile quality from the toenails was less than that of the conventional sample, the profiles from toenails met the reporting requirements for identification. Based on the results obtained, the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine will be implementing toenails as the primary sample type for collection from decomposed remains when blood is not a suitable sample type. PMID:26610200

  9. Nonhomologous DNA End Joining in Cell-Free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sheetal; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2010-01-01

    Among various DNA damages, double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered as most deleterious, as they may lead to chromosomal rearrangements and cancer when unrepaired. Nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) is one of the major DSB repair pathways in higher organisms. A large number of studies on NHEJ are based on in vitro systems using cell-free extracts. In this paper, we summarize the studies on NHEJ performed by various groups in different cell-free repair systems. PMID:20936167

  10. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  11. Crowdsourcing step-by-step information extraction to enhance existing how-to videos

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Phu Tran

    Millions of learners today use how-to videos to master new skills in a variety of domains. But browsing such videos is often tedious and inefficient because video player interfaces are not optimized for the unique step-by-step ...

  12. Direct Extraction and Amplification of DNA from Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, Jack T.; Leung, K.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that describes the direct extraction and purification of DNA from a small soil sample. Also discusses the subsequent amplification of a 343-bp Tn7 transposate A gene fragment (tnsA) from a strain of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 3732RNL11. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  13. Extraction and Elongation of Genomic DNA from a Single Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Christelle; Tegenfeldt, Jonas; Austin, Robert

    2001-03-01

    We are developing ways to use microfabricated electrode arrays to extract genomic DNA from single E. coli cells and then move the genomic material into an dielectrophoretic trap for clean-up and fractionation. We will present some preliminary data and discuss some of basic polymer physics that impact on these experiments.

  14. One-step assay for the quantification of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Steffi; Kreisig, Thomas; Buettner, Karin; Zuchner, Thole

    2015-02-01

    As one of the most commonly used enzyme in molecular biology, the T4 DNA ligase presents an important tool for the manipulation of DNA. T4 DNA ligase activity measurements are based on the use of radioactivity or rather labor-intense procedures including gel-based analysis. We therefore established a homogeneous T4 DNA ligase assay utilizing a specifically designed fluorescein- and dark quencher-labeled DNA molecule. Upon ligation of both DNA molecules, a quenching occurs and the fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing ligase concentrations. The assay allows a sensitive and precise quantification (CV, 4.6-5.5 %) of T4 DNA ligase activities and showed a high specificity when tested against other ligases of related and different species. Most importantly, this T4 DNA ligase assay requires only one working and incubation step before measurement can take place at room temperature and may therefore offer an interesting alternative to existing, more laborious ligase assays. PMID:25503935

  15. Implication of DNA polymerase lambda in alignment-based gap filling for nonhomologous DNA end joining in human nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wan; Blanco, Luis; Zhou, Tong; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A; Wang, Zhigang; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2004-01-01

    Accurate repair of free radical-mediated DNA double-strand breaks by the nonhomologous end joining pathway requires replacement of fragmented nucleotides in the aligned ends by a gap-filling DNA polymerase. Nuclear extracts of human HeLa cells, supplemented with recombinant XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex (XRCC4/ligase IV), were capable of accurately rejoining model double-strand break substrates with a 1- or 2-base gap, and the gap-filling step was dependent on XRCC4/ligase IV. To determine what polymerase was responsible for gap filling, end joining was examined in the presence of polyclonal antibodies against each of two prime candidate enzymes, DNA polymerases mu and lambda, both of which were present in the extracts. For a DNA substrate with partially complementary 3' overhangs and a 2-base gap, antibodies to polymerase lambda completely eliminated both gap filling and accurate end joining, whereas antibodies to polymerase mu had little effect. Immunodepletion of polymerase lambda, but not polymerase mu, likewise blocked both gap filling and end joining, and both functions could be restored by addition of recombinant polymerase lambda. Recombinant polymerase mu, and a truncated polymerase lambda lacking the Brca1 C-terminal domain, were at least 10-fold less active in restoring gap filling to the immunodepleted extracts, and polymerase beta was completely inactive. The results suggest that polymerase lambda is the primary gap-filling polymerase for accurate nonhomologous end joining, and that the Brca1 C-terminal domain is required for this activity. PMID:14561766

  16. Role for Rif1 in the checkpoint response to damaged DNA in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Yoo, Hae Yong; Kumagai, Akiko; Shevchenko, Anna; Shevchenko, Andrej; Dunphy, William G

    2012-03-15

    TopBP1 is critical for both DNA replication and checkpoint regulation in vertebrate cells. In this study, we have identified Rif1 as a binding partner of TopBP1 in Xenopus egg extracts. In addition, Rif1 also interacts with both ATM and the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, which are key regulators of checkpoint responses to double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). Depletion of Rif1 from egg extracts compromises the activation of Chk1 in response to DSBs but not stalled replication forks. Removal of Rif1 also has a significant impact on the chromatin-binding behavior of key checkpoint proteins. In particular, binding of TopBP1, ATR and the MRN complex to chromatin containing DSBs is reduced in the absence of Rif1. Rif1 interacts with chromatin in a highly regulated and dynamic manner. In unperturbed egg extracts, the association of Rif1 with chromatin depends upon formation of replication forks. In the presence of DSBs, there is elevated accumulation of Rif1 on chromatin under conditions where the activation of ATM is suppressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Rif1 plays a dynamic role in the early steps of a checkpoint response to DSBs in the egg-extract system by promoting the correct accumulation of key regulators on the DNA. PMID:22391207

  17. Role for Rif1 in the checkpoint response to damaged DNA in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Yoo, Hae Yong; Kumagai, Akiko; Shevchenko, Anna; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    TopBP1 is critical for both DNA replication and checkpoint regulation in vertebrate cells. In this study, we have identified Rif1 as a binding partner of TopBP1 in Xenopus egg extracts. In addition, Rif1 also interacts with both ATM and the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, which are key regulators of checkpoint responses to double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). Depletion of Rif1 from egg extracts compromises the activation of Chk1 in response to DSBs but not stalled replication forks. Removal of Rif1 also has a significant impact on the chromatin-binding behavior of key checkpoint proteins. In particular, binding of TopBP1, ATR and the MRN complex to chromatin containing DSBs is reduced in the absence of Rif1. Rif1 interacts with chromatin in a highly regulated and dynamic manner. In unperturbed egg extracts, the association of Rif1 with chromatin depends upon formation of replication forks. In the presence of DSBs, there is elevated accumulation of Rif1 on chromatin under conditions where the activation of ATM is suppressed. Taken together, these results suggest that Rif1 plays a dynamic role in the early steps of a checkpoint response to DSBs in the egg-extract system by promoting the correct accumulation of key regulators on the DNA. PMID:22391207

  18. Direct extraction of genomic DNA from maize with aqueous ionic liquid buffer systems for applications in genetically modified organisms analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez García, Eric; Ressmann, Anna K; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Mach, Robert L; Krska, Rudolf; Bica, Katharina; Brunner, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    To date, the extraction of genomic DNA is considered a bottleneck in the process of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. Conventional DNA isolation methods are associated with long extraction times and multiple pipetting and centrifugation steps, which makes the entire procedure not only tedious and complicated but also prone to sample cross-contamination. In recent times, ionic liquids have emerged as innovative solvents for biomass processing, due to their outstanding properties for dissolution of biomass and biopolymers. In this study, a novel, easily applicable, and time-efficient method for the direct extraction of genomic DNA from biomass based on aqueous-ionic liquid solutions was developed. The straightforward protocol relies on extraction of maize in a 10 % solution of ionic liquids in aqueous phosphate buffer for 5 min at room temperature, followed by a denaturation step at 95 °C for 10 min and a simple filtration to remove residual biopolymers. A set of 22 ionic liquids was tested in a buffer system and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate, as well as the environmentally benign choline formate, were identified as ideal candidates. With this strategy, the quality of the genomic DNA extracted was significantly improved and the extraction protocol was notably simplified compared with a well-established method. PMID:25381609

  19. Method of preparing an equimolar DNA mixture for one-step DNA assembly of over 50 fragments

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Kenji; Sato, Yukari; Kobayashi, Yuka; Gondo, Maiko; Hasebe, Masako; Togashi, Takashi; Tomita, Masaru; Itaya, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In the era of synthetic biology, techniques for rapidly constructing a designer long DNA from short DNA fragments are desired. To realize this, we attempted to establish a method for one-step DNA assembly of unprecedentedly large numbers of fragments. The basic technology is the Ordered Gene Assembly in Bacillus subtilis (OGAB) method, which uses the plasmid transformation system of B. subtilis. Since this method doesn’t require circular ligation products but needs tandem repeat ligation products, the degree of deviation in the molar concentration of the material DNAs is the only determinant that affects the efficiency of DNA assembly. The strict standardization of the size of plasmids that clone the DNA block and the measurement of the block in the state of intact plasmid improve the reliability of this step, with the coefficient of variation of the molar concentrations becoming 7%. By coupling this method with the OGAB method, one-step assembly of more than 50 DNA fragments becomes feasible. PMID:25990947

  20. Fingerprints and DNA: STR typing of DNA extracted from adhesive tape after processing for fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Zamir, A; Springer, E; Glattstein, B

    2000-05-01

    An exhibit that is often received for examination in cases of robbery or terrorist activity is adhesive tape. This type of exhibit can often, but not always, be successfully processed for fingerprints. The question arises whether or not it is possible to extract and type DNA after the tape has been sequentially processed for fingerprints. In this work, various donors left fingerprints on the adhesive side of tapes. The tapes were then sequentially processed for fingerprints using an alternate light source, cyanoacrylate fuming, and staining with BY-40 and then crystal violet. DNA was subsequently successfully extracted, amplified and typed for six STR loci. PMID:10855979

  1. Evaluation of Methods to Improve the Extraction and Recovery of DNA from Cotton Swabs for Forensic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adamowicz, Michael S.; Stasulli, Dominique M.; Sobestanovich, Emily M.; Bille, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol’s incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations. PMID:25549111

  2. Evaluation of methods to improve the extraction and recovery of DNA from cotton swabs for forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Michael S; Stasulli, Dominique M; Sobestanovich, Emily M; Bille, Todd W

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol's incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations. PMID:25549111

  3. DNA Extraction From Processed Wood: A Case Study for the Identification of an Endangered

    E-print Network

    Protocols DNA Extraction From Processed Wood: A Case Study for the Identification of an Endangered to the extraction of whole genomic DNA from processed wood samples to explore the possibility of identifying an endangered trop- ical timber species by using DNA sequencing technology. High-yield and high-quality DNA

  4. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  5. Assessing the Utility of Soil DNA Extraction Kits for Increasing DNA Yields and Eliminating PCR Inhibitors from Buried Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Hebda, Lisa M; Foran, David R

    2015-09-01

    DNA identification of human remains is often necessary when decedents are skeletonized; however, poor DNA recovery and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibition are frequently encountered, a situation exacerbated by burial. In this research, the utility of integrating soil DNA isolation kits into buried skeletal DNA analysis was evaluated and compared to a standard human DNA extraction kit and organic extraction. The soil kits successfully extracted skeletal DNA at quantities similar to standard methods, although the two kits tested, which differ mechanistically, were not equivalent. Further, the PCR inhibitors calcium and humic acid were effectively removed using the soil kits, whereas collagen was less so. Finally, concordant control region sequences were obtained from human skeletal remains using all four methods. Based on these comparisons, soil DNA isolation kits, which quickened the extraction process, proved to be a viable extraction technique for skeletal remains that resulted in positive identification of a decedent. PMID:26258388

  6. Improved rapid and efficient method for Staphylococcus aureus DNA extraction from milk for identification of mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Unno, Hirotaka; Inada, Mika; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Hashimoto, Michie; Ito, Keiko; Hashimoto, Koji; Nikaido, Masaru; Hayashi, Tomohito; Hata, Eiji; Katsuda, Ken; Kiku, Yoshio; Tagawa, Yuichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    A rapid and efficient DNA extraction method was developed for detecting mastitis pathogens in milk. The first critical step involved cell wall disruption by bead-beating, as physical disruption using beads was more effective for DNA extraction from Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, than enzymatic disruption using proteinase K. The second critical step involves the use of acetic acid and ammonium sulfate in the purification process, as these reagents effectively and efficiently remove the lipids and proteins in milk. Using these methods, DNA suitable for loop-mediated isothermal amplification was obtained within 30 min. Also, the rapid and sensitive detection of S. aureus in milk was possible at levels as low as 200 cfu/ml. PMID:25843742

  7. Improved rapid and efficient method for Staphylococcus aureus DNA extraction from milk for identification of mastitis pathogens

    PubMed Central

    UNNO, Hirotaka; INADA, Mika; NAKAMURA, Akiyoshi; HASHIMOTO, Michie; ITO, Keiko; HASHIMOTO, Koji; NIKAIDO, Masaru; HAYASHI, Tomohito; HATA, Eiji; KATSUDA, Ken; KIKU, Yoshio; TAGAWA, Yuichi; KAWAI, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and efficient DNA extraction method was developed for detecting mastitis pathogens in milk. The first critical step involved cell wall disruption by bead-beating, as physical disruption using beads was more effective for DNA extraction from Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, than enzymatic disruption using proteinase K. The second critical step involves the use of acetic acid and ammonium sulfate in the purification process, as these reagents effectively and efficiently remove the lipids and proteins in milk. Using these methods, DNA suitable for loop-mediated isothermal amplification was obtained within 30 min. Also, the rapid and sensitive detection of S. aureus in milk was possible at levels as low as 200 cfu/ml. PMID:25843742

  8. Optimized DNA extraction and metagenomic sequencing of airborne microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjun; Liang, Peng; Wang, Buying; Fang, Jianhuo; Lang, Jidong; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhu, Ting F

    2015-05-01

    Metagenomic sequencing has been widely used for the study of microbial communities from various environments such as soil, ocean, sediment and fresh water. Nonetheless, metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities in the air remains technically challenging, partly owing to the limited mass of collectable atmospheric particulate matter and the low biological content it contains. Here we present an optimized protocol for extracting up to tens of nanograms of airborne microbial genomic DNA from collected particulate matter. With an improved sequencing library preparation protocol, this quantity is sufficient for downstream applications, such as metagenomic sequencing for sampling various genes from the airborne microbial community. The described protocol takes ?12 h of bench time over 2-3 d, and it can be performed with standard molecular biology equipment in the laboratory. A modified version of this protocol may also be used for genomic DNA extraction from other environmental samples of limited mass or low biological content. PMID:25906115

  9. Ancient DNA: extraction, characterization, molecular cloning, and enzymatic amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Pääbo, S

    1989-01-01

    Several chemical and enzymatic properties were examined in the DNA extracted from dry remains of soft tissues that vary in age from 4 to 13,000 years and represent four species, including two extinct animals (the marsupial wolf and giant ground sloth). The DNA obtained was invariably of a low average molecular size and damaged by oxidative processes, which primarily manifest themselves as modifications of pyrimidines and sugar residues as well as baseless sites and intermolecular cross-links. This renders molecular cloning difficult. However, the polymerase chain reaction can be used to amplify and study short mitochondrial DNA sequences that are of anthropological and evolutionary significance. This opens up the prospect of performing diachronical studies of molecular evolutionary genetics. Images PMID:2928314

  10. Ancient DNA: extraction, characterization, molecular cloning, and enzymatic amplification.

    PubMed

    Pääbo, S

    1989-03-01

    Several chemical and enzymatic properties were examined in the DNA extracted from dry remains of soft tissues that vary in age from 4 to 13,000 years and represent four species, including two extinct animals (the marsupial wolf and giant ground sloth). The DNA obtained was invariably of a low average molecular size and damaged by oxidative processes, which primarily manifest themselves as modifications of pyrimidines and sugar residues as well as baseless sites and intermolecular cross-links. This renders molecular cloning difficult. However, the polymerase chain reaction can be used to amplify and study short mitochondrial DNA sequences that are of anthropological and evolutionary significance. This opens up the prospect of performing diachronical studies of molecular evolutionary genetics. PMID:2928314

  11. Repeat silica extraction: a simple technique for the removal of PCR inhibitors from DNA extracts

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Brian M. Kemp a,*, Cara Monroe b , David Glenn Smith a a Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA b Department of Anthropology, University to polymerase [11]. Inhibitors are also routinely en- countered in forensic investigations of DNA extracted from

  12. Feature extraction and signal processing for nylon DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, F; Rougemont, J; Loriod, B; Bourgeois, A; Loï, L; Bertucci, F; Hingamp, P; Houlgatte, R; Granjeaud, S

    2004-01-01

    Background High-density DNA microarrays require automatic feature extraction methodologies and softwares. These can be a potential source of non-reproducibility of gene expression measurements. Variation in feature location or in signal integration methodology may be a significant contribution to the observed variance in gene expression levels. Results We explore sources of variability in feature extraction from DNA microarrays on Nylon membrane with radioactive detection. We introduce a mathematical model of the signal emission and derive methods for correcting biases such as overshining, saturation or variation in probe amount. We also provide a quality metric which can be used qualitatively to flag weak or untrusted signals or quantitatively to modulate the weight of each experiment or gene in higher level analyses (clustering or discriminant analysis). Conclusions Our novel feature extraction methodology, based on a mathematical model of the radioactive emission, reduces variability due to saturation, neighbourhood effects and variable probe amount. Furthermore, we provide a fully automatic feature extraction software, BZScan, which implements the algorithms described in this paper. PMID:15222896

  13. Comparison of Alkaline Lysis with Electroextraction and Optimization of Electric Pulses to Extract Plasmid DNA

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    Plasmid DNA from Escherichia coli Sasa Haberl · Marko Jarc · Ales Strancar · Matjaz Peterka · Dusa Hodzic Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013 Abstract The use of plasmid DNA (pDNA) as a phar- maceutical for extracting pDNA. Keywords Alkaline lysis Á Electroextraction Á Plasmid DNA Á Escherichia coli Introduction

  14. A simple method for DNA extraction from marine bacteria that produce extracellular materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K; Kim, H W; Liu, C L; Lee, H K

    2003-02-01

    We present a simple method for extracting DNA from the marine bacteria Hahella chejuensis, a Streptomyces sp., and a Cytophaga sp. Previously, DNA purification from these strains was hindered by the presence of extracellular materials. In our extraction method, the marine bacteria are lysed by freezing and grinding in liquid nitrogen, and treated with SDS. The extracted DNA is purified using a phenol/chloroform mixture, and precipitated in isopropanol. The extracted DNA is of high quality and suitable for molecular analyses, such as PCR, restriction enzyme digestion, genomic DNA blot hybridization, and genomic DNA library construction. We used this method to extract genomic DNA from several other marine bacteria. Our method is a reproducible, simple, and rapid technique for routine DNA extractions from marine bacteria. Furthermore, the low cost of this method makes it attractive for large-scale studies. PMID:12459245

  15. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm2. Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation. PMID:26492833

  16. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-10-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm2. Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation.

  17. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm(2). Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation. PMID:26492833

  18. Summary. We present a method of extracting DNA from medium-sized paper wasps without sacrificing the animal.

    E-print Network

    Starks, Philip

    words: Behavior, DNA extraction, DNA fingerprinting, genetic analysis, PCR. Introduction GeneticSummary. We present a method of extracting DNA from medium-sized paper wasps without sacrificing the animal. From the distal half of a single leg, enough DNA is extracted for 125 PCR reactions. This DNA

  19. 'Direct PCR' optimization yields a rapid, cost-effective, nondestructive and efficient method for obtaining DNA barcodes without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Hing; Tay, Ywee Chieh; Puniamoorthy, Jayanthi; Balke, Michael; Cranston, Peter S; Meier, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    Macroinvertebrates that are collected in large numbers pose major problems in basic and applied biodiversity research: identification to species via morphology is often difficult, slow and/or expensive. DNA barcodes are an attractive alternative or complementary source of information. Unfortunately, obtaining DNA barcodes from specimens requires many steps and thus time and money. Here, we promote a short cut to DNA barcoding, that is, a nondestructive PCR method that skips DNA extraction ('direct PCR') and that can be used for a broad range of invertebrate taxa. We demonstrate how direct PCR can be optimized for the larvae and adults of nonbiting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae), a typical invertebrate group that is abundant, contains important bioindicator species, but is difficult to identify based on morphological features. After optimization, direct PCR yields high PCR success rates (>90%), preserves delicate morphological features (e.g. details of genitalia, and larval head capsules) while allowing for the recovery of genomic DNA. We also document that direct PCR can be successfully optimized for a wide range of other invertebrate taxa that need routine barcoding (flies: Culicidae, Drosophilidae, Dolichopodidae, Sepsidae; sea stars: Oreasteridae). Key for obtaining high PCR success rates is optimizing (i) tissue quantity, (ii) body part, (iii) primer pair and (iv) type of Taq polymerase. Unfortunately, not all invertebrates appear suitable because direct PCR has low success rates for other taxa that were tested (e.g. Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Copepoda, Hymenoptera: Formicidae and Odonata). It appears that the technique is less successful for heavily sclerotized insects and/or those with many exocrine glands. PMID:24816169

  20. Establishment and application of an efficient, economic, and rapid rice DNA extraction method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid, economic, and efficient method for DNA extraction from rice leaf, root and seed was developed, and the extracted DNA was used as a template to successfully amplify the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta. Profiles of Pi-ta in 165 breeding lines detected by DNA markers were verified using diff...

  1. DNA BARCODING Tissue-direct PCR, a rapid and extraction-free method

    E-print Network

    DNA BARCODING Tissue-direct PCR, a rapid and extraction-free method for barcoding of ferns F-W. LI gametophytes and young sporophytes often provide too little material for DNA extraction and are particularly distribution and population structure. Keywords: DNA barcoding, ferns, gametophytes, Tissue-direct PCR, young

  2. The Mechanism of the Translocation Step in DNA Replication by DNA Polymerase I: A Computer Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Golosov, Andrei A.; Warren, Joshua J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Karplus, Martin

    2010-11-03

    High-fidelity DNA polymerases copy DNA rapidly and accurately by adding correct deoxynucleotide triphosphates to a growing primer strand of DNA. Following nucleotide incorporation, a series of conformational changes translocate the DNA substrate by one base pair step, readying the polymerase for the next round of incorporation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the translocation consists globally of a polymerase fingers-opening transition, followed by the DNA displacement and the insertion of the template base into the preinsertion site. They also show that the pyrophosphate release facilitates the opening transition and that the universally conserved Y714 plays a key role in coupling polymerase opening to DNA translocation. The transition involves several metastable intermediates in one of which the O helix is bent in the vicinity of G711. Completion of the translocation appears to require a gating motion of the O1 helix, perhaps facilitated by the presence of G715. These roles are consistent with the high level of conservation of Y714 and the two glycine residues at these positions. It is likely that a corresponding mechanism is applicable to other polymerases.

  3. Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated proteins

    E-print Network

    Blow, J. Julian

    Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated online 19 April 2012 Communicated by Marcel Mechali Keywords: Xenopus Egg extract In vitro Cell-free system DNA replication Chromatin a b s t r a c t The use of cell-free extracts prepared from eggs

  4. Streamlining DNA Barcoding Protocols: Automated DNA Extraction and a New cox1 Primer in Arachnid Systematics

    PubMed Central

    Vidergar, Nina; Toplak, Nataša; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding is a popular tool in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, but for most animal lineages protocols for obtaining the barcoding sequences—mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (cox1 AKA CO1)—are not standardized. Our aim was to explore an optimal strategy for arachnids, focusing on the species-richest lineage, spiders by (1) improving an automated DNA extraction protocol, (2) testing the performance of commonly used primer combinations, and (3) developing a new cox1 primer suitable for more efficient alignment and phylogenetic analyses. Methodology We used exemplars of 15 species from all major spider clades, processed a range of spider tissues of varying size and quality, optimized genomic DNA extraction using the MagMAX Express magnetic particle processor—an automated high throughput DNA extraction system—and tested cox1 amplification protocols emphasizing the standard barcoding region using ten routinely employed primer pairs. Results The best results were obtained with the commonly used Folmer primers (LCO1490/HCO2198) that capture the standard barcode region, and with the C1-J-2183/C1-N-2776 primer pair that amplifies its extension. However, C1-J-2183 is designed too close to HCO2198 for well-interpreted, continuous sequence data, and in practice the resulting sequences from the two primer pairs rarely overlap. We therefore designed a new forward primer C1-J-2123 60 base pairs upstream of the C1-J-2183 binding site. The success rate of this new primer (93%) matched that of C1-J-2183. Conclusions The use of C1-J-2123 allows full, indel-free overlap of sequences obtained with the standard Folmer primers and with C1-J-2123 primer pair. Our preliminary tests suggest that in addition to spiders, C1-J-2123 will also perform in other arachnids and several other invertebrates. We provide optimal PCR protocols for these primer sets, and recommend using them for systematic efforts beyond DNA barcoding. PMID:25415202

  5. One-step extraction of subcellular proteins from eukaryotic cells Yihong Zhan,a

    E-print Network

    Lu, Chang

    One-step extraction of subcellular proteins from eukaryotic cells Yihong Zhan,a Victoria A. Martin a specific subcellular proteome is often a practical means to reduce the complexity of the eukaryotic cell Conventional biochemical analysis mainly focuses on the expression level of cellular proteins from entire cells

  6. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  7. DNA Extraction by Isotachophoresis in a Microfluidic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S J

    2011-08-10

    Biological assays have many applications. For example, forensics personnel and medical professionals use these tests to diagnose diseases and track their progression or identify pathogens and the host response to them. One limitation of these tests, however, is that most of them target only one piece of the sample - such as bacterial DNA - and other components (e.g. host genomic DNA) get in the way, even though they may be useful for different tests. To address this problem, it would be useful to extract several different substances from a complex biological sample - such as blood - in an inexpensive and efficient manner. This summer, I worked with Maxim Shusteff at Lawrence Livermore National Lab on the Rapid Automated Sample Prep project. The goal of the project is to solve the aforementioned problem by creating a system that uses a series of different extraction methods to extract cells, bacteria, and DNA from a complex biological sample. Biological assays can then be run on purified output samples. In this device, an operator could input a complex sample such as blood or saliva, and would receive separate outputs of cells, bacteria, viruses, and DNA. I had the opportunity to work this summer with isotachophoresis (ITP), a technique that can be used to extract nucleic acids from a sample. This technique is intended to be the last stage of the purification device. Isotachophoresis separates particles based on different electrophoretic mobilities. This technique is convenient for out application because free solution DNA mobility is approximately equal for DNA longer than 300 base pairs in length. The sample of interest - in our case DNA - is fed into the chip with streams of leading electrolyte (LE) and trailing electrolyte (TE). When an electric field is applied, the species migrate based on their electrophoretic mobilities. Because the ions in the leading electrolyte have a high electrophoretic mobility, they race ahead of the slower sample and trailing electrolyte ions. Conversely, the trailing electrolyte ions have a slow electrophoretic mobility, so they lag behind the sample, thus trapping the species of interest between the LE and TE streams. In a typical isotachophoresis configuration, the electric field is applied in a direction parallel to the direction of flow. The species then form bands that stretch across the width of the channel. A major limitation of that approach is that only a finite amount of sample can be processed at once, and the sample must be processed in batches. For our purposes, a form of free-flow isotachophoresis is more convenient, where the DNA forms a band parallel to the edges of the channel. To achieve this, in our chip, the electric field is applied transversely. This creates a force perpendicular to the direction of flow, which causes the different ions to migrate across the flow direction. Because the mobility of the DNA is between the mobility of the leading and the trailing electrolyte, the DNA is focused in a tight band near the center of the channel. The stream of DNA can then be directed to a different output to produce a highly concentrated outlet stream without batch processing. One hurdle that must be overcome for successful ITP is isolating the electrochemical reactions that result from the application of high voltage for the actual process of isotachophoresis. The electrochemical reactions that occur around metal electrodes produce bubbles and pH changes that are detrimental to successful ITP. The design of the chips we use incorporates polyacrylamide gels to serve as electrodes along the central channel. For our design, the metal electrodes are located away from the chip, and high conductivity buffer streams carry the potential to the chip, functioning as a 'liquid electrode.' The stream then runs alongside a gel barrier. The gel electrode permits ion transfer while simultaneously isolating the separation chamber from any contaminants in the outer, 'liquid electrode' streams. The difference in potential from one side of the chip to the other creates an electric field. Thi

  8. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar

    PubMed Central

    Leite, D.C.A.; Balieiro, F.C.; Pires, C.A.; Madari, B.E.; Rosado, A.S.; Coutinho, H.L.C.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  9. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar.

    PubMed

    Leite, D C A; Balieiro, F C; Pires, C A; Madari, B E; Rosado, A S; Coutinho, H L C; Peixoto, R S

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  10. Single-molecule analysis of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts Hasan Yardimci a

    E-print Network

    Single-molecule analysis of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts Hasan Yardimci a , Anna B in a soluble Xenopus leavis egg extract replication system and subsequent visualization of replication products

  11. Human beta-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old.

    PubMed Central

    Béraud-Colomb, E; Roubin, R; Martin, J; Maroc, N; Gardeisen, A; Trabuchet, G; Goosséns, M

    1995-01-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the beta-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for beta-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT) chi (T) gamma microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the beta-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8533755

  12. Innovative Graphite Oxide-Cellulose Based Material Specific for Genomic DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-09-01

    Extraction of genomic DNA from various types of samples is often challenging for commercial silica spin column. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/cellulose composite as an alternative material for genomic DNA extraction. The purity of DNA and extraction efficiency were compared to that of commercial silica product. In this study, the total weight % of GO was fixed at 4.15% in GO/Cellulose composite. Chewed gum, nail clip, cigarette bud paper, animal tissue and hair sample were used as various genomic DNA sources for extraction experiments. Among all types of samples, the extraction efficiencies were 4 to 12 times higher than that of commercial silica spin column. The absorbance ratio of 260 nm to 280 nm (A260/A280) of all samples ranged between 1.6 and 2.0. The results demonstrated that GO/Cellulose composites might serve as an innovative solid support material for genomic DNA extraction.

  13. Innovative Graphite Oxide-Cellulose Based Material Specific for Genomic DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-11-01

    Extraction of genomic DNA from various types of samples is often challenging for commercial silica spin column. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/cellulose composite as an alternative material for genomic DNA extraction. The purity of DNA and extraction efficiency were compared to that of commercial silica product. In this study, the total weight % of GO was fixed at 4.15% in GO/Cellulose composite. Chewed gum, nail clip, cigarette bud paper, animal tissue and hair sample were used as various genomic DNA sources for extraction experiments. Among all types of samples, the extraction efficiencies were 4 to 12 times higher than that of commercial silica spin column. The absorbance ratio of 260 nm to 280 nm (A260/A280) of all samples ranged between 1.6 and 2.0. The results demonstrated that GO/Cellulose composites might serve as an innovative solid support material for genomic DNA extraction.

  14. Tenrec phylogeny and the noninvasive extraction of nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Asher, Robert J; Hofreiter, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Due in part to scarcity of material, no published study has yet cladistically addressed the systematics of living and fossil Tenrecidae (Mammalia, Afrotheria). Using a noninvasive technique for sampling nuclear DNA from museum specimens, we investigate the evolution of the Tenrecidae and assess the extent to which tenrecids fit patterns of relationships proposed for other terrestrial mammals on Madagascar. Application of several tree-reconstruction techniques on sequences of the nuclear growth hormone receptor gene and morphological data for all recognized tenrecid genera supports monophyly of Malagasy tenrecids to the exclusion of the two living African genera. However, both parsimony and Bayesian methods favor a close relationship between fossil African tenrecs and the Malagasy Geogale, supporting the hypothesis of island paraphyly, but not polyphyly. More generally, the noninvasive extraction technique can be applied with minimal risk to rare/unique specimens and, by better utilizing museum collections for genetic work, can greatly mitigate field expenses and disturbance of natural populations. PMID:16522569

  15. In situ 2D-extraction of DNA wheels by 3D through-solution transport.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Nakanishi, Waka; Kawamata, Ibuki; Minami, Kosuke; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Murata, Satoshi; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Controlled transfer of DNA nanowheels from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic surface was achieved by complexation of the nanowheels with a cationic lipid (2C12N(+)). 2D surface-assisted extraction, '2D-extraction', enabled structure-persistent transfer of DNA wheels, which could not be achieved by simple drop-casting. PMID:26583486

  16. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD FOR PCR IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGAL INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following air sampling, fungal DNA needs to be extracted and purified to a state suitable for laboratory use. Our laboratory has developed a simple method of extraction and purification of fungal DNA appropriate for enzymatic manipulation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) appli...

  17. DNA extraction protocols from dormant buds of twelve woody plant genera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard plant DNA extraction protocols call for samples of newly expanding leaves and shoots yet analysis is sometimes needed when plants are dormant. We evaluated three DNA extraction protocols using dormant buds from 40 species and four hybrids of 12 genera. Two protocols were from ready-to-use ...

  18. EFFECTIVE METHOD TO EXTRACT DNA FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES FOR POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AMPLIFICATION AND DNA FINGERPRINT ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid direct-extraction method was used to obtain DNA from environmental soil samples. eat, enzymes, and guanidine isothiocyanate were utilized to lyse cells. he DNA was purified by agarose gel electrophoresis, amplified with 16S based primers by use of the polymerase chain rea...

  19. Enhanced method for microbial community DNA extraction and purification from agricultural yellow loess soil.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Gim, Geun Ho; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Pyung Il; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Si Wouk

    2015-11-01

    In this study, novel DNA extraction and purification methods were developed to obtain high-quantity and reliable quality DNA from the microbial community of agricultural yellow loess soil samples. The efficiencies of five different soil DNAextraction protocols were evaluated on the basis of DNA yield, quality and DNA shearing. Our suggested extraction method, which used CTAB, EDTA and cell membrane lytic enzymes in the extraction followed by DNA precipitation using isopropanol, yielded a maximum DNA content of 42.28 ± 5.59 µg/g soil. In addition, among the five different purification protocols, the acid-treated polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP) spin column purification method yielded high-quality DNA and recovered 91% of DNA from the crude DNA. Spectrophotometry revealed that the ultraviolet A 260/A 230 and A 260/A 280 absorbance ratios of the purified DNA were 1.82 ± 0.03 and 1.94 ± 0.05, respectively. PCR-based 16S rRNA amplification showed clear bands at ~1.5 kb with acid-treated PVPP-purified DNA templates. In conclusion, our suggested extraction and purification protocols can be used to recover high concentration, high purity, and high-molecular-weight DNA from clay and silica-rich agricultural soil samples. PMID:26502961

  20. DNA Extraction 5th Grade Physical Science Standard 1.1

    E-print Network

    DNA Extraction 5th Grade Physical Science Standard 1.1 Concepts and Skills: Mixtures of matter can don't mix. 5. Gently pull DNA strands from the bottom solution into the isopropanol with a stir rod. DNA should precipitate into fine white strands that look like cotton candy. What is happening? Mashing

  1. DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    E-print Network

    DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts Ronald Lebofsky1 , Antoine M a physiological mechanism, and thus represent a powerful system to understand vertebrate DNA replication. Surprisingly, DNA repli- cation in this system is highly sensitive to plasmid concentration, being undetectable

  2. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. PMID:24834966

  3. Extracting Strawberry DNA Adapted from http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Education/Modules/StrawberryExtractionInstructions.pdf

    E-print Network

    Gruber, Jonathan

    Extracting Strawberry DNA Adapted from http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Education/Modules/StrawberryExtractionInstructions.pdf for a group of 5 students with an adult moderator Strawberries have enormous genomes. Humans have two copies of the cell. Strawberries have up to eight copies of each chromosome (octoploid genome). Today, we

  4. Extraction of inhibitor-free metagenomic DNA from polluted sediments, compatible with molecular diversity analysis using adsorption and ion-exchange treatments.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirayu; Madamwar, Datta

    2007-03-01

    PCR inhibitor-free metagenomic DNA of high quality and high yield was extracted from highly polluted sediments using a simple remediation strategy of adsorption and ion-exchange chromatography. Extraction procedure was optimized with series of steps, which involved gentle mechanical lysis, treatment with powdered activated charcoal (PAC) and ion-exchange chromatography with amberlite resin. Quality of the extracted DNA for molecular diversity analysis was tested by amplifying bacterial 16S rDNA (16S rRNA gene) with eubacterial specific universal primers (8f and 1492r), cloning of the amplified 16S rDNA and ARDRA (amplified rDNA restriction analysis) of the 16S rDNA clones. The presence of discrete differences in ARDRA banding profiles provided evidence for expediency of the DNA extraction protocol in molecular diversity studies. A comparison of the optimized protocol with commercial Ultraclean Soil DNA isolation kit suggested that method described in this report would be more efficient in removing metallic and organic inhibitors, from polluted sediment samples. PMID:16806911

  5. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for the detection of Cytomegalovirus in dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Koontz, D.; Baecher, K.; Amin, M.; Nikolova, S.; Gallagher, M.; Dollard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dried blood spots (DBS) are collected universally from newborns and may be valuable for the diagnosis of congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. The reported analytical sensitivity for DBS testing compared to urine or saliva varies greatly across CMV studies. The purpose of this study was to directly compare the performance of various DNA extraction methods for identification of CMV in DBS including those used most often in CMV studies. Study design Whatman® Grade 903 filter paper cards were spotted with blood samples from 25 organ transplant recipients who had confirmed CMV viremia. Six DNA extraction methods were compared for relative yield of viral and cellular DNA: 2 manual solution-based methods (Gentra Puregene, thermal shock), 2 manual silica column-based methods (QIAamp DNA Mini, QIAamp DNA Investigator), and 2 automated methods (M48 MagAttract Mini, QIAcube Investigator). DBS extractions were performed in triplicate followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results For extraction of both viral and cellular DNA, two methods (QIAamp DNA Investigator and thermal shock) consistently gave the highest yields, and two methods (M48 MagAttract Mini and QIAamp DNA Mini) consistently gave the lowest yields. There was an average 3-fold difference in DNA yield between the highest and lowest yield methods. Conclusion The choice of DNA extraction method is a major factor in the ability to detect low levels of CMV in DBS and can largely account for the wide range of DBS sensitivities reported in studies to date. PMID:25866346

  6. Specific requirement for ATP at an early step of in vitro transcription of human mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, N.; Attardi, G.

    1987-06-01

    The ATP concentrations allowing transcription of heavy- and light-strand of human mtDNA in a HeLa cell mitochrondrial lysate were found to cover a broad range, with a maximum around 2.5 mM, and with reproducible differences in the ATP response curves for the two transcription events. Direct measurements showed that nonspecific ATP degradation during the assay did not account for the high ATP requirement. 5'-Adenylyl imidodiphosphate (p(NH)ppA), an ATP analog with a nonhydrolyzable ..beta..-..gamma.. bond, was unable to substitute for ATP in supporting mtDNA transcription but greatly stimulated this transcription in the presence of a low concentration of exogenous APT, measured with (/sup 32/P)-labeled nucleotides. Evidence was obtained indicating that p(NH)ppA did not support an early event in mtDNA transcription (formation of preinitiation complex or initiation), whereas this analog could substitute effectively for ATP in the subsequent elongation steps. These results pointed to a specific requirement for ATP at an early step of the transcription process.

  7. Effect of DNA extraction procedure, repeated extraction and ethidium monoazide (EMA)/propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment on overall DNA yield and impact on microbial fingerprints for bacteria, fungi and archaea in a reference soil

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas O.; Praeg, Nadine; Reitschuler, Christoph; Illmer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Different DNA extraction protocols were evaluated on a reference soil. A wide difference was found in the total extractable DNA as derived from different extraction protocols. Concerning the DNA yield phenol–chloroform–isomyl alcohol extraction resulted in high DNA yield but also in a remarkable co-extraction of contaminants making PCR from undiluted DNA extracts impossible. By comparison of two different extraction kits, the Macherey&Nagel SoilExtract II kit resulted in the highest DNA yields when buffer SL1 and the enhancer solution were applied. The enhancer solution not only significantly increased the DNA yield but also the amount of co-extracted contaminates, whereas additional disintegration strategies did not. Although a three times repeated DNA extraction increased the total amount of extracted DNA, microbial fingerprints were merely affected. However, with the 5th extraction this changed. A reduction of total DGGE band numbers was observed for archaea and fungi, whereas for bacteria the diversity increased. The application of ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment aiming on the selective removal of soil DNA derived from cells lacking cell wall integrity resulted in a significant reduction of total extracted DNA, however, the hypothesized effect on microbial fingerprints failed to appear indicating the need for further investigations. PMID:26339125

  8. Modification of a commercial DNA extraction kit for safe and rapid recovery of DNA and RNA simultaneously from soil, without the use of harmful solvents

    PubMed Central

    Tournier, E.; Amenc, L.; Pablo, A.L.; Legname, E.; Blanchart, E.; Plassard, C.; Robin, A.; Bernard, L.

    2015-01-01

    An optimized method, based on the coupling of two commercial kits, is described for the extraction of soil nucleic acids, with simultaneous extraction and purification of DNA and RNA following a cascade scheme and avoiding the use of harmful solvents. The protocol canmonitor the variations in the recovery yield of DNA and RNA from soils of various types.The quantitative version of the protocol was obtained by testing the starting soil quantity, the grinding parameters and the final elution volumes, in order to avoid saturation of both kits. • A first soil-crushing step in liquid nitrogen could be added for the assessment of fungal parameters. • The protocol was efficienton different tropical soils, including Andosol, while their high contents of clays, including poorly crystalline clays, and Fe and Al oxides usually make the nucleic acid extraction more difficult. • The RNA recovery yield from the previous tropical soils appeared to correlate better to soil respiration than DNA, which is positively influenced by soil clay content. PMID:26150987

  9. Replication of purified DNA in Xenopus egg extract is dependent on nuclear J. JULIAN BLOW1

    E-print Network

    Blow, J. Julian

    Replication of purified DNA in Xenopus egg extract is dependent on nuclear assembly J. JULIAN BLOW1 round of semicon- servative replication when incubated in extracts of Xenopus eggs. These extracts also. In this paper we show that although replication takes

  10. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA from mature rice kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few RNA extraction protocols or commercial kits work well with the starchy endosperm of cereal grains. Standard RNA extraction protocols are time consuming, use large amounts of expensive chemicals, and leave behind hazardous wastes. However, there are numerous commercial DNA extraction kits that ...

  11. Sequential steps in DNA replication are inhibited to ensure reduction of ploidy in meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hui; Namdar, Mandana; Ganier, Olivier; Gregan, Juraj; Méchali, Marcel; Kearsey, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis involves two successive rounds of chromosome segregation without an intervening S phase. Exit from meiosis I is distinct from mitotic exit, in that replication origins are not licensed by Mcm2-7 chromatin binding, but spindle disassembly occurs during a transient interphase-like state before meiosis II. The absence of licensing is assumed to explain the block to DNA replication, but this has not been formally tested. Here we attempt to subvert this block by expressing the licensing control factors Cdc18 and Cdt1 during the interval between meiotic nuclear divisions. Surprisingly, this leads only to a partial round of DNA replication, even when these factors are overexpressed and effect clear Mcm2-7 chromatin binding. Combining Cdc18 and Cdt1 expression with modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase activity, activation of Dbf4-dependent kinase, or deletion of the Spd1 inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase has little additional effect on the extent of DNA replication. Single-molecule analysis indicates this partial round of replication results from inefficient progression of replication forks, and thus both initiation and elongation replication steps may be inhibited in late meiosis. In addition, DNA replication or damage during the meiosis I–II interval fails to arrest meiotic progress, suggesting absence of checkpoint regulation of meiosis II entry. PMID:23303250

  12. Rapid and reliable method of extracting DNA and RNA from sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L). Lam.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hyung; Hamada, Tatsuro

    2005-12-01

    A quick, simple and reliable method of extracting DNA from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) has been developed. The method was applied successfully for extraction of total DNA from leaves and total RNA from leaves and various tissues. The yield of DNA extracted by this procedure was high (about 1 mg/g leaf tissue). The extracted DNA was completely digested by restriction endonucleases indicating the absence of common contaminating compounds. The absorbancy ratios of A260/A230 and A260/A280 of isolated RNA were approx. 2 and the yield was about 0.2 mg/g fresh wt. CIPK and tublin genes were successfully amplified by RT-PCR, suggesting the integrity of isolated RNA. The total DNA and RNA isolated by this method was of sufficient quality for subsequent molecular analysis. PMID:16328977

  13. EVALUATION OF FOUR DIFFERENT DNA EXTRACTION METHODS IN COAGULASE-NEGATIVE STAPHYLOCOCCI CLINICAL ISOLATES

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Caio Fernando; Paim, Thiago Galvão da Silva; Reiter, Keli Cristine; Rieger, Alexandre; D'azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are several methods to extract bacterial DNA based on different principles. However, the amount and the quality of the DNA obtained by each one of those methods is highly variable and microorganism dependent, as illustrated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) which have a thick cell wall that is difficult to lyse. This study was designed to compare the quality and the amount of CoNS DNA, extracted by four different techniques: two in-house protocols and two commercial kits. DNA amount and quality determination was performed through spectrophotometry. The extracted DNA was also analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis and by PCR. 267 isolates of CoNS were used in this study. The column method and thermal lyses showed better results with regard to DNA quality (mean ratio of A260/280 = 1.95) and average concentration of DNA (), respectively. All four methods tested provided appropriate DNA for PCR amplification, but with different yields. DNA quality is important since it allows the application of a large number of molecular biology techniques, and also it's storage for a longer period of time. In this sense the extraction method based on an extraction column presented the best results for CoNS. PMID:24553605

  14. Use of magnetic beads for tissue DNA extraction and IS6110 Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Caldarelli-Stefano, R; Vago, L; Bonetto, S; Nebuloni, M; Costanzi, G

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are used increasingly for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and can be used on the DNA obtained from both frozen and formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues. However, the extraction of DNA by means of the conventional phenol/chloroform method is time consuming and requires the use of potentially dangerous chemical reagents. This paper describes a method based upon the use of magnetic beads for the extraction of M tuberculosis DNA from both routinely formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues and frozen tissues. Magnetic bead extracted DNA from brain, lymph node, and lung tissues collected from patients with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis was compared with that extracted using the phenol/chloroform method. The magnetic bead extraction procedure requires less than two hours, including the time necessary to dewax the tissue sections. In all cases, the DNA extracted with both methods was amplified successfully by PCR for the M tuberculosis IS6110 sequence. Magnetic bead DNA extraction can be used on both frozen and archival tissues: the method is reliable, simple, sensitive, and rapid; in addition, it does not use hazardous procedures or specialised laboratory equipment and can be used for routine DNA isolation from various human tissues. PMID:10621838

  15. Use of magnetic beads for tissue DNA extraction and IS6110 Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR.

    PubMed

    Caldarelli-Stefano, R; Vago, L; Bonetto, S; Nebuloni, M; Costanzi, G

    1999-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are used increasingly for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and can be used on the DNA obtained from both frozen and formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues. However, the extraction of DNA by means of the conventional phenol/chloroform method is time consuming and requires the use of potentially dangerous chemical reagents. This paper describes a method based upon the use of magnetic beads for the extraction of M tuberculosis DNA from both routinely formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues and frozen tissues. Magnetic bead extracted DNA from brain, lymph node, and lung tissues collected from patients with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis was compared with that extracted using the phenol/chloroform method. The magnetic bead extraction procedure requires less than two hours, including the time necessary to dewax the tissue sections. In all cases, the DNA extracted with both methods was amplified successfully by PCR for the M tuberculosis IS6110 sequence. Magnetic bead DNA extraction can be used on both frozen and archival tissues: the method is reliable, simple, sensitive, and rapid; in addition, it does not use hazardous procedures or specialised laboratory equipment and can be used for routine DNA isolation from various human tissues. PMID:10621838

  16. A ruthenium dimer complex with a flexible linker slowly threads between DNA bases in two distinct steps

    PubMed Central

    Bahira, Meriem; McCauley, Micah J.; Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Lincoln, Per; Westerlund, Fredrik; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Several multi-component DNA intercalating small molecules have been designed around ruthenium-based intercalating monomers to optimize DNA binding properties for therapeutic use. Here we probe the DNA binding ligand [?-C4(cpdppz)2(phen)4Ru2]4+, which consists of two Ru(phen)2dppz2+ moieties joined by a flexible linker. To quantify ligand binding, double-stranded DNA is stretched with optical tweezers and exposed to ligand under constant applied force. In contrast to other bis-intercalators, we find that ligand association is described by a two-step process, which consists of fast bimolecular intercalation of the first dppz moiety followed by ?10-fold slower intercalation of the second dppz moiety. The second step is rate-limited by the requirement for a DNA-ligand conformational change that allows the flexible linker to pass through the DNA duplex. Based on our measured force-dependent binding rates and ligand-induced DNA elongation measurements, we are able to map out the energy landscape and structural dynamics for both ligand binding steps. In addition, we find that at zero force the overall binding process involves fast association (?10 s), slow dissociation (?300 s), and very high affinity (Kd ?10 nM). The methodology developed in this work will be useful for studying the mechanism of DNA binding by other multi-step intercalating ligands and proteins. PMID:26365236

  17. A ruthenium dimer complex with a flexible linker slowly threads between DNA bases in two distinct steps.

    PubMed

    Bahira, Meriem; McCauley, Micah J; Almaqwashi, Ali A; Lincoln, Per; Westerlund, Fredrik; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C

    2015-10-15

    Several multi-component DNA intercalating small molecules have been designed around ruthenium-based intercalating monomers to optimize DNA binding properties for therapeutic use. Here we probe the DNA binding ligand [?-C4(cpdppz)2(phen)4Ru2](4+), which consists of two Ru(phen)2dppz(2+) moieties joined by a flexible linker. To quantify ligand binding, double-stranded DNA is stretched with optical tweezers and exposed to ligand under constant applied force. In contrast to other bis-intercalators, we find that ligand association is described by a two-step process, which consists of fast bimolecular intercalation of the first dppz moiety followed by ?10-fold slower intercalation of the second dppz moiety. The second step is rate-limited by the requirement for a DNA-ligand conformational change that allows the flexible linker to pass through the DNA duplex. Based on our measured force-dependent binding rates and ligand-induced DNA elongation measurements, we are able to map out the energy landscape and structural dynamics for both ligand binding steps. In addition, we find that at zero force the overall binding process involves fast association (?10 s), slow dissociation (?300 s), and very high affinity (Kd ?10 nM). The methodology developed in this work will be useful for studying the mechanism of DNA binding by other multi-step intercalating ligands and proteins. PMID:26365236

  18. DNA extract characterization process for microbial detection methods development and validation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays used in pathogen detection require rigorous methods development including characterizing DNA extraction products. A DNA extract characterization process is demonstrated using DNA extracted from five different cells types (two Gram-negatives: Escherichia coli, and Burkholderia thailandensis, spores and vegetative cells from the Gram-positive Bacillus cereus, and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with six different methods. Results DNA extract quantity (concentration and extraction efficiency) and quality (purity and intactness) varied by cell type and extraction method enabling the demonstration of different DNA characterization methods. DNA purity was measured using UV spectroscopy, where the A260/A280 and A260/A230 ratios are indicators of different contaminants. Reproducibility of UV spectroscopy measurements decreased for DNA concentrations less than 17.5 ng/?L. Forty-seven extracts had concentrations greater than 17.5 ng/?L, 25 had A260/A280 above 2.0, and 28 had A260/A230 ratios below 1.8 indicating RNA and polysaccharide contamination respectively. Based on a qPCR inhibition assay the contaminants did not inhibit PCR. Extract intactness was evaluated using microfluidic gel electrophoresis. Thirty-five samples had concentrations above the limit of quantification (LOQ, roughly 11 ng/ ?L), 93.5% of the DNA was larger than 1kb and 1% was smaller than 300 bp. Extract concentrations ranged from 1502.2 ng/?L to below the LOQ when UV spectroscopy, fluorometry, and qPCR were used. LOQ for UV spectroscopic and fluorometric measurements were 3.5 ng/?L and 0.25 ng/?L respectively. The qPCR LOQ varied by cell type (5.72?×?10-3 ng/?L for E. coli, 2.66?×?10-3 ng/?L, for B. cereus, 3.78?×?10-3 ng/?L for B. thailandensis, and 7.67?×?10-4 ng/?L for S. cerevisiae). A number of samples were below the UV spectroscopy (n?=?27), flurometry (n?=?15), and qPCR (n?=?3) LOQ. Conclusion The presented DNA extract characterization process provides measures of DNA quantity and quality applicable to microbial detection methods development and validation studies. Evaluating DNA quality and quantity results in a better understanding of process LOD and contributing factors to suboptimal assay performance. The samples used demonstrated the use of different DNA characterization methods presented but did not encompass the full range of DNA extract characteristics. PMID:23206278

  19. Evaluating DNA Extraction Methods for Community Profiling of Pig Hindgut Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Hugenholtz, Philip; Batstone, Damien John

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of high quality PCR-amplifiable DNA has been the general minimal requirement for DNA extraction methods for bulk molecular analysis. However, modern high through-put community profiling technologies are more sensitive to representativeness and reproducibility of DNA extraction method. Here, we assess the impact of three DNA extraction methods (with different levels of extraction harshness) for assessing hindgut microbiomes from pigs fed with different diets (with different physical properties). DNA extraction from each sample was performed in three technical replicates for each extraction method and sequenced by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Host was the primary driver of molecular sequencing outcomes, particularly on samples analysed by wheat based diets, but higher variability, with one failed extraction occurred on samples from a barley fed pig. Based on these results, an effective method will enable reproducible and quality outcomes on a range of samples, whereas an ineffective method will fail to generate extract, but host (rather than extraction method) remains the primary factor. PMID:26560873

  20. DNA Extraction Protocol for Biological Ingredient Analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinwei; Chen, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Huanxin; Han, Maozhen; Bo, Cunpei; Xu, Jian; Bai, Hong; Ning, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW), as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method (TCM-CTAB) and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3–4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations. PMID:24838067

  1. DNA extraction protocol for biological ingredient analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinwei; Chen, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Huanxin; Han, Maozhen; Bo, Cunpei; Xu, Jian; Bai, Hong; Ning, Kang

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW), as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method (TCM-CTAB) and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3-4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations. PMID:24838067

  2. Viscum album L. Extracts Protects HeLa Cells against Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Onay-Uçar, Evren; Erol, Ozlem; Kandemir, Ba?ak; Merto?lu, Elif; Karagöz, Ali; Arda, Nazl?

    2012-01-01

    Viscum album L. is a semiparasitic plant grown on trees and widely used for the treatment of many diseases in traditional and complementary therapy. It is well known that some activities of Viscum album extracts are varied depending on the host trees, such as antioxidant, apoptosis-inducing, anticancer activities of the plant. The aim of the present study is to examine the comparative effects of methanolic extracts of V. album grown on three different host trees (locust tree, lime tree, and hedge maple tree) on H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage in HeLa cells. Oxidative damage in mitochondrial DNA and two nuclear regions was assessed by QPCR assay. The cells were pretreated with methanolic extracts (10??g/mL) for 48?h, followed by the treatment with 750??M H(2)O(2) for 1 hour. DNA damage was significantly induced by H(2)O(2) while it was inhibited by V. album extracts. All extracts completely protected against nuclear DNA damage. While the extract from lime tree or white locust tree entirely inhibited mitochondrial DNA damage, that from hedge maple tree inhibited by only 50%. These results suggest that methanolic extracts of V. album can prevent oxidative DNA damage, and the activity is dependent on the host tree. PMID:22988477

  3. DNA extraction from plant food supplements: Influence of different pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Amaral, Joana S; Fernandes, Telmo J R; Batista, Andreia; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    The consumption of plant food supplements (PFS) has been growing globally, with an increase of misleading labeling and fraudulent practices also being reported. Recently, the use of molecular biology techniques has been proposed to detect botanical adulterations, one of the possible frauds in PFS. However, difficulties in recovering DNA from some PFS samples have been described. Aiming at using DNA-based methods for the unequivocal identification of plant species in PFS, adequate DNA isolation is required. However, PFS often contain pharmaceutical excipients known to have adsorbent properties that might interfere with DNA extraction. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the effect of different excipients (talc, silica, iron oxide and titanium dioxide) on the recovery/amplification of DNA. For that purpose, known amounts of template maize DNA were spiked either to PFS or to model mixtures of excipients and quantified by real-time PCR. The tested excipients evidenced clear adsorption phenomena that justify the hampering effect on DNA extraction from PFS. The use of either 10% talc or 0.5% dyes completely adsorbed DNA, resulting in negative PCR amplifications. For the first time, pharmaceutical excipients were shown to affect DNA extraction explaining the inability of recovering DNA from some PFS samples in previous studies. PMID:26079045

  4. A SIMPLE VERSATILE HIGH THROUPHPUT DNA EXTRACTION METHOD SUITABLE FOR PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR has become the most popular technique in functional genomics. Both forward and reverse genetic projects routinely require PCR amplification of thousands of samples. Processing the samples for DNA suitable for PCR is usually the limiting step. We have developed a simple high throughput DNA extra...

  5. Evaluation of extraction and purification methods for obtaining PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost

    E-print Network

    Michel Jr., Frederick C.

    Evaluation of extraction and purification methods for obtaining PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost complicate the isolation of PCR- amplifiable DNA from compost and other organic-rich samples. In this study contamination, PCR amplifiability, and microbial community structure assessed by terminal restriction fragment

  6. Magnetic ionic liquids as PCR-compatible solvents for DNA extraction from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin D; Yamsek, Melissa M; Nacham, Omprakash; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-12-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer was systematically designed to relieve the inhibition caused by hydrophobic magnetic ionic liquids (MILs). We describe a simple, rapid method for MIL-based plasmid DNA extraction from crude bacterial cell lysate in which DNA-enriched MIL is transferred directly to a PCR tube for analysis. PMID:26434366

  7. EXTRACTION OF HIGH QUALITY GENOMIC DNA FROM LATEX-CONTAINING PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The isolation of intact, high molecular mass genomic DNA is essential for many molecular biology applications including long PCR, endonuclease restriction digestion, Southern blot analysis and genomic library construction. Many protocols are available for the extraction of DNA from plant material. H...

  8. Comparison of six extraction techniques for isolation of DNA from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    van Burik, J A; Schreckhise, R W; White, T C; Bowden, R A; Myerson, D

    1998-10-01

    Filamentous fungi have a sturdy cell wall which is resistant to the usual DNA extraction procedures. We determined the DNA extraction procedure with the greatest yield of high quality fungal DNA and the least predilection for cross-contamination of equipment between specimens. Each of six extraction methods was performed using Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae. The six methods were: (1) glass bead pulverization with vortexing; (2) grinding with mortar and pestle followed by glass bead pulverization; (3) glass bead pulverization using 1% hydroxyacetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) buffer in a water bath sonicator; (4) water bath sonication in CTAB buffer; (5) grinding followed by incubation with CTAB; and (6) lyticase enzymatic cell lysis. Genomic DNA yields were measured by spectrophotometry and by visual reading of 2% agarose gels, with shearing assessed by the migration of the DNA on the gel. Genomic fungal DNA yields were highest for Method 1, followed by Methods 5 approximately = to 2 >3 approximately = to 4 approximately = to 6. Methods 2 and 5, both of which involved grinding with mortar and pestle, led to shearing of the genomic DNA in one of two trials each. We conclude that the use of glass beads with extended vortexing is optimal for extraction of microgramme amounts of DNA from filamentous fungal cultures. PMID:10075499

  9. Water extracts of tree Hypericum sps. protect DNA from oxidative and alkylating damage and enhance DNA repair in colon cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Marques, Filipe; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Diet may induce colon carcinogenesis through oxidative or alkylating DNA damage. However, diet may also contain anticarcinogenic compounds that contribute to cancer prevention. DNA damage prevention and/or induction of repair are two important mechanisms involved in cancer chemoprevention by dietary compounds. Hypericum sps. are widely used in traditional medicine to prepare infusions due to their beneficial digestive and neurologic effects. In this study, we investigated the potential of water extracts from three Hypericum sps. and some of their main phenolic compounds to prevent and repair oxidative and alkylating DNA damage in colon cells. The results showed that water extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum androsaemum, Hypericum undulatum, quercetin and rutin have protective effect against oxidative DNA damage in HT29 cells. Protective effect was also observed against alkylating DNA damage induced by methyl-methanesulfonate, except for H. androsaemum. With regard to alkylating damage repair H. perforatum, H. androsaemum and chlorogenic acid increased repair of alkylating DNA damage by base excision repair pathway. No effect was observed on nucleotide excision repair pathway. Antigenotoxic effects of Hypericum sps. may contribute to colon cancer prevention and the high amount of phenolic compounds present in Hypericum sps. play an important role in DNA protective effects. PMID:23000446

  10. Comparison of DNA extraction methodologies used for assessing fungal diversity via ITS sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rittenour, William R.; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cox-Ganser, Jean M.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Green, Brett J.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods of assessing fungal exposure have been confounded by a number of limiting variables. The recent utilization of molecular methods such as internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes has provided improved insight into the diversity of fungal bioaerosols in indoor, outdoor and occupational environments. However, ITS analyses may also be confounded by a number of methodological limitations. In this study, we have optimized this technology for use in occupational or environmental studies. Three commonly used DNA extraction methodologies (UltraClean Soil kit, High Pure PCR Template kit, and EluQuik/DNeasy kit) were compared in terms of sensitivity and susceptibility to PCR inhibitors in dust for three common fungal bioaerosols, Aspergillus versicolor, Rhizopus microsporus and Wallemia sebi. Environmental dust samples were then studied using each extraction methodology and results were compared to viable culture data. The extraction methods differed in terms of their ability to efficiently extract DNA from particular species of fungi (e.g. Aspergillus versicolor). In addition, the ability to remove PCR inhibitors from dust samples was most effective using the soil DNA extraction kit. The species composition varied greatly between ITS clone libraries generated with the different DNA extraction kits. However, compared to viable culture data, ITS clone libraries included additional fungal species that are incapable of growth on solid culture medium. Collectively, our data indicated that DNA extraction methodologies used in ITS sequencing studies of occupational or environmental dust samples can greatly influence the fungal species that are detected. PMID:22230933

  11. Highly efficient automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Zupani? Pajni?, Irena; Debska, Magdalena; Gornjak Pogorelc, Barbara; Vodopivec Mohor?i?, Katja; Balažic, Jože; Zupanc, Tomaž; Štefani?, Borut; Geršak, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    We optimised the automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains using the AutoMate Express system and the PrepFiler BTA kit. 24 Contemporary and 25 old skeletal remains from WWII were analysed. For each skeleton, extraction using only 0.05 g of powder was performed according to the manufacturer's recommendations (no demineralisation - ND method). Since only 32% of full profiles were obtained from aged and 58% from contemporary casework skeletons, the extraction protocol was modified to acquire higher quality DNA and genomic DNA was obtained after full demineralisation (FD method). The nuclear DNA of the samples was quantified using the Investigator Quantiplex kit and STR typing was performed using the NGM kit to evaluate the performance of tested extraction methods. In the aged DNA samples, 64% of full profiles were obtained using the FD method. For the contemporary skeletal remains the performance of the ND method was closer to the FD method compared to the old skeletons, giving 58% of full profiles with the ND method and 71% of full profiles using the FD method. The extraction of DNA from only 0.05 g of bone or tooth powder using the AutoMate Express has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA from old and contemporary skeletons, especially with the modified FD method. We believe that the results obtained will contribute to the possibilities of using automated devices for extracting DNA from skeletal remains, which would shorten the procedures for obtaining high-quality DNA from skeletons in forensic laboratories. PMID:26615474

  12. The validation of forensic DNA extraction systems to utilize soil contaminated biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kasu, Mohaimin; Shires, Karen

    2015-07-01

    The production of full DNA profiles from biological evidence found in soil has a high failure rate due largely to the inhibitory substance humic acid (HA). Abundant in various natural soils, HA co-extracts with DNA during extraction and inhibits DNA profiling by binding to the molecular components of the genotyping assay. To successfully utilize traces of soil contaminated evidence, such as that found at many murder and rape crime scenes in South Africa, a reliable HA removal extraction system would often be selected based on previous validation studies. However, for many standard forensic DNA extraction systems, peer-reviewed publications detailing the efficacy on soil evidence is either lacking or is incomplete. Consequently, these sample types are often not collected or fail to yield suitable DNA material due to the use of unsuitable methodology. The aim of this study was to validate the common forensic DNA collection and extraction systems used in South Africa, namely DNA IQ, FTA elute and Nucleosave for processing blood and saliva contaminated with HA. A forensic appropriate volume of biological evidence was spiked with HA (0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/ml) and processed through each extraction protocol for the evaluation of HA removal using QPCR and STR-genotyping. The DNA IQ magnetic bead system effectively removed HA from highly contaminated blood and saliva, and generated consistently acceptable STR profiles from both artificially spiked samples and crude soil samples. This system is highly recommended for use on soil-contaminated evidence over the cellulose card-based systems currently being preferentially used for DNA sample collection. PMID:25690910

  13. Three step purification of C1q by DNA precipitation, ion exchange and lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rhen, M; Linder, E

    1982-10-01

    The difficulties associated with the isolation of pure C1q in sufficient amounts are reflected by the substantial number of isolation procedures, which are being published. The two major problems are a low yield and contaminating immunoglobulins. In addition, some isolation protocols appear to produce C1q contaminated with an inhibitor (C1q-INH). The present isolation protocol involves precipitation of C1q by DNA, chromatography using Sephadex QAE A 50 followed by Con A affinity chromatography. By this combination of purification steps maximal advantage was taken of the cationic properties and high carbohydrate content of the C1q molecule. The yield was 1-2 mg C1q per 100 ml serum. The isolated C1q was free of any demonstrable contaminants as demonstrated by Ouchterlony double diffusion and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PMID:6982284

  14. Antioxidant, DNA protective efficacy and HPLC analysis of Annona muricata (soursop) extracts.

    PubMed

    George, V Cijo; Kumar, D R Naveen; Suresh, P K; Kumar, R Ashok

    2015-04-01

    Annona muricata is a naturally occurring edible plant with wide array of therapeutic potentials. In India, it has a long history of traditional use in treating various ailments. The present investigation was carried out to characterize the phytochemicals present in the methanolic and aqueous leaf extracts of A. muricata, followed by validation of its radical scavenging and DNA protection activities. The extracts were also analyzed for its total phenolic contents and subjected to HPLC analysis to determine its active metabolites. The radical scavenging activities were premeditated by various complementary assays (DRSA, FRAP and HRSA). Further, its DNA protection efficacy against H2O2 induced toxicity was evaluated using pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results revealed that the extracts were highly rich in various phytochemicals including luteolin, homoorientin, tangeretin, quercetin, daidzein, epicatechin gallate, emodin and coumaric acid. Both the extracts showed significant (p?extract demonstrated improved protection against H2O2-induced DNA damage when compared to aqueous extract. A strong positive correlation was observed for the estimated total phenolic contents and radical scavenging potentials of the extracts. Further HPLC analysis of the phyto-constituents of the extracts provides a sound scientific basis for compound isolation. PMID:25829616

  15. Effect of DNA Extraction Method on the Apparent Microbial Diversity of Soil? †

    PubMed Central

    ?nceo?lu, Özgül; Hoogwout, Eelco F.; Hill, Patrick; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Four extraction methods, including a novel one, were compared for their efficiencies in producing DNA from three contrasting agricultural soils. Molecular analyses (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis [DGGE] and clone libraries) focusing on different microbial groups were used as assessment criteria. Per soil, the DNA yields differed between extraction methods. Clear effects of method on apparent richness and community structure were found. Actinobacterial diversity based on soil DNA produced by two divergent methods revealed that a hitherto-undescribed group was obtained by the novel method. PMID:20348306

  16. Evaluation of different DNA extraction procedures for the detection of Salmonella from chicken products by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Soumet, C; Ermel, G; Fach, P; Colin, P

    1994-11-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used after a short pre-enrichment culture to detect Salmonella subspecies in chicken fillets. A direct PCR assay performed with chicken meat inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium produced no PCR products. Six different DNA extraction protocols were tested to recover efficiently Salmonella DNA after a short incubation period. Three of them gave results that were reliable, rapid and sensitive. Successful protocols used Proteinase K and/or a centrifugation step to concentrate the samples. For reliable detection of Salmonella subspecies, a few thousand bacterial cells per ml must be present. To obtain this number of bacterial cells with an inoculation of about one cell in 25 g of ionized food products, it was necessary to incubate samples for at least 10 h before PCR. A larger inoculum of approximately 10 cells in 25 g of ionized food products, required 8 h in culture broth to give positive results by PCR-based assay. PMID:7765440

  17. Comparison of three DNA extraction kits to establish maximum yield and quality of coral-associated microbial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Erin J.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Coral microbiology is an expanding field, yet there is no standard DNA extraction protocol. Although many researchers depend on commercial extraction kits, no specific kit has been optimized for use with coral samples. Both soil and plant DNA extraction kits from MO BIO Laboratories, Inc., have been used by many research groups for this purpose. MO BIO recently replaced their PowerPlant® kit with an improved PowerPlantPro kit, but it was unclear how these changes would affect the kit’s use with coral samples. In order to determine which kit produced the best results, we conducted a comparison between the original PowerPlant kit, the new PowerPlantPro kit, and an alternative kit, PowerSoil, using samples from several different coral genera. The PowerPlantPro kit had the highest DNA yields, but the lack of 16S rRNA gene amplification in many samples suggests that much of the yield may be coral DNA rather than microbial DNA. The most consistent positive amplifications came from the PowerSoil kit.

  18. A Rapid and Economical Method for Efficient DNA Extraction from Diverse Soils Suitable for Metagenomic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Radha, Sudhakar; Arunraj, Rex; Curtis, Wayne R.; Ramya, Mohandass

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost effective method of metagenomic DNA extraction from soil is a useful tool for environmental microbiology. The present work describes an improved method of DNA extraction namely “powdered glass method” from diverse soils. The method involves the use of sterile glass powder for cell lysis followed by addition of 1% powdered activated charcoal (PAC) as purifying agent to remove humic substances. The method yielded substantial DNA (5.87 ± 0.04 ?g/g of soil) with high purity (A260/280: 1.76 ± 0.05) and reduced humic substances (A340: 0.047 ± 0.03). The quality of the extracted DNA was compared against five different methods based on 16S rDNA PCR amplification, BamHI digestion and validated using quantitative PCR. The digested DNA was used for a metagenomic library construction with the transformation efficiency of 4 X 106 CFU mL-1. Besides providing rapid, efficient and economical extraction of metgenomic DNA from diverse soils, this method’s applicability is also demonstrated for cultivated organisms (Gram positive B. subtilis NRRL-B-201, Gram negative E. coli MTCC40, and a microalgae C. sorokiniana UTEX#1666). PMID:26167854

  19. An optimized DNA extraction and purification method from dairy manure compost for genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Zhang, Zhenhua; Liu, Dongyang; Zhou, Tiantian; Shen, Qirong; Shen, Biao

    2013-05-01

    An unbiased DNA extraction protocol is necessary for analysis of genetic diversity, particularly, of genes in complex environmental samples by nucleic acid techniques. In the present study, three manual extraction methods and two commonly used commercial kits, which were accompanied by two DNA purification strategies, were compared based on cell lysis efficiency, DNA and humic acid yields, PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The results show that in spite of higher cell lysis efficiencies of the two commercial kits, the purified DNA yields were only one-third of that obtained by the two manual methods of FTSP (Freeze-thaw-SDS-Protein K) and FTSPP (Freeze-thaw-SDS-Protein K-Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone). The purified DNA from all five methods was pure enough for successful PCR and real-time PCR amplifications in the presence of 1 ?g ?L(-1) BSA. However, the FTSPP extraction method with DNA purification by a Wizard(®) kit yielded the largest number of 16S rRNA gene copies and ribotypes or bands in DGGE profiles, which indicated a superiority over the other four methods. The development of this optimized DNA extraction and purification method may provide a valuable tool for further molecular analysis of compost. PMID:23239373

  20. Non-invasive method for sampling and extraction of mouse DNA for PCR.

    PubMed

    Meldgaard, M; Bollen, P J A; Finsen, B

    2004-10-01

    We adapted a non-invasive, fast, reliable and inexpensive procedure for the sampling and extraction of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for genetic testing of mice. The procedure is based on a simple DNA extraction procedure used in the forensic genetic testing of humans. It involves mouth swabbing of the inner cheek using a cotton stick, followed by alkaline lysis of the harvested buccal epithelial cells. This procedure allows for repeated sampling and genetic testing of the individual mouse, and it is faster, simpler and, in our hands, more reliable than the currently used routine procedures for the sampling and extraction of mouse DNA. Current procedures all involve biopsy of a piece of the tail, ear or toe, followed by lengthy procedures to release and isolate the DNA. PMID:15479556

  1. Attempted DNA extraction from a Rancho La Brea Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi): prospects for ancient DNA from asphalt deposits.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Robinson, Jacqueline; Farrell, Aisling B; Harris, John M; Thalmann, Olaf; Jacobs, David K

    2014-02-01

    Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphalt-mediated inhibition. In an attempt to test these hypotheses, a recently recovered Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) skeleton with an unusual pattern of asphalt impregnation was studied. Ultimately, none of the bone samples tested successfully amplified M.?columbi DNA. Our work suggests that reagents typically used to remove asphalt from ancient samples also inhibit DNA extraction. Ultimately, we conclude that the probability of recovering ancient DNA from fossils in asphalt deposits is strongly (perhaps fatally) hindered by the organic compounds that permeate the bones and that at the Rancho La Brea tar pits, environmental conditions might not have been ideal for the general preservation of genetic material. PMID:24634719

  2. Dichlorvos exposure impedes extraction and amplification of DNA from insects in museum collections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The insecticides dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene have been commonly used to eradicate pest insects from natural history collections. However, it is not known how these chemicals affect the DNA of the specimens in the collections. We thus tested the effect of dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene on DNA of insects (Musca domestica) by extracting and amplifying DNA from specimens exposed to insecticides in two different concentrations over increasing time intervals. Results The results clearly show that dichlorvos impedes both extraction and amplification of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA after relatively short time, whereas paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene do not. Conclusion Collections treated with paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene, are better preserved concerning DNA, than those treated with dichlorvos. Non toxic pest control methods should, however, be preferred due to physical damage of specimens and putative health risks by chemicals. PMID:20148102

  3. Tracing tree nut allergens in chocolate: A comparison of DNA extraction protocols.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Melo, Vítor S; Santos, Cristina G; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2015-11-15

    The present work aimed at comparing different DNA extraction methods, from chocolate matrices, for the effective application in molecular techniques to detect tree nut allergens. For this study, DNA from almond or hazelnut model chocolates was extracted using seven selected protocols: the in-house methods of CTAB-PVP (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-polyvinylpyrrolidone), Wizard with and without RNase, Wizard-PVP with and without RNase, and the Wizard Magnetic and Nucleospin kits. The extracts were assessed for their suitability for amplification by qualitative PCR and real-time PCR. From the evaluated protocols, Nucleospin presented the best results for almond and hazelnut amplification, achieving a limit of detection of 0.005% (w/w) with high PCR efficiency, linearity and range of amplification. These results highlight the importance of the DNA extraction protocol in the case of food allergens from complex matrices, such as chocolate, in which sensitivity is a key parameter. PMID:25977052

  4. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kneževi?, Aleksandar; Živkovi?, Lada; Staji?, Mirjana; Vukojevi?, Jelena; Milovanovi?, Ivan; Spremo-Potparevi?, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0?mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0?mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  5. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD IS SUCCESSFULLY APPLIED TO ITS-RFLP ANALYSIS OF MYCORRHIZAL ROOT TIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid method for extracting DNA from intact, single root tips using a Xanthine solution was developed to handle very large numbers of analyses of ectomycorrhizas. By using an extraction without grinding we have attempted to bias the extraction towards the fungal DNA in the man...

  6. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  7. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore »16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  8. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  9. Exploring microbial diversity in volcanic environments: a review of methods in DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Aude; Cockell, Charles S

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has been marked by a large number of studies focused on understanding the distribution of microorganisms in volcanic environments. These studies are motivated by the desire to elucidate how the geochemically extreme conditions of such environments can influence microbial diversity both on the surface and in the subsurface of the Earth. The exploration of microbial community diversity has generally not relied on culture-dependent methods, but has been carried out using environmental DNA extraction. Because of the large diversity of chemically and physically complex samples, extracting DNA from volcanic environments is technically challenging. In view of the emerging literature, and our own experience in the optimisation of methods for DNA extraction from volcanic materials, it is timely to provide a methodological comparison. This review highlights and discusses new insights and methods published on DNA extraction methods from volcanic samples, considering the different volcanic environments. A description of a recent method for DNA extraction from basalt and obsidian glass rock samples from Iceland is included. Finally, we discuss these approaches in the wider context of modern work to understand the microbial diversity of volcanic environments. PMID:17540467

  10. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of ?-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  11. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of ?-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  12. Optimisation of DNA extraction and validation of PCR assays to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timms, Verlaine J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate DNA extraction methods and PCR assays suitable for the detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. The majority of methods currently used to detect M. paratuberculosis have been developed using bovine samples, such as faeces, blood or tissue and, in many cases, have been based on detection from pooled samples from a herd. However most studies have not compared PCR results to culture results. In order to address this problem, four DNA extraction protocols and three PCR assays were employed to detect M. paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. Given that culture is reliable from cows, the results were then compared with the known M. paratuberculosis culture status. The following DNA extractions were included, two commercial kits, a boiling method, an in house extraction based on a published method and enrichment by sonication. The three PCR assays used included single round IS900 and f57 assays and a nested IS900 assay. In addition, another PCR assay was validated for the detection of any Mycobacterial species and a universal bacterial 16S rRNA gene assay was used to detect sample inhibition. The in-house DNA extraction was the most consistent in extracting good quality DNA compared to all other methods. The use of two PCR markers, IS900 and f57, and a universal PCR enabled the correct samples to be identified as M. paratuberculosis positive. In addition, when compared to the culture result, false-positives did not occur and PCR inhibition was readily identified. Using an in house DNA extraction coupled with the IS900 and f57 PCR markers, this study provides a reliable and simple method to detect M. paratuberculosis in both veterinary and spill over infections. PMID:25797305

  13. Moricandia arvensis extracts protect against DNA damage, mutagenesis in bacteria system and scavenge the superoxide anion.

    PubMed

    Skandrani, Ines; Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Kilani, Soumaya; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghedira-Chekir, Leila

    2009-02-01

    The mutagenic potential of total aqueous, total oligomers flavonoids (TOF), ethyl acetate (EA), chloroform (Chl), petroleum ether (PE) and methanol (MeOH) extracts from aerial parts of Moricandia arvensis was assessed using Ames Salmonella tester strains TA100 and TA1535 with and without metabolic activation (S9), and using plasmid pBluescript DNA assay. None of the different extracts produced a mutagenic effect, except aqueous extract when incubated with Salmonella typhimurium TA100 after metabolic activation. Likewise, the antimutagenicity of the same extracts was tested using the "Ames test". Our results showed that M. arvensis extracts possess antimutagenic effects against sodium azide (SA) in the two tested Salmonella assay systems, except metabolized aqueous and PE extracts when tested with S. typhimurium TA100 assay system. Different extracts were also found to be effective in protecting plasmid DNA against the strand breakage induced by hydroxyl radicals, except PE and aqueous extracts. Antioxidant capacity of the tested extracts was evaluated using the enzymatic (xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay) (X/XOD) and the non enzymatic (NBT/Riboflavine assay) systems. TOF extract was the more effective one in inhibiting both xanthine oxidase activity and NBT reduction. PMID:19015021

  14. Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Peter J.; Gambus, Agnieszka; Blow, J. Julian

    2012-01-01

    The use of cell-free extracts prepared from eggs of the South African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, has led to many important discoveries in cell cycle research. These egg extracts recapitulate the key nuclear transitions of the eukaryotic cell cycle in vitro under apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. DNA added to the extract is first assembled into a nucleus and is then efficiently replicated. Progression of the extract into mitosis then allows the separation of paired sister chromatids. The Xenopus cell-free system is therefore uniquely suited to the study of the mechanisms, dynamics and integration of cell cycle regulated processes at a biochemical level. In this article we describe methods currently in use in our laboratory for the preparation of Xenopus egg extracts and demembranated sperm nuclei for the study of DNA replication in vitro. We also detail how DNA replication can be quantified in this system. In addition, we describe methods for isolating chromatin and chromatin-bound protein complexes from egg extracts. These recently developed and revised techniques provide a practical starting point for investigating the function of proteins involved in DNA replication. PMID:22521908

  15. Extracting DNA twist rigidity from experimental supercoiling data Sebastien Neukirch

    E-print Network

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    ­grained model known as the worm­like chain [1], where DNA is considered as a semi­flexible polymer with bending polymer segments is lost. It can be viewed as the ratio of the elastic bending rigid­ ity K 0 to this experiment, intro­ ducing the concepts of worm­like rod chain [5], or the torsional directed walk [6

  16. Multiple DNA Extractions Coupled with Stable-Isotope Probing of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Contaminated Soil?†

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Singleton, David R.; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the 13C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-13C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from 13C-enriched DNA and were designated “anthracene group 1.” Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP. PMID:21398486

  17. Optimization of DNA extraction and molecular detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in natural mineral water sources.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Rosely A B; Smith, Huw V

    2004-03-01

    The numerous published methods for extracting DNA from Cryptosporidium oocysts for PCR identify the lack of an optimized standard method for clinical, environmental, and public health investigations of cryptosporidiosis. A method that maximizes DNA extraction reliably, particularly from small numbers of partially purified or purified oocysts present in mineral waters and environmental samples, is required. We describe a maximized method for liberating DNA from Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by 15 cycles of freezing (liquid nitrogen) and thawing (65 degrees C) in lysis buffer containing sodium dodecyl sulfate. The inhibitory effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate are abrogated by the addition of Tween 20 to the PCR reaction. We tested seven different C. parvum oocyst isolates, consistently detecting fewer than five oocysts following direct PCR amplification of a segment of the 18S rRNA gene. Older oocysts, which were more refractory to freeze-thawing, were disrupted effectively. A single oocyst in each of two mineral water concentrates was detected by both microscopy and PCR/Southern blotting. We recommend 15 cycles of freeze-thawing, with thawing at 65 degrees C in lysis buffer, to maximize oocyst disruption and DNA extraction, particularly when isolate history and oocyst age are unknown. Both the DNA extraction method and the PCR described can be used for clinical, environmental, and public health investigations of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:15035368

  18. Extraction of PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA from Bacillus anthracisspores

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Tamas

    2003-05-19

    Bacterial endospore disruption and nucleic acid extractionresulting in DNA of PCR-amplifiable quality and quantity are not trivial.Responding to the needs of the Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU),Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, protocols weredeveloped to close these gaps. Effectiveness and reproducibility of thetechniques were validated with laboratory grown pure spores of Bacillusanthracis and its close phylogenetic neighbors, and with spiked soils anddamaged samples.

  19. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680) and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region) were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 ?g DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days), repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles), and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using 10 ng of DNA per genotyping reaction, the obtained samples can be used for more than one hundred candidate gene assays. When saliva is collected with an absorbent device, most of the nucleic acid content remains in the device, therefore it is advisable to collect the device separately for later genetic analyses. PMID:22182470

  20. How to Open the Treasure Chest? Optimising DNA Extraction from Herbarium Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Särkinen, Tiina; Staats, Martijn; Richardson, James E.; Cowan, Robyn S.; Bakker, Freek T.

    2012-01-01

    Herbarium collections are potentially an enormous resource for DNA studies, but the use of herbarium specimens in molecular studies has thus far been slowed down by difficulty in obtaining amplifiable DNA. Here we compare a set of commercially available DNA extraction protocols and their performance in terms of DNA purity and yield, and PCR amplification success as measured by using three differentially sized markers, the rbcL barcoding marker (cpDNA), the LEAFY exon 3 (nrDNA), and the trnL(UAA) P6 loop (cpDNA). Results reveal large differences between extraction methods, where DNA purity rather than yield is shown to be strongly correlated with PCR success. Amplicon size shows similarly strong correlation with PCR success, with the shortest fragment showing the highest success rate (78%, P6 loop, 10–143 base pairs (bp)) and the largest fragment the lowest success (10%, rbcL, 670 bp). The effect of specimen preparation method on PCR success was also tested. Results show that drying method strongly affects PCR success, especially the availability of fragments longer than 250 bp, where longer fragments are more available for PCR amplification in air dried material compared to alcohol dried specimens. Results from our study indicate that projects relying on poor-quality starting material such as herbarium or scat samples should focus on extracting pure DNA and aim to amplify short target regions (<200–300 bp) in order to maximise outcomes. Development of shorter barcoding regions, or mini-barcodes within existing ones should be of high importance as only a few options are currently available; this is particularly important if we hope to incorporate the millions of herbarium samples available into barcoding initiatives and other molecular studies. PMID:22952770

  1. How to open the treasure chest? Optimising DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Särkinen, Tiina; Staats, Martijn; Richardson, James E; Cowan, Robyn S; Bakker, Freek T

    2012-01-01

    Herbarium collections are potentially an enormous resource for DNA studies, but the use of herbarium specimens in molecular studies has thus far been slowed down by difficulty in obtaining amplifiable DNA. Here we compare a set of commercially available DNA extraction protocols and their performance in terms of DNA purity and yield, and PCR amplification success as measured by using three differentially sized markers, the rbcL barcoding marker (cpDNA), the LEAFY exon 3 (nrDNA), and the trnL((UAA)) P6 loop (cpDNA). Results reveal large differences between extraction methods, where DNA purity rather than yield is shown to be strongly correlated with PCR success. Amplicon size shows similarly strong correlation with PCR success, with the shortest fragment showing the highest success rate (78%, P6 loop, 10-143 base pairs (bp)) and the largest fragment the lowest success (10%, rbcL, 670 bp). The effect of specimen preparation method on PCR success was also tested. Results show that drying method strongly affects PCR success, especially the availability of fragments longer than 250 bp, where longer fragments are more available for PCR amplification in air dried material compared to alcohol dried specimens. Results from our study indicate that projects relying on poor-quality starting material such as herbarium or scat samples should focus on extracting pure DNA and aim to amplify short target regions (<200-300 bp) in order to maximise outcomes. Development of shorter barcoding regions, or mini-barcodes within existing ones should be of high importance as only a few options are currently available; this is particularly important if we hope to incorporate the millions of herbarium samples available into barcoding initiatives and other molecular studies. PMID:22952770

  2. Comparative Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods from Feces of Multiple Host Species for Downstream Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Marcia L.; Meyer, Alexandra; Johnson, Philip J.; Ericsson, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains a vast community of microbes that to this day remain largely unculturable, making studies in this area challenging. With the newly affordable advanced sequencing technology, important breakthroughs in this exciting field are now possible. However, standardized methods of sample collection, handling, and DNA extraction have yet to be determined. To help address this, we investigated the use of 5 common DNA extraction methods on fecal samples from 5 different species. Our data show that the method of DNA extraction impacts DNA concentration and purity, successful NGS amplification, and influences microbial communities seen in NGS output dependent on the species of fecal sample and the DNA extraction method used. These data highlight the importance of careful consideration of DNA extraction method used when designing and interpreting data from cross species studies. PMID:26599606

  3. Separation of Y-chromosomal haplotypes from male DNA mixtures via multiplex haplotype-specific extraction.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2015-11-01

    In forensic analysis, the interpretation of DNA mixtures is the subject of ongoing debate and requires expertise knowledge. Haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) is an alternative method that enables the separation of large chromosome fragments or haplotypes by using magnetic beads in conjunction with allele-specific probes. HSE thus allows physical separation of the components of a DNA mixture. Here, we present the first multiplex HSE separation of a Y-chromosomal haplotype consisting of six Yfiler short tandem repeat markers from a mixture of male DNA. PMID:26275613

  4. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Fori?, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as ?Eq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co ?-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with ?-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  5. Extraction and fractionation of RNA and DNA from single cells using selective lysing and isotachophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Santiago, Juan G.

    2015-03-01

    Single cell analyses of RNA and DNA are crucial to understanding the heterogeneity of cell populations. The numbers of approaches to single cells analyses are expanding, but sequence specific measurements of nucleic acids have been mostly limited to studies of either DNA or RNA, and not both. This remains a challenge as RNA and DNA have very similar physical and biochemical properties, and cross-contamination with each other can introduce false positive results. We present an electrokinetic technique which creates the opportunity to fractionate and deliver cytoplasmic RNA and genomic DNA to independent downstream analyses. Our technique uses an on-chip system that enables selective lysing of cytoplasmic membrane, extraction of RNA (away from genomic DNA and nucleus), focusing, absolute quantification of cytoplasmic RNA mass. The absolute RNA mass quantification is performed using fluorescence observation without enzymatic amplification in < 5 min. The cell nucleus is left intact and the relative genomic DNA amount in the nucleus can be measured. We demonstrate the technique using single mouse B lymphocyte cells, for which we extracted an average of 14.1 pg total cytoplasmic RNA per cell. We also demonstrate correlation analysis between the absolute amount of cytoplasmic RNA and relative amount of genomic DNA, showing heterogeneity associated with cell cycle.

  6. Low Cost Extraction and Isothermal Amplification of DNA for Infectious Diarrhea Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K.; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10?2 pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health. PMID:23555883

  7. Dynamic solid phase DNA extraction and PCR amplification in polyester-toner based microchip.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Gabriela R M; Price, Carol W; Augustine, Brian H; Carrilho, Emanuel; Landers, James P

    2011-07-01

    A variety of substrates have been used for fabrication of microchips for DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and DNA fragment separation, including the more conventional glass and silicon as well as alternative polymer-based materials. Polyester represents one such polymer, and the laser-printing of toner onto polyester films has been shown to be effective for generating polyester-toner (PeT) microfluidic devices with channel depths on the order of tens of micrometers. Here, we describe a novel and simple process that allows for the production of multilayer, high aspect-ratio PeT microdevices with substantially larger channel depths. This innovative process utilizes a CO(2) laser to create the microchannel in polyester sheets containing a uniform layer of printed toner, and multilayer devices can easily be constructed by sandwiching the channel layer between uncoated cover sheets of polyester containing precut access holes. The process allows the fabrication of deep channels, with ~270 ?m, and we demonstrate the effectiveness of multilayer PeT microchips for dynamic solid phase extraction (dSPE) and PCR amplification. With the former, we found that (i) more than 65% of DNA from 0.6 ?L of blood was recovered, (ii) the resultant DNA was concentrated to greater than 3 ng/?L (which was better than other chip-based extraction methods), and (iii) the DNA recovered was compatible with downstream microchip-based PCR amplification. Illustrative of the compatibility of PeT microchips with the PCR process, the successful amplification of a 520 bp fragment of ?-phage DNA in a conventional thermocycler is shown. The ability to handle the diverse chemistries associated with DNA purification and extraction is a testimony to the potential utility of PeT microchips beyond separations and presents a promising new disposable platform for genetic analysis that is low cost and easy to fabricate. PMID:21557576

  8. Development and validation of one-step ultrasound-assisted extraction for simultaneous determination of multiclass fungicides in soils.

    PubMed

    Merdassa, Yared; Liu, Jing-Fu; Megersa, Negussie

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, efficient, and simple one-step ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method was developed for the analysis of seven fungicides (cymoxanil, metalaxyl, mandipropamid, folpet, chlorothalonil, kresoxim-methyl, and famoxadone) in horticultural soils. Analytes in the samples were determined by HPLC with variable wavelength detection. Key parameters that influence the UAE procedure were optimized, such as the nature and volume of extraction solvent, number of sonication steps, and sonication time. The highest extraction efficiencies in the range of 61.1-87.8% were obtained by using only 7.5 mL of ethyl acetate-hexane (1+1, v/v) and sonicating for 10 min. At 0.5 and 2.0 ?g/g fortification levels, satisfactory recoveries (>60%) with RSD<13% were obtained for each analyte, except for folpet (>52%). The method was linear over the range of 0.005 to 10 ?g/g and the correlation coefficients (r2) obtained ranged from 0.9955 to 0.9992. The LODs (S/N=3) varied from 0.0015 to 0.006 ?g/g. The proposed UAE procedure was compared to classical extractions (shake-flask and Soxhlet extraction) and showed satisfactory extraction efficiencies using shorter time and smaller amounts of organic solvents, thereby minimizing the costs of the analysis and the disposal of waste solvent. PMID:25857897

  9. Comparison of Eight Methods for the Extraction of Bacillus atrophaeus Spore DNA from Eleven Common Interferents and a Common Swab

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Helen L.; Dewey, Caroline A.; Ely, Morgan S.; Willoughby, Sarah L.; Parsons, Tanya M.; Cox, Victoria; Spencer, Phillippa M.; Weller, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Eight DNA extraction products or methods (Applied Biosystems PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit; Bio-Rad Instagene Only, Bio-Rad Instagene & Spin Column Purification; EpiCentre MasterPure DNA & RNA Kit; FujiFilm QuickGene Mini80; Idaho Technologies 1-2-3 Q-Flow Kit; MoBio UltraClean Microbial DNA Isolation Kit; Sigma Extract-N-Amp Plant and Seed Kit) were adapted to facilitate extraction of DNA under BSL3 containment conditions. DNA was extracted from 12 common interferents or sample types, spiked with spores of Bacillus atropheaus. Resulting extracts were tested by real-time PCR. No one method was the best, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types. Statistical analysis indicated that the PrepFiler method was the best method from six dry powders (baking, biological washing, milk, plain flour, filler and talcum) and one solid (Underarm deodorant), the UltraClean method was the best from four liquids (aftershave, cola, nutrient broth, vinegar), and the MasterPure method was the best from the swab sample type. The best overall method, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types evaluated was the UltraClean method. PMID:21818364

  10. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of diesel and biodiesel exhaust extracts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract reports the results of studies assessing the relative DNA damage potential of extracts of exhaust particles resulting from the combustion of petroleum diesel, biodiesel, and petroleum diesel-biodiesel blends. Results indicate that the commercially available B20 petr...

  11. Near-quantitative extraction of genomic DNA from various food-borne eubacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work we have tested a dozen commercial bacterial genomic DNA extraction methodologies on an average of 7.70E6 (± 9.05%), 4.77E8 (± 31.0%), and 5.93E8 (± 4.69%) colony forming units (CFU) associated with 3 cultures (n = 3) each of Brochothrix thermosphacta (Bt), Shigella sonnei (Ss), and Esch...

  12. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for the analysis of gut microbiota in fishes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrea M; Mohammed, Haitham H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the impacts of bacterial DNA extraction methodology on downstream analysis of fish gut microbiota. Feces and intestine samples were taken from three sympatric freshwater fish species with varying diets. Samples were processed immediately (approximately 4 h after capture; fresh), stored at -20 °C for 15 days or preserved in RNAlater® reagent for 15 days. DNA was then extracted using two commercial kits: one designed for animal tissues and one specifically formulated for stool samples. Microbial community fingerprints were generated using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Factors including diversity as depicted by band number, band intensity, repeatability and practicalities such as cost and time were considered. Despite significant differences in microbiota structure, results were similar between feces and intestine samples. Frozen samples were consistently outperformed by other storage methods and the stool kit typically outperformed the tissue kit. Overall, we recommend extraction of bacterial DNA from fresh samples using the stool kit for both sample types. If samples cannot be processed immediately, preservation in RNAlater® is preferred to freezing. Choice of DNA extraction method significantly influences the results of downstream microbial community analysis and thus should be taken into consideration for metadata analysis. PMID:25757730

  13. A New Method to Extract Dental Pulp DNA: Application to Universal Detection of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Hung, Lam; Tran-Thi, Ny; Aboudharam, Gérard; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background Dental pulp is used for PCR-based detection of DNA derived from host and bacteremic microorganims. Current protocols require odontology expertise for proper recovery of the dental pulp. Dental pulp specimen exposed to laboratory environment yields contaminants detected using universal 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a new protocol by encasing decontaminated tooth into sterile resin, extracting DNA into the dental pulp chamber itself and decontaminating PCR reagents by filtration and double restriction enzyme digestion. Application to 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria in 144 teeth collected in 86 healthy people yielded a unique sequence in only 14 teeth (9.7%) from 12 individuals (14%). Each individual yielded a unique 16S rDNA sequence in 1–2 teeth per individual. Negative controls remained negative. Bacterial identifications were all confirmed by amplification and sequencing of specific rpoB sequence. Conclusions/Significance The new protocol prevented laboratory contamination of the dental pulp. It allowed the detection of bacteria responsible for dental pulp colonization from blood and periodontal tissue. Only 10% such samples contained 16S rDNA. It provides a new tool for the retrospective diagnostic of bacteremia by allowing the universal detection of bacterial DNA in animal and human, contemporary or ancient tooth. It could be further applied to identification of host DNA in forensic medicine and anthropology. PMID:17957246

  14. Optimized DNA extraction methods for encysted embryos of the endangered fairy shrimp, Branchinecta sandiegonensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, A.N.; Simovich, M.A.; Pepino, D.; Schroeder, K.M.; Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The San Diego fairy shrimp Branchinecta sandiegonensis is a federally endangered species endemic to vernal pools in southern California, USA. Filling events in these habitats are highly variable, with some pools failing to hold water long enough for reproduction over many successive years. Studies of this species are thus hindered by the relatively rare appearance of aquatically active life history phases. Because diapausing cysts are abundant and present at all times, they provide an underutilized opportunity for both species identification and genetic studies. However, methods for extracting DNA from cysts are technically challenging because of their structure and size. Here we present a protocol for extracting DNA from B. sandiegonensis cysts in sufficient quantities for "DNA Barcoding", microsatellite analysis and other genotyping and sequencing applications. The technique will aid in population genetic studies and species identification (since taxonomic keys only distinguish among adults), and will be applicable to other crustaceans with similar diapausing cysts. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  15. An Improved DNA Extraction Method for Efficient and Quantitative Recovery of Phytoplankton Diversity in Natural Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are highly diverse with different species possessing different cell coverings, posing challenges for thoroughly breaking the cells in DNA extraction yet preserving DNA integrity. While quantitative molecular techniques have been increasingly used in phytoplankton research, an effective and simple method broadly applicable to different lineages and natural assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we developed a bead-beating protocol based on our previous experience and tested it against 9 species of phytoplankton representing different lineages and different cell covering rigidities. We found the bead-beating method enhanced the final yield of DNA (highest as 2 folds) in comparison with the non-bead-beating method, while also preserving the DNA integrity. When our method was applied to a field sample collected at a subtropical bay located in Xiamen, China, the resultant ITS clone library revealed a highly diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other micro-eukaryotes, including Archaea, Amoebozoa, Chlorophyta, Ciliphora, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Fungi, Metazoa, etc. The appearance of thecate dinoflagellates, thin-walled phytoplankton and “naked” unicellular organisms indicates that our method could obtain the intact DNA of organisms with different cell coverings. All the results demonstrate that our method is useful for DNA extraction of phytoplankton and environmental surveys of their diversity and abundance. PMID:26218575

  16. DNA MICROARRAY IMAGE INTENSITY EXTRACTION USING EIGENSPOTS Sotirios A. Tsaftaris, Ramandeep Ahuja, Derek Shiell, and Aggelos K. Katsaggelos

    E-print Network

    Tsaftaris, Sotirios

    DNA MICROARRAY IMAGE INTENSITY EXTRACTION USING EIGENSPOTS Sotirios A. Tsaftaris, Ramandeep Ahuja, IL 60208, USA ABSTRACT DNA microarrays are commonly used in the rapid analysis of gene expression-to-noise metric xdev. Index Terms--DNA microarray, biochip, eigenspaces, noise, segmentation. 1. INTRODUCTION

  17. Facile and rapid DNA extraction and purification from food matrices using IFAST (immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension)

    E-print Network

    Beebe, David J.

    Facile and rapid DNA extraction and purification from food matrices using IFAST (immiscible and purification of DNA from food matrices. The IFAST device operates on the principle of immiscible phase. Purified DNA is then eluted from the PMPs. Here, detection of Clostridium botulinum type A (BoNT/A) in food

  18. DNA degradation by aqueous extract of Aloe vera in the presence of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Shoa; Ullah, M F; Hadi, S M

    2010-06-01

    The plant Aloe vera has long been used in medicine, as dietary supplements and for cosmetic purposes. Aloe vera extracts are a rich source of polyphenols, such as aloin and aloe emodin and have shown a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. The bioactive component aloe emodin has been reported to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. Many of the biological activities of Aloe vera have been attributed to its antioxidant properties. However, most plant-derived polyphenols that are also present in Aloe vera may exhibit pro-oxidant properties either alone or in the presence of transition metals, such as copper. Previous reports from this laboratory have implicated the pro-oxidant action as one of the mechanisms for their anti-cancer properties. In the present paper, we show that aqueous extract of Aloe vera is also able to cause DNA degradation in the presence of copper ions. Further, the extract is also able to reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I) and generate reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner, which correlates with ability of the extract to cause DNA breakage. Thus, the study shows that in addition to antioxidant activity, Aloe vera extract also possess pro-oxidant properties, leading to oxidative DNA breakage. PMID:20653287

  19. Release of Bacterial DNA by Marine Nanoflagellates, an Intermediate Step in Phosphorus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Valentina; Rehnstam, Ann-Sofi; Lundberg, Erik; Hagström, Åke

    1992-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved DNA and nanoflagellates were found to covary during a study of diel dynamics of the microbial food web in the Adriatic Sea. This observation was further investigated in a continuous seawater culture when nanoflagellates were fed bacteria grown in filtered seawater. Analysis of dissolved organic phosphorus and dissolved DNA showed a sixfold increase of dissolved DNA in the presence of the nanoflagellates (Ochromonas sp.). The amount of DNA released suggested that the majority of the consumed bacterial DNA was ejected. Phagotrophic nanoflagellates thus represent an important source of origin for dissolved DNA. The rate of breakdown of dissolved DNA and release of inorganic phosphorus in the pelagic ecosystem is suggested to be dependent on the ambient phosphate pool. In the P-limited northern Adriatic Sea, rapid degradation of the labelled DNA could be demonstrated, whereas the N-limited southern California bight water showed a much lower rate. Phosphorus originating from dissolved DNA was shown to be transferred mainly to organisms in the <3-?m-size fractions. On the basis of the C/P ratios, we suggest that a significant fraction of the phosphorus demand by the autotrophs may be sustained by the released DNA during stratified conditions. Thus, the nucleic acid-rich bacterial biomass grazed by protozoa plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in the marine environment. PMID:16348813

  20. To beat or not to beat a tick: comparison of DNA extraction methods for ticks (Ixodes scapularis)

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are important disease vectors in the United States, known to transmit a variety of pathogens to humans, including bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Their importance as a disease vector necessitates reliable and comparable methods for extracting microbial DNA from ticks. Furthermore, to explore the population genetics or genomics of this tick, appropriate DNA extraction techniques are needed for both the vector and its microbes. Although a few studies have investigated different methods of DNA isolation from ticks, they are limited in the number and types of DNA extraction and lack species-specific quantification of DNA yield. Methods. Here we determined the most efficient and consistent method of DNA extraction from two different developmental stages of I. scapularis—nymph and adult—that are the most important for disease transmission. We used various methods of physical disruption of the hard, chitinous exoskeleton, as well as commercial and non-commercial DNA isolation kits. To gauge the effectiveness of these methods, we quantified the DNA yield and confirmed the DNA quality via PCR of both tick and microbial genetic material. Results. DNA extraction using the Thermo GeneJET Genomic DNA Purification Kit resulted in the highest DNA yields and the most consistent PCR amplification when combined with either cutting or bead beating with select matrices across life stages. DNA isolation methods using ammonium hydroxide as well as the MoBio PowerSoil kit also produced strong and successful PCR amplification, but only for females. Discussion. We contrasted a variety of readily available methods of DNA extraction from single individual blacklegged ticks and presented the results through a quantitative and qualitative assessment. PMID:26290800

  1. Comparison of Eleven Methods for Genomic DNA Extraction Suitable for Large-Scale Whole-Genome Genotyping and Long-Term DNA Banking Using Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I.; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L.; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals. PMID:25635817

  2. A viral packaging motor varies its DNA rotation and step size to preserve subunit coordination as the capsid fills.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shixin; Chistol, Gheorghe; Hetherington, Craig L; Tafoya, Sara; Aathavan, K; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-04-24

    Multimeric, ring-shaped molecular motors rely on the coordinated action of their subunits to perform crucial biological functions. During these tasks, motors often change their operation in response to regulatory signals. Here, we investigate a viral packaging machine as it fills the capsid with DNA and encounters increasing internal pressure. We find that the motor rotates the DNA during packaging and that the rotation per base pair increases with filling. This change accompanies a reduction in the motor's step size. We propose that these adjustments preserve motor coordination by allowing one subunit to make periodic, specific, and regulatory contacts with the DNA. At high filling, we also observe the downregulation of the ATP-binding rate and the emergence of long-lived pauses, suggesting a throttling-down mechanism employed by the motor near the completion of packaging. This study illustrates how a biological motor adjusts its operation in response to changing conditions, while remaining highly coordinated. PMID:24766813

  3. Step-gate polysilicon nanowires field effect transistor compatible with CMOS technology for label-free DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wenga, G; Jacques, E; Salaün, A-C; Rogel, R; Pichon, L; Geneste, F

    2013-02-15

    Currently, detection of DNA hybridization using fluorescence-based detection technique requires expensive optical systems and complex bioinformatics tools. Hence, the development of new low cost devices that enable direct and highly sensitive detection stimulates a lot of research efforts. Particularly, devices based on silicon nanowires are emerging as ultrasensitive electrical sensors for the direct detection of biological species thanks to their high surface to volume ratio. In this study, we propose innovative devices using step-gate polycrystalline silicon nanowire FET (poly-Si NW FETs), achieved with simple and low cost fabrication process, and used as ultrasensitive electronic sensor for DNA hybridization. The poly-SiNWs are synthesized using the sidewall spacer formation technique. The detailed fabrication procedure for a step-gate NWFET sensor is described in this paper. No-complementary and complementary DNA sequences were clearly discriminated and detection limit to 1 fM range is observed. This first result using this nano-device is promising for the development of low cost and ultrasensitive polysilicon nanowires based DNA sensors compatible with the CMOS technology. PMID:22841443

  4. DNA Fingerprinting in a Forensic Teaching Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Stacy A.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an experiment designed to provide students, in a classroom laboratory setting, a hands-on demonstration of the steps used in DNA forensic analysis by performing DNA extraction, DNA fingerprinting, and statistical analysis of the data. This experiment demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting is performed and how long it takes. It…

  5. High-Capacity Conductive Nanocellulose Paper Sheets for Electrochemically Controlled Extraction of DNA Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Aamir; Nyström, Gustav; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Nyholm, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Highly porous polypyrrole (PPy)-nanocellulose paper sheets have been evaluated as inexpensive and disposable electrochemically controlled three-dimensional solid phase extraction materials. The composites, which had a total anion exchange capacity of about 1.1 mol kg?1, were used for extraction and subsequent release of negatively charged fluorophore tagged DNA oligomers via galvanostatic oxidation and reduction of a 30–50 nm conformal PPy layer on the cellulose substrate. The ion exchange capacity, which was, at least, two orders of magnitude higher than those previously reached in electrochemically controlled extraction, originated from the high surface area (i.e. 80 m2 g?1) of the porous composites and the thin PPy layer which ensured excellent access to the ion exchange material. This enabled the extractions to be carried out faster and with better control of the PPy charge than with previously employed approaches. Experiments in equimolar mixtures of (dT)6, (dT)20, and (dT)40 DNA oligomers showed that all oligomers could be extracted, and that the smallest oligomer was preferentially released with an efficiency of up to 40% during the reduction of the PPy layer. These results indicate that the present material is very promising for the development of inexpensive and efficient electrochemically controlled ion-exchange membranes for batch-wise extraction of biomolecules. PMID:22195031

  6. Antioxidant Activity of Lawsonia inermis Extracts Inhibits Chromium(VI)-Induced Cellular and DNA Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Gunjan; Rajkumar, V.; Kumar, R. Ashok; Mathew, Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a very strong oxidant which consequently causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress. Prevention of Cr(VI)-induced cellular damage has been sought in this study in aqueous and methanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Lythraceae), commonly known as Henna. The extracts showed significant (P < .05) potential in scavenging free radicals (DPPH• and ABTS•+) and Fe3+, and in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. DNA damage caused by exposure of pBR322 to Cr(VI)-UV is markedly inhibited by both extracts in varying degrees. A distinct decline in Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity was noticed in MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma) cells with an increase in dosage of both extracts individually. Furthermore, both extracts proved to contain a high content of phenolic compounds which were found to have a strong and significant (P < .05) positive correlation to the radical scavenging potential, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and cyto-protective efficiency against Cr(VI)-induced oxidative cellular damage. HPLC analysis identified some of the major phenolic compounds in both extracts, which might be responsible for the antioxidant potential and the properties of DNA and cyto-protection. This study contributes to the search for natural resources that might yield potent therapeutic drugs against Cr(VI)-induced oxidative cell damage. PMID:20008460

  7. Genomic DNA extraction methods using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Keerti; Mahas, Ahmed; Kent, Michael N; Naik, Sameep; Markey, Michael

    2015-10-01

    As new technologies come within reach for the average cytogenetic laboratory, the study of chromosome structure has become increasingly more sophisticated. Resolution has improved from karyotyping (in which whole chromosomes are discernible) to fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, with which specific megabase regions are visualized), array-based CGH (aCGH, examining hundreds of base pairs), and next-generation sequencing (providing single base pair resolution). Whole genome next-generation sequencing remains a cost-prohibitive method for many investigators. Meanwhile, the cost of aCGH has been reduced during recent years, even as resolution has increased and protocols have simplified. However, aCGH presents its own set of unique challenges. DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to hybridize to arrays and provide meaningful results is required. This is especially difficult for DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Here, we compare three different methods for acquiring DNA of sufficient length, purity, and "amplifiability" for aCGH and other downstream applications. Phenol-chloroform extraction and column-based commercial kits were compared with adaptive focused acoustics (AFA). Of the three extraction methods, AFA samples showed increased amplicon length and decreased polymerase chain reaction (PCR) failure rate. These findings support AFA as an improvement over previous DNA extraction methods for FFPE tissues. PMID:26126956

  8. An optimized DNA extraction and multiplex PCR for the detection of Fasciola sp. in lymnaeid snails.

    PubMed

    Caron, Y; Righi, S; Lempereur, L; Saegerman, C; Losson, B

    2011-05-31

    This study deals with the development and validation of an original PCR protocol to assess the presence of Fasciola hepatica in Galba truncatula its main intermediate host in Western Europe. In the present study two DNA extraction techniques are compared and a new multiplex PCR is described. The Chelex(®) DNA extraction technique showed to be more appropriate than the classical Phenol/Chloroform/Proteinase K based method because of the absence of toxic organic solvent, shorter duration and lower cost, and a higher reproducibility regarding DNA concentrations and wavelength ratios. The multiplex PCR was set up to amplify the lymnaeid internal transcribed spacer 2 sequence (500-600 bp) that act as an internal control and a 124 bp Fasciola sp. sequence that is repeated more than 300,000 times in fluke whole genome. Ninety six snails were pooled and 6 snails (6.25%) found positive for Fasciola sp. The limit of detection is lower than the minimal biological infestation unit (one miracidium). DNA extracts from Paramphistomum daubneyi, Dicrocoelium lanceolatum, and Fascioloides magna did not cross react. PMID:21242033

  9. Phenolic extracts of brewers' spent grain (BSG) as functional ingredients - assessment of their DNA protective effect against oxidant-induced DNA single strand breaks in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Aoife L; O'Callaghan, Yvonne C; Connolly, Alan; Piggott, Charles O; Fitzgerald, Richard J; O'Brien, Nora M

    2012-09-15

    Brewers' spent grain (BSG), a by-product of the brewing industry, contains high amounts of phenolic acids, which have antioxidant effects. The present study examined the ability of BSG extracts to protect against the genotoxic effects of oxidants, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) and tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) in U937 cells. Four pale (P1-P4) and four black (B1-B4) BSG extracts were investigated. U937 cells were pre-incubated with BSG extracts, exposed to the oxidants and the DNA damage was measured by the Comet assay. The black BSG extracts (B1-B4) significantly protected against H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage. Extract B2, which had the highest phenol content, provided the greatest protection. Extracts P2, B2, B3 and B4 provided significant protection against SIN-1-induced DNA damage. None of the extracts protected against DNA damage induced by t-BOOH and 4-NQO. The DNA protective effects of the BSG phenolic extracts may be related to iron chelation. PMID:23107673

  10. Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods for Microbial Community Profiling with an Application to Pediatric Bronchoalveolar Lavage Samples

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Dana; Daly, Joshua; Whiley, David; Grimwood, Keith; Wainwright, Claire E.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Barcoded amplicon sequencing is rapidly becoming a standard method for profiling microbial communities, including the human respiratory microbiome. While this approach has less bias than standard cultivation, several steps can introduce variation including the type of DNA extraction method used. Here we assessed five different extraction methods on pediatric bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples and a mock community comprised of nine bacterial genera to determine method reproducibility and detection limits for these typically low complexity communities. Additionally, using the mock community, we were able to evaluate contamination and select a relative abundance cut-off threshold based on the geometric distribution that optimizes the trade off between detecting bona fide operational taxonomic units and filtering out spurious ones. Using this threshold, the majority of genera in the mock community were predictably detected by all extraction methods including the hard-to-lyse Gram-positive genus Staphylococcus. Differences between extraction methods were significantly greater than between technical replicates for both the mock community and BAL samples emphasizing the importance of using a standardized methodology for microbiome studies. However, regardless of method used, individual patients retained unique diagnostic profiles. Furthermore, despite being stored as raw frozen samples for over five years, community profiles from BAL samples were consistent with historical culturing results. The culture-independent profiling of these samples also identified a number of anaerobic genera that are gaining acceptance as being part of the respiratory microbiome. This study should help guide researchers to formulate sampling, extraction and analysis strategies for respiratory and other human microbiome samples. PMID:22514642

  11. Unraveling the sequence-dependent polymorphic behavior of d(CpG) steps in B-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dans, Pablo Daniel; Faustino, Ignacio; Battistini, Federica; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Lavery, Richard; Orozco, Modesto

    2014-01-01

    We have made a detailed study of one of the most surprising sources of polymorphism in B-DNA: the high twist/low twist (HT/LT) conformational change in the d(CpG) base pair step. Using extensive computations, complemented with database analysis, we were able to characterize the twist polymorphism in the d(CpG) step in all the possible tetranucleotide environment. We found that twist polymorphism is coupled with BI/BII transitions, and, quite surprisingly, with slide polymorphism in the neighboring step. Unexpectedly, the penetration of cations into the minor groove of the d(CpG) step seems to be the key element in promoting twist transitions. The tetranucleotide environment also plays an important role in the sequence-dependent d(CpG) polymorphism. In this connection, we have detected a previously unexplored intramolecular C-H···O hydrogen bond interaction that stabilizes the low twist state when 3?-purines flank the d(CpG) step. This work explains a coupled mechanism involving several apparently uncorrelated conformational transitions that has only been partially inferred by earlier experimental or theoretical studies. Our results provide a complete description of twist polymorphism in d(CpG) steps and a detailed picture of the molecular choreography associated with this conformational change. PMID:25223784

  12. DNA analysis of soil extracts can be used to investigate fine root depth distribution of trees

    PubMed Central

    Bithell, Sean L.; Tran-Nguyen, Lucy T. T.; Hearnden, Mark N.; Hartley, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the root distribution of trees by soil coring is time-consuming as it requires the separation of roots from soil and classification of roots into particular size classes. This labour-intensive process can limit sample throughput and therefore sampling intensity. We investigated the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on soil DNA extractions to determine live fine root DNA density (RDD, mg DNA m?2) for mango (Mangifera indica) trees. The specificity of the qPCR was tested against DNA extracted from 10 mango cultivars and 14 weed species. All mango cultivars and no weeds were detected. Mango DNA was successfully quantified from control soil spiked with mango roots and weed species. The DNA yield of mango root sections stored in moist soil at 23–28 °C declined after 15 days to low concentrations as roots decayed, indicating that dead root materials in moist soil would not cause false-positive results. To separate large roots from samples, a root separation method for field samples was used to target the root fragments remaining in sieved (minimum 2 mm aperture) soil for RDD comparisons. Using this method we compared the seasonal RDD values of fine roots for five mango rootstock cultivars in a field trial. The mean cultivar DNA yields by depth from root fragments in the sieved soil samples had the strongest relationship (adjusted multiple R2 = 0.9307, P < 0.001) with the dry matter (g m?2) of fine (diameter <0.64 mm) roots removed from the soil by sieving. This method provides a species-specific and rapid means of comparing the distribution and concentration of live fine roots of trees in orchards using soil samples up to 500 g. PMID:25552675

  13. GENESUS: a two-step sequence design program for DNA nanostructure self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Takanobu; Asakawa, Takeshi; Kanegami, Akemi; Okada, Takao; Tahira, Tomoko; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been recognized as an ideal material for bottom-up construction of nanometer scale structures by self-assembly. The generation of sequences optimized for unique self-assembly (GENESUS) program reported here is a straightforward method for generating sets of strand sequences optimized for self-assembly of arbitrarily designed DNA nanostructures by a generate-candidates-and-choose-the-best strategy. A scalable procedure to prepare single-stranded DNA having arbitrary sequences is also presented. Strands for the assembly of various structures were designed and successfully constructed, validating both the program and the procedure. PMID:24724843

  14. Automated microfluidic DNA/RNA extraction with both disposable and reusable components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkyu; Johnson, Michael; Hill, Parker; Sonkul, Rahul S.; Kim, Jongwon; Gale, Bruce K.

    2012-01-01

    An automated microfluidic nucleic extraction system was fabricated with a multilayer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) structure that consists of sample wells, microvalves, a micropump and a disposable microfluidic silica cartridge. Both the microvalves and micropump structures were fabricated in a single layer and are operated pneumatically using a 100 µm PDMS membrane. To fabricate the disposable microfluidic silica cartridge, two-cavity structures were made in a PDMS replica to fit the stacked silica membranes. A handheld controller for the microvalves and pumps was developed to enable system automation. With purified ribonucleic acid (RNA), whole blood and E. coli samples, the automated microfluidic nucleic acid extraction system was validated with a guanidine-based solid phase extraction procedure. An extraction efficiency of ~90% for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ~54% for RNA was obtained in 12 min from whole blood and E. coli samples, respectively. In addition, the same quantity and quality of extracted DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR also presented the appropriate amplification and melting profiles. Automated, programmable fluid control and physical separation of the reusable components and the disposable components significantly decrease the assay time and manufacturing cost and increase the flexibility and compatibility of the system with downstream components.

  15. DNA topoisomerase II? controls replication origin cluster licensing and firing time in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Gaggioli, Vincent; Le Viet, Barbara; Germe, Thomas; Hyrien, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Sperm chromatin incubated in Xenopus egg extracts undergoes origin licensing and nuclear assembly before DNA replication. We found that depletion of DNA topoisomerase II? (topo II?), the sole topo II isozyme of eggs and its inhibition by ICRF-193, which clamps topo II? around DNA have opposite effects on these processes. ICRF-193 slowed down replication origin cluster activation and fork progression in a checkpoint-independent manner, without altering replicon size. In contrast, topo II? depletion accelerated origin cluster activation, and topo II? add-back negated overinitiation. Therefore, topo II? is not required for DNA replication, but topo II? clamps slow replication, probably by forming roadblocks. ICRF-193 had no effect on DNA synthesis when added after nuclear assembly, confirming that topo II? activity is dispensable for replication and revealing that topo II? clamps formed on replicating DNA do not block replication, presumably because topo II? acts behind and not in front of forks. Topo II? depletion increased, and topo II? addition reduced, chromatin loading of MCM2-7 replicative helicase, whereas ICRF-193 did not affect MCM2-7 loading. Therefore, topo II? restrains MCM2-7 loading in an ICRF-193-resistant manner during origin licensing, suggesting a model for establishing the sequential firing of origin clusters. PMID:23757188

  16. Reactive Molecular Dynamics study on the first steps of DNA-damage by free hydroxyl radicals

    E-print Network

    Abolfath, Ramin M; Brabec, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We employ a large scale molecular simulation based on bond-order ReaxFF to simulate the chemical reaction and study the damage to a large fragment of DNA-molecule in the solution by ionizing radiation. We illustrate that the randomly distributed clusters of diatomic OH-radicals that are primary products of megavoltage ionizing radiation in water-based systems are the main source of hydrogen-abstraction as well as formation of carbonyl- and hydroxyl-groups in the sugar-moiety that create holes in the sugar-rings. These holes grow up slowly between DNA-bases and DNA-backbone and the damage collectively propagate to DNA single and double strand break.

  17. Comparative Study of Seven Commercial Kits for Human DNA Extraction from Urine Samples Suitable for DNA Biomarker-Based Public Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    El Bali, Latifa; Diman, Aurélie; Bernard, Alfred; Roosens, Nancy H. C.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Human genomic DNA extracted from urine could be an interesting tool for large-scale public health studies involving characterization of genetic variations or DNA biomarkers as a result of the simple and noninvasive collection method. These studies, involving many samples, require a rapid, easy, and standardized extraction protocol. Moreover, for practicability, there is a necessity to collect urine at a moment different from the first void and to store it appropriately until analysis. The present study compared seven commercial kits to select the most appropriate urinary human DNA extraction procedure for epidemiological studies. DNA yield has been determined using different quantification methods: two classical, i.e., NanoDrop and PicoGreen, and two species-specific real-time quantitative (q)PCR assays, as DNA extracted from urine contains, besides human, microbial DNA also, which largely contributes to the total DNA yield. In addition, the kits giving a good yield were also tested for the presence of PCR inhibitors. Further comparisons were performed regarding the sampling time and the storage conditions. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, an important gene related to smoking has been genotyped using the developed tools. We could select one well-performing kit for the human DNA extraction from urine suitable for molecular diagnostic real-time qPCR-based assays targeting genetic variations, applicable to large-scale studies. In addition, successful genotyping was possible using DNA extracted from urine stored at ?20°C for several months, and an acceptable yield could also be obtained from urine collected at different moments during the day, which is particularly important for public health studies. PMID:25365790

  18. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Yih-Yih; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Naidu, Rakesh; Lai, Pey-Jiun; Ling, Shui-Nyuk; Mak, Joon-Wah; Lim, Patricia Kim-Chooi; Balraj, Pauline; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC50<0.01 µg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28 000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC50=2.9 µg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1’a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC50=1.38 µg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV. PMID:21528487

  19. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kok, Yih-Yih; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Naidu, Rakesh; Lai, Pey-Jiun; Ling, Shui-Nyuk; Mak, Joon-Wah; Lim, Patricia Kim-Chooi; Balraj, Pauline; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)<0.01 µg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC(50)=2.9 µg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1'a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)=1.38 µg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV. PMID:21528487

  20. Antioxidant, antibacterial and DNA protective activities of protein extracts from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Sa-Ard, Piyawan; Sarnthima, Rakrudee; Khammuang, Saranyu; Kanchanarach, Watchara

    2015-05-01

    Crude proteins of cultured mycelia and fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum were investigated for antioxidant, antibacterial and DNA protective activities. It was found that the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the mycelia protein and fruiting bodies protein extracts against 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radical (ABTS(•+)) were 2.47?±?0.01 and 2.77?±?0.11 ?g protein/ml and against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(•)) were 2.5?±?0.01 and 3.42?±?0.01 ?g protein/ml, respectively. The ferric reducing-antioxidant power (FRAP) values of those samples were 1.73?±?0.01 and 2.62?±?0.01 ?mole trolox/?g protein respectively. Protein hydrolysates prepared by pronase exhibited a weaker antioxidant activity. Both crude proteins showed antibacterial activity, whereas only the mycelia protein extract could protect DNA damage by hydroxyl ((•)OH) radicals. This protein extract was partial purified by Diethyl amino ethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose column and Sulfopropyl (SP)-Sepharose column, obtained major protein with molecular weight about 45 kilo Dalton (kDa). In conclusion, G. lucidum protein extracts have promise potential for applications as antioxidant and antibacterial agents. PMID:25892797

  1. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT METHODS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF DNA FROM FUNGAL CONIDIA BY QUANTITATIVE COMPETITIVE PCR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five different DNA extraction methods were evaluated for their effectiveness in recovering PCR templates from the conidia of a series of fungal species often encountered in indoor air. The test organisms were Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium chrysogenum, Stachybotrys chartaru...

  2. Convergent and General One-Step DNA-Catalyzed Synthesis of Multiply

    E-print Network

    Silverman, Scott K.

    and Scott K. Silverman* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South substrate into a 5-adenylate of the second DNA substrate. This approach can be used to synthesize multiply to the common "foundation strand" (gray). ORGANIC LETTERS 2008 Vol. 10, No. 20 4417-4420 10.1021/ol801568q CCC

  3. Single step aqueous two-phase extraction for downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Chethana, S; Nayak, Chetan A; Madhusudhan, M C; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2015-04-01

    C-phycocyanin, a natural food colorant, is gaining importance worldwide due to its several medical and pharmaceutical applications. In the present study, aqueous two-phase extraction was shown to be an attractive alternative for the downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis. By employing differential partitioning, C-phycocyanin selectively partitioned to the polymer rich (top) phase in concentrated form and contaminant proteins to the salt rich (bottom) phase. This resulted in an increase in the product purity (without losing much of the yield) in a single step without the need of multiple processing steps. Effect of process parameters such as molecular weight, tie line length, phase volume ratio, concentration of phase components on the partitioning behavior of C-phycocyanin was studied. The results were explained based on relative free volume of the phase systems. C-phycocyanin with a purity of 4.32 and yield of about 79 % was obtained at the standardized conditions. PMID:25829627

  4. A rapid method for extracting oocyst DNA from Cryptosporidium-positive human faeces for outbreak investigations.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Rosely A B; Moore, John E; Smith, Huw V

    2006-06-01

    We describe a rapid method for extracting and concentrating Cryptosporidium oocysts from human faecal samples with subsequent DNA preparation for mainstream PCR applications. This method consists of extracting faecal lipids using a modified water-ether treatment and releasing DNA from semi-purified oocysts by freeze thawing in lysis buffer. Following immunomagnetisable separation (IMS), recovery rates of 29.5%, 43.2% and 49.8% were obtained from oocyst-negative solid, semi-solid and liquid faeces, respectively, seeded with 100 +/- 2 C. parvum oocysts, which were enumerated by flow cytometry. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 92 positive human faecal samples including 78 oocyst-positive cases from 2 UK cryptosporidiosis outbreaks (outbreak A = 34 samples, outbreak B = 44 samples) and 14 oocyst-positive, sporadic cases. We used primers targeting the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein gene (COWP; STN-COWP), the 18S rRNA (direct PCR) and the dihydrofolate reductase gene (dhfr, MAS-PCR) fragments to evaluate extracted DNA by PCR. PCR inhibitors were present in 20 samples when template was co-amplified with the 18S rRNA gene primers and an internal control. Template dilution (1/5) in polyvinylpyrrolidone (10 mg ml(-1), pH 8.0) transformed four PCR-negative samples to PCR-positive and increased amplicon intensity in previously positive samples. Eighteen of 20 PCR-negative samples produced visible amplicons when Taq polymerase concentration in the STN-COWP PCR was increased from 2.5 to 5 U. The STN-COWP PCR assay amplified 90 of 92 samples (97.8%) and the MAS-PCR assay amplified 70 of 92 samples (76.1%) tested. In the absence of inhibitors, DNA equivalent to 3 C. parvum oocysts was amplified. PMID:16290112

  5. A simple method to determine bioethanol content in gasoline using two-step extraction and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Shunji; Saito, Masaaki

    2009-12-01

    A simple method for determining bioethanol content in gasoline containing bioethanol (denoted as E-gasoline in this study) is urgently required. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was employed based on the principle that (14)C exists in bioethanol but not in synthetic ethanol. Bioethanol was extracted in two steps by water from E-gasoline containing 3% (E3) or 10% (E10) bioethanol. The (14)C radioactivity was measured by LSC and converted to the amount of bioethanol. The bioethanol content in E-gasoline was determined precisely from the partition coefficient in the extraction and the amount of bioethanol in the water phases: 2.98+/-0.10% for E3 and 10.0+/-0.1% for E10 (means+/-SD; n=3). It appears that this method can be used to determine bioethanol content in E-gasoline quickly and easily. PMID:19577920

  6. Radiostrontium separation and measurement in a single step using plastic scintillators plus selective extractants. Application to aqueous sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Bagán, H; Tarancón, A; Rauret, G; García, J F

    2011-02-01

    This study describes a new protocol for (90)Sr determination in water samples based on the use of a selective extractant (DtBuCH18C6) and plastic scintillator microspheres. The proposed procedure unifies chemical separation and sample measurement preparation in a single step to reduce the effort, time and reagents required for analysis. In addition, the final measurement does not produce mixed waste. The minimum activity detectable for 10 mL of sample solution is 0.46 Bq L(-1). Relative errors for the determination of (90)Sr activity in drinking, sea and river waters are less than 4%. PMID:21237307

  7. COMPARISON OF RAPID METHODS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF BACTERIAL DNA FROM COLONIC AND CECAL LUMEN CONTENTS OF THE PIG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing use of DNA methodologies to study the microflora of the pig gastrointestinal tract requires an efficient recovery of bacterial DNA from intestinal samples. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine which extraction methods are most effective for colonic and cecal lumen sampl...

  8. Extraction of DNA from orange juice, and detection of bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jinhe; Baldwin, Elizabeth; Liao, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Kostenyuk, Igor; Burns, Jacqueline; Irey, Mike

    2013-10-01

    Orange juice processed from Huanglongbing (HLB) affected fruit is often associated with bitter taste and/or off-flavor. HLB disease in Florida is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), a phloem-limited bacterium. The current standard to confirm CLas for citrus trees is to take samples from midribs of leaves, which are rich in phloem tissues, and use a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test to detect the 16S rDNA gene of CLas. It is extremely difficult to detect CLas in orange juice because of the low CLas population, high sugar and pectin concentration, low pH, and possible existence of an inhibitor to DNA amplification. The objective of this research was to improve extraction of DNA from orange juice and detection of CLas by qPCR. Homogenization using a sonicator increased DNA yield by 86% in comparison to mortar and pestle extraction. It is difficult to separate DNA from pectin; however, DNA was successfully extracted by treating the juice with pectinase. Application of an elution column successfully removed the unidentified inhibitor to DNA amplification. This work provided a protocol to extract DNA from whole orange juice and detect CLas in HLB-affected fruit. PMID:24047134

  9. Mimicking the First Step of RNA Splicing: An Artificial DNA Enzyme Can Synthesize Branched RNA Using an Oligonucleotide Leaving Group as a

    E-print Network

    Silverman, Scott K.

    Mimicking the First Step of RNA Splicing: An Artificial DNA Enzyme Can Synthesize Branched RNA mimics the first step of natural RNA splicing. The observation of 7S11-catalyzed branch formation with an oligonucleotide leaving group strengthens this resemblance to natural RNA splicing, with the oligonucleotide

  10. The efficacy of uracil DNA glycosylase pretreatment in amplicon-based massively parallel sequencing with DNA extracted from archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded esophageal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Masakuni; Yokota, Tomoya; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Kusafuka, Kimihide; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takashi; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Advances in mutation testing for molecular-targeted cancer therapies have led to the increased use of archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors. However, DNA extracted from FFPE tumors (FFPE DNA) is problematic for mutation testing, especially for amplicon-based massively parallel sequencing (MPS), owing to DNA fragmentation and artificial C:G?>?T:A single nucleotide variants (SNVs) caused by deamination of cytosine to uracil. Therefore, to reduce artificial C:G?>?T:A SNVs in amplicon-based MPS using FFPE DNA, we evaluated the efficacy of uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) pretreatment, which can eliminate uracil-containing DNA molecules, with 126 archived FFPE esophageal cancer specimens. We also examined the association between the frequency of C:G?>?T:A SNVs and DNA quality, as assessed by a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based assay. UDG pretreatment significantly lowered the frequency of C:G?>?T:A SNVs in highly fragmented DNA (by approximately 60%). This effect was not observed for good- to moderate-quality DNA, suggesting that a predictive assay (i.e., DNA quality assessment) needs to be performed prior to UDG pretreatment. These results suggest that UDG pretreatment is efficacious for mutation testing by amplicon-based MPS with fragmented DNA from FFPE samples. PMID:26194062

  11. A Two-Step Double Filter Method to Extract Open Water Surfaces from Landsat ETM+ Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijing; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, lakes and temporal ponds play a significant role in agriculture and livelihood of local communities as well as in ecology. Monitoring the changes of these open water bodies allows to draw conclusions on water use as well as climatic impacts and can assist in the formulation of a sustainable resource management strategy. The simultaneous monitoring of larger numbers of water bodies with respect to their stage and area is feasible with the aid of remote sensing. Here the monitoring of lake surface areas is discussed. Landsat TM and ETM+ images provide a medium resolution of 30m, and offer an easily available data source to monitor the long term changes of water surfaces in arid and semi-arid regions. In the past great effort was put into developing simple indices to extract water surfaces from satellite images. However, there is a common problem in achieving accurate results with these indices: How to select a threshold value for water pixels without introducing excessive subjective judgment. The threshold value would also have to vary with location, land features and seasons, allowing for inherent uncertainty. A new method was developed using Landsat ETM+ imaginary (30 meter resolution) to extract open water surfaces. This method uses the Normalized Difference of Vegetation Index (NDVI) as the basis for an objective way of selecting threshold values of Modified Normalized Difference of Water Index (MNDWI) and Stress Degree Days (SDD), which were used as a combined filter to extract open water surfaces. We choose two study areas to verify the method. One study area is in Northeast China, where bigger lakes, smaller muddy ponds and wetlands are interspersed with agricultural land and salt crusts. The other one is Kafue Flats in Zambia, where seasonal floods of the Zambezi River create seasonal wetlands in addition to the more permanent water ponds and river channels. For both sites digital globe images of 0.5 meter resolution are available, which were taken within a few days of Landsat passing dates and which will serve here as ground truth information. On their basis the new method was compared to other available methods for extracting water pixels. Compared to the other methods, the new method can extract water surface not only from deep lakes/reservoirs and wetlands but also from small mud ponds in alkali flats and irrigation ponds in the fields. For the big and deep lakes, the extracted boundary of the lakes fits accurately the observed boundary. Five test sites in the study area in Northeast China with only shallow water surfaces were chosen and tested. The extracted water surfaces were compared with each site's digital globe maps, respectively to determine the accuracy of the method. The comparison shows that the method could extract all completely wet pixels (water area covering 100% of the pixel area) in all test sites. For partially wet pixels (50-100% of pixel area), the model can detect 91% of all pixels. No dry pixels were mistaken by the model as water pixels. Keywords: Remote sensing, Landsat ETM+ imaginary, Water Surface, NDVI, MNDWI, and SDD

  12. DNA DNA DNA (d)DNA DNA DNA

    E-print Network

    Hagiya, Masami

    DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA [ 2008] (d)DNA DNA DNA DNA 2 3 DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (a) (c) (b) (d) #12;DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (b) DNA [Tanaka et al.2008] DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA #12;iGEM MIT MIT

  13. A Viral Packaging Motor Varies Its DNA Rotation and Step Size to Preserve Subunit Coordination as the Capsid Fills

    PubMed Central

    Tafoya, Sara; Aathavan, K.; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Multimeric, ring-shaped molecular motors rely on the coordinated action of their subunits to perform crucial biological functions. During these tasks, motors often change their operation in response to regulatory signals. Here, we investigate a viral packaging machine as it fills the capsid with DNA and encounters increasing internal pressure. We find that the motor rotates the DNA during packaging and that the rotation per basepair increases with filling. This change accompanies a reduction in the motor’s step size. We propose that these adjustments preserve motor coordination by allowing one subunit to make periodic, specific, and regulatory contacts with the DNA. At high filling, we also observe the down-regulation of the ATP-binding rate and the emergence of long-lived pauses, suggesting a throttling-down mechanism employed by the motor near the completion of packaging. This study illustrates how a biological motor adjusts its operation in response to changing conditions, while remaining highly coordinated. PMID:24766813

  14. Determination of oil reservoir radiotracer (S14CN-) in a single step using a plastic scintillator extractive resin.

    PubMed

    Bagán, H; Tarancón, A; Stavsetra, L; Rauret, G; García, J F

    2012-07-29

    The analysis of radiotracers is important in the study of oil reservoir dynamics. One of the most widely used radiotracer is S(14)CN(-). Prior to activity measurements by Liquid Scintillation (LS), routine determinations require the pretreatment steps of purification and concentration of the samples using anion exchange columns. The final elution media produces samples with high salt concentration that may lead to problems with phase separation during the LS measurement. Plastic Scintillation (PS) is an alternative technique that provides a solid surface that can be used as a platform for the immobilisation of selective extractants to obtain a PS resin. The proposed procedure unifies chemical separation and sample measurement preparation in a single step, serving to reduce the number of reagents needed and manpower required for the analysis while also avoiding mixed waste production by LS. The objective of this study is to develop a PS resin for the determination of (14)C-labelled thiocyanate radiotracer in water samples. For this purpose, the immobilisation procedure was optimised, including optimisation of the proportion of PS microspheres:extractant and the use of a control blank to monitor the PS resin immobilisation process. The breakthrough volume was studied and the detection and quantification limits for 100 mL of sample were determined to be 0.08 Bq L(-1) and 0.31 Bq L(-1), respectively. The established procedure was applied to active samples from oil reservoirs and errors lower than 5% in the sample determinations were obtained. PMID:22769002

  15. Ancient Microbes from Halite Fluid Inclusions: Optimized Surface Sterilization and DNA Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Timofeeff, Michael N.; Spathis, Rita; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Lum, J. Koji

    2011-01-01

    Fluid inclusions in evaporite minerals (halite, gypsum, etc.) potentially preserve genetic records of microbial diversity and changing environmental conditions of Earth's hydrosphere for nearly one billion years. Here we describe a robust protocol for surface sterilization and retrieval of DNA from fluid inclusions in halite that, unlike previously published methods, guarantees removal of potentially contaminating surface-bound DNA. The protocol involves microscopic visualization of cell structures, deliberate surface contamination followed by surface sterilization with acid and bleach washes, and DNA extraction using Amicon centrifugal filters. Methods were verified on halite crystals of four different ages from Saline Valley, California (modern, 36 ka, 64 ka, and 150 ka), with retrieval of algal and archaeal DNA, and characterization of the algal community using ITS1 sequences. The protocol we developed opens up new avenues for study of ancient microbial ecosystems in fluid inclusions, understanding microbial evolution across geological time, and investigating the antiquity of life on earth and other parts of the solar system. PMID:21694765

  16. A novel reliable method of DNA extraction from olive oil suitable for molecular traceability.

    PubMed

    Raieta, Katia; Muccillo, Livio; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2015-04-01

    Extra virgin olive oil production has a worldwide economic impact. The use of this brand, however, is of great concern to Institutions and private industries because of the increasing number of fraud and adulteration attempts to the market products. Here, we present a novel, reliable and not expensive method for extracting the DNA from commercial virgin and extra virgin olive oils. The DNA is stable overtime and amenable for molecular analyses; in fact, by carrying out simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers analysis, we characterise the genetic profile of monovarietal olive oils. By comparing the oil-derived pattern with that of the corresponding tree, we can unambiguously identify four cultivars from Samnium, a region of Southern Italy, and distinguish them from reference and more widely used varieties. Through a parentage statistical analysis, we also identify the putative pollinators, establishing an unprecedented and powerful tool for olive oil traceability. PMID:25442596

  17. A novel approach on fluid dispensing for a DNA/RNA extraction chip package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ling; Premachandran, C. S.; Chew, Michelle; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Diao; Pinjala, D.

    2008-02-01

    Micro fluidic package with integrated reservoirs has been developed for DNA /RNA extraction application. A membrane based pump which consists of a reservoir to store reagents and a pin valve to control the fluid is developed to dispense the reagents into the chip. A programmable external actuator is fabricated to dispense the fluid from the membrane pump into the DNA chip. An elastic and high elongation thin rubber membrane is used to seal the membrane pump and at the same time prevent actuator from mixing with different reagents in the micro fluidic package. Break displacement during actuation of membrane pump sealing material is studied with different ratios of PDMS and other types of rubber materials. The fluid flow from the reservoir to the chip is controlled by a pin valve which is activated during the external actuation. A CFD simulation is performed to study the pumping action dusting the external actuation and is validated with experimental results.

  18. Evaluation of antibacterial, antioxidant and DNA protective capacity of Chenopodium album's ethanolic leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Elif Korcan, S; Aksoy, Onur; Erdo?mu?, S Feyza; Ci?erci, ? Hakk?; Konuk, Muhsin

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the antibacterial effects of Chenopodium album's ethanolic leaf extract (CAE) on all the Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms and evaluated the protective effects of CAE on both yeast and human mononuclear leukocytes' genomic DNA upon oxidative shock. Antibacterial activity was recorded on Bacillus subtilis with 13 mm of inhibition zone. Total oxidative status (TOS) and the total antioxidative status (TAS) levels were determined to evaluate the antioxidant activity of CAE. Results indicated that there was a good correlation between dose of CAE and TAS levels. We also observed that CAE protect the DNA of both yeast and mononuclear leukocytes against the damaging effect of hydrogen peroxide. The comet assay, applied on both Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 (MATa his3?1 leu2?0 met15?0 ura3?0) and human leukocytes, results suggested that there was statistically significant correlation between CAE dilutions and antigenotoxic activity. PMID:22897836

  19. DNA stretch during electrophoresis due to a step change in mobility.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Patrick T; Doyle, Patrick S

    2007-07-01

    We investigate DNA stretching during electrophoresis when the mobility abruptly changes. This is a simplified geometry that produces a nonhomogeneous strain rate over the scale of a single molecule. An effective Weissenberg number (Wi) and Deborah number were identified, and the degree of stretching was examined as a function of these two parameters. The system does not undergo a coil-stretch transition. The finite extensibility of the chains only affects the response if the chain is stretched to a significant fraction of the contour length. The wormlike chain shows a characteristic approach to full extension of Wi(-1/2). PMID:17677482

  20. Improved methods for capture, extraction, and quantitative assay of environmental DNA from Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.).

    PubMed

    Turner, Cameron R; Miller, Derryl J; Coyne, Kathryn J; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  1. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening approach.

  2. Improved Methods for Capture, Extraction, and Quantitative Assay of Environmental DNA from Asian Bigheaded Carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cameron R.; Miller, Derryl J.; Coyne, Kathryn J.; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  3. Use of supercritical fluid extraction for development of a single-step method for removal of shale oil from Green River oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, J.F.; Blanche, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of the experimentation described in this report was to examine the possibility of combining a methanol-water treatment step, which results in liquid yields of about 90%, with a fast (one hour) solvent extraction step. If successful, the experimentation would result in the development of a fast, high-yield, single-step recovery process. The terminology ''single-step'' refers to the fact that the shale is handled only once in the recovery process rather than being treated and then extracted in two separate steps. The first two single-step extraction experiments, run under the same experimental conditions, demonstrate the possibility of quickly recovering high yields of liquid product with only one handling of the shale. The third experiment was performed by heating the shale in an inert atmosphere under the same conditions of time and temperature followed by extraction with methylene chloride solvent. The third experiment serves as a benchmark to compare the effectiveness of methanol-water with short reaction-time dry heating conditions in the recovery process. The experiments yielded two important results. First, most of the organic matter was recovered by methylene chloride in the first extraction step, which required less than three hours to perform. The second important result was that dry heating on the shale under these conditions was ineffective in allowing oil to be recovered. Overall, these experiments were successful for quickly extracting large percentages of organic material from Green River shale using a single-step extraction technique. This procedure reduces experimental complexities reported earlier and avoids possible alteration of product by atmospheric oxygen. The technique shows promise for the development of a fast, efficient shale oil recovery process. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Next-generation DNA sequencing of HEXA: a step in the right direction for carrier screening.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jodi D; Greger, Valerie; Strovel, Erin T; Blitzer, Miriam G; Umbarger, Mark A; Kennedy, Caleb; Bishop, Brian; Saunders, Patrick; Porreca, Gregory J; Schienda, Jaclyn; Davie, Jocelyn; Hallam, Stephanie; Towne, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is the prototype for ethnic-based carrier screening, with a carrier rate of ?1/27 in Ashkenazi Jews and French Canadians. HexA enzyme analysis is the current gold standard for TSD carrier screening (detection rate ?98%), but has technical limitations. We compared DNA analysis by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) plus an assay for the 7.6 kb deletion to enzyme analysis for TSD carrier screening using 74 samples collected from participants at a TSD family conference. Fifty-one of 74 participants had positive enzyme results (46 carriers, five late-onset Tay-Sachs [LOTS]), 16 had negative, and seven had inconclusive results. NGS + 7.6 kb del screening of HEXA found a pathogenic mutation, pseudoallele, or variant of unknown significance (VUS) in 100% of the enzyme-positive or obligate carrier/enzyme-inconclusive samples. NGS detected the B1 allele in two enzyme-negative obligate carriers. Our data indicate that NGS can be used as a TSD clinical carrier screening tool. We demonstrate that NGS can be superior in detecting TSD carriers compared to traditional enzyme and genotyping methodologies, which are limited by false-positive and false-negative results and ethnically focused, limited mutation panels, respectively, but is not ready for sole use due to lack of information regarding some VUS. PMID:24498621

  5. Initial steps towards a production platform for DNA sequence analysis on the grid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics is confronted with a new data explosion due to the availability of high throughput DNA sequencers. Data storage and analysis becomes a problem on local servers, and therefore it is needed to switch to other IT infrastructures. Grid and workflow technology can help to handle the data more efficiently, as well as facilitate collaborations. However, interfaces to grids are often unfriendly to novice users. Results In this study we reused a platform that was developed in the VL-e project for the analysis of medical images. Data transfer, workflow execution and job monitoring are operated from one graphical interface. We developed workflows for two sequence alignment tools (BLAST and BLAT) as a proof of concept. The analysis time was significantly reduced. All workflows and executables are available for the members of the Dutch Life Science Grid and the VL-e Medical virtual organizations All components are open source and can be transported to other grid infrastructures. Conclusions The availability of in-house expertise and tools facilitates the usage of grid resources by new users. Our first results indicate that this is a practical, powerful and scalable solution to address the capacity and collaboration issues raised by the deployment of next generation sequencers. We currently adopt this methodology on a daily basis for DNA sequencing and other applications. More information and source code is available via http://www.bioinformaticslaboratory.nl/ PMID:21156038

  6. Introduction: DNA Electrophoresis Fralin Life Science

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    .................................... 12 Student Pre-Lab Activity: What is DNA? DNA extraction from strawberry ..... Teacher guide: DNA extraction from strawberry.................................. 14 Student guide: DNA extraction from strawberry.................................. 16

  7. In vitro free radical scavenging and DNA damage protective property of Coriandrum sativum L. leaves extract.

    PubMed

    Harsha, S N; Anilakumar, K R

    2014-08-01

    Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander), an everyday spice in the Indian kitchen is known to add flavor to the cuisine. It is an annual herb belonging to the Apiaceae (Umbellifera) family. The hydro-alcohol extract of Coriandrum sativum L. at the dose of 1 mg/ml was subjected to a series of in vitro assays viz. 2, 2'- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, lipid peroxidation by thiobarbituric acid, reducing power and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging in order to study its antioxidant efficacy in detail. The amount of flavonoids in 70% ethanol extract was found to be 44.5 ?g and that of the total phenols was 133.74 ?g gallic acid equivalents per mg extract. The extracts of the leaves showed metal chelating power, with IC50 values, 368.12 ?g/ml where as that of standard EDTA was 26.7 ?g/ml. The IC50 values for 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical scavenging was 222 ?g/ml where as that of standard ascorbic acid was 22.6 ?g/ml. The NO scavenging activity of the extract of the leaves showed IC50 value of 815.6 ?g/ml; at the same time the standard BHA had 49.1 ?g/ml. All the plant extracts provided DNA damage protection; however, the protection provided at the dose of 8 ?g/ml was comparable to that of standard gallic acid. The Coriandrum sativum leaf extract was able to prevent in vitro lipid peroxidation with IC50 values; 589.6 ?g/ml where as that of standard BHA was 16.3 ?g/ml. Our results also showed significant ferric reducing power indicating the hydrogen donating ability of the extract. This study indicated the potential of the leaf extract as a source of natural antioxidants or nutraceuticals that could be of use in food industry with potential application to reduce oxidative stress in living system. PMID:25114344

  8. A Modular, DNA-Based Beacon for Single-Step Fluorescence Detection of Antibodies and Other Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ranallo, Simona; Rossetti, Marianna; Plaxco, Kevin W; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    A versatile platform for the one-step fluorescence detection of both monovalent and multivalent proteins has been developed. This system is based on a conformation-switching stem-loop DNA scaffold that presents a small-molecule, polypeptide, or nucleic-acid recognition element on each of its two stem strands. The steric strain associated with the binding of one (multivalent) or two (monovalent) target molecules to these elements opens the stem, enhancing the emission of an attached fluorophore/quencher pair. The sensors respond rapidly (<10?min) and selectively, enabling the facile detection of specific proteins even in complex samples, such as blood serum. The versatility of the platform was demonstrated by detecting five bivalent proteins (four antibodies and the chemokine platelet-derived growth factor) and two monovalent proteins (a Fab fragment and the transcription factor TBP) with low nanomolar detection limits and no detectable cross-reactivity. PMID:26337144

  9. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  10. Meta-barcoded evaluation of the ISO standard 11063 DNA extraction procedure to characterize soil bacterial and fungal community diversity and composition

    PubMed Central

    Terrat, Sebastien; Plassart, Pierre; Bourgeois, Emilie; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Adele-Dit-De-Renseville, Nathalie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Bispo, Antonio; Chabbi, Abad; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Ranjard, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of three soil DNA extraction procedures, namely the International Organization for Standardization (ISO-11063, GnS-GII and modified ISO procedure (ISOm), on the taxonomic diversity and composition of soil bacterial and fungal communities. The efficacy of each soil DNA extraction method was assessed on five soils, differing in their physico-chemical characteristics and land use. A meta-barcoded pyrosequencing approach targeting 16S and 18S rRNA genes was applied to characterize soil microbial communities. We first observed that the GnS-GII introduced some heterogeneity in bacterial composition between replicates. Then, although no major difference was observed between extraction procedures for soil bacterial diversity, we saw that the number of fungal genera could be underestimated by the ISO-11063. In particular, this procedure underestimated the detection in several soils of the genera Cryptococcus, Pseudallescheria, Hypocrea and Plectosphaerella, which are of ecological interest. Based on these results, we recommend using the ISOm method for studies focusing on both the bacterial and fungal communities. Indeed, the ISOm procedure provides a better evaluation of bacterial and fungal communities and is limited to the modification of the mechanical lysis step of the existing ISO-11063 standard. PMID:25195809

  11. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences

    PubMed Central

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W.; Taylor, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  12. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 ?L droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3?min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10?min. Following extraction, the 1500?bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10?min for 30?cycles. The total assay time was 23?min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 ?L droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5?min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of accuracy and automation. PMID:22947281

  13. Novel DNA Extraction Method Unveiled the Ancient Hot Deep Biosphere Concealed in Terrestrial Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouduka, M.; Suko, T.; Okuzawa, K.; Fukuda, A.; Nanba, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Sakata, S.; Ito, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-12-01

    It has been proposed that the hot deep biosphere is distributed deeply in the crust of the Earth. Below the upper limit of life, prokaryotic habitats extend at a depth of 4 km within a typical range of thermal gradients (2.5-3°C/100m). In contrary, large geothermal gradients allow the hot deep biosphere approaching to the Earth’s surface. We conducted aseptic and deoxygenated drilling targeting Miocene marine siliceous rocks in a tectonically stable inland fore-arc basin in central Japan. Although the in-situ groundwater temperature was 30.2°C at a maximum drilling depth of 352 mbgl, opal-CT and clinoptilolite, which commonly form as a result of progressive burial at 30-60°C and over 70°C, respectively, were detected by XRD analysis. However, burial-driven degradation and transformation of sterols (sterene to sterane) was not evident in the core samples. As presented by Y. Suzuki et al. in this meeting, extant microbial populations were dominated by Pseudomonas spp. and Flavobacterium spp. with cell numbers ranging ~107-108 cells/cm3 rock. Despite the abundance of microbial cells, DNA were not extracted from the core samples by conventional methods. We developed a DNA extraction method to avoid binding of DNA onto the siliceous mineral matrix by heating under alkaline conditions, which resulted in the successful retrieval of PCR-amplifiable DNA. Unexpectedly, 16S rRNA gene sequences closely related thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Thermus thermophilus were dominant in the clone libraries from 300- and 350-m deep core samples, while those almost identical to the Pseudomonas spp. were minor. Based on the correlation between the GC contents of 16S rRNA gene sequences and growth temperatures of prokaryotes, the estimated growth temperatures were 90.0°C (G+C=66.3%) and 67.5°C (G+C=61.3%) for G. stearothermophilus and T. thermophilus, respectively. From these results, it is implied that temperature rise in the past led to the colonization of thermophilic bacteria and the transformation of silica minerals in the deep subsurface. As intensive erosion is unlikely around the drilling site, a short period of hydrothermal activities rather than long-term burial at great depth caused high temperature conditions, which might explain the lack of maturity in hydrocarbon. A novel DNA-based approach coupled mineralogical and organic geochemical analyses has the potential to reconstruct ancient biogeochemical processes mediated in the deep subsurface as well as geothermal history. This study was supported by grants from the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES).

  14. Two separable functions of Ctp1 in the early steps of meiotic DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lijuan; Milman, Neta; Nambiar, Mridula; Smith, Gerald R.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is essential for crossing-over and viable gamete formation and requires removal of Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes from 5? ends (clipping) and their resection to generate invasive 3?-end single-stranded DNA (resection). Ctp1 (Com1, Sae2, CtIP homolog) acting with the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is required in both steps. We isolated multiple S. pombe ctp1 mutants deficient in clipping but proficient in resection during meiosis. Remarkably, all of the mutations clustered in or near the conserved CxxC or RHR motif in the C-terminal portion. The mutants tested, like ctp1?, were clipping-deficient by both genetic and physical assays­. But, unlike ctp1?, these mutants were recombination-proficient for Rec12 (Spo11 homolog)-independent break-repair and resection-proficient by physical assay. We conclude that the intracellular Ctp1 C-terminal portion is essential for clipping, while the N-terminal portion is sufficient for DSB end-resection. This conclusion agrees with purified human CtIP resection and endonuclease activities being independent. Our mutants provide intracellular evidence for separable functions of Ctp1. Some mutations truncate Ctp1 in the same region as one of the CtIP mutations linked to the Seckel and Jawad severe developmental syndromes, suggesting that these syndromes are caused by a lack of clipping at DSB ends that require repair. PMID:26130711

  15. A new rapid method for Clostridium difficile DNA extraction and detection in stool: toward point-of-care diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Freifeld, Alison G; Simonsen, Kari A; Booth, Christine S; Zhao, Xing; Whitney, Scott E; Karre, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Viljoen, Hendrik J

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new method for the rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection, with stool sample preparation and DNA extraction by heat and physical disruption in a single-use lysis microreactor (LMR), followed by a rapid PCR amplification step. All steps can be accomplished in <20 minutes overall. Gel electrophoresis is currently used to detect the amplification product, pending real-time availability with an ultra-rapid thermocycler. Compared with the dual enzyme immunoassay (EIA) screening test (C. diff Quik Chek Complete; Techlab, Blacksburg, VA), the novel LMR/PCR assay showed complete concordance with all glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) results (GDH(+)/toxin(+), n = 48; GDH(-)/toxin(-), n = 81). All 69 stool samples with discordant EIA results (GDH(+)/toxin(-)) were tested by both the LMR/PCR assay and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification test (LAMP) (Illumigene C. difficile; Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH). In 64/69 EIA-discordant samples, LAMP and LMR/PCR results matched (both positive in 29 sample and both negative in 35 samples); in the remaining 5 samples, results were discrepant between the LAMP assay (all five negative) and the LMR/PCR assay (all 5 positive). Overall, LMR/PCR testing matched the current algorithm of EIA and/or LAMP reflex testing in 193/198 (97.5%) samples. The present proof-of-concept study suggests that the novel LMR/PCR technique described here may be developed as an inexpensive, rapid, and reliable point-of-care diagnostic test for C. difficile infection and other infectious diseases. PMID:22402170

  16. A two-step nanofiltration process for the production of phenolic-rich fractions from artichoke aqueous extracts.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Alfredo; Conidi, Carmela; Figueroa, René Ruby; Muñoz, Roberto Castro

    2015-01-01

    Commercial nanofiltration (NF) membranes in spiral-wound configuration (NP030 from Microdyn Nadir and Desal DK from GE Water & Process Technologies) were used in a sequential design in order to produce a separated fraction of phenolic and sugar compounds from an aqueous artichoke extract. For both membranes, the effect of transmembrane pressure (TMP) on the permeation flux was evaluated. In optimized conditions of TMP, the NP030 membrane exhibited high rejections of apigenin, cynarin and chlorogenic acid (higher than 85%); on the other hand, very low rejections of fructose, glucose and sucrose (lower than 4%) were measured. Starting from an extract with a total antioxidant activity (TAA) of 5.28 mM trolox a retentate fraction with a TAA of 47.75 mM trolox was obtained. The NF permeate from the NP030 membrane was processed with the Desal DK membrane in optimized conditions of TMP producing a permeate stream free of phenolic and sugar compounds. Accordingly, as most part of phenolic compounds was removed in the first NF step, the concentration of sugar compounds in the NF retentate had much higher results than that of phenolic compounds. PMID:25913377

  17. A Two-Step Nanofiltration Process for the Production of Phenolic-Rich Fractions from Artichoke Aqueous Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Alfredo; Conidi, Carmela; Ruby Figueroa, René; Castro Muñoz, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Commercial nanofiltration (NF) membranes in spiral-wound configuration (NP030 from Microdyn Nadir and Desal DK from GE Water & Process Technologies) were used in a sequential design in order to produce a separated fraction of phenolic and sugar compounds from an aqueous artichoke extract. For both membranes, the effect of transmembrane pressure (TMP) on the permeation flux was evaluated. In optimized conditions of TMP, the NP030 membrane exhibited high rejections of apigenin, cynarin and chlorogenic acid (higher than 85%); on the other hand, very low rejections of fructose, glucose and sucrose (lower than 4%) were measured. Starting from an extract with a total antioxidant activity (TAA) of 5.28 mM trolox a retentate fraction with a TAA of 47.75 mM trolox was obtained. The NF permeate from the NP030 membrane was processed with the Desal DK membrane in optimized conditions of TMP producing a permeate stream free of phenolic and sugar compounds. Accordingly, as most part of phenolic compounds was removed in the first NF step, the concentration of sugar compounds in the NF retentate had much higher results than that of phenolic compounds. PMID:25913377

  18. A one-step extraction procedure for the screening of cocaine, amphetamines and cannabinoids in postmortem blood samples.

    PubMed

    Pelição, Fabrício Souza; Peres, Mariana Dadalto; Pissinate, Jauber Fornaciari; De Martinis, Bruno Spinosa

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous detection and quantification in postmortem whole blood samples of cocaine (COC), amphetamines (AMPs) and cannabis; the main drugs involved in cases of impaired driving in Brazil. The analytes were extracted by solid-phase extraction by means of Bond-Elute Certify cartridges, derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide at 80°C for 30 min and analyzed by GC-MS. Linearity ranged from 10 to 500 ng/mL, except for ecgonine methyl ester, for which linearity ranged from 10 to 100 ng/mL. Inter- and intra-day imprecision ranged from 2.8 to 18.4% and from 1.5 to 14.9%, respectively. Accuracy values lay between 86.9 and 104.4%. The limit of quantitation for all drugs was 10 ng/mL and recoveries were >74% for all analytes, except for cannabinoids, which showed poor recovery (?30%). The developed method was applied to real samples collected from deceased victims due to traffic accidents. These samples were selected according to the results obtained in immunoassay screening on collected urine samples. Five samples were positive for the presence of COC and metabolites, four samples were positive for cannabinoids, six samples were positive for AMPs and two samples were drug negative. Some samples were positive for more than one class of drug. Results obtained from whole blood samples showed good agreement with urine screening. The developed method proved capable of quantifying all three classes of drugs of abuse proposed in this study, through a one-step extraction procedure. PMID:24782143

  19. 5-Methylation of cytosine in CG:CG base-pair steps: a physicochemical mechanism for the epigenetic control of DNA nanomechanics.

    PubMed

    Yusufaly, Tahir I; Li, Yun; Olson, Wilma K

    2013-12-27

    van der Waals density functional theory is integrated with analysis of a non-redundant set of protein-DNA crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database to study the stacking energetics of CG:CG base-pair steps, specifically the role of cytosine 5-methylation. Principal component analysis of the steps reveals the dominant collective motions to correspond to a tensile "opening" mode and two shear "sliding" and "tearing" modes in the orthogonal plane. The stacking interactions of the methyl groups globally inhibit CG:CG step overtwisting while simultaneously softening the modes locally via potential energy modulations that create metastable states. Additionally, the indirect effects of the methyl groups on possible base-pair steps neighboring CG:CG are observed to be of comparable importance to their direct effects on CG:CG. The results have implications for the epigenetic control of DNA mechanics. PMID:24313757

  20. Antioxidant activity of herbaceous plant extracts protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herbaceous plants containing antioxidants can protect against DNA damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant substances, antioxidant activity, and protection of DNA from oxidative damage in human lymphocytes induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our methods used acidic methanol and water extractions from six herbaceous plants, including Bidens alba (BA), Lycium chinense (LC), Mentha arvensis (MA), Plantago asiatica (PA), Houttuynia cordata (HC), and Centella asiatica (CA). Methods Antioxidant compounds such as flavonol and polyphenol were analyzed. Antioxidant activity was determined by the inhibition percentage of conjugated diene formation in a linoleic acid emulsion system and by trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay. Their antioxidative capacities for protecting human lymphocyte DNA from H2O2-induced strand breaks was evaluated by comet assay. Results The studied plants were found to be rich in flavonols, especially myricetin in BA, morin in MA, quercetin in HC, and kaemperol in CA. In addition, polyphenol abounded in BA and CA. The best conjugated diene formation inhibition percentage was found in the acidic methanolic extract of PA. Regarding TEAC, the best antioxidant activity was generated from the acidic methanolic extract of HC. Water and acidic methanolic extracts of MA and HC both had better inhibition percentages of tail DNA% and tail moment as compared to the rest of the tested extracts, and significantly suppressed oxidative damage to lymphocyte DNA. Conclusion Quercetin and morin are important for preventing peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA, and the leaves of MA and HC extracts may have excellent potential as functional ingredients representing potential sources of natural antioxidants. PMID:24279749

  1. Fast and simple DNA extraction from saliva and sperm cells obtained from the skin or isolated from swabs.

    PubMed

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Mályusz, Victoria; Fremdt, Heike; Koch, Christine; Simeoni, Eva; Schwark, Thorsten

    2006-05-01

    The forensic scientist often has to cope with problematic samples from the crime scene due to their minute size and thus the low amount of extractable DNA. The retrieval of DNA from swabs taken from the surface of the skin, for example, in cases of strangulation, can be especially difficult. We systematically investigated swabs taken from the skin (to obtain a genetic profile from the victim and also from a possible offender) and from sperm cell containing swabs using two extraction kits: the Invisorb forensic and the Invisorb spin swab kit (both Invitek, Germany). DNA quality and quantity were tested on ethidium bromide containing agarose gels and in a highly sensitive duplex-PCR, which amplifies fragments specific for mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. Absolute quantification was done using real time PCR. Samples, which were positive in the duplex-PCR, were also employed to genetic fingerprinting using the Powerplex ES and the AmpFlSTRIdentifiler(TM) kits. Our study shows that the easy-to-use Invisorb spin swab kit is very suitable for DNA isolation from swabs taken from the skin and also from sperm cells. Retrieval of cells from the skin with swabs moistened in extraction buffer, not in distilled water, led to a significant higher DNA yield. PMID:16516526

  2. Enhanced DPPH radical scavenging activity and DNA protection effect of litchi pericarp extract by Aspergillus awamori bioconversion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) pericarp is a major byproduct which contains a significant amount of polyphenol. This study was designed to biotransformation litchi pericarp extract (LPE) by Aspergillus awamori to produce more bioactive compounds with stronger antioxidant activities. Results The study exhibited that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activities significantly (p?extracted fraction and from 25.41% to 36.82% in the ethyl acetate-extracted fraction. Application of DNA cleavage assay further demonstrated the enhanced protection effect of the fermented phenolics on DNA damage. It is also noted that the water-extracted fraction of the fermented LPE possessed a much stronger capacity than the ethyl acetate-extracted fraction to prevent from damage of supercoiled DNA. Interestingly, it was found that some new compounds such as catechin and quercetin appeared after of A. awamori fermentation of LPE, which could account for the enhanced antioxidant activity. Conclusion The DPPH radical scavenging activity and DNA protection effect of LPE were increased by Aspergillus awamori bioconversion while some compounds responsible for the enhanced antioxidant activity were identified. This study provided an effective way of utilizing fruit pericarp as a readily accessible source of the natural antioxidants in food industry and, thus, extended the application area such as fruit by-products. PMID:23016522

  3. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    2012-04-01

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study, DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples; however, differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six different primer pairs targeting 16S rRNA genes of significant bacterial groups, and the community composition was evaluated by comparing specific ratios of the calculated abundances. In seven of nine cases, the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene ratio was significantly higher in fecal samples that had been frozen compared to identical samples that had not. This effect was further supported by qPCR analysis of bacterial groups within these two phyla. The results demonstrate that storage conditions of fecal samples may adversely affect the determined Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio, which is a frequently used biomarker in gut microbiology. PMID:22325006

  4. Determination of gold, indium, tellurium and thallium in the same sample digest of geological materials by atomic-absorption spectroscopy and two-step solvent extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubert, A.E.; Chao, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    A rock, soil, or stream-sediment sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric acid, aqua regia, and hydrobromic acid-bromine solution. Gold, thallium, indium and tellurium are separated and concentrated from the sample digest by a two-step MIBK extraction at two concentrations of hydrobromic add. Gold and thallium are first extracted from 0.1M hydrobromic acid medium, then indium and tellurium are extracted from 3M hydrobromic acid in the presence of ascorbic acid to eliminate iron interference. The elements are then determined by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The two-step solvent extraction can also be used in conjunction with electrothermal atomic-absorption methods to lower the detection limits for all four metals in geological materials. ?? 1985.

  5. Detection of polychlorinated biphenyl degradation genes in polluted sediments by direct DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Erb, R W; Wagner-Döbler, I

    1993-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to specifically detect the DNA sequences for the bphC gene, the meta-cleavage enzyme of the aerobic catabolic pathway for biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyl degradation, in aquatic sediments without prior cultivation of microorganisms by using extraction of total DNA, PCR amplification of bphC sequences, and detection with specific gene probes. The direct DNA extraction protocol used was modified to enhance lysis efficiency. Crude extracts of DNA were further purified by gel filtration, which yielded DNA that could be used for the PCR. PCR primers were designed for conserved regions of the bphC gene from a sequence alignment of five known sequences. The specificity of PCR amplification was verified by using digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes which were located internal to the amplified gene sequence. The detection limit for the bphC gene of Pseudomonas paucimobilis Q1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 was 100 cells per g (wet weight) or approximately five copies of the target sequence per PCR reaction mixture. In total-DNA extracts of aerobic top layers of sediment samples obtained from three different sampling sites along the Elbe River, which has a long history of anthropogenic pollution, Pseudomonas sp. strain LB 400-like sequences for the bphC gene were detected, but P. paucimobilis Q1 sequences were not detected. No bphC sequences were detected in an unpolluted lake sediment. A restriction analysis did not reveal any heterogeneity in the PCR product, and the possibility that sequences highly related to the bphC gene (namely, nahC and todE) were present was excluded.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8285706

  6. Locking ssDNA in a Graphene-Terraces Nanopore and Steering Its Step-by-Step Transportation via Electric Trigger

    E-print Network

    Lv, Wenping; Xu, Dongsheng; Wu, Renan

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the nanopore terraces constructed on a multilayer graphene sheet could be employed to con-trol the conformation and transportation of an ssDNA for nanopore sequencing. As adsorbed on a terraced graphene na-nopore, the ssDNA has no in-plane swing nearby the nanopore, and can be locked on graphene terraces in a stretched con-formation. Under biasing, the accumulated ions near the nanopore promote the translocation of the locked ssDNA, and also disturb the balance between the driven force and resistance force acted on the nucleotide in pore. A critical force is found to be necessary in trigging the kickoff of the ssDNA translocation, implying an inherent field effect of the terraced graphene nanopore. By changing the intensities of electric field as trigger signal, the stop and go of an ssDNA in the nanopore are manipulated at single nucleobase level. The velocity of ssDNA in the nanopore can also be regulated by the frequency of the electro-stimulations. As a result, a new scheme of...

  7. One-Step Analysis of DNA/Chitosan Complexes by Field-Flow Fractionation Reveals Particle Size and Free Chitosan Content

    E-print Network

    Buschmann, Michael

    with chitosan was analyzed by asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4) with online UVOne-Step Analysis of DNA/Chitosan Complexes by Field-Flow Fractionation Reveals Particle Size and Free Chitosan Content Pei Lian Ma, Michael D. Buschmann, and Franc¸oise M. Winnik*, Department

  8. High-throughput, Automated Extraction of DNA and RNA from Clinical Samples using TruTip Technology on Common Liquid Handling Robots

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Rebecca C.; Gindlesperger, Alissa; Stokes, Tinsley; Brady, Dane; Thakore, Nitu; Belgrader, Philip; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2013-01-01

    TruTip is a simple nucleic acid extraction technology whereby a porous, monolithic binding matrix is inserted into a pipette tip. The geometry of the monolith can be adapted for specific pipette tips ranging in volume from 1.0 to 5.0 ml. The large porosity of the monolith enables viscous or complex samples to readily pass through it with minimal fluidic backpressure. Bi-directional flow maximizes residence time between the monolith and sample, and enables large sample volumes to be processed within a single TruTip. The fundamental steps, irrespective of sample volume or TruTip geometry, include cell lysis, nucleic acid binding to the inner pores of the TruTip monolith, washing away unbound sample components and lysis buffers, and eluting purified and concentrated nucleic acids into an appropriate buffer. The attributes and adaptability of TruTip are demonstrated in three automated clinical sample processing protocols using an Eppendorf epMotion 5070, Hamilton STAR and STARplus liquid handling robots, including RNA isolation from nasopharyngeal aspirate, genomic DNA isolation from whole blood, and fetal DNA extraction and enrichment from large volumes of maternal plasma (respectively). PMID:23793016

  9. High-throughput, automated extraction of DNA and RNA from clinical samples using TruTip technology on common liquid handling robots.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Rebecca C; Gindlesperger, Alissa; Stokes, Tinsley; Brady, Dane; Thakore, Nitu; Belgrader, Philip; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2013-01-01

    TruTip is a simple nucleic acid extraction technology whereby a porous, monolithic binding matrix is inserted into a pipette tip. The geometry of the monolith can be adapted for specific pipette tips ranging in volume from 1.0 to 5.0 ml. The large porosity of the monolith enables viscous or complex samples to readily pass through it with minimal fluidic backpressure. Bi-directional flow maximizes residence time between the monolith and sample, and enables large sample volumes to be processed within a single TruTip. The fundamental steps, irrespective of sample volume or TruTip geometry, include cell lysis, nucleic acid binding to the inner pores of the TruTip monolith, washing away unbound sample components and lysis buffers, and eluting purified and concentrated nucleic acids into an appropriate buffer. The attributes and adaptability of TruTip are demonstrated in three automated clinical sample processing protocols using an Eppendorf epMotion 5070, Hamilton STAR and STARplus liquid handling robots, including RNA isolation from nasopharyngeal aspirate, genomic DNA isolation from whole blood, and fetal DNA extraction and enrichment from large volumes of maternal plasma (respectively). PMID:23793016

  10. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from DNA extracts of 12 samples and compared to clone libraries previously generated using RNA extracts from the same samples. Phylogenetic analysis of 761 DNA-based ...

  11. 5-Methylation of Cytosine in CG:CG Base-Pair Steps: A Physicochemical Mechanism for the Epigenetic Control of DNA Nanomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Olson, Wilma; Li, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals density functional theory is integrated with analysis of a non-redundant set of protein-DNA crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database to study the stacking energetics of CG:CG base-pair steps, specifically the role of cytosine 5-methylation. Principal component analysis of the steps reveals the dominant collective motions to correspond to a tensile ``opening'' mode and two shear ``sliding'' and ``tearing'' modes in the orthogonal plane. The stacking interactions of the methyl groups are observed to globally inhibit CG:CG step overtwisting while simultaneously softening the modes locally via potential energy modulations that create metastable states. The results have implications for the epigenetic control of DNA mechanics.

  12. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in th...

  13. Extraction of Plasmid DNA The majority of the work done with plasmids in M. tuberculosis strains is with plasmids

    E-print Network

    Extraction of Plasmid DNA The majority of the work done with plasmids in M. tuberculosis strains for studies in M. tuberculosis are shuttle plasmids that have two plasmid origins of replication: one for use to retrieve a plasmid from an M. tuberculosis transformant to verify the integrity of an area of interest

  14. A Method for DNA Extraction from the Desert Cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis and Its Application to Identification of ftsZ

    PubMed Central

    Billi, Daniela; Grilli Caiola, Maria; Paolozzi, Luciano; Ghelardini, Patrizia

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed for extraction of DNA from Chroococcidiopsis that overcomes obstacles posed by bacterial contamination and the presence of a thick envelope surrounding the cyanobacterial cells. The method is based on the resistance of Chroococcidiopsis to lysozyme and consists of a lysozyme treatment followed by osmotic shock that reduces the bacterial contamination by 3 orders of magnitude. Then DNase treatment is performed to eliminate DNA from the bacterial lysate. Lysis of Chroococcidiopsis cells is achieved by grinding with glass beads in the presence of hot phenol. Extracted DNA is further purified by cesium-chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation. This method permitted the first molecular approach to the study of Chroococcidiopsis, and a 570-bp fragment of the gene ftsZ was cloned and sequenced. PMID:9758840

  15. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products. PMID:26243938

  16. A Simple and Effective Method for High Quality Co-Extraction of Genomic DNA and Total RNA from Low Biomass Ectocarpus siliculosus, the Model Brown Alga

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Maria; Sáez, Claudio A.; Brown, Murray T.; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The brown seaweed Ectocarpus siliculosus is an emerging model species distributed worldwide in temperate coastal ecosystems. Over 1500 strains of E. siliculosus are available in culture from a broad range of geographic locations and ecological niches. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying its capacity to cope with different environmental and biotic stressors, genomic and transcriptomic studies are necessary; this requires the co-isolation of genomic DNA and total RNA. In brown algae, extraction of nucleic acids is hindered by high concentrations of secondary metabolites that co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Here, we propose a reliable, rapid and cost-effective procedure for the co-isolation of high-quality nucleic acids using small quantities of biomass (25-, 50- and 100 mg) from strains of E. siliculosus (RHO12; LIA4A; EC524 and REP10–11) isolated from sites with different environmental conditions. The procedure employs a high pH extraction buffer (pH 9.5) which contains 100 mM Tris-HCl and 150 mM NaCl, with the addition of 5 mM DTT and 1% sarkosyl to ensure maximum solubility of nucleic acids, effective inhibition of nuclease activity and removal of interfering contaminants (e.g. polysaccharides, polyphenols). The use of sodium acetate together with isopropanol shortened precipitation time and enhanced the yields of DNA/RNA. A phenol:chlorophorm:isoamyl alcohol step was subsequently used to purify the nucleic acids. The present protocol produces high yields of nucleic acids from only 25 mg of fresh algal biomass (0.195 and 0.284 µg mg?1 fresh weigh of RNA and DNA, respectively) and the high quality of the extracted nucleic acids was confirmed through spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analyses. The isolated RNA can be used directly in downstream applications such as RT-PCR and the genomic DNA was suitable for PCR, producing reliable restriction enzyme digestion patterns. Co-isolation of DNA/RNA from different strains indicates that this method is likely to have wider applications for intra- and inter-specific studies on other brown algae. PMID:24867404

  17. A simple and effective method for high quality co-extraction of genomic DNA and total RNA from low biomass Ectocarpus siliculosus, the model brown alga.

    PubMed

    Greco, Maria; Sáez, Claudio A; Brown, Murray T; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The brown seaweed Ectocarpus siliculosus is an emerging model species distributed worldwide in temperate coastal ecosystems. Over 1500 strains of E. siliculosus are available in culture from a broad range of geographic locations and ecological niches. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying its capacity to cope with different environmental and biotic stressors, genomic and transcriptomic studies are necessary; this requires the co-isolation of genomic DNA and total RNA. In brown algae, extraction of nucleic acids is hindered by high concentrations of secondary metabolites that co-precipitate with nucleic acids. Here, we propose a reliable, rapid and cost-effective procedure for the co-isolation of high-quality nucleic acids using small quantities of biomass (25-, 50- and 100 mg) from strains of E. siliculosus (RHO12; LIA4A; EC524 and REP10-11) isolated from sites with different environmental conditions. The procedure employs a high pH extraction buffer (pH 9.5) which contains 100 mM Tris-HCl and 150 mM NaCl, with the addition of 5 mM DTT and 1% sarkosyl to ensure maximum solubility of nucleic acids, effective inhibition of nuclease activity and removal of interfering contaminants (e.g. polysaccharides, polyphenols). The use of sodium acetate together with isopropanol shortened precipitation time and enhanced the yields of DNA/RNA. A phenol:chlorophorm:isoamyl alcohol step was subsequently used to purify the nucleic acids. The present protocol produces high yields of nucleic acids from only 25 mg of fresh algal biomass (0.195 and 0.284 µg mg(-1) fresh weigh of RNA and DNA, respectively) and the high quality of the extracted nucleic acids was confirmed through spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analyses. The isolated RNA can be used directly in downstream applications such as RT-PCR and the genomic DNA was suitable for PCR, producing reliable restriction enzyme digestion patterns. Co-isolation of DNA/RNA from different strains indicates that this method is likely to have wider applications for intra- and inter-specific studies on other brown algae. PMID:24867404

  18. DNA Extraction Method Affects the Detection of a Fungal Pathogen in Formalin-Fixed Specimens Using qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Andrea J.; LaBonte, John P.; Ball, Morgan L.; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L.; Toothman, Mary H.; Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2015-01-01

    Museum collections provide indispensable repositories for obtaining information about the historical presence of disease in wildlife populations. The pathogenic amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has played a significant role in global amphibian declines, and examining preserved specimens for Bd can improve our understanding of its emergence and spread. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) enables Bd detection with minimal disturbance to amphibian skin and is significantly more sensitive to detecting Bd than histology; therefore, developing effective qPCR methodologies for detecting Bd DNA in formalin-fixed specimens can provide an efficient and effective approach to examining historical Bd emergence and prevalence. Techniques for detecting Bd in museum specimens have not been evaluated for their effectiveness in control specimens that mimic the conditions of animals most likely to be encountered in museums, including those with low pathogen loads. We used American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) of known infection status to evaluate the success of qPCR to detect Bd in formalin-fixed specimens after three years of ethanol storage. Our objectives were to compare the most commonly used DNA extraction method for Bd (PrepMan, PM) to Macherey-Nagel DNA FFPE (MN), test optimizations for Bd detection with PM, and provide recommendations for maximizing Bd detection. We found that successful detection is relatively high (80–90%) when Bd loads before formalin fixation are high, regardless of the extraction method used; however, at lower infection levels, detection probabilities were significantly reduced. The MN DNA extraction method increased Bd detection by as much as 50% at moderate infection levels. Our results indicate that, for animals characterized by lower pathogen loads (i.e., those most commonly encountered in museum collections), current methods may underestimate the proportion of Bd-infected amphibians. Those extracting DNA from archived museum specimens should ensure that the techniques they are using are known to provide high-quality throughput DNA for later analysis. PMID:26291624

  19. Schematic Diagram of Physical and Chemical Steps to extract Al and Be from Quartz-bearing rocks Quartz separation and pre-

    E-print Network

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Schematic Diagram of Physical and Chemical Steps to extract Al and Be from Quartz-bearing rocks;Chemical Separation of Al and Be from Quartz-bearing rocks Bodo Bookhagen, UC Santa Barbara 1/91 Cosmogenic separation method with a new resin and will change our procedures in the near future. Kohl, C

  20. Sensing cocaine in saliva with attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy combined with a one-step extraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, Kerstin M.-C.; Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-03-01

    On-site drug tests have gained importance, e.g., for protecting the society from impaired drivers. Since today's drug tests are majorly only positive/negative, there is a great need for a reliable, portable and preferentially quantitative drug test. In the project IrSens we aim to bridge this gap with the development of an optical sensor platform based on infrared spectroscopy and focus on cocaine detection in saliva. We combine a one-step extraction method, a sample drying technique and infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy. As a first step we have developed an extraction technique that allows us to extract cocaine from saliva to an almost infrared-transparent solvent and to record ATR spectra with a commercially available Fourier Transform-infrared spectrometer. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that such a simple and easy-to-use one-step extraction method is used to transfer cocaine from saliva into an organic solvent and detect it quantitatively. With this new method we are able to reach a current limit of detection around 10 ?g/ml. This new extraction method could also be applied to waste water monitoring and controlling caffeine content in beverages.

  1. Selective Single-Step Separation of a Mixture of Three Metal Ions by a Triphasic Ionic-Liquid-Water-Ionic-Liquid Solvent Extraction System.

    PubMed

    Vander Hoogerstraete, Tom; Blockx, Jonas; De Coster, Hendrik; Binnemans, Koen

    2015-08-10

    In a conventional solvent extraction system, metal ions are distributed between two immiscible phases, typically an aqueous and an organic phase. In this paper, the proof-of-principle is given for the distribution of metal ions between three immiscible phases, two ionic liquid phases with an aqueous phase in between them. Three-liquid-phase solvent extraction allows separation of a mixture of three metal ions in a single step, whereas at least two steps are required to separate three metals in the case of two-liquid-phase solvent extraction. In the triphasic system, the lower organic phase is comprised of the ionic liquid betainium- or choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, whereas the upper organic phase is comprised of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide. The triphasic system was used for the separation of a mixture of tin(II), yttrium(III), and scandium(III) ions. PMID:26178665

  2. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mikania laevigata Extract on DNA Damage Caused by Acute Coal Dust Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Heuser, V.D.; Tavares, P.; Leffa, D.D.; da Silva, G.A.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.R.T.; Pinho, R.A.; Streck, E.L.; Andrade,V.M.

    2009-06-15

    We report data on the possible antigenotoxic activity of Mikania laevigata extract (MLE) after acute intratracheal instillation of coal dust using the comet assay in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and liver cells and the micronucleus test in peripheral blood of Wistar rats. The animals were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution (groups 1 and 2) or MLE (100 mg/kg) (groups 3 and 4). On day 15, the animals were anesthetized with ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (20 mg/kg), and gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.3 mL saline) (groups 2 and 4) or saline solution (0.3 mL) (groups 1 and 3) was administered directly in the lung by intratracheal administration. Fifteen days after coal dust or saline instillation, the animals were sacrificed, and the femur, liver, and peripheral blood were removed. The results showed a general increase in the DNA damage values at 8 hours for all treatment groups, probably related to surgical procedures that had stressed the animals. Also, liver cells from rats treated with coal dust, pretreated or not with MLE, showed statistically higher comet assay values compared to the control group at 14 days after exposure. These results could be expected because the liver metabolizes a variety of organic compounds to more polar by-products. On the other hand, the micronucleus assay results did not show significant differences among groups. Therefore, our data do not support the antimutagenic activity of M. laevigata as a modulator of DNA damage after acute coal dust instillation.

  3. Detection and enumeration of bacteria in soil by direct DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Picard, C; Ponsonnet, C; Paget, E; Nesme, X; Simonet, P

    1992-09-01

    In order to develop a rapid and specific detection test for bacteria in soil, we improved a method based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Each step of the protocol, including direct lysis of cells, DNA purification, and PCR amplification, was optimized. To increase the efficiency of lysis, a step particularly critical for some microorganisms which resist classical techniques, we used small soil samples (100 mg) and various lytic treatments, including sonication, microwave heating, and thermal shocks. Purification of nucleic acids was achieved by passage through up to three Elutip d columns. Finally, PCR amplifications were optimized via biphasic protocols using booster conditions, lower denaturation temperatures, and addition of formamide. Two microorganisms were used as models: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which is naturally absent from the soil used and was inoculated to calibrate the validity of the protocol, and Frankia spp., an actinomycete indigenous to the soil used. Specific primers were characterized either in the plasmid-borne vir genes for A. tumefaciens or in the variable regions of the 16S ribosomal gene for Frankia spp. Specific detection of the inoculated A. tumefaciens strain was routinely obtained when inocula ranged from 10(7) to 10(3) cells. Moreover, the strong correlation we observed between the size of the inocula and the results of the PCR reactions permitted assessment of the validity of the protocol in enumerating the number of microbial cells present in a soil sample. This allowed us to estimate the indigenous population of Frankia spp. at 0.2 x 10(5) genomes (i.e., amplifiable target sequences) per g of soil. PMID:1444380

  4. Preparation of magnetite-loaded silica microspheres for solid-phase extraction of genomic DNA from soy-based foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ruobing; Wang, Yucong; Hu, Yunli; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2009-09-01

    Solid-phase extraction has been widely employed for the preparation of DNA templates for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analytical methods. Among the variety of adsorbents studied, magnetically responsive silica particles are particularly attractive due to their potential to simplify, expedite, and automate the extraction process. Here we report a facile method for the preparation of such magnetic particles, which entails impregnation of porous silica microspheres with iron salts, followed by calcination and reduction treatments. The samples were characterized using powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD data show that magnetite nanocrystals of about 27.2 nm are produced within the pore channels of the silica support after reduction. SEM images show that the as-synthesized particles exhibit spherical shape and uniform particle size of about 3 microm as determined by the silica support. Nitrogen sorption data confirm that the magnetite-loaded silica particles possess typical mesopore structure with BET surface area of about 183 m(2)/g. VSM data show that the particles display paramagnetic behavior with saturation magnetization of 11.37 emu/g. The magnetic silica microspheres coated with silica shells were tested as adsorbents for rapid extraction of genomic DNA from soybean-derived products. The purified DNA templates were amplified by PCR for screening of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The preliminary results confirm that the DNA extraction protocols using magnetite-loaded silica microspheres are capable of producing DNA templates which are inhibitor-free and ready for downstream analysis. PMID:19632684

  5. Back to Basics – The Influence of DNA Extraction and Primer Choice on Phylogenetic Analysis of Activated Sludge Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Rasmus H.; Nielsen, Per H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA extraction and primer choice have a large effect on the observed community structure in all microbial amplicon sequencing analyses. Although the biases are well known, no comprehensive analysis has been conducted in activated sludge communities. In this study we systematically explored the impact of a number of parameters on the observed microbial community: bead beating intensity, primer choice, extracellular DNA removal, and various PCR settings. In total, 176 samples were subjected to 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, and selected samples were investigated through metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization was used as a DNA extraction-independent method for qualitative comparison. In general, an effect on the observed community was found on all parameters tested, although bead beating and primer choice had the largest effect. The effect of bead beating intensity correlated with cell-wall strength as seen by a large increase in DNA from Gram-positive bacteria (up to 400%). However, significant differences were present at lower phylogenetic levels within the same phylum, suggesting that additional factors are at play. The best primer set based on in silico analysis was found to underestimate a number of important bacterial groups. For 16S rRNA gene analysis in activated sludge we recommend using the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil with four times the normal bead beating and V1-3 primers. PMID:26182345

  6. Microfluidic extraction and stretching of chromosomal DNA from single cell nuclei for DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Bernardin, Evans; Gilbert, David M.; Chella, Ravindran

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel method for genetic characterization of single cells by integrating microfluidic stretching of chromosomal DNA and fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this method, individually isolated cell nuclei were immobilized in a microchannel. Chromosomal DNA was released from the nuclei and stretched by a pressure-driven flow. We analyzed and optimized flow conditions to generate a millimeter-long band of stretched DNA from each nucleus. Telomere fiber FISH was successfully performed on the stretched chromosomal DNA. Individual telomere fiber FISH signals from single cells could be resolved and their lengths measured, demonstrating the ability of the method to quantify genetic features at the level of single cells. PMID:22231286

  7. Comparison of automated nucleic acid extraction methods for the detection of cytomegalovirus DNA in fluids and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Jesse J.

    2014-01-01

    Testing for cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA is increasingly being used for specimen types other than plasma or whole blood. However, few studies have investigated the performance of different nucleic acid extraction protocols in such specimens. In this study, CMV extraction using the Cell-free 1000 and Pathogen Complex 400 protocols on the QIAsymphony Sample Processing (SP) system were compared using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), tissue samples, and urine. The QIAsymphonyAssay Set-up (AS) system was used to assemble reactions using artus CMV PCR reagents and amplification was carried out on the Rotor-Gene Q. Samples from 93 patients previously tested for CMV DNA and negative samples spiked with CMV AD-169 were used to evaluate assay performance. The Pathogen Complex 400 protocol yielded the following results: BAL, sensitivity 100% (33/33), specificity 87% (20/23); tissue, sensitivity 100% (25/25), specificity 100% (20/20); urine, sensitivity 100% (21/21), specificity 100% (20/20). Cell-free 1000 extraction gave comparable results for BAL and tissue, however, for urine, the sensitivity was 86% (18/21) and specimen quantitation was inaccurate. Comparative studies of different extraction protocols and DNA detection methods in body fluids and tissues are needed, as assays optimized for blood or plasma will not necessarily perform well on other specimen types. PMID:24765569

  8. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Materials and Methods: Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Results: Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). Conclusion: The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method. PMID:25598636

  9. Sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity: validation of the methods of actinobacterial DNA extraction and optimization of 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M M; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Experiments were designed to validate the two common DNA extraction protocols (CTAB-based method and DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit) used to effectively recover actinobacterial DNA from sponge samples in order to study the sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. This was done by artificially spiking sponge samples with actinobacteria (spores, mycelia and a combination of the two). Our results demonstrated that both DNA extraction methods were effective in obtaining DNA from the sponge samples as well as the sponge samples spiked with different amounts of actinobacteria. However, it was noted that in the presence of the sponge, the bacterial 16S rRNA gene could not be amplified unless the combined DNA template was diluted. To test the hypothesis that the extracted sponge DNA contained inhibitors, dilutions of the DNA extracts were tested for six sponge species representing five orders. The results suggested that the inhibitors were co-extracted with the sponge DNA, and a high dilution of this DNA was required for the successful PCR amplification for most of the samples. The optimized PCR conditions, including primer selection, PCR reaction system and program optimization, further improved the PCR performance. However, no single PCR condition was found to be suitable for the diverse sponge samples using various primer sets. These results highlight for the first time that the DNA extraction methods used are effective in obtaining actinobacterial DNA and that the presence of inhibitors in the sponge DNA requires high dilution coupled with fine tuning of the PCR conditions to achieve success in the study of sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. PMID:26245685

  10. One-step extraction and concentration of estrogens for an adequate monitoring of wastewater using ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems†

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Diana L. D.; Esteves, Valdemar I.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    Ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic hormone that has been recognized as one of the most prominent endocrine disruptors found in the aqueous environment. Nevertheless, the low content of EE2 in wastewater makes its identification/quantification unfeasible – a major drawback for the evaluation of its persistence and environmental impact. In this context, a novel extraction/concentration method for EE2 from wastewater is proposed here based on aqueous biphasic systems composed of ionic liquids (ILs). Aqueous biphasic systems formed by several hydrophilic ILs and KNaC4H4O6 were initially screened and optimized, with extraction efficiencies of EE2 for the IL-rich phase ranging between 92 and 100%. Remarkable results were obtained with systems that allow the complete extraction of EE2 in a single-step, and without loss of EE2 or the saturation of the extractive phase. Further, the concentration factors of EE2 attainable with these systems were investigated by a suitable manipulation of the composition of the phase-forming components and the corresponding volumes of the coexisting phases. An outstanding concentration of EE2 up to 1000-fold (from ng L?1 to ?g L?1) in a single extraction and concentration step was achieved for the first time with IL-based aqueous biphasic systems. These systems are straightforwardly envisaged for the monitoring of wastewater as one-step extraction and concentration routes for a wide array of endocrine disrupting chemicals while allowing an adequate evaluation of their environmental impact. PMID:26379470

  11. FUNGAL-SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS DEVELOPED FOR ANALYSIS OF THE ITS REGION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background The Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) are highly variable sequences of great importance in distinguishing fungal species by PCR analysis. Previously published PCR primers available for amplifying these sequences from environmenta...

  12. Detection of ostreid herpesvirus-1 (OsHV-1) by PCR using a rapid and simple method of DNA extraction from oyster larvae.

    PubMed

    Batista, Frederico M; Taris, Nicolas; Boudry, Pierre; Renault, Tristan

    2005-04-01

    A DNA extraction procedure was developed for the detection of ostreid herpesvirus-1 (OsHV-1) using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in oyster larvae. The DNA extraction procedure developed was tested on 8 larval samples. Abnormal nuclei with characteristic features associated with OsHV-1 infections were only observed in samples in which the viral DNA was detected by PCR. A previously described competitive PCR method was applied to detect inhibition during PCR reactions. The results show that the method can be used on small amounts of oyster larvae (3 mg) for the detection of OsHV-1 DNA by PCR. PMID:15900681

  13. Wheat bran biorefinery: an investigation on the starch derived glucose extraction accompanied by pre- and post-treatment steps.

    PubMed

    Tirpanalan, Özge; Reisinger, Michael; Huber, Florian; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Novalin, Senad

    2014-07-01

    Wheat bran, a side product of the milling industry, can be considered as a feedstock for biorefineries. Unlike other lignocellulosic feedstock, wheat bran contains a reasonable amount of starch, which is not of recalcitrant nature. Therefore, it can be extracted without a costly pretreatment process. The present work evaluates the extraction of starch derived glucose in relation to a wheat bran biorefinery. The purity of free glucose extracted quantitatively was 44%. The extract was concentrated by threefold via nanofiltration, thereby reaching a glucose concentration of 49 g/L. Hydrothermal treatment (180°C - 20 min) of the starch-free bran did not induce the formation of hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid. Interestingly, the furfural level increased compared to the process, in which bran was treated hydrothermally without a preceding starch extraction. By separation of water-extractables prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, the free glucose purity was increased to 58%, however the yield of glucose decreased to 61%. PMID:24835741

  14. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Identification Assays Using a Thermostable DNA Polymerase and Delayed Extraction MALDI-TOF Mass?Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Haff, Lawrence A.; Smirnov, Igor P.

    1997-01-01

    We report a simple method, the PinPoint assay, for detecting and identifying single-base variations (polymorphisms) at specific locations within DNA sequences. An oligonucleotide primer is annealed to the target DNA immediately upstream of the polymorphic site and is extended by a single base in the presence of all four dideoxynucleotide triphosphates and a thermostable DNA polymerase. The extension products are desalted, concentrated, and subjected to delayed-extraction MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The base at the polymorphic site is identified by the mass added onto the primer. Heterozygous targets produce two mass-resolved species that represent the addition of both bases complementary to those at the polymorphic site. The assay is suitable for double-stranded PCR products without purification or strand separation. More than one primer can be simultaneously extended and then mass-analyzed. The mass spectrometric method thus shows promise for high-volume diagnostic or genotyping applications. PMID:9110177

  15. Validating DNA barcodes: A non-destructive extraction protocol enables simultaneous vouchering of DNA and morphological vouchers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morphology-based keys support accurate identification of many taxa. However, identification can be difficult for taxa that are not well studied, very small, members of cryptic species complexes, or represented by immature stages. For such cases, DNA barcodes may provide diagnostic characters. Ecolog...

  16. RecQ4 promotes the conversion of the pre-initiation complex at a site-specific origin for DNA unwinding in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Yosuke; Kubota, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T; Takahashi, Tatsuro S; Mimura, Satoru; Takisawa, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is initiated through stepwise assembly of evolutionarily conserved replication proteins onto replication origins, but how the origin DNA is unwound during the assembly process remains elusive. Here, we established a site-specific origin on a plasmid DNA, using in vitro replication systems derived from Xenopus egg extracts. We found that the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) was preferentially assembled in the vicinity of GAL4 DNA-binding sites of the plasmid, depending on the binding of Cdc6 fused with a GAL4 DNA-binding domain in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Subsequent addition of nucleoplasmic S-phase extracts to the GAL4-dependent pre-RC promoted initiation of DNA replication from the origin, and components of the pre-initiation complex (pre-IC) and the replisome were recruited to the origin concomitant with origin unwinding. In this replication system, RecQ4 is dispensable for both recruitment of Cdc45 onto the origin and stable binding of Cdc45 and GINS to the pre-RC assembled plasmid. However, both origin binding of DNA polymerase ? and unwinding of DNA were diminished upon depletion of RecQ4 from the extracts. These results suggest that RecQ4 plays an important role in the conversion of pre-ICs into active replisomes requiring the unwinding of origin DNA in vertebrates. PMID:25602506

  17. Probing the functional impact of sequence variation on p53-DNA interactions using a novel microsphere assay for protein-DNA binding with human cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Noureddine, Maher A; Menendez, Daniel; Campbell, Michelle R; Bandele, Omari J; Horvath, Monica M; Wang, Xuting; Pittman, Gary S; Chorley, Brian N; Resnick, Michael A; Bell, Douglas A

    2009-05-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor regulates its target genes through sequence-specific binding to DNA response elements (REs). Although numerous p53 REs are established, the thousands more identified by bioinformatics are not easily subjected to comparative functional evaluation. To examine the relationship between RE sequence variation -- including polymorphisms -- and p53 binding, we have developed a multiplex format microsphere assay of protein-DNA binding (MAPD) for p53 in nuclear extracts. Using MAPD we measured sequence-specific p53 binding of doxorubicin-activated or transiently expressed p53 to REs from established p53 target genes and p53 consensus REs. To assess the sensitivity and scalability of the assay, we tested 16 variants of the p21 target sequence and a 62-multiplex set of single nucleotide (nt) variants of the p53 consensus sequence and found many changes in p53 binding that are not captured by current computational binding models. A group of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was examined and binding profiles closely matched transactivation capability tested in luciferase constructs. The in vitro binding characteristics of p53 in nuclear extracts recapitulated the cellular in vivo transactivation capabilities for eight well-established human REs measured by luciferase assay. Using a set of 26 bona fide REs, we observed distinct binding patterns characteristic of transiently expressed wild type and mutant p53s. This microsphere assay system utilizes biologically meaningful cell extracts in a multiplexed, quantitative, in vitro format that provides a powerful experimental tool for elucidating the functional impact of sequence polymorphism and protein variation on protein/DNA binding in transcriptional networks. PMID:19424414

  18. Probing the Functional Impact of Sequence Variation on p53-DNA Interactions Using a Novel Microsphere Assay for Protein-DNA Binding with Human Cell Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Bandele, Omari J.; Horvath, Monica M.; Wang, Xuting; Pittman, Gary S.; Chorley, Brian N.; Resnick, Michael A.; Bell, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor regulates its target genes through sequence-specific binding to DNA response elements (REs). Although numerous p53 REs are established, the thousands more identified by bioinformatics are not easily subjected to comparative functional evaluation. To examine the relationship between RE sequence variation—including polymorphisms—and p53 binding, we have developed a multiplex format microsphere assay of protein-DNA binding (MAPD) for p53 in nuclear extracts. Using MAPD we measured sequence-specific p53 binding of doxorubicin-activated or transiently expressed p53 to REs from established p53 target genes and p53 consensus REs. To assess the sensitivity and scalability of the assay, we tested 16 variants of the p21 target sequence and a 62-multiplex set of single nucleotide (nt) variants of the p53 consensus sequence and found many changes in p53 binding that are not captured by current computational binding models. A group of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was examined and binding profiles closely matched transactivation capability tested in luciferase constructs. The in vitro binding characteristics of p53 in nuclear extracts recapitulated the cellular in vivo transactivation capabilities for eight well-established human REs measured by luciferase assay. Using a set of 26 bona fide REs, we observed distinct binding patterns characteristic of transiently expressed wild type and mutant p53s. This microsphere assay system utilizes biologically meaningful cell extracts in a multiplexed, quantitative, in vitro format that provides a powerful experimental tool for elucidating the functional impact of sequence polymorphism and protein variation on protein/DNA binding in transcriptional networks. PMID:19424414

  19. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction and purification on an automated microfluidic cassette from bacterial and viral pathogens causing community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Spang, Peter; Schwind, Carmen; Drese, Klaus S; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Nieto, Benjamin; Camps, Marta; Landgraf, Bryan; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; Samitier, Josep; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Roeser, Tina

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of an automated sample preparation procedure for etiological agents of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (CA-LRTI). The consecutive assay steps, including sample re-suspension, pre-treatment, lysis, nucleic acid purification, and concentration, were integrated into a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) cassette that is operated hands-free by a demonstrator setup, providing fluidic and valve actuation. The performance of the assay was evaluated on viral and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial broth cultures previously sampled using a nasopharyngeal swab. Sample preparation on the microfluidic cassette resulted in higher or similar concentrations of pure bacterial DNA or viral RNA compared to manual benchtop experiments. The miniaturization and integration of the complete sample preparation procedure, to extract purified nucleic acids from real samples of CA-LRTI pathogens to, and above, lab quality and efficiency, represent important steps towards its application in a point-of-care test (POCT) for rapid diagnosis of CA-LRTI. PMID:24615272

  20. Archived Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Blocks: A Valuable Underexploited Resource for Extraction of DNA, RNA, and Protein

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Miral S.; McGarvey, Diane; LiVolsi, Virginia A.; Baloch, Zubair W.

    2013-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material presents a readily available resource in the study of various biomarkers. There has been interest in whether the storage period has significant effect on the extracted macromolecules. Thus, in this study, we investigated if the storage period had an effect on the quantity/quality of the extracted nucleic acids and proteins. We systematically examined the quality/quantity of genomic DNA, total RNA, and total protein in the FFPE blocks of malignant tumors of lung, thyroid, and salivary gland that had been stored over several years. We show that there is no significant difference between macromolecules extracted from blocks stored over 11–12 years, 5–7 years, or 1–2 years in comparison to the current year blocks. PMID:24845430

  1. Simultaneous analysis of carotenoids and tocopherols in botanical species using one step solid-liquid extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Valdivielso, Izaskun; Bustamante, María Ángeles; Ruiz de Gordoa, Juan Carlos; Nájera, Ana Isabel; de Renobales, Mertxe; Barron, Luis Javier R

    2015-04-15

    Carotenoids and tocopherols from botanical species abundant in Atlantic mountain grasslands were simultaneously extracted using one-step solid-liquid phase. A single n-hexane/2-propanol extract containing both types of compounds was injected twice under two different sets of HPLC conditions to separate the tocopherols by normal-phase chromatography and carotenoids by reverse-phase mode. The method allowed reproducible quantification in plant samples of very low amounts of ?-, ?-, ?- and ?-tocopherols (LOD from 0.0379 to 0.0720 ?g g(-1) DM) and over 15 different xanthophylls and carotene isomers. The simplified one-step extraction without saponification significantly increased the recovery of tocopherols and carotenoids, thereby enabling the determination of ?-tocopherol acetate in plant samples. The two different sets of chromatographic analysis provided near baseline separation of individual compounds without interference from other lipid compounds extracted from plants, and a very sensitive and accurate detection of tocopherols and carotenoids. The detection of minor individual components in botanical species from grasslands is nowadays of high interest in searching for biomarkers for foods derived from grazing animals. PMID:25466080

  2. Bringing Laboulbeniales into the 21st century: enhanced techniques for extraction and PCR amplification of DNA from minute ectoparasitic fungi.

    PubMed

    Haelewaters, Danny; Gorczak, Micha?; Pfliegler, Walter P; Tartally, András; Tischer, Marta; Wrzosek, Marta; Pfister, Donald H

    2015-12-01

    Laboulbeniales is one of the most peculiar orders of Ascomycota. These fungi are characterized by an ectoparasitic life-style on arthropods, determinate growth, lack of an asexual stage, high species richness, and intractability to culture. The order Laboulbeniales, sister to Pyxidiophorales, has only recently been assigned a separate class, the Laboulbeniomycetes, based on very few ribosomal DNA sequences. So far, DNA isolations and PCR amplifications have proven difficult. Here, we provide details of isolation techniques and the application of commercially available kits that enable efficient and reliable genetic analyses of these fungi. We provide 43 newly generated Laboulbeniales ribosomal DNA sequences, among which are the first published sequences for species in the genera Gloeandromyces, Herpomyces, Laboulbenia, Monoicomyces, and Polyandromyces. DNA extractions were possible using from 1 to 30 thalli from hosts preserved in ethanol (70-100 %). In two cases, we successfully isolated DNA from thalli on dried insect collections. Laboulbeniales molecular systematics could be substantially enhanced through these improved methods by allowing more complete sampling of both taxa and gene regions. PMID:26734547

  3. The Impact of Different DNA Extraction Kits and Laboratories upon the Assessment of Human Gut Microbiota Composition by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Nicholas A.; Walker, Alan W.; Berry, Susan H.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Farquarson, Freda M.; Louis, Petra; Thomson, John M.; Ahmad, T; Anderson, CA; Barrett, JC; Drummond, H; Edwards, C; Hart, A; Hawkey, C; Henderson, P; Khan, M; Lamb, CA; Lee, JC; Mansfield, JC; Mathew, CG; Mowat, C; Newman, WG; Prescott, NJ; Simmons, A; Simpson, P; Taylor, K; Taylor, K; Wilson, DC; Satsangi, Jack; Flint, Harry J.; Parkhill, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Determining bacterial community structure in fecal samples through DNA sequencing is an important facet of intestinal health research. The impact of different commercially available DNA extraction kits upon bacterial community structures has received relatively little attention. The aim of this study was to analyze bacterial communities in volunteer and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient fecal samples extracted using widely used DNA extraction kits in established gastrointestinal research laboratories. Methods Fecal samples from two healthy volunteers (H3 and H4) and two relapsing IBD patients (I1 and I2) were investigated. DNA extraction was undertaken using MoBio Powersoil and MP Biomedicals FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil DNA extraction kits. PCR amplification for pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was performed in both laboratories on all samples. Hierarchical clustering of sequencing data was done using the Yue and Clayton similarity coefficient. Results DNA extracted using the FastDNA kit and the MoBio kit gave median DNA concentrations of 475 (interquartile range 228-561) and 22 (IQR 9-36) ng/µL respectively (p<0.0001). Hierarchical clustering of sequence data by Yue and Clayton coefficient revealed four clusters. Samples from individuals H3 and I2 clustered by patient; however, samples from patient I1 extracted with the MoBio kit clustered with samples from patient H4 rather than the other I1 samples. Linear modelling on relative abundance of common bacterial families revealed significant differences between kits; samples extracted with MoBio Powersoil showed significantly increased Bacteroidaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, and lower Enterobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridiaceae, and Erysipelotrichaceae (p<0.05). Conclusion This study demonstrates significant differences in DNA yield and bacterial DNA composition when comparing DNA extracted from the same fecal sample with different extraction kits. This highlights the importance of ensuring that samples in a study are prepared with the same method, and the need for caution when cross-comparing studies that use different methods. PMID:24586470

  4. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  5. 32 P-POSTLABELING AND HPLC SEPARATION OF DNA ADDUCTS FORMED BYDIESEL EXHAUST EXTRACTS IN VITRO AND IN MOUSE SKIN AND LUNG AFTERTOPICAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust extracts contain many carcinogenic compounds which have been shown to form PAH- and nitrated-PAH-DNA adducts in rodent skin and lung. he aim of this study was to characterize by "P-postlabeling, TLC and HPLC the primary postlabeled PAH-DNA adduct(s) formed in vitro...

  6. Assessment of DNA damage induced by extracts, fractions and isolated compounds of Davilla nitida and Davilla elliptica (Dilleniaceae).

    PubMed

    Biso, Fabiana Izilda; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; Rinaldo, Daniel; Reis, Mariana Bisarro dos; Bernardi, Caroline Cristiane; de Mattos, José Carlos Pelielo; Caldeira-de-Araújo, Adriano; Vilegas, Wagner; Cólus, Ilce Mara de Syllos; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2010-09-30

    Davilla nitida and Davilla elliptica (Dilleniaceae) are plants that occur predominantly in the cerrado region of South America. They are used in popular medicine to treat stomach diseases, diarrhea and swelling, particularly of the lymph nodes and testicles. Chemical investigation of these two plant species led to the identification of the compounds myricetin-3-O-?-l-rhamnoside (myricitrin), quercetin-3-O-?-l-rhamnoside (quercitrin), myricetin, quercetin and gallic acid derivatives in the leaves of D. nitida and D. elliptica. Therefore, it was concluded that the two species of Davilla possess qualitatively similar chemical profiles. In the present study, the mutagenic and genotoxic potential of these plants and of their isolated compounds was tested in the Salmonella typhimurium assay (Ames test) with strains TA100, TA98, TA102 and TA97a, in the micronucleus test with peripheral blood cells of mice treated in vivo, and in plasmid DNA to analyze DNA strand-breaks. In the assessment of mutagenic potential by the Ames test, extracts from both plant species and a D. nitida ethyl-acetate fraction induced positive responses. On the other hand, none of the extracts showed genotoxic activity in the mouse cells. In the presence of metal ion, D. nitida and D. elliptica aqueous and ethyl-acetate fractions, as well as their isolated compounds, induced single- and double-strand-breaks in plasmid DNA in a cell-free system. PMID:20692361

  7. Chamomile flower extract-directed CuO nanoparticle formation for its antioxidant and DNA cleavage properties.

    PubMed

    Duman, Fatih; Ocsoy, Ismail; Kup, Fatma Ozturk

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) using a medicinal plant (Matricaria chamomilla) flower extract as both reducing and capping agent and investigate their antioxidant activity and interaction with plasmid DNA (pBR322).The CuO NPs were characterized using Uv-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), DLS (dynamic light scattering), XRD (X-ray diffraction), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray) spectroscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). The CuO NPs exhibited nearly mono-distributed and spherical shapes with diameters of 140nm size. UV-Vis absorption spectrum of CuO NPs gave a broad peak around 285 and 320nm. The existence of functional groups on the surface of CuO NPs was characterized with FT-IR analysis. XRD pattern showed that the NPs are in the form of a face-centered cubic crystal. Zeta potential value was measured as -20mV due to the presence of negatively charged functional groups in plant extract. Additionally, we demonstrated concentration-dependent antioxidant activity of CuO NPs and their interaction with plasmid DNA. We assumed that the CuO NPs both cleave and break DNA double helix structure. PMID:26706538

  8. Extraction of nuclear DNA from rhinoceros horn and characterization of DNA profiling systems for white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros.

    PubMed

    Harper, Cindy K; Vermeulen, Gerhard J; Clarke, Amy B; de Wet, Jacobus I; Guthrie, Alan J

    2013-07-01

    Rhinoceros horn is now worth more, per unit weight, than gold, diamonds, or cocaine. Rhinoceros horn has been used in traditional Asian medicine as a presumed cure for a wide range of ailments. Rhinoceros poaching in South Africa has, on average, more than doubled each year over the past 5 years with the rapid economic growth in east and southeast Asia being assumed to be the primary factor driving the increased demand for horn. Here we report on the characterization of methods for genomic DNA extraction from rhinoceros horn and on DNA profiling systems for white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros. The DNA profiling system described includes 22 short tandem repeat (STR), or microsatellite, markers and a gender marker (ZF1), which have been used previously in various studies on rhinoceros. Using a ? value of 0.1, a conservative estimate of random match probability in 5 white rhinoceros ranged from 1:7.3x10(6) to 1:3.0x10(8). Given that the total population of white rhinoceros is approximately 20,000 such random match probabilities indicate that the genotyping system described provides data which can be used for evidentiary purposes. Furthermore, the methods are appropriate for use in investigations involving trace amounts of rhinoceros horn and the matching of profiles obtained from seized rhinoceros horn with material collected from live animals or poached carcasses. PMID:23768315

  9. Analysis of plasticizers in poly(vinyl chloride) medical devices for infusion and artificial nutrition: comparison and optimization of the extraction procedures, a pre-migration test step.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Lise; Cueff, Régis; Bourdeaux, Daniel; Breysse, Colette; Sautou, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Medical devices (MDs) for infusion and enteral and parenteral nutrition are essentially made of plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The first step in assessing patient exposure to these plasticizers, as well as ensuring that the MDs are free from di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), consists of identifying and quantifying the plasticizers present and, consequently, determining which ones are likely to migrate into the patient's body. We compared three different extraction methods using 0.1 g of plasticized PVC: Soxhlet extraction in diethyl ether and ethyl acetate, polymer dissolution, and room temperature extraction in different solvents. It was found that simple room temperature chloroform extraction under optimized conditions (30 min, 50 mL) gave the best separation of plasticizers from the PVC matrix, with extraction yields ranging from 92 to 100% for all plasticizers. This result was confirmed by supplemented Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) and gravimetric analyses. The technique was used on eight marketed medical devices and showed that they contained different amounts of plasticizers, ranging from 25 to 36% of the PVC weight. These yields, associated with the individual physicochemical properties of each plasticizer, highlight the need for further migration studies. PMID:25577357

  10. Antioxidant activity and protective effect on DNA cleavage of extracts from Cistus incanus L. and Cistus monspeliensis L.

    PubMed

    Attaguile, G; Russo, A; Campisi, A; Savoca, F; Acquaviva, R; Ragusa, N; Vanella, A

    2000-01-01

    The genus Cistus includes many typical species of Mediterranean flora; Cistus species are used as antidiarrhetics, as general remedies for treatment of various skin diseases in folk medicine and as anti-inflammatory agents. These species contain flavonoids that are considered to be chain-breaking antioxidants. In this work, we have investigated the effects of crude aqueous extracts from Cistus incanus and Cistus monspeliensis on DNA cleavage and their free-radical scavenging capacity. In addition, their effect on lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes was evaluated. These extracts showed a protective effect on DNA cleavage and a dose-dependent free-radical scavenging capacity; Cistus monspeliensis was more active than Cistus incanus; these results were confirmed by a significant inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes. The experimental evidence, therefore, suggests that because of their antioxidant activity these extracts may offer excellent photoprotection for skin and may be useful in the treatment of human diseases where oxidative stress plays a key role. PMID:10917563

  11. A one-step extraction/clean-up method for determination of PCBs, PBDEs and HBCDs in environmental solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Drage, Daniel; Harrad, Stuart

    2013-12-01

    A selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE) method was developed for rapid determination of 3 classes of halogenated organic contaminants in indoor dust, soil and sediment samples. The optimised method used 3?:?2 v/v n-hexane-dichloromethane for extraction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs). Extraction was performed at 90 °C for 5 min followed by 4 min static time under 1500 psi. Good recoveries of target analytes were obtained after 3 extraction cycles. In-cell cleanup was performed using 10 g of 44% H2SO4 acid silica and 5 g of florisil (secondary fat retainer), while copper powder was used to remove elemental sulfur. The method was validated using NIST SRM2585 and SRM 1941b in addition to an in-house previously characterised soil sample. Measured concentrations of target compounds showed good agreement with the certified values with RSD < 20% indicating the good accuracy and precision of the S-PLE method. Clean extracts provided low noise levels resulting in low method detection limits (<0.03 ng g(-1)) and LOQs (<0.1 ng g(-1)). The method developed was applied successfully to real environmental samples and it provided various advantages over traditional methods including reduced solvent consumption and analysis time, minimal sample contamination and high sample throughput which can be beneficial for environmental monitoring programs dealing with large numbers of samples. PMID:24145825

  12. [Changes in the concentration of 3H-thymidine in the DNA of liver and skin cells after administration of syngeneic tissue extracts].

    PubMed

    Shadrin, B P; Bulava, G V

    1981-02-01

    Autoradiography was used to show that twofold intravenous injection of liver extracts from CC57 white mice resulted in stimulation of primary incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA of liver cells whilst injection of extracts of skin cells entailed stimulation of 3H-thymidine incorporation into epidermal skin cells of syngeneic recipients. PMID:7225551

  13. Relevance of sampling and DNA extraction techniques for the analysis of salivary evidence from bite marks: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Briones, M L; Hernández-Cortés, R; Jaramillo-Rangel, G; Ortega-Martínez, M

    2015-01-01

    Bite mark evidence has been repeatedly found in criminal cases. Physical comparison of a bite mark to the teeth of available suspects may not always be possible. Experimental studies have shown that the analysis of DNA present in the saliva recovered from bite marks might help in the identification of individuals. However, the application of this approach to an actual criminal case has been reported only once before in forensic literature. Therefore, there is very limited scientific and technical information available on this subject. The current study focuses on a woman found dead in her home; the autopsy ruled the death to be a result of manual strangulation. A bite mark was found on each breast. The single swab technique was used to collect evidence from these bite marks, and an organic extraction method was employed for DNA isolation. Short tandem repeat (STR) sequence typing was performed using a commercially available kit, and the result was compared to the STR profile of a suspect. A full single-source STR profile was obtained from both bite marks, which matched the STR profile of the suspect. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report on the analysis of DNA isolated from bite marks on the victim used to identify the crime perpetrator. Our results indicated that, contrary to most theoretical indications, a single swab technique for evidence collection and an organic method for DNA isolation could be very useful in solving this class of criminal cases. PMID:26345953

  14. Abstract--DNA matching is a crucial step in sequence alignment. Since sequence alignment is an approximate

    E-print Network

    Nicolescu, Monica

    89557. E-mail: monica@cse.unr.edu. A. Murray is with the Desert Research Institute, Reno, E-mail: Alison reactions researchers use to decode the DNA base pairs are accurate for only about 600 to 700 nucleotides be achieved. Several organisms' genomes have been sequenced. On a larger scale, the mouse, rat and chimpanzee

  15. Micro-Doppler Effect Analysis and Feature Extraction in ISAR Imaging With Stepped-Frequency Chirp Signals

    E-print Network

    Luo, Ying

    The micro-Doppler (m-D) effect induced by the rotating parts or vibrations of the target provides a new approach for target recognition. To obtain high range resolution for the extraction of the fine m-D signatures of an ...

  16. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  17. TECHNICAL ADVANCES A rapid column-based ancient DNA extraction method for

    E-print Network

    Reich, David

    Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School. 2006; Krystufek et al. 2007) based on museum specimens. Finally, in forensic science, DNA analyses are

  18. Replication and matagenesis of UV-damaged DNA templates in human and monkey cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, M.P.; Dixon, K. ); Levine, A.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism by which ultraviolet radiation induced DNA damage causes mutations in humans is not well understood. Ultraviolet light has been shown to be mutagenic in a variety of repair-proficient and repair-deficient mammalian cells in culture. The frequency of mutations appears to correlate with the amount of unrepaired DNA damage remaining in the DNA at the time of replication. This suggests that replication of damaged DNA leads to mutation fixation. This research examines the mechanism of replication of UV-damaged templates and mutation fixation in an in-vitro, mammalian cell-free system. The establishment of this system offers new experimental approaches for gaining a detailed understanding of the process of mutation fixation at the molecular and biochemical levels.

  19. Molecular Threading: Mechanical Extraction, Stretching and Placement of DNA Molecules from a Liquid-Air Interface

    PubMed Central

    Kemmish, Kent; Hamalainen, Mark; Bowell, Charlotte; Bleloch, Andrew; Klejwa, Nathan; Lehrach, Wolfgang; Schatz, Ken; Stark, Heather; Marblestone, Adam; Church, George; Own, Christopher S.; Andregg, William

    2013-01-01

    We present “molecular threading”, a surface independent tip-based method for stretching and depositing single and double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA is stretched into air at a liquid-air interface, and can be subsequently deposited onto a dry substrate isolated from solution. The design of an apparatus used for molecular threading is presented, and fluorescence and electron microscopies are used to characterize the angular distribution, straightness, and reproducibility of stretched DNA deposited in arrays onto elastomeric surfaces and thin membranes. Molecular threading demonstrates high straightness and uniformity over length scales from nanometers to micrometers, and represents an alternative to existing DNA deposition and linearization methods. These results point towards scalable and high-throughput precision manipulation of single-molecule polymers. PMID:23935923

  20. Evaluation of five DNA extraction methods for detection of H. pylori in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) liver tissue from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rabelo-Gonçalves, Elizabeth; Roesler, Bruna; Guardia, Ana Carolina; Milan, Arlete; Hara, Natalicia; Escanhoela, Cecília; Almeida, Jazon; Boin, Ilka; Zeitune, José Murilo

    2014-03-01

    Since Helicobacter spp. DNA was identified in liver tissue resected from patients with hepatocelullar carcinoma (HCC), researchers have suggested a role of this bacterium in hepatic carcinogenesis. Archives of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues represent an extraordinary source for clinical studies providing many advantages. However, DNA extraction from FFPE tissues is laborious, time-consuming and still remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to evaluate five protocols for DNA extraction from FFPE liver obtained from patients with HCC in order to detect Helicobacter pylori DNA. These methods were: (1) QIAamp FFPE Tissue Kit, (2) QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, (3) Wizard SV Genomic DNA Purification System, (4) RealiaPrep FFPE gDNA Miniprep System and (5) phenol-chloroform. H. pylori detection was performed using 16S rRNA gene amplification by PCR. The highest total amount of DNA was obtained using the phenol-chloroform method. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene amplification did not show statistically significant differences among the methods (p=0.466), although the highest percentage of positive cases (70%) was found in samples extracted with phenol-chloroform. We suggest that of the five methods evaluated, phenol/chloroform is the most suitable for detection of H. pylori in FFPE liver from patients with HCC. PMID:24355442

  1. USING A COMMERCIAL DNA EXTRACTION KIT TO OBTAIN RNA FROM MATURE RICE KERNELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraction of total RNA from starchy plant material such as common food grains is difficult, and especially so from dry rice (Oryza sativa L.) kernels. Most commercial RNA kits are not suited for starchy materials and traditional RNA extraction procedures leave hazardous organic wastes that have ex...

  2. Evaluation of DNA damage of hydro-alcoholic and aqueous extract of Echium amoenum and Nardostachys jatamansi

    PubMed Central

    Etebari, Mahmoud; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Rakian, Roya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Today most of herbal medicines are marketing without any standard safety profiles. Although common assumption is that these products are nontoxic but this assumption may be incorrect and dangerous, so toxicological studies should be done for herbal drugs. According to the frequent use of Echium amoenum as immunostimulant and useful in conditions including pain, cough, sore throat and arthritis, and Nardostachys jatamansi as tranquilizer and sleep inducer and evidences of some toxicities, we assessed the probable effect of their extracts on DNA of hepG2 cells using the comet assay. Materials and Methods: Different concentrations of above extracts of the plants are incubated with hepG2 cells for 24 h. A mixture of cell suspension and agarose gel were put on slides, then slides were embedded in a lysing solution and were put in electrophoresis buffer (pH = 13). Then the electrophoresis procedure took place in an alkaline solution and after neutralization stage, colorization was done by ethidium bromide and comets were observed using a fluorescence microscope. At least 100 cells of each sample were evaluated and three parameters including comet length, percent of DNA in tail, and tail moment were assessed. Results: Both Aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extract of E. amoenum were genotoxic in the concentrations of 25 mg/ml and aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extract of N. jatamansi were genotoxic in the concentrations 5 and 10 mg/ml, respectively. Conclusions: Although E. amoenum and N. jatamansi are highly used in medicine, these herbs have genotoxic effects in determined concentrations and they should be used cautiously. PMID:23798947

  3. Bangladeshi medicinal plant extracts inhibiting molecular interactions between nuclear factors and target DNA sequences mimicking NF-kappaB binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lampronti, I; Khan, M T H; Bianchi, N; Ather, A; Borgatti, M; Vizziello, L; Fabbri, E; Gambari, R

    2005-07-01

    Several medicinal plants can be employed to produce extracts exhibiting biological effects. The aim of this work was to verify the ability of extracts derived from different medicinal plants of Bangladesh in interfering with specific DNA-protein interactions. The rationale for this study is based on the observation that alteration of gene transcription represents a very promising approach to control the expression of selected genes and could be obtained using different molecules acting on the interactions between DNA and transcription factors (TFs). We have analysed the antiproliferative activity of extracts from the medicinal plants Hemidesmus indicus, Polyalthia longifolia, Aphanamixis polystachya, Moringa oleifera, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Paederia foetida, Cassia sophera, Hygrophila auriculata and Ocimum sanctum. Antiproliferative activity was assayed on different human cell lines, including erythroleukemia K562, B-lymphoid Raji, T-lymphoid Jurkat and erythroleukemia HEL cell lines. We employed the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) as a suitable technique for the identification of plant extracts altering the binding between transcription factors and the specific DNA elements. We found that low concentrations of Hemidesmus indicus, Polyalthia longifolia, Moringa oleifera and Lagerstroemia speciosa, and very low concentrations of Aphanamixis polystachya extracts inhibit the interactions between nuclear factors and target DNA elements mimicking sequences recognized by the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). On the contrary, high amount of extracts from Paederia foetida, Cassia sophera, Hygrophila auriculata or Ocimum sanctum were unable to inhibit NF-kappaB/DNA interactions. Extracts inhibiting both NF-kappaB binding activity and tumor cell growth might be a source for anti-tumor compounds, while extracts inhibiting NF-kappaB/DNA interactions with lower effects on cell growth, could be of interest in the search of compounds active in inflammatory diseases, for which inhibition of NF-kappaB binding activity without toxic effects should be obtained. PMID:16789890

  4. Development of a Nucleic Acid Extraction Procedure for Simultaneous Recovery of DNA and RNA from Diverse Microbes in Water

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Vincent R.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Gallen, Rachel R.; Ferdinand, Karen L.; Cromeans, Theresa; Vinjé, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Drinking and environmental water samples contain a diverse array of constituents that can interfere with molecular testing techniques, especially when large volumes of water are concentrated to the small volumes needed for effective molecular analysis. In this study, a suite of enteric viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites were seeded into concentrated source water and finished drinking water samples, in order to investigate the relative performance of nucleic acid extraction techniques for molecular testing. Real-time PCR and reverse transcription-PCR crossing threshold (CT) values were used as the metrics for evaluating relative performance. Experimental results were used to develop a guanidinium isothiocyanate-based lysis buffer (UNEX buffer) that enabled effective simultaneous extraction and recovery of DNA and RNA from the suite of study microbes. Procedures for bead beating, nucleic acid purification, and PCR facilitation were also developed and integrated in the protocol. The final lysis buffer and sample preparation procedure was found to be effective for a panel of drinking water and source water concentrates when compared to commercial nucleic acid extraction kits. The UNEX buffer-based extraction protocol enabled PCR detection of six study microbes, in 100 L finished water samples from four drinking water treatment facilities, within three CT values (i.e., within 90% difference) of the reagent-grade water control. The results from this study indicate that this newly formulated lysis buffer and sample preparation procedure can be useful for standardized molecular testing of drinking and environmental waters. PMID:26016775

  5. Controlling DNA compaction with cationic amphiphiles for efficient delivery systems A step forward towards non-viral Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savarala, Sushma

    The synthesis of pyridinium cationic lipids, their counter-ion exchange, and the transfection of lipoplexes consisting of these lipids with firefly luciferase plasmid DNA (6.7 KDa), into lung, prostate and breast cancer cell lines was investigated. The transfection ability of these newly synthesized compounds was found to be twice as high as DOTAP/cholesterol and Lipofectamine TM (two commercially available successful transfection agents). The compaction of the DNA onto silica (SiO2) nanoparticles was also investigated. For this purpose, it was necessary to study the stability and fusion studies of colloidal systems composed of DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), a zwitterionic lipid, and mixtures of DMPC with cationic DMTAP (1,2-dimyristoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane).

  6. Comparison of small scale methods for the rapid and efficient extraction of mitochondrial DNA from wheat crop suitable for down-stream processes.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, M; Gaisheng, Z; Na, N; Huiyan, Z; Qidi, Z; Qunzhu, W

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated and compared 2 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extraction methods in terms of DNA quality and success of subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications from yellow etiolated shoots of wheat crop (Triticum aestivum). mtDNA ex-traction is difficult because the presence of metabolites interfere with DNA isolation procedures and downstream applications such as DNA restriction, amplification, and cloning. The method (with modification) involved inactivation of genomic DNA by DNase I enzyme, RNA by RNase enzyme, contaminant proteins by using proteinase K, and precipitation of polysaccharides in the presence of a high salt concentration. The DNase I and RNA enzyme ratio was adjusted to 10:8 mL. The purity of mtDNA was confirmed by PCR amplification of genomic, mitochondrial, and chloroplast (rbcL) gene. The mitochondrial COXIII gene of 400 bp was amplified; the b-actin and chloroplast genes were not amplified. A260/A280 (1.89) and A260/A230 (2.07) ratios were calculated using a spectrophotometer. The isolated mtDNA was amenable to amplification and restriction digestion. The technique is fast, reproducible, and suitable for PCR-based markers. PMID:25501244

  7. Evaluation of commercial kits for dual extraction of DNA and RNA from human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Schweighardt, Andrew J; Tate, Courtney M; Scott, Kristina A; Harper, Kathryn A; Robertson, James M

    2015-01-01

    STR typing of DNA evidence can identify the donor with a high power of discrimination but cannot identify the tissue origin of a body-fluid stain. Using RNA to attribute a crime scene stain to a particular tissue may aid in reconstruction efforts. With blood from 10 donors, four DNA and RNA coextraction kits were evaluated by measuring yields and STR and mRNA profiles. T tests indicated some significant differences in kit performance. The Zymo Research ZR-Duet(™) kit performed best based on average DNA (41.4 ng) and mRNA (4.07 ng) yields and was the only kit to provide complete DNA/RNA profiles for all samples. The consistency of this kit was challenged by data from additional blood and saliva donors. Further testing is advised before a superior kit is unequivocally chosen. Stand-alone DNA or RNA purification generally offers higher yield, but coextraction may still allow successful STR profiling and tissue source identification. PMID:25284026

  8. Histone H2A.Z controls a critical chromatin remodeling step required for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Ayrapetov, Marina K.; Xu, Chang; Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Hu, Yiduo; Price, Brendan D.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling during DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is required to facilitate access to and repair of DSBs. This remodeling requires increased acetylation of histones and a shift in nucleosome organization to create open, relaxed chromatin domains. However, the underlying mechanism driving changes in nucleosome structure at DSBs is poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that histone H2A.Z is exchanged onto nucleosomes at DSBs by the p400 remodeling ATPase. H2A.Z exchange at DSBs shifts the chromatin to an open conformation, and is required for acetylation and ubiquitination of histones and for loading of the brca1 complex. H2A.Z exchange also restricts single-stranded DNA production by nucleases and is required for loading of the Ku70/80 DSB repair protein. H2A.Z exchange therefore promotes specific patterns of histone modification and reorganization of the chromatin architecture, leading to the assembly of a chromatin template which is an efficient substrate for the DSB repair machinery. PMID:23122415

  9. Microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization for rapid analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Mou, Zhao-Li; Hao, Shuang-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qi

    2012-11-01

    A rapid and practical microwave-assisted one-step extraction-derivatization (MAED) method was developed for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acids profile in herbal medicine. Several critical experimental parameters for MAED, including reaction temperature, microwave power and the amount of derivatization reagent (methanol), were optimized with response surface methodology. The results showed that the chromatographic peak areas of total fatty acids and total unsaturated fatty acids content obtained with MAED were markedly higher than those obtained by the conventional Soxhlet or microwave extraction and then derivatization method. The investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of the derivatization reaction revealed that microwave assistance could reduce activation energy and increase the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor. The MAED method simplified the sample preparation procedure, shortened the reaction time, but improved the extraction and derivatization efficiency of lipids and reduced ingredient losses, especially for the oxidization and isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids. The simplicity, speed and practicality of this method indicates great potential for high throughput analysis of fatty acids in natural medicinal samples. PMID:22968083

  10. An improved protocol for the isolation of total genomic DNA from Labyrinthulomycetes.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Chaminda Padmashantha; Harding, Rob; Hargreaves, Megan

    2015-03-01

    Many protocols have been used for extraction of DNA from Thraustochytrids. These generally involve the use of CTAB, phenol/chloroform and ethanol. They also feature mechanical grinding, sonication, N2 freezing or bead beating. However, the resulting chemical and physical damage to extracted DNA reduces its quality. The methods are also unsuitable for large numbers of samples. Commercially-available DNA extraction kits give better quality and yields but are expensive. Therefore, an optimized DNA extraction protocol was developed which is suitable for Thraustochytrids to both minimise expensive and time-consuming steps prior to DNA extraction and also to improve the yield. The most effective method is a combination of single bead in TissueLyser (Qiagen) and Proteinase K. Results were conclusive: both the quality and the yield of extracted DNA were higher than with any other method giving an average yield of 8.5 µg/100 mg biomass. PMID:25355522

  11. Comparative study on two-step concentrated acid hydrolysis for the extraction of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Yanuar Philip; Putra, Robertus Dhimas Dhewangga; Widyaya, Vania Tanda; Ha, Jeong-Myeong; Suh, Dong Jin; Kim, Chang Soo

    2014-07-01

    Among all the feasible thermochemical conversion processes, concentrated acid hydrolysis has been applied to break the crystalline structure of cellulose efficiently and scale up for mass production as lignocellulosic biomass fractionation process. Process conditions are optimized by investigating the effect of decrystallization sulfuric acid concentration (65-80 wt%), hydrolysis temperature (80°C and 100°C), hydrolysis reaction time (during two hours), and biomass species (oak wood, pine wood, and empty fruit bunch (EFB) of palm oil) toward sugar recovery. At the optimum process condition, 78-96% sugars out of theoretically extractable sugars have been fractionated by concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis of the three different biomass species with 87-90 g/L sugar concentration in the hydrolyzate and highest recalcitrance of pine (softwood) was determined by the correlation of crystallinity index and sugar yield considering reaction severity. PMID:24859214

  12. A simple procedure for the extraction of DNA from long-term formalin-preserved brain tissues for the detection of EBV by PCR.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Asma; Khan, Gulfaraz

    2015-12-01

    Long-term formalin fixed brain tissues are potentially an important source of material for molecular studies. Ironically, very few protocols have been published describing DNA extraction from such material for use in PCR analysis. In our attempt to investigate the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), extracting PCR quality DNA from brain samples fixed in formalin for 2-22years, proved to be very difficult and challenging. As expected, DNA extracted from these samples was not only of poor quality and quantity, but more importantly, it was frequently found to be non-amplifiable due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. Here, we describe a simple and reproducible procedure for extracting DNA using a modified proteinase K and phenol-chloroform methodology. Central to this protocol is the thorough pre-digestion washing of the tissues in PBS, extensive digestion with proteinase K in low SDS containing buffer, and using low NaCl concentration during DNA precipitation. The optimized protocol was used in extracting DNA from meninges of 26 MS and 6 non-MS cases. Although the quality of DNA from these samples was generally poor, small size amplicons (100-200 nucleotides) of the house-keeping gene, ?-globin could be reliably amplified from all the cases. PCR for EBV revealed positivity in 35% (9/26) MS cases, but 0/6 non-MS cases. These findings indicate that the method described here is suitable for PCR detection of viral sequences in long-term formalin persevered brain tissues. Our findings also support a possible role for EBV in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:26450268

  13. A Microfluidic Device for Preparing Next Generation DNA Sequencing Libraries and for Automating Other Laboratory Protocols That Require One or More Column Chromatography Steps

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Swee Jin; Phan, Huan; Gerry, Benjamin Michael; Kuhn, Alexandre; Hong, Lewis Zuocheng; Min Ong, Yao; Poon, Polly Suk Yean; Unger, Marc Alexander; Jones, Robert C.; Quake, Stephen R.; Burkholder, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Library preparation for next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) remains a key bottleneck in the sequencing process which can be relieved through improved automation and miniaturization. We describe a microfluidic device for automating laboratory protocols that require one or more column chromatography steps and demonstrate its utility for preparing Next Generation sequencing libraries for the Illumina and Ion Torrent platforms. Sixteen different libraries can be generated simultaneously with significantly reduced reagent cost and hands-on time compared to manual library preparation. Using an appropriate column matrix and buffers, size selection can be performed on-chip following end-repair, dA tailing, and linker ligation, so that the libraries eluted from the chip are ready for sequencing. The core architecture of the device ensures uniform, reproducible column packing without user supervision and accommodates multiple routine protocol steps in any sequence, such as reagent mixing and incubation; column packing, loading, washing, elution, and regeneration; capture of eluted material for use as a substrate in a later step of the protocol; and removal of one column matrix so that two or more column matrices with different functional properties can be used in the same protocol. The microfluidic device is mounted on a plastic carrier so that reagents and products can be aliquoted and recovered using standard pipettors and liquid handling robots. The carrier-mounted device is operated using a benchtop controller that seals and operates the device with programmable temperature control, eliminating any requirement for the user to manually attach tubing or connectors. In addition to NGS library preparation, the device and controller are suitable for automating other time-consuming and error-prone laboratory protocols requiring column chromatography steps, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation. PMID:23894273

  14. Comparison of four automated nucleic acid extraction platforms for the recovery of DNA from Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Perry, Michael D; White, P Lewis; Barnes, Rosemary A

    2014-09-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality within at-risk groups. Directed antifungal chemotherapy, guided by effective screening algorithms that incorporate reliable and validated molecular assays, reduces the morbidity associated with empirical administration and allows earlier diagnosis. The efficient extraction of nucleic acid from Aspergillus fumigatus is the main limiting factor for successful Aspergillus PCR from clinical specimens. With the integration of automated extraction platforms, assessment of the suitability of these platforms for specific targets is of paramount importance. In this study, four extraction robots (Applied Biosystems MagMAX, bioMérieux easyMAG, Qiagen EZ1 and Roche MagNA Pure LC) were evaluated for their ability to extract clinically significant levels of A. fumigatus from blood. All of the platforms could detect 10(1) c.f.u. ml(-1) from EDTA whole blood, although only the easyMAG, EZ1 and MagNA Pure had 100?% reproducibility at this level. Despite good analytical sensitivity, contamination associated with the easyMAG platform excluded its use for diagnostic Aspergillus PCR. The EZ1 and MagNA Pure platforms demonstrated equivalent high sensitivity and negative predictive values (97.4-100?%), essential for screening assays. PMID:24987100

  15. Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, A.M.; Santos, A.G.; Csipak, A.R.; Caliri, C.M.; Silva, I.C.; Arbex, M.A.; Silva, F.S.; Marchi, M.R.R.

    2012-12-15

    Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract—3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)—or with casearin X—0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW—after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ? We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ? We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ? We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ? We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ? The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

  16. Single step detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA and housekeeping ?-actin gene from dried blood spots by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ipsita; Chimanpure, Vaishali; Patil, Ajit; Mukhopadhyaya, Robin; Paranjape, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for developing a simple, rapid, reliable and cost effective method for detection of HIV-1 for early diagnosis of the infection especially in developing countries and in resource limited settings. A method for simultaneous detection of the HIV-1 p17 gene and the house keeping human ?-actin gene from dried blood spots (DBS) by a monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is described. Genomic DNA was extracted from 40 HIV-1 positive and 40 HIV-1 negative DBS and used as templates to amplify both the HIV-1 p17 and ?-actin genes simultaneously under the same cycling condition by a single round PCR. This method of detection of HIV-1 may provide a simple, rapid and cost effective alternative in resource limited settings; however, it would require testing a larger number of samples before widespread use. PMID:23085628

  17. Identification of Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Motifs in Truffles: a First Step toward Their DNA Bar Coding? †

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-01-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (?50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  18. One step carbon nanotubes-based solid-phase extraction for the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric multiclass pesticide control in virgin olive oils.

    PubMed

    López-Feria, S; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2009-10-23

    This article presents a novel application of carbon nanotubes for the determination of pesticides (chlortoluron, diuron, atrazine, simazine, terbuthylazin-desethyl, dimetoathe, malathion and parathion) in virgin olive oil samples. For this purpose, two carbon nanotubes, multi-walled and carboxylated single-walled, were evaluated, the later being the most appropriate for the aim of the work. The sorbent (30 mg) was packed in 3-mL commercial cartridge and the virgin olive oil samples diluted (20%, v/v) in hexane were passed through it. After a washing step with 3 mL of hexane to remove the sample matrix, the pesticides were eluted with 500 microL of ethyl acetate. In order to achieve lower detection limits, the eluent was evaporated under a nitrogen stream and the residue reconstituted in 50 microL of the same solvent. Aliquots of 2 microL of the extract were directly injected into the GC-MS system for analysis. The low limits of detection achieved, between 1.5 and 3.0 microg L(-1), permit the application of the method to control the presence of these pollutants in very restrictive samples such as the ecological virgin olive oil. In addition to the sensitivity enhancement, the solid-phase extraction procedure is rather simple as it involves a single preconcentration-elution step, which allows sample processing in less than 8 min. Moreover, the cartridge can be reused at least 100 times without losing performance. The method was applied to the determination of the pesticides in two monovarietal and one ecologic commercial extra virgin olive oil samples. Two pesticides were detected in each of the monovarietal virgin olive oils while the ecological sample resulted to be a pesticide-free one. PMID:19298965

  19. Seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in a river in Taiwan evaluated with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Min-Che; Chang, Tien-Yu; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Shen, Shu-Min; Huang, Jen-Te; Kao, Po-Min; Chiu, Yi-Chou; Fan, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the presence and amount of Legionella in along a river in Taiwan, and the relations between seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and geographic characteristics in the watershed were also evaluated. Water samples were pre-treated and analyzed with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods. For culture-confirmed method, water samples were cultivated through a series of selective media, and candidate colonies were confirmed by PCR. For direct DNA extraction method, direct DNA extraction was performed from pre-treated water samples. The DNA extracts were analyzed with PCR and DNA sequence analysis for species determination, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to quantify Legionella concentration in the water sample. In all, 150 water samples were included in this study, with 73 (48.6%) water samples detected with Legionella spp., and 17 with L. pneumophila. Over 80% Legionella spp. detections were through direct DNA extraction method, but more than 80% L. pneumophila detections were through culture-confirmed method. While detection of Legionella spp. was done with two methods, positive results were found through only one method. Legionella spp. was detected in all seasons with detection rate ranging between 34.3-58.8% and seasonal average concentration from 1.9 × 102 to 7.1 × 103 CFU/L. Most of the L. pneumophila detections were from samples collected in fall (38.2%) and summer (6.0%), which also coincided with increased cases of Legionellosis reported through Center of Disease Control in Taiwan. The high prevalence and concentration of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in the surface waters should be further evaluated for potential health risks.

  20. Simultaneous determination of fat-soluble vitamins A, D and E and pro-vitamin D2 in animal feeds by one-step extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Qian, H; Sheng, M

    1998-11-01

    Traditionally, alkaline saponification for the extraction of vitamins and step-wise HPLC analyses have been widely used for analysis of fat-soluble vitamins in animal feeds. The objective of present study was to develop an analytical method using one-step extraction and simultaneous determination of the vitamins A, D and E and pro-vitamin D2 in animals feeds b HPLC. Various analytical conditions were tested which included sample particle size extraction solvents, the ratio of solvent to sample, extraction approach, extraction time, N2 protection, prepurification with Sep-Pak cartridge and detection wavelength. The accuracy of the developed method has been proven by comparison with the AOAC method. The reproducibility of the developed method has been substantiated by repeated recovery experiments. The detection limit for the four vitamins was 10 ng/g of feed sample. One of the important properties of the present method is rapidity and ease of use. PMID:9867394

  1. DNAzymes in DNA Nanomachines and DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Tian, Ye; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde

    This chapter discusses our efforts in using DNAzymes in DNA nano-machines and DNA analysis systems. 10-23 DNAzymes can cleave specific phos-phodiester bonds in RNA. We use them to construct an autonomous DNA-RNA chimera nanomotor, which constantly extracts chemical energy from RNA substrates and transduces the energy into a mechanical motion: cycles of contraction and extension. The motor's motion can be reversibly turned on and off by a DNA analogue (brake) of the RNA substrate. Addition and removal of the brake stops and restarts, respectively, the motor's motion. Furthermore, when the RNA substrates are preorganized into a one-dimensional track, a DNAzyme can continuously move along the track so long as there are substrates available ahead. Based on a similar mechanism, a novel DNA detection system has been developed. A target DNA activates a DNAzyme to cleave RNA-containing molecular beacons (MB), which generates an enhanced fluorescence signal. A following work integrates two steps of signal amplifications: a rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to synthesize multiple copies of DNAzymes, and the DNAzymes catalyze a chemical reaction to generate a colorimetric signal. This method allows detection of DNA analytes whose concentration is as low as 1 pM.

  2. Online polar two phase countercurrent chromatography×high performance liquid chromatography for preparative isolation of polar polyphenols from tea extract in a single step.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bin; Li, Shu-Qi; Chen, Long-Jiang; Fang, Mei-Juan; Chen, Quan-Cheng; Wu, Zhen; Wu, Yun-Long; Qiu, Ying-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report an on-line two-dimensional system constructed by counter-current chromatography (CCC) coupling with preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (prep-HPLC) for the separation and purification of polar natural products. The CCC was used as the first dimensional isolation column, where an environmental friendly polar two-phase solvent system of isopropanol and 16% sodium chloride aqueous solution (1:1.2, v/v) was introduced for low toxicity and favorable resolution. In addition, by applying the stop-and-go flow technique, effluents pre-fractionated by CCC was further purified by a preparative column packed with octadecyl silane (ODS) as the second dimension. The interface between the two dimensions was comprised of a 6-port switching valve and an electronically controlled 2-position 10-port switching valve connected with two equivalent holding columns. To be highlighted here, this rationally designed interface for the purpose of smooth desalination, absorption and desorption, successfully solved the solvent compatibility problem between the two dimensional separation systems. The present integrated system was successfully applied in a one-step preparative separation and identification of 10 pure compounds from the water extracts of Tieguanyin tea (Chinese oolong tea). In short, all the results demonstrated that the on-line 2D CCC×LC method is an efficient and green approach for harvesting polar targets in a single step, which showed great promise in drug discovery. PMID:26114653

  3. Multi-step infrared macro-fingerprint features of ethanol extracts from different Cistanche species in China combined with HPLC fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Sun, Suqin; Zhu, Weicheng; Xu, Changhua; Liu, Yougang; Shen, Liang; Shi, Yue; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The genus Cistanche generally has four species in China, including C. deserticola (CD), C. tubulosa (CT), C. salsa (CS) and C. sinensis (CSN), among which CD and CT are official herbal sources of Cistanche Herba (CH). To clarify the sources of CH and ensure the clinical efficacy and safety, a multi-step IR macro-fingerprint method was developed to analyze and evaluate the ethanol extracts of the four species. Through this method, the four species were distinctively distinguished, and the main active components phenylethanoid glycosides (PhGs) were estimated rapidly according to the fingerprint features in the original IR spectra, second derivative spectra, correlation coefficients and 2D-IR correlation spectra. The exclusive IR fingerprints in the spectra including the positions, shapes and numbers of peaks indicated that constitutes of CD were the most abundant, and CT had the highest level of PhGs. The results deduced by some macroscopic features in IR fingerprint were in agreement with the HPLC fingerprint of PhGs from the four species, but it should be noted that the IR provided more chemical information than HPLC. In conclusion, with the advantages of high resolution, cost effective and speediness, the macroscopic IR fingerprint method should be a promising analytical technique for discriminating extremely similar herbal medicine, monitoring and tracing the constituents of different extracts and even for quality control of the complex systems such as TCM.

  4. Protective effect of dry olive leaf extract in adrenaline induced DNA damage evaluated using in vitro comet assay with human peripheral leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cabarkapa, Andrea; Zivkovi?, Lada; Zukovec, Dijana; Djeli?, Ninoslav; Baji?, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparevi?, Biljana

    2014-04-01

    Excessive release of stress hormone adrenaline is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species which may cause disruption of DNA integrity leading to cancer and age-related disorders. Phenolic-rich plant product dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) is known to modulate effects of various oxidants in human cells. The aim was to evaluate the effect of commercial DOLE against adrenaline induced DNA damage in human leukocytes by using comet assay. Peripheral blood leukocytes from 6 healthy subjects were treated in vitro with three final concentrations of DOLE (0.125, 0.5, and 1mg/mL) for 30 min at 37°C under two different protocols, pretreatment and post-treatment. Protective effect of DOLE was assessed from its ability to attenuate formation of DNA lesions induced by adrenaline. Compared to cells exposed only to adrenaline, DOLE displayed significant reduction (P<0.001) of DNA damage at all three concentrations and under both experimental protocols. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a significant positive association between DOLE concentration and leukocytes DNA damage (P<0.05). Antigenotoxic effect of the extract was more pronounced at smaller concentrations. Post-treatment with 0.125 mg/mL DOLE was the most effective against adrenaline genotoxicity. Results indicate genoprotective and antioxidant properties in dry olive leaf extract, strongly supporting further explorations of its underlying mechanisms of action. PMID:24389114

  5. Comparison between a chimeric lysin ClyH and other enzymes for extracting DNA to detect methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Hang; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    Extracting DNA from Staphylococcus aureus cells is important for detecting MRSA by PCR. However, S. aureus cells are known to be difficult to disrupt due to their compact cell walls. Here, we systematically studied the efficiency of a highly active lysin ClyH for extracting DNA of S. aureus in comparison with commonly used enzymes, such as lysostaphin and achromopeptidase (ACP), and its compatibility in quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection of MRSA. qPCR analysis of S. aureus specific gene femB showed that ClyH was much faster than lysostaphin, ACP and lysozyme for releasing DNA. Five minutes disruption with ClyH at room temperature was enough to release all the DNA from S. aureus. Analysis of the spiked nasal swabs by a dual qPCR assay of the ?-lactam resistance mecA gene and the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec)-open reading frame X (orfX) junction (SCCmec-orfX) after ClyH lysis showed 100 % sensitivity and specificity to the commercial BD GeneOhm™ MRSA test with ACP lysis, but the lysis time was reduced from 20 min by ACP to 5 min by ClyH. Our research shows that ClyH could be a better option than the currently used enzymes for DNA extraction from S. aureus, which can provide simpler and faster PCR detection of MRSA. PMID:26596268

  6. One simple DNA extraction device and its combination with modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid on-field detection of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Yinan; Chen, Lili; Quan, Sheng; Jiang, Shimeng; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Quickness, simplicity, and effectiveness are the three major criteria for establishing a good molecular diagnosis method in many fields. Herein we report a novel detection system for genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which can be utilized to perform both on-field quick screening and routine laboratory diagnosis. In this system, a newly designed inexpensive DNA extraction device was used in combination with a modified visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (vLAMP) assay. The main parts of the DNA extraction device included a silica gel membrane filtration column and a modified syringe. The DNA extraction device could be easily operated without using other laboratory instruments, making it applicable to an on-field GMO test. High-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and isothermal amplification could be quickly isolated from plant tissues using this device within 15 min. In the modified vLAMP assay, a microcrystalline wax encapsulated detection bead containing SYBR green fluorescent dye was introduced to avoid dye inhibition and cross-contaminations from post-LAMP operation. The system was successfully applied and validated in screening and identification of GM rice, soybean, and maize samples collected from both field testing and the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) proficiency test program, which demonstrated that it was well-adapted to both on-field testing and/or routine laboratory analysis of GMOs. PMID:23181490

  7. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  8. 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis of Drinking Water Using RNA and DNA Extracts as Targets for Clone Library Development - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the bacterial composition of chlorinated drinking water using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from RNA and DNA extracted from twelve water samples collected in three different months (June, August, and September of 2007). Phylogenetic analysis of 1234 and 1117 ...

  9. On-chip concentration of bacteria using a 3D dielectrophoretic chip and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-hyeong; Lee, Jeong-Gun

    2010-06-01

    We report the on-chip concentration of bacteria using a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with 3D electrodes and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip. The DEP chip has a set of interdigitated Au post electrodes with 50 µm height to generate a network of non-uniform electric fields for the efficient trapping by DEP. The metal post array was fabricated by photolithography and subsequent Ni and Au electroplating. Three model bacteria samples (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans) were tested and over 80-fold concentrations were achieved within 2 min. Subsequently, on-chip DNA extraction from the concentrated bacteria in the 3D DEP chip was performed by laser irradiation using the laser-irradiated magnetic bead system (LIMBS) in the same chip. The extracted DNA was analyzed with silicon chip-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The total process of on-chip bacteria concentration and the subsequent DNA extraction can be completed within 10 min including the manual operation time.

  10. DNA Extraction Center for Coastal Margin Observation & Prediction (www.stccmop.org)

    E-print Network

    extraction buffer: Contains 0.1 M EDTA @ pH 8, 1% SDS and 200 µg/mL proteinase K. Make a stock of 50 mL 0.1 M EDTA-1% SDS by combining 10 mL EDTA pH8, 5 mL 10% SDS and 35 mL MilliQ water for a total volume of 50 m BUFFER WORKING SOLUTION. Add 10 µl of 20 mg/mL Proteinase K to 1 mL of 0.1M EDTA-1% SDS, mix by gently

  11. Supplementation of Seaweeds Extracts Suppresses Azoxymethane-induced Aberrant DNA Methylation in Colon and Liver of ICR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bu, So Young; Kwon, Hoonjeong; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Seamustard and seatangle are commonly consumed seaweeds in Korea and rich sources of non-digestible polysaccharides which possess biological activities. However anti-mutagenic and anti-cancer activities of these seaweeds under physiological condition have not been clarified yet. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of seaweeds consumption on azoxymethane (AOM) -induced DNA methylation at N7 and O6 position of guanine base, an indicator of DNA damage related to cancer initiation. Methods: Thirty ICR mice were divided into five groups and fed one of the following diets for two weeks: control diet, diet containing 10% water-soluble or water-insoluble fraction of seamustard or seatangle. After two weeks of experimental diet AOM was injected at 6 hours before sacrifice and N7-methylguanine (N7-meG) and O6-methylguanine (O6-meG) from the colon and liver DNA were quantified using a gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Results: Water-soluble fractions of both seamustard and seatangle significantly reduced AOM-induced production of N7-meG guanine in colon and liver. Also water-soluble fractions of these seaweeds suppressed the level of methylation at O6-guanine of colon and liver directly responsible for tumorigenesis. While water-insoluble fraction of seamustard suppressed the production of N7-meG in liver this seaweed fraction decreased O6-meG and the ratio of O6/N7-meG in liver. Water insoluble fraction of seatangle decreased both O6- and N7-meG in colon and liver. Supplementation of all seaweeds extracts increased fecal weight of animals and the increase of fecal weight by water-insoluble fraction of seaweeds were higher than that by water-soluble fraction. Conclusion: Seamustard and seatangle intake may effectively prevent colon and liver carcinogenesis by decreasing DNA damage and the mechanism of inhibiting carcinogenesis by seaweeds in a long term study are warranted. PMID:25337591

  12. Basil extract inhibits the sulfotransferase mediated formation of DNA adducts of the procarcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole by rat and human liver S9 homogenates and in HepG2 human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, Suzanne M F; Punt, Ans; Delatour, Thierry; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2008-06-01

    The effects of a basil extract on the sulfation and concomitant DNA adduct formation of the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole were studied using rat and human liver S9 homogenates and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Basil was chosen since it contains the procarcinogen estragole that can be metabolized to 1'-hydroxyestragole by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Basil extract addition to incubations of rat and human liver S9 homogenates with 1'-hydroxyestragole, the sulfotransferase cofactor PAPS, and 2'-deoxyguanosine resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of N2-(trans-isoestragol-3'-yl)-2'-deoxyguanosine formation. Because the inhibition resembled the inhibition by the sulfotransferase inhibitor pentachlorophenol and since the inhibition was not observed in incubations with the direct electrophile 1'-acetoxyestragole it is concluded that the inhibition occurs at the level of the sulfotransferase mediated bioactivation step. Additional experiments in HepG2 cells revealed the same protective effect of basil extract in intact cells, demonstrating that the inhibitors are able to enter the cells. The results of this study suggest that bioactivation and subsequent adverse effects of 1'-hydroxyestragole might be lower in a matrix of other basil ingredients than what would be expected on the basis of experiments using 1'-hydroxyestragole as a single compound. PMID:18433972

  13. The effect of dilution and the use of a post-extraction nucleic acid purification column on the accuracy, precision, and inhibition of environmental DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna M.; Spear, Stephen F.; Pierson, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of environmental DNA (eDNA) is an increasingly common method for detecting presence and assessing relative abundance of rare or elusive species in aquatic systems via the isolation of DNA from environmental samples and the amplification of species-specific sequences using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Co-extracted substances that inhibit qPCR can lead to inaccurate results and subsequent misinterpretation about a species’ status in the tested system. We tested three treatments (5-fold and 10-fold dilutions, and spin-column purification) for reducing qPCR inhibition from 21 partially and fully inhibited eDNA samples collected from coastal plain wetlands and mountain headwater streams in the southeastern USA. All treatments reduced the concentration of DNA in the samples. However, column purified samples retained the greatest sensitivity. For stream samples, all three treatments effectively reduced qPCR inhibition. However, for wetland samples, the 5-fold dilution was less effective than other treatments. Quantitative PCR results for column purified samples were more precise than the 5-fold and 10-fold dilutions by 2.2× and 3.7×, respectively. Column purified samples consistently underestimated qPCR-based DNA concentrations by approximately 25%, whereas the directional bias in qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed between stream and wetland samples for both dilution treatments. While the directional bias of qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed among treatments and locations, the magnitude of inaccuracy did not. Our results suggest that 10-fold dilution and column purification effectively reduce qPCR inhibition in mountain headwater stream and coastal plain wetland eDNA samples, and if applied to all samples in a study, column purification may provide the most accurate relative qPCR-based DNA concentrations estimates while retaining the greatest assay sensitivity.

  14. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA); Mariella, Raymond P. (Danville, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  15. Optimisation of Arabidopsis thaliana DNA extraction for the analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine formation after gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dany, A. L.; Triantaphylidès, C.; Cadet, J.; Douki, T.

    1999-01-01

    8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) is a major oxidative DNA lesion. Plant DNA extraction protocols were improved in order to quantify 8-oxodGuo in the overall DNA of a cell suspension of Arabidopsis thaliana using the method of high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). Our results show that DNA can be artefactually oxidised during the extraction procedure. Metal chelating agents were efficient to decrease the 8-oxodGuo background level to 3.3 ± 0.1 8-oxodGuo/105Gua and to improve experiment reproducibility. It was observed that DNA guanine oxidation in plant cells by ?-rays is very low in vivo (15 8-oxodGuo/10^9Gua formation per Gy). La 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-désoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) est une lésion oxydative majeure de l'ADN. Divers protocoles d'extraction d'ADN végétal ont été optimisés dans le but de quantifier la 8-oxodGuo dans l'ADN total d'une suspension cellulaire d'Arabidopsis thaliana en utilisant la chromatographie liquide haute pérformance couplée à un détecteur électrochimique (CLHP-EC). Nos résultats montrent que l'ADN peut être oxydé artéfactuellement au cours de son extraction. L'utilisation de chélateurs de métaux permet de réduire le niveau de base de 8-oxodGuo à 3,3±0,1 8-oxodGuo/10^5Gua et d'augmenter la reproductibilité des expériences. L'étude des effets des rayons ? sur les cellules de plantes a mis en évidence que l'oxydation de la guanine de l'ADN est très faible in vivo (formation de 15 8-oxodGuo/10^9Gua par Gy).

  16. Effects of DNA extraction and universal primers on 16S rRNA gene-based DGGE analysis of a bacterial community from fish farming water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Peng; Hu, Chaoqun; Zhang, Lüping; Ren, Chunhua; Shen, Qi

    2007-07-01

    Among many reports investigating microbial diversity from environmental samples with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), limited attention has been given to the effects of universal primers and DNA extraction on the outcome of DGGE analysis. In this study, these effects were tested with 16S rRNA gene-based DGGE on a bacterial community from farming water samples. The results indicate that the number of discernable bands in the DGGE fingerprint differed with the primer pairs used; the bands produced by 63f/518r, 341f/926r and 933f/1387r primer pairs were obviously fewer than those by 968f/1401r. Also, we found that each DNA extraction method resulted in different community profiles, reflected by the number and intensity of bands in the DGGE fingerprint. Furthermore, the main bands (theoretically representing dominant bacteria) differed with the extraction methods applied. It is therefore believed that the effects of universal primers and DNA extraction should be given more attention and carefully chosen before performing an investigation into a new environment with DGGE.

  17. A two-step load-deflection procedure applicable to extract the Young's modulus and the residual tensile stress of circularly shaped thin-film diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigelbeck, Roman; Schneider, Michael; Schalko, Johannes; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    We report on a novel two-step load-deflection (LD) formula and technique that enables an accurate extraction of the Young's modulus and the residual tensile stress from LD measurements on circularly shaped thin-film diaphragms. This LD relationship is derived from an adaptation of Timoshenko's plate bending theory, where the in-plane and out-of-plane deflections are approximated by series expansions. Utilizing the minimum total potential energy principle yields an infinite-dimensional system of equations which is solved analytically resulting in a compact closed-form solution. In the appendant measurement procedure, the whole transverse bending characteristic of the diaphragm as a function of the radial coordinate is recorded for different pressure loads and introduced into the novel LD equation in order to determine the elastomechanical parameters of interest. The flexibility of this approach is demonstrated by ascertaining the Young's modulus and the residual tensile stress of two disparate diaphragm materials made of either micromachined silicon or microfiltered buckypapers composed of carbon nanotube compounds.

  18. Advances in forensic DNA quantification: a review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven B; McCord, Bruce; Buel, Eric

    2014-11-01

    This review focuses upon a critical step in forensic biology: detection and quantification of human DNA from biological samples. Determination of the quantity and quality of human DNA extracted from biological evidence is important for several reasons. Firstly, depending on the source and extraction method, the quality (purity and length), and quantity of the resultant DNA extract can vary greatly. This affects the downstream method as the quantity of input DNA and its relative length can determine which genotyping procedure to use-standard short-tandem repeat (STR) typing, mini-STR typing or mitochondrial DNA sequencing. Secondly, because it is important in forensic analysis to preserve as much of the evidence as possible for retesting, it is important to determine the total DNA amount available prior to utilizing any destructive analytical method. Lastly, results from initial quantitative and qualitative evaluations permit a more informed interpretation of downstream analytical results. Newer quantitative techniques involving real-time PCR can reveal the presence of degraded DNA and PCR inhibitors, that provide potential reasons for poor genotyping results and may indicate methods to use for downstream typing success. In general, the more information available, the easier it is to interpret and process the sample resulting in a higher likelihood of successful DNA typing. The history of the development of quantitative methods has involved two main goals-improving precision of the analysis and increasing the information content of the result. This review covers advances in forensic DNA quantification methods and recent developments in RNA quantification. PMID:25088961

  19. Security: Step by Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetcov, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a list of the essential steps to keeping a school's or district's network safe and sound. It describes how to establish a security architecture and approach that will continually evolve as the threat environment changes over time. The article discusses the methodology for implementing this approach and then discusses the…

  20. Rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) extract and its component, piceatannol, enhance the activity of DNA polymerase and suppress the inflammatory response elicited by UVB?induced DNA damage in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Shiratake, Sawako; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Iwahashi, Hiroyasu; Onodera, Takefumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    A number of naturally occurring agents are hypothesized to protect against ultraviolet (UV)?induced skin damage. The present study screened >50 plant extracts for inhibitors of UVB?induced cytotoxicity, using cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), and identified that the fruit of rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) was the most marked inhibitor of cell death. The protective effect of rose myrtle extract and the two key components, piceatannol and piceatannol?4'?O???D?glucopyranoside, on UVB?induced damage and inflammation in cultured NHEK was investigated. The 80% ethanol extract from rose myrtle fruit with piceatannol exhibited protection of UVB?induced cytotoxicity in NHEK; however, piceatannol?4'?O???D?glucopyranoside exhibited no protection, as determined by a 3?(4,5?dimethylthiazol?2?yl)?2,5?diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. This extract and piceatannol reduced the production of UVB?induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and enhanced the cellular enzyme activity of the DNA polymerases in UVB?irradiated NHEK, suggesting that UVB?stimulated DNA damage was repaired by the polymerases. In addition, the secretion of prostaglandin E2, which is an inflammatory mediator, was decreased. These results indicated that rose myrtle fruit extract and its key constituent, piceatannol, are potential photoprotective candidates for UV?induced skin damage. PMID:26239705

  1. Assessment of free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Nandini; Chatterjee, Sreemoyee

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids results in generation of free radicals in an organism which is the major cause of onset of various degenerative diseases. Antioxidants scavenge these free radicals, thereby protecting the cell from damage. The present study was designed to examine the free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of traditionally used spices Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel). The aqueous, methanolic, and acetonic extracts of T. ammi and F. vulgare seeds were prepared using soxhlet extraction assembly and subjected to qualitative and quantitative estimation of phytochemical constituents. Free radical scavenging potential was investigated using standard methods, namely, DPPH radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay along with the protection against oxidative DNA damage. The results stated that acetonic seed extracts (AAcSE and FAcSE) of both the spices possessed comparatively high amount of total phenolics whereas methanolic seed extracts (AMSE and FMSE) were found to have highest amount of total flavonoids. At 1?mg/mL concentration, highest DPPH radical scavenging activity was shown by FMSE (96.2%), AAcSE was recorded with highest FRAP value (2270.27 ± 0.005??mol/L), and all the seed extracts have been shown to mitigate the damage induced by Fenton reaction on calf thymus DNA. Therefore, the study suggests that T. ammi and F. vulgare seed extracts could contribute as a highly significant bioresource of antioxidants to be used in our day-to-day life and in food and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25143939

  2. Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Potential and Oxidative DNA Damage Preventive Activity of Trachyspermum ammi L. (Carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (Fennel) Seed Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids results in generation of free radicals in an organism which is the major cause of onset of various degenerative diseases. Antioxidants scavenge these free radicals, thereby protecting the cell from damage. The present study was designed to examine the free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of traditionally used spices Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel). The aqueous, methanolic, and acetonic extracts of T. ammi and F. vulgare seeds were prepared using soxhlet extraction assembly and subjected to qualitative and quantitative estimation of phytochemical constituents. Free radical scavenging potential was investigated using standard methods, namely, DPPH radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay along with the protection against oxidative DNA damage. The results stated that acetonic seed extracts (AAcSE and FAcSE) of both the spices possessed comparatively high amount of total phenolics whereas methanolic seed extracts (AMSE and FMSE) were found to have highest amount of total flavonoids. At 1?mg/mL concentration, highest DPPH radical scavenging activity was shown by FMSE (96.2%), AAcSE was recorded with highest FRAP value (2270.27 ± 0.005??mol/L), and all the seed extracts have been shown to mitigate the damage induced by Fenton reaction on calf thymus DNA. Therefore, the study suggests that T. ammi and F. vulgare seed extracts could contribute as a highly significant bioresource of antioxidants to be used in our day-to-day life and in food and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25143939

  3. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard extraction methods, without the need for specialised equipment or large-volume demineralisation steps. PMID:25992635

  4. Microfluidic device for bacterial genome extraction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galajda, Peter; Riehn, Robert; Wang, Yan-Mei; Keymer, Juan; Golding, Ido; Cox, Edward C.; Austin, Robert H.

    2006-03-01

    Although single molecule DNA manipulation and analysis techniques are emerging, methods for whole genome extraction from single cells, genomic length DNA handling and analytics is still to be developed. Here we present a microfabricated device to address some of these needs. This microfluidic chip is suitable for culturing bacteria and subsequently retrieve their genetic content. As a next step, the extracted DNA can be introduced in a nanostructured segment of the chip for precise handling, stretching and analysis. We hope that similar microdevices can be useful in studying genetic aspects of the cell lifecycle in a variety of organisms.

  5. A programmable Y-shaped junction scaffold-mediated modular and cascade amplification strategy for the one-step, isothermal and ultrasensitive detection of target DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Sun, Xinya; Liu, Tao; Wang, Li

    2015-12-28

    The programmable DNA polymerization across the two branches of the assembled Y-shaped junction was ingeniously manipulated for modular target recycling and cascade lambda exonuclease cleavage, which afforded the one-pot, isothermal and ultrasensitive detection of target DNA. A low detection limit of 28.2 fM of target DNA with an excellent selectivity could be obtained. PMID:26492526

  6. Evaluating the efficacy of various thermo-stable polymerases against co-extracted PCR inhibitors in ancient DNA samples

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    in ancient DNA samples Cara Monroe a,b,c , Colin Grier b , Brian M. Kemp a,b, * a Department of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4910, United States c Department of Anthropology, University by [28]) and forensic DNA (see review by [4]). In these types of investigations, if contaminating DNA

  7. Brassica oleracea L. Var. costata DC and Pieris brassicae L. aqueous extracts reduce methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage in V79 hamster lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Carla; Fernandes, Fátima; Valentão, Patrícia; Rodrigues, António Sebastião; Coelho, Marta; Teixeira, João P; Silva, Susana; Ferreres, Federico; Guedes de Pinho, Paula; Andrade, Paula B

    2012-05-30

    Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC leaves and Pieris brassicae L. larvae aqueous extracts were assayed for their potential to prevent/induce DNA damage. None of them was mutagenic at the tested concentrations in the Ames test reversion assay using Salmonella His(+) TA98 strains, with and without metabolic activation. In the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase mutation assay using mammalian V79 fibroblast cell line, extracts at 500 ?g/mL neither induced mutations nor protected against the mutagenicity caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). In the comet assay, none of the extracts revealed to be genotoxic by itself, and both afforded protection, more pronounced for larvae extracts, against MMS-induced genotoxicity. As genotoxic/antigenotoxic effects of Brassica vegetables are commonly attributed to isothiocyanates, the extracts were screened for these compounds by headspace-solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. No sulfur compound was detected. These findings demonstrate that both extracts could be useful against damage caused by genotoxic compounds, the larvae extract being the most promising. PMID:22582708

  8. Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus pcr detection in aborted fetuses or calves born from cows experimentally infected with strain 2308

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, M.; Keid, L.B.; Rocha, V.C.M.; Vejarano, M.P.; Ikuta, C.Y.; Rodriguez, C.A.R.; Ferreira, F.; Dias, R.A.; Ferreira Neto, J.S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the detection of B. abortus by PCR in organs of aborted fetuses from infected cows, an important mechanism to find infected herds on the eradication phase of the program. So, different DNA extraction protocols were compared, focusing the PCR detection of B. abortus in clinical samples collected from aborted fetuses or calves born from cows challenged with the 2308 B. abortus strain. Therefore, two gold standard groups were built based on classical bacteriology, formed from: 32 lungs (17 positives), 26 spleens (11 positives), 23 livers (8 positives) and 22 bronchial lymph nodes (7 positives). All samples were submitted to three DNA extraction protocols, followed by the same amplification process with the primers B4 and B5. From the accumulated results for organ, the proportion of positives for the lungs was higher than the livers (p=0.04) or bronchial lymph nodes (p=0.004) and equal to the spleens (p=0.18). From the accumulated results for DNA extraction protocol, the proportion of positives for the Boom protocol was bigger than the PK (p< 0.0001) and GT (p=0.0004). There was no difference between the PK and GT protocols (p=0.5). Some positive samples from the classical bacteriology were negative to the PCR and vice-versa. Therefore, the best strategy for B. abortus detection in the organs of aborted fetuses or calves born from infected cows is the use, in parallel, of isolation by classical bacteriology and the PCR, with the DNA extraction performed by the Boom protocol. PMID:24031391

  9. Assessment of methods to recover DNA from bacteria, fungi and archaea in complex environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Navarro, Karina; Herrera-López, David; López-Chávez, Mariana Y; Cancino-Gómez, Máximo; Reyes-Reyes, Ana L

    2015-11-01

    DNA extraction from environmental samples is a critical step for metagenomic analysis to study microbial communities, including those considered uncultivable. Nevertheless, obtaining good quality DNA in sufficient quantities for downstream methodologies is not always possible, and it depends on the complexity and stability of each ecosystem, which could be more problematic for samples from tropical regions because those ecosystems are less stable and more complex. Three laboratory methods for the extraction of nucleic acids from samples representing unstable (decaying coffee pulp and mangrove sediments) and relatively stable (compost and soil) environments were tested. The results were compared with those obtained using two commercial DNA extraction kits. The quality of the extracted DNA was evaluated by PCR amplification to verify the recovery of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal genetic material. The laboratory method that gave the best results used a lysis procedure combining physical, chemical, and enzymatic steps. PMID:26014885

  10. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley (Cambridge, MA); Richardson, Charles C. (Chestnut Hill, MA)

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  11. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods for Use in Combination with SYBR Green I Real-Time PCR To Detect Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in Poultry

    PubMed Central

    De Medici, Dario; Croci, Luciana; Delibato, Elisabetta; Di Pasquale, Simona; Filetici, Emma; Toti, Laura

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, reproducible, and robust method for detecting Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. First, for the extraction and purification of DNA from the preenrichment culture, four methods (boiling, alkaline lysis, Nucleospin, and Dynabeads DNA Direct System I) were compared. The most effective method was then combined with a real-time PCR method based on the double-stranded DNA binding dye SYBR Green I used with the ABI Prism 7700 system. The specificity of the reaction was determined by the melting temperature (Tm) of the amplicon obtained. The experiments were conducted both on samples of chicken experimentally contaminated with serotype Enteritidis and on commercially available poultry samples, which were also used for comparisons with the standard cultural method (i.e., ISO 6579/2001). The results of comparisons among the four DNA extraction methods showed significant differences except for the results from the boiling and Nucleospin methods (the two methods that produced the lowest threshold cycles). Boiling was selected as the preferred extraction method because it is the simplest and most rapid. This method was then combined with SYBR Green I real-time PCR, using primers SEFA-1 and SEFA-2. The specificity of the reaction was confirmed by the Tm, which was consistently specific for the amplicon obtained; the mean peak Tm obtained with curves specific for serotype Enteritidis was 82.56 ± 0.22°C. The standard curve constructed using the mean threshold cycle and various concentrations of serotype Enteritidis (ranging from 103 to 108 CFU/ml) showed good linearity (R2 = 0.9767) and a sensitivity limit of less than 103 CFU/ml. The results of this study demonstrate that the SYBR Green I real-time PCR constitutes an effective and easy-to-perform method for detecting serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. PMID:12788750

  12. DNA damage caused by organic extracts of contaminated sediment, crude, and weathered oil and their fractions recovered up to 5 years after the 2007 Hebei Spirit oil spill off Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Lee, Hyo Jin; Hong, Seongjin; Khim, Jong Seong; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Gi Beum

    2015-06-15

    We examined the degree of DNA damage caused by three fractions (F1, aliphatic hydrocarbons; F2, aromatic hydrocarbons; and F3, polar compounds) of the organic extract of sediments taken from Taean, Korea, following the Hebei Spirit oil spill. DNA damage was measured using the comet assay with blood cells of the striped beakfish (Oplegnathus fasciatus). DNA damage was also examined for fractions of crude oil (Iranian Heavy Crude Oil, IHC), weathered oil and six subfractions (F2.1-F2.6). The greatest DNA damage was found from the Sinduri dune region and DNA damage decreased to 40% weathered oil in F2 fraction compared with crude oil. The DNA damage of the sum of fractions was found higher than the organic extracts of sediments, suggesting antagonistic interactions between the genotoxic compounds. This study confirmed the persistence of potential genotoxicity in sediments of the severely affected regions as long as 5 years after the oil spill. PMID:25869203

  13. Organic solvent-free air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for optimized extraction of illegal azo-based dyes and their main metabolite from spices, cosmetics and human bio-fluid samples in one step.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh

    2015-08-15

    Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has unique capabilities to develop as an organic solvent-free and one-step microextraction method, applying ionic-liquids as extraction solvent and avoiding centrifugation step. Herein, a novel and simple eco-friendly method, termed one-step air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (OS-AALLME), was developed to extract some illegal azo-based dyes (including Sudan I to IV, and Orange G) from food and cosmetic products. A series of experiments were investigated to achieve the most favorable conditions (including extraction solvent: 77?L of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate; sample pH 6.3, without salt addition; and extraction cycles: 25 during 100s of sonication) using a central composite design strategy. Under these conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, enrichment factors and consumptive indices were in the range of 3.9-84.8ngmL(-1), 0.013-3.1?gmL(-1), 33-39, and 0.13-0.15, respectively. The results showed that -as well as its simplicity, fastness, and use of no hazardous disperser and extraction solvents- OS-AALLME is an enough sensitive and efficient method for the extraction of these dyes from complex matrices. After optimization and validation, OS-AALLME was applied to estimate the concentration of 1-amino-2-naphthol in human bio-fluids as a main reductive metabolite of selected dyes. Levels of 1-amino-2-naphthol in plasma and urinary excretion suggested that this compound may be used as a new potential biomarker of these dyes in human body. PMID:26149246

  14. Natural lipid extracts and biomembrane-mimicking lipid compositions are disposed to form nonlamellar phases, and they release DNA from lipoplexes most efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    A viewpoint now emerging is that a critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection (lipofection) is the structural evolution of lipoplexes upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. Here we report our finding that lipid mixtures mimicking biomembrane lipid compositions are superior to pure anionic liposomes in their ability to release DNA from lipoplexes (cationic lipid/DNA complexes), even though they have a much lower negative charge density (and thus lower capacity to neutralize the positive charge of the lipoplex lipids). Flow fluorometry revealed that the portion of DNA released after a 30-min incubation of the cationic O-ethylphosphatidylcholine lipoplexes with the anionic phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol was 19% and 37%, respectively, whereas a mixture mimicking biomembranes (MM: phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylserine /cholesterol 45:20:20:15 w/w) and polar lipid extract from bovine liver released 62% and 74%, respectively, of the DNA content. A possible reason for this superior power in releasing DNA by the natural lipid mixtures was suggested by structural experiments: while pure anionic lipids typically form lamellae, the natural lipid mixtures exhibited a surprising predilection to form nonlamellar phases. Thus, the MM mixture arranged into lamellar arrays at physiological temperature, but began to convert to the hexagonal phase at a slightly higher temperature, {approx} 40-45 C. A propensity to form nonlamellar phases (hexagonal, cubic, micellar) at close to physiological temperatures was also found with the lipid extracts from natural tissues (from bovine liver, brain, and heart). This result reveals that electrostatic interactions are only one of the factors involved in lipid-mediated DNA delivery. The tendency of lipid bilayers to form nonlamellar phases has been described in terms of bilayer 'frustration' which imposes a nonzero intrinsic curvature of the two opposing monolayers. Because the stored curvature elastic energy in a 'frustrated' bilayer seems to be comparable to the binding energy between cationic lipid and DNA, the balance between these two energies could play a significant role in the lipoplex-membrane interactions and DNA release energetics.

  15. One-step cell lysis suitable for quantitative bacteria detection in inhibitor-laden sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-04-01

    Complexity and heterogeneity of soils often hinder effective DNA extraction from the soil matrix. In particular, conventional DNA extraction techniques require extensive purification which makes DNA extraction time-consuming and labor-intensive. Other drawbacks include lower recovery yield, degradation, and damage of DNA, which are also caused by intensive purifications during DNA extraction. Therefore a rapid and simple and yet effective DNA pretreatment method is preferred for environmental monitoring and screening. This study has evaluated the feasibility of simple physical pretreatment for effective cell lysis of bacteria in sands. Bead beating method was selected as an effective physical cell lysis method in this study. We examined the capability of this physical lysis for Pseudomonas putida seeded sands without additional chemical purification steps. The lysate from the method was analysed by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay and subsequently compared to that by commercial DNA extraction kit. The best lysis condition (treatment with 0.1 mm glass beads at 3000 rpm for 3 minutes) was selected. The qPCR results of bead beating treated samples showed the better performance than that of conventional DNA extraction kit. Moreover, the qPCR assay was performed to the sands laden with qPCR inhibitors (humic acids, clay, and magnesium), which generally present in environmental samples. Further experiments with the sands containing less than 10 ?g/g of humic acids and 70% of clay showed successful quantification results of qPCR assay. In conclusion, the bead beating method is useful for simplified DNA extraction prior to qPCR analysis for sand samples of particular composition. It is expected that this approach will be beneficial for environmental in-situ analysis or immediate pre-screening. It also provides the groundwork for future studies with real soil samples that have various physico-chemical properties.

  16. A rapid method for authentication of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) meat by Alkaline Lysis method of DNA extraction and species specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Girish, P S; Haunshi, S; Vaithiyanathan, S; Rajitha, R; Ramakrishna, C

    2013-02-01

    Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) meat is a major item of export from India but export of beef i.e. meat from cattle (Bos indicus) is prohibited. Also, adulteration of buffalo meat with that of beef (meat from cattle) is a common fraudulent practice because of prohibition on cow slaughter in most states of India. Food analysts require precise identification techniques to implement such regulations. In the present study, a method of DNA extraction by Alkaline lysis from meat samples and speciation of buffalo meat using species specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has been reported. Alkaline lysis technique is a rapid method which involves triturating meat with four volumes of 0.2N NaOH, dilution of resultant liquid extract with eight volumes of 0.2N NaOH, heating the mix 75 °C for 20 min followed by neutralization with eight volumes of 0.04N Tris HCl. Entire procedure of DNA extraction takes less than 30 min and it is economical as it involves less expensive chemicals. Method was successfully applied in animal byproducts also viz., liver, heart and kidney. For authentication of buffalo meat, pair of primers was designed based on mitochondrial D loop gene nucleotide sequence. PCR amplification using the designed primers gave amplicon of size 482 bp in buffalo and no amplification was detected in closely related species viz., cattle, sheep and goat meat samples. Results of the assay were highly repetitive and reliable. An export sample referred by export regulation authorities was also analyzed by using the Alkaline lysis method of DNA extraction and species specific PCR which enabled authentication of meat within 5 h. PMID:24425899

  17. Mentha piperita as a pivotal neuro-protective agent against gamma irradiation induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis : Mentha extract as a neuroprotective against gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hanaa A; Hafez, Hani S; Goda, Mona S

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is classified as a potent carcinogen, and its injury to living cells, in particular to DNA, is due to oxidative stress enhancing apoptotic cell death. Our present study aimed to characterize and semi-quantify the radiation-induced apoptosis in CNS and the activity of Mentha extracts as neuron-protective agent. Our results through flow cytometry exhibited the significant disturbance and arrest in cell cycle in % of M1: SubG1 phase, M2: G0/1 phase of diploid cycle, M3: S phase and M4: G2/M phase of cell cycle in brain tissue (p < 0.05). Significant increase in % of apoptosis and P53 protein expression as apoptotic biomarkers were coincided with significant decrease in Bcl(2) as an anti-apoptotic marker. The biochemical analysis recorded a significant decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid contents. Moreover, numerous histopathological alterations were detected in brain tissues of gamma irradiated mice such as signs of chromatolysis in pyramidal cells of cortex, nuclear vacuolation, numerous apoptotic cell, and neural degeneration. On the other hand, gamma irradiated mice pretreated with Mentha extract showed largely an improvement in all the above tested parameters through a homeostatic state for the content of brain apoptosis and stabilization of DNA cycle with a distinct improvement in cell cycle analysis and antioxidant defense system. Furthermore, the aforementioned effects of Mentha extracts through down-regulation of P53 expression and up-regulation of Bcl(2) domain protected brain structure from extensive damage. Therefore, Mentha extract seems to have a significant role to ameliorate the neuronal injury induced by gamma irradiation. PMID:23011739

  18. Erica Butts MAAFS 2010 -DNA Extraction Efficiency May 21, 2010 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/NISTpub.htm

    E-print Network

    ." Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series 2 (2009) 69­70 E. Milne et al. "Buccal DNA from firearms and fired cartridge cases." Forensic Science International: Genetics 3 (2009) 242 process · Involves a Proteinase K digest · Saturated Ammonium Acetate solution to separate DNA · Absolute

  19. Next Step for STEP

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Claire; Bremner, Brenda

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  20. Xanthium strumarium L. Extracts Produce DNA Damage Mediated by Cytotoxicity in In Vitro Assays but Does Not Induce Micronucleus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piloto Ferrer, Janet; Cozzi, Renata; Cornetta, Tommaso; Stano, Pasquale; Fiore, Mario; Degrassi, Francesca; De Salvia, Rosella; Remigio, Antonia; Francisco, Marbelis; Quiñones, Olga; Valdivia, Dayana; González, Maria L.; Pérez, Carlos; Sánchez-Lamar, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Xanthium strumarium L. is a member of the Asteraceae commonly used in Cuba, mainly as diuretic. Some toxic properties of this plant have also been reported and, to date, very little is known about its genotoxic properties. The present work aims was to evaluate the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic risk of whole extract from Xanthium strumarium L. whole extract of aerial parts. No positive response was observed in a battery of four Salmonella typhimurium strains, when exposed to concentrations up to 5?mg/plate, with and without mammalian metabolic activation (liver microsomal S9 fraction from Wistar rats). In CHO cells, high concentrations (25–100??g/mL) revealed significant reduction in cell viability. Results from sister chromatid exchanges, chromosome aberrations, and comet assay showed that X. strumarium extract is genotoxic at the highest concentration used, when clear cytotoxic effects were also observed. On the contrary, no increase in micronuclei frequency in bone marrow cells was observed when the extract was orally administered to mice (100, 500, and 2000?mg/Kg doses). The data presented here constitute the most complete study on the genotoxic potential of X. strumarium L. and show that the extract can induce in vitro DNA damage at cytotoxic concentrations. PMID:25025061

  1. TATA box-dependent protein-DNA interactions are detected on heat shock and histone gene promoters in nuclear extracts derived from Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, D.S.; Dietz, T.J.; Elgin, S.C.R.

    1988-08-01

    The authors monitored protein-DNA interactions that occur on the hsp26, hsp70, histone H3, and histone H4 promoters in nuclear extracts derived from frozen Drosophila melanogaster embryos. All four of these promoters were found to be transcribed in vitro at comparable levels by extracts from both heat-shocked and non-heat-shocked embryos. Factors were detected in both types of extracts that block exonuclease digestion from a downstream site at ca. +35 and -20 base pairs from the start of transcription of all four of these promoters. In addition, factors in extracts from heat-shocked embryos blocked exonuclease digestion at sites flanking the heat shock consensus sequences of hsp26 and hsp70. Competition experiments indicated that common factors cause the +35 and -20 barriers on all four promoters in both extracts. The formation of the barriers at +35 and -20 required a TATA box but did not appear to require specific sequences downstream of +7. The authors suggest that the factors responsible for the +35 and -20 barriers are components whose association with the promoter precedes transcriptional activation.

  2. DNA Pendant

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-11-14

    Broadcast Transcript: It's a symbol of commitment. It's a memento mori. It's the DNA pendant offered by Japan's Eiwa Industry and it's two, two, two things in one. Using genetic extraction, Eiwa removes the DNA from, say, a strand of hair or a...

  3. Monitoring of the antiviral potential of bee venom and wax extracts against Adeno-7 (DNA) and Rift Valley fever virus (RNA) viruses models.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mostafa I; Mohamed, Aly F; Amer, Moner A; Hammad, Kotb M; Riad, Saber A

    2015-04-01

    This study monitored the antiviral potential of bee venom and four wax extracts, ethanol white and black beeswax (EWW/EBW) and acetone white and black beeswax (AWW/ABW) extracts. Two different virus models namely Adeno-7 as DNA model and RVFV as RNA virus models. End point calculation assay was used to calculate virus depletion titer. The depletion of viral infectivity titer of ABW to Adeno-7 virus showed strong antiviral activity recorded a depletion of viral infectivity titer (1.66 log (10)/ ml) that gave equal action with bee venom and more than interferon IFN (1 log (10)/ ml). On the other hand, antiviral activity of EBW showed a moderate potential, while AWW showed no antiviral activity. Finally EWW showed synergetic activity against Adeno-7 virus activity. Thus, activity of wax extracts to RVFV was arranged in order of IFN bee venom > AWW & EBW > EWW and ABW recorded 3.34, 0.65, 0.5, 0.34 respectively. It is the first time to study the beeswax effect against DNA and RNA virus' models; acetone black beeswax recorded a depletion titer 1.66 log (10)/ml. PMID:26012234

  4. Rejoining of gamma-radiation-induced single-strand breaks in plasmid DNA by human cell extracts: Dependence on the concentration of the hydroxyl radical scavenger, Tris

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkins, P.S.; Fairman, M.P.; O`Neill, P.

    1996-01-01

    The rejoining of single-strand breaks induced by {gamma} irradiation in plasmid DNA under different scavenging conditions is described using human cell extracts. As the scavenging capacity of the irradiated solution increases from 1.5 X 10{sup 7} to 3 X 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} using Tris-HCl as a scavenger, the ratio of single- to double-strand breaks is reduced from {approx}70:1 to 40:1. After irradiation, a proportion of DNA molecules have no initial strand breaks but contain damage that is converted to strand breaks when incubated either at 37{degrees}C or in the presence of cellular extract. Repair of damage by the extracts is dependent upon the scavenging capacity of the irradiated solution. Optimal rejoining is observed when the scavenging capacity is <1.5 X 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, and results in the repair of some initial strand breaks. As the scavenging capacity increases to 3 X 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} the proportion of breaks repaired is significantly reduced. The relative increase in the yield of double-strand breaks and reduced repairability of single-strand breaks at a scavenging capacity of 3 X 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} is consistent with the concept that the severity of damage increases upon increasing the scavenger concentration. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep® (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy® and QIAamp® (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect® (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software®). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A260/280 values using QIAamp were 33.2?ng/?L and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2?ng/?L and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4?ng/?L and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8?ng/?L and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6?h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates. PMID:23386926

  6. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Mee, Blanaid C; Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F

    2011-12-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep(®) (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy(®) and QIAamp(®) (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect(®) (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software(®)). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A(260/280) values using QIAamp were 33.2?ng/?L and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2?ng/?L and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4?ng/?L and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8?ng/?L and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6?h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates. PMID:23386926

  7. Identification of RNase-resistant RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts: Separation from chromosomal DNA by selective precipitation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Blanca V; Malczewskyj, Eric T; Cabiya, Joshua M; Lewis, L Kevin; Maeder, Corina

    2016-01-01

    High-quality chromosomal DNA is a requirement for many biochemical and molecular biological techniques. To isolate cellular DNA, standard protocols typically lyse cells and separate nucleic acids from other biological molecules using a combination of chemical and physical methods. After a standard chemical-based protocol to isolate chromosomal DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and then treatment with RNase A to degrade RNA, two RNase-resistant bands persisted when analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Interestingly, such resistant bands did not appear in preparations of Escherichia coli bacterial DNA after RNase treatment. Several enzymatic, chemical, and physical methods were employed in an effort to remove the resistant RNAs, including use of multiple RNases and alcohol precipitation, base hydrolysis, and chromatographic methods. These experiments resulted in the development of a new method for isolation of S. cerevisiae chromosomal DNA. This method utilizes selective precipitation of DNA in the presence of a potassium acetate/isopropanol mixture and produces high yields of chromosomal DNA without detectable contaminating RNAs. PMID:26416692

  8. Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Prieto, A M; Santos, A G; Csipak, A R; Caliri, C M; Silva, I C; Arbex, M A; Silva, F S; Marchi, M R R; Cavalheiro, A J; Silva, D H S; Bolzani, V S; Soares, C P

    2012-12-15

    Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract-3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)-or with casearin X-0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW-after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. PMID:22982620

  9. Enzymes acting at strand interruptions in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, T; Satoh, M S; Dianov, G

    1995-01-30

    Endogenous and environmental DNA-damaging agents often generate single-strand interruptions in DNA. The lesions trigger a complex set of cellular reactions. In most eukaryotic cells, cellular poly(ADP-ribose) formation is the most acute response to such damage. Recently, such events have been amenable to study with soluble cell-free extracts of human cells. These investigations clarify the modulating role on DNA repair by poly (ADP-ribose), and suggest that the primary function of this unusual polymer is to act as an antirecombinant agent. Similar biochemical studies of subsequent repair events have revealed a branched pathway for the ubiquitous DNA base excision-repair process. The alternative pathway provides the cell with back-up functions for individual steps in this essential form of DNA repair. PMID:7746855

  10. Extracting physical chemistry from mechanics: a new approach to investigate DNA interactions with drugs and proteins in single molecule experiments

    E-print Network

    Rocha, M S

    2015-01-01

    In this review we focus on the idea of establishing connections between the mechanical properties of DNAligand complexes and the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions. This type of connection is interesting because it opens the possibility of performing a robust characterization of such interactions by using only one experimental technique: single molecule stretching. Furthermore, it also opens new possibilities in comparing results obtained by very different approaches, in special when comparing single molecule techniques to ensemble-averaging techniques. We start the manuscript reviewing important concepts of the DNA mechanics, from the basic mechanical properties to the Worm-Like Chain model. Next we review the basic concepts of the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions, revisiting the most important models used to analyze the binding data and discussing their binding isotherms. Then, we discuss the basic features of the single molecule techniques most used to stretch the DNA-ligand complex...

  11. LOW-COST BACTERIAL DETECTION SYSTEM FOR FOOD SAFETY BASED ON AUTOMATED DNA EXTRACTION, AMPLIFICATION AND READOUT

    E-print Network

    Hoehl, Melanie Margarete

    To ensure food, medical and environmental safety and quality, rapid, low-cost and easy-to-use detection methods are desirable. Here, the LabSystem is introduced for integrated, automated DNA purification and amplification. ...

  12. Molecular detection of Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' Infection in cats by direct PCR using whole blood without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Hisasue, Masaharu; Souma, Takehisa; Ohshiro, Shuichi; Yamada, Takatsugu; Tsuchiya, Ryo

    2008-10-01

    Detection of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. infection was attempted in cats by PCR using whole blood without DNA extraction. A total 46 of 54 (85%) cats with suspected Mycoplasma spp. infection showed a positive reaction, corresponding completely with the results of standard PCR testing. The direct PCR assay was sensitive enough to detect more than 0.0061% parasitemia for ;C. M. haemominutum' and 0.0075% parasitemia for M. haemofelis. These data indicate that the direct PCR assay might be sufficient for use as a tool in clinical examinations. PMID:18981667

  13. Comparison of C18-Carboxypropylbetaine and Glass Bead DNA Extraction Methods for Detection of Mycobacterium bovis in Bovine Milk Samples and Analysis of Samples by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Brandon J.; Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Thornton, Charles G.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Adams, L. Garry

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to compare two different milk preparation methods to assay for the presence of Mycobacterium bovis by PCR. Detection by a C18-carboxypropylbetaine (CB-18)-based sample processing method was compared to extraction of DNA from milk with glass beads. Samples from 17 skin test-positive cattle were analyzed. Following CB-18 processing and glass bead extraction, the sensitivity of IS6110-based PCR was 94.1 and 58.8%, respectively (P < 0.025). Because CB-18 processing will permit the proficient use of PCR for diagnosis and surveillance of bovine tuberculosis, it will contribute to the more efficient detection and control of tuberculosis. PMID:9687483

  14. Partial uracil-DNA-glycosylase treatment for screening of ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin; Harney, Eadaoin; Mallick, Swapan; Nordenfelt, Susanne; Reich, David

    2015-01-19

    The challenge of sequencing ancient DNA has led to the development of specialized laboratory protocols that have focused on reducing contamination and maximizing the number of molecules that are extracted from ancient remains. Despite the fact that success in ancient DNA studies is typically obtained by screening many samples to identify a promising subset, ancient DNA protocols have not, in general, focused on reducing the time required to screen samples. We present an adaptation of a popular ancient library preparation method that makes screening more efficient. First, the DNA extract is treated using a protocol that causes characteristic ancient DNA damage to be restricted to the terminal nucleotides, while nearly eliminating it in the interior of the DNA molecules, allowing a single library to be used both to test for ancient DNA authenticity and to carry out population genetic analysis. Second, the DNA molecules are ligated to a unique pair of barcodes, which eliminates undetected cross-contamination from this step onwards. Third, the barcoded library molecules include incomplete adapters of short length that can increase the specificity of hybridization-based genomic target enrichment. The adapters are completed just before sequencing, so the same DNA library can be used in multiple experiments, and the sequences distinguished. We demonstrate this protocol on 60 ancient human samples. PMID:25487342

  15. Enzymic removal of 5-methylcytosine from poly(dG-5-methyl-dC) by HeLa cell nuclear extracts is not by a DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, R A

    1995-01-01

    A recent report in this journal [Vairapandi, M. and Duker, N.J. (1993) Nucleic Acids Res. 21, 5323-5327) presented evidence of an activity in HeLa cell nuclear extracts that released radiolabeled material from a poly(dG.dC) polymer that had been methylated and simultaneously labeled on cytosine residues by incubation with a CpG-specific DNA methylase and [methyl-3H]S-adenosylmethionine. Based on chromatographic evidence that the released products were thymine and 5-methylcytosine and on f1p4olabeling data suggesting a concomitant increase in abasic sites, the authors concluded that the releasing activity was a 5-methylcytosine-specific glycosylase and that the solubilized 5-methylcytosine was converted to thymine by a nuclear deaminase. We have confirmed that HeLa nuclear extracts promote release of ethanol-soluble radioactivity from a methyl-labeled poly(dG-5-methyl-dC)polymer, but the products released were neither 5-methylcytosine nor thymine. Furthermore, free 5-methylcytosine was not deaminated by incubation with the nuclear extract. The labeled compound released initially from the polymer appeared to be 5-methyl-deoxycytidine monophosphate, which was converted to 5-methyl-deoxycytidine, thymidine monophosphate, and/or thymidine by further incubation with the nuclear extract. The activity responsible for the release, therefore, was a nuclease. Release of 32P-labeled nucleotides from a 32P-labeled poly(dG-dC) polymer suggested, furthermore, that the activity was not specific for methylated DNA. Images PMID:7784219

  16. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26426354

  17. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  18. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that is increasingly applied to casework samples. Previously, we have described an mRNA multiplex system that targets blood, saliva, semen, menstrual secretion, vaginal mucosa and skin (Lindenbergh et al. and van den Berge et al.) [1-2]. In this study we consider various topics to improve this mRNA profiling system or its use and adapt the method accordingly. Bodily secretions that may be encountered at a crime scene whilst not targeted by the multiplex-id est nasal mucosa, sweat, tears, faeces and urine-were examined for false positive signals. The results prompted us to identify a nasal mucosa marker that allows the discrimination of nasal mucosa from saliva or vaginal mucosa and nosebleed blood from peripheral blood. An updated version of the multiplex was prepared to which the nasal mucosa marker was added and in which markers for semen, vaginal mucosa and blood were replaced. Lactobacillus markers were regarded unsuitable as replacement for vaginal mucosa mRNA markers because of background signals on penile swabs that appeared devoid of female DNA. Furthermore, we provide approaches to deal with highly unbalanced mixtures. First, a differential extraction protocol was incorporated into a co-extraction protocol to allow DNA and RNA analysis of separated non-sperm and sperm fractions. In a second approach, besides the standard multiplex, a customized multiplex is used which excludes markers for prevailing cell types. This allows the use of lower cDNA inputs for the prevailing cell types and higher inputs for cell types that appear masked. Additionally, we assessed the relation between the percentage of alleles or markers detected in DNA or RNA profiles when decreasing sample amounts are analysed. While blood, saliva, semen and menstrual secretion show the trend that DNA profiling is more sensitive than RNA profiling, the reverse is seen for skin and variable results occur for vaginal and nasal mucosa. Lastly, we show that replicates are useful for interpretation of RNA data, as variations can be found even for true technical replicates. Increased numbers of replicates (over four) do, however, not cancel out the impact of this variation on data interpretation. Overall, the results of this study further forensic RNA profiling. PMID:26590860

  19. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with the linear array HPV genotyping PCR assay and influence of DNA extraction method on HPV detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine C; Swoyer, Ryan; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2011-05-01

    Real-time human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific multiplex PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in specimens collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). We evaluated the concordance between type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and the widely used, commercially available Roche Linear Array genotyping PCR assay. Female genital swab specimens were tested for the presence of L1, E6, and E7 sequences of HPV type 6 (HPV6), HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58 and E6 and E7 sequences of HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV51, HPV56, and HPV59 in type- and gene-specific real-time multiplex PCR assays. Specimens were also tested for the presence of L1 sequences using two versions of the Roche Linear Array genotyping assay. Measures of concordance of a modified version of the Linear Array and the standard Linear Array PCR assay were evaluated. With specimen DNA extraction using the Qiagen Spin blood kit held as the constant, multiplex PCR assays detect more HPV-positive specimens for the 14 HPV types common to both than either version of the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay. Type-specific agreements between the assays were good, at least 0.838, but were often driven by negative agreement in HPV types with low prevalence, as evidenced by reduced proportions of positive agreement. Overall HPV status agreements ranged from 0.615 for multiplex PCR and standard Linear Array to 0.881 for multiplex PCR and modified Linear Array. An alternate DNA extraction technique, that used by the Qiagen MinElute kit, impacted subsequent HPV detection in both the multiplex PCR and Linear Array assays. PMID:21346041

  20. Studying DNA in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarins, Silja

    1993-01-01

    Outlines a workshop for teachers that illustrates a method of extracting DNA and provides instructions on how to do some simple work with DNA without sophisticated and expensive equipment. Provides details on viscosity studies and breaking DNA molecules. (DDR)

  1. EVALUATION OF RAPID DNA EXTRACTION PROCEDURES FOR THE QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF FUNGAL CELLS USING REAL TIME PCR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ease and rapidity of quantitative DNA sequence detection by real-time PCR instruments promises to make their use increasingly common for the microbial analysis many different types of environmental samples. To fully exploit the capabilities of these instruments, correspondin...

  2. Table of Contents 1 SI 1 -DNA extraction, library preparation, and sequencing of the Denisova phalanx. 2-3

    E-print Network

    Good, Jeffrey M.

    using this approach (SL3003 and SL3004) with a modified Illumina multiplex protocol5 . A 7nt-index (5 the clean room. Illumina Sequencing and primary data processing DNA sequencing was performed on the Illumina analyzed starting from QSEQ sequence files and CIF intensity files from the Illumina Genome Analyzer RTA 1

  3. Anti-proliferative effect of methanolic extract of Gracilaria tenuistipitata on oral cancer cells involves apoptosis, DNA damage, and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methanolic extracts of Gracilaria tenuistipitata (MEGT) were obtained from the edible red algae. Previously, we found that water extract of G. tenuistipitata was able to modulate oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and its related cellular responses. Methods In this study, the methanol extraction product MEGT was used to evaluate the cell growth inhibition in oral cancer cells and its possible mechanism was investigated. Results The cell viability of MEGT treated Ca9-22 oral cancer cell line was significantly decreased in a dose–response manner (p?DNA damage, ROS induction, and mitochondrial depolarization. Therefore, MEGT derived from the edible algae may have potential therapeutic effects against oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). PMID:22937998

  4. A Column Experiment To Determine Black Shale Degradation And Colonization By Means of ?13C and 14C Analysis Of Phospholipid Fatty Acids And DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Gleixner, G.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the degradation of black shale organic matter by microbial communities. We inoculated two columns respectively, with the fungi Schizophyllum commune, the gram-positive bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the gram-negative bacteria Streptomyces griseus and Streptomyces chartreusis. These microorganisms are known to degrade a wide variety of organic macromolecules. Additionally, we had two sets of control columns. To one set the same nutrient solution was added as to the inoculated columns and to the other set only sterile deionised water was supplied. All columns contained 1.5 kg of freshly crushed not autoclaved black shale material with a particle size of 0.63-2 mm. The columns were incubated at 28° C and 60% humidity in the dark. The aim was to investigate, which microorganisms live on black shales and if these microorganisms are able to degrade ancient organic matter. We used compound specific stable isotope measurement techniques and compound specific 14C-dating methods. After 183 days PLFAs were extracted from the columns to investigate the microbial community, furthermore we extracted on one hand total-DNA of column material and on the other hand DNA from pure cultures isolates which grew on Kinks-agar B, Starch-casein-nitrate-agar (SCN) and on complete-yeast-medium-agar (CYM). According to the PLFA analysis bacteria dominated in the columns, whereas in pure cultures more fungi were isolated. A principal component analysis revealed differences between the columns in accordance with the inoculation, but it seems that the inoculated microorganisms were replaced by the natural population. For AMS measurements palmitic acid (C 16:0) was re-isolated from total-PLFA-extract with a preparative fraction collector (PFC). Preliminary results of the study revealed that microorganisms are able to degrade black shale material and that PLFA analysis are useful methods to be combined with analysis of stable isotope and 14C measurements to study microbial degradation processes.

  5. Panax ginseng extract modulates oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation and up-regulate gene expression in rats sub chronically treated with aflatoxin B1 and fumonisin B 1.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Aziza M; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H; El-Nekeety, Aziza A; Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A

    2015-10-01

    Aflatoxins and fumonisins are important food-borne mycotoxins implicated in human health and have cytotoxic effects. The aims of the current study were to evaluate the protective role of Panax ginseng extract (PGE) against the synergistic effect of subchronic administration of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) on DNA and gene expression in rat. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight groups (ten rats/group) and treated for 12 weeks including the control group, the group having received AFB1 (80 µg/kg bw), the group having received FB1 (100 µg/kg bw), the group having received AFB1 plus FB1 and the groups having received PGE (20 mg/kg bw) alone or with AFB1 and/or FB1. At the end of experiment, liver and kidney were collected for the determination of DNA fragmentation, lipid peroxidation (LP), glutathione (GSH) contents and alterations in gene expression. The results indicated that these mycotoxins increased DNA fragmentation, LP and decreased GSH content in liver and kidney and down-regulated gene expression of antioxidants enzymes. The combined treatments with AFB1 and/or FB1 plus PGE suppressed DNA fragmentation only in the liver, normalized LP and increased GSH in the liver and kidney as well as up-regulated the expression of GPx, SOD1 and CAT mRNA. It could be concluded that AFB1 and FB1 have synergistic genotoxic effects. PGE induced protective effects against their oxidative stress and genotoxicity through its antioxidant properties. PMID:24748134

  6. 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim www.biotechnology-journal.com Stepping stones in DNA sequencing

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Huimin

    © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim www.biotechnology-journal.com Review Stepping, Marla Tuffin and Don A. Cowan http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/biot.201100335 Biotechnology Journal ­ list ­ Biofuels, Protein engineering, Plant biotechnology. This issue provides an excellent overview of the latest

  7. One-step immobilization of poly(dT)-modified DNA onto non-modified plastic substrates by UV irradiation for microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Naoki . E-mail: n-kimu@nisshinbo.co.jp

    2006-08-25

    Previously, 'DNattach', an alternative DNA immobilization system for attaching modified oligonucleotide probes onto a gold surface by UV irradiation that can be used in various DNA microarray applications including gene expression analysis, was developed. Attached to the gold surface, the modified probes have been shown to successfully detect synaptogenesis in the developing mouse cerebellum. In this study, this technology to immobilize modified oligonucleotide probes onto three different non-modified plastic surfaces in a microarray format has been further expanded. Using this system, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of both oligonucleotide and PCR product targets has been successfully performed and it has also been shown that the probes immobilized on the slides can be used efficiently in hybridization experiments. Furthermore, it has been shown that probe concentrations of only 1-5 {mu}M are sufficient for hybridization and that this immobilization method provides hybridization signals greater than those of conventional immobilization techniques.

  8. DNA Damage: Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study on the Oxygen Binding and Substrate Hydroxylation Step in AlkB Repair Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de?Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N1-methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)–oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive ?-and ?-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained. PMID:24339041

  9. Using a Fluorescent Cytosine Analogue tC[superscript o] To Probe the Effect of the Y567 to Ala Substitution on the Preinsertion Steps of dNMP Incorporation by RB69 DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Beckman, Jeff; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H.

    2012-10-10

    Residues in the nascent base pair binding pocket (NBP) of bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69pol) are responsible for base discrimination. Replacing Tyr567 with Ala leads to greater flexibility in the NBP, increasing the probability of misincorporation. We used the fluorescent cytosine analogue, 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tC{sup o}), to identify preinsertion step(s) altered by NBP flexibility. When tC{sup o} is the templating base in a wild-type (wt) RB69pol ternary complex, its fluorescence is quenched only in the presence of dGTP. However, with the RB69pol Y567A mutant, the fluorescence of tC{sup o} is also quenched in the presence of dATP. We determined the crystal structure of the dATP/tC{sup o}-containing ternary complex of the RB69pol Y567A mutant at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and found that the incoming dATP formed two hydrogen bonds with an imino-tautomerized form of tC{sup o}. Stabilization of the dATP/tC{sup o} base pair involved movement of the tC{sup o} backbone sugar into the DNA minor groove and required tilting of the tC{sup o} tricyclic ring to prevent a steric clash with L561. This structure, together with the pre-steady-state kinetic parameters and dNTP binding affinity, estimated from equilibrium fluorescence titrations, suggested that the flexibility of the NBP, provided by the Y567 to Ala substitution, led to a more favorable forward isomerization step resulting in an increase in dNTP binding affinity.

  10. Using a Fluorescent Cytosine Analogue tC° to Probe the Effect of Y567 to Ala Substitution on the Pre-insertion Steps of dNMP Incorporation by RB69 DNA Polymerase†

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shuangluo; Beckman, Jeff; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Residues in the Nascent Base-pair binding Pocket (NBP) of bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69pol) are responsible for base discrimination. Replacing Tyr567 with Ala leads to greater flexibility in the NBP, increasing the probability of misincorporation. We used the fluorescent cytosine analogue, 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tC°) to identify pre-insertion step(s) altered by NBP flexibility. When tC° is the templating base in a wild type (wt) RB69pol ternary complex, its fluorescence is quenched only in the presence of dGTP. However with the RB69pol Y567A mutant, tC° fluorescence is also quenched in the presence of dATP. We determined the crystal structure of the dATP/tC°-containing ternary complex of the RB69pol Y567A mutant at 1.9 Å resolution, and found that the incoming dATP formed two hydrogen bonds with an imino-tautomerized form of tC°. Stabilization of the dATP/tC° base-pair involved movement of the tC° backbone sugar into the DNA minor groove and required tilting of the tC° tricyclic ring to avoid a steric clash with L561. This structure, together with the pre-steady-state kinetic parameters and dNTP binding affinity, estimated from equilibrium fluorescence titrations, suggested that the flexibility of the NBP, provided by Y567 to Ala substitution, led to a more favorable isomerization step resulting in an increase in dNTP binding affinity. PMID:22616982

  11. Effects of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf and bloom head extracts on chemically induced DNA lesions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jacociunas, Laura Vicedo; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio; de Barros Falcão Ferraz, Alexandre; Richter, Marc François; da Silva, Juliana; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2014-03-01

    The genotoxicity of bloom head (BHE) and leaf (LE) extracts from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.), and their ability to modulate the mutagenicity and recombinogenicity of two alkylating agents (ethyl methanesulfonate - EMS and mitomycin C - MMC) and the intercalating agent bleomycin (BLM), were examined using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. Neither the mutagenicity nor the recombinogenicity of BLM or MMC was modified by co- or post-treatment with BHE or LE. In contrast, co-treatment with BHE significantly enhanced the EMS-induced genotoxicity involving mutagenic and/or recombinant events. Co-treatment with LE did not alter the genotoxicity of EMS whereas post-treatment with the highest dose of LE significantly increased this genotoxicity. This enhancement included a synergistic increase restricted to somatic recombination. These results show that artichoke extracts promote homologous recombination in proliferative cells of D. melanogaster. PMID:24688296

  12. Effects of artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf and bloom head extracts on chemically induced DNA lesions in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jacociunas, Laura Vicedo; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio; de Barros Falcão Ferraz, Alexandre; Richter, Marc François; da Silva, Juliana; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The genotoxicity of bloom head (BHE) and leaf (LE) extracts from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.), and their ability to modulate the mutagenicity and recombinogenicity of two alkylating agents (ethyl methanesulfonate – EMS and mitomycin C – MMC) and the intercalating agent bleomycin (BLM), were examined using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. Neither the mutagenicity nor the recombinogenicity of BLM or MMC was modified by co- or post-treatment with BHE or LE. In contrast, co-treatment with BHE significantly enhanced the EMS-induced genotoxicity involving mutagenic and/or recombinant events. Co-treatment with LE did not alter the genotoxicity of EMS whereas post-treatment with the highest dose of LE significantly increased this genotoxicity. This enhancement included a synergistic increase restricted to somatic recombination. These results show that artichoke extracts promote homologous recombination in proliferative cells of D. melanogaster. PMID:24688296

  13. One-step solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in edible oils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Long-Kai; Liu, Yu-Lan; Liu, Hua-Min; Zhang, Ming-Ming

    2015-05-01

    A method for rapid analysis of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in edible oils has been developed on the basis of a simplified solvent extraction and liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry performed in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The briefness of the experimental procedure, the use of milliliters of acetonitrile for extraction without any further cleanup process, the short analysis time, and the excellent sensitivity and selectivity demonstrated the advantages of this practical and environmentally friendly method. All the analytes exhibited satisfactory recoveries at three spiking levels (the recoveries ranged from 77.8 to 106.4%), and the relative standard deviations were lower than 10%. The limits of quantitation of this method for the 16 PAHs were in the range of 0.02-0.43 ?g/kg. The validated method was successfully applied for the determination of PAHs in coconut oil reference material (BCR-458) and real edible oil samples. The results suggested that a large-scale investigation of the concentration of PAHs in vegetable oils in China is required. PMID:25725580

  14. Sensitive and precise HPLC method with back-extraction clean-up step for the determination of sildenafil in rat plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Strach, Beata; Wyska, El?bieta; Pociecha, Krzysztof; Krupa, Anna; Jachowicz, Renata

    2015-10-01

    A sensitive HPLC method was developed and validated for the determination of sildenafil concentrations in rat plasma (200 ?L) using a liquid-liquid extraction procedure and paroxetine as an internal standard. In order to eliminate interferences and improve the peak shape, a back-extraction into an acidic solution was utilized. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a cyanopropyl bonded-phase column with a mobile phase composed of 50 m m potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 4.5) and acetonitrile (75:25, v/v), pumped at the flow rate of 1 mL/min. A UV detector was set at 230 nm. A calibration curve was constructed within a concentration range from 10 to 1500 ng/mL. The limit of detection was 5 ng/mL. The inter- and intra-day precisions of the assay were in the ranges 2.91-7.33 and 2.61-6.18%, respectively, and the accuracies for inter- and intra-day runs were within 0.14-3.92 and 0.44-2.96%, respectively. The recovery of sildenafil was 85.22 ± 4.54%. Tests confirmed the stability of sildenafil in plasma during three freeze-thaw cycles and during long-term storage at -20 and -80°C for up to 2 months. The proposed method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats. PMID:25864807

  15. Improving access to endogenous DNA in ancient bones and teeth

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Peter B.; Margaryan, Ashot; Schroeder, Hannes; Orlando, Ludovic; Willerslev, Eske; Allentoft, Morten E.

    2015-01-01

    Poor DNA preservation is the most limiting factor in ancient genomic research. In the majority of ancient bones and teeth, endogenous DNA molecules represent a minor fraction of the whole DNA extract, rendering shot-gun sequencing inefficient for obtaining genomic data. Based on ancient human bone samples from temperate and tropical environments, we show that an EDTA-based enzymatic ‘pre-digestion’ of powdered bone increases the proportion of endogenous DNA several fold. By performing the pre-digestion step between 30?min and 6?hours on five bones, we observe an asymptotic increase in endogenous DNA content, with a 2.7-fold average increase reached at 1?hour. We repeat the experiment using a brief pre-digestion (15 or 30?mins) on 21 ancient bones and teeth from a variety of archaeological contexts and observe an improvement in 16 of these. We here advocate the implementation of a brief pre-digestion step as a standard procedure in ancient DNA extractions. Finally, we demonstrate on 14 ancient teeth that by targeting the outer layer of the roots we obtain up to 14 times more endogenous DNA than when using the inner dentine. Our presented methods are likely to increase the proportion of ancient samples that are suitable for genome-scale characterization. PMID:26081994

  16. Assessing the bias linked to DNA recovery from biofiltration woodchips for microbial community investigation by fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we explored methodological aspects of nucleic acid recovery from microbial communities involved in a gas biofilter filled with pine bark woodchips. DNA was recovered indirectly in two steps, comparing different methods: cell dispersion (crushing, shaking, and sonication) and DNA extraction (three commercial kits and a laboratory protocol). The objectives were (a) to optimize cell desorption from the packing material and (b) to compare the 12 combinations of desorption and extraction methods, according to three relevant criteria: DNA yield, DNA purity, and community structure representation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Cell dispersion was not influenced by the operational parameters tested for shaking and blending, while it increased with time for sonication. DNA extraction by the laboratory protocol provided the highest DNA yields, whereas the best DNA purity was obtained by a commercial kit designed for DNA extraction from soil. After successful PCR amplification, the 12 methods did not generate the same bias in microbial community representation. Eight combinations led to high diversity estimation, independently of the experimental procedure. Among them, six provided highly similar DGGE profiles. Two protocols generated a significantly dissimilar community profile, with less diversity. This study highlighted the crucial importance of DNA recovery bias evaluation. PMID:19826809

  17. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Carbonate Species Using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five Ordinary Chondrite (OC) meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were identified and requested from NASA based upon their size, alteration history, and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They are also assumed to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This research addresses two questions involving Mars carbonates: 1) characterize terrestrial, secondary carbonate isotope values to apply to Martian meteorites for isolating in-situ carbonates, and 2) increase understanding of carbonates formed in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each approximately 0.5 grams, were crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) R times 0 for 1 hour at 30 degrees Centigrade (fine calcite extraction), b) R times 1 for 18 hours at 30 degrees Centigrade (course calcite extraction), and c) R times 2 for 3 hours at 150 degrees Centigrade (siderite and/or magnesite extraction). CO (sub 2) was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6 foot 2 millimeter stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof-tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected error bands. Two distinct species of carbonates are found: 1) calcite, and 2) non-calcite carbonate (future testing will attempt to differentiate siderite from magnesite). Preliminary results indicate the terrestrial carbonates are formed at approximately sigma (sup 13) C equal to plus 5 per mille, which is consistent with atmospheric CO (sub 2) sigma (sup 13) C equal to minus 7 per mille and fractionation of plus12 per mille based upon polar temperature of -20 degrees Centigrade. The oxygen values fractionate sigma (sup 18) O equal to minus 10-20 per mille lighter between the R times 0 and R times 1 reactions at 30 degrees Centigrade. The carbonate oxygen isotope measurements are consistently heavier than expected with meteoric water and temperatures from Antarctica, perhaps due to secondary carbonate formation during curation in Houston, TX.

  18. The successful recovery of low copy number and degraded DNA from bones exposed to seawater suitable for generating a DNA STR profile.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Alessandro; Piras, Gavino; Delogu, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    A universal method allowing for DNA profiling from bones exposed to seawater has not been reported yet. This study refers on the identification of a body immersed in seawater for 8 months. The biological material for identification was the mandibular body, usually characterized by low success rates of DNA analysis. Initially, two extraction protocols were performed with negative results: one used for bones immersed in fresh water and a silica-column procedure. A third protocol was performed, which combined the extraction of a higher amount of bone powder, the use of multi-silica-based extraction columns followed by a concentration step. This protocol allowed to obtain low copy number DNA and to generate a 12-loci STR profile by combining conventional STR typing and mini-STR technologies. This protocol could be suitable when human bones have been exposed to severe environmental conditions, and the available nuclear DNA is highly degraded and in low copy number. PMID:24313323

  19. A DNA 3' phosphatase functions in active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Qian, Weiqiang; Miki, Daisuke; Pontes, Olga; Liu, Yunhua; Tang, Kai; Liu, Renyi; Morales-Ruiz, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2012-02-10

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark established by the combined actions of methylation and demethylation reactions. Plants use a base excision repair pathway for active DNA demethylation. After 5-methylcytosine removal, the Arabidopsis DNA glycosylase/lyase ROS1 incises the DNA backbone and part of the product has a single-nucleotide gap flanked by 3'- and 5'-phosphate termini. Here we show that the DNA phosphatase ZDP removes the blocking 3' phosphate, allowing subsequent DNA polymerization and ligation steps needed to complete the repair reactions. ZDP and ROS1 interact in vitro and colocalize in vivo in nucleoplasmic foci. Extracts from zdp mutant plants are unable to complete DNA demethylation in vitro, and the mutations cause DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of a reporter gene. Genome-wide methylation analysis in zdp mutant plants identified hundreds of hypermethylated endogenous loci. Our results show that ZDP functions downstream of ROS1 in one branch of the active DNA demethylation pathway. PMID:22325353

  20. CtIP interacts with TopBP1 and Nbs1 in the response to double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Su Jin

    2011-01-01

    In the presence of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs), the activation of ATR is achieved by the ability of ATM to phosphorylate TopBP1 on serine 1131, which leads to an enhancement of the interaction between ATR and TopBP1. In Xenopus egg extracts, the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is additionally required to bridge ATM and TopBP1 together. In this report, we show that CtIP, which is recruited to DSB-containing chromatin, interacts with both TopBP1 and Nbs1 in a damage-dependent manner. An N-terminal region containing the first two BRCT repeats of TopBP1 is essential for the interaction with CtIP. Furthermore, two distinct regions in the N-terminus of CtIP participate in establishing the association between CtIP and TopBP1. The first region includes two adjacent putative ATM/ATR phosphorylation sites on serines 273 and 275. Secondly, binding is diminished when an MRN-binding region spanning residues 25–48 is deleted, indicative of a role for the MRN complex in mediating this interaction. This was further evidenced by a decrease in the interaction between CtIP and TopBP1 in Nbs1-depleted extracts and a reciprocal decrease in the binding of Nbs1 to TopBP1 in the absence of CtIP, suggestive of the formation of a complex containing CtIP, TopBP1 and the MRN complex. When CtIP is immunodepleted from egg extracts, the activation of the response to DSBs is compromised and the levels of ATR, TopBP1 and Nbs1 on damaged chromatin are reduced. Thus, CtIP interacts with TopBP1 in a damage-stimulated, MRN-dependent manner during the activation of ATR in response to DSBs. PMID:21263215

  1. A liquid-liquid extraction procedure followed by a low temperature purification step for the analysis of macrocyclic lactones in milk by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Rübensam, Gabriel; Barreto, Fabiano; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Kist, Tarso Ledur; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara

    2011-10-31

    In this work a method is proposed and demonstrated for the analysis of the macrocyclic lactones abamectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, ivermectin and moxidectin in bovine milk by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FL). The method is based on liquid-liquid extraction followed by a low temperature purification (LLE-LTP) step. Moreover, the proposed method was validated according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, using LC-MS/MS and LC-FL for confirmatory and quantitative analysis, respectively. For LC-MS/MS the recovery rates observed ranged from 101.2 to 141.6% with coefficient of variation from 2.6 to 19.8%. For LC-FL the recovery rates observed ranged from 100.2 to 105% and coefficient of variations from 2.9 to 8.8%. Matrix effects were negligible due to the low temperature purification step. The quantification limits were far below the maximum limits established by regulations of all countries consulted. The proposed method proved to be simple, easy, and adequate for high-throughput analysis of a large number of samples per day at low cost. PMID:21962343

  2. RECOVERY OF DNA FROM SOILS AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of different methodological approaches for recovering DNA from soil and sediment bacterial communities; cell extraction followed by lysis and DNA recovery (cell extraction method) versus direct cell lysis and alkaline extra...

  3. Protocol Improvements for Low Concentration DNA-Based Bioaerosol Sampling and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun Kiat; Miller, Dana; Cao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As bioaerosol research attracts increasing attention, there is a need for additional efforts that focus on method development to deal with different environmental samples. Bioaerosol environmental samples typically have very low biomass concentrations in the air, which often leaves researchers with limited options in choosing the downstream analysis steps, especially when culture-independent methods are intended. Objectives This study investigates the impacts of three important factors that can influence the performance of culture-independent DNA-based analysis in dealing with bioaerosol environmental samples engaged in this study. The factors are: 1) enhanced high temperature sonication during DNA extraction; 2) effect of sampling duration on DNA recoverability; and 3) an alternative method for concentrating composite samples. In this study, DNA extracted from samples was analysed using the Qubit fluorometer (for direct total DNA measurement) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results and Findings The findings suggest that additional lysis from high temperature sonication is crucial: DNA yields from both high and low biomass samples increased up to 600% when the protocol included 30-min sonication at 65°C. Long air sampling duration on a filter media was shown to have a negative impact on DNA recoverability with up to 98% of DNA lost over a 20-h sampling period. Pooling DNA from separate samples during extraction was proven to be feasible with margins of error below 30%. PMID:26619279

  4. MAMMALIAN DNA IN PCR REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high- cycle PCR amplification t...

  5. Direct extraction of DNA from positive transparent dressing and swab to identify Candida albicans infection in intertriginous Candidiasis in the inguinal region.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daoxian; Ran, Yuping; Dai, Yaling; Lama, Jebina

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of a patient infected by Candida albicans which was identified by direct extraction of DNA from a positive transparent dressing and a swab. The patient was a 32-year-old male who complained of erosion in his inguinal region. Large patches of erythema and erosion were present in his inguinal and perianal region, with soya-bean like residue discharge. He was diagnosed with erythrasma and treated with antibiotics but his clinical condition did not improve. KOH examination furnished a positive result for candidiasis. Morphologic characteristics confirmed his infection was caused by Candida albicans. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1/4 polymerase chain reaction products, amplified from positive transparent dressing and cotton swab with discharge and from primary culture isolates, established the Candida albicans lineage. The patient was cured by treatment with itraconazole 200 mg twice a day orally in combination with topical wash with 2 % ketoconazole shampoo and topical use of 1 % naftifine-0.25 % ketoconazole cream. PMID:22772509

  6. Step-step interactions on GaAs (110) nanopatterns

    SciTech Connect

    Galiana, B.; Benedicto, M.; Tejedor, P.

    2013-01-14

    The step-step interactions on vicinal GaAs (110) surface patterns have been extracted from the quantitative analysis of the terrace width distribution (TWD). We have specifically studied the interactions in near-equilibrium faceting and kinetics-driven step bunching and meandering formed by spontaneous self-organization or through the modification of GaAs growth kinetics by atomic hydrogen. We show that the experimental TWDs determined from atomic force microscopy measurements can be accurately described by a weighed sum of a generalized Wigner distribution and several Gaussians. The results of our calculations indicate that straight facets are formed during high temperature homoepitaxy due to attractive interactions between [110] steps. At low temperatures, steady state attractive interactions in [110] step bunches are preceded by a transition regime dominated by entropic and energetic repulsions between meandering [11n]-type steps (n {>=} 2), whose population density exceeds that of the [110] bunched steps. In addition, it has been found that atomic H reduces the attractive interactions between [110] bunched steps and enhances entropic and dipole-induced energetic repulsions between H-terminated [11n] steps through the inhibition of As-As bond formation at step edges. Our analysis has evidenced a correlation between the value of the adjustable parameter that accounts in our model for the specific weight of the secondary peaks in the TWD ({beta}) and the extent of transverse meandering on the vicinal surface.

  7. Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan ; Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen; Chang, Hui-Hsien; Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ? To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ? ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ? PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ? The findings suggest that ELF has a protective role against PM. ? The synthetic ELF system could reduce the use of animals in PM-driven ROS testing.

  8. DNA Display I. Sequence-Encoded Routing of DNA Populations

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, David R

    2004-01-01

    Recently reported technologies for DNA-directed organic synthesis and for DNA computing rely on routing DNA populations through complex networks. The reduction of these ideas to practice has been limited by a lack of practical experimental tools. Here we describe a modular design for DNA routing genes, and routing machinery made from oligonucleotides and commercially available chromatography resins. The routing machinery partitions nanomole quantities of DNA into physically distinct subpools based on sequence. Partitioning steps can be iterated indefinitely, with worst-case yields of 85% per step. These techniques facilitate DNA-programmed chemical synthesis, and thus enable a materials biology that could revolutionize drug discovery. PMID:15221027

  9. Synergistic effects induced by a low dose of diesel particulate extract and ultraviolet-A in Caenorhabditis elegans: DNA damage-triggered germ cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoying; Bian, Po; Liang, Junting; Wang, Yichen; Li, Luzhi; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Hang; Chen, Shaopeng; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2014-06-16

    Diesel exhaust has been classified as a potential carcinogen and is associated with various health effects. A previous study showed that the doses for manifesting the mutagenetic effects of diesel exhaust could be reduced when coexposed with ultraviolet-A (UVA) in a cellular system. However, the mechanisms underlying synergistic effects remain to be clarified, especially in an in vivo system. In the present study, using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as an in vivo system we studied the synergistic effects of diesel particulate extract (DPE) plus UVA, and the underlying mechanisms were dissected genetically using related mutants. Our results demonstrated that though coexposure of wild type worms at young adult stage to low doses of DPE (20 ?g/mL) plus UVA (0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 J/cm2) did not affect worm development (mitotic germ cells and brood size), it resulted in a significant induction of germ cell death. Using the strain of hus-1::gfp, distinct foci of HUS-1::GFP was observed in proliferating germ cells, indicating the DNA damage after worms were treated with DPE plus UVA. Moreover, the induction of germ cell death by DPE plus UVA was alleviated in single-gene loss-of-function mutations of core apoptotic, checkpoint HUS-1, CEP-1/p53, and MAPK dependent signaling pathways. Using a reactive oxygen species (ROS) probe, it was found that the production of ROS in worms coexposed to DPE plus UVA increased in a time-dependent manner. In addition, employing a singlet oxygen (1O2) trapping probe, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone, coupled with electron spin resonance analysis, we demonstrated the increased 1O2 production in worms coexposed to DPE plus UVA. These results indicated that UVA could enhance the apoptotic induction of DPE at low doses through a DNA damage-triggered pathway and that the production of ROS, especially (1)O2, played a pivotal role in initiating the synergistic process. PMID:24841043

  10. Synergistic Effects Induced by a Low Dose of Diesel Particulate Extract and Ultraviolet-A in Caenorhabditis elegans: DNA Damage-Triggered Germ Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust has been classified as a potential carcinogen and is associated with various health effects. A previous study showed that the doses for manifesting the mutagenetic effects of diesel exhaust could be reduced when coexposed with ultraviolet-A (UVA) in a cellular system. However, the mechanisms underlying synergistic effects remain to be clarified, especially in an in vivo system. In the present study, using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as an in vivo system we studied the synergistic effects of diesel particulate extract (DPE) plus UVA, and the underlying mechanisms were dissected genetically using related mutants. Our results demonstrated that though coexposure of wild type worms at young adult stage to low doses of DPE (20 ?g/mL) plus UVA (0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 J/cm2) did not affect worm development (mitotic germ cells and brood size), it resulted in a significant induction of germ cell death. Using the strain of hus-1::gfp, distinct foci of HUS-1::GFP was observed in proliferating germ cells, indicating the DNA damage after worms were treated with DPE plus UVA. Moreover, the induction of germ cell death by DPE plus UVA was alleviated in single-gene loss-of-function mutations of core apoptotic, checkpoint HUS-1, CEP-1/p53, and MAPK dependent signaling pathways. Using a reactive oxygen species (ROS) probe, it was found that the production of ROS in worms coexposed to DPE plus UVA increased in a time-dependent manner. In addition, employing a singlet oxygen (1O2) trapping probe, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone, coupled with electron spin resonance analysis, we demonstrated the increased 1O2 production in worms coexposed to DPE plus UVA. These results indicated that UVA could enhance the apoptotic induction of DPE at low doses through a DNA damage-triggered pathway and that the production of ROS, especially 1O2, played a pivotal role in initiating the synergistic process. PMID:24841043

  11. The Glass Slide Extraction System Snap Card Improves Non-Invasive Prenatal Genotyping in Pregnancies with Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Thomasz; Doescher, Andrea; Haydock, Paul V.; Aldrich, Russ; Petershofen, Eduard K.; Müller, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Determination of fetal blood groups in maternal plasma samples critically depends on adequate pre-analytical steps for optimal amplification of fetal DNA. We compared the extraction of cell-free DNA by binding on a glass surface (BCSI SNAP™ Card) with an automated system based on bead technology (MagnaPure compact™). Methods Maternal blood samples from 281 pregnancies (7th-39th week of gestation) with known antibodies were evaluated in this study. Both the SNAP card and the MagnaPure method were applied to isolate DNA in order to directly compare the amplification in a single base extension assay and/or real-time PCR. Results The mean concentration of total DNA obtained by the SNAP card (33.8 ng/µl) exceeded more than twofold that of MagnaPure extraction (15.7 ng/µl). SNAP card-extracted samples allowed to detect 3.7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) versus 2.5 SNPs in MagnaPure extracts to control for traces of fetal DNA. This difference is highest for samples from 7th-13th week of gestation. Conclusion The SNAP card system improves DNA extraction efficacy for prenatal diagnosis in maternal blood samples and provides an at least eightfold higher total amount of DNA for the ensuing analysis. Its advantage is most evident for samples from early stages of pregnancy and thus especially valuable for pregnancies with antibodies.

  12. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, G.P.

    1998-07-14

    An insert is described which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment. 5 figs.

  13. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, George P. (Danville, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An insert which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment.

  14. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Cellular Protein, DNA and RNA Synthesis in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells by Ethanol Extract of Abnormal Savda Munziq of Traditional Uighur Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Upur, Halmurat; Yusup, Abdiryim; Baudrimont, Isabelle; Umar, Anwar; Berke, Benedicte; Yimit, Dilxat; Lapham, Jaya Conser; Creppy, Edmon E.; Moore, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) is a traditional Uighur medicinal herbal preparation, commonly used for the treatment and prevention of cancer. We tested the effects of ethanol extract of ASMq on cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2) to explore the mechanism of its putative anticancer properties, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) bromide, neutral red and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assays, testing the incorporation of 3[H]-leucine and 3[H]-nucleosides into protein, DNA and RNA, and quantifying the formation of malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid (MDA) adducts. ASMq ethanol extract significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 and cell viability, increased the leakage of LDH after 48 hours or 72 hours treatment, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). Cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis were inhibited in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). No significant MDA release in culture medium and no lipid peroxidation in cells were observed. The results suggest that the cytotoxic effects of ASMq ethanol extract might be related to inhibition of cancer cell growth, alteration of cell membrane integrity and inhibition of cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis. PMID:18955370

  15. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Cellular Protein, DNA and RNA Synthesis in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells by Ethanol Extract of Abnormal Savda Munziq of Traditional Uighur Medicine.

    PubMed

    Upur, Halmurat; Yusup, Abdiryim; Baudrimont, Isabelle; Umar, Anwar; Berke, Benedicte; Yimit, Dilxat; Lapham, Jaya Conser; Creppy, Edmon E; Moore, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) is a traditional Uighur medicinal herbal preparation, commonly used for the treatment and prevention of cancer. We tested the effects of ethanol extract of ASMq on cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2) to explore the mechanism of its putative anticancer properties, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) bromide, neutral red and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assays, testing the incorporation of (3)[H]-leucine and (3)[H]-nucleosides into protein, DNA and RNA, and quantifying the formation of malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid (MDA) adducts. ASMq ethanol extract significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 and cell viability, increased the leakage of LDH after 48 hours or 72 hours treatment, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). Cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis were inhibited in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). No significant MDA release in culture medium and no lipid peroxidation in cells were observed. The results suggest that the cytotoxic effects of ASMq ethanol extract might be related to inhibition of cancer cell growth, alteration of cell membrane integrity and inhibition of cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis. PMID:18955370

  16. Ethanol extract of Hedyotis diffusa willd upregulates G0/G1 phase arrest and induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells by modulating caspase cascade signaling and altering associated genes expression was assayed by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Jui; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    The authors' previous study has shown that water extract of Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW) promoted immune response and exhibited anti-leukemic activity in BALB/c leukemic mice in vivo. In this study, the anti-proliferation effects of ethanol extract of H. diffusa Willd (EEHDW) on lung cancer cell lines (A549, H1355, and LLC), leukemia cell lines (HL-60, WEHI-3), and a mouse melanoma cell line (B16F10) in vitro were investigated. The results demonstrated that EEHDW suppressed the cell proliferation of A549, H1355, HL-60, WEHI-3, and B16F10 cells as well as reduced cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. We found that EEHDW inhibited the cell proliferation of HL-60 cells in concentration-dependent manner. In addition, EEHDW triggered an arrest of HL-60 cells at G0/G1 phase and sub-G1 population (apoptotic cells). EEHDW provoked DNA condensation and DNA damage in HL-60 cells. The activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were elevated in EEHDW-treated HL-60 cells. DNA microarray to investigate and display the gene levels related to cell growth, signal transduction, apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell cycle, DNA damage and repair, transcription and translation was also used. These findings suggest that EEHDW may be a potential herbal medicine and therapeutic agent for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:24677778

  17. First steps in R Florian Markowetz, Tim Beissbarth

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    First steps in R Florian Markowetz, Tim Beissbarth Practical DNA Microarray Analysis This tutorial Statistics with R" by Peter Dalgaard, Springer 2002, or "Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Solutions

  18. Inhibition of adenovirus DNA synthesis in vitro by sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.S.; Friefeld, B.R.; Keiser, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    Sera containing antinuclear antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and related disorders were tested for their effect on the synthesis of adenovirus (Ad) DNA in an in vitro replication system. After being heated at 60/sup 0/C for 1 h, some sera from patients with SLE inhibited Ad DNA synthesis by 60 to 100%. Antibodies to double-stranded DNA were present in 15 of the 16 inhibitory sera, and inhibitory activity copurified with anti-double-stranded DNA in the immunoglobulin G fraction. These SLE sera did not inhibit the DNA polymerases ..cap alpha.., BETA, ..gamma.. and had no antibody to the 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein necessary for Ad DNA synthesis. The presence of antibodies to single-stranded DNA and a variety of saline-extractable antigens (Sm, Ha, nRNP, and rRNP) did not correlate with SLE serum inhibitory activity. Methods previously developed for studying the individual steps in Ad DNA replication were used to determine the site of inhibition by the SLE sera that contained antibody to double-stranded DNA. Concentrations of the SLE inhibitor that decreased the elongation of Ad DNA by greater than 85% had no effect on either the initiation of Ad DNA synthesis or the polymerization of the first 26 deoxyribonucleotides.

  19. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich (Moscow, RU); Lysov, Yuri Petrovich (Moscow, RU); Dubley, Svetlana A. (Moscow, RU)

    1999-01-01

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between said cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting said extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to said extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from said array.

  20. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, A.D.; Lysov, Y.P.; Dubley, S.A.

    1999-05-18

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between the cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting the extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to the extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from the array. 14 figs.

  1. Forensic DNA profiling and database.

    PubMed

    Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2003-07-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection. PMID:23386793

  2. The Claviceps purpurea gene encoding dimethylallyltryptophan synthase, the committed step for ergot alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, H F; Wang, H; Gebler, J C; Poulter, C D; Schardl, C L

    1995-11-01

    The first pathway-specific step of ergot alkaloid biosynthesis in the fungus, Claviceps purpurea, is catalyzed by the prenyltransferase, 4-(gamma,gamma-dimethylallyl)tryptophan synthase. Partial sequence information was obtained for the purified enzyme and a degenerate oligonucleotide mixture was used to identify and amplify segments of the gene, dmaW. The complete gene and near-full-length cDNA were cloned and sequenced. The cDNA was cloned in a yeast expression vector in sense and antisense orientations relative to the inducible GAL1 promoter. Extracts of yeast transformants with the sense constructs, but not antisense constructs or cloning vector, catalyzed production of 4-(gamma,gamma-dimethylallyl)tryptophan. The sequence of dmaW and its cDNA indicated that it encoded a 455 amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 51,824 Da and a putative prenyl diphosphate binding motif. PMID:7488077

  3. Effective Extraction and Assembly Methods for Simultaneously Obtaining Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wanjun; Fan, Shihang; Hua, Wei; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-01-01

    Background In conventional approaches to plastid and mitochondrial genome sequencing, the sequencing steps are performed separately; thus, plastid DNA (ptDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) should be prepared independently. However, it is difficult to extract pure ptDNA and mtDNA from plant tissue. Following the development of high-throughput sequencing technology, many researchers have attempted to obtain plastid genomes or mitochondrial genomes using high-throughput sequencing data from total DNA. Unfortunately, the huge datasets generated consume massive computing and storage resources and cost a great deal, and even more importantly, excessive pollution reads affect the accuracy of the assembly. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an effective method that can generate base sequences from plant tissue and that is suitable for all plant species. Here, we describe a highly effective, low-cost method for obtaining plastid and mitochondrial genomes simultaneously. Results First, we obtained high-quality DNA employing Partial Concentration Extraction. Second, we evaluated the purity of the DNA sample and determined the sequencing dataset size employing Vector Control Quantitative Analysis. Third, paired-end reads were obtained using a high-throughput sequencing platform. Fourth, we obtained scaffolds employing Two-step Assembly. Finally, we filled in gaps using specific methods and obtained complete plastid and mitochondrial genomes. To ensure the accuracy of plastid and mitochondrial genomes, we validated the assembly using PCR and Sanger sequencing. Using this method,we obtained complete plastid and mitochondrial genomes with lengths of 153,533 nt and 223,412 nt separately. Conclusion A simple method for extracting, evaluating, sequencing and assembling plastid and mitochondrial genomes was developed. This method has many advantages: it is timesaving, inexpensive and reproducible and produces high-quality sequence. Furthermore, this method can produce plastid and mitochondrial genomes simultaneously and be used for other plant species. Due to its simplicity and extensive applicability, this method will support research on plant cytoplasmic genomes. PMID:25251391

  4. Modification of radiation-induced DNA double strand break repair pathways by chemicals extracted from Podophyllum hexandrum: an in vitro study in human blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nitya N; Shukla, Sandeep K; Yashavarddhan, M H; Devi, Memita; Tripathi, Rajendra P; Gupta, Manju L

    2014-06-01

    Radiation exposure is a serious threat to biomolecules, particularly DNA, proteins and lipids. Various exogenous substances have been reported to protect these biomolecules. In this study we explored the effect of pre-treatment with G-002M, a mixture of three active derivatives isolated from the rhizomes of Podophyllum hexandrum, on DNA damage response in irradiated human blood leukocytes. Blood was collected from healthy male volunteers, preincubated with G-002M and then irradiated with various doses of radiation. Samples were analyzed using flow cytometry to quantify DNA double strand break (DSB) biomarkers including ?-H2AX, P53BP1 and levels of ligase IV. Blood samples were irradiated in vitro and processed to determine time and dose-dependent kinetics. Semiquantitative RT-PCR was performed at various time points to measure gene expression of DNA-PKcs, Ku80, ATM, and 53BP1; each of these genes is involved in DNA repair signaling. Pre-treatment of blood with G-002M resulted in reduction of ?-H2AX and P53BP1 biomarkers levels and elevated ligase IV levels relative to non-G-002M-treated irradiated cells. These results confirm suppression in radiation-induced DNA DSBs. Samples pre-treated with G-002M and then irradiated also showed significant up-regulation of DNA-PKcs and Ku80 and downregulation of ATM and 53BP1 gene expressions, suggesting that G-002M plays a protective role against DNA damage. The protective effect of G-002M may be due to its ability to scavange radiation-induced free radicals or assist in DNA repair. Further studies are needed to decipher the role of G-002M on signaling molecules involved in radiation-induced DNA damage repair pathways. PMID:24500925

  5. Efficient oil palm total RNA extraction with a total RNA extraction kit.

    PubMed

    Habib, S H; Saud, H M; Kausar, H

    2014-01-01

    Oil palm tissues are rich in polyphenols, polysaccharides and secondary metabolites; these can co-precipitate with RNA, causing problems for downstream applications. We compared two different methods (one conventional and a kit-based method - Easy-Blue(TM) Total RNA Extraction Kit) to isolate total RNA from leaves, roots and shoot apical meristems of tissue culture derived truncated leaf syndrome somaclonal oil palm seedlings. The quality and quantity of total RNA were compared through spectrophotometry and formaldehyde gel electrophoresis. The specificity and applicability of the protocols were evaluated for downstream applications, including cDNA synthesis and RT-PCR analysis. We found that the conventional method gave higher yields of RNA but took longer, and it was contaminated with genomic DNA. This method required extra genomic DNA removal steps that further reduced the RNA yield. The kit-based method, on the other hand, produced good yields as well as well as good quality RNA, within a very short period of time from a small amount of starting material. Moreover, the RNA from the kit-based method was more suitable for synthesizing cDNA and RT-PCR amplification than the conventional method. Therefore, we conclude that the Easy-BlueTM Total RNA Extraction Kit method is suitable and superior for isolation of total RNA from oil palm leaf, root and shoot apical meristem. PMID:24781991

  6. Label-Free and Sensitive Fluorescent Detection of Sequence-Specific Single-Strand DNA Based on S1 Nuclease Cleavage Effects

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zheng; Liu, Jinchuan; Bai, Wenhui; Lv, Zhenzhen; Jiang, Xiaoling; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang; Lv, Guiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect sequence-specific single-strand DNA (ssDNA) in complex, contaminant-ridden samples, using a fluorescent method directly without a DNA extraction and PCR step could simplify the detection of pathogens in the field and in the clinic. Here, we have demonstrated a simple label-free sensing strategy to detect ssDNA by employing its complementary ssDNA, S1 nuclease and nucleic acid fluorescent dyes. Upon clearing away redundant complementary ssDNA and possibly mismatched double strand DNA by using S1 nuclease, the fluorescent signal-to-noise ratio could be increased dramatically. It enabled the method to be adaptable to three different types of DNA fluorescent dyes and the ability to detect target ssDNA in complex, multicomponent samples, like tissue homogenate. The method can distinguish a two-base mismatch from avian influenza A (H1N1) virus. Also, it can detect the appearance of 50 pM target ssDNA in 0.5 µg·mL?1 Lambda DNA, and 50 nM target ssDNA in 5 µg·mL?1 Lambda DNA or in tissue homogenate. It is facile and cost-effective, and could be easily extended to detect other ssDNA with many common nucleic acid fluorescent dyes. PMID:25285445

  7. Integrated microfluidic systems for DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Chen, Hui-Wen; Witek, Ma?gorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of genome-related research in terms of evolving basic discoveries in biology has generated widespread use of DNA diagnostics and DNA forensics and driven the accelerated development of fully integrated microfluidic systems for genome processing. To produce a microsystem with favorable performance characteristics for genetic-based analyses, several key operational elements must be strategically chosen, including device substrate material, temperature control, fluidic control, and reaction product readout. As a matter of definition, a microdevice is a chip that performs a single processing step, for example microchip electrophoresis. Several microdevices can be integrated to a single wafer, or combined on a control board as separate devices to form a microsystem. A microsystem is defined as a chip composed of at least two microdevices. Among the many documented analytical microdevices, those focused on the ability to perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported extensively due to the importance of this processing step in most genetic-based assays. Other microdevices that have been detailed in the literature include those for solid-phase extractions, microchip electrophoresis, and devices composed of DNA microarrays used for interrogating DNA primary structure. Great progress has also been made in the areas of chip fabrication, bonding and sealing to enclose fluidic networks, evaluation of different chip substrate materials, surface chemistries, and the architecture of reaction conduits for basic processing steps such as mixing. Other important elements that have been developed to realize functional systems include miniaturized readout formats comprising optical or electrochemical transduction and interconnect technologies. These discoveries have led to the development of fully autonomous and functional integrated systems for genome processing that can supply "sample in/answer out" capabilities. In this chapter, we focus on microfluidic systems that are composed of two or more microdevices directed toward DNA analyses. Our discussions will primarily be focused on the integration of various processing steps with microcapillary electrophoresis (?CE) or microarrays. The advantages afforded by fully integrated microfluidic systems to enable challenging applications, such as single-copy DNA sequencing, single-cell gene expression analysis, pathogen detection, and forensic DNA analysis in formats that provide high throughput and point-of-analysis capabilities will be discussed as well. PMID:21607848

  8. Miniaturized reaction vessel system, method for performing site-specific biochemical reactions and affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich (Moscow, RU); Lysov, Yuri Petrovich (Moscow, RU); Dubley, Svetlana A. (Moscow, RU)

    2000-01-01

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between said cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting said extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to said extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from said array.

  9. Optimized method for methylated DNA immuno-precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) is one of the most widely used methods to evaluate DNA methylation on a whole genome scale, and involves the capture of the methylated fraction of the DNA by an antibody specific to methyl-cytosine. MeDIP was initially coupled with microarray hybridization to detect local DNA methylation enrichments along the genome. More recently, MeDIP has been coupled with next generation sequencing, which highlights its current and future applicability. In previous studies in which MeDIP was applied, the protocol took around 3 days to be performed. Given the importance of MeDIP for studies involving DNA methylation, it was important to optimize the method in order to deliver faster turnouts. The present article describes optimization steps of the MeDIP method. The length of the procedure was reduced in half without compromising the quality of the results. This was achieved by:•Reduction of the number of washes in different stages of the protocol, after a careful evaluation of the number of indispensable washes.•Reduction of reaction times for detaching methylated DNA fragments from the complex agarose beads:antibody.•Modification of the methods to purify methylated DNA, which incorporates new devices and procedures, and eliminates a lengthy phenol and chloroform:isoamyl alcohol extraction.

  10. DNA damage, redox changes, and associated stress-inducible signaling events underlying the apoptosis and cytotoxicity in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S by methanol-extracted Stachybotrys chartarum toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyan; Yadav, Jagjit S. . E-mail: Jagjit.Yadav@uc.edu

    2006-08-01

    Spore-extracted toxins of the indoor mold Stachybotrys chartarum (SC) caused cytotoxicity (release of lactate dehydrogenase), inhibition of cell proliferation, and cell death in murine alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptotic cell death, confirmed based on morphological changes, DNA ladder formation, and caspase 3/7 activation, was detectable as early as at 3 h during treatment with a toxin concentration of 1 spore equivalent/macrophage and was preceded by DNA damage beginning at 15 min, as evidenced by DNA comet formation in single cell gel electrophoresis assay. The apoptotic dose of SC toxins did not induce detectable nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1{beta}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha}) but showed exacerbated cytotoxicity in presence of a non-apoptotic dose of the known pro-inflammatory agent LPS (10 ng/ml). Intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level showed a significant decrease beginning at 9 h of the toxin treatment whereas oxidized glutathione (GSSG) showed a corresponding significant increase, indicating a delayed onset of oxidative stress in the apoptosis process. The toxin-treated macrophages accumulated p53, an indicator of DNA damage response, and showed activation of the stress-inducible MAP kinases, JNK, and p38, in a time-dependent manner. Chemical blocking of either p38 or p53 inhibited in part the SC toxin-induced apoptosis whereas blocking of JNK did not show any such effect. This study constitutes the first report on induction of DNA damage and associated p53 activation by SC toxins, and demonstrates the involvement of p38- and p53-mediated signaling events in SC toxin-induced apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

  11. Multicolor and erasable DNA photolithography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fujian; Xu, Huaguo; Tan, Weihong; Liang, Haojun

    2014-07-22

    The immobilization of DNA molecules onto a solid support is a crucial step in biochip research and related applications. In this work, we report a DNA photolithography method based on photocleavage of 2-nitrobenzyl linker-modified DNA strands. These strands were subjected to ultraviolet light irradiation to generate multiple short DNA strands in a programmable manner. Coupling the toehold-mediated DNA strand-displacement reaction with DNA photolithography enabled the fabrication of a DNA chip surface with multifunctional DNA patterns having complex geometrical structures at the microscale level. The erasable DNA photolithography strategy was developed to allow different paintings on the same chip. Furthermore, the asymmetrical modification of colloidal particles was carried out by using this photolithography strategy. This strategy has broad applications in biosensors, nanodevices, and DNA-nanostructure fabrication. PMID:24988147

  12. Multicolor and Erasable DNA Photolithography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The immobilization of DNA molecules onto a solid support is a crucial step in biochip research and related applications. In this work, we report a DNA photolithography method based on photocleavage of 2-nitrobenzyl linker-modified DNA strands. These strands were subjected to ultraviolet light irradiation to generate multiple short DNA strands in a programmable manner. Coupling the toehold-mediated DNA strand-displacement reaction with DNA photolithography enabled the fabrication of a DNA chip surface with multifunctional DNA patterns having complex geometrical structures at the microscale level. The erasable DNA photolithography strategy was developed to allow different paintings on the same chip. Furthermore, the asymmetrical modification of colloidal particles was carried out by using this photolithography strategy. This strategy has broad applications in biosensors, nanodevices, and DNA-nanostructure fabrication. PMID:24988147

  13. Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Its Repair in Human Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    1999-05-12

    DNA damage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured mammalian cells including human cells was studied. In the first phase of these studies, a cell culture laboratory was established. Necessary equipment including an incubator, a sterile laminar flow hood and several centrifuges was purchased. We have successfully grown several cell lines such as murine hybridoma cells, V79 cells and human K562 leukemia cells. This was followed by the establishment of a methodology for the isolation of chromatin from cells. This was a very important step, because a routine and successful isolation of chromatin was a prerequisite for the success of the further studies in this project, the aim of which was the measurement of DNA darnage in mammalian chromatin in vitro and in cultured cells. Chromatin isolation was accomplished using a slightly modified procedure of the one described by Mee & Adelstein (1981). For identification and quantitation of DNA damage in cells, analysis of chromatin was preferred over the analysis of "naked DNA" for the following reasons: i. DNA may not be extracted efficiently from nucleoprotein in exposed cells, due to formation of DNA-protein cross-links, ii. the extractability of DNA is well known to decrease with increasing doses of radiation, iii. portions of DNA may not be extracted due to fragmentation, iv. unextracted DNA may contain a significant portion of damaged DNA bases and DNA-protein cross-links. The technique of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which was used in the present project, permits the identification and quantitation of modified DNA bases in chromatin in the presence of proteins without the necessity of first isolating DNA from chromatin. This has been demonstrated previously by the results from our laboratory and by the results obtained during the course of the present project. The quality of isolated chromatin was tested by measurement of its content of DNA, proteins, and RNA, by analysis of its protein components using gel electrophoresis, and by absorption spectral analysis. GeneraUy, the RNA content was <5% of the amount of DNA, and the ratio of the amount of protein to that of DNA was =1. 8-2 (w/w). Having developed a suitable methodology for routine isolation of chromatin from mammalian cells, studies of DNA damage in chromatin in vitro and in cultured human cells were pursued.

  14. Why DNA Interpretation Has Become More Challenging

    E-print Network

    in Forensic DNA Typing: Interpretation" (Elsevier, 2015). I do not receive any royalties for this book in Forensic DNA Typing: Interpretation Butler, J.M. (2015) Advanced Topics in Forensic DNA Typing or equipment identified are necessarily the best available for the purpose. #12;Steps in Forensic DNA Analysis

  15. Another Extraction! Try This One Instead of Dried Peas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultana, Khalida; van Rooy, Wilhelmina

    2009-01-01

    Extracting DNA from fruit and vegetables provides students with hands-on opportunities to engage with a visualisation of genetic material that can later be supported by ICT and practical model making. Here is a quick, cheap and easy way to extract DNA from strawberries that avoids the mess involved in other DNA extractions, such as from dried…

  16. DNA Analyses of Phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, K.; Bench, S.; Saltzman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Microbes and phytoplankton are extremely important for marine life because they produce much of Earth's oxygen and are the foundation for ocean ecosystems, such as the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. As it is undergoing some of the most extreme warming on Earth, the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is experiencing drastic changes in the ecosystem, which motivates researchers to study its population of microbes and phytoplankton. However, little research has been done on the genetic changes that the microbes and phytoplankton have undergone. The research project I worked on studies the genetic changes of the WAP organisms through three steps: sampling, which is done at the Palmer station in the WAP, sequencing, and microarrays. Throughout the course of the summer, I contributed to the sequencing aspect of the project by conducting DNA extractions and determining the quality and quantity of DNA in the samples. DNA extractions and quality checking are necessary for my project in order to prepare the DNA for sequencing and to use in microarray experiments. Additionally, I performed microscopy and looked at high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigment ratios to identify which organisms are in the collected samples. The data from the microscopy and the HPLC pigment ratios provide support for the results yielded from the DNA sequences and microarrays.

  17. Feature extraction Feature extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Feature extraction #12;Feature extraction ! · Image interpretation: extract information from images · but the desired information may not be explicit in the raw observed pixel intensities · Transform image to make (hyperspectral sensors) Meteosat thermal IR channel hyperspectral "image cube" #12;Raw intensities ! · Pros

  18. Feature extraction Feature extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Feature extraction #12;Feature extraction · Image interpretation: extract information from images · but the desired information may not be explicit in the raw observed pixel intensities · Transform image to make (hyperspectral sensors) Meteosat thermal IR channel hyperspectral "image cube" #12;Raw intensities · Pros

  19. First analysis stepsFirst analysis steps o quality control and optimization

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    -tip a microarray slide Slide: 25x75 mm Spot-to-spot: ca. 150-350 µm #12;Terminology sample: RNA (cDNA) hybridized (signal) or background. 3. Information extraction. For each spot on the array and each dye · foreground. Information extraction. For each spot on the array and each dye · foreground intensities; · background

  20. First analysis stepsFirst analysis steps o quality control and optimization

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    -tip a microarray slide Slide: 25x75 mm Spot-to-spot: ca. 150-350 µm #12;Terminology sample: RNA (cDNA) hybridized (signal) or background. 3. Information extraction. For each spot on the array and each dye · foreground amount of RNA in the biopsy efficiencies of -RNA extraction -reverse transcription -labeling

  1. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of single fingerprints in forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Lana; Klempner, Stacey A; Patel, Rosni A; Mitchell, Adele A; Axler-DiPerte, Grace L; Wurmbach, Elisa

    2014-11-01

    Fingerprints and touched items are important sources of DNA for STR profiling, since this evidence can be recovered in a wide variety of criminal offenses. However, there are some fundamental difficulties in working with these samples, including variability in quantity and quality of extracted DNA. In this study, we collected and analyzed over 700 fingerprints. We compared a commercially available extraction protocol (Zygem) to two methods developed in our laboratory, a simple one-tube protocol and a high sensitivity protocol (HighSens) that includes additional steps to concentrate and purify the DNA. The amplification protocols tested were AmpFLSTR® Identifiler® using either 28 or 31 amplification cycles, and Identifiler® Plus using 32 amplification cycles. We found that the HighSens and Zygem extraction methods were significantly better in their DNA yields than the one-tube method. Identifiler® Plus increased the quality of the STR profiles for the one-tube extraction significantly. However, this effect could not be verified for the other extraction methods. Furthermore, microscopic analysis of single fingerprints revealed that some individuals tended to shed more material than others onto glass slides. However, a dense deposition of skin flakes did not strongly correlate with a high quality STR profile. PMID:25098234

  2. DNA barcoding for plants.

    PubMed

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing. PMID:25373752

  3. Towards Privacy Preserving of Forensic DNA Databases 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Sanmin

    2012-02-14

    Protecting privacy of individuals is critical for forensic genetics. In a kinship/identity testing, related DNA profiles between user's query and the DNA database need to be extracted. However, unrelated profiles cannot be revealed to each other...

  4. Droplet-Based Segregation and Extraction of Concentrated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Buie, C R; Buckley, P; Hamilton, J; Ness, K D; Rose, K A

    2007-02-23

    Microfluidic analysis often requires sample concentration and separation techniques to isolate and detect analytes of interest. Complex or scarce samples may also require an orthogonal separation and detection method or off-chip analysis to confirm results. To perform these additional steps, the concentrated sample plug must be extracted from the primary microfluidic channel with minimal sample loss and dilution. We investigated two extraction techniques; injection of immiscible fluid droplets into the sample stream (''capping'''') and injection of the sample into an immiscible fluid stream (''extraction''). From our results we conclude that capping is the more effective partitioning technique. Furthermore, this functionality enables additional off-chip post-processing procedures such as DNA/RNA microarray analysis, realtime polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and culture growth to validate chip performance.

  5. Modeling the Sensitivity of Field Surveys for Detection of Environmental DNA (eDNA)

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin T.; Lance, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental DNA (eDNA) method is the practice of collecting environmental samples and analyzing them for the presence of a genetic marker specific to a target species. Little is known about the sensitivity of the eDNA method. Sensitivity is the probability that the target marker will be detected if it is present in the water body. Methods and tools are needed to assess the sensitivity of sampling protocols, design eDNA surveys, and interpret survey results. In this study, the sensitivity of the eDNA method is modeled as a function of ambient target marker concentration. The model accounts for five steps of sample collection and analysis, including: 1) collection of a filtered water sample from the source; 2) extraction of DNA from the filter and isolation in a purified elution; 3) removal of aliquots from the elution for use in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay; 4) PCR; and 5) genetic sequencing. The model is applicable to any target species. For demonstration purposes, the model is parameterized for bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix) assuming sampling protocols used in the Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS). Simulation results show that eDNA surveys have a high false negative rate at low concentrations of the genetic marker. This is attributed to processing of water samples and division of the extraction elution in preparation for the PCR assay. Increases in field survey sensitivity can be achieved by increasing sample volume, sample number, and PCR replicates. Increasing sample volume yields the greatest increase in sensitivity. It is recommended that investigators estimate and communicate the sensitivity of eDNA surveys to help facilitate interpretation of eDNA survey results. In the absence of such information, it is difficult to evaluate the results of surveys in which no water samples test positive for the target marker. It is also recommended that invasive species managers articulate concentration-based sensitivity objectives for eDNA surveys. In the absence of such information, it is difficult to design appropriate sampling protocols. The model provides insights into how sampling protocols can be designed or modified to achieve these sensitivity objectives. PMID:26509674

  6. Promoting 21st-Century Skills in the Science Classroom by Adapting Cookbook Lab Activities: The Case of DNA Extraction of Wheat Germ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alozie, Nonye M.; Grueber, David J.; Dereski, Mary O.

    2012-01-01

    How can science instruction engage students in 21st-century skills and inquiry-based learning, even when doing simple labs in the classroom? We collaborated with teachers in professional development workshops to transform "cookbook" activities into engaging laboratory experiences. We show how to change the common classroom activity of DNA

  7. Effects of DNA Extraction Procedures on Bacteroides Profiles in Fecal Samples From Various Animals Determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major assumption in microbial source tracking is that some fecal bacteria are specific to a host animal, and thus provide unique microbial fingerprints that can be used to differentiate hosts. However, the DNA information obtained from a particular sample may be biased dependi...

  8. Duplex Reverse-Hybridization Assay for The Simultaneous Detection of KRAS/BRAF Mutations in FFPE-extracted Genomic DNA from Colorectal Cancer Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Ausch, Christoph; Zeillinger, Robert; Oberkanins, Christian; Dandachi, Nadia; Reiner-Concin, Angelika; Kriegshäuser, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    We report the performance evaluation of a non-quantitative reverse-hybridization assay (KRAS-BRAF StripAssay) designed for the simultaneous detection of 10 mutations in codons 12 and 13 of the KRAS gene and BRAF mutation V600E. Dilution experiments using DNA from tumor cell lines or from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue were performed to assess assay sensitivity. Using 50 ng of total DNA (mutant and wild-type), the KRAS-BRAF StripAssay demonstrated a detection limit of 1% mutant sequence in a background of wild-type DNA. With respect to BRAF V600E, the KRAS-BRAF StripAssay was evaluated using 60 FFPE CRC samples previously analyzed by high resolution melting (HRM). Test strip hybridization identified 2/60 (3%) samples to carry the BRAF V600E mutation, and results were in agreement with those obtained by HRM analysis. This work demonstrates the KRAS-BRAF StripAssay to be a robust and sensitive method for the detection of common KRAS/BRAF mutations in genomic DNA isolated from FFPE tissue samples. PMID:23324583

  9. Vol. 40, no. 1 Journal of Vector Ecology 11 Comparison of manual and semi-automatic DNA extraction protocols for the barcoding

    E-print Network

    Figuerola, Jordi

    protocols for the barcoding characterization of hematophagous louse flies (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) Rafael@ebd.csic.es Received 13 May 2014; Accepted 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: The barcoding of life initiative provides of a fragment of the subunit 1 of the cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene. Obtaining good quality DNA for barcoding

  10. DNA barcoding fishes.

    PubMed

    Weigt, Lee A; Driskell, Amy C; Baldwin, Carole C; Ormos, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the techniques for DNA barcoding of fishes from field collection to DNA sequence analysis. Recommendations for modifications of field protocols and best tissue sampling practices are made. A variety of DNA extraction protocols is provided, including high-throughput robot-assisted methods. A pair of well-tested forward and reverse primers for PCR amplification and sequencing are presented. These primers have been successfully used for DNA barcode on a wide array of marine fish taxa and also work well in most freshwater and cartilaginous fishes. Recipes and cycling protocols for both PCR amplification and sequencing and cleanup methods for the reaction products are provided. A method for the consistent production of high-quality DNA barcodes from DNA sequence data is given and stringent guidelines for judging the quality of raw sequence data are laid out. PMID:22684954

  11. Isolation of PCR quality microbial community DNA from heavily contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Manjula; Chang, Simon; Jimenez, Abraham; Holland-Moritz, Daniel; Holland-Moritz, Hannah; La Val, Taylor P; Lund, Craig; Mullen, Madeline; Olsen, John; Sztain, Terra A; Yoo, Jennifer; Moss, John A; Baum, Marc M

    2014-07-01

    Asphalts, biochemically degraded oil, contain persistent, water-soluble compounds that pose a significant challenge to the isolation of PCR quality DNA. The adaptation of existing DNA purification protocols and commercial kits proved unsuccessful at overcoming this hurdle. Treatment of aqueous asphalt extracts with a polyamide resin afforded genomic microbial DNA templates that could readily be amplified by PCR. Physicochemically distinct asphalt samples from five natural oil seeps successfully generated the expected 291 bp amplicons targeting a region of the 16S rRNA gene, illustrating the robustness of the method. DNA recovery yields were in the 50-80% range depending on how the asphalt sample was seeded with exogenous DNA. The scope of the new method was expanded to include soil with high humic acid content. DNA from soil samples spiked with a range of humic acid concentrations was extracted with a commercial kit followed by treatment with the polyamide resin. The additional step significantly improved the purity of the DNA templates, especially at high humic acid concentrations, based on qPCR analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The new method has the advantages of being inexpensive, simple, and rapid and should provide a valuable addition to protocols in the field of petroleum and soil microbiology. PMID:24769406

  12. Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices

    E-print Network

    Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

    Nanotechnology with DNA DNA Nanodevices Friedrich C. Simmel* and Wendy U. Dittmer A DNA actuator. Introduction.............285 2. Overview: DNA Nanotechnology.......285 3. Prototypes of Nanomechanical DNA overview of DNA nanotechnology as a whole is given. The most important properties of DNA molecules

  13. Sensitive life detection strategies for low-biomass environments: optimizing extraction of nucleic acids adsorbing to terrestrial and Mars analogue minerals.

    PubMed

    Direito, Susana O L; Marees, Andries; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2012-07-01

    The adsorption of nucleic acids to mineral matrixes can result in low extraction yields and negatively influences molecular microbial ecology studies, in particular for low-biomass environments on Earth and Mars. We determined the recovery of nucleic acids from a range of minerals relevant to Earth and Mars. Clay minerals, but also other silicates and nonsilicates, showed very low recovery (< 1%). Consequently, optimization of DNA extraction was directed towards clays. The high temperatures and acidic conditions used in some methods to dissolve mineral matrices proved to destruct DNA. The most efficient method comprised a high phosphate solution (P/EtOH; 1 M phosphate, 15% ethanol buffer at pH 8) introduced at the cell-lysing step in DNA extraction, to promote chemical competition with DNA for adsorption sites. This solution increased DNA yield from clay samples spiked with known quantities of cells up to nearly 100-fold. DNA recovery was also enhanced from several mineral samples retrieved from an aquifer, while maintaining reproducible DGGE profiles. DGGE profiles were obtained for a clay sample for which no profile could be generated with the standard DNA isolation protocol. Mineralogy influenced microbial community composition. The method also proved suitable for the recovery of low molecular weight DNA (< 1.5 kb). PMID:22329626

  14. The N-terminal noncatalytic region of Xenopus RecQ4 is required for chromatin binding of DNA polymerase alpha in the initiation of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Kumiko; Kumano, Maya; Kubota, Yumiko; Hashimoto, Yoshitami; Takisawa, Haruhiko

    2006-07-01

    Recruitment of DNA polymerases onto replication origins is a crucial step in the assembly of eukaryotic replication machinery. A previous study in budding yeast suggests that Dpb11 controls the recruitment of DNA polymerases alpha and epsilon onto the origins. Sld2 is an essential replication protein that interacts with Dpb11, but no metazoan homolog has yet been identified. We isolated Xenopus RecQ4 as a candidate Sld2 homolog. RecQ4 is a member of the metazoan RecQ helicase family, and its N-terminal region shows sequence similarity with Sld2. In Xenopus egg extracts, RecQ4 is essential for the initiation of DNA replication, in particular for chromatin binding of DNA polymerase alpha. An N-terminal fragment of RecQ4 devoid of the helicase domain could rescue the replication activity of RecQ4-depleted extracts, and antibody against the fragment inhibited DNA replication and chromatin binding of the polymerase. Further, N-terminal fragments of RecQ4 physically interacted with Cut5, a Xenopus homolog of Dpb11, and their ability to bind to Cut5 closely correlated with their ability to rescue the replication activity of the depleted extracts. Our data suggest that RecQ4 performs an essential role in the assembly of replication machinery through interaction with Cut5 in vertebrates. PMID:16782873

  15. [DNA biobanks. Establishment and maintenance].

    PubMed

    Henriksen, F L; Hørder, M

    1998-08-24

    The need for extraction, purification and storage of DNA in biobanks is increasing. DNA may be obtained from mouth brush water, guthrie cards, tissue biopsies or venous blood. Sampling conditions depend on the method used for procurement of DNA, e.g. DNA extraction or Ebstein Barr Virus transformation. Exact knowledge about the validity and stability of DNA stored in buffer is still insufficient. Biobanks at hospitals and at research departments are regulated by the Danish Private Registers, etc. Act. Research projects based on DNA biobanks should be notified to the Danish Data Protection Agency and approved by the local ethical committee. Discount, economic, and business class set-ups are different practical and financial models for the structure of DNA biobanking. PMID:9739602

  16. Changes in chromosome structure, mitotic activity and nuclear DNA content from cells of Allium Test induced by bark water extract of Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC.

    PubMed

    Kura?, Mieczys?aw; Nowakowska, Julita; Sliwi?ska, Elwira; Pilarski, Rados?aw; Ilasz, Renata; Tykarska, Teresa; Zobel, Alicja; Gulewicz, Krzysztof

    2006-09-19

    The influence of water extract of Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC bark on the meristematic cells of the root tips of Allium cepa L., e.g. cells of Allium Test, was investigated. The experiment was carried out in two variants: (1) continuous incubation at different concentrations (2, 4, 8 and 16 mg/ml) of the extract for 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72h; and (2) 24-h incubation in three concentrations of the extract (4, 8 or 16 mg/ml), followed by post-incubation in distilled water for 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48h. During the continuous incubation, the mitotic activity was reduced (2 and 4 mg/ml) or totally inhibited (8 and 16 mg/ml), depending on the concentration of the extract. All the concentrations resulted in gradual reduction of the mitotic activity. In the concentration of 2 mg/ml, the mitotic activity reached its lowest value after 12h (2 mg/ml) and after 24h in 4 mg/ml, followed by spontaneous intensification of divisions during further incubation. Instead, in higher concentrations of the extracts (8 and 16 mg/ml), the mitotic activity was totally inhibited within 24h and did not resume even after 72h. Incubation caused changes in the phase index, mainly as an increase in the number of prophases. After 24h of incubation, in all phases, condensation and contraction of chromosomes were observed. During post-incubation, divisions resumed in all concentrations, reaching even higher values than the control. Cytometric analysis showed that the extract caused inhibition of the cell cycle at the border between gap(2) and beginning of mitosis (G(2)/M). PMID:16793229

  17. Complementation of the xeroderma pigmentosum DNA repair synthesis defect with Escherichia coli UvrABC proteins in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, J; Grossman, L; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed cell-free system was used to study DNA repair synthesis carried out by extracts from human cell lines in vitro. Extracts from a normal human lymphoid cell line and from cell lines established from individuals with hereditary dysplastic nevus syndrome perform damage-dependent repair synthesis in plasmid DNA treated with cis- or trans-diamminedichloro-platinum(II) or irradiated with ultraviolet light. Cell extracts of xeroderma pigmentosum origin (complementation groups A, C, D, and G) are deficient in DNA repair synthesis. When damaged plasmid DNA was pretreated with purified Escherichia coli UvrABC proteins, xeroderma pigmentosum cell extracts were able to carry out DNA repair synthesis. The ability of E. coli UvrABC proteins to complement xeroderma pigmentosum cell extracts indicates that the extracts are deficient in incision, but can carry out later steps of repair. Thus the in vitro system provides results that are in agreement with the incision defect found from studies of xeroderma pigmentosum cells. Images PMID:2408009

  18. The mechanism of DNA replication termination in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Dewar, James M; Budzowska, Magda; Walter, Johannes C

    2015-09-17

    Eukaryotic DNA replication terminates when replisomes from adjacent replication origins converge. Termination involves local completion of DNA synthesis, decatenation of daughter molecules and replisome disassembly. Termination has been difficult to study because termination events are generally asynchronous and sequence nonspecific. To overcome these challenges, we paused converging replisomes with a site-specific barrier in Xenopus egg extracts. Upon removal of the barrier, forks underwent synchronous and site-specific termination, allowing mechanistic dissection of this process. We show that DNA synthesis does not slow detectably as forks approach each other, and that leading strands pass each other unhindered before undergoing ligation to downstream lagging strands. Dissociation of the replicative CMG helicase (comprising CDC45, MCM2-7 and GINS) occurs only after the final ligation step, and is not required for completion of DNA synthesis, strongly suggesting that converging CMGs pass one another and dissociate from double-stranded DNA. This termination mechanism allows rapid completion of DNA synthesis while avoiding premature replisome disassembly. PMID:26322582

  19. DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter; Pedersen, Jonas N.; Austin, Robert H.

    2012-10-01

    DNA is the central storage molecule of genetic information in the cell, and reading that information is a central problem in biology. While sequencing technology has made enormous advances over the past decade, there is growing interest in platforms that can readout genetic information directly from long single DNA molecules, with the ultimate goal of single-cell, single-genome analysis. Such a capability would obviate the need for ensemble averaging over heterogeneous cellular populations and eliminate uncertainties introduced by cloning and molecular amplification steps (thus enabling direct assessment of the genome in its native state). In this review, we will discuss how the information contained in genomic-length single DNA molecules can be accessed via physical confinement in nanochannels. Due to self-avoidance interactions, DNA molecules will stretch out when confined in nanochannels, creating a linear unscrolling of the genome along the channel for analysis. We will first review the fundamental physics of DNA nanochannel confinement—including the effect of varying ionic strength—and then discuss recent applications of these systems to genomic mapping. Apart from the intense biological interest in extracting linear sequence information from elongated DNA molecules, from a physics view these systems are fascinating as they enable probing of single-molecule conformation in environments with dimensions that intersect key physical length-scales in the 1 nm to 100 µm range.

  20. Assessment of a fully automated high-throughput DNA extraction method from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue for KRAS, and BRAF somatic mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Ronald; Stevens, Lisa; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2013-02-01

    Preoperative biopsies or imbedded cytological cells will become more and more a primary source of tissue for molecular diagnostic analyses as a result of novel neo-adjuvant treatment regimens for several cancer types. Furthermore there is a growing need to examine metastatic cancer tissue. Hence, nucleic acids need to be reliably isolated and analyzed from small amounts of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The limited numbers of (tumor) cells in these samples make high quality and sensitive DNA isolation challenging. Also demands for faster turnaround times are growing. Therefore, we evaluated a fully automated DNA/RNA isolation system and compared this with a manual, classical routine molecular pathology method. We compared the quality of the isolates from both tissue cores and micro-dissection for detection of hotspot mutations in KRAS, BRAF applying hydrolysis probe assays. In addition we determined whether the automated method decreases the hands-on-time and turnaround times in routine molecular pathology workflow. In conclusion, the automated method delivers high quality DNA from both small FFPE tissue cores and micro-dissected tissue material. In comparison to classical methods, less than 50% of starting tissue was sufficient as input for micro-dissection. Turnaround times decreased significantly and 50% less hands-on time was needed. PMID:22750048

  1. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swansen, James E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  2. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  3. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  4. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    PubMed

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide. PMID:24617463

  5. DNA microarray (spot) .

    E-print Network

    1. DNA microarray DNA (spot) . DNA probe , probe (hybridization) . DNA microarray cDNA oligonucleotide oligonucleotide cDNA probe . oligonucleotide microarray , DNA , probe . oligonucleotide microarray probe

  6. Ancient DNA Chronology within Sediment Deposits: Are Paleobiological Reconstructions Possible and Is DNA Leaching a Factor?

    E-print Network

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    Ancient DNA Chronology within Sediment Deposits: Are Paleobiological Reconstructions Possible and Is DNA Leaching a Factor? James Haile,* Richard Holdaway, Karen Oliver,* Michael Bunce,à M. Thomas P reported the successful extraction of ancient DNA (aDNA) from both frozen and nonfrozen sediments (even

  7. ANIMAL DNA IN PCR REAGENTS PLAGUES ANCIENT DNA RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high-cycle PCR amplification targ...

  8. A direct qPCR method for residual DNA quantification in monoclonal antibody drugs produced in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Musaddeq

    2015-11-10

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the host cell of choice for manufacturing of monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and must be controlled and monitored in order to ensure drug purity and safety. A conventional method for quantification of host residual DNA in drug requires extraction of DNA from the mAb drug substance with subsequent quantification of the extracted DNA using real-time PCR (qPCR). Here we report a method where the DNA extraction step is eliminated prior to qPCR. In this method, which we have named 'direct resDNA qPCR', the mAb drug substance is digested with a protease called KAPA in a 96-well PCR plate, the protease in the digest is then denatured at high temperature, qPCR reagents are added to the resultant reaction wells in the plate along with standards and controls in other wells of the same plate, and the plate subjected to qPCR for analysis of residual host DNA in the samples. This direct resDNA qPCR method for CHO is sensitive to 5.0fg of DNA with high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with four mAbs drug, two IgG1 and two IgG4. Both the purified drug substance as well as a number of process intermediate samples, e.g., bioreactor harvest, Protein A column eluate and ion-exchange column eluates were tested. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol, reduces time of analysis and leads to increased assay sensitivity and development of automated high-throughput methods. PMID:25850374

  9. Whole genome sequencing of environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 from 10 nanograms of DNA using short reads.

    PubMed

    Pérez Chaparro, Paula Juliana; McCulloch, John Anthony; Cerdeira, Louise Teixeira; Al-Dilaimi, Arwa; Canto de Sá, Lena Lillian; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Tauch, Andreas; de Carvalho Azevedo, Vasco Ariston; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; da Silva, Artur Luiz da Costa

    2011-11-01

    Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA) of DNA using ?29 (phi29) DNA polymerase amplifies DNA several billion-fold, which has proved to be potentially very useful for evaluating genome information in a culture-independent manner. Whole genome sequencing using DNA from a single prokaryotic genome copy amplified by MDA has not yet been achieved due to the formation of chimeras and skewed amplification of genomic regions during the MDA step, which then precludes genome assembly. We have hereby addressed the issue by using 10 ng of genomic Vibrio cholerae DNA extracted within an agarose plug to ensure circularity as a starting point for MDA and then sequencing the amplified yield using the SOLiD platform. We successfully managed to assemble the entire genome of V. cholerae strain LMA3984-4 (environmental O1 strain isolated in urban Amazonia) using a hybrid de novo assembly strategy. Using our method, only 178 out of 16,713 (1%) of contigs were not able to be inserted into either chromosome scaffold, and out of these 178, only 3 appeared to be chimeras. The other contigs seem to be the result of template-independent non-specific amplification during MDA, yielding spurious reads. Extraction of genomic DNA within an agarose plug in order to ensure circularity of the extracted genome might be key to minimizing amplification bias by MDA for WGS. PMID:21871929

  10. Genotyping of plant and animal samples without prior DNA purification.

    PubMed

    Chum, Pak Y; Haimes, Josh D; André, Chas P; Kuusisto, Pia K; Kelley, Melissa L

    2012-01-01

    The Direct PCR approach facilitates PCR amplification directly from small amounts of unpurified samples, and is demonstrated here for several plant and animal tissues (Figure 1). Direct PCR is based on specially engineered Thermo Scientific Phusion and Phire DNA Polymerases, which include a double-stranded DNA binding domain that gives them unique properties such as high tolerance of inhibitors. PCR-based target DNA detection has numerous applications in plant research, including plant genotype analysis and verification of transgenes. PCR from plant tissues traditionally involves an initial DNA isolation step, which may require expensive or toxic reagents. The process is time consuming and increases the risk of cross contamination. Conversely, by using Thermo Scientific Phire Plant Direct PCR Kit the target DNA can be easily detected, without prior DNA extraction. In the model demonstrated here, an example of derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence analysis (dCAPS) is performed directly from Arabidopsis plant leaves. dCAPS genotyping assays can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by SNP allele-specific restriction endonuclease digestion. Some plant samples tend to be more challenging when using Direct PCR methods as they contain components that interfere with PCR, such as phenolic compounds. In these cases, an additional step to remove the compounds is traditionally required. Here, this problem is overcome by using a quick and easy dilution protocol followed by Direct PCR amplification (Figure 1). Fifteen year-old oak leaves are used as a model for challenging plants as the specimen contains high amounts of phenolic compounds including tannins. Gene transfer into mice is broadly used to study the roles of genes in development, physiology and human disease. The use of these animals requires screening for the presence of the transgene, usually with PCR. Traditionally, this involves a time consuming DNA isolation step, during which DNA for PCR analysis is purified from ear, tail or toe tissues. However, with the Thermo Scientific Phire Animal Tissue Direct PCR Kit transgenic mice can be genotyped without prior DNA purification. In this protocol transgenic mouse genotyping is achieved directly from mouse ear tissues, as demonstrated here for a challenging example where only one primer set is used for amplification of two fragments differing greatly in size. PMID:23051689

  11. Development of multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection of six swine DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Gang; Chen, Guang-Da; Huang, Yong; Ding, Li; Li, Zhao-Cai; Chang, Ching-Dong; Wang, Chi-Young; Tong, De-Wen; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2012-07-01

    Uniplex and multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR protocols were developed and evaluated subsequently for its effectiveness in detecting simultaneously single and mixed infections in swine. Specific primers for three DNA viruses and three RNA viruses, including classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine pseudorabies virus (PRV) and porcine parvovirus (PPV) were used for testing procedure. A single nucleic acid extraction protocol was adopted for the simultaneous extraction of both RNA and DNA viruses. The multiplex PCR consisted with two-step procedure which included reverse transcription of RNA virus and multiplex PCR of viral cDNA and DNA. The multiplex PCR assay was shown to be sensitive detecting at least 450pg of viral genomic DNA or RNA from a mixture of six viruses in a reaction. The assay was also highly specific in detecting one or more of the same viruses in various combinations in specimens. Thirty clinical samples and aborted fetuses collected from 4- to 12-week-old piglets were detected among 39 samples tested by both uniplex and multiplex PCR, showing highly identification. Because of the sensitivity and specificity, the multiplex PCR is a useful approach for clinical diagnosis of mixed infections of DNA and RNA viruses in swine. PMID:22575688

  12. DNA Computing Hamiltonian path

    E-print Network

    Hagiya, Masami

    2014 DNA DNA #12;DNA Computing · Feynman · Adleman · DNASIMD · ... · · · · · DNADNA #12;DNA · DNA · · · · DNA · · #12;2000 2005 2010 1995 Hamiltonian path DNA tweezers DNA tile DNA origami DNA box Sierpinski DNA tile self assembly DNA logic gates Whiplash PCR DNA automaton DNA spider MAYA

  13. Dimethyl adipimidate/Thin film Sample processing (DTS); A simple, low-cost, and versatile nucleic acid extraction assay for downstream analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong; Lim, Swee Yin; Lee, Tae Yoon; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Sample processing, especially that involving nucleic acid extraction, is a prerequisite step for the isolation of high quantities of relatively pure DNA for downstream analyses in many life science and biomedical engineering studies. However, existing methods still have major problems, including labor-intensive time-consuming methods and high costs, as well as requirements for a centrifuge and the complex fabrication of filters and membranes. Here, we first report a versatile Dimethyl adipimidate/Thin film based Sample processing (DTS) procedure without the limitations of existing methods. This procedure is useful for the extraction of DNA from a variety of sources, including 6 eukaryotic cells, 6 bacteria cells, and 2 body fluids in a single step. Specifically, the DTS procedure does not require a centrifuge and has improved time efficiency (30?min), affordability, and sensitivity in downstream analysis. We validated the DTS procedure for the extraction of DNA from human body fluids, as well as confirmed that the quality and quantity of the extracted DNA were sufficient to allow robust detection of genetic and epigenetic biomarkers in downstream analysis. PMID:26370251

  14. Dimethyl adipimidate/Thin film Sample processing (DTS); A simple, low-cost, and versatile nucleic acid extraction assay for downstream analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yong; Lim, Swee Yin; Lee, Tae Yoon; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Sample processing, especially that involving nucleic acid extraction, is a prerequisite step for the isolation of high quantities of relatively pure DNA for downstream analyses in many life science and biomedical engineering studies. However, existing methods still have major problems, including labor-intensive time-consuming methods and high costs, as well as requirements for a centrifuge and the complex fabrication of filters and membranes. Here, we first report a versatile Dimethyl adipimidate/Thin film based Sample processing (DTS) procedure without the limitations of existing methods. This procedure is useful for the extraction of DNA from a variety of sources, including 6 eukaryotic cells, 6 bacteria cells, and 2 body fluids in a single step. Specifically, the DTS procedure does not require a centrifuge and has improved time efficiency (30?min), affordability, and sensitivity in downstream analysis. We validated the DTS procedure for the extraction of DNA from human body fluids, as well as confirmed that the quality and quantity of the extracted DNA were sufficient to allow robust detection of genetic and epigenetic biomarkers in downstream analysis. PMID:26370251

  15. FEATURE ARTICLE Steps Leading to the Initiation of Replication: Where

    E-print Network

    Blow, J. Julian

    FEATURE ARTICLE Steps Leading to the Initiation of Replication: Where We Are and Where We May, Dundee, UK Chromosomal DNA replication is a fundamental part of the cell divi- sion cycle and is central, and must occur only when it is appropriate. The control of chromosomal DNA replication largely centers

  16. Recovery of bulky DNA adducts by the regular and a modified 32P-postlabelling assay; influence of the DNA-isolation method.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Katalin; Anna, Lívia; Rudnai, Péter; Schoket, Bernadette

    2011-03-18

    Bulky DNA adducts are widely used as biomarkers of human exposure to complex mixtures of environmental genotoxicants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The 32P-postlabelling method is highly sensitive for the detection of bulky DNA adducts, but its relatively low throughput poses limits to its use in large-scale molecular epidemiological studies. The objectives of this study were to compare the impact of DNA-sample preparation with a commercial DNA-isolation kit or with the classical phenol-extraction procedure on the measurement of bulky DNA adducts by 32P-postlabelling, and to increase the throughput of the 32P-postlabelling method--whilst maintaining radio-safety--by reducing the radioisotope requirement per sample. The test DNA samples were prepared from MCF-7 cells treated with benzo[a]pyrene and from human peripheral blood lymphocytes, buffy coat, and peripheral lung tissue. The modified 32P-postlabelling procedure involved an evaporation-to-dryness step after the enzymatic digestions of the DNA, and radio-labelling with a reduced amount of [?-32P]ATP substrate in a reduced reaction volume compared with the regular method. Higher levels of DNA adducts were measured in the MCF-7 cells and in the lung-tissue samples after isolation with the kit than after solvent extraction. A seven-fold higher level of adducts was detected in the buffy-coat DNA samples isolated with the kit than with the phenol extraction procedure (p<0.001). Reduction of the amount of [?-32P]ATP from 50 ?Ci to 25 ?Ci (>6000 Ci/mmol specific radioactivity) per sample in the modified 32P-postlabelling procedure was generally applicable without loss of adduct recovery for all test samples prepared with both DNA isolation methods. The difference between the bulky DNA-adduct levels resulting from the two DNA-isolation procedures requires further systematic investigation. The modified 32P-postlabelling procedure allows a 50% reduction of radioisotope requirement per sample, which facilitates increased throughput of the assay whilst maintaining radio-safety. PMID:21237286

  17. DNA barcoding a regional fauna: Irish solitary bees.

    PubMed

    Magnacca, Karl N; Brown, Mark J F

    2012-11-01

    As the globally dominant group of pollinators, bees provide a key ecosystem service for natural and agricultural landscapes. Their corresponding global decline thus poses an important threat to plant populations and the ecosystems they support. Bee conservation requires rapid and effective tools to identify and delineate species. Here, we apply DNA barcoding to Irish solitary bees as the first step towards a DNA barcode library for European solitary bees. Using the standard barcoding sequence, we were able to identify 51 of 55 species. Potential problems included a suite of species in the genus Andrena, which were recalcitrant to sequencing, mitochondrial heteroplasmy and parasitic flies, which led to the production of erroneous sequences from DNA extracts. DNA barcoding enabled the assignment of morphologically unidentifiable females of the parasitic genus Sphecodes to their nominal taxa. It also enabled correction of the Irish bee list for morphologically inaccurately identified specimens. However, the standard COI barcode was unable to differentiate the recently diverged taxa Sphecodes ferruginatus and S. hyalinatus. Overall, our results show that DNA barcoding provides an excellent identification tool for Irish solitary bees and should be rolled out to provide a database for solitary bees globally. PMID:22931682

  18. Organic Data Memory using the DNA Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Wong, Kwong K.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2003-01-01

    A data preservation problem looms large behind today's information superhighway. During the prehistoric age, humans preserved their knowledge by engraving bones and rocks. About two millenniums ago, people invented paper and started writing and publishing. In today?s electronic age, we use magnetic media and silicon chips to store our data. But bones and rocks erode, paper disintegrates, and electronic memory simply loses its contents into thin air. All these storage media require constant attention to maintain their information content. All of them can easily be destroyed intentionally or accidentally by people or natural disasters. With the large amount of information generated by our society every day, it is time to think of a new generation of data memory. In an effort to search for an inexpensive and lasting data memory, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have investigated the use of deoxyribonucleic acid--commonly known as DNA--as an information storage medium since 1998. The ambitious goal is to develop a data memory technology that has a life expectancy much longer than any of the existing ones. The creation of our initial DNA memory prototype consists of four major steps: encoding meaningful information as artificial DNA sequences, transforming the sequences to living organisms, allowing the organisms to grow and multiply, and eventually extracting the information back from the organisms. This article describes the objective of our investigation, followed by a brief description of our recent experiments and several potential applications being considered at PNNL.

  19. Comparing different post-mortem human samples as DNA sources for downstream genotyping and identification.

    PubMed

    Calacal, Gayvelline C; Apaga, Dame Loveliness T; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Jimenez, Joseph Andrew D; Lagat, Ludivino J; Villacorta, Renato Pio F; Lim, Maria Cecilia F; Fortun, Raquel D R; Datar, Francisco A; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A

    2015-11-01

    The capability of DNA laboratories to perform genotyping procedures from post-mortem remains, including those that had undergone putrefaction, continues to be a challenge in the Philippines, a country characterized by very humid and warm conditions all year round. These environmental conditions accelerate the decomposition of human remains that were recovered after a disaster and those that were left abandoned after a crime. When considerable tissue decomposition of human remains has taken place, there is no other option but to extract DNA from bone and/or teeth samples. Routinely, femur shafts are obtained from recovered bodies for human identification because the calcium matrix protects the DNA contained in the osteocytes. In the Philippines, there is difficulty in collecting femur samples after natural disasters or even human-made disasters, because these events are usually characterized by a large number of fatalities. Identification of casualties is further delayed by limitation in human and material resources. Hence, it is imperative to test other types of biological samples that are easier to collect, transport, process and store. We analyzed DNA that were obtained from body fluid, bone marrow, muscle tissue, clavicle, femur, metatarsal, patella, rib and vertebral samples from five recently deceased untreated male cadavers and seven male human remains that were embalmed, buried for ? 1 month and then exhumed. The bodies had undergone different environmental conditions and were in various stages of putrefaction. A DNA extraction method utilizing a detergent-washing step followed by an organic procedure was used. The utility of bone marrow and vitreous fluid including bone marrow and vitreous fluid that was transferred on FTA(®) cards and subjected to autosomal STR and Y-STR DNA typing were also evaluated. DNA yield was measured and the presence or absence of PCR inhibitors in DNA extracts was assessed using Plexor(®)HY. All samples were amplified using PowerPlex(®)21 and PowerPlexY(®)23 systems and analyzed using the AB3500 Genetic Analyzer and the GeneMapper(®) ID-X v.1.2 software. PCR inhibitors were consistently detected in bone marrow, muscle tissue, rib and vertebra samples. Amplifiable DNA was obtained in a majority of the samples analyzed. DNA recovery from 0.1g biological material was adequate for successful genotyping of most of the non-bone and bone samples. Complete DNA profiles were generated from bone marrow, femur, metatarsal and patella with 0.1 ng DNA template. Using 0.5 ng DNA template resulted in increased allele recovery and improved intra- and inter-locus peak balance. PMID:26275611

  20. Automatic DNA Diagnosis for 1D Gel Electrophoresis Images using Bio-image Processing Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA gel electrophoresis is a molecular biology technique for separating different sizes of DNA fragments. Applications of DNA gel electrophoresis include DNA fingerprinting (genetic diagnosis), size estimation of DNA, and DNA separation for Southern blotting. Accurate interpretation of DNA banding patterns from electrophoretic images can be laborious and error prone when a large number of bands are interrogated manually. Although many bio-imaging techniques have been proposed, none of them can fully automate the typing of DNA owing to the complexities of migration patterns typically obtained. Results We developed an image-processing tool that automatically calls genotypes from DNA gel electrophoresis images. The image processing workflow comprises three main steps: 1) lane segmentation, 2) extraction of DNA bands and 3) band genotyping classification. The tool was originally intended to facilitate large-scale genotyping analysis of sugarcane cultivars. We tested the proposed tool on 10 gel images (433 cultivars) obtained from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of PCR amplicons for detecting intron length polymorphisms (ILP) on one locus of the sugarcanes. These gel images demonstrated many challenges in automated lane/band segmentation in image processing including lane distortion, band deformity, high degree of noise in the background, and bands that are very close together (doublets). Using the proposed bio-imaging workflow, lanes and DNA bands contained within are properly segmented, even for adjacent bands with aberrant migration that cannot be separated by conventional techniques. The software, called GELect, automatically performs genotype calling on each lane by comparing with an all-banding reference, which was created by clustering the existing bands into the non-redundant set of reference bands. The automated genotype calling results were verified by independent manual typing by molecular biologists. Conclusions This work presents an automated genotyping tool from DNA gel electrophoresis images, called GELect, which was written in Java and made available through the imageJ framework. With a novel automated image processing workflow, the tool can accurately segment lanes from a gel matrix, intelligently extract distorted and even doublet bands that are difficult to identify by existing image processing tools. Consequently, genotyping from DNA gel electrophoresis can be performed automatically allowing users to efficiently conduct large scale DNA fingerprinting via DNA gel electrophoresis. The software is freely available from http://www.biotec.or.th/gi/tools/gelect. PMID:26681167

  1. Conformation of DNA in chromatin protein-DNA complexes studied by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Liquier, J; Gadenne, M C; Taillandier, E; Defer, N; Favatier, F; Kruh, J

    1979-01-01

    The following observations concerning the DNA secondary structures in various nucleohistone complexes were made by infrared spectroscopy: 1/ in chromatin, chromatin extracted by 0.6 M NaCl, nucleosomes, and histone-DNA reconstituted complexes, the DNA remains in a B type conformation at low relative hygrometry; 2/ in chromatin extracted by tRNA and in non histone protein-DNA reconstituted complexes, the DNA can adopt an A type conformation. Infrared linear dichroism data show that in NHP-DNA complexes the low relative hygrometry conformation of DNA may be modified and that the infrared parameter -1090 is close to that measured for RNA's or DNA-RNA hybrids. It is concluded that the histones block the DNA in a B form and that some of the NHP could be involved in the control of the secondary structure of DNA in chromatin. Images PMID:450704

  2. DNA banking and DNA databanking by academic and commercial laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, J.E. |; Reilly, P.R.

    1994-09-01

    The advent of DNA-based testing is giving rise to DNA banking (the long-term storage of cells, transformed cell lines, or extracted DNA for subsequent retrieval and analysis) and DNA data banking (the indefinite storage of information derived from DNA analysis). Large scale acquisition and storage of DNA and DNA data has important implications for the privacy rights of individuals. A survey of 148 academically based and commercial DNA diagnostic laboratories was conducted to determine: (1) the extent of their DNA banking activities; (2) their policies and experiences regarding access to DNA samples and data; (3) the quality assurance measures they employ; and (4) whether they have written policies and/or depositor`s agreements addressing specific issues. These issues include: (1) who may have access to DNA samples and data; (2) whether scientists may have access to anonymous samples or data for research use; (3) whether they have plans to contact depositors or retest samples if improved tests for a disorder become available; (4) disposition of samples at the end of the contract period if the laboratory ceases operations, if storage fees are unpaid, or after a death or divorce; (5) the consequence of unauthorized release, loss, or accidental destruction of samples; and (6) whether depositors may share in profits from the commercialization of tests or treatments developed in part from studies of stored DNA. The results suggest that many laboratories are banking DNA, that many have already amassed a large number of samples, and that a significant number plan to further develop DNA banking as a laboratory service over the next two years. Few laboratories have developed written policies governing DNA banking, and fewer still have drafted documents that define the rights and obligations of the parties. There may be a need for increased regulation of DNA banking and DNA data banking and for better defined policies with respect to protecting individual privacy.

  3. Reactive oxygen species are involved in nickel inhibition of dna repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Yew, F.H.; Chen, K.S.; Jan, K.Y.

    1997-06-01

    Nickel has been shown to inhibit DNA repair in a way that may play a role in its toxicity. Since nickel treatment increases cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), we have investigated the involvement of ROS in nickel inhibition of DNA repair. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis or catalase activity increased the enhancing effect of nickel on the cytotoxicity of ultraviolet (UV) light. Inhibition of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities also enhanced the retardation effect of nickel on the rejoining of DNA strand breaks accumulated by hydroxyurea plus cytosine-{beta}-D-arabinofuranoside in UV-irradiated cells. Since DNA polymerization and ligation are involved in the DNA-break rejoining, we have investigated the effect of ROS on these two steps in an extract of Chinese hamster ovary cells. Nickel inhibition of the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)dTTP into the DNase l-activated calf thymus DNA was stronger than the ligation of poly(dA){center_dot}oligo(dT), whereas H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was more potent in inhibiting DNA ligation than DNA polymerization. Nickel, in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, exhibited a synergistic inhibition on both DNA polymerization and ligation and caused protein fragmentation. In addition, glutathione could completely recover the inhibition by nickel or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone but only partially recover the inhibition by nickel plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Therefore, nickel may bind to DNA-repair enzymes and generate oxygen-free radicals to cause protein degradation in situ. This irreversible damage to the proteins involved in DNA repair, replication, recombination, and transcription could be important for the toxic effects of nickel. 60 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Forensic trace DNA: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    DNA analysis is frequently used to acquire information from biological material to aid enquiries associated with criminal offences, disaster victim identification and missing persons investigations. As the relevance and value of DNA profiling to forensic investigations has increased, so too has the desire to generate this information from smaller amounts of DNA. Trace DNA samples may be defined as any sample which falls below recommended thresholds at any stage of the analysis, from sample detection through to profile interpretation, and can not be defined by a precise picogram amount. Here we review aspects associated with the collection, DNA extraction, amplification, profiling and interpretation of trace DNA samples. Contamination and transfer issues are also briefly discussed within the context of trace DNA analysis. Whilst several methodological changes have facilitated profiling from trace samples in recent years it is also clear that many opportunities exist for further improvements. PMID:21122102

  5. Multiplex analysis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M. (Boston, MA); Kieffer-Higgins, Stephen (Dorchester, MA)

    1992-01-01

    This invention features vectors and a method for sequencing DNA. The method includes the steps of: a) ligating the DNA into a vector comprising a tag sequence, the tag sequence includes at least 15 bases, wherein the tag sequence will not hybridize to the DNA under stringent hybridization conditions and is unique in the vector, to form a hybrid vector, b) treating the hybrid vector in a plurality of vessels to produce fragments comprising the tag sequence, wherein the fragments differ in length and terminate at a fixed known base or bases, wherein the fixed known base or bases differs in each vessel, c) separating the fragments from each vessel according to their size, d) hybridizing the fragments with an oligonucleotide able to hybridize specifically with the tag sequence, and e) detecting the pattern of hybridization of the tag sequence, wherein the pattern reflects the nucleotide sequence of the DNA.

  6. Two-step stimulation of B lymphocytes to enter DNA synthesis: Synergy between anti-immunoglobulin antibody and cytochalasin on expression of c-myc and a G/sub 1/-specific gene

    SciTech Connect

    Buckler, A.J.; Rothstein, T.L.; Sonenshein, G.E.

    1988-03-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that stimulation of resting murine splenic B lymphocytes with goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibody (GaMIg) plus cytochalasin D (CD) led to DNA synthesis; GaMIg and CD added simultaneously, or GaMIg added before CD, induced this response. Cells similarly treated with GaMIg or CD alone did not enter S phase. Here they have measured the effects of this two-signal stimulation on the c-myc, 2F1, and ..gamma..-actin genes. The expression of these growth-related genes is known to change either during the G/sub 0/-to-G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle. For the 2F1 and c-myc genes, neither the GaMIg nor CD stimulus alone led to a prolonged increase in mRNA levels, whereas GaMIg plus CD allowed for continuous elevated expression of these genes. Furthermore, GaMIg pretreatment rendered expression of the c-myc and 2F1 genes susceptible to subsequent action by CD. In contrast, CD alone was sufficient to produce changes in ..gamma..-actin gene expression. Thus there are synergistic effects of competence- and progression like factors on the expression of the c-myc and 2F1 genes, and these effects correlate with the progression of B lymphocytes to DNA synthesis.

  7. Object extraction Object extraction

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    ("house", "lake") · usually solved jointly as detection: identify all objects of a certain class · object methods · for well-defined corners ­ least-squares matching pixel ­ human (stereoscopic) >0.3 pixel ­ least-squares matching pixel ­ human (stereoscopic) >0.3 pixel #12;Semi-automatic extraction

  8. DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.C.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a method for determining the nucleotide base sequence of a DNA molecule. It comprises: providing the DNA molecule annealed with a primer molecule able to hybridize to the DNA molecule; incubating the annealed molecules in a vessel containing four different deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a processive DNA polymerase, wherein the polymerase is able to remain bound for at least 500 bases to the DNA molecule in an environmental condition used in the extension reaction of a DNA sequencing reaction, the polymerase having less than 500 units of exonuclease activity per mg of the polymerase, and one of four DNA synthesis terminating agents which terminate DNA synthesis at a specific nucleotide base, wherein each the agent terminates DNA synthesis at a different nucleotide base, and separating the DNA products of the incubating reaction according to their size, whereby at least a part of the nucleotide base sequence of the DNA molecule can be determined.

  9. The N-terminus of RPA large subunit and its spatial position are important for the 5?->3? resection of DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, Margaret; Liao, Shuren; McCane, Jill; Yan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The first step of homology-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is the resection of the 5? strand to generate 3? ss-DNA. Of the two major nucleases responsible for resection, EXO1 has intrinsic 5?->3? directionality, but DNA2 does not. DNA2 acts with RecQ helicases such as the Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and the heterotrimeric eukaryotic ss-DNA binding protein RPA. We have found that the N-terminus of the RPA large subunit (RPA1N) interacts with both WRN and DNA2 and is essential for stimulating WRN's 3?->5? helicase activity and DNA2's 5?->3? ss-DNA exonuclease activity. A mutant RPA complex that lacks RPA1N is unable to support resection in Xenopus egg extracts and human cells. Furthermore, relocating RPA1N to the middle subunit but not to the small subunit causes severe defects in stimulating DNA2 and WRN and in supporting resection. Together, these findings suggest that RPA1N and its spatial position are critical for restricting the directionality of the WRN-DNA2 resection pathway. PMID:26227969

  10. AAFS 2006 Workshop (Butler and McCord) Advanced Topics in STR DNA Analysis

    E-print Network

    + mtDNA Sex- chromosomes mtDNA 16,569 bp Autosomes Mitochondrial DNA Nuclear DNA 3.2 billion bp Located extraction is not possible such as fingernail scrapings) · Due to high copy number, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNAAAFS 2006 Workshop (Butler and McCord) Advanced Topics in STR DNA Analysis February 20, 2006 http

  11. Radioprotective effect of Haberlea rhodopensis (Friv.) leaf extract on gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant levels in rabbit blood.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Svetlana; Popov, Borislav; Bonev, Georgi

    2013-01-01

    Different concentrations of H. rhodopensis total extract (HRE; 0.03, 0.06 and 0.12 g/kg body weight) were injected im, into rabbits 2 h before collecting the blood samples. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to 2.0 Gy 60Co gamma-radiation. The radiation-induced changes were estimated by using the chromosome aberration test (CA) and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN) in peripheral lymphocytes, and by determining the malondialdehyde levels (MDA) in blood plasma and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity in erythrocytes. Radiation significantly increased the chromosome aberration and micronuclei frequencies as well as MDA levels and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activity. On the other hand, the HRE pretreatment significantly decreased the CA, MN frequencies and MDA levels and increased the SOD and CAT activity in a concentration dependent manner. The most effective was the highest concentration of HRE (0.12 g/kg body weight). The results suggest that HRE as a natural product with a nantioxidant capacity could play a modulatory role against the cellular damage induced by gamma-irradiation. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective potential of HRE is discussed. PMID:23441477

  12. Growth inhibition and antioxidative status induced by selenium-enriched broccoli extract and selenocompounds in DNA mismatch repair-deficient human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Ou, Bor-Rung; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Yeh, Jan-Ying

    2013-08-15

    The effects of enzymatic-digested Se-enriched broccoli extracts (SeB) and selenocompounds on growth and antioxidative status in human colon cancer cells was investigated in this study. HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cells were treated with selenocompounds (sodium selenite, sodium selenate, Se-Met, MeSeCys) or SeB [high-Se (H-SeB) or low-Se (L-SeB)]. The cytotoxicity induced by selenocompounds in HCT116 cells was not associated with cellular H2O2 level, while the differential cytotoxicity observed by sodium selenite between HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cell lines was related to cellular H2O2 production with the change in antioxidative enzyme activity, and the restoration of chromosome 3. H-SeB was found to reduce the cellular H2O2 content in HCT116+Chr.3 cells. The results in this study indicate that regardless of Se content, the cytotoxicity in HCT116 cells of both SeB forms appeared to be H2O2-independent, whereas the cytotoxicity in HCT116+Chr.3 of either SeB form appeared to be H2O2-dependent with an increase in antioxidative ability for H-SeB. PMID:23561105

  13. Phosphorylation of PTEN at STT motif is associated with DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sandip; Mukherjee, Ananda; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-12-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor protein participates in multiple cellular activities including DNA repair. In this work we found a relationship between phosphorylation of carboxy (C)-terminal STT motif of PTEN and DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of C-terminal phospho-mutants of PTEN, in PTEN deficient human glioblastoma cells, U87MG, resulted in reduced viability and DNA repair after etoposide induced DNA damage compared to cells expressing wild type PTEN. Also, after etoposide treatment phosphorylation of PTEN increased at C-terminal serine 380 and threonine 382/383 residues in PTEN positive HEK293T cells and wild type PTEN transfected U87MG cells. One-step further, DNA damage induced phosphorylation of PTEN was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of total PTEN from cellular extract followed by immunobloting with phospho-specific PTEN antibodies. Additionally, phospho-PTEN translocated to nucleus after etoposide treatment as revealed by indirect immunolabeling. Further, phosphorylation dependent nuclear foci formation of PTEN was observed after ionizing radiation or etoposide treatment which colocalized with ?H2AX. Additionally, etoposide induced ?H2AX, Mre11 and Ku70 foci persisted for a longer period of times in U87MG cells after ectopic expression of PTEN C-terminal phospho-mutant constructs compared to wild type PTEN expressing cells. Thus, our findings strongly suggest that DNA damage induced phosphorylation of C-terminal STT motif of PTEN is necessary for DNA repair. PMID:25771877