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Sample records for dna extraction step

  1. Sampling, metadata and DNA extraction - important steps in metagenomic studies.

    PubMed

    Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Anna; Zieli?ska, Sylwia; ?o?, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic studies have become increasingly popular. They allow for the estimation of biodiversity in complex populations. This diversity presents an enormous but largely unexpected genetic and biological pool and can be exploited for the recovery of novel genes, entire metabolic pathways and their products. Generally metagenomic study is a genomic analysis of organisms by direct extraction and cloning of DNA from their natural environment. The most common problems of modern metagenomics are as follows: majority of the microorganisms present in the environment cannot be cultivated by standard techniques, DNA extraction methods are not very effective, isolated DNA is contaminated with various compounds, a choice for a screening method is not obvious. PMID:25680373

  2. DNA extraction from fossil eggshell.

    PubMed

    Oskam, Charlotte L; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Avian eggshell fragments recovered from both paleontological and archaeological deposits contain a cache of well-preserved ancient DNA. Here, we describe an extraction protocol that has been optimized to maximize the recovery of ancient DNA from fossil eggshell and minimize the co-purification of PCR inhibitors. In this method, fossil eggshell fragments are powdered, then digested and heated to release DNA from the calcite matrix. The digest then undergoes a concentration step before purification and washing using silica columns. The method has been used to recover aDNA from the eggshell of many avian species including moa, elephant birds, and emu, up to 19,000 years old. PMID:22237523

  3. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA. PMID:22987431

  4. Development of a rapid DNA extraction method and one-step nested PCR for the detection of Naegleria fowleri from the environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Arine Fadzlun; Lonnen, James; Andrew, Peter W; Kilvington, Simon

    2011-10-15

    Naegleria fowleri is a small free-living amoebo-flagellate found in natural and manmade thermal aquatic habitats worldwide. The organism is pathogenic to man causing fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Infection typically results from bathing in contaminated water and is usually fatal. It is, therefore, important to identify sites containing N. fowleri in the interests of preventive public health microbiology. Culture of environmental material is the conventional method for the isolation of N. fowleri but requires several days incubation and subsequent biochemical or molecular tests to confirm identification. Here, a nested one-step PCR test, in conjunction with a direct DNA extraction from water or sediment material, was developed for the rapid and reliable detection of N. fowleri from the environment. Here, the assay detected N, fowleri in 18/109 river water samples associated with a nuclear power plant in South West France and 0/10 from a similar site in the UK. Although culture of samples yielded numerous thermophilic free-living amoebae, none were N. fowleri or other thermophilic Naegleria spp. The availability of a rapid, reliable and sensitive one-step nested PCR method for the direct detection of N. fowleri from the environment may aid ecological studies and enable intervention to prevent PAM cases. PMID:21855956

  5. DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)

    Cancer.gov

    As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

  6. DNA extraction from herbarium specimens.

    PubMed

    Drábková, Lenka Záveská

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of molecular techniques, the historical collections have become widely used. Studying plant DNA using modern molecular techniques such as DNA sequencing plays an important role in understanding evolutionary relationships, identification through DNA barcoding, conservation status, and many other aspects of plant biology. Enormous herbarium collections are an important source of material especially for specimens from areas difficult to access or from taxa that are now extinct. The ability to utilize these specimens greatly enhances the research. However, the process of extracting DNA from herbarium specimens is often fraught with difficulty related to such variables as plant chemistry, drying method of the specimen, and chemical treatment of the specimen. Although many methods have been developed for extraction of DNA from herbarium specimens, the most frequently used are modified CTAB and DNeasy Plant Mini Kit protocols. Nine selected protocols in this chapter have been successfully used for high-quality DNA extraction from different kinds of plant herbarium tissues. These methods differ primarily with respect to their requirements for input material (from algae to vascular plants), type of the plant tissue (leaves with incrustations, sclerenchyma strands, mucilaginous tissues, needles, seeds), and further possible applications (PCR-based methods or microsatellites, AFLP). PMID:24415470

  7. Automated DNA extraction from pollen in honey.

    PubMed

    Guertler, Patrick; Eicheldinger, Adelina; Muschler, Paul; Goerlich, Ottmar; Busch, Ulrich

    2014-04-15

    In recent years, honey has become subject of DNA analysis due to potential risks evoked by microorganisms, allergens or genetically modified organisms. However, so far, only a few DNA extraction procedures are available, mostly time-consuming and laborious. Therefore, we developed an automated DNA extraction method from pollen in honey based on a CTAB buffer-based DNA extraction using the Maxwell 16 instrument and the Maxwell 16 FFS Nucleic Acid Extraction System, Custom-Kit. We altered several components and extraction parameters and compared the optimised method with a manual CTAB buffer-based DNA isolation method. The automated DNA extraction was faster and resulted in higher DNA yield and sufficient DNA purity. Real-time PCR results obtained after automated DNA extraction are comparable to results after manual DNA extraction. No PCR inhibition was observed. The applicability of this method was further successfully confirmed by analysis of different routine honey samples. PMID:24295710

  8. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for recovery of soil protist DNA.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana S; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars H; Winding, Anne

    2015-08-01

    The use of molecular methods to investigate protist communities in soil is in rapid development this decade. Molecular analysis of soil protist communities is usually dependant on direct genomic DNA extraction from soil and inefficient or differential DNA extraction of protist DNA can lead to bias in downstream community analysis. Three commonly used soil DNA extraction methods have been tested on soil samples from three European Long-Term Observatories (LTOs) with different land-use and three protist cultures belonging to different phylogenetic groups in different growth stages. The methods tested were: ISOm-11063 (a version of the ISO-11063 method modified to include a FastPrep ®-24 mechanical lysis step), GnS-GII (developed by the GenoSol platform to extract soil DNA in large-scale soil surveys) and a commercial DNA extraction kit - Power Lyzer™ PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio). DNA yield and quality were evaluated along with DNA suitability for amplification of 18S rDNA fragments by PCR. On soil samples, ISOm-11063 yields significantly higher DNA for two of the three soil samples, however, MoBio extraction favors DNA quality. This method was also more effective to recover copies of 18S rDNA numbers from all soil types. In addition and despite the lower yields, higher DNA quality was observed with DNA extracted from protist cultures with the MoBio method. Likewise, a bead-beating step shows to be a good solution for DNA extraction of soil protists, since the recovery of DNA from protist cultures and from the different soil samples with the ISOm method proved to be efficient in recovering PCR-amplifiable DNA. This study showed that soil DNA extraction methods provide biased results towards the cyst stages of protist organism. PMID:25966645

  9. DNA Extraction Techniques for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, R. P.; Arblaster, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction provides a hands-on introduction to DNA and enables students to gain real life experience and practical knowledge of DNA. Students gain a sense of ownership and are more enthusiastic when they use their own DNA. A cost effective, simple protocol for DNA extraction and visualization was devised. Buccal mucosal epithelia provide a…

  10. DNA Extraction Techniques for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, R. P.; Arblaster, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction provides a hands-on introduction to DNA and enables students to gain real life experience and practical knowledge of DNA. Students gain a sense of ownership and are more enthusiastic when they use their own DNA. A cost effective, simple protocol for DNA extraction and visualization was devised. Buccal mucosal epithelia provide a…

  11. DNA INTERSTRAND CROSSLINK REPAIR IN MAMMALIAN CELLS: STEP BY STEP

    PubMed Central

    Muniandy, Parameswary; Liu, Jia; Majumdar, Alokes; Liu, Su-ting; Seidman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs) are formed by natural products of metabolism and by chemotherapeutic reagents. Work in E. coli identified a two cycle repair scheme involving incisions on one strand on either side of the ICL (unhooking) producing a gapped intermediate with the incised oligonucleotide attached to the intact strand. The gap is filled by recombinational repair or lesion bypass synthesis. The remaining monoadduct is then removed by Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). Despite considerable effort, our understanding of each step in mammalian cells is still quite limited. In part this reflects the variety of crosslinking compounds, each with distinct structural features, used by different investigators. Also, multiple repair pathways are involved, variably operative during the cell cycle. G1 phase repair requires functions from NER, although the mechanism of recognition has not been determined. Repair can be initiated by encounters with the transcriptional apparatus, or a replication fork. In the case of the latter, the reconstruction of a replication fork, stalled or broken by collision with an ICL, adds to the complexity of the repair process. The enzymology of unhooking, the identity of the lesion bypass polymerases required to fill the first repair gap, and the functions involved in the second repair cycle are all subjects of active inquiry. Here we will review current understanding of each step in ICL repair in mammalian cells. PMID:20039786

  12. Simplified buccal DNA extraction with FTA Elute Cards.

    PubMed

    Wolfgramm, Eldamária de Vargas; de Carvalho, Fernanda Magri; Aguiar, Vitor Rezende da Costa; Sartori, Mariana Penha De Nadai; Hirschfeld-Campolongo, Gabriela C R; Tsutsumida, Weslley M; Louro, Iúri Drumond

    2009-03-01

    DNA isolation is the initial step of most genetic studies, and ideally it should use a reliable and non-invasive method. Buccal samples are adequate for such purposes, being painless, easy to collect and a very reliable DNA source. FTA Elute Cards are relatively new on the market and are designed for rapid blood DNA extraction, in which DNA is solubilized in water, instead of attached to the paper matrix. In this study, we sought to test if FTA Elute Cards are suitable for buccal DNA extraction. Furthermore, several time and temperature conditions were analyzed in order to determine the best concentration/time ratio. Twenty-five different conditions were tested in quadruplicate and extracted DNA was quantified by real-time PCR. PMID:19215882

  13. A two-step electrodialysis method for DNA purification from polluted metallic environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mejía, José Luis; Martínez-Anaya, Claudia; Folch-Mallol, Jorge Luis; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2008-08-01

    Extracting DNA from samples of polluted environments using standard methods often results in low yields of poor-quality material unsuited to subsequent manipulation and analysis by molecular biological techniques. Here, we report a novel two-step electrodialysis-based method for the extraction of DNA from environmental samples. This technique permits the rapid and efficient isolation of high-quality DNA based on its acidic nature, and without the requirement for phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol cleanup and ethanol precipitation steps. Subsequent PCR, endonuclease restriction, and cloning reactions were successfully performed utilizing DNA obtained by electrodialysis, whereas some or all of these techniques failed using DNA extracted with two alternative methods. We also show that his technique is applicable to purify DNA from a range of polluted and nonpolluted samples. PMID:18601228

  14. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanasundaram, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Yeo, W.-H.; Oh, K.; Lee, K.-H.; Kim, M.-H.; Ryew, S.-M.; Ahn, S.-G.; Gao, D.; Cangelosi, G. A.; Chung, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottle neck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab- and saliva samples. DNA is attracted on to a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle 4 microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for one month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol. PMID:23307121

  15. Experiments in DNA extraction and PCR amplification from bighorn sheep feces: the importance of DNA extraction method.

    PubMed

    Wehausen, J D; Ramey, R R; Epps, C W

    2004-01-01

    Reliability of genotyping is an issue for studies using non-invasive sources of DNA. We emphasize the importance of refining DNA extraction methods to maximize reliability and efficiency of genotyping for such DNA sources. We present a simple and general method to quantitatively compare genotyping reliability of various DNA extraction techniques and sample materials used. For bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) fecal samples we compare different fecal pellet materials, different amounts of fecal pellet material, and the effects of eliminating two DNA extraction steps for four microsatellite loci and four samples heterozygous at each locus. We evaluated 192 PCR outcomes for each treatment using indices of PCR success and peak height (signal strength) developed from analysis output of sequencer chromatograms. Outermost pellet material produced PCR results almost equivalent to DNA extracted from blood. Where any inner pellet material was used for DNA extraction, PCR results were poorer and inconsistent among samples. PCR success was not sensitive to amount of pellet material used until it was decreased to 15 mg from 60 mg. Our PCR index provides considerably more information relative to potential genotyping errors than simply comparing genotypes derived from paired fecal and blood or tissue samples. Our DNA extraction method probably has wide applicability to herbivores that produce pelleted feces where samples dry rapidly after deposition. PMID:15475396

  16. PCR DNA typing of stamps: evaluation of the DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Fridez, F; Coquoz, R

    1996-04-01

    Today, the PCR analysis of DNA from the saliva deposited on a stamp of an anonymous letter can lead to an identification. However, this analysis still involves problems, and DNA extraction can be particularly difficult. A comparative study of two DNA extraction methods with two categories of postage stamps was carried out and a purification process was tested. This study shows that the extraction with phenol/chloroform gives much better results than Chelex extraction. A purification process such as the use of Centricon 100 microconcentrators is recommended when an inhibition of PCR is present. This operation, however, results in a large loss of material. PMID:8621117

  17. Monitoring of four DNA extraction methods upstream of high-throughput sequencing of Anisakidae nematodes.

    PubMed

    Seesao, Y; Audebert, C; Verrez-Bagnis, V; Merlin, S; Jérôme, M; Viscogliosi, E; Dei-Cas, E; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Gay, M

    2014-07-01

    Different methods were evaluated to extract DNA from pooled nematodes belonging to Anisakis, Contracaecum, Pseudoterranova and Hysterothylacium genera isolated from edible fish. Pooled DNA extraction is the first and compulsory step to allow the identification of a large number of samples through high-throughput DNA sequencing with drastic time and cost reductions. PMID:24845469

  18. A comparison of the efficiency of five different commercial DNA extraction kits for extraction of DNA from faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Shantelle; du Toit, Elloise; Kaba, Mamadou; Moodley, Clinton; Zar, Heather J; Nicol, Mark P

    2013-08-01

    Differences in the composition of the gut microbiota have been associated with a range of diseases using culture-independent methods. Reliable extraction of nucleic acid is a key step in identifying the composition of the faecal microbiota. Five widely used commercial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction kits (QIAsymphony® Virus/Bacteria Midi Kit (kit QS), ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep™ (kit Z), QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (kit QA), Ultraclean® Fecal DNA Isolation Kit (kit U) and PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (kit P)) were evaluated, using human faecal samples. Yield, purity and integrity of total genomic DNA were compared spectrophotometrically and using gel electrophoresis. Three bacteria, commonly found in human faeces were quantified using real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and total bacterial diversity was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) as well as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The measurements of DNA yield and purity exhibited variations between the five kits tested in this study. Automated kit QS exhibited the best quality and highest quantity of DNA. All kits were shown to be reproducible with CV values?0.46 for DNA extraction. qPCR results showed that all kits were uniformly efficient for extracting DNA from the selected target bacteria. DGGE and T-RFLP produced the highest diversity scores for DNA extracted using kit Z (H'=2.30 and 1.27) and kit QS (H'=2.16 and 0.94), which also extracted the highest DNA yields compared to the other kits assessed. PMID:23684993

  19. DNA nanoarchitectures: steps towards biological applications.

    PubMed

    Tintoré, Maria; Eritja, Ramon; Fábrega, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    DNA's remarkable molecular recognition properties, flexibility, and structural features make it one of the most promising scaffolds to design a variety of nanostructures. During recent decades, two major methods have been developed for the construction of DNA nanomaterials in a programmable way; both generate nanostructures in one, two, and three dimensions. The tile-based assembly process is a useful tool to construct large and simple structures; the DNA origami method is suitable for the production of smaller, more sophisticated and well-defined structures. Proteins, nanoparticles and other functional elements have been specifically positioned into designed patterns on these structures. They can also act as templates to study chemical reactions, help in the structural determination of proteins, and be used as platform for genomic and drug delivery applications. In this review we examine recent progresses towards the potential use of DNA nanostructures in molecular and cellular biology. PMID:24953971

  20. A single protocol for extraction of gDNA from bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Vingataramin, Laurie; Frost, Eric H

    2015-03-01

    Guanidine thiocyanate breakage of microorganisms has been the standard initial step in genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction of microbial DNA for two decades, despite the requirement for pretreatments to extract DNA from microorganisms other than Gram-negative bacteria. We report a quick and low-cost gDNA extraction protocol called EtNa that is efficient for bacteria and yeast over a broad range of concentrations. EtNa is based on a hot alkaline ethanol lysis. The solution can be immediately centrifuged to yield a crude gDNA extract suitable for PCR, or it can be directly applied to a silica column for purification. PMID:25757544

  1. Microcoding: the second step in DNA barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Summerbell, R.C; Lévesque, C.A; Seifert, K.A; Bovers, M; Fell, J.W; Diaz, M.R; Boekhout, T; de Hoog, G.S; Stalpers, J; Crous, P.W

    2005-01-01

    After the process of DNA barcoding has become well advanced in a group of organisms, as it has in the economically important fungi, the question then arises as to whether shorter and literally more barcode-like DNA segments should be utilized to facilitate rapid identification and, where applicable, detection. Through appropriate software analysis of typical full-length barcodes (generally over 500 base pairs long), uniquely distinctive oligonucleotide ‘microcodes’ of less than 25?bp can be found that allow rapid identification of circa 100–200 species on various array-like platforms. Microarrays can in principle fulfill the function of microcode-based species identification but, because of their high cost and low level of reusability, they tend to be less cost-effective. Two alternative platforms in current use in fungal identification are reusable nylon-based macroarrays and the Luminex system of specific, colour-coded DNA detection beads analysed by means of a flow cytometer. When the most efficient means of rapid barcode-based species identification is sought, a choice can be made either for one of these methodologies or for basic high-throughput sequencing, depending on the strategic outlook of the investigator and on current costs. Arrays and functionally similar platforms may have a particular advantage when a biologically complex material such as soil or a human respiratory secretion sample is analysed to give a census of relevant species present. PMID:16214747

  2. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Mikić, Aleksandar M.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350–1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl-1 of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide. PMID:26635833

  3. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Mikić, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350-1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl(-1) of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide. PMID:26635833

  4. Comparison of seven methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from fecal and cecal samples of mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Janina; Patron, Kevin; Legrand-Frossi, Christine; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Merlin, Christophe; Alauzet, Corentine; Lozniewski, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of bacterial DNA from fecal samples of mice is commonly performed in experimental studies. Although DNA extraction is a critical step in various molecular approaches, the efficiency of methods that may be used for DNA extraction from mice fecal samples has never been evaluated. We compared the efficiencies of six widely used commercial kits (MasterPure™ Gram Positive DNA Purification Kit, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit; NucliSENS® easyMAG®, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep™, FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Feces and FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil) and a non-commercial method for DNA isolation from mice feces and cecal contents. DNA quantity and quality were assessed by fluorometry, spectrophotometry, gel electrophoresis and qPCR. Cell lysis efficiencies were evaluated by qPCR targeting three relevant bacteria in spiked specimens. For both feces and intestinal contents, the most efficient extraction method was the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil. PMID:25093756

  5. Multi-step vortex filtering for phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Alberto; Dávila, Abundio; García-Márquez, Jorge

    2014-04-01

    A quantized version of a continuous spiral phase filter with unitary topological charge, here denominated multi-step spiral phase filter (MSSPF), is proposed to extract phase from rotated spiral interferograms. Spiral interferograms are usually obtained from phase objects by registering the interference of its vortex filtered complex amplitude with a reference complex amplitude. The structure found in this kind of interferograms, depend on the number of steps used in the MSSPF that usually are assumed with an infinite number of steps for the continuous spiral phase filter. Reducing the number of steps of the MSSPF affects the residual phase error obtained after the phase extraction method. This error is therefore analysed here using a numerical simulation of a Mach-Zender interferometer with a MSSPF and a reduced number of steps. It is shown that, for our proposed method of rotated spiral interferograms, a residual error persists as the number of steps is increased approaching the residual error reported for the phase extraction method of single-shot spiral interferograms. Furthermore, it is shown that this novel technique can be applied without further modifications for phase contrast measurement. Experimental results show similar performance of this phase extraction technique, when compared to the results obtained with a commercial interferometer and with the numerical simulations. PMID:24718222

  6. An Efficient Method for Genomic DNA Extraction from Different Molluscs Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jorge C.; Chaves, Raquel; Bastos, Estela; Leitão, Alexandra; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    The selection of a DNA extraction method is a critical step when subsequent analysis depends on the DNA quality and quantity. Unlike mammals, for which several capable DNA extraction methods have been developed, for molluscs the availability of optimized genomic DNA extraction protocols is clearly insufficient. Several aspects such as animal physiology, the type (e.g., adductor muscle or gills) or quantity of tissue, can explain the lack of efficiency (quality and yield) in molluscs genomic DNA extraction procedure. In an attempt to overcome these aspects, this work describes an efficient method for molluscs genomic DNA extraction that was tested in several species from different orders: Veneridae, Ostreidae, Anomiidae, Cardiidae (Bivalvia) and Muricidae (Gastropoda), with different weight sample tissues. The isolated DNA was of high molecular weight with high yield and purity, even with reduced quantities of tissue. Moreover, the genomic DNA isolated, demonstrated to be suitable for several downstream molecular techniques, such as PCR sequencing among others. PMID:22174651

  7. Microscope Titration and Extraction of DNA from Liver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Lois T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive, one-period activity to extract DNA to make the study of DNA less abstract. A microscope titration is used to determine when cells are ready for DNA extraction. (PR)

  8. A Simple Method to Extract DNA from Hair Shafts Using Enzymatic Laundry Powder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinchuan; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Sicong; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2013-01-01

    A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts was developed by using enzymatic laundry powder at the first step of the process. The whole extraction can be finished in less than 2 hours. The simple extraction reagent proposed here contains only two cheap components: ordinary enzymatic laundry powder and PCR buffer. After extraction, an ultra sensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, PicoGreen, was used for quantifying trace amount of double-stranded DNA in the solution extracted. For further validation of DNA extraction, four primers were employed to amplify DNA microsatellite loci. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and PCR results suggested that this method can extract DNA from hair shafts with good efficiency and repeatability. The study will greatly facilitate the use of hair shafts in future for DNA analyses on genome-wide scale. PMID:23922747

  9. A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts using enzymatic laundry powder.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jinchuan; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Sicong; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2013-01-01

    A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts was developed by using enzymatic laundry powder at the first step of the process. The whole extraction can be finished in less than 2 hours. The simple extraction reagent proposed here contains only two cheap components: ordinary enzymatic laundry powder and PCR buffer. After extraction, an ultra sensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, PicoGreen, was used for quantifying trace amount of double-stranded DNA in the solution extracted. For further validation of DNA extraction, four primers were employed to amplify DNA microsatellite loci. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and PCR results suggested that this method can extract DNA from hair shafts with good efficiency and repeatability. The study will greatly facilitate the use of hair shafts in future for DNA analyses on genome-wide scale. PMID:23922747

  10. Plant and metagenomic DNA extraction of mucilaginous seeds.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Simone N M; Salazar, Marcela M; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Efraim, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The pulp surrounding the seeds of some fruits is rich in mucilage, carbohydrates, etc. Some seeds are rich in proteins and polyphenols. Fruit seeds, like cacao (Theobroma cacao) and cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum), are subjected to fermentation to develop flavor. During fermentation, ethanol is produced [2-6]. All of these compounds are considered as interfering substances that hinder the DNA extraction [4-8]. Protocols commonly used in the DNA extraction in samples of plant origin were used, but without success. Thus, a protocol for DNA samples under different conditions that can be used for similar samples was developed and applied with success. The protocol initially described for RNA samples by Zeng et al. [9] and with changes proposed by Provost et al. [5] was adapted for extracting DNA samples from those described. However, several modifications have been proposed:•Samples were initially washed with petroleum ether for fat phase removal.•RNAse was added to the extraction buffer, while spermidin was removed.•Additional steps of extraction with 5 M NaCl, saturated NaCl and CTAB (10%) were included and precipitation was carried out with isopropanol, followed by washing with ethanol. PMID:26150956

  11. Plant and metagenomic DNA extraction of mucilaginous seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Simone N.M.; Salazar, Marcela M.; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.; Efraim, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The pulp surrounding the seeds of some fruits is rich in mucilage, carbohydrates, etc. Some seeds are rich in proteins and polyphenols. Fruit seeds, like cacao (Theobroma cacao) and cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum), are subjected to fermentation to develop flavor. During fermentation, ethanol is produced [2–6]. All of these compounds are considered as interfering substances that hinder the DNA extraction [4–8]. Protocols commonly used in the DNA extraction in samples of plant origin were used, but without success. Thus, a protocol for DNA samples under different conditions that can be used for similar samples was developed and applied with success. The protocol initially described for RNA samples by Zeng et al. [9] and with changes proposed by Provost et al. [5] was adapted for extracting DNA samples from those described. However, several modifications have been proposed:•Samples were initially washed with petroleum ether for fat phase removal.•RNAse was added to the extraction buffer, while spermidin was removed.•Additional steps of extraction with 5 M NaCl, saturated NaCl and CTAB (10%) were included and precipitation was carried out with isopropanol, followed by washing with ethanol. PMID:26150956

  12. Single-step Charge Transport through DNA over Long Distances

    PubMed Central

    Genereux, Joseph C.; Wuerth, Stephanie M.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum yields for charge transport across adenine tracts of increasing length have been measured by monitoring hole transport in synthetic oligonucleotides between photoexcited 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analogue of adenine, and N2-cyclopropyl guanine. Using fluorescence quenching, a measure of hole injection, and hole trapping by the cyclopropyl guanine derivative, we separate the individual contributions of single- and multi-step channels to DNA charge transport, and find that with 7 or 8 intervening adenines the charge transport is a coherent, single-step process. Moreover, a transition occurs from multi-step to single-step charge transport with increasing donor/acceptor separation, opposite to that generally observed in molecular wires. These results establish that coherent transport through DNA occurs preferentially across 10 base pairs, favored by delocalization over a full turn of the helix. PMID:21348520

  13. Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua

    DOEpatents

    Warzinski, Robert P. (Venetia, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

  14. The Critical Role of DNA Extraction for Detection of Mycobacteria in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Radomski, Nicolas; Kreitmann, Louis; McIntosh, Fiona; Behr, Marcel A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nucleic acid-based methods offer promise for both targeted and exploratory investigations of microbes in tissue samples. As the starting material for such studies is a mixture of host and microbial DNA, we have critically evaluated the DNA extraction step to determine the quantitative and qualitative parameters that permit faithful molecular detection of mycobacteria in infected tissue. Specifically, we assessed: 1) tissue disruption procedures; 2) DNA extraction protocols; and 3) inhibition of bacterial PCR by host DNA. Principal Findings Regarding DNA extraction, we found that 1) grinding was not necessary if bead-beating is done, 2) the reference mycobacterial DNA extraction method recovered more pure DNA than commercial spin column kits, 3) lysozyme digestion of 1 hour was sufficient, and 4) repeated steps of phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol offered minimal gain in DNA quality. By artificially mixing mycobacterial DNA with DNA extracted from uninfected mice, we found that bacterial real-time quantitative PCR was only reliable when the quantity of host DNA was < 3 µg in a final volume of 25 µl and the quality was high (260/280 nm ratio = 1.89±0.08). Findings from spiked DNA studies were confirmed using DNA extracted from mice infected with different intracellular pathogens (M. tuberculosis, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis). Conclusions Our findings point to the most appropriate methods for extracting DNA from tissue samples for the purpose of detecting and quantifying mycobacteria. These data also inform on the limits of detection for two mycobacterial species and indicate that increasing the sample mass to improve analytic sensitivity comes at the cost of inhibition of PCR by host DNA. PMID:24194951

  15. Optimized microbial DNA extraction from diarrheic stools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of enteropathogens in stool specimens increasingly relies on the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences. We observed that such detection was hampered in diarrheic stool specimens and we set-up an improved protocol combining lyophilization of stools prior to a semi-automated DNA extraction. Findings A total of 41 human diarrheic stool specimens comprising of 35 specimens negative for enteropathogens and six specimens positive for Salmonella enterica in culture, were prospectively studied. One 1-mL aliquot of each specimen was lyophilised and total DNA was extracted from lyophilised and non-lyophilised aliquots by combining automatic and phenol-chloroform DNA extraction. DNA was incorporated into real-time PCRs targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Bacteria and the archaea Methanobrevibacter smithii and the chorismate synthase gene of S. enterica. Whereas negative controls consisting in DNA-free water remained negative, M. smithii was detected in 26/41 (63.4%) non-lyophilised (Ct value 28.78?±?9.1) versus 39/41 (95.1%) lyophilised aliquots (Ct value 22.04?±?5.5); bacterial 16S rRNA was detected in 33/41 (80.5%) non-lyophilised (Ct value 28.11?±?5.9) versus 40/41 (97.6%) lyophilised aliquots (Ct value 24.94?±?6.6); and S. enterica was detected in 6/6 (100%) non-lyophilized and lyophilized aliquots (Ct value 26.98?±?4.55 and 26.16?±?4.97, respectively). S. enterica was not detected in the 35 remaining diarrheal-stool specimens. The proportion of positive specimens was significantly higher after lyophilization for the detection of M. smithii (p?=?0.00043) and Bacteria (p?=?0.015). Conclusion Lyophilization of diarrheic stool specimens significantly increases the PCR-based detection of microorganisms. The semi-automated protocol described here could be routinely used for the molecular diagnosis of infectious diarrhea. PMID:23273000

  16. COMPARISON OF DNA EXTRACTION METHODS ON DAIRY CONSTRUCTED WETLAND WASTEWATER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct DNA extraction from environmental samples is a useful and culture-independent method for the examination of microbial diversity. To date, there is little information on the effectiveness of commercial DNA extraction kits on wastewater. We compared two commercial DNA extraction kits for amount...

  17. Single-strand DNA translation initiation step analyzed by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, Luminita; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse; IUB, School of Engineering and Science, D-28727 Bremen ; Marty-Detraves, Claire; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse ; Winterhalter, Mathias; Fournier, Didier; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse ; Paquereau, Laurent; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse

    2009-07-31

    Is single-strand DNA translatable? Since the 60s, the question still remains whether or not DNA could be directly translated into protein. Some discrepancies in the results were reported about functional translation of single-strand DNA but all results converged on a similar behavior of RNA and ssDNA in the initiation step. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry method was used to determine thermodynamic constants of interaction between single-strand DNA and S30 extract of Escherichia coli. Our results showed that the binding was not affected by the nature of the template tested and the dissociation constants were in the same range when ssDNA (K{sub d} = 3.62 {+-} 2.1 x 10{sup -8} M) or the RNA corresponding sequence (K{sub d} = 2.7 {+-} 0.82 x 10{sup -8} M) bearing SD/ATG sequences were used. The binding specificity was confirmed by antibiotic interferences which block the initiation complex formation. These results suggest that the limiting step in translation of ssDNA is the elongation process.

  18. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile. PMID:26409535

  19. A rapid and efficient assay for extracting DNA from fungi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Peak, K.K.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A method for the rapid extraction of fungal DNA from small quantities of tissue in a batch-processing format was investigated. Methods and Results: Tissue (< 3.0 mg) was scraped from freshly-grown fungal isolates. The tissue was suspended in buffer AP1 and subjected to seven rounds of freeze/thaw using a crushed dry ice/ethanol bath and a boiling water bath. After a 30 min boiling step, the tissue was quickly ground against the wall of the microfuge tube using a sterile pipette tip. The Qiagen DNeasy Plant Tissue Kit protocol was then used to purify the DNA for PCR/ sequencing applications. Conclusions: The method allowed batch DNA extraction from multiple fungal isolates using a simple yet rapid and reliable assay. Significance and Impact of the Study: Use of this assay will allow researchers to obtain DNA from fungi quickly for use in molecular assays that previously required specialized instrumentation, was time-consuming or was not conducive to batch processing.

  20. High Efficiency DNA Extraction by Graphite Oxide/Cellulose/Magnetite Composites Under Na+ Free System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-02-01

    DNA extraction is the key step at various research areas like biotechnology, diagnostic development, paternity determination, and forensic science . Solid support extraction is the most common method for DNA purification. In this method, Na+ ions have often been applied as binding buffers in order to obtain high extraction efficiency and high quality of DNA; however, the presence of Na+ ions might be interfering with the downstream DNA applications. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/magnetite composite/cellulose as an innovative material for Na+-free DNA extraction. The total wt.% of GO was fixed at 4.15% in the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite . The concentration of magnetite within the composites were controlled at 0-3.98 wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of magnetite. The highest yield was achieved at 3.98 wt.% magnetite, where the extraction efficiency was reported to be 338.5 ng/µl. The absorbance ratios between 260 nm and 280 nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution volume was demonstrated as 1.81, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The mechanism of adsorption of DNA was provided by (1) π-π interaction between the aromatic ring in GO and nucleobases of DNA molecule, and (2) surface charge interaction between the positive charge magnetite and anions such as phosphates within the DNA molecules. The results proved that the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite provides a Na+-free method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA.

  1. A simple, reliable, and fast protocol for thraustochytrid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Mo, C; Rinkevich, B

    2001-03-01

    DNA extraction of thraustochytrids, common marine unicellular organisms, is usually accomplished by either the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or proteinase K protocols. A novel lysis buffer protocol for thraustochytrid total DNA extraction is described. The average isolated total DNA is 20 to 40 kb, and DNA samples are suitable for a variety of uses including 18S-ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction, restriction enzyme digestions, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses. The new protocol is also faster than the other protocols. PMID:14961371

  2. Human DNA extraction from empty puparia.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Daniela; Arena, Elisa; Boschi, Ilaria; Vanin, Stefano

    2013-06-10

    Empty puparia, as well as larvae at different developmental stages, are potentially useful in the identification of a victim where a corpse has been removed from the scene of a forensic investigation. To evaluate the relevance and the reliability of this substrate to be used as forensic evidence, the authors report for the first time the extraction and typing of human DNA from empty puparia using STR analysis, in two actual cases where the bodies of the victims were still present thereby enabling validation of the typing. PMID:23821788

  3. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  4. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  5. Bacterial and fungal DNA extraction from positive blood culture bottles: a manual and an automated protocol.

    PubMed

    Mäki, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When adapting a gene amplification-based method in a routine sepsis diagnostics using a blood culture sample as a specimen type, a prerequisite for a successful and sensitive downstream analysis is the efficient DNA extraction step. In recent years, a number of in-house and commercial DNA extraction solutions have become available. Careful evaluation in respect to cell wall disruption of various microbes and subsequent recovery of microbial DNA without putative gene amplification inhibitors should be conducted prior selecting the most feasible DNA extraction solution for the downstream analysis used. Since gene amplification technologies have been developed to be highly sensitive for a broad range of microbial species, it is also important to confirm that the used sample preparation reagents and materials are bioburden-free to avoid any risks for false-positive result reporting or interference of the diagnostic process. Here, one manual and one automated DNA extraction system feasible for blood culture samples are described. PMID:25319779

  6. Forensic animal DNA analysis using economical two-step direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Kitpipit, Thitika; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Linacre, Adrian; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol

    2014-03-01

    Wildlife forensic DNA analysis by amplification of a mitochondrial locus followed by DNA sequencing is routine, yet suffers from being costly and time-consuming. To address these disadvantages we report on a low-cost two-step direct PCR assay to efficiently analyze 12 forensically relevant mammalian sample types without DNA extraction. A cytochrome oxidase I degenerate-universal primer pair was designed and validated for the developed assay. The 12 sample types, which included bone, horn, feces, and urine, were amplified successfully by the assay using a pre-direct PCR dilution protocol. The average amplification success rate was as high as 92.5 % (n = 350), with an average PCR product concentration of 220.71 ± 180.84 ng/?L. Differences in amplification success rate and PCR product quantity between sample types were observed; however, most samples provided high quality sequences, permitting a 100 % nucleotide similarity to their respective species via BLAST database queries. The combination of PBS and Phire(®) Hot Start II DNA polymerase gave comparable amplification success rate and amplicon quantity with the proprietary commercial kits (P > 0.05, n = 350) but at considerably lower cost. The stability of the assay was tested by successfully amplifying samples that had been stored for up to 12 months. Our data indicate that this low-cost two-step direct amplification assay has the potential to be a valuable tool for the forensic DNA community. PMID:24435950

  7. Direct DNA extraction method of an obligate parasitic fungus from infected plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, C L; Peng, W Y; Yang, J; Lan, M Q; Zhang, B; Li, J B; Zhu, Y Y; Li, C Y

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew and rust fungi are obligate parasites that cannot live without host organisms. They are difficult to culture in synthetic medium in the laboratory. Genomic DNA extraction is one of the basic molecular techniques used to study the genetic structure of populations. In this study, 2 different DNA extraction methods, Chelex-100 and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), were used to extract DNA from euonymus powdery mildew and Puccinia striiformis f. sp Tritici. Polymerase chain reaction was carried out with a race-specific-marker rDNA-internal transcribed spacer sequence. Both DNA extraction methods were compared and analyzed. The results showed that both Chelex-100 and CTAB were effective for extracting genomic DNA from infected plant tissue. However, less DNA was required for the Chelex-100 method than for the CTAB method, and the Chelex-100 method involved fewer steps, was simpler and safer, and did not require organic solvents compared to the CTAB method. DNA quality was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction, and the results showed that genomic DNA extracted using the Chelex-100 method was better than that using CTAB method, and was sufficient for studying the genetic structure of population. PMID:26782502

  8. Thermodynamics of the DNA Damage Repair Steps of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van’t Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  9. Direct DNA Extraction from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Frozen Stocks as a Reculture-Independent Approach to Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zallet, J.; Lillebaek, T.; Andersen, A. B.; Niemann, S.; Rasmussen, E. M.; Kohl, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Culturing before DNA extraction represents a major time-consuming step in whole-genome sequencing of slow-growing bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report a workflow to extract DNA from frozen isolates without reculturing. Prepared libraries and sequence data were comparable with results from recultured aliquots of the same stocks. PMID:26019203

  10. Viral DNA Packaging: One Step at a Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Carlos; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    During its life-cycle the bacteriophage ?29 actively packages its dsDNA genome into a proteinacious capsid, compressing its genome to near crystalline densities against large electrostatic, elastic, and entropic forces. This remarkable process is accomplished by a nano-scale, molecular DNA pump - a complex assembly of three protein and nucleic acid rings which utilizes the free energy released in ATP hydrolysis to perform the mechanical work necessary to overcome these large energetic barriers. We have developed a single molecule optical tweezers assay which has allowed us to probe the detailed mechanism of this packaging motor. By following the rate of packaging of a single bacteriophage as the capsid is filled with genome and as a function of optically applied load, we find that the compression of the genome results in the build-up of an internal force, on the order of ˜ 55 pN, due to the compressed genome. The ability to work against such large forces makes the packaging motor one of the strongest known molecular motors. By titrating the concentration of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate at different opposing load, we are able to determine features of the mechanochemistry of this motor - the coupling between the mechanical and chemical cycles. We find that force is generated not upon binding of ATP, but rather upon release of hydrolysis products. Finally, by improving the resolution of the optical tweezers assay, we are able to observe the discrete increments of DNA encapsidated each cycle of the packaging motor. We find that DNA is packaged in 10-bp increments preceded by the binding of multiple ATPs. The application of large external forces slows the packaging rate of the motor, revealing that the 10-bp steps are actually composed of four 2.5-bp steps which occur in rapid succession. These data show that the individual subunits of the pentameric ring-ATPase at the core of the packaging motor are highly coordinated, with the binding of ATP and the translocation of DNA temporally segregated into two distinct phases of the mechanochemical cycle of the entire ring. Because this ring-ATPase is a member of the ASCE superfamily of ATPases, these results may have implications for a broad and diverse family of cellular motors.

  11. A fully automatable enzymatic method for DNA extraction from plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    Manen, Jean-François; Sinitsyna, Olga; Aeschbach, Lorène; Markov, Alexander V; Sinitsyn, Arkady

    2005-01-01

    Background DNA extraction from plant tissues, unlike DNA isolation from mammalian tissues, remains difficult due to the presence of a rigid cell wall around the plant cells. Currently used methods inevitably require a laborious mechanical grinding step, necessary to disrupt the cell wall for the release of DNA. Results Using a cocktail of different carbohydrases, a method was developed that enables a complete digestion of the plant cell walls and subsequent DNA release. Optimized conditions for the digestion reaction minimize DNA shearing and digestion, and maximize DNA release from the plant cell. The method gave good results in 125 of the 156 tested species. Conclusion In combination with conventional DNA isolation techniques, the new enzymatic method allows to obtain high-yield, high-molecular weight DNA, which can be used for many applications, including genome characterization by AFLP, RAPD and SSR. Automation of the protocol (from leaf disks to DNA) is possible with existing workstations. PMID:16269076

  12. Selective Extraction of Bacterial DNA from the Surfaces of Macroalgae▿

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Catherine; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Thomas, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for the selective extraction of DNA from surface-associated bacterial communities from the two model marine benthic algae Ulva australis and Delisea pulchra. The extracted DNA had no detectable contamination with host DNA, was recovered in high yield and quality, and was representative of the bacterial community on the algal surfaces. The DNA is suitable for a variety of subsequent applications, including the construction of large-insert clone libraries and metagenomic sequencing. PMID:18978081

  13. Biases during DNA extraction of activated sludge samples revealed by high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2013-05-01

    Standardization of DNA extraction is a fundamental issue of fidelity and comparability in investigations of environmental microbial communities. Commercial kits for soil or feces are often adopted for studies of activated sludge because of a lack of specific kits, but they have never been evaluated regarding their effectiveness and potential biases based on high throughput sequencing. In this study, seven common DNA extraction kits were evaluated, based on not only yield/purity but also sequencing results, using two activated sludge samples (two sub-samples each, i.e. ethanol-fixed and fresh, as-is). The results indicate that the bead-beating step is necessary for DNA extraction from activated sludge. The two kits without the bead-beating step yielded very low amounts of DNA, and the least abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and significantly underestimated the Gram-positive Actinobacteria, Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, and Alphaproteobacteria and overestimated Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and the rare phyla whose cell walls might have been readily broken. Among the other five kits, FastDNA(@) SPIN Kit for Soil extracted the most and the purest DNA. Although the number of total OTUs obtained using this kit was not the highest, the abundant OTUs and abundance of Actinobacteria demonstrated its efficiency. The three MoBio kits and one ZR kit produced fair results, but had a relatively low DNA yield and/or less Actinobacteria-related sequences. Moreover, the 50 % ethanol fixation increased the DNA yield, but did not change the sequenced microbial community in a significant way. Based on the present study, the FastDNA SPIN kit for Soil is recommended for DNA extraction of activated sludge samples. More importantly, the selection of the DNA extraction kit must be done carefully if the samples contain dominant lysing-resistant groups, such as Actinobacteria and Nitrospirae. PMID:22760785

  14. Extraction of DNA from plant and fungus tissues in situ

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When samples are collected in the field and transported to the lab, degradation of the nucleic acids contained in the samples is frequently observed. Immediate extraction and precipitation of the nucleic acids reduces degradation to a minimum, thus preserving accurate sequence information. An extraction method to obtain high quality DNA in field studies is described. Findings DNA extracted immediately after sampling was compared to DNA extracted after allowing the sampled tissues to air dry at 21°C for 48 or 72 hours. While DNA extracted from fresh tissues exhibited little degradation, DNA extracted from all tissues exposed to 21°C air for 48 or 72 hours exhibited varying degrees of degradation. Yield was higher for extractions from fresh tissues in most cases. Four microcentrifuges were compared for DNA yield: one standard electric laboratory microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?16,000×g), two battery-operated microcentrifuges (max rcf?=?5,000 and 3,000 ×g), and one manually-operated microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?120×g). Yields for all centrifuges were similar. DNA extracted under simulated field conditions was similar in yield and quality to DNA extracted in the laboratory using the same equipment. Conclusions This CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) DNA extraction method employs battery-operated and manually-operated equipment to isolate high quality DNA in the field. The method was tested on plant and fungus tissues, and may be adapted for other types of organisms. The method produced high quality DNA in laboratory tests and under simulated field conditions. The field extraction method should prove useful for working in remote sites, where ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen are unavailable; where degradation is likely to occur due to the long distances between the sample site and the laboratory; and in instances where other DNA preservation and transportation methods have been unsuccessful. It may be possible to adapt this method for genomic, metagenomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic projects using samples collected in situ. PMID:22672795

  15. DNA extraction from bovine faeces: current status and future trends.

    PubMed

    Rapp, D

    2010-05-01

    There is an increasing interest in the detection and enumeration of micro-organisms pathogenic for human and present in bovine faeces. This interest is because pollution of the environment by animal faeces may affect the safety of food and of drinking or recreational water. Detection and quantification of microbial pathogens carried out using DNA extracted from the faecal matrix are affected by the quality and the quantity of the DNA extracts, which are critical factors that limit the accuracy and sensitivity of molecular studies. This review compares published methods on DNA extraction from bovine faeces, focusing on the extent to which the success of DNA amplification is affected by issues related to the faeces. Following a general discussion on the DNA extraction methods used for faeces, we focus particularly on issues related to the faecal environment itself. The objective is to identify information that can be used to improve the sensitivity of those PCR methods used after direct DNA extraction. PMID:19912432

  16. DNA walks one step at a time in electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Juan; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2011-03-01

    Testing the classical view that in DNA gel electrophoresis, long polymer chains navigate through their gel environment via reptation, we reach a different conclusion: this driven motion proceeds by stick-slip. Our single-molecule experiments visualize fluorescent-labeled lambda-DNA, whose intramolecular conformations are resolved with 30 ms resolution using home-written software. Combining hundreds to thousands of trajectories under amplitudes of electric field ranging from zero to large, we quantify the full statistical distribution of motion with unprecedented statistics. Pauses are seen between steps of driven motion, probably reflecting that the chain is trapped inside the gel matrix. The pausing time is exponentially distributed and decreases with increasing electric field strength, suggesting that the jerky behavior is an activated process, facilitated by electric field. We propose a stretch-assisted mechanism: that the energy barrier to move through the gel environment is first overcome by a leading segment, the ensuing intramolecular stress from stretching causing lagging segments to recoil and follow along.

  17. Microbial food safety: Potential of DNA extraction methods for use in diagnostic metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Josefsen, Mathilde H; Andersen, Sandra C; Christensen, Julia; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of ten widely applied DNA extraction protocols was evaluated for suitability for diagnostic metagenomics. The protocols were selected based on a thorough literature study. Chicken fecal samples inoculated with about 1×10(3) and 1×10(6) CFU/g Campylobacter jejuni were used as a model. The evaluation was performed based on total DNA yield measured by fluorometry, and quality and quantity of C. jejuni DNA measured by real-time PCR. There was up to a 25-fold variance between the lowest (NucliSens miniMAG, BIOMÉRIEUX) and highest (PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MO BIO Laboratories) yielding protocols. The PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit performed significantly better than all other protocols tested. Selected protocols were modified, i.e., extended heating and homogenization, resulting in increased yields of total DNA. For QIAamp Fast DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) a 7-fold increase in total DNA was observed following the protocol for human DNA analysis and including a 5 min heating step at 70°C. For the PowerLyzer PowerSoil and the PowerFecal DNA Isolation Kit (MO BIO Laboratories) the total DNA fold increase was 1.6 to 1.8 when including an extra 10 min of bead-vortexing. There was no correlation between the yield of total DNA and the amount of PCR-amplifiable DNA from C. jejuni. The protocols resulting in the highest yield of total DNA did not show correspondingly increased levels of C. jejuni DNA as determined by PCR. In conclusion, substantial variation in the efficiency of the protocols to extract DNA was observed. The highest DNA yield was obtained with the PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, whereas the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Feces (MP Biomedicals) resulted in the highest amount of PCR-amplifiable C. jejuni DNA. PMID:25937085

  18. Collection and Extraction of Saliva DNA for Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Michael R.; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Li, Ning; Ray, William C.; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Short Abstract DNA extraction from saliva can provide a readily available source of high molecular weight DNA, with little to no degradation/fragmentation. This protocol provides optimized parameters for saliva collection/storage and DNA extraction to be of sufficient quality and quantity for downstream DNA assays with high quality requirements. Long Abstract: The preferred source of DNA in human genetics research is blood, or cell lines derived from blood, as these sources yield large quantities of high quality DNA. However, DNA extraction from saliva can yield high quality DNA with little to no degradation/fragmentation that is suitable for a variety of DNA assays without the expense of a phlebotomist and can even be acquired through the mail. However, at present, no saliva DNA collection/extraction protocols for next generation sequencing have been presented in the literature. This protocol optimizes parameters of saliva collection/storage and DNA extraction to be of sufficient quality and quantity for DNA assays with the highest standards, including microarray genotyping and next generation sequencing. PMID:25225892

  19. One-stop Genomic DNA Extraction by Salicylic Acid Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Kadam, Ulhas; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared via a modified, one-step synthesis and used for a one-stop extraction of genomic DNA from mammalian cells. The synthesized magnetic particles were used for magnetic separation of cells from the media by non-specific binding of the particles, as well as extraction of genomic DNA from the lysate. The quantity and quality were confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction. The entire process of extraction and isolation can be completed within 30 min. Compared to traditional methods based on centrifugation and filtration, the established method is fast, simple, reliable, and environmentally-friendly. PMID:23911528

  20. A DNA extraction protocol for improved DNA yield from individual mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Catelyn C.; Yamasaki, Youki; Collier, Travis C.; Lee, Yoosook

    2015-01-01

    Typical DNA extraction protocols from commercially available kits provide an adequate amount of DNA from a single individual mosquito sufficient for PCR-based assays. However, next-generation sequencing applications and high-throughput SNP genotyping assays exposed the limitation of DNA quantity one usually gets from a single individual mosquito. Whole genome amplification could alleviate the issue but it also creates bias in genome representation. While trying to find alternative DNA extraction protocols for improved DNA yield, we found that a combination of the tissue lysis protocol from Life Technologies and the DNA extraction protocol from Qiagen yielded a higher DNA amount than the protocol using the Qiagen or Life Technologies kit only. We have not rigorously tested all the possible combinations of extraction protocols; we also only tested this on mosquito samples. Therefore, our finding should be noted as a suggestion for improving people’s own DNA extraction protocols and not as an advertisement of a commercially available product.

  1. A simple Chelex protocol for DNA extraction from Anopheles spp.

    PubMed

    Musapa, Mulenga; Kumwenda, Taida; Mkulama, Mtawa; Chishimba, Sandra; Norris, Douglas E; Thuma, Philip E; Mharakurwa, Sungano

    2013-01-01

    Endemic countries are increasingly adopting molecular tools for efficient typing, identification and surveillance against malaria parasites and vector mosquitoes, as an integral part of their control programs. For sustainable establishment of these accurate approaches in operations research to strengthen malaria control and elimination efforts, simple and affordable methods, with parsimonious reagent and equipment requirements are essential. Here we present a simple Chelex-based technique for extracting malaria parasite and vector DNA from field collected mosquito specimens. We morphologically identified 72 Anopheles gambiae sl. from 156 mosquitoes captured by pyrethrum spray catches in sleeping rooms of households within a 2,000 km(2) vicinity of the Malaria Institute at Macha. After dissection to separate the head and thorax from the abdomen for all 72 Anopheles gambiae sl. mosquitoes, the two sections were individually placed in 1.5 ml microcentrifuge tubes and submerged in 20 ?l of deionized water. Using a sterile pipette tip, each mosquito section was separately homogenized to a uniform suspension in the deionized water. Of the ensuing homogenate from each mosquito section, 10 ?l was retained while the other 10 ?l was transferred to a separate autoclaved 1.5 ml tube. The separate aliquots were subjected to DNA extraction by either the simplified Chelex or the standard salting out extraction protocol(9,10). The salting out protocol is so-called and widely used because it employs high salt concentrations in lieu of hazardous organic solvents (such as phenol and chloroform) for the protein precipitation step during DNA extraction(9). Extracts were used as templates for PCR amplification using primers targeting arthropod mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) subunit 4 gene (ND4) to check DNA quality, a PCR for identification of Anopheles gambiae sibling species(10) and a nested PCR for typing of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Comparison using DNA quality (ND4) PCR showed 93% sensitivity and 82% specificity for the Chelex approach relative to the established salting out protocol. Corresponding values of sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 78%, respectively, using sibling species identification PCR and 92% and 80%, respectively for P. falciparum detection PCR. There were no significant differences in proportion of samples giving amplicon signal with the Chelex or the regular salting out protocol across all three PCR applications. The Chelex approach required three simple reagents and 37 min to complete, while the salting out protocol entailed 10 different reagents and 2 hr and 47 min' processing time, including an overnight step. Our results show that the Chelex method is comparable to the existing salting out extraction and can be substituted as a simple and sustainable approach in resource-limited settings where a constant reagent supply chain is often difficult to maintain. PMID:23328684

  2. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  3. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  4. DNA, RNA, and Protein Extraction: The Past and The Present

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siun Chee; Yiap, Beow Chin

    2009-01-01

    Extraction of DNA, RNA, and protein is the basic method used in molecular biology. These biomolecules can be isolated from any biological material for subsequent downstream processes, analytical, or preparative purposes. In the past, the process of extraction and purification of nucleic acids used to be complicated, time-consuming, labor-intensive, and limited in terms of overall throughput. Currently, there are many specialized methods that can be used to extract pure biomolecules, such as solution-based and column-based protocols. Manual method has certainly come a long way over time with various commercial offerings which included complete kits containing most of the components needed to isolate nucleic acid, but most of them require repeated centrifugation steps, followed by removal of supernatants depending on the type of specimen and additional mechanical treatment. Automated systems designed for medium-to-large laboratories have grown in demand over recent years. It is an alternative to labor-intensive manual methods. The technology should allow a high throughput of samples; the yield, purity, reproducibility, and scalability of the biomolecules as well as the speed, accuracy, and reliability of the assay should be maximal, while minimizing the risk of cross-contamination. PMID:20011662

  5. A SIMPLE VERSATILE HIGH THROUGHPUT DNA EXTRACTION METHOD SUITABLE FOR PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR has become one of the most popular techniques in functional genomics. Projects in both forward and reverse genetics routinely require PCR amplification of thousands of samples. Processing samples to extract DNA of sufficient purity for PCR is often a limiting step. We have developed a simple ...

  6. Comparison of microvolume DNA quantification methods for use with volume-sensitive environmental DNA extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate DNA concentration estimates from environmental samples using minimal sample volumes are essential for most downstream applications. To compare the efficacy of microvolume quantification methods, DNA was extracted from soil, compost, and pure culture samples, and quantified using two absorba...

  7. Comparison of one-step acidic extraction versus two-step basic and acidic extraction procedures for semivolatile analysis of wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M.S.; Kelada, N.; Sawyer, B.; Zenz, D.R.; Tata, P.; Lue-Hing, C.

    1999-05-01

    The feasibility of using the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (US EPA`s) contract laboratory protocol method for analyzing semivolatile compounds in industrial wastewater pretreatment program samples was investigated because of time and labor savings involved. Various laboratory evaluation studies were conducted to determine whether this alternate one-step acidic extraction method would give comparable results to US EPA Method 625. These studies consisted of comparisons of method detection limits, spike recoveries in reagent water and actual field samples, and the precision between Method 625 and the alternate one-step acidic extraction. More than 60 base-neutral and acid extractables (55 target compounds and 6 surrogates) were used in the comparative study of method detection limits and spike recoveries of the two procedures. Using reagent water, one-step acidic extraction gave consistently better recoveries than two-step basic and acidic extraction. Similar results were obtained with representative field sample matrices. Based on results of this investigation, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, Illinois, submitted an application to US EPA to have one-step acidic extraction accepted as a site-specific alternate test procedure for analyzing industrial wastewater samples. After thorough review, US EPA Region V approved the use of this alternate one-step acidic extraction method. It is recommended that other municipal analytical laboratories apply to US EPA for similar approval.

  8. Maxiprep genomic DNA extractions for molecular epidemiology studies and biorepositories.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sepulveda, Christian Alberto; Carrillo-Acuña, Enrique; Guerra-Palomares, Sandra Elizabeth; Barriga-Moreno, Montserrat

    2010-04-01

    Molecular epidemiology and genomic characterisation studies require the screening of large numbers of individuals to achieve statistical significance. Although many of the novel DNA extraction methods offer convenient, high-throughput capabilities, their use for the processing of larger sample volumes becomes very expensive. We are currently compiling the Mexican Genomic DNA Collection in order to address specific health priorities through molecular techniques. Our approach employs a low-cost laundry detergent based DNA extraction technique that maximizes DNA yield and quality. We have optimised four different modalities (maxiprep, midiprep, miniprep and microprep) for two different sources (leukocyte concentrates and whole blood). Our optimised protocol produces 4.5 mg of DNA from 15 ml of blood-bank discarded leukocyte concentrates with spectrophotometric quality, genomic integrity and PCR suitability that rivals that of phenol-chloroform extracted samples. We present evidence of many PCR applications that we have carried out on samples extracted with this technique including Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor genotyping, Short Tandem Repeat profiling as well as nucleic acid screening for hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency type-1 viruses. This paper highlights many of the advantages that this DNA extraction technique provides over existing methodologies, whether it is used to establish large genomic DNA collections (as was our main intention) or as a routine DNA extraction method for PCR applications. PMID:19609718

  9. Optimization of DNA Extraction for RAPD and ISSR Analysis of Arbutus unedo L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Olga; Pereira, José Alberto; Baptista, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Genetic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure DNA. For the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) this represents a great challenge since leaves can accumulate large amounts of polysaccharides, polyphenols and secondary metabolites, which co-purify with DNA. For this specie, standard protocols do not produce efficient yields of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Here, we present for the first time an improved leaf-tissue protocol, based on the standard cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide protocol, which yields large amounts of high-quality amplifiable DNA. Key steps in the optimized protocol are the addition of antioxidant compounds—namely polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT) and 2-mercaptoethanol, in the extraction buffer; the increasing of CTAB (3%, w/v) and sodium chloride (2M) concentration; and an extraction with organic solvents (phenol and chloroform) with the incubation of samples on ice. Increasing the temperature for cell lyses to 70 °C also improved both DNA quality and yield. The yield of DNA extracted was 200.0 ± 78.0 ?g/?L and the purity, evaluated by the ratio A260/A280, was 1.80 ± 0.021, indicative of minimal levels of contaminating metabolites. The quality of the DNA isolated was confirmed by random amplification polymorphism DNA and by inter-simple sequence repeat amplification, proving that the DNA can be amplified via PCR. PMID:21747730

  10. Extracting DNA of nematodes communities from Argentine Pampas agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Mondino, Eduardo A; Covacevich, Fernanda; Studdert, Guillermo A; Pimentel, João P; Berbara, Ricardo L L

    2015-01-01

    We examined four strategies (Tris/EDTA, sodium dodecyl sulfate, Chelex 100 resin and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide -CTAB-) for extracting nucleic acid (DNA) from communities of nematodes. Nematodes were isolated from an agricultural area under different management of long-term crop rotation experiment from Argentina during three seasons. After DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction-amplifications were performed and considered as indicators of successful DNA extraction. The CTAB combined with proteinase K and phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol was the unique successful method because positive amplifications were obtained by using both eukaryotic and nematode specific primers. This work could contribute to biodiversity studies of nematodes on agroecosystems. PMID:26131632

  11. Hot-Alkaline DNA Extraction Method for Deep-Subseafloor Archaeal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Takeshi; Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Inagaki, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    A prerequisite for DNA-based microbial community analysis is even and effective cell disruption for DNA extraction. With a commonly used DNA extraction kit, roughly two-thirds of subseafloor sediment microbial cells remain intact on average (i.e., the cells are not disrupted), indicating that microbial community analyses may be biased at the DNA extraction step, prior to subsequent molecular analyses. To address this issue, we standardized a new DNA extraction method using alkaline treatment and heating. Upon treatment with 1 M NaOH at 98°C for 20 min, over 98% of microbial cells in subseafloor sediment samples collected at different depths were disrupted. However, DNA integrity tests showed that such strong alkaline and heat treatment also cleaved DNA molecules into short fragments that could not be amplified by PCR. Subsequently, we optimized the alkaline and temperature conditions to minimize DNA fragmentation and retain high cell disruption efficiency. The best conditions produced a cell disruption rate of 50 to 80% in subseafloor sediment samples from various depths and retained sufficient DNA integrity for amplification of the complete 16S rRNA gene (i.e., ?1,500 bp). The optimized method also yielded higher DNA concentrations in all samples tested compared with extractions using a conventional kit-based approach. Comparative molecular analysis using real-time PCR and pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed that the new method produced an increase in archaeal DNA and its diversity, suggesting that it provides better analytical coverage of subseafloor microbial communities than conventional methods. PMID:24441163

  12. Optimization of DNA Extraction from Deep-sea Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Edwards, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Studies on the microorganisms that inhabit deep-sea basalt can provide information on this dark ecosystem, which will contribution to our understanding of mass transformation and energy flow in the deep ocean. However, molecular methods for use with metal- and clay-rich rock materials such as basalt have not been suitably developed at present, yet are critically required in order to be able to fully evaluate the basalt biotope. For example, inefficient DNA extraction might lead to loss of information about important components of this community, and misinterpretation about the total community diversity and function. In order to investigate the effects of sample pretreated method, particle size, different DNA extraction methods and cell density on extracted DNA yields, two basalt samples were collected from the East Pacific Rise 9° N during research cruise AT11- 20 in Nov 2004. Basalt samples were crushed to different particle size, washed with ddH2O and 100% ethanol respectively, and autoclaved. Marinobacter aquaeolei cultures with different cell densities were inoculated into differently treated basalt samples. Pure culture and basalt samples without inoculation were used as positive and negative control to evaluate the extracting efficiency. FastDNA spin for soil kit, GeneClean for ancient DNA kit and UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit are used for DNA extraction. Results showed that DNA yields increased with culture density. FastDNA spin for soil kit gave the highest DNA yields, which is almost 10 times more than that of UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit. Ethanol washing and ddH2O washing did not make big difference to DNA yields. Mineral composition and surface areas might also affect DNA yields.

  13. An evaluation of the performance of five extraction methods: Chelex® 100, QIAamp® DNA Blood Mini Kit, QIAamp® DNA Investigator Kit, QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kit and DNA IQ™.

    PubMed

    Ip, Stephen C Y; Lin, Sze-Wah; Lai, Kam-Ming

    2015-05-01

    DNA left at a crime scene was often limited in amount and far from pristine. To maximize the chance of recovering as much information as possible from such compromised samples, an appropriate extraction method using the available technologies needs to be devised. In this study, we used human blood, buffy coat and a total of 76 simulated touch DNA samples to test the effectiveness of the following five common DNA extraction methods, namely, Chelex® 100, QIAamp® DNA Blood Mini Kit, QIAamp® DNA Investigator Kit, QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kit and DNA IQ™ system, in the recovery of such DNA. We demonstrated that the QIAamp® and QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kits, and the DNA IQ™ system, exhibited a better effectiveness in DNA recovery amongst these methods and yielded extracts with higher success rate in subsequent DNA profiling. These extracts also generated profiles with better intra-colour signal balance. The findings in this work allowed us to propose an extraction approach as follows: 1) casework samples shall be extracted with the QIAamp®/QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kits or the DNA IQ™ system, viz., QIAsymphony® DNA Investigator® Kit and DNA IQ™, due to their higher throughput, are for the touched DNA evidence from the volume crime, while QIAamp® DNA Investigator Kit is preferable for challenging bloodstain samples; and 2) control samples, such as buccal swab, with known identity can be extracted with the Chelex, due to their cheaper cost per sample. PMID:25934373

  14. Stepped electrophoresis for movement and concentration of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy Wei-Yun; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2005-03-15

    A fluidic channel patterned with a series of thin-film electrodes makes it possible to move and concentrate DNA in a fluid passing through the fluidic channel. The DNA has an inherent negative charge and by applying a voltage between adjacent electrodes the DNA is caused to move. By using a series of electrodes, when one electrode voltage or charge is made negative with respect to adjacent electrodes, the DNA is repelled away from this electrode and attached to a positive charged electrode of the series. By sequentially making the next electrode of the series negative, the DNA can be moved to and concentrated over the remaining positive electrodes.

  15. Extraction of DNA by magnetic ionic liquids: tunable solvents for rapid and selective DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin D; Nacham, Omprakash; Yu, Honglian; Li, Tianhao; Yamsek, Melissa M; Ronning, Donald R; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-02-01

    DNA extraction represents a significant bottleneck in nucleic acid analysis. In this study, hydrophobic magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) were synthesized and employed as solvents for the rapid and efficient extraction of DNA from aqueous solution. The DNA-enriched microdroplets were manipulated by application of a magnetic field. The three MILs examined in this study exhibited unique DNA extraction capabilities when applied toward a variety of DNA samples and matrices. High extraction efficiencies were obtained for smaller single-stranded and double-stranded DNA using the benzyltrioctylammonium bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL, while the dicationic 1,12-di(3-hexadecylbenzimidazolium)dodecane bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C16BnIM)2C12(2+)][NTf2(-), FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL produced higher extraction efficiencies for larger DNA molecules. The MIL-based method was also employed for the extraction of DNA from a complex matrix containing albumin, revealing a competitive extraction behavior for the trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium tetrachloroferrate(III) ([P6,6,6,14(+)][FeCl4(-)]) MIL in contrast to the [(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)] MIL, which resulted in significantly less coextraction of albumin. The MIL-DNA method was employed for the extraction of plasmid DNA from bacterial cell lysate. DNA of sufficient quality and quantity for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was recovered from the MIL extraction phase, demonstrating the feasibility of MIL-based DNA sample preparation prior to downstream analysis. PMID:25582771

  16. Evaluation of Methods for the Extraction and Purification of DNA from the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sanqing; Cohen, Dora B.; Ravel, Jacques; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA extraction is an essential step in all cultivation-independent approaches to characterize microbial diversity, including that associated with the human body. A fundamental challenge in using these approaches has been to isolate DNA that is representative of the microbial community sampled. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we statistically evaluated six commonly used DNA extraction procedures using eleven human-associated bacterial species and a mock community that contained equal numbers of those eleven species. These methods were compared on the basis of DNA yield, DNA shearing, reproducibility, and most importantly representation of microbial diversity. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from a mock community showed that the observed species abundances were significantly different from the expected species abundances for all six DNA extraction methods used. Conclusions/Significance Protocols that included bead beating and/or mutanolysin produced significantly better bacterial community structure representation than methods without both of them. The reproducibility of all six methods was similar, and results from different experimenters and different times were in good agreement. Based on the evaluations done it appears that DNA extraction procedures for bacterial community analysis of human associated samples should include bead beating and/or mutanolysin to effectively lyse cells. PMID:22457796

  17. Extracting Step Stiffness from Correlation Functions Consistent with the GWD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Amber; Richards, Howard

    2003-03-01

    The statistics of a pair of neighboring steps can be derived approximately from a two-particle Hamiltonian in which the steps are mapped onto spinless fermions. Under typical circumstances, this mapping results in the two-particle Calogero model, for which the complete set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions can be obtained. The terrace-width distribution (TWD) resulting from this approximation is the ``generalized Wigner distribution'' (GWD), which has been shown to be in excellent agreement with simulations of the terrace-step-kink (TSK) model and to be a useful approximation for experimental TWDs. Here we discuss the use of the complete eigensolution to obtain information about the correlations of step fluctuations along the direction parallel to the step. Of particular interest is the autocorrelation function for the midpoint between adjacent steps. An improved estimate for step stiffness can be derived from this correlation function. The results are compared with preliminary Monte Carlo simulations of the TSK model and with previous Gruber-Mullins predictions.

  18. Mycobacterial DNA Extraction for Whole-Genome Sequencing from Early Positive Liquid (MGIT) Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, Louise J.; Anson, Luke W.; Morgan, Marcus R.; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah; Walker, Timothy M.; Quan, T. Phuong; Wyllie, David H.; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Wilcox, Mark; Walker, A. Sarah; Peto, Tim E. A.; Crook, Derrick W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a low-cost and reliable method of DNA extraction from as little as 1 ml of early positive mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) cultures that is suitable for whole-genome sequencing to identify mycobacterial species and predict antibiotic resistance in clinical samples. The DNA extraction method is based on ethanol precipitation supplemented by pretreatment steps with a MolYsis kit or saline wash for the removal of human DNA and a final DNA cleanup step with solid-phase reversible immobilization beads. The protocol yielded ?0.2 ng/?l of DNA for 90% (MolYsis kit) and 83% (saline wash) of positive MGIT cultures. A total of 144 (94%) of the 154 samples sequenced on the MiSeq platform (Illumina) achieved the target of 1 million reads, with <5% of reads derived from human or nasopharyngeal flora for 88% and 91% of samples, respectively. A total of 59 (98%) of 60 samples that were identified by the national mycobacterial reference laboratory (NMRL) as Mycobacterium tuberculosis were successfully mapped to the H37Rv reference, with >90% coverage achieved. The DNA extraction protocol, therefore, will facilitate fast and accurate identification of mycobacterial species and resistance using a range of bioinformatics tools. PMID:25631807

  19. EXTRACTION AND PURIFICATION OF MICROBIAL DNA FROM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method for the isolation of intracellular and extracellular DNA from a range of sediment types has been developed. The method is based upon the direct lysis of cells in the sediment, extraction of released DNA from the sediments and its subsequent purification by CsC1-EtBr ...

  20. DNA damage mediated transcription arrest: Step back to go forward.

    PubMed

    Mullenders, Leon

    2015-12-01

    The disturbance of DNA helix conformation by bulky DNA damage poses hindrance to transcription elongating due to stalling of RNA polymerase at transcription blocking lesions. Stalling of RNA polymerase provokes the formation of R-loops, i.e. the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid and a displaced single stranded DNA strand as well as displacement of spliceosomes. R-loops are processed into DNA single and double strand breaks by NER factors depending on TC-NER factors leading to genome instability. Moreover, stalling of RNA polymerase induces a strong signal for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These toxic and mutagenic effects are counteracted by a rapid recruitment of DNA repair proteins to perform transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) to remove the blocking DNA lesions and to restore transcription. Recent studies have highlighted the role of backtracking of RNA polymerase to facilitate TC-NER and identified novel factors that play key roles in TC-NER and in restoration of transcription. On the molecular level these factors facilitate stability of the repair complex by promotion and regulation of various post-translational modifications of NER factors and chromatin substrate. In addition, the continuous flow of new factors that emerge from screening assays hints to several regulatory levels to safeguard the integrity of transcription elongation after disturbance by DNA damage that have yet to be explored. PMID:26422136

  1. Extracting biological knowledge from DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    De La Vega, F.M.; Thieffry, D.; Collado-Vides, J.

    1996-12-31

    This session describes the elucidation of information from dna sequences and what challenges computational biologists face in their task of summarizing and deciphering the human genome. Techniques discussed include methods from statistics, information theory, artificial intelligence and linguistics. 1 ref.

  2. Purification of crime scene DNA extracts using centrifugal filter devices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The success of forensic DNA analysis is limited by the size, quality and purity of biological evidence found at crime scenes. Sample impurities can inhibit PCR, resulting in partial or negative DNA profiles. Various DNA purification methods are applied to remove impurities, for example, employing centrifugal filter devices. However, irrespective of method, DNA purification leads to DNA loss. Here we evaluate the filter devices Amicon Ultra 30 K and Microsep 30 K with respect to recovery rate and general performance for various types of PCR-inhibitory crime scene samples. Methods Recovery rates for DNA purification using Amicon Ultra 30 K and Microsep 30 K were gathered using quantitative PCR. Mock crime scene DNA extracts were analyzed using quantitative PCR and short tandem repeat (STR) profiling to test the general performance and inhibitor-removal properties of the two filter devices. Additionally, the outcome of long-term routine casework DNA analysis applying each of the devices was evaluated. Results Applying Microsep 30 K, 14 to 32% of the input DNA was recovered, whereas Amicon Ultra 30 K retained 62 to 70% of the DNA. The improved purity following filter purification counteracted some of this DNA loss, leading to slightly increased electropherogram peak heights for blood on denim (Amicon Ultra 30 K and Microsep 30 K) and saliva on envelope (Amicon Ultra 30 K). Comparing Amicon Ultra 30 K and Microsep 30 K for purification of DNA extracts from mock crime scene samples, the former generated significantly higher peak heights for rape case samples (P-values <0.01) and for hairs (P-values <0.036). In long-term routine use of the two filter devices, DNA extracts purified with Amicon Ultra 30 K were considerably less PCR-inhibitory in Quantifiler Human qPCR analysis compared to Microsep 30 K. Conclusions Amicon Ultra 30 K performed better than Microsep 30 K due to higher DNA recovery and more efficient removal of PCR-inhibitory substances. The different performances of the filter devices are likely caused by the quality of the filters and plastic wares, for example, their DNA binding properties. DNA purification using centrifugal filter devices can be necessary for successful DNA profiling of impure crime scene samples and for consistency between different PCR-based analysis systems, such as quantification and STR analysis. In order to maximize the possibility to obtain complete STR DNA profiles and to create an efficient workflow, the level of DNA purification applied should be correlated to the inhibitor-tolerance of the STR analysis system used. PMID:23618387

  3. Effect of DNA Extraction Methods and Sampling Techniques on the Apparent Structure of Cow and Sheep Rumen Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Kittelmann, Sandra; Miri, Vahideh Heidarian; Zethof, Michael; Noel, Samantha J.; Waghorn, Garry C.; Janssen, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular microbial ecology techniques are widely used to study the composition of the rumen microbiota and to increase understanding of the roles they play. Therefore, sampling and DNA extraction methods that result in adequate yields of microbial DNA that also accurately represents the microbial community are crucial. Fifteen different methods were used to extract DNA from cow and sheep rumen samples. The DNA yield and quality, and its suitability for downstream PCR amplifications varied considerably, depending on the DNA extraction method used. DNA extracts from nine extraction methods that passed these first quality criteria were evaluated further by quantitative PCR enumeration of microbial marker loci. Absolute microbial numbers, determined on the same rumen samples, differed by more than 100-fold, depending on the DNA extraction method used. The apparent compositions of the archaeal, bacterial, ciliate protozoal, and fungal communities in identical rumen samples were assessed using 454 Titanium pyrosequencing. Significant differences in microbial community composition were observed between extraction methods, for example in the relative abundances of members of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Microbial communities in parallel samples collected from cows by oral stomach-tubing or through a rumen fistula, and in liquid and solid rumen digesta fractions, were compared using one of the DNA extraction methods. Community representations were generally similar, regardless of the rumen sampling technique used, but significant differences in the abundances of some microbial taxa such as the Clostridiales and the Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade were observed. The apparent microbial community composition differed between rumen sample fractions, and Prevotellaceae were most abundant in the liquid fraction. DNA extraction methods that involved phenol-chloroform extraction and mechanical lysis steps tended to be more comparable. However, comparison of data from studies in which different sampling techniques, different rumen sample fractions or different DNA extraction methods were used should be avoided. PMID:24040342

  4. High-throughput Method of One-Step DNA Isolation for PCR Diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, D. V.; Prostyakova, A. I.; Alexeev, Ya. I.; Varlamov, D. A.; Zubov, V. P.; Zavriev, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of one-step and multi-step protocols of DNA isolation from lysed sputum samples containing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has been compared. DNA was isolated using spin-cartridges containing a special silica-based sorbent modified with fluoroplast and polyaniline, or using an automated isolation system. One-step isolation using the obtained sorbent has been shown to ensure a significantly lower DNA loss and higher sensitivity in the PCR detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as compared to a system based on sorption and desorption of nucleic acids during the isolation. PMID:25093111

  5. Impedimetric DNA detection--steps forward to sensorial application.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Marc; Kartchemnik, Julia; Schöning, Michael J; Lisdat, Fred

    2014-08-01

    This study describes a label-free impedimetric sensor based on short ssDNA recognition elements for the detection of hybridization events. We concentrate on the elucidation of the influence of target length and recognition sequence position on the sensorial performance. The impedimetric measurements are performed in the presence of the redox system ferri-/ferrocyanide and show an increase in charge transfer resistance upon hybridization of ssDNA to the sensor surface. Investigations on the impedimetric signal stability demonstrate a clear influence of the buffers used during the sensor preparation and the choice of the passivating mercaptoalcanol compound. A stable sensor system has been developed, enabling a reproducible detection of 25mer target DNA in the low nanomolar range. After hybridization, a sensor regeneration can be reached with deionized water by adjustment of effective convection conditions, ensuring a sensor reusability. By investigations of longer targets with overhangs exposed to the solution, we can demonstrate applicability of the impedimetric detection for longer ssDNA. However, a decreasing charge transfer resistance change (ΔR(ct)) is found by extending the overhang. As a strategy to increase the impedance change for longer target strands, the position of the recognition sequence can be designed in a way that a small overhang is exposed to the electrode surface. This is found to result in an increase in the relative R(ct) change. These results suggest that DNA and consequently negative charge near the electrode possess a larger impact on the impedimetric signal than DNA further away. PMID:24999077

  6. Establishing a novel automated magnetic bead-based method for the extraction of DNA from a variety of forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Witt, Sebastian; Neumann, Jan; Zierdt, Holger; Gébel, Gabriella; Röscheisen, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    Automated systems have been increasingly utilized for DNA extraction by many forensic laboratories to handle growing numbers of forensic casework samples while minimizing the risk of human errors and assuring high reproducibility. The step towards automation however is not easy: The automated extraction method has to be very versatile to reliably prepare high yields of pure genomic DNA from a broad variety of sample types on different carrier materials. To prevent possible cross-contamination of samples or the loss of DNA, the components of the kit have to be designed in a way that allows for the automated handling of the samples with no manual intervention necessary. DNA extraction using paramagnetic particles coated with a DNA-binding surface is predestined for an automated approach. For this study, we tested different DNA extraction kits using DNA-binding paramagnetic particles with regard to DNA yield and handling by a Freedom EVO(®)150 extraction robot (Tecan) equipped with a Te-MagS magnetic separator. Among others, the extraction kits tested were the ChargeSwitch(®)Forensic DNA Purification Kit (Invitrogen), the PrepFiler™Automated Forensic DNA Extraction Kit (Applied Biosystems) and NucleoMag™96 Trace (Macherey-Nagel). After an extensive test phase, we established a novel magnetic bead extraction method based upon the NucleoMag™ extraction kit (Macherey-Nagel). The new method is readily automatable and produces high yields of DNA from different sample types (blood, saliva, sperm, contact stains) on various substrates (filter paper, swabs, cigarette butts) with no evidence of a loss of magnetic beads or sample cross-contamination. PMID:22310206

  7. Application of chemometric tools for automatic classification and profile extraction of DNA samples in forensic tasks.

    PubMed

    Talavera Bustamante, Isneri; Silva Mata, Francisco; Hernández González, Noslen; González Gazapo, Ricardo; Palau, Juan; Ferreira, Marcia M Castro

    2007-07-01

    In this paper a method for the automatic DNA spots classification and extraction of profiles associated in DNA polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is presented and it integrates the use of image processing techniques and chemometrics tools. A software which implements this method was developed; for feature extraction a combination of a PCA analysis and a C4.5 decision tree were used. To obtain good results in the profile extraction only DNA spots are useful; therefore, it was necessary to solve a two-class classification problem among DNA spots and no-DNA spots. In order to perform the classification process with high velocity, effectiveness and robustness, comparative classification studies among support vector machine (SVM), K-NN and PLS-DA classifiers were made. The best results obtained with the SVM classifier demonstrated the advantages attributed to it in the literature as a two-class classifier. A Sequential Cluster Leader Algorithm and another one developed for the restoration of pattern missing spots were needed to conclude the profiles extraction step. The experimental results show that this method has a very effective computational behavior and effectiveness, and provide a very useful tool to decrease the time and increase the quality of the specialist responses. PMID:17605982

  8. Automated DNA extraction of single dog hairs without roots for mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bekaert, Bram; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vanhove, Maarten P M; Opdekamp, Anouschka; Decorte, Ronny

    2012-03-01

    Dogs are intensely integrated in human social life and their shed hairs can play a major role in forensic investigations. The overall aim of this study was to validate a semi-automated extraction method for mitochondrial DNA analysis of telogenic dog hairs. Extracted DNA was amplified with a 95% success rate from 43 samples using two new experimental designs in which the mitochondrial control region was amplified as a single large (± 1260 bp) amplicon or as two individual amplicons (HV1 and HV2; ± 650 and 350 bp) with tailed-primers. The results prove that the extraction of dog hair mitochondrial DNA can easily be automated to provide sufficient DNA yield for the amplification of a forensically useful long mitochondrial DNA fragment or alternatively two short fragments with minimal loss of sequence in case of degraded samples. PMID:21531187

  9. Statistical assessment of DNA extraction reagent lot variability in real-time quantitative PCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Kephart, C.M.; Koltun, G.F.; Francy, D.S.; Schaefer, F. W., III; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability in lots of a DNA extraction kit using real-time PCR assays for Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Vibrio cholerae. Methods and Results: Replicate aliquots of three bacteria were processed in duplicate with three different lots of a commercial DNA extraction kit. This experiment was repeated in triplicate. Results showed that cycle threshold values were statistically different among the different lots. Conclusions: Differences in DNA extraction reagent lots were found to be a significant source of variability for qPCR results. Steps should be taken to ensure the quality and consistency of reagents. Minimally, we propose that standard curves should be constructed for each new lot of extraction reagents, so that lot-to-lot variation is accounted for in data interpretation. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study highlights the importance of evaluating variability in DNA extraction procedures, especially when different reagent lots are used. Consideration of this variability in data interpretation should be an integral part of studies investigating environmental samples with unknown concentrations of organisms. ?? 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Application of the NucliSENS easyMAG system for nucleic acid extraction: optimization of DNA extraction for molecular diagnosis of parasitic and fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeddi, Fakhri; Piarroux, Renaud; Mary, Charles

    2013-01-01

    During the last 20 years, molecular biology techniques have propelled the diagnosis of parasitic diseases into a new era, as regards assay speed, sensitivity, and parasite characterization. However, DNA extraction remains a critical step and should be adapted for diagnostic and epidemiological studies. The aim of this report was to document the constraints associated with DNA extraction for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases and illustrate the adaptation of an automated extraction system, NucliSENS easyMAG, to these constraints, with a critical analysis of system performance. Proteinase K digestion of samples is unnecessary with the exception of solid tissue preparation. Mechanically grinding samples prior to cell lysis enhances the DNA extraction rate of fungal cells. The effect of host-derived nucleic acids on the extraction efficiency of parasite DNA varies with sample host cell density. The optimal cell number for precise parasite quantification ranges from 10 to 100,000 cells. Using the NucliSENS easyMAG technique, the co-extraction of inhibitors is reduced, with an exception for whole blood, which requires supplementary extraction steps to eliminate inhibitors. PMID:24331004

  11. Toenails as an alternative source material for the extraction of DNA from decomposed human remains.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Andrew; Grimble, Katelyn; Azim, Arani; Owen, Rebecca; Hartman, Dadna

    2016-01-01

    The DNA identification of decomposed human remains for coronial investigations at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine routinely requires the retrieval and processing of a bone sample obtained from the deceased. Bone is a difficult sample type to work with as it requires surgical removal from the deceased, refrigerated storage, and additional processing steps prior to DNA analysis in comparison to other samples types such as buccal swabs or blood stains. In an attempt to overcome the issues posed by bone, a DNA extraction method utilising toenails as an alternate source material was optimised and trialled. Two DNA extraction methods were optimised for digestion of toenail material, with the method utilising the QIAGEN DNA Investigator Kit selected for a casework trial. Single source DNA profiles, matching those of the conventional samples taken, were obtained for toenail samples collected from 28 of 30 coronial cases available for this study. Of these, 26 toenail samples produced full profiles. Although the overall DNA profile quality from the toenails was less than that of the conventional sample, the profiles from toenails met the reporting requirements for identification. Based on the results obtained, the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine will be implementing toenails as the primary sample type for collection from decomposed remains when blood is not a suitable sample type. PMID:26610200

  12. One-step assay for the quantification of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Steffi; Kreisig, Thomas; Buettner, Karin; Zuchner, Thole

    2015-02-01

    As one of the most commonly used enzyme in molecular biology, the T4 DNA ligase presents an important tool for the manipulation of DNA. T4 DNA ligase activity measurements are based on the use of radioactivity or rather labor-intense procedures including gel-based analysis. We therefore established a homogeneous T4 DNA ligase assay utilizing a specifically designed fluorescein- and dark quencher-labeled DNA molecule. Upon ligation of both DNA molecules, a quenching occurs and the fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing ligase concentrations. The assay allows a sensitive and precise quantification (CV, 4.6-5.5 %) of T4 DNA ligase activities and showed a high specificity when tested against other ligases of related and different species. Most importantly, this T4 DNA ligase assay requires only one working and incubation step before measurement can take place at room temperature and may therefore offer an interesting alternative to existing, more laborious ligase assays. PMID:25503935

  13. Development of a fast DNA extraction method for sea food and marine species identification.

    PubMed

    Tagliavia, Marcello; Nicosia, Aldo; Salamone, Monica; Biondo, Girolama; Bennici, Carmelo Daniele; Mazzola, Salvatore; Cuttitta, Angela

    2016-07-15

    The authentication of food components is one of the key issues in food safety. Similarly taxonomy, population and conservation genetics as well as food web structure analysis, also rely on genetic analyses including the DNA barcoding technology. In this scenario we developed a fast DNA extraction method without any purification step from fresh and processed seafood, suitable for any PCR analysis. The protocol allows the fast DNA amplification from any sample, including fresh, stored and processed seafood and from any waste of industrial fish processing, independently of the sample storage method. Therefore, this procedure is particularly suitable for the fast processing of samples and to carry out investigations for the authentication of seafood by means of DNA analysis. PMID:26948627

  14. Evaluation of the ISO Standard 11063 DNA Extraction Procedure for Assessing Soil Microbial Abundance and Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Robert; Dequiedt, Samuel; Lelievre, Mélanie; Regnier, Tiffanie; Nowak, Virginie; Bailey, Mark; Lemanceau, Philippe; Bispo, Antonio; Chabbi, Abad; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Mougel, Christophe; Ranjard, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    Soil DNA extraction has become a critical step in describing microbial biodiversity. Historically, ascertaining overarching microbial ecological theories has been hindered as independent studies have used numerous custom and commercial DNA extraction procedures. For that reason, a standardized soil DNA extraction method (ISO-11063) was previously published. However, although this ISO method is suited for molecular tools such as quantitative PCR and community fingerprinting techniques, it has only been optimized for examining soil bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess an appropriate soil DNA extraction procedure for examining bacterial, archaeal and fungal diversity in soils of contrasting land-use and physico-chemical properties. Three different procedures were tested: the ISO-11063 standard; a custom procedure (GnS-GII); and a modified ISO procedure (ISOm) which includes a different mechanical lysis step (a FastPrep ®-24 lysis step instead of the recommended bead-beating). The efficacy of each method was first assessed by estimating microbial biomass through total DNA quantification. Then, the abundances and community structure of bacteria, archaea and fungi were determined using real-time PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism approaches. Results showed that DNA yield was improved with the GnS-GII and ISOm procedures, and fungal community patterns were found to be strongly dependent on the extraction method. The main methodological factor responsible for differences between extraction procedure efficiencies was found to be the soil homogenization step. For integrative studies which aim to examine bacteria, archaea and fungi simultaneously, the ISOm procedure results in higher DNA recovery and better represents microbial communities. PMID:22984486

  15. HHS guidance on synthetic DNA is the right step.

    PubMed

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2010-12-01

    Synthetic biology has advanced to the point where some pathogens can be manufactured from scratch. This technical leap has beneficent implications for medical research and vaccine design, but it also raises concerns that the technology could be used to produce a deadly pathogen for nefarious use. Addressing these concerns, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released their Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA on October 13, 2010. They took the right approach: The oversight framework for gene synthesis companies included in this guidance is adaptable to new technical developments and changing risks, it can be implemented immediately, it can be readily adopted by other countries, and it will cost little. Though there have been some calls to increase the regulatory controls on synthetic biology, these should be resisted. For now, at least, the oversight is appropriate to the risks. PMID:21142764

  16. Direct Extraction and Amplification of DNA from Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevors, Jack T.; Leung, K.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise that describes the direct extraction and purification of DNA from a small soil sample. Also discusses the subsequent amplification of a 343-bp Tn7 transposate A gene fragment (tnsA) from a strain of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 3732RNL11. Contains 21 references. (DDR)

  17. An expedient and versatile protocol for extracting high-quality DNA from plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONProtocols for extracting plant genomic DNA have to contend with two major challenges: preventing the oxidation of phenolic substances that can react with nucleic acids and proteins, and eliminating polysaccharides that interfere with downstream enzymatic manipulations of DNA. A protocol has been developed in which the above-mentioned substances are removed from the sample before the DNA is removed from the chromatin structure. This protocol requires only two tubes during extraction and a single precipitation step to yield high-quality DNA. DNA extracted with this method has virtually no protein or phenolic contaminants (A(260)/A(280)>1.8), is RNA-free, contains high-molecular-weight fragments according to CHEF electrophoresis, and is fully digestible by restriction enzymes. This protocol has been successfully tested with leaf samples from common bean and corn; with leaves known to be rich in phenolics (tomato and bell pepper), pectins (sweet orange, grapefruit, and peach), or both substances (Muscadine grape); and with leaves that contain latex in the sap (papaya). PMID:21357104

  18. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  19. Developmental validation of the PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit for extraction of genomic DNA from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Brevnov, Maxim G; Pawar, Hemant S; Mundt, Janna; Calandro, Lisa M; Furtado, Manohar R; Shewale, Jaiprakash G

    2009-05-01

    The PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit enables isolation of genomic DNA from a variety of biological samples. The kit facilitates reversible binding of DNA with magnetic particles resulting in high DNA recovery from samples with very low and high quantities of biological materials: 0.1 and 40 microL of human blood (donor 2) provided 14 and 2883 ng of DNA, respectively. Following the revised SWGDAM guidelines, performance of the developed method was investigated using different sample types including saliva on swabs, semen stains on cotton fabric, samples exposed to environment, samples with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors, blood stains (on denim, cotton cloth, and FTA paper), and touch evidence-type samples. DNA yields for all samples tested were equal or better than those obtained by both phenol-chloroform extraction and commercial kits tested. DNA obtained from these samples was free of detectable PCR inhibitors. Short tandem repeat profiles were complete, conclusive, and devoid of PCR artifacts. PMID:19302383

  20. Optimization and validation of DNA extraction and real-time PCR assay for the quantitative measurement of residual host cell DNA in biopharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Sellers, J; Kupec, J; Ngo, W; Fenton, S; Yang, T-Y; Grebanier, A

    2014-01-01

    Host cell DNA contamination occurs during the production of biopharmaceuticals and must be controlled and monitored for the purity and safety of the drug products. A sodium iodide-based DNA extraction and a subsequent real time PCR assay were developed and validated for the quantitative measurement of residual host cell DNA impurity in monoclonal antibody therapeutic products. A sodium iodide-based commercial kit was optimized for the removal of interfering matrices. Several incubation steps from the kit protocol were combined and a neutralization buffer was introduced to protein digestion step to eliminate any precipitation from the detergent. The elimination of the two washing steps significantly reduced assay variability from loss of DNA pellets. The optimized DNA extraction procedure can recover DNA close to 100% for DNA concentrations from 10 to 100,000pg/mL. Of the published sequences of repetitive interspersed nuclear elements, we identified a nucleotide mismatch from the published CHO probe. Correction of this nucleotide increased DNA amplification by a thousand fold. The optimized assay was further validated for the quantitation of residual CHO DNA according to ICH guidelines with preset assay acceptance criteria. The method met all assay acceptance criteria and was found linear, accurate and precise for the quantitation of residual CHO in the linear range of 10-100,000pg DNA/mL. LOQ was measured at 10pg DNA/mL and LOD at 1pg DNA/mL. No matrix interference to our validated assay was detected from bioreactor harvest, Protein A eluate or eluate from ion exchange columns. PMID:24042121

  1. Quantitative cell lysis of indigenous microorganisms and rapid extraction of microbial DNA from sediment.

    PubMed

    Moré, M I; Herrick, J B; Silva, M C; Ghiorse, W C; Madsen, E L

    1994-05-01

    This study reports improvements in two of the key steps, lysis of indigenous cells and DNA purification, required for achieving a rapid nonselective protocol for extracting nucleic acids directly from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated sediment rich in organic matter. Incorporation of bead-mill homogenization into the DNA extraction procedure doubled the densitometrically determined DNA yield (11.8 micrograms of DNA.g [dry weight] of sediment-1) relative to incorporation of three cycles of freezing and thawing (5.2 micrograms of DNA.g [dry weight] of sediment-1). The improved DNA extraction efficiency was attributed to increased cell lysis, measured by viable counts of sediment microorganisms which showed that 2 and 8%, respectively, survived the bead-mill homogenization and freeze-thaw procedures. Corresponding measurements of suspensions of viable Bacillus endospores demonstrated that 2 and 94% of the initial number survived. Conventional, laser scanning epifluorescence phase-contrast, and differential interference-contrast microscopy revealed that small coccoid bacterial cells (1.2 to 0.3 micron long) were left intact after combined SDS and bead-mill homogenization of sediment samples. Estimates of the residual fraction of the fluorescently stained cell numbers indicated that 6% (2.2 x 10(8) cells.g [dry weight] of sediment-1) of the original population (3.8 x 10(9) cells.g [dry weight] of sediment-1) remained after treatment with SDS and bead-mill homogenization. Thus, lysis of total cells was less efficient than that of cells which could be cultured. The extracted DNA was used to successfully amplify nahR, the regulatory gene for naphthalene catabolism in Pseudomonas putida G7, by PCR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8017936

  2. A one-step miniprep for the isolation of plasmid DNA and lambda phage particles.

    PubMed

    Lezin, George; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Yost, H Joseph; Kuehn, Michael R; Brunelli, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid DNA minipreps are fundamental techniques in molecular biology. Current plasmid DNA minipreps use alkali and the anionic detergent SDS in a three-solution format. In addition, alkali minipreps usually require additional column-based purification steps and cannot isolate other extra-chromosomal elements, such as bacteriophages. Non-ionic detergents (NIDs) have been used occasionally as components of multiple-solution plasmid DNA minipreps, but a one-step approach has not been developed. Here, we have established a one-tube, one-solution NID plasmid DNA miniprep, and we show that this approach also isolates bacteriophage lambda particles. NID minipreps are more time-efficient than alkali minipreps, and NID plasmid DNA performs better than alkali DNA in many downstream applications. In fact, NID crude lysate DNA is sufficiently pure to be used in digestion and sequencing reactions. Microscopic analysis showed that the NID procedure fragments E. coli cells into small protoplast-like components, which may, at least in part, explain the effectiveness of this approach. This work demonstrates that one-step NID minipreps are a robust method to generate high quality plasmid DNA, and NID approaches can also isolate bacteriophage lambda particles, outperforming current standard alkali-based minipreps. PMID:21858126

  3. Method of preparing an equimolar DNA mixture for one-step DNA assembly of over 50 fragments.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Kenji; Sato, Yukari; Kobayashi, Yuka; Gondo, Maiko; Hasebe, Masako; Togashi, Takashi; Tomita, Masaru; Itaya, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In the era of synthetic biology, techniques for rapidly constructing a designer long DNA from short DNA fragments are desired. To realize this, we attempted to establish a method for one-step DNA assembly of unprecedentedly large numbers of fragments. The basic technology is the Ordered Gene Assembly in Bacillus subtilis (OGAB) method, which uses the plasmid transformation system of B. subtilis. Since this method doesn't require circular ligation products but needs tandem repeat ligation products, the degree of deviation in the molar concentration of the material DNAs is the only determinant that affects the efficiency of DNA assembly. The strict standardization of the size of plasmids that clone the DNA block and the measurement of the block in the state of intact plasmid improve the reliability of this step, with the coefficient of variation of the molar concentrations becoming 7%. By coupling this method with the OGAB method, one-step assembly of more than 50 DNA fragments becomes feasible. PMID:25990947

  4. Method of preparing an equimolar DNA mixture for one-step DNA assembly of over 50 fragments

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Kenji; Sato, Yukari; Kobayashi, Yuka; Gondo, Maiko; Hasebe, Masako; Togashi, Takashi; Tomita, Masaru; Itaya, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In the era of synthetic biology, techniques for rapidly constructing a designer long DNA from short DNA fragments are desired. To realize this, we attempted to establish a method for one-step DNA assembly of unprecedentedly large numbers of fragments. The basic technology is the Ordered Gene Assembly in Bacillus subtilis (OGAB) method, which uses the plasmid transformation system of B. subtilis. Since this method doesn’t require circular ligation products but needs tandem repeat ligation products, the degree of deviation in the molar concentration of the material DNAs is the only determinant that affects the efficiency of DNA assembly. The strict standardization of the size of plasmids that clone the DNA block and the measurement of the block in the state of intact plasmid improve the reliability of this step, with the coefficient of variation of the molar concentrations becoming 7%. By coupling this method with the OGAB method, one-step assembly of more than 50 DNA fragments becomes feasible. PMID:25990947

  5. Convenient determination of DNA extraction efficiency using an external DNA recovery standard and quantitative-competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    Mumy, Karen L; Findlay, Robert H

    2004-05-01

    Molecular biology techniques have advanced the field of microbial ecology through the analysis of nucleic acids. Most techniques that use DNA or RNA require their extraction from environmental matrices, which can be tedious and inefficient. While a number of extraction methods, both laboratory-based and commercially available, have been developed, none of these include a convenient method to determine extraction efficiency. We have developed an external DNA recovery standard, Lambda DNA (target DNA) contained within pBR322, allowing routine determinations of DNA recovery efficiency. Target DNA was added to sediments as whole cells, total DNA extracted using commercial DNA extraction/purification kits and the amount of target DNA recovered quantified by quantitative-competitive PCR (QC-PCR). Three commercially available kits (UltraClean Soil DNA, FastDNA SPIN and Soil Master DNA Extraction) were evaluated for recovery efficiency. Recoveries for the three kits ranged from undetectable to 43.3% with average recoveries of 14.9+/-16.0%, 28.3+/-10.5% and 2.4+/-0.1% (UltraClean, FastDNA and Soil Master, respectively). Quantification of target DNA proved robust in sediments heavily polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the external recovery standard could be detected following extraction and amplification from as few as 1 x 10(3) cells added to 0.5 g sediment (wet weight). The external DNA recovery standard was also added directly to the sediment as purified plasmid DNA prior to extraction. It was recovered with similar efficiency as when added as whole cells, suggesting its usefulness in estimating DNA recovery in ribosomal DNA studies. These results show that, while the commercial kits offer expedited sample processing, the extraction efficiencies vary on a sample-by-sample basis and were <100%. Therefore, quantitative DNA studies require an estimation of DNA recovery. PMID:15063066

  6. Comparisons of Three Automated Systems for Genomic DNA Extraction in a Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Han; Park, Yongjung; Choi, Jong Rak; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The extraction of nucleic acid is initially a limiting step for successful molecular-based diagnostic workup. This study aims to compare the effectiveness of three automated DNA extraction systems for clinical laboratory use. Materials and Methods Venous blood samples from 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed using QIAamp® Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen), MagNA Pure LC Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I (Roche), and Magtration-Magnazorb DNA common kit-200N (PSS). The concentration of extracted DNAs was measured by NanoDrop ND-1000 (PeqLab). Also, extracted DNAs were confirmed by applying in direct agarose gel electrophoresis and were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for human beta-globin gene. Results The corrected concentrations of extracted DNAs were 25.42 ± 8.82 ng/µL (13.49-52.85 ng/µL) by QIAamp® Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen), and 22.65 ± 14.49 ng/µL (19.18-93.39 ng/µL) by MagNA Pure LC Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I, and 22.35 ± 6.47 ng/µL (12.57-35.08 ng/µL) by Magtration-Magnazorb DNA common kit-200N (PSS). No statistically significant difference was noticed among the three commercial kits (p > 0.05). Only the mean value of DNA purity through PSS was slightly lower than others. All the extracted DNAs were successfully identified in direct agarose gel electrophoresis. And all the product of beta-globin gene PCR showed a reproducible pattern of bands. Conclusion The effectiveness of the three automated extraction systems is of an equivalent level and good enough to produce reasonable results. Each laboratory could select the automated system according to its clinical and laboratory conditions. PMID:20046522

  7. Development of microfluidic modules for DNA purification via phenol extraction and analyte concentration using transverse electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Mercedes C.

    In this work, microfluidic platforms have been designed and evaluated to demonstrate microscale DNA purification via organic (phenol) extraction as well as analyte trapping and concentration using a transverse electrokinetic force balance. First, in order to evaluate DNA purification via phenol extraction in a microdevice, an aqueous phase containing protein and DNA and an immiscible receiving organic phase were utilized to evaluate microfluidic DNA extraction under both stratified and droplet-based flow conditions using a serpentine microfluidic device. The droplet based flow resulted in a significant improvement of protein partitioning from the aqueous phase due to the flow recirculation inside each droplet improving material convective transport into the organic phase. The plasmid recovery from bacterial lysates using droplet-based flow was high (>92%) and comparable to the recovery achieved using commercial DNA purification kits and standard macroscale phenol extraction. Second, a converging Y-inlet microfluidic channel with integrated coplanar electrodes was used to investigate transverse DNA and protein migration under uniform direct current (DC) electric fields. Negatively charged samples diluted in low and high ionic strength buffers were co-infused with a receiving buffer of the same ionic strength into a main channel where transverse electric fields were applied. Experimental results demonstrated that charged analytes could traverse the channel width and accumulate at the positive bias electrode in a low electroosmotic mobility and high electrophoretic mobility condition (high ionic strength buffer) or migrated towards an equilibrium position within the channel when both electroosmotic mobility and electrophoretic mobility are high (low ionic strength buffer). The different behaviors are the result of a balance between the electrophoretic force and a drag force induced by a recirculating electroosmotic flow generated across the channel width due to the bounding walls. The miniaturization of DNA phenol extraction and the novel electrokinetic trapping techniques presented in this research are the initial steps towards an efficient DNA sample preparation chip which could be integrated with post-extraction DNA manipulations for genomic analysis modules such as capillary electrophoretic separations.

  8. Implication of DNA polymerase lambda in alignment-based gap filling for nonhomologous DNA end joining in human nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wan; Blanco, Luis; Zhou, Tong; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Kunkel, Thomas A; Wang, Zhigang; Povirk, Lawrence F

    2004-01-01

    Accurate repair of free radical-mediated DNA double-strand breaks by the nonhomologous end joining pathway requires replacement of fragmented nucleotides in the aligned ends by a gap-filling DNA polymerase. Nuclear extracts of human HeLa cells, supplemented with recombinant XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex (XRCC4/ligase IV), were capable of accurately rejoining model double-strand break substrates with a 1- or 2-base gap, and the gap-filling step was dependent on XRCC4/ligase IV. To determine what polymerase was responsible for gap filling, end joining was examined in the presence of polyclonal antibodies against each of two prime candidate enzymes, DNA polymerases mu and lambda, both of which were present in the extracts. For a DNA substrate with partially complementary 3' overhangs and a 2-base gap, antibodies to polymerase lambda completely eliminated both gap filling and accurate end joining, whereas antibodies to polymerase mu had little effect. Immunodepletion of polymerase lambda, but not polymerase mu, likewise blocked both gap filling and end joining, and both functions could be restored by addition of recombinant polymerase lambda. Recombinant polymerase mu, and a truncated polymerase lambda lacking the Brca1 C-terminal domain, were at least 10-fold less active in restoring gap filling to the immunodepleted extracts, and polymerase beta was completely inactive. The results suggest that polymerase lambda is the primary gap-filling polymerase for accurate nonhomologous end joining, and that the Brca1 C-terminal domain is required for this activity. PMID:14561766

  9. Simulated radioactive decontamination of biological samples using a portable DNA extraction instrument for rapid DNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Dalpé, Claude

    2016-02-01

    A portable DNA extraction instrument was evaluated for its ability to decontaminate blood and saliva samples deposited on different surfaces (metal, plastic and glass) contaminated with stable isotopes of cobalt (Co), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) as equivalents to their radiogenic (60)Co, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr isotopes, respectively, that could be released during a nuclear weapon accident or a radiological dispersal device (RDD) detonation. Despite the very high contamination levels tested in this study, successful removal of greater than 99.996% of the Co, Cs, Sr contaminants was achieved based on inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and neutron activation analyses carried out on all liquids (including DNA eluates) and solid waste produced during automated DNA extraction. The remaining amounts of Co, Cs and Sr in the DNA eluates, when converted to dose rates (corresponding to (60)Co, (137)Cs and (90)Sr), were determined to be below the recommended dose limits for the general public in most of the scenarios tested. The presence of Co, Cs and Sr contaminants in the cell lysates had no adverse impact on the binding of DNA onto the magnetic DNA IQ™ beads. DNA yields were similar to uncontaminated controls. The remaining Co, Cs and Sr in the DNA eluates did not interfere with real-time PCR DNA quantification. In addition, the quality of the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler(®) profiles derived in 26min using an accelerated protocol was very good and comparable to controls. This study emphasizes the use of an accelerated process involving a portable DNA extraction instrument to significantly reduce radioactive dose rates to allow contaminated samples to be processed safely in a forensic mobile laboratory to expedite the identification of individuals potentially involved in the dispersal of nuclear or other radioactive materials. PMID:26773226

  10. DNA extraction from protozoan oocysts/cysts in feces for diagnostic PCR.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yousry

    2014-06-01

    PCR detection of intestinal protozoa is often restrained by a poor DNA recovery or by inhibitors present in feces. The need for an extraction protocol that can overcome these obstacles is therefore clear. QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) was evaluated for its ability to recover DNA from oocysts/cysts directly from feces. Twenty-five Giardia-positive, 15 Cryptosporidium-positive, 15 Entamoeba histolytica-positive, and 45 protozoa-free samples were processed as control by microscopy and immunoassay tests. DNA extracts were amplified using 3 sets of published primers. Following the manufacturer's protocol, the kit showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% towards Giardia and Entamoeba. However, for Cryptosporidium, the sensitivity and specificity were 60% (9/15) and 100%, respectively. A series of optimization experiments involving various steps of the kit's protocol were conducted using Cryptosporidium-positive samples. The best DNA recoveries were gained by raising the lysis temperature to the boiling point for 10 min and the incubation time of the InhibitEX tablet to 5 min. Also, using a pre-cooled ethanol for nucleic acid precipitation and small elution volume (50-100 µl) were valuable. The sensitivity of the amended protocol to Cryptosporidium was raised to 100%. Cryptosporidium DNA was successfully amplified by either the first or the second primer set. When applied on parasite-free feces spiked with variable oocysts/cysts counts, ? 2 oocysts/cysts were theoretically enough for detection by PCR. To conclude, the Qiagen kit with the amended protocol was proved to be suitable for protozoan DNA extraction directly from feces and support PCR diagnosis. PMID:25031466

  11. DNA Extraction from Protozoan Oocysts/Cysts in Feces for Diagnostic PCR

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PCR detection of intestinal protozoa is often restrained by a poor DNA recovery or by inhibitors present in feces. The need for an extraction protocol that can overcome these obstacles is therefore clear. QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) was evaluated for its ability to recover DNA from oocysts/cysts directly from feces. Twenty-five Giardia-positive, 15 Cryptosporidium-positive, 15 Entamoeba histolytica-positive, and 45 protozoa-free samples were processed as control by microscopy and immunoassay tests. DNA extracts were amplified using 3 sets of published primers. Following the manufacturer's protocol, the kit showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% towards Giardia and Entamoeba. However, for Cryptosporidium, the sensitivity and specificity were 60% (9/15) and 100%, respectively. A series of optimization experiments involving various steps of the kit's protocol were conducted using Cryptosporidium-positive samples. The best DNA recoveries were gained by raising the lysis temperature to the boiling point for 10 min and the incubation time of the InhibitEX tablet to 5 min. Also, using a pre-cooled ethanol for nucleic acid precipitation and small elution volume (50-100 µl) were valuable. The sensitivity of the amended protocol to Cryptosporidium was raised to 100%. Cryptosporidium DNA was successfully amplified by either the first or the second primer set. When applied on parasite-free feces spiked with variable oocysts/cysts counts, ≈ 2 oocysts/cysts were theoretically enough for detection by PCR. To conclude, the Qiagen kit with the amended protocol was proved to be suitable for protozoan DNA extraction directly from feces and support PCR diagnosis. PMID:25031466

  12. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the recovery of DNA to 45% efficiency. Furthermore, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips recover more DNA than gold-coated microtips when the surface is washed. Heat-cured (225°C) PEI-coated microtips are used for the recovery of human genomic DNA from whole blood. A washing protocol is developed to remove inhibiting particles bound to the PEI-coated microtip surface after DNA extraction. From 1.25 muL of whole blood, an average of 1.83 ng of human genomic DNA is captured, purified, and released using a 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtip in less than 30 minutes. The extracted DNA is profiled by short tandem repeat analysis (STR). For forensic and medical applications, genomic DNA is extracted from dried samples using heat-cured PEI-coated microtips that are integrated into an automated device. DNA extraction from dried samples is critical for forensics. The use of dried samples in the medical field is increasing because dried samples are convenient for storage, biosafety, and contamination. The main challenge is the time required to properly extract DNA in a purified form. Typically, a 1 hour incubation period is required to complete this process. Overnight incubation is sometimes necessary. To address this challenge, a pre-extraction washing step is investigated to remove inhibiting particles from dried blood spots (DBS) before DNA is released from dried form into solution for microtip extraction. The developed protocol is expanded to extract DNA from a variety of dried samples including nasal swabs, buccal swabs, and other forensic samples. In comparison to a commercial kit, the microtip-based extraction reduced the processing time from 1.5 hours to 30 minutes or less with an equivalent concentration of extracted DNA from dried blood spots. The developed assay will benefit genetic studies on newborn screening, forensic investigation, and POC diagnostics.

  13. Fingerprints and DNA: STR typing of DNA extracted from adhesive tape after processing for fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Zamir, A; Springer, E; Glattstein, B

    2000-05-01

    An exhibit that is often received for examination in cases of robbery or terrorist activity is adhesive tape. This type of exhibit can often, but not always, be successfully processed for fingerprints. The question arises whether or not it is possible to extract and type DNA after the tape has been sequentially processed for fingerprints. In this work, various donors left fingerprints on the adhesive side of tapes. The tapes were then sequentially processed for fingerprints using an alternate light source, cyanoacrylate fuming, and staining with BY-40 and then crystal violet. DNA was subsequently successfully extracted, amplified and typed for six STR loci. PMID:10855979

  14. Stacking interactions in RNA and DNA: Roll-slide energy hyperspace for ten unique dinucleotide steps.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanchita; Kailasam, Senthilkumar; Bansal, Manju; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Understanding dinucleotide sequence directed structures of nuleic acids and their variability from experimental observation remained ineffective due to unavailability of statistically meaningful data. We have attempted to understand this from energy scan along twist, roll, and slide degrees of freedom which are mostly dependent on dinucleotide sequence using ab initio density functional theory. We have carried out stacking energy analysis in these dinucleotide parameter phase space for all ten unique dinucleotide steps in DNA and RNA using DFT-D by ωB97X-D/6-31G(2d,2p), which appears to satisfactorily explain conformational preferences for AU/AU step in our recent study. We show that values of roll, slide, and twist of most of the dinucleotide sequences in crystal structures fall in the low energy region. The minimum energy regions with large twist values are associated with the roll and slide values of B-DNA, whereas, smaller twist values correspond to higher stability to RNA and A-DNA like conformations. Incorporation of solvent effect by CPCM method could explain the preference shown by some sequences to occur in B-DNA or A-DNA conformations. Conformational preference of BII sub-state in B-DNA is preferentially displayed mainly by pyrimidine-purine steps and partly by purine-purine steps. The purine-pyrimidine steps show largest effect of 5-methyl group of thymine in stacking energy and the introduction of solvent reduces this effect significantly. These predicted structures and variabilities can explain the effect of sequence on DNA and RNA functionality. PMID:25257334

  15. A hybrid DNA extraction method for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of bacterial communities from poultry production samples.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Hiett, Kelli L; Gamble, John; Caudill, Andrew C; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Caporaso, J Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA extraction protocols can be highly dependent upon both the type of sample being investigated and the types of downstream analyses performed. Considering that the use of new bacterial community analysis techniques (e.g., microbiomics, metagenomics) is becoming more prevalent in the agricultural and environmental sciences and many environmental samples within these disciplines can be physiochemically and microbiologically unique (e.g., fecal and litter/bedding samples from the poultry production spectrum), appropriate and effective DNA extraction methods need to be carefully chosen. Therefore, a novel semi-automated hybrid DNA extraction method was developed specifically for use with environmental poultry production samples. This method is a combination of the two major types of DNA extraction: mechanical and enzymatic. A two-step intense mechanical homogenization step (using bead-beating specifically formulated for environmental samples) was added to the beginning of the "gold standard" enzymatic DNA extraction method for fecal samples to enhance the removal of bacteria and DNA from the sample matrix and improve the recovery of Gram-positive bacterial community members. Once the enzymatic extraction portion of the hybrid method was initiated, the remaining purification process was automated using a robotic workstation to increase sample throughput and decrease sample processing error. In comparison to the strict mechanical and enzymatic DNA extraction methods, this novel hybrid method provided the best overall combined performance when considering quantitative (using 16S rRNA qPCR) and qualitative (using microbiomics) estimates of the total bacterial communities when processing poultry feces and litter samples. PMID:25548939

  16. Isolation of plant DNA for PCR and genotyping using organic extraction and CTAB.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan M

    2010-11-01

    A general difficulty in isolation of DNA from plant cells is the presence of a cell wall. It is necessary to degrade plant cell walls, either physically or enzymatically, in order to effectively isolate plant DNA. Additionally, some tissues (such as endosperm) or some species contain high levels of starches or phenolic compounds that can complicate DNA isolation. A number of plant DNA isolation protocols are designed to overcome species-specific difficulties. This is a relatively simple protocol that uses an extraction buffer containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB); it can be used for many plant species. It provides a substantial amount of high-quality DNA that is suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures and is stable for long periods of time. The cost per sample is very low. In addition, this protocol is relatively robust and can be performed by individuals who have had relatively little training. A typical undergraduate student can perform ~200-300 isolations in a day using this protocol. The disadvantages are that it requires a freeze-dryer and a mill or paint-shaker-like device and that it utilizes an organic extraction step, requiring the use of a fume hood. PMID:21041388

  17. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm(2). Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation. PMID:26492833

  18. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm2. Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation. PMID:26492833

  19. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-10-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm2. Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation.

  20. Comparison of eight methods of genomic DNA extraction from babassu.

    PubMed

    Viana, J P G; Borges, A N C; Lopes, A C A; Gomes, R L F; Britto, F B; Lima, P S C; Valente, S E S

    2015-01-01

    Babassu (Orbignya phalerata Martius) is one of the most important palms in Brazil because of the largest morphological variation, wide geographic distribution, and high socio-economic importance. The diversity present in babassu germplasm should be protected against loss to ensure their use with high productivity. Study of the available variability in populations of babassu is necessary to develop conservation strategies. The study of genetic variability can be conducted using molecular markers and many of these studies require significant quantity of high-quality DNA. The present study aimed to effect comparison among eight DNA extraction methods in case of O. phalerata. The quality and concentration of nucleic acids were analyzed by spectrophotometry and integrity of DNA was ascertained by agarose gel electrophoresis. The spectrophotometry revealed that some methods resulted in high levels of concentration of nucleic acids, in which values of the ratio A260/280 and A260/230 were outside the range of purity. The agarose gel electrophoresis established the concentration and integrity of DNA. The methods of Murray and Thompson (1980) and Ferreira and Grattapaglia (1998) did not result in satisfactory quantities of DNA. Conversely, the method proposed by Khanuja et al. (1999) resulted in DNA of adequate quality and quantity that could be satisfactorily used for amplification reactions performed with two ISSR primers. PMID:26782447

  1. Optimized DNA extraction and metagenomic sequencing of airborne microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjun; Liang, Peng; Wang, Buying; Fang, Jianhuo; Lang, Jidong; Tian, Geng; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhu, Ting F

    2015-05-01

    Metagenomic sequencing has been widely used for the study of microbial communities from various environments such as soil, ocean, sediment and fresh water. Nonetheless, metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities in the air remains technically challenging, partly owing to the limited mass of collectable atmospheric particulate matter and the low biological content it contains. Here we present an optimized protocol for extracting up to tens of nanograms of airborne microbial genomic DNA from collected particulate matter. With an improved sequencing library preparation protocol, this quantity is sufficient for downstream applications, such as metagenomic sequencing for sampling various genes from the airborne microbial community. The described protocol takes ?12 h of bench time over 2-3 d, and it can be performed with standard molecular biology equipment in the laboratory. A modified version of this protocol may also be used for genomic DNA extraction from other environmental samples of limited mass or low biological content. PMID:25906115

  2. Direct extraction of genomic DNA from maize with aqueous ionic liquid buffer systems for applications in genetically modified organisms analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez García, Eric; Ressmann, Anna K; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Mach, Robert L; Krska, Rudolf; Bica, Katharina; Brunner, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    To date, the extraction of genomic DNA is considered a bottleneck in the process of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. Conventional DNA isolation methods are associated with long extraction times and multiple pipetting and centrifugation steps, which makes the entire procedure not only tedious and complicated but also prone to sample cross-contamination. In recent times, ionic liquids have emerged as innovative solvents for biomass processing, due to their outstanding properties for dissolution of biomass and biopolymers. In this study, a novel, easily applicable, and time-efficient method for the direct extraction of genomic DNA from biomass based on aqueous-ionic liquid solutions was developed. The straightforward protocol relies on extraction of maize in a 10 % solution of ionic liquids in aqueous phosphate buffer for 5 min at room temperature, followed by a denaturation step at 95 °C for 10 min and a simple filtration to remove residual biopolymers. A set of 22 ionic liquids was tested in a buffer system and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate, as well as the environmentally benign choline formate, were identified as ideal candidates. With this strategy, the quality of the genomic DNA extracted was significantly improved and the extraction protocol was notably simplified compared with a well-established method. PMID:25381609

  3. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  4. Ancient DNA: extraction, characterization, molecular cloning, and enzymatic amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Pääbo, S

    1989-01-01

    Several chemical and enzymatic properties were examined in the DNA extracted from dry remains of soft tissues that vary in age from 4 to 13,000 years and represent four species, including two extinct animals (the marsupial wolf and giant ground sloth). The DNA obtained was invariably of a low average molecular size and damaged by oxidative processes, which primarily manifest themselves as modifications of pyrimidines and sugar residues as well as baseless sites and intermolecular cross-links. This renders molecular cloning difficult. However, the polymerase chain reaction can be used to amplify and study short mitochondrial DNA sequences that are of anthropological and evolutionary significance. This opens up the prospect of performing diachronical studies of molecular evolutionary genetics. Images PMID:2928314

  5. Ancient DNA: extraction, characterization, molecular cloning, and enzymatic amplification.

    PubMed

    Pääbo, S

    1989-03-01

    Several chemical and enzymatic properties were examined in the DNA extracted from dry remains of soft tissues that vary in age from 4 to 13,000 years and represent four species, including two extinct animals (the marsupial wolf and giant ground sloth). The DNA obtained was invariably of a low average molecular size and damaged by oxidative processes, which primarily manifest themselves as modifications of pyrimidines and sugar residues as well as baseless sites and intermolecular cross-links. This renders molecular cloning difficult. However, the polymerase chain reaction can be used to amplify and study short mitochondrial DNA sequences that are of anthropological and evolutionary significance. This opens up the prospect of performing diachronical studies of molecular evolutionary genetics. PMID:2928314

  6. Optimization of DNA Extractions from Iron-rich Microbial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, H.; Hilton, T. S.; Moyer, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and is potentially one of the most abundant energy sources on the earth as an electron donor for chemolithoautotrophicgrowth coupled to Fe(II) oxidation. Many microbes have adapted to this energy source. One such bacterial class are the Zetaproteobacteria, which dominate Iron-rich microbial mats at Loihi seamount. Although cell counts are very high (up to 5.3x108 cells/ml), efficient DNA yields are low in comparison. In this study we compared extraction efficiency across different methods and with the addition of various buffers. Regardless of protocol (i.e., kit), the addition of sodium citrate drastically increased the DNA yield. The addition of sodium citrate did not alter community structure as determined by T-RFLP and qPCR. Citrate is a well-known ferric iron chelator and will bind ferrous as well. The chelated iron is then unable to participate in the Fenton reaction and this stops the generation of hydroxyl radicals which in turn can react and degrade the extracted DNA. We have utilized this relationship to allow us to obtain nearly an order of magnitude more microbial community DNA per sample, which should also have implications when processing low biomass samples, e.g., from the deep subsurface.

  7. The initial step of DNA hairpin folding: a kinetic analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides were studied in aqueous solution by monitoring contact-induced fluorescence quenching of the oxazine fluorophore MR121 by intrinsic guanosine residues (dG). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze kinetics of DNA hairpin folding. We first characterized the reporter system by investigating bimolecular quenching interactions between MR121 and guanosine monophosphate in aqueous solution estimating rate constants, efficiency and stability for formation of quenched complexes. We then studied the kinetics of complex formation between MR121 and dG residues site-specifically incorporated in DNA hairpins. To uncover the initial steps of DNA hairpin folding we investigated complex formation in ssDNA carrying one or two complementary base pairs (dC–dG pairs) that could hybridize to form a short stem. Our data show that incorporation of a single dC–dG pair leads to non-exponential decays for opening and closing kinetics and reduces rate constants by one to two orders of magnitude. We found positive activation enthalpies independent of the number of dC–dG pairs. These results imply that the rate limiting step of DNA hairpin folding is not determined by loop dynamics, or by mismatches in the stem, but rather by interactions between stem and loop nucleotides. PMID:16687657

  8. Assessing the Utility of Soil DNA Extraction Kits for Increasing DNA Yields and Eliminating PCR Inhibitors from Buried Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Hebda, Lisa M; Foran, David R

    2015-09-01

    DNA identification of human remains is often necessary when decedents are skeletonized; however, poor DNA recovery and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibition are frequently encountered, a situation exacerbated by burial. In this research, the utility of integrating soil DNA isolation kits into buried skeletal DNA analysis was evaluated and compared to a standard human DNA extraction kit and organic extraction. The soil kits successfully extracted skeletal DNA at quantities similar to standard methods, although the two kits tested, which differ mechanistically, were not equivalent. Further, the PCR inhibitors calcium and humic acid were effectively removed using the soil kits, whereas collagen was less so. Finally, concordant control region sequences were obtained from human skeletal remains using all four methods. Based on these comparisons, soil DNA isolation kits, which quickened the extraction process, proved to be a viable extraction technique for skeletal remains that resulted in positive identification of a decedent. PMID:26258388

  9. Feature extraction and signal processing for nylon DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, F; Rougemont, J; Loriod, B; Bourgeois, A; Loï, L; Bertucci, F; Hingamp, P; Houlgatte, R; Granjeaud, S

    2004-01-01

    Background High-density DNA microarrays require automatic feature extraction methodologies and softwares. These can be a potential source of non-reproducibility of gene expression measurements. Variation in feature location or in signal integration methodology may be a significant contribution to the observed variance in gene expression levels. Results We explore sources of variability in feature extraction from DNA microarrays on Nylon membrane with radioactive detection. We introduce a mathematical model of the signal emission and derive methods for correcting biases such as overshining, saturation or variation in probe amount. We also provide a quality metric which can be used qualitatively to flag weak or untrusted signals or quantitatively to modulate the weight of each experiment or gene in higher level analyses (clustering or discriminant analysis). Conclusions Our novel feature extraction methodology, based on a mathematical model of the radioactive emission, reduces variability due to saturation, neighbourhood effects and variable probe amount. Furthermore, we provide a fully automatic feature extraction software, BZScan, which implements the algorithms described in this paper. PMID:15222896

  10. A Single-Step Method for Rapid Extraction of Total Lipids from Green Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, Martin; Gentili, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae produce a wide range of lipid compounds of potential commercial interest. Total lipid extraction performed by conventional extraction methods, relying on the chloroform-methanol solvent system are too laborious and time consuming for screening large numbers of samples. In this study, three previous extraction methods devised by Folch et al. (1957), Bligh and Dyer (1959) and Selstam and Öquist (1985) were compared and a faster single-step procedure was developed for extraction of total lipids from green microalgae. In the single-step procedure, 8 ml of a 2∶1 chloroform-methanol (v/v) mixture was added to fresh or frozen microalgal paste or pulverized dry algal biomass contained in a glass centrifuge tube. The biomass was manually suspended by vigorously shaking the tube for a few seconds and 2 ml of a 0.73% NaCl water solution was added. Phase separation was facilitated by 2 min of centrifugation at 350 g and the lower phase was recovered for analysis. An uncharacterized microalgal polyculture and the green microalgae Scenedesmus dimorphus, Selenastrum minutum, and Chlorella protothecoides were subjected to the different extraction methods and various techniques of biomass homogenization. The less labour intensive single-step procedure presented here allowed simultaneous recovery of total lipid extracts from multiple samples of green microalgae with quantitative yields and fatty acid profiles comparable to those of the previous methods. While the single-step procedure is highly correlated in lipid extractability (r2 = 0.985) to the previous method of Folch et al. (1957), it allowed at least five times higher sample throughput. PMID:24586930

  11. A single-step method for rapid extraction of total lipids from green microalgae.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Martin; Gentili, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae produce a wide range of lipid compounds of potential commercial interest. Total lipid extraction performed by conventional extraction methods, relying on the chloroform-methanol solvent system are too laborious and time consuming for screening large numbers of samples. In this study, three previous extraction methods devised by Folch et al. (1957), Bligh and Dyer (1959) and Selstam and Öquist (1985) were compared and a faster single-step procedure was developed for extraction of total lipids from green microalgae. In the single-step procedure, 8 ml of a 2?1 chloroform-methanol (v/v) mixture was added to fresh or frozen microalgal paste or pulverized dry algal biomass contained in a glass centrifuge tube. The biomass was manually suspended by vigorously shaking the tube for a few seconds and 2 ml of a 0.73% NaCl water solution was added. Phase separation was facilitated by 2 min of centrifugation at 350 g and the lower phase was recovered for analysis. An uncharacterized microalgal polyculture and the green microalgae Scenedesmus dimorphus, Selenastrum minutum, and Chlorella protothecoides were subjected to the different extraction methods and various techniques of biomass homogenization. The less labour intensive single-step procedure presented here allowed simultaneous recovery of total lipid extracts from multiple samples of green microalgae with quantitative yields and fatty acid profiles comparable to those of the previous methods. While the single-step procedure is highly correlated in lipid extractability (r²?=?0.985) to the previous method of Folch et al. (1957), it allowed at least five times higher sample throughput. PMID:24586930

  12. Evaluation of Methods to Improve the Extraction and Recovery of DNA from Cotton Swabs for Forensic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adamowicz, Michael S.; Stasulli, Dominique M.; Sobestanovich, Emily M.; Bille, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol’s incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations. PMID:25549111

  13. Evaluation of methods to improve the extraction and recovery of DNA from cotton swabs for forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Michael S; Stasulli, Dominique M; Sobestanovich, Emily M; Bille, Todd W

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol's incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations. PMID:25549111

  14. Magnetic controlling of migration of DNA and proteins using one-step modified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-06-01

    A protocol was developed for preparing magnetic gold nanoparticles via one-step modification with a paramagnetic cationic surfactant. These magnetic gold nanoparticles can bind to and manipulate a low strength magnetic field-based delivery of DNA and proteins powerfully and non-invasively. PMID:25847127

  15. Using Concrete & Representational Experiences to Understand the Structure of DNA: A Four-Step Instructional Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Richards, Debbie; Collins, James; Taylor, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    A description of learning experience that uses a four-step instrumentational framework involving concrete and representational experiences to promote conceptual understanding of abstract biological concepts by a series of closely-related activities is presented. The students are introduced to the structure and implications of DNA using four…

  16. The Mechanism of the Translocation Step in DNA Replication by DNA Polymerase I: A Computer Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Golosov, Andrei A.; Warren, Joshua J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Karplus, Martin

    2010-11-03

    High-fidelity DNA polymerases copy DNA rapidly and accurately by adding correct deoxynucleotide triphosphates to a growing primer strand of DNA. Following nucleotide incorporation, a series of conformational changes translocate the DNA substrate by one base pair step, readying the polymerase for the next round of incorporation. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the translocation consists globally of a polymerase fingers-opening transition, followed by the DNA displacement and the insertion of the template base into the preinsertion site. They also show that the pyrophosphate release facilitates the opening transition and that the universally conserved Y714 plays a key role in coupling polymerase opening to DNA translocation. The transition involves several metastable intermediates in one of which the O helix is bent in the vicinity of G711. Completion of the translocation appears to require a gating motion of the O1 helix, perhaps facilitated by the presence of G715. These roles are consistent with the high level of conservation of Y714 and the two glycine residues at these positions. It is likely that a corresponding mechanism is applicable to other polymerases.

  17. Mechano-chemical kinetics of DNA replication: identification of the translocation step of a replicative DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Morin, José A; Cao, Francisco J; Lázaro, José M; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo; Valpuesta, José M; Carrascosa, José L; Salas, Margarita; Ibarra, Borja

    2015-04-20

    During DNA replication replicative polymerases move in discrete mechanical steps along the DNA template. To address how the chemical cycle is coupled to mechanical motion of the enzyme, here we use optical tweezers to study the translocation mechanism of individual bacteriophage Phi29 DNA polymerases during processive DNA replication. We determine the main kinetic parameters of the nucleotide incorporation cycle and their dependence on external load and nucleotide (dNTP) concentration. The data is inconsistent with power stroke models for translocation, instead supports a loose-coupling mechanism between chemical catalysis and mechanical translocation during DNA replication. According to this mechanism the DNA polymerase works by alternating between a dNTP/PPi-free state, which diffuses thermally between pre- and post-translocated states, and a dNTP/PPi-bound state where dNTP binding stabilizes the post-translocated state. We show how this thermal ratchet mechanism is used by the polymerase to generate work against large opposing loads (?50 pN). PMID:25800740

  18. Microfluidic chip for stacking, separation and extraction of multiple DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruige; Seah, Y P; Wang, Zhiping

    2016-03-11

    A disposable integrated microfluidic device was developed for rapid sample stacking, separation and extraction of multiple DNA fragments from a relatively large amount of sample. Isotachophoresis hyphenated gel electrophoresis (ITP-GE) was used to pre-concentrate and separate DNA fragments, followed by extraction of pure DNA fragments with electroelution on-chip. DNA fragments of 200bp, 500bp and 1kbp were successfully separated and collected in the extraction chamber within 25min. The extraction efficiency obtained from the chip was 49.9%, 52.1% and 53.7% for 200bp, 500bp and 1kbp DNA fragments, respectively. The extracted DNA fragments exhibited compatibility with downstream enzymatic reactions, for example PCR. The chip was also used to extract DNA fragments with specific size range from sheared genomic DNA and demonstrated similar performance to that using traditional gel cutting method. The whole assay can finish in 32min, 6 times faster than traditional method. PMID:26879456

  19. An alternate method for extracting DNA from environmentally challenged teeth for improved DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Stamm, Sheree; Warnke, Frauke; van Daal, Angela

    2016-01-01

    A grinding-free method to extract DNA from teeth via a direct minimal-invasive retrograde approach to the pulp cavity and dentine was compared to a standard grinding/pulverisation method. This alternate method uses endodontic dental files to access the root canals and pulp cavity for tissue and dentine harvest via the apical end of the roots and avoids mechanical damage to the crown and root morphology. In contrast, other methods require pulverisation of the whole root or tooth, transection or destruction of the occlusal surface to gain access to the DNA in the root canals and pulp chamber. This study compared two methods for preparing dentine powder from the roots of environmentally challenged teeth for forensic DNA analysis. We found that although the filing method was more laborious, and produced less dentine powder, the amount of amplifiable DNA per milligram of powder was substantially higher with the filing method compared to grinding the entire root. In addition, the number of short tandem repeat (STR) alleles detected and the peak height ratios of the STR profiles were notably higher. Although several other methods of extracting DNA-rich tissue from the pulp chamber of teeth have previously been reported, the method presented in this study is minimally invasive, thereby allowing the preservation of tooth and crown morphology. PMID:26832373

  20. DNA extraction and a cost-effective detection method for Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Petrigh, R S; Fugassa, M H

    2013-12-01

    Most methods of DNA purification from protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus involve the use of expensive kits and may also require a second step after extraction for an effective purification. The present work describes an optimized cost-effective method that is fast and simple. This method is based on a chemical lysis with proteinase K with a subsequent one-step PCR detection. In this study we used already available primers and newly designed primers to amplify two fragments of different size corresponding to the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 gene. By one-step PCR, both fragments were successfully amplified from even a single protoscolex. This result demonstrates that this method of extraction is efficient even with small amounts of sample and that PCR is highly sensitive. The major advantage of this lysis-PCR method is that it avoids a second step of purification resulting in a simpler and more economical method. Our research will serve as a base for future studies on E. granulosus genotyping, mainly with wild mammals with a low number of cysts. PMID:24113464

  1. DNA Extraction from Bronchial Aspirates for Molecular Cytology: Which Method to Take?

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Hans Jürgen; Schmiemann, Viola; Sarbia, Mario; Böcking, Alfred

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To date, there are only few systematic reports on the quality of DNA extracted from routine diagnostic cytologic specimens. It was the aim of the present study to evaluate the ability of 50% ethanol/2% carbowax (Saccomanno fixative) to preserve bronchial secretions with high quality genomic DNA as well as to compare different DNA extraction methods. Methods: DNA was extracted from 45 bronchial aspirates by four different extraction protocols. Beside DNA yield, DNA quality with regard to purity, integrity, and PCR success rate were investigated. Results: No fragmentation of sample DNA due to the fixative was detected. It was preserved as high molecular weight DNA. DNA yield, purity, and integrity were dependent on the DNA extraction method to some extend. Irrespective of the DNA extraction method the PCR success rate for amplification of ??globin gene fragments (268, 536, and 989 bp) was 100%. Conclusions: A fixative containing 50% ethanol/2% carbowax preserves high quality DNA which is well suited for PCR?based assays regardless of the extraction protocol used. The selection of the DNA extraction protocol has to be adjusted to the circumstances of application. PMID:12632017

  2. The RSC chromatin remodelling ATPase translocates DNA with high force and small step size

    PubMed Central

    Sirinakis, George; Clapier, Cedric R; Gao, Ying; Viswanathan, Ramya; Cairns, Bradley R; Zhang, Yongli

    2011-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition and reconfigure nucleosomes. Despite their diverse functions, all remodellers share highly conserved ATPase domains, many shown to translocate DNA. Understanding remodelling requires biophysical knowledge of the DNA translocation process: how the ATPase moves DNA and generates force, and how translocation and force generation are coupled on nucleosomes. Here, we characterize the real-time activity of a minimal RSC translocase ‘motor' on bare DNA, using high-resolution optical tweezers and a ‘tethered' translocase system. We observe on dsDNA a processivity of ∼35 bp, a speed of ∼25 bp/s, and a step size of 2.0 (±0.4, s.e.m.) bp. Surprisingly, the motor is capable of moving against high force, up to 30 pN, making it one of the most force-resistant motors known. We also provide evidence for DNA ‘buckling' at initiation. These observations reveal the ATPase as a powerful DNA translocating motor capable of disrupting DNA–histone interactions by mechanical force. PMID:21552204

  3. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  4. Development of a real-world direct interface for integrated DNA extraction and amplification in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Joyce, Domino A; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenway, Gillian M; Greenman, John; Haswell, Stephen J

    2011-02-01

    Integrated DNA extraction and amplification have been carried out in a microfluidic device using electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) for fluidic control. All the necessary reagents for performing both DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification were pre-loaded into the microfluidic device following encapsulation in agarose gel. Buccal cells were collected using OmniSwabs [Whatman™, UK] and manually added to a chaotropic binding/lysis solution pre-loaded into the microfluidic device. The released DNA was then adsorbed onto a silica monolith contained within the DNA extraction chamber and the microfluidic device sealed using polymer electrodes. The washing and elution steps for DNA extraction were carried out using EOP, resulting in transfer of the eluted DNA into the PCR chamber. Thermal cycling, achieved using a Peltier element, resulted in amplification of the Amelogenin locus as confirmed using conventional capillary gel electrophoresis. It was demonstrated that the PCR reagents could be stored in the microfluidic device for at least 8 weeks at 4 °C with no significant loss of activity. Such methodology lends itself to the production of 'ready-to-use' microfluidic devices containing all the necessary reagents for sample processing, with many obvious applications in forensics and clinical medicine. PMID:21072429

  5. One-step DNA fragment assembly and circularization for gene cloning.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peijun; Rabie, Bakr M

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a one-step procedure based on Taq polymerase for the precise assembly of DNA fragments into circular constructs as long as 6 kb. The only prior step needed was the amplification of the gene to be cloned and the linear vector backbone, and the whole process up to assembly and circularization lasted only 2 days, compared with the conventional method's 2 weeks. Furthermore, the final DNA construct was used to transform Escherichia coli directly without any further treatment. By circumventing the need for DNA ligase, our "Quick Assemble" method offers an improvement over the combination of long PCR and overlap extension PCR, and is expected to facilitate various kinds of complex genetic engineering projects that require precise in-frame assembly of multiple fragments, such as multiple site-directed mutagenesis and whole-DNA library gene shuffling, as well as the construction of new plasmids with any promoter, resistance gene marker, restriction site, or any DNA tag. PMID:19494420

  6. Rapid microfluidic solid-phase extraction system for hyper-methylated DNA enrichment and epigenetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    De, Arpita; Sparreboom, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic sequence and hyper-methylation profile information from the promoter regions of tumor suppressor genes are important for cancer disease investigation. Since hyper-methylated DNA (hm-DNA) is typically present in ultra-low concentrations in biological samples, such as stool, urine, and saliva, sample enrichment and amplification is typically required before detection. We present a rapid microfluidic solid phase extraction (μSPE) system for the capture and elution of low concentrations of hm-DNA (≤1 ng ml−1), based on a protein-DNA capture surface, into small volumes using a passive microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platform. All assay steps have been qualitatively characterized using a real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor, and quantitatively characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. The hm-DNA capture/elution process requires less than 5 min with an efficiency of 71% using a 25 μl elution volume and 92% efficiency using a 100 μl elution volume. PMID:25538809

  7. 'Direct PCR' optimization yields a rapid, cost-effective, nondestructive and efficient method for obtaining DNA barcodes without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Hing; Tay, Ywee Chieh; Puniamoorthy, Jayanthi; Balke, Michael; Cranston, Peter S; Meier, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    Macroinvertebrates that are collected in large numbers pose major problems in basic and applied biodiversity research: identification to species via morphology is often difficult, slow and/or expensive. DNA barcodes are an attractive alternative or complementary source of information. Unfortunately, obtaining DNA barcodes from specimens requires many steps and thus time and money. Here, we promote a short cut to DNA barcoding, that is, a nondestructive PCR method that skips DNA extraction ('direct PCR') and that can be used for a broad range of invertebrate taxa. We demonstrate how direct PCR can be optimized for the larvae and adults of nonbiting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae), a typical invertebrate group that is abundant, contains important bioindicator species, but is difficult to identify based on morphological features. After optimization, direct PCR yields high PCR success rates (>90%), preserves delicate morphological features (e.g. details of genitalia, and larval head capsules) while allowing for the recovery of genomic DNA. We also document that direct PCR can be successfully optimized for a wide range of other invertebrate taxa that need routine barcoding (flies: Culicidae, Drosophilidae, Dolichopodidae, Sepsidae; sea stars: Oreasteridae). Key for obtaining high PCR success rates is optimizing (i) tissue quantity, (ii) body part, (iii) primer pair and (iv) type of Taq polymerase. Unfortunately, not all invertebrates appear suitable because direct PCR has low success rates for other taxa that were tested (e.g. Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Copepoda, Hymenoptera: Formicidae and Odonata). It appears that the technique is less successful for heavily sclerotized insects and/or those with many exocrine glands. PMID:24816169

  8. Selective removal of human DNA from metagenomic DNA samples extracted from dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Stephanie J; Easton, Samantha; Booth, Veronica; Henderson, Brian; Wade, William G; Ward, John M

    2011-08-01

    Metagenomic techniques are used to analyse bacterial communities allowing both culturable and unculturable species to be represented. However, the screening of oral metagenomic samples can be hindered by high animal host DNA content. This study evaluated methods for the reduction of human DNA concentrations within oral metagenomic samples. Plaque samples were collected from 27 patients presenting with periodontal disease and treated to remove human DNA using either selective lysis of eukaryotic cells at several buffer concentrations or differential centrifugation after treatment with trypsin and/or detergents. Human and bacterial DNA levels were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The human DNA content of plaque extracts was significantly reduced by all treatments compared with an untreated control (P < 0.05). However, differential centrifugation simultaneously reduced the bacterial DNA content unless samples were pretreated with a detergent. Observations of Gram stained samples that were processed using differential centrifugation without detergent suggest that many bacteria remain adhered to human cells. An approach that uses differential centrifugation in parallel with selective lysis is recommended to fully represent the oral microbiota in metagenomic samples, including those tightly adhered to human cells and more delicate bacteria such as Mycoplasma. PMID:21298692

  9. Optimization of a one-step heat-inducible in vivo mini DNA vector production system.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Sum, Chi Hong; Wettig, Shawn; Slavcev, Roderick A

    2014-01-01

    While safer than their viral counterparts, conventional circular covalently closed (CCC) plasmid DNA vectors offer a limited safety profile. They often result in the transfer of unwanted prokaryotic sequences, antibiotic resistance genes, and bacterial origins of replication that may lead to unwanted immunostimulatory responses. Furthermore, such vectors may impart the potential for chromosomal integration, thus potentiating oncogenesis. Linear covalently closed (LCC), bacterial sequence free DNA vectors have shown promising clinical improvements in vitro and in vivo. However, the generation of such minivectors has been limited by in vitro enzymatic reactions hindering their downstream application in clinical trials. We previously characterized an in vivo temperature-inducible expression system, governed by the phage ? pL promoter and regulated by the thermolabile ? CI[Ts]857 repressor to produce recombinant protelomerase enzymes in E. coli. In this expression system, induction of recombinant protelomerase was achieved by increasing culture temperature above the 37°C threshold temperature. Overexpression of protelomerase led to enzymatic reactions, acting on genetically engineered multi-target sites called "Super Sequences" that serve to convert conventional CCC plasmid DNA into LCC DNA minivectors. Temperature up-shift, however, can result in intracellular stress responses and may alter plasmid replication rates; both of which may be detrimental to LCC minivector production. We sought to optimize our one-step in vivo DNA minivector production system under various induction schedules in combination with genetic modifications influencing plasmid replication, processing rates, and cellular heat stress responses. We assessed different culture growth techniques, growth media compositions, heat induction scheduling and temperature, induction duration, post-induction temperature, and E. coli genetic background to improve the productivity and scalability of our system, achieving an overall LCC DNA minivector production efficiency of ? 90%.We optimized a robust technology conferring rapid, scalable, one-step in vivo production of LCC DNA minivectors with potential application to gene transfer-mediated therapeutics. PMID:24586704

  10. Evaluation of different methods for extracting extracellular DNA from the biofilm matrix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianfeng; Xi, Chuanwu

    2009-08-01

    The occurrence of high concentrations of extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the extracellular matrices of biofilms plays an important role in biofilm formation and development and possibly in horizontal gene transfer through natural transformation. Studies have been conducted to characterize the nature of eDNA and its potential function in biofilm development, but it is difficult to extract eDNA from the extracellular matrices of biofilms without any contamination from genomic DNA released by cell lysis during the extraction process. In this report, we compared several different extraction methods in order to obtain highly pure eDNA from different biofilm samples. After different extraction methods were explored, it was concluded that using chemical treatment or enzymatic treatment of biofilm samples may obtain larger amounts of eDNA than using the simple filtration method. There was no detectable cell lysis when the enzymatic treatment methods were used, but substantial cell lysis was observed when the chemical treatment methods were used. These data suggest that eDNA may bind to other extracellular polymers in the biofilm matrix and that enzymatic treatment methods are effective and favorable for extracting eDNA from biofilm samples. Moreover, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of eDNA in Acinetobacter sp. biofilms and Acinetobacter sp. genomic DNA and DNA sequencing analysis revealed that eDNA originated from genomic DNA but was not structurally identical to the genomic DNA. PMID:19561191

  11. Evaluation of Different Methods for Extracting Extracellular DNA from the Biofilm Matrix▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfeng; Xi, Chuanwu

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of high concentrations of extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the extracellular matrices of biofilms plays an important role in biofilm formation and development and possibly in horizontal gene transfer through natural transformation. Studies have been conducted to characterize the nature of eDNA and its potential function in biofilm development, but it is difficult to extract eDNA from the extracellular matrices of biofilms without any contamination from genomic DNA released by cell lysis during the extraction process. In this report, we compared several different extraction methods in order to obtain highly pure eDNA from different biofilm samples. After different extraction methods were explored, it was concluded that using chemical treatment or enzymatic treatment of biofilm samples may obtain larger amounts of eDNA than using the simple filtration method. There was no detectable cell lysis when the enzymatic treatment methods were used, but substantial cell lysis was observed when the chemical treatment methods were used. These data suggest that eDNA may bind to other extracellular polymers in the biofilm matrix and that enzymatic treatment methods are effective and favorable for extracting eDNA from biofilm samples. Moreover, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of eDNA in Acinetobacter sp. biofilms and Acinetobacter sp. genomic DNA and DNA sequencing analysis revealed that eDNA originated from genomic DNA but was not structurally identical to the genomic DNA. PMID:19561191

  12. One-step purification of metallothionein extracted from two different sources.

    PubMed

    Honda, Rubens T; Araújo, Roziete Mendes; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Val, Adalberto L; Demasi, Marilene

    2005-06-25

    We describe a one-step purification of hepatic metallothionein from the Amazon fish Colossoma macropomum injected with cadmium and from the copper-loaded metallothionein from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, performed by affinity chromatography through metal-chelating columns. Yeast metallothionein was purified from Cu2+-loaded resin and eluted by a continuous EDTA gradient whereas hepatic metallothionein extracted from fishes was purified by Ni2+-loaded resin and eluted by a continuous imidazol gradient. Purified metallothioneins were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and characterized by UV spectra of the apo- and Cd2+-loaded protein. This method allowed high purity and yield as well as rapid one-step extraction of both metal-loaded and apoprotein. PMID:15899374

  13. Comparative analysis of fecal DNA extraction methods with phylogenetic microarray: effective recovery of bacterial and archaeal DNA using mechanical cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Anne; Nikkilä, Janne; Jalanka-Tuovinen, Jonna; Immonen, Outi; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Kekkonen, Riina A; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2010-05-01

    Several different protocols are used for fecal DNA extraction, which is an integral step in all phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches to characterize the highly diverse intestinal ecosystem. We compared four widely used methods, and found their DNA yields to vary up to 35-fold. Bacterial, archaeal and human DNA was quantified by real-time PCR, and a compositional analysis of different extracts was carried out using the Human Intestinal Tract Chip, a 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic microarray. The overall microbiota composition was highly similar between the methods in contrast to the profound differences between the subjects (Pearson correlations >0.899 and 0.735, respectively). A detailed comparative analysis of mechanical and enzymatic methods showed that despite their overall similarity, the mechanical cell disruption by repeated bead beating showed the highest bacterial diversity and resulted in significantly improved DNA extraction efficiency of archaea and some bacteria, including Clostridium cluster IV. By applying the mechanical disruption method a high prevalence (67%) of methanogenic archaea was detected in healthy subjects (n=24), exceeding the typical values reported previously. The assessment of performance differences between different methodologies serves as a concrete step towards the comparison and reliable meta-analysis of the results obtained in different laboratories. PMID:20171997

  14. Manipulation and extraction of genomic DNA from cell lysate by functionalized magnetic particles for lab on a chip applications.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Siu Wai; Hsing, I-Ming

    2006-01-15

    A novel approach for extracting living cells' genomic DNA materials utilizing functionalized magnetic particles (MPs) is reported in this investigation. This strategy is amenable to handle bio-samples in a miniaturized environment and it offers a possibility to separate and purify DNA from other cell lysate mixtures "on-chip", which is known to be a bottle-neck step in an integrated micro-total-analysis-system (muTAS). "Species-specific" genomic DNA of interest is captured by the MPs based on the hybridization interaction between the biotinylated probes modified MPs and a complementary region of the targeted genome. The genome DNA anchored on the particles can be separated from the rest of cellular mixtures by a simple buffer washing upon the exertion of external magnetic force. Surface modifications of MPs and hybridization conditions affecting the genome capturing efficiency are investigated. Extraction of genomic DNA from E. coli is demonstrated in a silicon/glass-based micro-reactor patterned with a platinum heater and sensors. On-chip extraction and manipulation of genomic DNAs illustrated in this study is a step forward toward a total integrated bioanalytical microsystem for crude cells/sample analysis. PMID:16368479

  15. Highly Effective DNA Extraction Method from Fresh, Frozen, Dried and Clotted Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Samadi Shams, Sara; Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Soltanzad, Farzaneh; Kafil, Vala; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Atashpaz, Sina; Barar, Jaleh

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Today, with the tremendous potential of genomics and other recent advances in science, the role of science to improve reliable DNA extraction methods is more relevant than ever before. The ideal process for genomic DNA extraction demands high quantities of pure, integral and intact genomic DNA (gDNA) from the sample with minimal co-extraction of inhibitors of downstream processes. Here, we report the development of a very rapid, less-hazardous, and high throughput protocol for extracting of high quality DNA from blood samples. Methods Dried, clotted and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) treated fresh and frozen blood samples were extracted using this method in which the quality and integrity of the extracted DNA were corroborated by agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR reaction and DNA digestion using restricted enzyme. The UV spectrophotometric and gel electrophoresis analysis resulted in high A260/A280 ratio (>1.8) with high intactness of DNA. Results PCR and DNA digestion experiments indicated that the final solutions of extracted DNA contained no inhibitory substances, which confirms that the isolated DNA is of good quality. Conclusion The high quality and quantity of current method, no enzymatic processing and accordingly its low cost, make it appropriate for DNA extraction not only from human but also from animal blood samples in any molecular biology labs. PMID:23678425

  16. Establishment and application of an efficient, economic, and rapid rice DNA extraction method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid, economic, and efficient method for DNA extraction from rice leaf, root and seed was developed, and the extracted DNA was used as a template to successfully amplify the rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta. Profiles of Pi-ta in 165 breeding lines detected by DNA markers were verified using diff...

  17. Microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies is improved by avoiding mechanical cell disruption

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Nava, Gerardo M.; Benefiel, Ann C.; Greenberg, Eugene; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2011-01-01

    Currently, standard protocols for microbial DNA extraction from intestinal tissues do not exist. We assessed the efficiency of a commercial kit with and without mechanical disruption. Better quality DNA was obtained without mechanical disruption. Thus, it appears that bead-beating is not required for efficient microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies. PMID:21820015

  18. Effect of DNA Extraction Methods on the Apparent Structure of Yak Rumen Microbial Communities as Revealed by 16S rDNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Bing; Lan, Dao-Liang; Tang, Cheng; Yang, Xiao-Nong; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    To more efficiently identify the microbial community of the yak rumen, the standardization of DNA extraction is key to ensure fidelity while studying environmental microbial communities. In this study, we systematically compared the efficiency of several extraction methods based on DNA yield, purity, and 16S rDNA sequencing to determine the optimal DNA extraction methods whose DNA products reflect complete bacterial communities. The results indicate that method 6 (hexadecyltrimethylammomium bromide-lysozyme-physical lysis by bead beating) is recommended for the DNA isolation of the rumen microbial community due to its high yield, operational taxonomic unit, bacterial diversity, and excellent cell-breaking capability. The results also indicate that the bead-beating step is necessary to effectively break down the cell walls of all of the microbes, especially Gram-positive bacteria. Another aim of this study was to preliminarily analyze the bacterial community via 16S rDNA sequencing. The microbial community spanned approximately 21 phyla, 35 classes, 75 families, and 112 genera. A comparative analysis showed some variations in the microbial community between yaks and cattle that may be attributed to diet and environmental differences. Interestingly, numerous uncultured or unclassified bacteria were found in yak rumen, suggesting that further research is required to determine the specific functional and ecological roles of these bacteria in yak rumen. In summary, the investigation of the optimal DNA extraction methods and the preliminary evaluation of the bacterial community composition of yak rumen support further identification of the specificity of the rumen microbial community in yak and the discovery of distinct gene resources. PMID:26094313

  19. DNA Extraction by Isotachophoresis in a Microfluidic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S J

    2011-08-10

    Biological assays have many applications. For example, forensics personnel and medical professionals use these tests to diagnose diseases and track their progression or identify pathogens and the host response to them. One limitation of these tests, however, is that most of them target only one piece of the sample - such as bacterial DNA - and other components (e.g. host genomic DNA) get in the way, even though they may be useful for different tests. To address this problem, it would be useful to extract several different substances from a complex biological sample - such as blood - in an inexpensive and efficient manner. This summer, I worked with Maxim Shusteff at Lawrence Livermore National Lab on the Rapid Automated Sample Prep project. The goal of the project is to solve the aforementioned problem by creating a system that uses a series of different extraction methods to extract cells, bacteria, and DNA from a complex biological sample. Biological assays can then be run on purified output samples. In this device, an operator could input a complex sample such as blood or saliva, and would receive separate outputs of cells, bacteria, viruses, and DNA. I had the opportunity to work this summer with isotachophoresis (ITP), a technique that can be used to extract nucleic acids from a sample. This technique is intended to be the last stage of the purification device. Isotachophoresis separates particles based on different electrophoretic mobilities. This technique is convenient for out application because free solution DNA mobility is approximately equal for DNA longer than 300 base pairs in length. The sample of interest - in our case DNA - is fed into the chip with streams of leading electrolyte (LE) and trailing electrolyte (TE). When an electric field is applied, the species migrate based on their electrophoretic mobilities. Because the ions in the leading electrolyte have a high electrophoretic mobility, they race ahead of the slower sample and trailing electrolyte ions. Conversely, the trailing electrolyte ions have a slow electrophoretic mobility, so they lag behind the sample, thus trapping the species of interest between the LE and TE streams. In a typical isotachophoresis configuration, the electric field is applied in a direction parallel to the direction of flow. The species then form bands that stretch across the width of the channel. A major limitation of that approach is that only a finite amount of sample can be processed at once, and the sample must be processed in batches. For our purposes, a form of free-flow isotachophoresis is more convenient, where the DNA forms a band parallel to the edges of the channel. To achieve this, in our chip, the electric field is applied transversely. This creates a force perpendicular to the direction of flow, which causes the different ions to migrate across the flow direction. Because the mobility of the DNA is between the mobility of the leading and the trailing electrolyte, the DNA is focused in a tight band near the center of the channel. The stream of DNA can then be directed to a different output to produce a highly concentrated outlet stream without batch processing. One hurdle that must be overcome for successful ITP is isolating the electrochemical reactions that result from the application of high voltage for the actual process of isotachophoresis. The electrochemical reactions that occur around metal electrodes produce bubbles and pH changes that are detrimental to successful ITP. The design of the chips we use incorporates polyacrylamide gels to serve as electrodes along the central channel. For our design, the metal electrodes are located away from the chip, and high conductivity buffer streams carry the potential to the chip, functioning as a 'liquid electrode.' The stream then runs alongside a gel barrier. The gel electrode permits ion transfer while simultaneously isolating the separation chamber from any contaminants in the outer, 'liquid electrode' streams. The difference in potential from one side of the chip to the other creates an electric field. This field traverses the inner, separation channel, containing the leading electrolyte, the trailing electrolyte, and the sample of interest (DNA). To increase the ease of use of the chips, a newer chip design has been fabricated. This design has wire electrodes integrated on the chip, rather than elsewhere. To keep the pH changes and bubbling isolated from the separation channel, the chip contains deeper wells near the electrodes so that the flowing buffer can wash away any gases that form around the electrode. This design is significantly more compact because it eliminates the cumbersome electrode boxes. Eliminating the electrode boxes also decreases the required voltage, making the experiments safer. This happens because when the 'liquid electrode' streams travel through small diameter tubing, they lose much of their voltage due to the electrical resistance of the fluid in the tubing.

  20. A two-step strategy for constructing specifically self-subtracted cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Laveder, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Toppo, Stefano; Valle, Giorgio; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for producing subtracted cDNA libraries that is optimized for connective and epithelial tissues, where a few exceptionally abundant (super-prevalent) RNA species account for a large fraction of the total mRNA mass. Our method consists of a two-step subtraction of the most abundant mRNAs: the first step involves a novel use of oligo-directed RNase H digestion to lower the concentration of tissue-specific, super-prevalent RNAs. In the second step, a highly specific subtraction is achieved through hybridization with probes from a 3?-end ESTs collection. By applying this technique in skeletal muscle, we have constructed subtracted cDNA libraries that are effectively enriched for genes expressed at low levels. We further report on frequent premature termination of transcription in human muscle mitochondria and discuss the importance of this phenomenon in designing subtractive approaches. The tissue-specific collections of cDNA clones generated by our method are particularly well suited for expression profiling. PMID:11972353

  1. Comparison of different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Santos, H.F.; Carmo, F.L.; Leite, D.C.A.; Jesus, H.E.; Maalouf, P. De Carvalho; Almeida, C.; Soriano, A.U.; Altomari, D.; Suhett, L.; Vólaro, V.; Valoni, E.; Francisco, M.; Vieira, J.; Rocha, R.; Sardinha, B.L.; Mendes, L.B.; João, R.R.; Lacava, B.; Jesus, R.F.; Sebastian, G.V.; Pessoa, A.; van Elsas, J.D.; Rezende, R.P.; Pires, D.O.; Duarte, G.; Castro, C.B.; Rosado, A.S.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to test different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from the coral Mussismilia harttii. Four different commercial kits were tested, three of them based on methods for DNA extraction from soil (FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, MP Bio, PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio, and ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit, Zymo Research) and one kit for DNA extraction from plants (UltraClean Plant DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio). Five polyps of the same colony of M. harttii were macerated and aliquots were submitted to DNA extraction by the different kits. After extraction, the DNA was quantified and PCR-DGGE was used to study the molecular fingerprint of Bacteria and Eukarya. Among the four kits tested, the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount of DNA extracted, yielding about three times more DNA than the other kits. Also, we observed a higher number and intensities of DGGE bands for both Bacteria and Eukarya with the same kit. Considering these results, we suggested that the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit is the best adapted for the study of the microbial communities of corals. PMID:24031859

  2. A simple and cost-effective method of DNA extraction from small formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue for molecular oncologic testing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraction of DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a critical step in molecular oncologic testing. As molecular oncology testing becomes more important for prognostic and therapeutic decision making and tissue specimens become smaller due to earlier detection of suspicious lesions and the use of fine needle aspiration methods for tissue collection, it becomes more challenging for the typical molecular pathology laboratory to obtain reliable test results. We developed a DNA extraction method to obtain sufficient quantity and high quality genomic DNA from limited FFPE tissue for molecular oncology testing using a combination of H&E stained slides, a matrix capture method and the Qiagen DNA column. Methods Three DNA extraction methods were compared: our standard procedure of manually scraping tissue from unstained slides followed by DNA extraction using the QIAamp FFPE column (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), a glue capture method (Pinpoint Solution, Zymo Research Corp, Inc) on H&E stained slides followed by DNA extraction using either the QIAamp column or the column included with the Pinpoint kit (Zymo Research). The DNA extraction protocol was optimized. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired two-sample student’s t-test. Results The combination of the matrix capture method with the QIAamp column gave an equivalent amount of DNA as our standard extraction method using the unstained slides and a 4.6-fold higher DNA yield than using the Zymo column included in the Pinpoint Slide Solution kit. Several molecular tests were performed and DNA purified using the new method gave the same results as for the previous methods. Conclusions Using H&E stained slides allows visual confirmation of tumor cells during microdissection. The Pinpoint solution made removal of specific tissue from the slides easier and reduced the risk of contamination and tissue loss. This DNA extraction method is simple, cost-effective, and blends with our current workflow requiring no additional equipment. PMID:25067909

  3. Fast protocol for extraction of DNA from Prosopis spp leaves (plant adapted to arid environment) without liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Michel-López, C Y; González-Mendoza, D; Grimaldo-Juarez, O

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from Prosopis spp for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is complicated, owing to the presence of a high percentage of secondary metabolites that bind to or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. In the present study, we report a modified sodium dodecyl sulfate/phenol protocol that eliminates the use of liquid nitrogen in the maceration process, ?-mercaptoethanol in the buffer extraction, and the ethanol precipitation step. The A???/A??? absorbance ratios of the isolated DNA were approximately 2.0 to 1.9, suggesting that the DNA fraction was pure and can be used for further PCR analysis. The DNA isolated by this protocol is of sufficient quality for molecular applications; this technique could be applied to other organisms that have similar substances that hinder DNA extraction. Finally, this proposal represents an alternative fast, cheap, and effective method for the isolation of genomic DNA from fresh leaves of Prosopis spp, even in low-technology laboratories. PMID:24089098

  4. Step-wise DNA relaxation and decatenation by NaeI-43K.

    PubMed Central

    Jo, K; Topal, M D

    1998-01-01

    Nae I protein was originally isolated for its restriction endonuclease properties. Nae I was later discovered to either relax or cleave supercoiled DNA, depending upon whether Nae I position 43 contains a lysine (43K) or leucine (43L) respectively. Nae I-43K DNA relaxation activity appears to be the product of coupling separate endonuclease and ligase domains within the same polypeptide. Whereas Nae I relaxes supercoiled DNA like a topoisomerase, even forming a transient covalent intermediate with the substrate DNA, Nae I shows no obvious sequence similarity to the topoisomerases. To further characterize the topoisomerase activity of Nae I, we report here that Nae I-43K changes the linking number of a single negatively supercoiled topoisomer of pBR322 by units of one and therefore is a type I topoisomerase. Positively supercoiled pBR322 was resistant to Nae I-43K. At low salt concentration Nae I-43K was processive; non-saturating amounts of enzyme relaxed a fraction of the DNA. At high salt concentration the same non-saturating amounts of Nae I-43K partially relaxed all the DNA in a step-wise fashion to give a Gaussian distribution of topoisomers, demonstrating a switch from a processive to a distributive mode of action. Nae I-43K decatenated kinetoplast DNA containing nicked circles, implying that Nae I-43K can cleave opposite a nick. The products of the reaction are decatenated nicked circles under both processive and distributive conditions. The behavior of Nae I-43K is consistent with that of a prokaryotic type I topoisomerase. PMID:9580689

  5. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar.

    PubMed

    Leite, D C A; Balieiro, F C; Pires, C A; Madari, B E; Rosado, A S; Coutinho, H L C; Peixoto, R S

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  6. Tenrec phylogeny and the noninvasive extraction of nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Asher, Robert J; Hofreiter, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Due in part to scarcity of material, no published study has yet cladistically addressed the systematics of living and fossil Tenrecidae (Mammalia, Afrotheria). Using a noninvasive technique for sampling nuclear DNA from museum specimens, we investigate the evolution of the Tenrecidae and assess the extent to which tenrecids fit patterns of relationships proposed for other terrestrial mammals on Madagascar. Application of several tree-reconstruction techniques on sequences of the nuclear growth hormone receptor gene and morphological data for all recognized tenrecid genera supports monophyly of Malagasy tenrecids to the exclusion of the two living African genera. However, both parsimony and Bayesian methods favor a close relationship between fossil African tenrecs and the Malagasy Geogale, supporting the hypothesis of island paraphyly, but not polyphyly. More generally, the noninvasive extraction technique can be applied with minimal risk to rare/unique specimens and, by better utilizing museum collections for genetic work, can greatly mitigate field expenses and disturbance of natural populations. PMID:16522569

  7. DNA Extraction and Amplification from Contemporary Polynesian Bark-Cloth

    PubMed Central

    Moncada, Ximena; Payacán, Claudia; Arriaza, Francisco; Lobos, Sergio; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Paper mulberry has been used for thousands of years in Asia and Oceania for making paper and bark-cloth, respectively. Museums around the world hold valuable collections of Polynesian bark-cloth. Genetic analysis of the plant fibers from which the textiles were made may answer a number of questions of interest related to provenance, authenticity or species used in the manufacture of these textiles. Recovery of nucleic acids from paper mulberry bark-cloth has not been reported before. Methodology We describe a simple method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable DNA from small samples of contemporary Polynesian bark-cloth (tapa) using two types of nuclear markers. We report the amplification of about 300 bp sequences of the ITS1 region and of a microsatellite marker. Conclusions Sufficient DNA was retrieved from all bark-cloth samples to permit successful PCR amplification. This method shows a means of obtaining useful genetic information from modern bark-cloth samples and opens perspectives for the analyses of small fragments derived from ethnographic materials. PMID:23437166

  8. Specific requirement for ATP at an early step of in vitro transcription of human mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, N.; Attardi, G.

    1987-06-01

    The ATP concentrations allowing transcription of heavy- and light-strand of human mtDNA in a HeLa cell mitochrondrial lysate were found to cover a broad range, with a maximum around 2.5 mM, and with reproducible differences in the ATP response curves for the two transcription events. Direct measurements showed that nonspecific ATP degradation during the assay did not account for the high ATP requirement. 5'-Adenylyl imidodiphosphate (p(NH)ppA), an ATP analog with a nonhydrolyzable ..beta..-..gamma.. bond, was unable to substitute for ATP in supporting mtDNA transcription but greatly stimulated this transcription in the presence of a low concentration of exogenous APT, measured with (/sup 32/P)-labeled nucleotides. Evidence was obtained indicating that p(NH)ppA did not support an early event in mtDNA transcription (formation of preinitiation complex or initiation), whereas this analog could substitute effectively for ATP in the subsequent elongation steps. These results pointed to a specific requirement for ATP at an early step of the transcription process.

  9. A kinetic analysis of strand breaks on large DNA induced by cigarette smoke extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Takata, Tatsuya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We report a kinetic analysis of strand breakages on large DNA molecules induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE), an extract of soluble cigarette smoke components. Previously, this DNA damage was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, whereas we used fluorescence to kinetically analyze damage to individual DNA molecules. CSE caused a marked change in length of DNA molecules. The rate of CSE-induced double-strand breakage on large random-coiled DNA molecules was determined using a simple theoretical model, allowing the facile estimation of the rate of double-strand breaks on large DNA molecules.

  10. Innovative Graphite Oxide-Cellulose Based Material Specific for Genomic DNA Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-11-01

    Extraction of genomic DNA from various types of samples is often challenging for commercial silica spin column. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/cellulose composite as an alternative material for genomic DNA extraction. The purity of DNA and extraction efficiency were compared to that of commercial silica product. In this study, the total weight % of GO was fixed at 4.15% in GO/Cellulose composite. Chewed gum, nail clip, cigarette bud paper, animal tissue and hair sample were used as various genomic DNA sources for extraction experiments. Among all types of samples, the extraction efficiencies were 4 to 12 times higher than that of commercial silica spin column. The absorbance ratio of 260 nm to 280 nm (A260/A280) of all samples ranged between 1.6 and 2.0. The results demonstrated that GO/Cellulose composites might serve as an innovative solid support material for genomic DNA extraction.

  11. DNA extraction from fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Gouda-Vossos, Amany; Dzamko, Nicolas; Halliday, Glenda; Huang, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human brain tissues are invaluable resources for molecular genetic studies of central nervous system diseases, especially neurodegenerative disorders. To identify the optimal method for DNA extraction from human brain tissue, we compared methods on differently-processed tissues. Fragments of LRRK2 and MAPT (257 bp and 483 bp/245 bp) were amplified for evaluation. We found that for FFPE samples, the success rate of DNA extraction was greater when using a commercial kit than a laboratory-based method (successful DNA extraction from 76% versus 33% of samples). PCR amplicon size and storage period were key factors influencing the success rate of DNA extraction from FFPE samples. In the fresh-frozen samples, the DNA extraction success rate was 100% using either a commercial kit (QIAamp DNA Micro) or a laboratory-based method (sample boiling in 0.1 mol/L NaOH, followed by proteinase K digestion, and then DNA extraction using Chelex-100) regardless of PCR amplicon length or tissue storage time. Although the present results demonstrate that PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA can be extracted from both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples, fresh brain tissue is recommended for DNA extraction in future neuropathological studies. PMID:23996594

  12. Human beta-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old.

    PubMed Central

    Béraud-Colomb, E; Roubin, R; Martin, J; Maroc, N; Gardeisen, A; Trabuchet, G; Goosséns, M

    1995-01-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the beta-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for beta-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT) chi (T) gamma microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the beta-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8533755

  13. Human {beta}-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old

    SciTech Connect

    Beraud-Colomb, E. |; Maroc, N.; Roubin, R.

    1995-12-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the P-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for P-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT){sub x}(T){sub y} microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the P-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar

    PubMed Central

    Leite, D.C.A.; Balieiro, F.C.; Pires, C.A.; Madari, B.E.; Rosado, A.S.; Coutinho, H.L.C.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  15. Streamlining DNA Barcoding Protocols: Automated DNA Extraction and a New cox1 Primer in Arachnid Systematics

    PubMed Central

    Vidergar, Nina; Toplak, Nataša; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding is a popular tool in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, but for most animal lineages protocols for obtaining the barcoding sequences—mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (cox1 AKA CO1)—are not standardized. Our aim was to explore an optimal strategy for arachnids, focusing on the species-richest lineage, spiders by (1) improving an automated DNA extraction protocol, (2) testing the performance of commonly used primer combinations, and (3) developing a new cox1 primer suitable for more efficient alignment and phylogenetic analyses. Methodology We used exemplars of 15 species from all major spider clades, processed a range of spider tissues of varying size and quality, optimized genomic DNA extraction using the MagMAX Express magnetic particle processor—an automated high throughput DNA extraction system—and tested cox1 amplification protocols emphasizing the standard barcoding region using ten routinely employed primer pairs. Results The best results were obtained with the commonly used Folmer primers (LCO1490/HCO2198) that capture the standard barcode region, and with the C1-J-2183/C1-N-2776 primer pair that amplifies its extension. However, C1-J-2183 is designed too close to HCO2198 for well-interpreted, continuous sequence data, and in practice the resulting sequences from the two primer pairs rarely overlap. We therefore designed a new forward primer C1-J-2123 60 base pairs upstream of the C1-J-2183 binding site. The success rate of this new primer (93%) matched that of C1-J-2183. Conclusions The use of C1-J-2123 allows full, indel-free overlap of sequences obtained with the standard Folmer primers and with C1-J-2123 primer pair. Our preliminary tests suggest that in addition to spiders, C1-J-2123 will also perform in other arachnids and several other invertebrates. We provide optimal PCR protocols for these primer sets, and recommend using them for systematic efforts beyond DNA barcoding. PMID:25415202

  16. A two-step nucleotide-flipping mechanism enables kinetic discrimination of DNA lesions by AGT.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Ma, Ao; Dinner, Aaron R

    2008-03-25

    O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) repairs damage to the human genome by flipping guanine and thymine bases into its active site for irreversible transfer of alkyl lesions to Cys-145, but how the protein identifies its targets has remained unknown. Understanding molecular recognition in this system, which can serve as a paradigm for the many nucleotide-flipping proteins that regulate genes and repair DNA in all kingdoms of life, is particularly important given that inhibitors are in clinical trials as anticancer therapeutics. Computational approaches introduced recently for harvesting and statistically characterizing trajectories of molecularly rare events now enable us to elucidate a pathway for nucleotide flipping by AGT and the forces that promote it. In contrast to previously proposed flipping mechanisms, we observe a two-step process that promotes a kinetic, rather than a thermodynamic, gate-keeping strategy for lesion discrimination. Connection is made to recent single-molecule studies of DNA-repair proteins sliding on DNA to understand how they sense subtle chemical differences between bases efficiently. PMID:18353991

  17. A high-throughput, high-quality plant genomic DNA extraction protocol.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J; Cong, X H; Duan, Y B; Li, L; Wei, P C; Lu, X Z; Yang, J B

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) is a crucial technique in plant molecular biology. The quality of gDNA determines the reliability of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In this paper, we reported a high-quality gDNA extraction protocol optimized for real-time PCR in a variety of plant species. Performed in a 96-well block, our protocol provides high throughput. Without the need for phenol-chloroform and liquid nitrogen or dry ice, our protocol is safer and more cost-efficient than traditional DNA extraction methods. The method takes 10 mg leaf tissue to yield 5-10 µg high-quality gDNA. Spectral measurement and electrophoresis were used to demonstrate gDNA purity. The extracted DNA was qualified in a restriction enzyme digestion assay and conventional PCR. The real-time PCR amplification was sufficiently sensitive to detect gDNA at very low concentrations (3 pg/µL). The standard curve of gDNA dilutions from our phenol-chloroform-free protocol showed better linearity (R(2) = 0.9967) than the phenol-chloroform protocol (R(2) = 0.9876). The results indicate that the gDNA was of high quality and fit for real-time PCR. This safe, high-throughput plant gDNA extraction protocol could be used to isolate high-quality gDNA for real-time PCR and other downstream molecular applications. PMID:24222228

  18. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  19. Limitations and recommendations for successful DNA extraction from forensic soil samples: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer M; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Soil is commonly used in forensic casework to provide discriminatory power to link a suspect to a crime scene. Standard analyses examine the intrinsic properties of soils, including mineralogy, geophysics, texture and colour; however, soils can also support a vast amount of organisms, which can be examined using DNA fingerprinting techniques. Many previous genetic analyses have relied on patterns of fragment length variation produced by amplification of unidentified taxa in the soil extract. In contrast, the development of advanced DNA sequencing technologies now provides the ability to generate a detailed picture of soil microbial communities and the taxa present, allowing for improved discrimination between samples. However, DNA must be efficiently extracted from the complex soil matrix to achieve accurate and reproducible DNA sequencing results, and extraction efficacy is highly dependent on the soil type and method used. As a result, a consideration of soil properties is important when estimating the likelihood of successful DNA extraction. This would include a basic understanding of soil components, their interactions with DNA molecules and the factors that affect such interactions. This review highlights some important considerations required prior to DNA extraction and discusses the use of common chemical reagents in soil DNA extraction protocols to achieve maximum efficacy. Together, the information presented here is designed to facilitate informed decisions about the most appropriate sampling and extraction methodology, relevant both to the soil type and the details of a specific forensic case, to ensure sufficient DNA yield and enable successful analysis. PMID:24796953

  20. Commercial DNA extraction kits impact observed microbial community composition in permafrost samples.

    PubMed

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Layton, Alice C; Lau, Maggie C Y; Chauhan, Archana; Cheng, Karen R; Meyers, Arthur J; Murphy, Jasity R; Rogers, Alexandra W; Saarunya, Geetha S; Williams, Daniel E; Pfiffner, Susan M; Biggerstaff, John P; Stackhouse, Brandon T; Phelps, Tommy J; Whyte, Lyle; Sayler, Gary S; Onstott, Tullis C

    2014-01-01

    The total community genomic DNA (gDNA) from permafrost was extracted using four commercial DNA extraction kits. The gDNAs were compared using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting 16S rRNA genes and bacterial diversity analyses obtained via 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA (V3 region) amplified in single or nested PCR. The FastDNA(®) SPIN (FDS) Kit provided the highest gDNA yields and 16S rRNA gene concentrations, followed by MoBio PowerSoil(®) (PS) and MoBio PowerLyzer™ (PL) kits. The lowest gDNA yields and 16S rRNA gene concentrations were from the Meta-G-Nome™ (MGN) DNA Isolation Kit. Bacterial phyla identified in all DNA extracts were similar to that found in other soils and were dominated by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Proteobacteria, and Acidobacteria. Weighted UniFrac and statistical analyses indicated that bacterial community compositions derived from FDS, PS, and PL extracts were similar to each other. However, the bacterial community structure from the MGN extracts differed from other kits exhibiting higher proportions of easily lysed ?- and ?-Proteobacteria and lower proportions of Actinobacteria and Methylocystaceae important in carbon cycling. These results indicate that gDNA yields differ between the extraction kits, but reproducible bacterial community structure analysis may be accomplished using gDNAs from the three bead-beating lysis extraction kits. PMID:24102625

  1. DNA extraction protocols from dormant buds of twelve woody plant genera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard plant DNA extraction protocols call for samples of newly expanding leaves and shoots yet analysis is sometimes needed when plants are dormant. We evaluated three DNA extraction protocols using dormant buds from 40 species and four hybrids of 12 genera. Two protocols were from ready-to-use ...

  2. RECOVERY OF BULK DNA FROM SOIL USING A RAPID, SMALL-SCALE EXTRACTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe an extraction method that yields restrictable 20-25 kb DNA from one gram of soil. ells are lysed directly in the soil. he crude DNA extract is separated from contaminating humic compounds, concentrated, and purified by CsCl gradient centrifugation and the commercial p...

  3. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD FOR PCR IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGAL INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following air sampling, fungal DNA needs to be extracted and purified to a state suitable for laboratory use. Our laboratory has developed a simple method of extraction and purification of fungal DNA appropriate for enzymatic manipulation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) appli...

  4. Replication and supercoiling of simian virus 40 DNA in cell extracts from human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, B W; Gluzman, Y

    1985-01-01

    Soluble extracts prepared from the nucleus and cytoplasm of human 293 cells are capable of efficient replication and supercoiling of added DNA templates that contain the origin of simian virus 40 replication. Extracts prepared from human HeLa cells are less active than similarly prepared extracts from 293 cells for initiation and elongation of nascent DNA strands. DNA synthesis is dependent on addition of purified simian virus 40 tumor (T) antigen, which is isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography of extracts from cells infected with an adenovirus modified to produce large quantities of this protein. In the presence of T antigen and the cytoplasmic extract, replication initiates at the origin and continues bidirectionally. Initiation is completely dependent on functional origin sequences; a plasmid DNA containing an origin mutation known to affect DNA replication in vivo fails to replicate in vitro. Multiple rounds of DNA synthesis occur, as shown by the appearance of heavy-heavy, bromodeoxyuridine-labeled DNA products. The products of this reaction are resolved, but are relaxed, covalently closed DNA circles. Addition of a nuclear extract during DNA synthesis promotes the negative supercoiling of the replicated DNA molecules. Images PMID:3018548

  5. A modified acidic approach for DNA extraction from plant species containing high levels of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, M M; Siqueira, M V B M; Val, T M; Pavanelli, J C; Monteiro, M; Grando, C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Gimenes, M A

    2014-01-01

    Purified genomic DNA can be difficult to obtain from some plant species because of the presence of impurities such as polysaccharides, which are often co-extracted with DNA. In this study, we developed a fast, simple, and low-cost protocol for extracting DNA from plants containing high levels of secondary metabolites. This protocol does not require the use of volatile toxic reagents such as mercaptoethanol, chloroform, or phenol and allows the extraction of high-quality DNA from wild and cultivated tropical species. PMID:25158268

  6. EFFECTIVE METHOD TO EXTRACT DNA FROM ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES FOR POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AMPLIFICATION AND DNA FINGERPRINT ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid direct-extraction method was used to obtain DNA from environmental soil samples. eat, enzymes, and guanidine isothiocyanate were utilized to lyse cells. he DNA was purified by agarose gel electrophoresis, amplified with 16S based primers by use of the polymerase chain rea...

  7. A ruthenium dimer complex with a flexible linker slowly threads between DNA bases in two distinct steps

    PubMed Central

    Bahira, Meriem; McCauley, Micah J.; Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Lincoln, Per; Westerlund, Fredrik; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Several multi-component DNA intercalating small molecules have been designed around ruthenium-based intercalating monomers to optimize DNA binding properties for therapeutic use. Here we probe the DNA binding ligand [?-C4(cpdppz)2(phen)4Ru2]4+, which consists of two Ru(phen)2dppz2+ moieties joined by a flexible linker. To quantify ligand binding, double-stranded DNA is stretched with optical tweezers and exposed to ligand under constant applied force. In contrast to other bis-intercalators, we find that ligand association is described by a two-step process, which consists of fast bimolecular intercalation of the first dppz moiety followed by ?10-fold slower intercalation of the second dppz moiety. The second step is rate-limited by the requirement for a DNA-ligand conformational change that allows the flexible linker to pass through the DNA duplex. Based on our measured force-dependent binding rates and ligand-induced DNA elongation measurements, we are able to map out the energy landscape and structural dynamics for both ligand binding steps. In addition, we find that at zero force the overall binding process involves fast association (?10 s), slow dissociation (?300 s), and very high affinity (Kd ?10 nM). The methodology developed in this work will be useful for studying the mechanism of DNA binding by other multi-step intercalating ligands and proteins. PMID:26365236

  8. A ruthenium dimer complex with a flexible linker slowly threads between DNA bases in two distinct steps.

    PubMed

    Bahira, Meriem; McCauley, Micah J; Almaqwashi, Ali A; Lincoln, Per; Westerlund, Fredrik; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C

    2015-10-15

    Several multi-component DNA intercalating small molecules have been designed around ruthenium-based intercalating monomers to optimize DNA binding properties for therapeutic use. Here we probe the DNA binding ligand [?-C4(cpdppz)2(phen)4Ru2](4+), which consists of two Ru(phen)2dppz(2+) moieties joined by a flexible linker. To quantify ligand binding, double-stranded DNA is stretched with optical tweezers and exposed to ligand under constant applied force. In contrast to other bis-intercalators, we find that ligand association is described by a two-step process, which consists of fast bimolecular intercalation of the first dppz moiety followed by ?10-fold slower intercalation of the second dppz moiety. The second step is rate-limited by the requirement for a DNA-ligand conformational change that allows the flexible linker to pass through the DNA duplex. Based on our measured force-dependent binding rates and ligand-induced DNA elongation measurements, we are able to map out the energy landscape and structural dynamics for both ligand binding steps. In addition, we find that at zero force the overall binding process involves fast association (?10 s), slow dissociation (?300 s), and very high affinity (Kd ?10 nM). The methodology developed in this work will be useful for studying the mechanism of DNA binding by other multi-step intercalating ligands and proteins. PMID:26365236

  9. Computational delineation of the catalytic step of a high-fidelity DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Ravindra; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2010-04-01

    The Bacillus fragment, belonging to a class of high-fidelity polymerases, demonstrates high processivity (adding approximately 115 bases per DNA binding event) and exceptional accuracy (1 error in 10(6) nucleotide incorporations) during DNA replication. We present analysis of structural rearrangements and energetics just before and during the chemical step (phosphodiester bond formation) using a combination of classical molecular dynamics, mixed quantum mechanics molecular mechanics simulations, and free energy computations. We find that the reaction is associative, proceeding via the two-metal-ion mechanism, and requiring the proton on the terminal primer O3' to transfer to the pyrophosphate tail of the incoming nucleotide before the formation of the pentacovalent transition state. Different protonation states for key active site residues direct the system to alternative pathways of catalysis and we estimate a free energy barrier of approximately 12 kcal/mol for the chemical step. We propose that the protonation of a highly conserved catalytic aspartic acid residue is essential for the high processivity demonstrated by the enzyme and suggest that global motions could be part of the reaction free energy landscape. PMID:20162624

  10. Enhanced method for microbial community DNA extraction and purification from agricultural yellow loess soil.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Gim, Geun Ho; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Pyung Il; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Si Wouk

    2015-11-01

    In this study, novel DNA extraction and purification methods were developed to obtain high-quantity and reliable quality DNA from the microbial community of agricultural yellow loess soil samples. The efficiencies of five different soil DNAextraction protocols were evaluated on the basis of DNA yield, quality and DNA shearing. Our suggested extraction method, which used CTAB, EDTA and cell membrane lytic enzymes in the extraction followed by DNA precipitation using isopropanol, yielded a maximum DNA content of 42.28 ± 5.59 µg/g soil. In addition, among the five different purification protocols, the acid-treated polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP) spin column purification method yielded high-quality DNA and recovered 91% of DNA from the crude DNA. Spectrophotometry revealed that the ultraviolet A 260/A 230 and A 260/A 280 absorbance ratios of the purified DNA were 1.82 ± 0.03 and 1.94 ± 0.05, respectively. PCR-based 16S rRNA amplification showed clear bands at ~1.5 kb with acid-treated PVPP-purified DNA templates. In conclusion, our suggested extraction and purification protocols can be used to recover high concentration, high purity, and high-molecular-weight DNA from clay and silica-rich agricultural soil samples. PMID:26502961

  11. A non-invasive technique for rapid extraction of DNA from fish scales.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Singh, Poonam Jayant; Nagpure, N S; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Srivastava, S K; Lakra, W S

    2007-11-01

    DNA markers are being increasingly used in studies related to population genetics and conservation biology of endangered species. DNA isolation for such studies requires a source of biological material that is easy to collect, non-bulky and reliable. Further, the sampling strategies based on non-invasive procedures are desirable, especially for the endangered fish species. In view of above, a rapid DNA extraction method from fish scales has been developed with the use of a modified lysis buffer that require about 2 hr duration. This methodology is non-invasive, less expensive and reproducible with high efficiency of DNA recovery. The DNA extracted by this technique, have been found suitable for performing restriction enzyme digestion and PCR amplification. Therefore, the present DNA extraction procedure can be used as an alternative technique in population genetic studies pertaining to endangered fish species. The technique was also found equally effective for DNA isolation from fresh, dried and ethanol preserved scales. PMID:18072545

  12. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. PMID:24834966

  13. Optimizing techniques to capture and extract environmental DNA for detection and quantification of fish.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, Jessica J; Miller, Loren M; Sorensen, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined capture and extraction methods for environmental DNA (eDNA) to identify techniques optimal for detection and quantification. In this study, precipitation, centrifugation and filtration eDNA capture methods and six commercially available DNA extraction kits were evaluated for their ability to detect and quantify common carp (Cyprinus carpio) mitochondrial DNA using quantitative PCR in a series of laboratory experiments. Filtration methods yielded the most carp eDNA, and a glass fibre (GF) filter performed better than a similar pore size polycarbonate (PC) filter. Smaller pore sized filters had higher regression slopes of biomass to eDNA, indicating that they were potentially more sensitive to changes in biomass. Comparison of DNA extraction kits showed that the MP Biomedicals FastDNA SPIN Kit yielded the most carp eDNA and was the most sensitive for detection purposes, despite minor inhibition. The MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit had the lowest coefficient of variation in extraction efficiency between lake and well water and had no detectable inhibition, making it most suitable for comparisons across aquatic environments. Of the methods tested, we recommend using a 1.5 ?m GF filter, followed by extraction with the MP Biomedicals FastDNA SPIN Kit for detection. For quantification of eDNA, filtration through a 0.2-0.6 ?m pore size PC filter, followed by extraction with MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit was optimal. These results are broadly applicable for laboratory studies on carps and potentially other cyprinids. The recommendations can also be used to inform choice of methodology for field studies. PMID:25919417

  14. Interference of humic acids and DNA extracted directly from soil in detection and transformation of recombinant DNA from bacteria and a yeast.

    PubMed

    Tebbe, C C; Vahjen, W

    1993-08-01

    A two-step protocol for the extraction and purification of total DNA from soil samples was developed. Crude DNA extracts (100 microliters from 5 g of soil) were contaminated with humic acids at concentrations of 0.7 to 3.3 micrograms/microliters, depending on the type of soil extracted. The coextracted humic acid fraction of a clay silt was similar to a commercially available standard humic acid mixture, as determined by electrophoretic mobility in agarose gels, UV fluorescence, and inhibition assays with DNA-transforming enzymes. Restriction endonucleases were inhibited at humic acid concentrations of 0.5 to 17.2 micrograms/ml for the commercial product and 0.8 to 51.7 micrograms/ml for the coextracted humic acids. DNase I was less susceptible (MIC of standard humic acids, 912 micrograms/ml), and RNase could not be inhibited at all (MIC, > 7.6 mg/ml). High inhibitory susceptibilities for humic acids were observed with Taq polymerase. For three Taq polymerases from different commercial sources, MICs were 0.08 to 0.64 micrograms of the standard humic acids per ml and 0.24 to 0.48 micrograms of the coextracted humic acids per ml. The addition of T4 gene 32 protein increased the MIC for one Taq polymerase to 5.12 micrograms/ml. Humic acids decreased nonradioactive detection in DNA-DNA slot blot hybridizations at amounts of 0.1 micrograms and inhibited transformation of competent Escherichia coli HB101 with a broad-host-range plasmid, pUN1, at concentrations of 100 micrograms/ml. Purification of crude DNA with ion-exchange chromatography resulted in removal of 97% of the initially coextracted humic acids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7690221

  15. Extraction of high-quality DNA from ethanol-preserved tropical plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper conservation of plant samples, especially during remote field collection, is essential to assure quality of extracted DNA. Tropical plant species contain considerable amounts of secondary compounds, such as polysaccharides, phenols, and latex, which affect DNA quality during extraction. The suitability of ethanol (96%?v/v) as a preservative solution prior to DNA extraction was evaluated using leaves of Jatropha curcas and other tropical species. Results Total DNA extracted from leaf samples stored in liquid nitrogen or ethanol from J. curcas and other tropical species (Theobroma cacao, Coffea arabica, Ricinus communis, Saccharum spp., and Solanum lycopersicon) was similar in quality, with high-molecular-weight DNA visualized by gel electrophoresis. DNA quality was confirmed by digestion with EcoRI or HindIII and by amplification of the ribosomal gene internal transcribed spacer region. Leaf tissue of J. curcas was analyzed by light and transmission electron microscopy before and after exposure to ethanol. Our results indicate that leaf samples can be successfully preserved in ethanol for long periods (30?days) as a viable method for fixation and conservation of DNA from leaves. The success of this technique is likely due to reduction or inactivation of secondary metabolites that could contaminate or degrade genomic DNA. Conclusions Tissue conservation in 96% ethanol represents an attractive low-cost alternative to commonly used methods for preservation of samples for DNA extraction. This technique yields DNA of equivalent quality to that obtained from fresh or frozen tissue. PMID:24761774

  16. Using a commercial DNA extraction kit to obtain RNA from mature rice kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few RNA extraction protocols or commercial kits work well with the starchy endosperm of cereal grains. Standard RNA extraction protocols are time consuming, use large amounts of expensive chemicals, and leave behind hazardous wastes. However, there are numerous commercial DNA extraction kits that ...

  17. [Method validation according to ISO 15189 and SH GTA 04: application for the extraction of DNA and its quantitative evaluation by a spectrophotometric assay].

    PubMed

    Harlé, Alexandre; Lion, Maëva; Husson, Marie; Dubois, Cindy; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    According to the French legislation on medical biology (January 16th, 2010), all biological laboratories must be accredited according to ISO 15189 for at least 50% of their activities before the end of 2016. The extraction of DNA from a sample of interest, whether solid or liquid is one of the critical steps in molecular biology and specifically in somatic or constitutional genetic. The extracted DNA must meet a number of criteria such quality and also be in sufficient concentration to allow molecular biology assays such as the detection of somatic mutations. This paper describes the validation of the extraction and purification of DNA using chromatographic column extraction and quantitative determination by spectrophotometric assay, according to ISO 15189 and the accreditation technical guide in Human Health SH-GTA-04. PMID:24113450

  18. Extraction of inhibitor-free metagenomic DNA from polluted sediments, compatible with molecular diversity analysis using adsorption and ion-exchange treatments.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirayu; Madamwar, Datta

    2007-03-01

    PCR inhibitor-free metagenomic DNA of high quality and high yield was extracted from highly polluted sediments using a simple remediation strategy of adsorption and ion-exchange chromatography. Extraction procedure was optimized with series of steps, which involved gentle mechanical lysis, treatment with powdered activated charcoal (PAC) and ion-exchange chromatography with amberlite resin. Quality of the extracted DNA for molecular diversity analysis was tested by amplifying bacterial 16S rDNA (16S rRNA gene) with eubacterial specific universal primers (8f and 1492r), cloning of the amplified 16S rDNA and ARDRA (amplified rDNA restriction analysis) of the 16S rDNA clones. The presence of discrete differences in ARDRA banding profiles provided evidence for expediency of the DNA extraction protocol in molecular diversity studies. A comparison of the optimized protocol with commercial Ultraclean Soil DNA isolation kit suggested that method described in this report would be more efficient in removing metallic and organic inhibitors, from polluted sediment samples. PMID:16806911

  19. The Presence of Humic Substances and DNA in RNA Extracts Affects Hybridization Results

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Zheng, Dandan; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-01-01

    RNA extracts obtained from environmental samples are frequently contaminated with coextracted humic substances and DNA. It was demonstrated that the response in rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe hybridizations decreased as the concentrations of humic substances and DNA in RNA extracts increased. The decrease in hybridization signal in the presence of humic substances appeared to be due to saturation of the hybridization membrane with humic substances, resulting in a lower amount of target rRNA bound to the membrane. The decrease in hybridization response in the presence of low amounts of DNA may be the result of reduced rRNA target accessibility. The presence of high amounts of DNA in RNA extracts resulted in membrane saturation. Consistent with the observations for DNA contamination, the addition of poly(A) to RNA extracts, a common practice used to prepare RNA dilutions for membrane blotting, also reduced hybridization signals, likely because of reduced target accessibility and membrane saturation effects. PMID:11010915

  20. Modification of a commercial DNA extraction kit for safe and rapid recovery of DNA and RNA simultaneously from soil, without the use of harmful solvents

    PubMed Central

    Tournier, E.; Amenc, L.; Pablo, A.L.; Legname, E.; Blanchart, E.; Plassard, C.; Robin, A.; Bernard, L.

    2015-01-01

    An optimized method, based on the coupling of two commercial kits, is described for the extraction of soil nucleic acids, with simultaneous extraction and purification of DNA and RNA following a cascade scheme and avoiding the use of harmful solvents. The protocol canmonitor the variations in the recovery yield of DNA and RNA from soils of various types.The quantitative version of the protocol was obtained by testing the starting soil quantity, the grinding parameters and the final elution volumes, in order to avoid saturation of both kits. • A first soil-crushing step in liquid nitrogen could be added for the assessment of fungal parameters. • The protocol was efficienton different tropical soils, including Andosol, while their high contents of clays, including poorly crystalline clays, and Fe and Al oxides usually make the nucleic acid extraction more difficult. • The RNA recovery yield from the previous tropical soils appeared to correlate better to soil respiration than DNA, which is positively influenced by soil clay content. PMID:26150987

  1. Effect of DNA extraction procedure, repeated extraction and ethidium monoazide (EMA)/propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment on overall DNA yield and impact on microbial fingerprints for bacteria, fungi and archaea in a reference soil

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas O.; Praeg, Nadine; Reitschuler, Christoph; Illmer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Different DNA extraction protocols were evaluated on a reference soil. A wide difference was found in the total extractable DNA as derived from different extraction protocols. Concerning the DNA yield phenol–chloroform–isomyl alcohol extraction resulted in high DNA yield but also in a remarkable co-extraction of contaminants making PCR from undiluted DNA extracts impossible. By comparison of two different extraction kits, the Macherey&Nagel SoilExtract II kit resulted in the highest DNA yields when buffer SL1 and the enhancer solution were applied. The enhancer solution not only significantly increased the DNA yield but also the amount of co-extracted contaminates, whereas additional disintegration strategies did not. Although a three times repeated DNA extraction increased the total amount of extracted DNA, microbial fingerprints were merely affected. However, with the 5th extraction this changed. A reduction of total DGGE band numbers was observed for archaea and fungi, whereas for bacteria the diversity increased. The application of ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment aiming on the selective removal of soil DNA derived from cells lacking cell wall integrity resulted in a significant reduction of total extracted DNA, however, the hypothesized effect on microbial fingerprints failed to appear indicating the need for further investigations. PMID:26339125

  2. Evaluation of commercial kits for extraction of DNA and RNA from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Devon; Weese, J Scott

    2012-12-01

    Commercial nucleic acid extraction kits are a cost effective, efficient and convenient way to isolate DNA and RNA from bacteria. Despite the increasing importance of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Clostridium difficile, and the increased use of nucleic acids in its identification, characterization, and investigation of virulence factors, no standardized or recommended methods for nucleic acid isolation exist. Here, we sought to evaluate 4 commercial DNA extraction kits and 3 commercial RNA extraction kits assessing cost, labor intensity, purity, quantity and quality of nucleic acid preparations. The DNA extraction kits produced a range of concentrations (20.9-546 ng/ml) and A(260/280) ratios (1.92-2.11). All kits were suitable for DNA extraction with the exception of the Roche MagNA pure LC DNA isolation kit III which produced DNA of high yield but with substantial shearing, but that did not affect downstream PCR amplifications. For RNA extraction, the Qiagen RNeasy mini kit stood out producing preparations of consistently higher concentrations and higher RNA integrity numbers (RIN). The Roche MagNA pure LC RNA isolation kit produced preparations that could not be properly assigned RINs due to a failure to remove small RNAs which were interpreted as degradation. Good DNA and RNA yield are critical but methods are often overlooked. This study highlights the potential for critical variation between established commercial systems and the need for assessment of any extraction methods that are used. PMID:23128271

  3. EVALUATION OF FOUR DIFFERENT DNA EXTRACTION METHODS IN COAGULASE-NEGATIVE STAPHYLOCOCCI CLINICAL ISOLATES

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Caio Fernando; Paim, Thiago Galvão da Silva; Reiter, Keli Cristine; Rieger, Alexandre; D'azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are several methods to extract bacterial DNA based on different principles. However, the amount and the quality of the DNA obtained by each one of those methods is highly variable and microorganism dependent, as illustrated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) which have a thick cell wall that is difficult to lyse. This study was designed to compare the quality and the amount of CoNS DNA, extracted by four different techniques: two in-house protocols and two commercial kits. DNA amount and quality determination was performed through spectrophotometry. The extracted DNA was also analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis and by PCR. 267 isolates of CoNS were used in this study. The column method and thermal lyses showed better results with regard to DNA quality (mean ratio of A260/280 = 1.95) and average concentration of DNA (), respectively. All four methods tested provided appropriate DNA for PCR amplification, but with different yields. DNA quality is important since it allows the application of a large number of molecular biology techniques, and also it's storage for a longer period of time. In this sense the extraction method based on an extraction column presented the best results for CoNS. PMID:24553605

  4. Evaluation of four different DNA extraction methods in coagulase-negative staphylococci clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Caio Fernando de; Paim, Thiago Galvão da Silva; Reiter, Keli Cristine; Rieger, Alexandre; D'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are several methods to extract bacterial DNA based on different principles. However, the amount and the quality of the DNA obtained by each one of those methods is highly variable and microorganism dependent, as illustrated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) which have a thick cell wall that is difficult to lyse. This study was designed to compare the quality and the amount of CoNS DNA, extracted by four different techniques: two in-house protocols and two commercial kits. DNA amount and quality determination was performed through spectrophotometry. The extracted DNA was also analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis and by PCR. 267 isolates of CoNS were used in this study. The column method and thermal lyses showed better results with regard to DNA quality (mean ratio of A260/280 = 1.95) and average concentration of DNA (), respectively. All four methods tested provided appropriate DNA for PCR amplification, but with different yields. DNA quality is important since it allows the application of a large number of molecular biology techniques, and also it's storage for a longer period of time. In this sense the extraction method based on an extraction column presented the best results for CoNS. PMID:24553605

  5. Simple practical approach for sample loading prior to DNA extraction using a silica monolith in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Joyce, Domino A; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-12-01

    A novel DNA loading methodology is presented for performing DNA extraction on a microfluidic system. DNA in a chaotropic salt solution was manually loaded onto a silica monolith orthogonal to the subsequent flow of wash and elution solutions. DNA was successfully extracted from buccal swabs using electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) coupled with in situ reagents contained within a 1.5% agarose gel matrix. The extracted DNA was of sufficient quantity and purity for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. PMID:19904411

  6. A comparison of five methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from human faecal samples.

    PubMed

    McOrist, Alexandra L; Jackson, Michelle; Bird, Anthony R

    2002-07-01

    The purity of DNA extracted from faecal samples is a key issue in the sensitivity and usefulness of biological analyses such as PCR for infectious pathogens and non-pathogens. We have compared the relative efficacy of extraction of bacterial DNA (both Gram negative and positive origin) from faeces using four commercial kits (FastDNA kit, Bio 101; Nucleospin C+T kit, Macherey-Nagal; Quantum Prep Aquapure Genomic DNA isolation kit, Bio-Rad; QIAamp DNA stool mini kit, Qiagen) and a non-commercial guanidium isothiocyanate/silica matrix method. Human faecal samples were spiked with additional known concentrations of Lactobacillus acidophilus or Bacteroides uniformis, the DNA was then extracted by each of the five methods, and tested in genus-specific PCRs. The Nucleospin method was the most sensitive procedure for the extraction of DNA from a pure bacterial culture of Gram-positive L. acidophilus (10(4) bacteria/PCR), and QIAamp and the guanidium method were most sensitive for cultures of Gram-negative B. uniformis (10(3) bacteria/PCR). However, for faecal samples, the QIAamp kit was the most effective extraction method and led to the detection of bacterial DNA over the greatest range of spike concentrations for both B. uniformis and L. acidophilus in primary PCR reactions. A difference in extraction efficacy was observed between faecal samples from different individuals. The use of appropriate DNA extraction kits or methods is critical for successful and valid PCR studies on clinical, experimental or environmental samples and we recommend that DNA extraction techniques are carefully selected with particular regard to the specimen type. PMID:11997164

  7. DNA extract characterization process for microbial detection methods development and validation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays used in pathogen detection require rigorous methods development including characterizing DNA extraction products. A DNA extract characterization process is demonstrated using DNA extracted from five different cells types (two Gram-negatives: Escherichia coli, and Burkholderia thailandensis, spores and vegetative cells from the Gram-positive Bacillus cereus, and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with six different methods. Results DNA extract quantity (concentration and extraction efficiency) and quality (purity and intactness) varied by cell type and extraction method enabling the demonstration of different DNA characterization methods. DNA purity was measured using UV spectroscopy, where the A260/A280 and A260/A230 ratios are indicators of different contaminants. Reproducibility of UV spectroscopy measurements decreased for DNA concentrations less than 17.5 ng/?L. Forty-seven extracts had concentrations greater than 17.5 ng/?L, 25 had A260/A280 above 2.0, and 28 had A260/A230 ratios below 1.8 indicating RNA and polysaccharide contamination respectively. Based on a qPCR inhibition assay the contaminants did not inhibit PCR. Extract intactness was evaluated using microfluidic gel electrophoresis. Thirty-five samples had concentrations above the limit of quantification (LOQ, roughly 11 ng/ ?L), 93.5% of the DNA was larger than 1kb and 1% was smaller than 300 bp. Extract concentrations ranged from 1502.2 ng/?L to below the LOQ when UV spectroscopy, fluorometry, and qPCR were used. LOQ for UV spectroscopic and fluorometric measurements were 3.5 ng/?L and 0.25 ng/?L respectively. The qPCR LOQ varied by cell type (5.72?×?10-3 ng/?L for E. coli, 2.66?×?10-3 ng/?L, for B. cereus, 3.78?×?10-3 ng/?L for B. thailandensis, and 7.67?×?10-4 ng/?L for S. cerevisiae). A number of samples were below the UV spectroscopy (n?=?27), flurometry (n?=?15), and qPCR (n?=?3) LOQ. Conclusion The presented DNA extract characterization process provides measures of DNA quantity and quality applicable to microbial detection methods development and validation studies. Evaluating DNA quality and quantity results in a better understanding of process LOD and contributing factors to suboptimal assay performance. The samples used demonstrated the use of different DNA characterization methods presented but did not encompass the full range of DNA extract characteristics. PMID:23206278

  8. Efficiency of genomic DNA extraction dependent on the size of magnetic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun Ah; Hyun Min, Ji; Hua Wu, Jun; Woo Jang, Jin; Lim, Chae-Seung; Keun Kim, Young

    2014-05-01

    We report the efficiency of genomic DNA extraction as a function of particle size and quantity. For DNA extraction, we synthesized magnetic nanoclusters of various sizes and coated the surface of these magnetic nanoclusters with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid. We showed that the nanoclusters had a tight particle size distribution and high crystallinity. Furthermore, we observed that the three types of magnetic nanoclusters studied exhibited ferrimagnetic behavior and that larger nanoclusters showed larger saturation magnetization values. The resultant efficiency of DNA extraction is inversely proportional to particle size in the range of nanoclusters tested, due to the fact that the surface-to-volume ratio decreases as particle size increases.

  9. Evaluating DNA Extraction Methods for Community Profiling of Pig Hindgut Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Hugenholtz, Philip; Batstone, Damien John

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of high quality PCR-amplifiable DNA has been the general minimal requirement for DNA extraction methods for bulk molecular analysis. However, modern high through-put community profiling technologies are more sensitive to representativeness and reproducibility of DNA extraction method. Here, we assess the impact of three DNA extraction methods (with different levels of extraction harshness) for assessing hindgut microbiomes from pigs fed with different diets (with different physical properties). DNA extraction from each sample was performed in three technical replicates for each extraction method and sequenced by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Host was the primary driver of molecular sequencing outcomes, particularly on samples analysed by wheat based diets, but higher variability, with one failed extraction occurred on samples from a barley fed pig. Based on these results, an effective method will enable reproducible and quality outcomes on a range of samples, whereas an ineffective method will fail to generate extract, but host (rather than extraction method) remains the primary factor. PMID:26560873

  10. DNA extraction of ancient animal hard tissue samples via adsorption to silica particles.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin

    2012-01-01

    A large number of subfossil and more recent skeletal remains, many of which are stored in museums and private collections, are potentially accessible for DNA sequence analysis. In order to extract the small amount of DNA preserved in these specimens, an efficient DNA release and purification method is required. In this chapter, I describe an efficient and straightforward purification and concentration method that uses DNA adsorption to a solid surface of silica particles. Comparative analysis of extraction methods has shown that this method works reliably for ancient as well as younger, museum-preserved specimens. PMID:22237517

  11. Elimination of bioweapons agents from forensic samples during extraction of human DNA.

    PubMed

    Timbers, Jason; Wilkinson, Della; Hause, Christine C; Smith, Myron L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Laframboise, Denis; Wright, Kathryn E

    2014-11-01

    Collection of DNA for genetic profiling is a powerful means for the identification of individuals responsible for crimes and terrorist acts. Biologic hazards, such as bacteria, endospores, toxins, and viruses, could contaminate sites of terrorist activities and thus could be present in samples collected for profiling. The fate of these hazards during DNA isolation has not been thoroughly examined. Our goals were to determine whether the DNA extraction process used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police eliminates or neutralizes these agents and if not, to establish methods that render samples safe without compromising the human DNA. Our results show that bacteria, viruses, and toxins were reduced to undetectable levels during DNA extraction, but endospores remained viable. Filtration of samples after DNA isolation eliminated viable spores from the samples but left DNA intact. We also demonstrated that contamination of samples with some bacteria, endospores, and toxins for longer than 1 h compromised the ability to complete genetic profiling. PMID:25069670

  12. Semi-quantitative detection of cytomegalovirus DNA from native serum and plasma by nested PCR: influence of DNA extraction procedures.

    PubMed

    Hamprecht, K; Mikeler, E; Jahn, G

    1997-12-01

    The diagnostic implications of different procedures of DNA extraction were examined for the detection of HCMV DNA from sera and plasma of immunosuppressed patients. The detection limit of HCMV plasmid DNA from cell free seronegative plasma and serum by limiting dilution nested PCR decreased in the following sequence: phenol/chloroform > NaI-single tube method > proteinase K digestion equal to amplification of native sera and plasma. Nested PCR from native sera and plasma performed well and surpassed the proteinase K method in sensitivity for detection of serum DNAemia. Semi-quantitative determination of HCMV DNA titer present in native sera of immunosuppressed patients did not seem to be correlated to HCMV disease. When compared to the persistence of leukoDNAemia, the viral DNA titer in native plasma could only be observed in the acute phase of HCMV infection, an important phenomenon for diagnostic purposes. Correlation of serum DNAemia to virus culture revealed low positive and high negative predictive values. Predictive values of nested PCR from native sera for HCMV infection were not lower than those following organic DNA extraction. Despite its low correlation to viremia and virus isolation from any site, nested PCR from organic DNA extracts of serum or plasma is the most sensitive diagnostic tool of an ongoing HCMV infection. Additionally, semi-quantitative end point dilution nested PCR from native serum or plasma promises to be a rapid and easy tool for the monitoring of antiviral therapy. PMID:9504758

  13. DNA extraction methods for detecting genetically modified foods: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Elsanhoty, Rafaat M; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Jany, Klaus Dieter

    2011-06-15

    The work presented in this manuscript was achieved to compare six different methods for extracting DNA from raw maize and its derived products. The methods that gave higher yield and quality of DNA were chosen to detect the genetic modification in the samples collected from the Egyptian market. The different methods used were evaluated for extracting DNA from maize kernels (without treatment), maize flour (mechanical treatment), canned maize (sweet corn), frozen maize (sweet corn), maize starch, extruded maize, popcorn, corn flacks, maize snacks, and bread made from corn flour (mechanical and thermal treatments). The quality and quantity of the DNA extracted from the standards, containing known percentages of GMO material and from the different food products were evaluated. For qualitative detection of the GMO varieties in foods, the GMOScreen 35S/NOS test kit was used, to screen the genetic modification in the samples. The positive samples for the 35S promoter and/or the NOS terminator were identified by the standard methods adopted by EU. All of the used methods extracted yielded good DNA quality. However, we noted that the purest DNA extract were obtained using the DNA extraction kit (Roche) and this generally was the best method for extracting DNA from most of the maize-derived foods. We have noted that the yield of DNA extracted from maize-derived foods was generally lower in the processed products. The results indicated that 17 samples were positive for the presence of 35S promoter, while 34% from the samples were positive for the genetically modified maize line Bt-176. PMID:25213972

  14. DNA extraction protocol for biological ingredient analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinwei; Chen, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Huanxin; Han, Maozhen; Bo, Cunpei; Xu, Jian; Bai, Hong; Ning, Kang

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW), as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method (TCM-CTAB) and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3-4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations. PMID:24838067

  15. Evaluation of three methods for effective extraction of DNA from human hair.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Emi; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we evaluate three different methods for extracting DNA from human hair i.e. the Chelex method, the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit method and the ISOHAIR method. Analysis of DNA prepared from dyed hairs with the ISOHAIR method suggested that the DNA extracts contained PCR inhibitors. On the other hand, few inhibition was observed when DNA from dyed hairs were extracted using the Chelex method and the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit method. In conclusion, the Chelex method is recommended for PCR experiments in view of its simplicity and cost-effectiveness. To assess the reliability of the Chelex method for the extraction of genomic DNA from both natural and dyed hair samples, minisatellite variant repeat (MVR)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) patterns of Chelex-extracted DNA were compared using hairs (three natural black hairs and three dyed hairs) with buccal swabs from six individuals. Complete agreement was observed between hair and swab samples in each individual, proving the utility of the Chelex method. PMID:15866502

  16. Viscum album L. Extracts Protects HeLa Cells against Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Onay-Uçar, Evren; Erol, Ozlem; Kandemir, Ba?ak; Merto?lu, Elif; Karagöz, Ali; Arda, Nazl?

    2012-01-01

    Viscum album L. is a semiparasitic plant grown on trees and widely used for the treatment of many diseases in traditional and complementary therapy. It is well known that some activities of Viscum album extracts are varied depending on the host trees, such as antioxidant, apoptosis-inducing, anticancer activities of the plant. The aim of the present study is to examine the comparative effects of methanolic extracts of V. album grown on three different host trees (locust tree, lime tree, and hedge maple tree) on H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage in HeLa cells. Oxidative damage in mitochondrial DNA and two nuclear regions was assessed by QPCR assay. The cells were pretreated with methanolic extracts (10??g/mL) for 48?h, followed by the treatment with 750??M H(2)O(2) for 1 hour. DNA damage was significantly induced by H(2)O(2) while it was inhibited by V. album extracts. All extracts completely protected against nuclear DNA damage. While the extract from lime tree or white locust tree entirely inhibited mitochondrial DNA damage, that from hedge maple tree inhibited by only 50%. These results suggest that methanolic extracts of V. album can prevent oxidative DNA damage, and the activity is dependent on the host tree. PMID:22988477

  17. Comparison of DNA extraction kits and modification of DNA elution procedure for the quantitation of subdominant bacteria from piggery effluents with real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Desneux, Jérémy; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Four commercial DNA extraction kits and a minor modification in the DNA elution procedure were evaluated for the quantitation of bacteria in pig manure samples. The PowerSoil(®), PowerFecal(®), NucleoSpin(®) Soil kits and QIAamp(®) DNA Stool Mini kit were tested on raw manure samples and on lagoon effluents for their ability to quantify total bacteria and a subdominant bacteria specific of pig manure contamination: Lactobacillus amylovorus. The NucleoSpin(®) Soil kit (NS kit), and to a lesser extent the PowerFecal(®) kit were the most efficient methods. Regardless of the kit utilized, the modified elution procedure increased DNA yield in the lagoon effluent by a factor of 1.4 to 1.8. When tested on 10 piggery effluent samples, compared to the QIAamp kit, the NS kit combined with the modified elution step, increased by a factor up to 1.7 log10 the values of the concentration of L. amylovorus. Regardless of the type of manure, the best DNA quality and the highest concentrations of bacteria were obtained using the NS kit combined with the modification of the elution procedure. The method recommended here significantly improved quantitation of subdominant bacteria in manure. PMID:24838631

  18. Comparison of DNA extraction kits and modification of DNA elution procedure for the quantitation of subdominant bacteria from piggery effluents with real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Desneux, Jérémy; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Four commercial DNA extraction kits and a minor modification in the DNA elution procedure were evaluated for the quantitation of bacteria in pig manure samples. The PowerSoil®, PowerFecal®, NucleoSpin® Soil kits and QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini kit were tested on raw manure samples and on lagoon effluents for their ability to quantify total bacteria and a subdominant bacteria specific of pig manure contamination: Lactobacillus amylovorus. The NucleoSpin® Soil kit (NS kit), and to a lesser extent the PowerFecal® kit were the most efficient methods. Regardless of the kit utilized, the modified elution procedure increased DNA yield in the lagoon effluent by a factor of 1.4 to 1.8. When tested on 10 piggery effluent samples, compared to the QIAamp kit, the NS kit combined with the modified elution step, increased by a factor up to 1.7 log10 the values of the concentration of L. amylovorus. Regardless of the type of manure, the best DNA quality and the highest concentrations of bacteria were obtained using the NS kit combined with the modification of the elution procedure. The method recommended here significantly improved quantitation of subdominant bacteria in manure. PMID:24838631

  19. Comparison of methods for total community DNA extraction and purification from compost.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zh H; Xiao, Y; Zeng, G M; Xu, Zh Y; Liu, Y Sh

    2007-03-01

    The differences on DNA yield and purity of three different DNA extraction protocols were compared with regard to the use for PCR and other molecular analyses. Total DNA was extracted from compost by the three protocols, and then was purified by spin-bind cartridges after being precipitated by PEG8000. The detection performed on a nucleic acid and protein analyzer showed that all three methods produced high DNA yields. The agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the fragments of crude and purified DNA had a length of about 23 kb. A eubacterial 16S rRNA gene-targeted primer pair was used for PCR amplification, and full length 16S rDNAs were amplified from all the purified DNA samples. After being digested by restriction endonucleases, the restriction map of amplified rDNA showed identical genetic diversity. The products of PCR using primer pair GC341F and 907R were also used for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. The results indicated that high-quality DNA was extracted from compost by the three protocols, and each of the protocols is adapted to extract microbial genome DNA from compost expediently and cheaply. PMID:17115207

  20. Comparison of DNA extraction kits for PCR-DGGE analysis of human intestinal microbial communities from fecal specimens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The influence of diet on intestinal microflora has been investigated mainly using conventional microbiological approaches. Although these studies have advanced knowledge on human intestinal microflora, it is imperative that new methods are applied to facilitate scientific progress. Culture-independent molecular fingerprinting method of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) has been used to study microbial communities in a variety of environmental samples. However, these protocols must be optimized prior to their application in order to enhance the quality and accuracy of downstream analyses. In this study, the relative efficacy of four commercial DNA extraction kits (Mobio Ultra Clean® Fecal DNA Isolation Kit, M; QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit, Q; FastDNA® SPIN Kit, FSp; FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil, FSo) were evaluated. Further, PCR-DGGE technique was also assessed for its feasibility in detecting differences in human intestinal bacterial fingerprint profiles. Method Total DNA was extracted from varying weights of human fecal specimens using four different kits, followed by PCR amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA genes, and DGGE separation of the amplicons. Results Regardless of kit, maximum DNA yield was obtained using 10 to 50 mg (wet wt) of fecal specimens and similar DGGE profiles were obtained. However, kits FSp and FSo extracted significantly larger amounts of DNA per g dry fecal specimens and produced more bands on their DGGE profiles than kits M and Q due to their use of bead-containing lysing matrix and vigorous shaking step. DGGE of 16S rRNA gene PCR products was suitable for capturing the profiles of human intestinal microbial community and enabled rapid comparative assessment of inter- and intra-subject differences. Conclusion We conclude that extraction kits that incorporated bead-containing lysing matrix and vigorous shaking produced high quality DNA from human fecal specimens (10 to 50 mg, wet wt) that can be resolved as bacterial community fingerprints using PCR-DGGE technique. Subsequently, PCR-DGGE technique can be applied for studying variations in human intestinal microbial communities. PMID:20492702

  1. The use of carrier RNA to enhance DNA extraction from microfluidic-based silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Thain, Lauren; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-10-12

    DNA extraction was carried out on silica-based monoliths within a microfluidic device. Solid-phase DNA extraction methodology was applied in which the DNA binds to silica in the presence of a chaotropic salt, such as guanidine hydrochloride, and is eluted in a low ionic strength solution, such as water. The addition of poly-A carrier RNA to the chaotropic salt solution resulted in a marked increase in the effective amount of DNA that could be recovered (25ng) compared to the absence of RNA (5ng) using the silica-based monolith. These findings confirm that techniques utilising nucleic acid carrier molecules can enhance DNA extraction methodologies in microfluidic applications. PMID:19786185

  2. A rapid column-based ancient DNA extraction method for increased sample throughput.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin; Siedel, Heike; Hofreiter, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Genetic analyses using museum specimens and ancient DNA from fossil samples are becoming increasingly important in phylogenetic and especially population genetic studies. Recent progress in ancient DNA sequencing technologies has substantially increased DNA sequence yields and, in combination with barcoding methods, has enabled large-scale studies using any type of DNA. Moreover, more and more studies now use nuclear DNA sequences in addition to mitochondrial ones. Unfortunately, nuclear DNA is, due to its much lower copy number in living cells compared to mitochondrial DNA, much more difficult to obtain from low-quality samples. Therefore, a DNA extraction method that optimizes DNA yields from low-quality samples and at the same time allows processing many samples within a short time frame is immediately required. In fact, the major bottleneck in the analysis process using samples containing low amounts of degraded DNA now lies in the extraction of samples, as column-based methods using commercial kits are fast but have proven to give very low yields, while more efficient methods are generally very time-consuming. Here, we present a method that combines the high DNA yield of batch-based silica extraction with the time-efficiency of column-based methods. Our results on Pleistocene cave bear samples show that DNA yields are quantitatively comparable, and in fact even slightly better than with silica batch extraction, while at the same time the number of samples that can conveniently be processed in parallel increases and both bench time and costs decrease using this method. Thus, this method is suited for harvesting the power of high-throughput sequencing using the DNA preserved in the millions of paleontological and museums specimens. PMID:21565072

  3. DNA extraction from plant food supplements: Influence of different pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Amaral, Joana S; Fernandes, Telmo J R; Batista, Andreia; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    The consumption of plant food supplements (PFS) has been growing globally, with an increase of misleading labeling and fraudulent practices also being reported. Recently, the use of molecular biology techniques has been proposed to detect botanical adulterations, one of the possible frauds in PFS. However, difficulties in recovering DNA from some PFS samples have been described. Aiming at using DNA-based methods for the unequivocal identification of plant species in PFS, adequate DNA isolation is required. However, PFS often contain pharmaceutical excipients known to have adsorbent properties that might interfere with DNA extraction. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the effect of different excipients (talc, silica, iron oxide and titanium dioxide) on the recovery/amplification of DNA. For that purpose, known amounts of template maize DNA were spiked either to PFS or to model mixtures of excipients and quantified by real-time PCR. The tested excipients evidenced clear adsorption phenomena that justify the hampering effect on DNA extraction from PFS. The use of either 10% talc or 0.5% dyes completely adsorbed DNA, resulting in negative PCR amplifications. For the first time, pharmaceutical excipients were shown to affect DNA extraction explaining the inability of recovering DNA from some PFS samples in previous studies. PMID:26079045

  4. Comparison of proteases in DNA extraction via quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Eychner, Alison M; Lebo, Roberta J; Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-06-01

    We compared four proteases in the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit (Qiagen) to extract DNA for use in multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The aim was to evaluate alternate proteases for improved DNA recovery as compared with proteinase K for forensic, biochemical research, genetic paternity and immigration, and molecular diagnostic purposes. The Quantifiler Kit TaqMan quantitative PCR assay was used to measure the recovery of DNA from human blood, semen, buccal cells, breastmilk, and earwax in addition to low-template samples, including diluted samples, computer keyboard swabs, chewing gum, and cigarette butts. All methods yielded amplifiable DNA from all samples. PMID:25197027

  5. A SIMPLE VERSATILE HIGH THROUPHPUT DNA EXTRACTION METHOD SUITABLE FOR PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR has become the most popular technique in functional genomics. Both forward and reverse genetic projects routinely require PCR amplification of thousands of samples. Processing the samples for DNA suitable for PCR is usually the limiting step. We have developed a simple high throughput DNA extra...

  6. Fabrication of two-weir structure-based packed columns for on-chip solid-phase extraction of DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Runtao; Liu, Dayu; Yu, Linfen; Ye, Nannan; Dai, Zhongpeng; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2007-08-01

    Microchip-based packed column SPE of DNA was performed using the microfabricated two-weir structure within a microchannel. We developed two methods to fabricate the two-weir structured glass chips: a "two-side etching/alignment" method and a simplified "one-side/two-step etching" method. The former method required a straightforward alignment step, while the latter approach comprised a simplified wet etching process using paraffin wax as the temporary protective layer. Both methods were convenient and rapid as compared to the previous approaches. Through a reversibly sealed bead-introduction channel, beads can be fed into or out of the chip columns, thus enabling refreshment of the packing materials. Using the proposed chip columns, highly efficient lambda-DNA extractions (average recovery >80%) were performed with good chip-to-chip reproducibility (RSD <10%). The on-chip SPE procedure was completed within 15 min at the flow rate of 3 microL/min and the bulk of the loaded DNA was eluted within a small volume of approximately 8 microL. Application of the microchip-based packed columns was demonstrated by purifying PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA from human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells and human whole blood samples. PMID:17640088

  7. A Simple Method of Genomic DNA Extraction from Human Samples for PCR-RFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Souvik; Muthukumaran, Rajendra Bose; Nachimuthu, Senthil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Isolation of DNA from blood and buccal swabs in adequate quantities is an integral part of forensic research and analysis. The present study was performed to determine the quality and the quantity of DNA extracted from four commonly available samples and to estimate the time duration of the ensuing PCR amplification. Here, we demonstrate that hair and urine samples can also become an alternate source for reliably obtaining a small quantity of PCR-ready DNA. We developed a rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive method of sample collection and simple DNA extraction from buccal swabs, urine, and hair using the phenol-chloroform method. Buccal samples were subjected to DNA extraction, immediately or after refrigeration (4–6°C) for 3 days. The purity and the concentration of the extracted DNA were determined spectrophotometerically, and the adequacy of DNA extracts for the PCR-based assay was assessed by amplifying a 1030-bp region of the mitochondrial D-loop. Although DNA from all the samples was suitable for PCR, the blood and hair samples provided a good quality DNA for restriction analysis of the PCR product compared with the buccal swab and urine samples. In the present study, hair samples proved to be a good source of genomic DNA for PCR-based methods. Hence, DNA of hair samples can also be used for the genomic disorder analysis in addition to the forensic analysis as a result of the ease of sample collection in a noninvasive manner, lower sample volume requirements, and good storage capability. PMID:24294115

  8. SV40 DNA extracted from persistently infected Vero cells using miniprep columns for plasmids.

    PubMed

    Hamelin, C; Yelle, J; D'Amours, B; Chung, Y S

    1993-01-01

    A recombinant pAT153 plasmid carrying the whole simian virus 40 (SV40) genome in the form of two consecutive Pst I restriction fragments was rapidly isolated using a commercially available minipreps DNA purification system. This rapid and simple method was used to extract SV40 DNA from infected Vero monkey cells. Viral DNA replication in persistently infected SVP-1 monkey cells was also conveniently followed over a period of 8 d by agarose gel electrophoresis and molecular hybridization using minipreps and the recombinant plasmid (pLCB104) as a probe. Unsatisfactory results were obtained, however, when herpes simplex virus DNA was tentatively extracted from infected Vero cells with the above method. Only covalently closed circular DNA molecules, with two strands unable to separate fully under denaturing conditions, were apparently retained after rapid neutralization by the silicone-based minipreps DNA purification resin. PMID:8293042

  9. Magnetic ionic liquids as PCR-compatible solvents for DNA extraction from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin D; Yamsek, Melissa M; Nacham, Omprakash; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-12-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) buffer was systematically designed to relieve the inhibition caused by hydrophobic magnetic ionic liquids (MILs). We describe a simple, rapid method for MIL-based plasmid DNA extraction from crude bacterial cell lysate in which DNA-enriched MIL is transferred directly to a PCR tube for analysis. PMID:26434366

  10. EXTRACTION OF HIGH QUALITY GENOMIC DNA FROM LATEX-CONTAINING PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The isolation of intact, high molecular mass genomic DNA is essential for many molecular biology applications including long PCR, endonuclease restriction digestion, Southern blot analysis and genomic library construction. Many protocols are available for the extraction of DNA from plant material. H...

  11. Assessment of the quality and quantity of genomic DNA recovered from canine blood samples by three different extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Wood, Shona; Carter, Stuart D; Ollier, William E R

    2008-08-01

    The ideal method for genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction should recover high quantities of pure, integral gDNA from the original sample source with minimal co-extraction of inhibitors of downstream processes. Canine ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) treated and clotted blood samples were extracted by three different methods (a silica column method, a phenol-chloroform method and a modified salt precipitation method). Phenol-chloroform and modified salt precipitation based extractions demonstrated similar relative recovery of gDNA with EDTA preserved blood, but were less efficient at recovering gDNA from clotted blood. Spectrophotometer measurement of phenol-chloroform based extractions tended to overestimate the quantity of gDNA recovered from extractions, and was associated with the greater co-extraction of PCR inhibitors. The silica column method recovered gDNA with equal efficiency, purity and integrity irrespective of the sample type or method of quantification. PMID:18031774

  12. Comparison of DNA extraction methodologies used for assessing fungal diversity via ITS sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Rittenour, William R.; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Cox-Ganser, Jean M.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Green, Brett J.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods of assessing fungal exposure have been confounded by a number of limiting variables. The recent utilization of molecular methods such as internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes has provided improved insight into the diversity of fungal bioaerosols in indoor, outdoor and occupational environments. However, ITS analyses may also be confounded by a number of methodological limitations. In this study, we have optimized this technology for use in occupational or environmental studies. Three commonly used DNA extraction methodologies (UltraClean Soil kit, High Pure PCR Template kit, and EluQuik/DNeasy kit) were compared in terms of sensitivity and susceptibility to PCR inhibitors in dust for three common fungal bioaerosols, Aspergillus versicolor, Rhizopus microsporus and Wallemia sebi. Environmental dust samples were then studied using each extraction methodology and results were compared to viable culture data. The extraction methods differed in terms of their ability to efficiently extract DNA from particular species of fungi (e.g. Aspergillus versicolor). In addition, the ability to remove PCR inhibitors from dust samples was most effective using the soil DNA extraction kit. The species composition varied greatly between ITS clone libraries generated with the different DNA extraction kits. However, compared to viable culture data, ITS clone libraries included additional fungal species that are incapable of growth on solid culture medium. Collectively, our data indicated that DNA extraction methodologies used in ITS sequencing studies of occupational or environmental dust samples can greatly influence the fungal species that are detected. PMID:22230933

  13. Evaluation of six methods for extraction and purification of viral DNA from urine and serum samples.

    PubMed

    Bergallo, Massimiliano; Costa, Cristina; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Tarallo, Sonia; Baro, Sara; Negro Ponzi, Alessandro; Cavallo, Rossana

    2006-04-01

    The sensitivity and reliability of PCR for diagnostic and research purposes require efficient unbiased procedures of extraction and purification of nucleic acids. One of the major limitations of PCR-based tests is the inhibition of the amplification process by substances present in clinical samples. This study used specimens spiked with a known amount of plasmid pBKV (ATCC 33-1) to compare six methods for extraction and purification of viral DNA from urine and serum samples based on recovery efficiency in terms of yield of DNA and percentage of plasmid pBKV recovered, purity of extracted DNA, and percentage of inhibition. The most effective extraction methods were the phenol/chloroform technique and the silica gel extraction procedure for urine and serum samples, respectively. Considering DNA purity, the silica gel extraction procedure and the phenol/chloroform method produced the most satisfactory results in urine and serum samples, respectively. The presence of inhibitors was overcome by all DNA extraction techniques in urine samples, as evidenced by semiquantitative PCR amplification. In serum samples, the lysis method and the proteinase K procedure did not completely overcome the presence of inhibitors. PMID:16841551

  14. Extraction of DNA suitable for PCR applications from mature leaves of Mangifera indica L.*

    PubMed Central

    Azmat, Muhammad Abubakkar; Khan, Iqrar Ahmad; Cheema, Hafiza Masooma Naseer; Rajwana, Ishtiaq Ahmad; Khan, Ahmad Sattar; Khan, Asif Ali

    2012-01-01

    Good quality deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the pre-requisite for its downstream applications. The presence of high concentrations of polysaccharides, polyphenols, proteins, and other secondary metabolites in mango leaves poses problem in getting good quality DNA fit for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) applications. The problem is exacerbated when DNA is extracted from mature mango leaves. A reliable and modified protocol based on the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method for DNA extraction from mature mango leaves is described here. High concentrations of inert salt were used to remove polysaccharides; Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and ?-mercaptoethanol were employed to manage phenolic compounds. Extended chloroform-isoamyl alcohol treatment followed by RNase treatment yielded 950?1050 µg of good quality DNA, free of protein and RNA. The problems of DNA degradation, contamination, and low yield due to irreversible binding of phenolic compounds and coprecipitation of polysaccharides with DNA were avoided by this method. The DNA isolated by the modified method showed good PCR amplification using simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers. This modified protocol can also be used to extract DNA from other woody plants having similar problems. PMID:22467363

  15. Highly efficient automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Zupani? Pajni?, Irena; Debska, Magdalena; Gornjak Pogorelc, Barbara; Vodopivec Mohor?i?, Katja; Balažic, Jože; Zupanc, Tomaž; Štefani?, Borut; Geršak, Ksenija

    2016-01-01

    We optimised the automated extraction of DNA from old and contemporary skeletal remains using the AutoMate Express system and the PrepFiler BTA kit. 24 Contemporary and 25 old skeletal remains from WWII were analysed. For each skeleton, extraction using only 0.05 g of powder was performed according to the manufacturer's recommendations (no demineralisation - ND method). Since only 32% of full profiles were obtained from aged and 58% from contemporary casework skeletons, the extraction protocol was modified to acquire higher quality DNA and genomic DNA was obtained after full demineralisation (FD method). The nuclear DNA of the samples was quantified using the Investigator Quantiplex kit and STR typing was performed using the NGM kit to evaluate the performance of tested extraction methods. In the aged DNA samples, 64% of full profiles were obtained using the FD method. For the contemporary skeletal remains the performance of the ND method was closer to the FD method compared to the old skeletons, giving 58% of full profiles with the ND method and 71% of full profiles using the FD method. The extraction of DNA from only 0.05 g of bone or tooth powder using the AutoMate Express has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA from old and contemporary skeletons, especially with the modified FD method. We believe that the results obtained will contribute to the possibilities of using automated devices for extracting DNA from skeletal remains, which would shorten the procedures for obtaining high-quality DNA from skeletons in forensic laboratories. PMID:26615474

  16. The validation of forensic DNA extraction systems to utilize soil contaminated biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kasu, Mohaimin; Shires, Karen

    2015-07-01

    The production of full DNA profiles from biological evidence found in soil has a high failure rate due largely to the inhibitory substance humic acid (HA). Abundant in various natural soils, HA co-extracts with DNA during extraction and inhibits DNA profiling by binding to the molecular components of the genotyping assay. To successfully utilize traces of soil contaminated evidence, such as that found at many murder and rape crime scenes in South Africa, a reliable HA removal extraction system would often be selected based on previous validation studies. However, for many standard forensic DNA extraction systems, peer-reviewed publications detailing the efficacy on soil evidence is either lacking or is incomplete. Consequently, these sample types are often not collected or fail to yield suitable DNA material due to the use of unsuitable methodology. The aim of this study was to validate the common forensic DNA collection and extraction systems used in South Africa, namely DNA IQ, FTA elute and Nucleosave for processing blood and saliva contaminated with HA. A forensic appropriate volume of biological evidence was spiked with HA (0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/ml) and processed through each extraction protocol for the evaluation of HA removal using QPCR and STR-genotyping. The DNA IQ magnetic bead system effectively removed HA from highly contaminated blood and saliva, and generated consistently acceptable STR profiles from both artificially spiked samples and crude soil samples. This system is highly recommended for use on soil-contaminated evidence over the cellulose card-based systems currently being preferentially used for DNA sample collection. PMID:25690910

  17. Antioxidant, DNA protective efficacy and HPLC analysis of Annona muricata (soursop) extracts.

    PubMed

    George, V Cijo; Kumar, D R Naveen; Suresh, P K; Kumar, R Ashok

    2015-04-01

    Annona muricata is a naturally occurring edible plant with wide array of therapeutic potentials. In India, it has a long history of traditional use in treating various ailments. The present investigation was carried out to characterize the phytochemicals present in the methanolic and aqueous leaf extracts of A. muricata, followed by validation of its radical scavenging and DNA protection activities. The extracts were also analyzed for its total phenolic contents and subjected to HPLC analysis to determine its active metabolites. The radical scavenging activities were premeditated by various complementary assays (DRSA, FRAP and HRSA). Further, its DNA protection efficacy against H2O2 induced toxicity was evaluated using pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results revealed that the extracts were highly rich in various phytochemicals including luteolin, homoorientin, tangeretin, quercetin, daidzein, epicatechin gallate, emodin and coumaric acid. Both the extracts showed significant (p < 0.05) radical scavenging activities, while methanolic extract demonstrated improved protection against H2O2-induced DNA damage when compared to aqueous extract. A strong positive correlation was observed for the estimated total phenolic contents and radical scavenging potentials of the extracts. Further HPLC analysis of the phyto-constituents of the extracts provides a sound scientific basis for compound isolation. PMID:25829616

  18. A universal DNA extraction and PCR amplification method for fungal rDNA sequence-based identification.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, A M; Fu, J; Herrera, M L; Wickes, B L

    2014-10-01

    Accurate identification of fungal pathogens using a sequence-based approach requires an extraction method that yields template DNA pure enough for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or other types of amplification. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and standardise a rapid, inexpensive DNA extraction protocol applicable to the major fungal phyla, which would yield sufficient template DNA pure enough for PCR and sequencing. A total of 519 clinical and culture collection strains, comprised of both yeast and filamentous fungi, were prepared using our extraction method to determine its applicability for PCR, which targeted the ITS and D1/D2 regions in a single PCR amplicon. All templates were successfully amplified and found to yield the correct strain identification when sequenced. This protocol could be completed in approximately 30 min and utilised a combination of physical and chemical extraction methods but did not require organic solvents nor ethanol precipitation. The method reduces the number of tube manipulations and yielded suitable template DNA for PCR amplification from all phyla that were tested. PMID:24865530

  19. Comparison of three DNA extraction kits to establish maximum yield and quality of coral-associated microbial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Erin J.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Coral microbiology is an expanding field, yet there is no standard DNA extraction protocol. Although many researchers depend on commercial extraction kits, no specific kit has been optimized for use with coral samples. Both soil and plant DNA extraction kits from MO BIO Laboratories, Inc., have been used by many research groups for this purpose. MO BIO recently replaced their PowerPlant® kit with an improved PowerPlantPro kit, but it was unclear how these changes would affect the kit’s use with coral samples. In order to determine which kit produced the best results, we conducted a comparison between the original PowerPlant kit, the new PowerPlantPro kit, and an alternative kit, PowerSoil, using samples from several different coral genera. The PowerPlantPro kit had the highest DNA yields, but the lack of 16S rRNA gene amplification in many samples suggests that much of the yield may be coral DNA rather than microbial DNA. The most consistent positive amplifications came from the PowerSoil kit.

  20. “Versatile toolset” for DNA or protein immobilization: Toward a single-step chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelot, Thomas; Garcia, Alexandre; Le, Xuan Tuan; El Morsli, Jenna; Jégou, Pascale; Palacin, Serge; Viel, Pascal

    2011-02-01

    Covalent immobilization of non-modified biological materials as proteins or nucleic acids has been performed through a single and soft method. Based on diazonium salt chemistry, this protocol leads to an ultrathin grafted film, on metallic or polymer materials, which can eventually be used as a self-adhesive primer for immobilizing biological materials from aqueous solutions through a simple dipping step. Moreover, this self-adhesive primer may be patterned by cheap and easy methods as ink or UV masking. Biological models as low molecular weight DNA from salmon sperm and glucose oxidase (GOD) were covalently immobilized by this soft procedure. In order to evaluate the consequences of this non-specific covalent immobilization method on biological activity, enzymatic activity of GOD was monitored by electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We thus demonstrate that such a self-adhesive primer represents a new and alternative process offering a versatile toolset for immobilizing biological material for biosensor development on conductive and non-conductive materials.

  1. Non-destructive high-throughput DNA extraction and genotyping methods for cotton seeds and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuting; Hoegenauer, Kevin A; Maeda, Andrea B V; Wang, Fei; Stelly, David M; Nichols, Robert L; Jones, Don C

    2015-05-01

    Extensive use of targeted PCR-based genotyping is precluded for many plant research laboratories by the cost and time required for DNA extraction. Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) as a model for plants with medium-sized seeds, we report here manual procedures for inexpensive non-destructive high-throughput extraction of DNA suitable for PCR-based genotyping of large numbers of individual seeds and seedlings. By sampling only small amounts of cotyledon tissue of ungerminated seed or young seedlings, damage is minimized, and viability is not discernibly affected. The yield of DNA from each seed or seedling is typically sufficient for 1000 or 500 PCR reactions, respectively. For seeds, the tissue sampling procedure relies on a modified 96-well plate that is used subsequently for seed storage. For seeds and seedlings, the DNA is extracted in a strongly basic DNA buffer that is later neutralized and diluted. Extracts can be used directly for high-throughput PCR-based genotyping. Any laboratory can thus extract DNA from thousands of individual seeds/seedlings per person-day at a very modest cost for consumables (~$0.05 per sample). Being non-destructive, our approach enables a wide variety of time- and resource-saving applications, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), before planting, transplanting, and flowering. PMID:25967902

  2. A Rapid and Economical Method for Efficient DNA Extraction from Diverse Soils Suitable for Metagenomic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Radha, Sudhakar; Arunraj, Rex; Curtis, Wayne R.; Ramya, Mohandass

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost effective method of metagenomic DNA extraction from soil is a useful tool for environmental microbiology. The present work describes an improved method of DNA extraction namely “powdered glass method” from diverse soils. The method involves the use of sterile glass powder for cell lysis followed by addition of 1% powdered activated charcoal (PAC) as purifying agent to remove humic substances. The method yielded substantial DNA (5.87 ± 0.04 μg/g of soil) with high purity (A260/280: 1.76 ± 0.05) and reduced humic substances (A340: 0.047 ± 0.03). The quality of the extracted DNA was compared against five different methods based on 16S rDNA PCR amplification, BamHI digestion and validated using quantitative PCR. The digested DNA was used for a metagenomic library construction with the transformation efficiency of 4 X 106 CFU mL-1. Besides providing rapid, efficient and economical extraction of metgenomic DNA from diverse soils, this method’s applicability is also demonstrated for cultivated organisms (Gram positive B. subtilis NRRL-B-201, Gram negative E. coli MTCC40, and a microalgae C. sorokiniana UTEX#1666). PMID:26167854

  3. A Rapid and Economical Method for Efficient DNA Extraction from Diverse Soils Suitable for Metagenomic Applications.

    PubMed

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Radha, Sudhakar; Arunraj, Rex; Curtis, Wayne R; Ramya, Mohandass

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost effective method of metagenomic DNA extraction from soil is a useful tool for environmental microbiology. The present work describes an improved method of DNA extraction namely "powdered glass method" from diverse soils. The method involves the use of sterile glass powder for cell lysis followed by addition of 1% powdered activated charcoal (PAC) as purifying agent to remove humic substances. The method yielded substantial DNA (5.87 ± 0.04 μg/g of soil) with high purity (A260/280: 1.76 ± 0.05) and reduced humic substances (A340: 0.047 ± 0.03). The quality of the extracted DNA was compared against five different methods based on 16S rDNA PCR amplification, BamHI digestion and validated using quantitative PCR. The digested DNA was used for a metagenomic library construction with the transformation efficiency of 4 X 106 CFU mL-1. Besides providing rapid, efficient and economical extraction of metgenomic DNA from diverse soils, this method's applicability is also demonstrated for cultivated organisms (Gram positive B. subtilis NRRL-B-201, Gram negative E. coli MTCC40, and a microalgae C. sorokiniana UTEX#1666). PMID:26167854

  4. Non-invasive method for sampling and extraction of mouse DNA for PCR.

    PubMed

    Meldgaard, M; Bollen, P J A; Finsen, B

    2004-10-01

    We adapted a non-invasive, fast, reliable and inexpensive procedure for the sampling and extraction of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for genetic testing of mice. The procedure is based on a simple DNA extraction procedure used in the forensic genetic testing of humans. It involves mouth swabbing of the inner cheek using a cotton stick, followed by alkaline lysis of the harvested buccal epithelial cells. This procedure allows for repeated sampling and genetic testing of the individual mouse, and it is faster, simpler and, in our hands, more reliable than the currently used routine procedures for the sampling and extraction of mouse DNA. Current procedures all involve biopsy of a piece of the tail, ear or toe, followed by lengthy procedures to release and isolate the DNA. PMID:15479556

  5. Attempted DNA extraction from a Rancho La Brea Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi): prospects for ancient DNA from asphalt deposits

    PubMed Central

    Gold, David A; Robinson, Jacqueline; Farrell, Aisling B; Harris, John M; Thalmann, Olaf; Jacobs, David K

    2014-01-01

    Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphalt-mediated inhibition. In an attempt to test these hypotheses, a recently recovered Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) skeleton with an unusual pattern of asphalt impregnation was studied. Ultimately, none of the bone samples tested successfully amplified M.?columbi DNA. Our work suggests that reagents typically used to remove asphalt from ancient samples also inhibit DNA extraction. Ultimately, we conclude that the probability of recovering ancient DNA from fossils in asphalt deposits is strongly (perhaps fatally) hindered by the organic compounds that permeate the bones and that at the Rancho La Brea tar pits, environmental conditions might not have been ideal for the general preservation of genetic material. PMID:24634719

  6. Attempted DNA extraction from a Rancho La Brea Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi): prospects for ancient DNA from asphalt deposits.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Robinson, Jacqueline; Farrell, Aisling B; Harris, John M; Thalmann, Olaf; Jacobs, David K

    2014-02-01

    Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphalt-mediated inhibition. In an attempt to test these hypotheses, a recently recovered Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) skeleton with an unusual pattern of asphalt impregnation was studied. Ultimately, none of the bone samples tested successfully amplified M.?columbi DNA. Our work suggests that reagents typically used to remove asphalt from ancient samples also inhibit DNA extraction. Ultimately, we conclude that the probability of recovering ancient DNA from fossils in asphalt deposits is strongly (perhaps fatally) hindered by the organic compounds that permeate the bones and that at the Rancho La Brea tar pits, environmental conditions might not have been ideal for the general preservation of genetic material. PMID:24634719

  7. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Aleksandar; Živković, Lada; Stajić, Mirjana; Vukojević, Jelena; Milovanović, Ivan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0 mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0 mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  8. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Kneževi?, Aleksandar; Živkovi?, Lada; Staji?, Mirjana; Vukojevi?, Jelena; Milovanovi?, Ivan; Spremo-Potparevi?, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0 mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0 mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  9. Tracing tree nut allergens in chocolate: A comparison of DNA extraction protocols.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Melo, Vítor S; Santos, Cristina G; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2015-11-15

    The present work aimed at comparing different DNA extraction methods, from chocolate matrices, for the effective application in molecular techniques to detect tree nut allergens. For this study, DNA from almond or hazelnut model chocolates was extracted using seven selected protocols: the in-house methods of CTAB-PVP (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-polyvinylpyrrolidone), Wizard with and without RNase, Wizard-PVP with and without RNase, and the Wizard Magnetic and Nucleospin kits. The extracts were assessed for their suitability for amplification by qualitative PCR and real-time PCR. From the evaluated protocols, Nucleospin presented the best results for almond and hazelnut amplification, achieving a limit of detection of 0.005% (w/w) with high PCR efficiency, linearity and range of amplification. These results highlight the importance of the DNA extraction protocol in the case of food allergens from complex matrices, such as chocolate, in which sensitivity is a key parameter. PMID:25977052

  10. Rapid and economic DNA extraction from a single salmon egg for real-time PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Lee, Guo-Chi; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Salmon eggs are common in Japanese sushi and other seafood products; however, certain fish eggs are used as counterfeit salmon eggs which are found in foods and processed products. This study develops a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method for DNA extraction, filtration (FT) and dilution (DL) protocols from a single salmon egg with good DNA quality for real-time PCR amplification. The DNA amount, DNA quality, and real-time PCR performance for different dilutions and different lengths of PCR amplicons were evaluated and compared with the common Qiagen tissue kit (QTK) and Chelex-100-based (CX) protocols. The extracted DNA from a single salmon egg using the FT or DL protocol can be applied in phylogenic research, food authentication and post-marketing monitoring of genetically modified (GM) food products. PMID:21979091

  11. Enzymatic Treatment of Specimens before DNA Extraction Directly Influences Molecular Detection of Infectious Agents

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Pablo; Degorge, Sandrine; Merabet, Lilia; Chaumeil, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Biological samples, pharmaceuticals or food contain proteins, lipids, polymers, ammoniums and macromolecules that alter the detection of infectious agents by DNA amplification techniques (PCR). Moreover the targeted DNA has to be released from the complex cell walls and the compact nucleoprotein matrixes and cleared from potential inhibitors. The goal of the present work was to assess the efficiency of enzymatic pretreatments on infectious agents to make DNA available for further extraction and amplification. Methods Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mitis, Propionibacterium acnes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium solani were mixed with an internal control virus and treated with: 1) proteinase K; 2) lyticase and 3) lyticase followed by proteinase K. DNAs was manually extracted using the QIAmp DNA Mini kit or the MagNA Pure Compact automate. DNA extraction yields and the inhibitors were assessed with a phocid Herpesvirus. Bacterial detection was performed using TaqMan real-time PCR and yeasts and filamentous Fungi with HRM (real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting analysis). Results Viral DNA was released, extracted and detected using manual and automatic methods without pre enzymatic treatments. Either the manual or the automatic DNA extraction systems did not meet the sensitivity expectations if enzymatic treatments were not performed before: lyticase for Fungi and Proteinase K for Bacteria. The addition of lyticase and proteinase K did not improve results. For Fungi the detection after lyticase was higher than for Proteinase K, for which melting analysis did not allow fungal specification. Discussion Columns and magnetic beads allowed collecting DNA and separate PCR inhibitors. Detection rates cannot be related to DNA-avidity of beads or to elution but to the lack of proteolysis. PMID:24936792

  12. Inhibitory effect of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, extracted from spinach using supercritical CO2, on mammalian DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Hiroshi; Musumi, Keiichi; Hada, Takahiko; Maeda, Naoki; Yonezawa, Yuko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the effective extraction of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) from dried spinach (Spinacia oleracea) using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) with a modifier/entrainer. The yield of MGDG in the SC-CO(2) extract was not influenced by increasing temperature at a constant pressure, although the total extract yield was decreased. The total extract yield and MGDG yield in the extract from commercially purchased spinach (unknown subspecies), were greatly influenced by lower pressure. In a modifier (i.e., ethanol) concentration range of 2.5-20%, both the extract and MGDG yield increased as the ethanol concentration rose. The highest total extract yield (69.5 mg/g of spinach) and a good MGDG yield (16.3 mg/g of spinach) were obtained at 80 degrees C, 25 MPa, and 20% ethanol. The highest MGDG concentration (76.0% in the extract) was obtained at 80 degrees C, 25 MPa, and 2.5% ethanol, although the total extract yield under these conditions was low (5.2 mg/g of spinach). The optimal conditions for the extraction of MGDG were 80 degrees C, 20 MPa, and 10% ethanol. Of the 11 subspecies of spinach tested under these conditions, "Ujyou" had the highest concentration of MGDG. The total extract yield and MGDG concentration of Ujyou were 20.4 mg of the extract/g of spinach and 70.5%, respectively. The concentration of MGDG was higher in the SC-CO(2) extract than in the extract obtained using solvents such as methanol and n-hexane. The extract of Ujyou, which was the optimal subspecies for the extraction of MGDG, inhibited the activity of calf DNA polymerase alpha with IC(50) values of 145 microg/mL but was not effective against DNA polymerase beta. PMID:16506811

  13. BRCA2: One Small Step for DNA Repair, One Giant Protein Purified

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ryan B.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage, malfunctions in DNA repair, and genomic instability are processes that intersect at the crossroads of carcinogenesis. Underscoring the importance of DNA repair in breast and ovarian tumorigenesis is the familial inherited cancer predisposition gene BRCA2. The role of BRCA2 in DNA double-strand break repair was first revealed based on its interaction with RAD51, a central player in homologous recombination. The RAD51 protein forms a nucleoprotein filament on single-stranded DNA, invades a DNA duplex, and initiates a search for homology. Once a homologous DNA sequence is found, the DNA is used as a template for the high-fidelity repair of the DNA break. Many of the biochemical features that allow BRCA2 to choreograph the activities of RAD51 have been elucidated and include: targeting RAD51 to single-stranded DNA while inhibiting binding to dsDNA, reducing the ATPase activity of RAD51, and facilitating the displacement of the single-strand DNA binding protein, Replication Protein A. These reinforcing activities of BRCA2 culminate in the correct positioning of RAD51 onto a processed DNA double-strand break and initiate its faithful repair by homologous recombination. In this review, I will address current biochemical data concerning the BRCA2 protein and highlight unanswered questions regarding BRCA2 function in homologous recombination and cancer. PMID:24348212

  14. A comparison between direct PCR and extraction to generate DNA profiles from samples retrieved from various substrates.

    PubMed

    Swaran, Yuvaneswari Chandramoulee; Welch, Lindsey

    2012-05-01

    Direct PCR generates DNA profiles from samples without using the extraction process. During sample extraction, DNA may be lost due to the methods used, which can affect the quality of the DNA profile obtained. This is not the case with direct PCR, where the sample is transferred directly into the PCR tube. Here, we report on the ability of direct PCR to generate DNA profiles from low amounts of control DNA retrieved from various surfaces using PowerPlex 16 HS. A comparison is made with samples undergoing a preliminary extraction stage using QiaAmp DNA Micro kits. Samples subjected to direct PCR generated DNA profiles with higher peak heights and lower allele dropout on all the different substrates tested when compared to the samples subjected to extraction. The amount of DNA retrieved from each substrate also varied even though the same amount of starting material was deposited, proving that the type of substrate can affect the retrieval of DNA. PMID:21925992

  15. Microbes on building materials--evaluation of DNA extraction protocols as common basis for molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Ettenauer, Jörg D; Piñar, Guadalupe; Lopandic, Ksenija; Spangl, Bernhard; Ellersdorfer, Günther; Voitl, Christian; Sterflinger, Katja

    2012-11-15

    The study of microbial life in building materials is an emerging topic concerning biodeterioration of materials as well as health risks in houses and at working places. Biodegradation and potential health implications associated with microbial growth in our residues claim for more precise methods for quantification and identification. To date, cultivation experiments are commonly used to gain insight into the microbial diversity. Nowadays, molecular techniques for the identification of microorganisms provide efficient methods that can be applied in this field. The efficiency of DNA extraction is decisive in order to perform a reliable and reproducible quantification of the microorganisms by qPCR or to characterize the structure of the microbial community. In this study we tested thirteen DNA extraction methods and evaluated their efficiency for identifying (1) the quantity of DNA, (2) the quality and purity of DNA and (3) the ability of the DNA to be amplified in a PCR reaction using three universal primer sets for the ITS region of fungi as well as one primer pair targeting the 16S rRNA of bacteria with three typical building materials - common plaster, red brick and gypsum cardboard. DNA concentration measurements showed strong variations among the tested methods and materials. Measurement of the DNA yield showed up to three orders of magnitude variation from the same samples, whereas A260/A280 ratios often prognosticated biases in the PCR amplifications. Visualization of the crude DNA extracts and the comparison of DGGE fingerprints showed additional drawbacks of some methods. The FastDNA Spin kit for soil showed to be the best DNA extraction method and could provide positive results for all tests with the three building materials. Therefore, we suggest this method as a gold standard for quantification of indoor fungi and bacteria in building materials. PMID:23063637

  16. DNA extraction for short tandem repeat typing from mixed samples using anti-human leukocyte CD45 and ABO blood group antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shizue; Honda, Katsuya; Kaminiwa, Junko; Nishi, Takeki; Iwabuchi, Yayoi; Sugano, Yukiko; Kurosu, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    DNA testing from mixed cell samples can be difficult to use successfully in criminal investigations. Here, we present a method for the extraction of DNA from mixed bloodstains involving plural contributors, after antibody-microbead captured cell separation. This method, together with the multiplex short tandem repeat typing presented, has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA profiles corresponding to the ABO blood type. Methodological steps include magnetic separation using leukocyte specific CD45 antibody-coated microbeads and centrifugal separation of leukocyte agglutination by ABO antibody. The detection results of variable mixed ratio showed that the target DNA was detected accurately as low as 1:512 mixed ratio, regardless of the large amount of the background DNA present. The method presented here is applicable to PCR-based identification for various kinds of mixed samples. PMID:24680125

  17. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ? 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni < 0.5. This result is counterintuitive because there are at least twice as many ionic protein-DNA contacts in the fully wrapped complex than in the weakly bent intermediate. The following picture emerges from this analysis: in the bimolecular step, the observed [KCl]-dependence is consistent with the number of DNA counterions expected to be released when IHF binds nonspecifically to DNA whereas in the unimolecular reorganization step, the weak [KCl]-dependence suggests that two effects cancel one another. On one hand, formation of additional protein-DNA contacts in the fully wrapped complex releases bound counterions into bulk solution, which is entropically favored by decreasing [salt]. On the other hand, formation of the fully wrapped complex also releases tightly bound water molecules, which is osmotically favored by increasing [salt]. More generally, our global analysis strategy is applicable to other protein-DNA complexes, and opens up the possibility of measuring DNA bending rates in complexes where the unimolecular and bimolecular steps are not easily separable.

  18. Two-step recognition of DNA damage for mammalian nucleotide excision repair: Directional binding of the XPC complex and DNA strand scanning.

    PubMed

    Sugasawa, Kaoru; Akagi, Jun-ichi; Nishi, Ryotaro; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2009-11-25

    For mammalian nucleotide excision repair (NER), DNA lesions are recognized in at least two steps involving detection of unpaired bases by the XPC protein complex and the subsequent verification of injured bases. Although lesion verification is important to ensure high damage discrimination and the accuracy of the repair system, it has been unclear how this is accomplished. Here, we show that damage verification involves scanning of a DNA strand from the site where XPC is initially bound. Translocation by the NER machinery exhibits a 5'-to-3' directionality, strongly suggesting involvement of the XPD helicase, a component of TFIIH. Furthermore, the initial orientation of XPC binding is crucial in that only one DNA strand is selected to search for the presence of lesions. Our results dissect the intricate molecular mechanism of NER and provide insights into a strategy for mammalian cells to survey large genomes to detect DNA damage. PMID:19941824

  19. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD IS SUCCESSFULLY APPLIED TO ITS-RFLP ANALYSIS OF MYCORRHIZAL ROOT TIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid method for extracting DNA from intact, single root tips using a Xanthine solution was developed to handle very large numbers of analyses of ectomycorrhizas. By using an extraction without grinding we have attempted to bias the extraction towards the fungal DNA in the man...

  20. A practical and novel method to extract genomic DNA from blood collection kits for plasma protein preservation.

    PubMed

    Waters, Jon; Dhere, Vishal; Benjamin, Adam; Sekar, Arvind; Kumar, Archana; Prahalad, Sampath; Okou, David T; Kugathasan, Subra

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory tests can be done on the cellular or fluid portions of the blood. The use of different blood collection tubes determines the portion of the blood that can be analyzed (whole blood, plasma or serum). Laboratories involved in studying the genetic basis of human disorders rely on anticoagulated whole blood collected in EDTA-containing vacutainer as the source of DNA for genetic / genomic analysis. Because most clinical laboratories perform biochemical, serologic and viral testing as a first step in phenotypic outcome investigation, anticoagulated blood is also collected in heparin-containing tube (plasma tube). Therefore when DNA and plasma are needed for simultaneous and parallel analyses of both genomic and proteomic data, it is customary to collect blood in both EDTA and heparin tubes. If blood could be collected in a single tube and serve as a source for both plasma and DNA, that method would be considered an advancement to existing methods. The use of the compacted blood after plasma extraction represents an alternative source for genomic DNA, thus minimizing the amount of blood samples processed and reducing the number of samples required from each patient. This would ultimately save time and resources. The BD P100 blood collection system for plasma protein preservation were created as an improved method over previous plasma or serum collection tubes(1), to stabilize the protein content of blood, enabling better protein biomarker discovery and proteomics experimentation from human blood. The BD P100 tubes contain 15.8 ml of spray-dried K2EDTA and a lyophilized proprietary broad spectrum cocktail of protease inhibitors to prevent coagulation and stabilize the plasma proteins. They also include a mechanical separator, which provides a physical barrier between plasma and cell pellets after centrifugation. Few methods have been devised to extract DNA from clotted blood samples collected in old plasma tubes(2-4). Challenges from these methods were mainly associated with the type of separator inside the tubes (gel separator) and included difficulty in recovering the clotted blood, the inconvenience of fragmenting or dispersing the clot, and obstruction of the clot extraction by the separation gel. We present the first method that extracts and purifies genomic DNA from blood drawn in the new BD P100 tubes. We compare the quality of the DNA sample from P100 tubes to that from EDTA tubes. Our approach is simple and efficient. It involves four major steps as follows: 1) the use of a plasma BD P100 (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD, USA) tube with mechanical separator for blood collection, 2) the removal of the mechanical separator using a combination of sucrose and a sterile paperclip metallic hook, 3) the separation of the buffy coat layer containing the white cells and 4) the isolation of the genomic DNA from the buffy coat using a regular commercial DNA extraction kit or a similar standard protocol. PMID:23711730

  1. A Practical and Novel Method to Extract Genomic DNA from Blood Collection Kits for Plasma Protein Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Jon; Dhere, Vishal; Benjamin, Adam; Sekar, Arvind; Kumar, Archana; Prahalad, Sampath; Okou, David T.; Kugathasan, Subra

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory tests can be done on the cellular or fluid portions of the blood. The use of different blood collection tubes determines the portion of the blood that can be analyzed (whole blood, plasma or serum). Laboratories involved in studying the genetic basis of human disorders rely on anticoagulated whole blood collected in EDTA-containing vacutainer as the source of DNA for genetic / genomic analysis. Because most clinical laboratories perform biochemical, serologic and viral testing as a first step in phenotypic outcome investigation, anticoagulated blood is also collected in heparin-containing tube (plasma tube). Therefore when DNA and plasma are needed for simultaneous and parallel analyses of both genomic and proteomic data, it is customary to collect blood in both EDTA and heparin tubes. If blood could be collected in a single tube and serve as a source for both plasma and DNA, that method would be considered an advancement to existing methods. The use of the compacted blood after plasma extraction represents an alternative source for genomic DNA, thus minimizing the amount of blood samples processed and reducing the number of samples required from each patient. This would ultimately save time and resources. The BD P100 blood collection system for plasma protein preservation were created as an improved method over previous plasma or serum collection tubes1, to stabilize the protein content of blood, enabling better protein biomarker discovery and proteomics experimentation from human blood. The BD P100 tubes contain 15.8 ml of spray-dried K2EDTA and a lyophilized proprietary broad spectrum cocktail of protease inhibitors to prevent coagulation and stabilize the plasma proteins. They also include a mechanical separator, which provides a physical barrier between plasma and cell pellets after centrifugation. Few methods have been devised to extract DNA from clotted blood samples collected in old plasma tubes2-4. Challenges from these methods were mainly associated with the type of separator inside the tubes (gel separator) and included difficulty in recovering the clotted blood, the inconvenience of fragmenting or dispersing the clot, and obstruction of the clot extraction by the separation gel. We present the first method that extracts and purifies genomic DNA from blood drawn in the new BD P100 tubes. We compare the quality of the DNA sample from P100 tubes to that from EDTA tubes. Our approach is simple and efficient. It involves four major steps as follows: 1) the use of a plasma BD P100 (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD, USA) tube with mechanical separator for blood collection, 2) the removal of the mechanical separator using a combination of sucrose and a sterile paperclip metallic hook, 3) the separation of the buffy coat layer containing the white cells and 4) the isolation of the genomic DNA from the buffy coat using a regular commercial DNA extraction kit or a similar standard protocol. PMID:23711730

  2. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of ?-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  3. Exploring microbial diversity in volcanic environments: a review of methods in DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Aude; Cockell, Charles S

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has been marked by a large number of studies focused on understanding the distribution of microorganisms in volcanic environments. These studies are motivated by the desire to elucidate how the geochemically extreme conditions of such environments can influence microbial diversity both on the surface and in the subsurface of the Earth. The exploration of microbial community diversity has generally not relied on culture-dependent methods, but has been carried out using environmental DNA extraction. Because of the large diversity of chemically and physically complex samples, extracting DNA from volcanic environments is technically challenging. In view of the emerging literature, and our own experience in the optimisation of methods for DNA extraction from volcanic materials, it is timely to provide a methodological comparison. This review highlights and discusses new insights and methods published on DNA extraction methods from volcanic samples, considering the different volcanic environments. A description of a recent method for DNA extraction from basalt and obsidian glass rock samples from Iceland is included. Finally, we discuss these approaches in the wider context of modern work to understand the microbial diversity of volcanic environments. PMID:17540467

  4. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of ?-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition. PMID:26419945

  5. Optimisation of DNA extraction and validation of PCR assays to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timms, Verlaine J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate DNA extraction methods and PCR assays suitable for the detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. The majority of methods currently used to detect M. paratuberculosis have been developed using bovine samples, such as faeces, blood or tissue and, in many cases, have been based on detection from pooled samples from a herd. However most studies have not compared PCR results to culture results. In order to address this problem, four DNA extraction protocols and three PCR assays were employed to detect M. paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. Given that culture is reliable from cows, the results were then compared with the known M. paratuberculosis culture status. The following DNA extractions were included, two commercial kits, a boiling method, an in house extraction based on a published method and enrichment by sonication. The three PCR assays used included single round IS900 and f57 assays and a nested IS900 assay. In addition, another PCR assay was validated for the detection of any Mycobacterial species and a universal bacterial 16S rRNA gene assay was used to detect sample inhibition. The in-house DNA extraction was the most consistent in extracting good quality DNA compared to all other methods. The use of two PCR markers, IS900 and f57, and a universal PCR enabled the correct samples to be identified as M. paratuberculosis positive. In addition, when compared to the culture result, false-positives did not occur and PCR inhibition was readily identified. Using an in house DNA extraction coupled with the IS900 and f57 PCR markers, this study provides a reliable and simple method to detect M. paratuberculosis in both veterinary and spill over infections. PMID:25797305

  6. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for polymerase chain reaction amplification of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) fecal DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, M I; Bertin, A; Squeo, F A; Cortés, A; Gouin, N

    2015-01-01

    Feces-based population genetic studies have become increasingly popular. However, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification rates from fecal material vary depending on the species, populations, loci, and extraction protocols. Here, we assessed the PCR amplification success of three microsatellite markers and a segment of the mitochondrial control region of DNA extracted from field-collected feces of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) using two protocols - Qiagen DNA Stool Kit and 2 cetyltrimethylammonium bromide/phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (2CTAB/PCI) method. Chelex resin treatment to remove inhibitors was also tested. Our results show that the mitochondrial locus was the most difficult to amplify. PCR success rates improved for all markers after Chelex treatment of extracted DNA, and 2CTAB/PCI method (95.83%) appeared to perform slightly better than stool kit (91.67%) for the nuclear markers. Amplification success was significantly influenced by the extraction method, Chelex treatment, and locus (P < 0.001) but not by the freshness of the feces (fresh vs old, P = 0.17). The repeatability levels were high without Chelex treatment (> 0.89), but they decreased slightly after treatment for amplification of nuclear markers and markedly after treatment for amplification of the mitochondrial control region. Thus, we showed that Chelex treatment gives high PCR success, especially for nuclear markers, and adequate DNA extraction rates can be achieved from L. guanicoe feces even from non-fresh fecal material. Although not significant, 2CTAB/PCI method tended to provide higher successful amplification rates on a whole set of samples, suggesting that the method could be particularly useful when using small sample sizes. PMID:25729972

  7. Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Peter J.; Gambus, Agnieszka; Blow, J. Julian

    2012-01-01

    The use of cell-free extracts prepared from eggs of the South African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, has led to many important discoveries in cell cycle research. These egg extracts recapitulate the key nuclear transitions of the eukaryotic cell cycle in vitro under apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. DNA added to the extract is first assembled into a nucleus and is then efficiently replicated. Progression of the extract into mitosis then allows the separation of paired sister chromatids. The Xenopus cell-free system is therefore uniquely suited to the study of the mechanisms, dynamics and integration of cell cycle regulated processes at a biochemical level. In this article we describe methods currently in use in our laboratory for the preparation of Xenopus egg extracts and demembranated sperm nuclei for the study of DNA replication in vitro. We also detail how DNA replication can be quantified in this system. In addition, we describe methods for isolating chromatin and chromatin-bound protein complexes from egg extracts. These recently developed and revised techniques provide a practical starting point for investigating the function of proteins involved in DNA replication. PMID:22521908

  8. Extraction of PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA from Bacillus anthracisspores

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Tamas

    2003-05-19

    Bacterial endospore disruption and nucleic acid extractionresulting in DNA of PCR-amplifiable quality and quantity are not trivial.Responding to the needs of the Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU),Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, protocols weredeveloped to close these gaps. Effectiveness and reproducibility of thetechniques were validated with laboratory grown pure spores of Bacillusanthracis and its close phylogenetic neighbors, and with spiked soils anddamaged samples.

  9. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  10. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  11. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  12. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  13. Release of Bacterial DNA by Marine Nanoflagellates, an Intermediate Step in Phosphorus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Valentina; Rehnstam, Ann-Sofi; Lundberg, Erik; Hagström, Åke

    1992-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved DNA and nanoflagellates were found to covary during a study of diel dynamics of the microbial food web in the Adriatic Sea. This observation was further investigated in a continuous seawater culture when nanoflagellates were fed bacteria grown in filtered seawater. Analysis of dissolved organic phosphorus and dissolved DNA showed a sixfold increase of dissolved DNA in the presence of the nanoflagellates (Ochromonas sp.). The amount of DNA released suggested that the majority of the consumed bacterial DNA was ejected. Phagotrophic nanoflagellates thus represent an important source of origin for dissolved DNA. The rate of breakdown of dissolved DNA and release of inorganic phosphorus in the pelagic ecosystem is suggested to be dependent on the ambient phosphate pool. In the P-limited northern Adriatic Sea, rapid degradation of the labelled DNA could be demonstrated, whereas the N-limited southern California bight water showed a much lower rate. Phosphorus originating from dissolved DNA was shown to be transferred mainly to organisms in the <3-?m-size fractions. On the basis of the C/P ratios, we suggest that a significant fraction of the phosphorus demand by the autotrophs may be sustained by the released DNA during stratified conditions. Thus, the nucleic acid-rich bacterial biomass grazed by protozoa plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in the marine environment. PMID:16348813

  14. Mite species identification in the production of allergenic extracts for clinical use and in environmental samples by ribosomal DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Beroiz, B; Couso-Ferrer, F; Ortego, F; Chamorro, M J; Arteaga, C; Lombardero, M; Castañera, P; Hernández-Crespo, P

    2014-09-01

    The identification of allergy-causing mites is conventionally based on morphological characters. However, molecular taxonomy using ribosomal DNA (rDNA) may be particularly useful in the analysis of mite cultures and purified mite fractions in the production of allergenic extracts. Full-length internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) were obtained from Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides microceras and Euroglyphus maynei (Astigmata: Pyroglyphidae), Glycyphagus domesticus and Lepidoglyphus destructor (Astigmata: Glycyphagidae), Tyrophagus fanetzhangorum, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Tyrophagus longior, Tyrophagus neiswanderi, Acarus farris and Acarus siro (Astigmata: Acaridae), and Blomia tropicalis (Astigmata: Echymopodidae), using mite-specific primers. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were digested with HpaII and RsaI restriction enzymes in order to produce species-specific PCR restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles. A semi-nested re-amplification step was introduced before the RFLP in order to apply the method to environmental samples. Results demonstrate that rDNA sequences can be used for the unambiguous identification of mite species. The PCR-RFLP system allows the identification of species in purified mite fractions when the availability of intact adult mite bodies for morphological identification is limited. This reliable and straightforward PCR-RFLP system and the rDNA sequences obtained can be of use in the identification of allergy-causing mite species. PMID:24617319

  15. An evaluation of the effect of microwave irradiation on bone decalcification aimed to DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Kei; Ogawa, Yoshinori

    2013-09-01

    An effect of intermittent microwave irradiation on decalcification of compact bone followed by DNA extraction was verified. In order to perform quantitative analysis regarding the degree of decalcification, Cubic bone specimens were prepared from bovine metacarpal bone and micro-focus X-ray CT imaging was applied to measure precise volume of decalcified area in the cubes. Microwave irradiation was performed under strict control of temperature using commercially available experimental device which is designed for advancing tissue fixation, decalcification, and antigen-antibody reaction by intermittent microwave. The integrity of the DNA obtained from irradiated specimen was also examined by PCR analysis. The results of morphological analysis with CT imaging showed that microwave irradiation has a positive effect on decalcification though that effect is not so drastic. The results obtained from PCR analysis showed that microwave irradiation decrease amplifiable DNA, suggesting that we should be careful to use microwave for the purpose of bone DNA extraction. PMID:23838266

  16. One-Step Formation of "Chain-Armor"-Stabilized DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cassinelli, Valentina; Oberleitner, Birgit; Sobotta, Jessica; Nickels, Philipp; Grossi, Guido; Kempter, Susanne; Frischmuth, Thomas; Liedl, Tim; Manetto, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    DNA-based self-assembled nanostructures are widely used to position organic and inorganic objects with nanoscale precision. A particular promising application of DNA structures is their usage as programmable carrier systems for targeted drug delivery. To provide DNA-based templates that are robust against degradation at elevated temperatures, low ion concentrations, adverse pH conditions, and DNases, we built 6-helix DNA tile tubes consisting of 24 oligonucleotides carrying alkyne groups on their 3'-ends and azides on their 5'-ends. By a mild click reaction, the two ends of selected oligonucleotides were covalently connected to form rings and interlocked DNA single strands, so-called DNA catenanes. Strikingly, the structures stayed topologically intact in pure water and even after precipitation from EtOH. The structures even withstood a temperature of 95?°C when all of the 24 strands were chemically interlocked. PMID:25980669

  17. Comparison of five protocols to extract DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues for the detection of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Aldana, Adalucy; Martínez, José William; Sepúlveda-Arias, Juan C

    2015-02-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are a valuable source of DNA with which to perform large retrospective studies on the epidemiology of HPV infection. Five different DNA extraction protocols were carried out to evaluate the DNA obtained from FFPE samples with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two primer sets to amplify a constitutive human gene, β-globin, and two primer sets to detect the L1 and E6 HPV genes. From the five DNA extraction protocols evaluated, the best results were obtained with protocol A, corresponding to a crude extract from the sample. With the procedures described herein, we were able to amplify DNA extracted from archival paraffin blocks stored for six years. However, the amplification products were more efficiently obtained with primers that amplified shorter fragments. This result indicates that a major factor limiting the extraction process in these samples is DNA fragmentation, a factor that will naturally vary between the different specimens evaluated. Also, depending upon the extraction method, PCR amplification of a human gene does not necessarily guarantee the successful extraction of viral DNA. In conclusion, different DNA and HPV detection methods can significantly influence the results. Therefore, the DNA extraction methods and primers used for DNA amplification in fixed tissues need to be chosen carefully, depending on the specific requirements of the study being carried out. PMID:25444238

  18. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection. PMID:26202628

  19. Inhibition of oxidative DNA damage in vitro by extracts of brussels sprouts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C; Poulsen, H E; Loft, S

    2000-08-01

    Cruciferous vegetables have cancer preventive effects which may be due to reduction of oxidative DNA damage. We investigated the effect of an aqueous extract of cooked Brussels sprouts on formation of 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in calf thymus DNA in vitro. Damage was induced by a Fenton reaction, UVC (254 nm), UVA (365 nm), sunlamp light, and methylene blue with visible light. The extract inhibited 8-oxodG formation in all systems except visible light with methylene blue. The IC50 values were 6-20 microg/ml corresponding to the extract of 5-20 g of Brussels sprouts distributed in a volume of 50 L. The protective effect in the Fenton reaction was unaffected by addition of EDTA. After HPLC separation fractions were identified with similar DNA protective effects. Sinigrin, a glucosinolate abundant in Brussels sprouts, co-eluted with the most effective fraction and had DNA protective effects. In comparison with other antioxidants the patterns of effect of the extract in the five damage systems were more similar to that of sodium azide than to those of dimethylsulfoxide and vitamin C. Constituents of Brussels sprouts can protect DNA by direct scavenging, e.g. hydroxyl radical and other oxidants, without prooxidant effects at concentrations potentially achievable by modest intake of the vegetable. PMID:10885626

  20. First-passage problems in DNA replication: effects of template tension on stepping and exonuclease activities of a DNA polymerase motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ajeet K.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-09-01

    A DNA polymerase (DNAP) replicates a template DNA strand. It also exploits the template as the track for its own motor-like mechanical movement. In the polymerase mode it elongates the nascent DNA by one nucleotide in each step. However, whenever it commits an error by misincorporating an incorrect nucleotide, it can switch to an exonuclease mode. In the latter mode it excises the wrong nucleotide before switching back to its polymerase mode. We develop a stochastic kinetic model of DNA replication that mimics an in vitro experiment where single-stranded DNA, subjected to a mechanical tension F, is converted to double-stranded DNA by a single DNAP. The F-dependence of the average rate of replication, which depends on the rates of both polymerase and exonuclease activities of the DNAP, is in good qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental results. We introduce nine novel distinct conditional dwell times of a DNAP. Using the method of first-passage times, we also derive the exact analytical expressions for the probability distributions of these conditional dwell times. The predicted F-dependences of these distributions are, in principle, accessible to single-molecule experiments.

  1. DNA extraction using modified bacterial magnetic particles in the presence of amino silane compound.

    PubMed

    Yoza, Brandon; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2002-04-11

    Magnetic particles produced by magnetic bacteria have been used to carry out magnetic separation of DNA. Separation was achieved using magnetite coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, N-(trimethoxy-silylpropyl) isothiouronium chloride or 3-[2-(2-aminoethyl)-ethylamino]-propyltrimethoxysilane (AEEA). The DNA binding efficiency increased with the number of amino groups present on the silane compounds and was 14 fold higher than with untreated magnetite. Addition of AEEA to aqueous solutions containing coated magnetite increased efficiency due to co-condensation of DNA. From 10(8) Escherichia coli cells, 7.1 microg of DNA was recovered using 100 microg of magnetite. E. coli DNA extracted with modified bacterial magnetite was suitable for restriction enzyme digestion and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Ten replicate samples of E. coli cells were extracted using an automated magnetic robot and 9.5 microg of DNA was extracted using 100 microg of modified bacterial magnetite and possessed a 1.94 absorbance ratio (260:280 nm). PMID:11861080

  2. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes as assessed by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Hyang Burm; Jeon, Eun-Jae; Jung, Hack Sung; Kang, Myung-Hee

    2004-01-01

    The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) is claimed to have beneficial properties for human health, such as anti-bacterial, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant effects of the mushroom may be partly explained by protection of cell components against free radicals. We evaluated the effect of aqueous Chaga mushroom extracts for their potential for protecting against oxidative damage to DNA in human lymphocytes. Cells were pretreated with various concentrations (10, 50, 100 and 500 microg/mL) of the extract for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Cells were then treated with 100 microM of H2O2 for 5 min as an oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative damage was performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation (Comet assay). Using image analysis, the degree of DNA damage was evaluated as the DNA tail moment. Cells pretreated with Chaga extract showed over 40% reduction in DNA fragmentation compared with the positive control (100 micromol H2O2 treatment). Thus, Chaga mushroom treatment affords cellular protection against endogenous DNA damage produced by H2O2. PMID:15630179

  3. Easy DNA extraction for rapid detection of Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer in commercial ginseng products.

    PubMed

    Serrone, P Del; Attorri, L; Palazzino, G

    2007-10-01

    An investigation was carried out in order to obtain an easy and rapid detection of Panax ginseng in commercial herbal products by using molecular techniques (polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)). Two protocols and one commercial kit for DNA extraction were used. Four forms of commercial products were considered, i.e., dried body roots, dried root tails, dried root prongs and dried extracts. The RFLP of DNA amplified products by 18df/28ccr primers, obtained using Inf I, Sau 3A1 and Taq I endonucleases, allowed the identification of P. ginseng and its differentiation from P. quinquefolium. The presence of adulterants, as Mirabilis jalapa L. and Phytolacca acinosa Roxb. was excluded in the examined commercial samples. P. ginseng was detected in 63% of the considered samples according to the declaration of the labels, whereas negative results were obtained with the dried extract form. Therefore, the Invitrogen DNA extraction kit let the easy extraction of useful amounts of DNA and a standardisation of routine work, in comparison with the other molecular protocols so far used. PMID:17852746

  4. How to Open the Treasure Chest? Optimising DNA Extraction from Herbarium Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Särkinen, Tiina; Staats, Martijn; Richardson, James E.; Cowan, Robyn S.; Bakker, Freek T.

    2012-01-01

    Herbarium collections are potentially an enormous resource for DNA studies, but the use of herbarium specimens in molecular studies has thus far been slowed down by difficulty in obtaining amplifiable DNA. Here we compare a set of commercially available DNA extraction protocols and their performance in terms of DNA purity and yield, and PCR amplification success as measured by using three differentially sized markers, the rbcL barcoding marker (cpDNA), the LEAFY exon 3 (nrDNA), and the trnL(UAA) P6 loop (cpDNA). Results reveal large differences between extraction methods, where DNA purity rather than yield is shown to be strongly correlated with PCR success. Amplicon size shows similarly strong correlation with PCR success, with the shortest fragment showing the highest success rate (78%, P6 loop, 10–143 base pairs (bp)) and the largest fragment the lowest success (10%, rbcL, 670 bp). The effect of specimen preparation method on PCR success was also tested. Results show that drying method strongly affects PCR success, especially the availability of fragments longer than 250 bp, where longer fragments are more available for PCR amplification in air dried material compared to alcohol dried specimens. Results from our study indicate that projects relying on poor-quality starting material such as herbarium or scat samples should focus on extracting pure DNA and aim to amplify short target regions (<200–300 bp) in order to maximise outcomes. Development of shorter barcoding regions, or mini-barcodes within existing ones should be of high importance as only a few options are currently available; this is particularly important if we hope to incorporate the millions of herbarium samples available into barcoding initiatives and other molecular studies. PMID:22952770

  5. Multiple DNA Extractions Coupled with Stable-Isotope Probing of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Contaminated Soil▿†

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Singleton, David R.; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the 13C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-13C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from 13C-enriched DNA and were designated “anthracene group 1.” Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP. PMID:21398486

  6. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Fori?, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as ?Eq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co ?-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with ?-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  7. Genomic DNA extraction from whole blood stored from 15- to 30-years at -20 °C by rapid phenol-chloroform protocol: a useful tool for genetic epidemiology studies.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Ortenzi, Francesco; Tilio, Martina; Concetti, Fabio; Napolioni, Valerio

    2011-02-01

    Long-term stored (LTS) whole blood collection can be an important source of DNA without collection costs, but there is a lack of information on methods useful to extract genomic DNA from such type of biological material. Here we report a simple and fast revisited phenol/chloroform extraction method from LTS whole blood. Protocol reliability was assessed by comparison with proteinase K and silica-gel membrane spin column-based DNA extraction methods using LTS -20 °C whole blood from 1980, and by testing it on 82 whole blood samples, collected from 1980 to 1995, with high quality (A(260/280) = 1.79 ± 0.32 O.D., A(260/230) = 1.45 ± 0.52 O.D.) and quantity results. Genotyping efficiency was also checked by performing RFLP-PCR and ASP-PCR of p53 Pro72Arg (rs1042522) SNP and hTERT MNS16A VNTR, respectively, resulting in 100% of samples successfully typed. In addition to the goodness and the efficiency of method proposed here, this protocol achieves working time reduction combining extraction and purification steps, allowing to work at room temperature. Furthermore, phenol is able to inactivate any potential nuclease and potential infective sources from the first step on. Based on these results we also conclude that LTS -20 °C whole blood samples may be considered a reliable and potential resource for future genotyping studies and retrospective analysis in a genetic epidemiological setting. PMID:21029772

  8. Comparative Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods from Feces of Multiple Host Species for Downstream Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hart, Marcia L; Meyer, Alexandra; Johnson, Philip J; Ericsson, Aaron C

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains a vast community of microbes that to this day remain largely unculturable, making studies in this area challenging. With the newly affordable advanced sequencing technology, important breakthroughs in this exciting field are now possible. However, standardized methods of sample collection, handling, and DNA extraction have yet to be determined. To help address this, we investigated the use of 5 common DNA extraction methods on fecal samples from 5 different species. Our data show that the method of DNA extraction impacts DNA concentration and purity, successful NGS amplification, and influences microbial communities seen in NGS output dependent on the species of fecal sample and the DNA extraction method used. These data highlight the importance of careful consideration of DNA extraction method used when designing and interpreting data from cross species studies. PMID:26599606

  9. Comparative Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods from Feces of Multiple Host Species for Downstream Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Marcia L.; Meyer, Alexandra; Johnson, Philip J.; Ericsson, Aaron C.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains a vast community of microbes that to this day remain largely unculturable, making studies in this area challenging. With the newly affordable advanced sequencing technology, important breakthroughs in this exciting field are now possible. However, standardized methods of sample collection, handling, and DNA extraction have yet to be determined. To help address this, we investigated the use of 5 common DNA extraction methods on fecal samples from 5 different species. Our data show that the method of DNA extraction impacts DNA concentration and purity, successful NGS amplification, and influences microbial communities seen in NGS output dependent on the species of fecal sample and the DNA extraction method used. These data highlight the importance of careful consideration of DNA extraction method used when designing and interpreting data from cross species studies. PMID:26599606

  10. Extraction and fractionation of RNA and DNA from single cells using selective lysing and isotachophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Santiago, Juan G.

    2015-03-01

    Single cell analyses of RNA and DNA are crucial to understanding the heterogeneity of cell populations. The numbers of approaches to single cells analyses are expanding, but sequence specific measurements of nucleic acids have been mostly limited to studies of either DNA or RNA, and not both. This remains a challenge as RNA and DNA have very similar physical and biochemical properties, and cross-contamination with each other can introduce false positive results. We present an electrokinetic technique which creates the opportunity to fractionate and deliver cytoplasmic RNA and genomic DNA to independent downstream analyses. Our technique uses an on-chip system that enables selective lysing of cytoplasmic membrane, extraction of RNA (away from genomic DNA and nucleus), focusing, absolute quantification of cytoplasmic RNA mass. The absolute RNA mass quantification is performed using fluorescence observation without enzymatic amplification in < 5 min. The cell nucleus is left intact and the relative genomic DNA amount in the nucleus can be measured. We demonstrate the technique using single mouse B lymphocyte cells, for which we extracted an average of 14.1 pg total cytoplasmic RNA per cell. We also demonstrate correlation analysis between the absolute amount of cytoplasmic RNA and relative amount of genomic DNA, showing heterogeneity associated with cell cycle.

  11. A viral packaging motor varies its DNA rotation and step size to preserve subunit coordination as the capsid fills.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shixin; Chistol, Gheorghe; Hetherington, Craig L; Tafoya, Sara; Aathavan, K; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-04-24

    Multimeric, ring-shaped molecular motors rely on the coordinated action of their subunits to perform crucial biological functions. During these tasks, motors often change their operation in response to regulatory signals. Here, we investigate a viral packaging machine as it fills the capsid with DNA and encounters increasing internal pressure. We find that the motor rotates the DNA during packaging and that the rotation per base pair increases with filling. This change accompanies a reduction in the motor's step size. We propose that these adjustments preserve motor coordination by allowing one subunit to make periodic, specific, and regulatory contacts with the DNA. At high filling, we also observe the downregulation of the ATP-binding rate and the emergence of long-lived pauses, suggesting a throttling-down mechanism employed by the motor near the completion of packaging. This study illustrates how a biological motor adjusts its operation in response to changing conditions, while remaining highly coordinated. PMID:24766813

  12. Low cost extraction and isothermal amplification of DNA for infectious diarrhea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10(-2) pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health. PMID:23555883

  13. Low Cost Extraction and Isothermal Amplification of DNA for Infectious Diarrhea Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K.; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10?2 pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health. PMID:23555883

  14. Dynamic solid phase DNA extraction and PCR amplification in polyester-toner based microchip.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Gabriela R M; Price, Carol W; Augustine, Brian H; Carrilho, Emanuel; Landers, James P

    2011-07-01

    A variety of substrates have been used for fabrication of microchips for DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and DNA fragment separation, including the more conventional glass and silicon as well as alternative polymer-based materials. Polyester represents one such polymer, and the laser-printing of toner onto polyester films has been shown to be effective for generating polyester-toner (PeT) microfluidic devices with channel depths on the order of tens of micrometers. Here, we describe a novel and simple process that allows for the production of multilayer, high aspect-ratio PeT microdevices with substantially larger channel depths. This innovative process utilizes a CO(2) laser to create the microchannel in polyester sheets containing a uniform layer of printed toner, and multilayer devices can easily be constructed by sandwiching the channel layer between uncoated cover sheets of polyester containing precut access holes. The process allows the fabrication of deep channels, with ~270 ?m, and we demonstrate the effectiveness of multilayer PeT microchips for dynamic solid phase extraction (dSPE) and PCR amplification. With the former, we found that (i) more than 65% of DNA from 0.6 ?L of blood was recovered, (ii) the resultant DNA was concentrated to greater than 3 ng/?L (which was better than other chip-based extraction methods), and (iii) the DNA recovered was compatible with downstream microchip-based PCR amplification. Illustrative of the compatibility of PeT microchips with the PCR process, the successful amplification of a 520 bp fragment of ?-phage DNA in a conventional thermocycler is shown. The ability to handle the diverse chemistries associated with DNA purification and extraction is a testimony to the potential utility of PeT microchips beyond separations and presents a promising new disposable platform for genetic analysis that is low cost and easy to fabricate. PMID:21557576

  15. Adsorption and desorption of DNA tuned by hydroxyl groups in graphite oxides-based solid extraction material.

    PubMed

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of DNA is the most crucial method used in molecular biology. Up to date silica matrices has been widely applied as solid support for selective DNA adsorption and extraction. However, since adsorption force of SiOH functional groups is much greater than that of desorption force, the DNA extraction efficiency of silica surfaces is limited. In order to increase the DNA extraction yield, a new surface with different functional groups which possess of greater desorption property is required. In this study, we proposed cellulose/graphite oxide (GO) composite as an alternative material for DNA adsorption and extraction. GO/Cellulose composite provides the major adsorption and desorption of DNA by COH, which belongs to alkyl or phenol type of OH functional group. Compared to SiOH, COH is less polarized and reactive, therefore the composite might provide a higher desorption of DNA during the elution process. The GO/cellulose composite were prepared in spherical structure by mixing urea, cellulose, NaOH, Graphite oxide and water. The concentration of GO within the composites were controlled to be 0-4.15wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of GO. The highest yield was achieved at 4.15wt.% GO, where the extraction efficiency was reported as 660.4ng/?l when applying 2M GuHCl as the binding buffer. The absorbance ratios between 260nm and 280nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution was demonstrated as 1.86, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The results proved that GO/cellulose composite provides a simple method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA. PMID:26355811

  16. Unraveling the sequence-dependent polymorphic behavior of d(CpG) steps in B-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dans, Pablo Daniel; Faustino, Ignacio; Battistini, Federica; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Lavery, Richard; Orozco, Modesto

    2014-01-01

    We have made a detailed study of one of the most surprising sources of polymorphism in B-DNA: the high twist/low twist (HT/LT) conformational change in the d(CpG) base pair step. Using extensive computations, complemented with database analysis, we were able to characterize the twist polymorphism in the d(CpG) step in all the possible tetranucleotide environment. We found that twist polymorphism is coupled with BI/BII transitions, and, quite surprisingly, with slide polymorphism in the neighboring step. Unexpectedly, the penetration of cations into the minor groove of the d(CpG) step seems to be the key element in promoting twist transitions. The tetranucleotide environment also plays an important role in the sequence-dependent d(CpG) polymorphism. In this connection, we have detected a previously unexplored intramolecular C-H···O hydrogen bond interaction that stabilizes the low twist state when 3′-purines flank the d(CpG) step. This work explains a coupled mechanism involving several apparently uncorrelated conformational transitions that has only been partially inferred by earlier experimental or theoretical studies. Our results provide a complete description of twist polymorphism in d(CpG) steps and a detailed picture of the molecular choreography associated with this conformational change. PMID:25223784

  17. GENESUS: a two-step sequence design program for DNA nanostructure self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Takanobu; Asakawa, Takeshi; Kanegami, Akemi; Okada, Takao; Tahira, Tomoko; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been recognized as an ideal material for bottom-up construction of nanometer scale structures by self-assembly. The generation of sequences optimized for unique self-assembly (GENESUS) program reported here is a straightforward method for generating sets of strand sequences optimized for self-assembly of arbitrarily designed DNA nanostructures by a generate-candidates-and-choose-the-best strategy. A scalable procedure to prepare single-stranded DNA having arbitrary sequences is also presented. Strands for the assembly of various structures were designed and successfully constructed, validating both the program and the procedure. PMID:24724843

  18. MtDNA GeneExtractor: a computer tool for mtDNA gene/region information extraction.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Fernando; Oliveira, Sandra; Rocha, Ricardo; Pereira, Luísa

    2009-02-01

    The analysis of considerable numbers of DNA sequences is largely dependent on the development of simple software tools for automatically process the genetic data deposited on public databases. However, there are some difficulties in the automation process due to diverse synonyms being used as qualifiers for genes and some inconsistencies in gene locations between related Primate species, this fact happening even in the carefully curated database RefSeq. Here, we present mtDNA GeneEXtractor, a Windows based computer tool developed for the extraction of information for particular gene/regions from mammal mitochondrial DNA sequences deposited under GenBank format. The tool was quite efficient in retrieving organized information for comparative mtDNA gene/region diversity analyses when tested for the evaluation of transition/transversion ratios in humans and between Primates. Taking phylogenetic information into account to avoid redundancy due to ancestry-sharing, the transition/transversion ratios in the 13 protein-coding genes had a mean value of 12.46 for Primates (from 6.46 in ND2 to 17.04 in COX1) and higher (34.74) but more heterogeneous (ranging from 17.30 in ND5 to 74.39 in ND4) in a worldwide human database. The similar patterns of transition/transversion ratios in all positions and in only four fold degenerate positions show no evidence for selection in the 13 mtDNA protein-coding genes. PMID:19070686

  19. Automated DNA extraction platforms offer solutions to challenges of assessing microbial biofouling in oil production facilities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of microbial assemblages in industrial, marine, and medical systems can inform decisions regarding quality control or mitigation. Modern molecular approaches to detect, characterize, and quantify microorganisms provide rapid and thorough measures unbiased by the need for cultivation. The requirement of timely extraction of high quality nucleic acids for molecular analysis is faced with specific challenges when used to study the influence of microorganisms on oil production. Production facilities are often ill equipped for nucleic acid extraction techniques, making the preservation and transportation of samples off-site a priority. As a potential solution, the possibility of extracting nucleic acids on-site using automated platforms was tested. The performance of two such platforms, the Fujifilm QuickGene-Mini80™ and Promega Maxwell®16 was compared to a widely used manual extraction kit, MOBIO PowerBiofilm™ DNA Isolation Kit, in terms of ease of operation, DNA quality, and microbial community composition. Three pipeline biofilm samples were chosen for these comparisons; two contained crude oil and corrosion products and the third transported seawater. Overall, the two more automated extraction platforms produced higher DNA yields than the manual approach. DNA quality was evaluated for amplification by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and end-point PCR to generate 454 pyrosequencing libraries for 16S rRNA microbial community analysis. Microbial community structure, as assessed by DGGE analysis and pyrosequencing, was comparable among the three extraction methods. Therefore, the use of automated extraction platforms should enhance the feasibility of rapidly evaluating microbial biofouling at remote locations or those with limited resources. PMID:23168231

  20. Application of Generalized Wigner Distribution to Extracting Step Repulsions on Vicinals: Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremariam, Hailu; Richards, Howard L.; Einstein, T. L.

    2003-03-01

    We have argued(E.g., T.L. Einstein et al., Surface Sci. 493, 460 (2001)) that the generalized Wigner distribution provides the best available continuum description of the terrace-width distribution of vicinal surfaces, interpolating between exact and gaussian mean-field results at moderately weak elastic repulsions and gaussian-with-neglected-entropic-interactions at strong repulsions. Monte Carlo verification has proved very challenging. We show the results of extensive simulations using a TSK (terrace-step-kink) model and describe when breakdown of the model should occur. We also describe parallel efforts to characterize the step-step correlation function, which has been applied successfully to experimental data(S. D. Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 115310 (2002)) and for which formally exact results exist.

  1. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of diesel and biodiesel exhaust extracts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract reports the results of studies assessing the relative DNA damage potential of extracts of exhaust particles resulting from the combustion of petroleum diesel, biodiesel, and petroleum diesel-biodiesel blends. Results indicate that the commercially available B20 petr...

  2. Effects of Sanionia uncinata extracts in protecting against and inducing DNA cleavage by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Andréia da Silva; Mazzei, José Luiz; de Alencar, Alexandre Santos; Evangelista, Heitor; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2011-01-01

    When mosses are exposed to increased quantities of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, they produce more secondary metabolites. Antarctica moss Sanionia uncinata (Hedw.) Loeske has presented high carotenoid contents in response to an increase in UVB radiation. This moss has been recommended as a potential source of antioxidants. In the present work, the protective and enhancing effects of aqueous (AE) and hydroalcoholic (HE) extracts of S. uncinata on the cleavage of supercoiled DNA were evaluated through topological modifications, quantified by densitometry after agarose gel electrophoresis. Total phenolic contents reached 5.89 mg/g. Our data demonstrated that the extract does not induce DNA cleavage. Furthermore, both extracts showed antioxidant activity that protected the DNA against cleavage induced by (i) O(2)(•-), 89% (AE) and 94% (HE) (P<0.05), and (ii) (.)OH, 17% (AE) and 18% (HE). However, the extracts intensified cleavage induced by Fenton-like reactions: (i) Cu(2+)/H(2)O(2), 94% (AE) and 100% (HE) (P<0.05), and (ii) SnCl(2), 62% (AE) and 56% (HE). DNA damages seem to follow different ways: (i) in the presence of Fenton-like reactions could be via reactive oxygen species generation and (ii) with HE/Cu(2+) could have also been triggered by other mechanisms. PMID:22005340

  3. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for the analysis of gut microbiota in fishes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrea M; Mohammed, Haitham H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the impacts of bacterial DNA extraction methodology on downstream analysis of fish gut microbiota. Feces and intestine samples were taken from three sympatric freshwater fish species with varying diets. Samples were processed immediately (approximately 4 h after capture; fresh), stored at -20 °C for 15 days or preserved in RNAlater® reagent for 15 days. DNA was then extracted using two commercial kits: one designed for animal tissues and one specifically formulated for stool samples. Microbial community fingerprints were generated using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Factors including diversity as depicted by band number, band intensity, repeatability and practicalities such as cost and time were considered. Despite significant differences in microbiota structure, results were similar between feces and intestine samples. Frozen samples were consistently outperformed by other storage methods and the stool kit typically outperformed the tissue kit. Overall, we recommend extraction of bacterial DNA from fresh samples using the stool kit for both sample types. If samples cannot be processed immediately, preservation in RNAlater® is preferred to freezing. Choice of DNA extraction method significantly influences the results of downstream microbial community analysis and thus should be taken into consideration for metadata analysis. PMID:25757730

  4. Near-quantitative extraction of genomic DNA from various food-borne eubacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work we have tested a dozen commercial bacterial genomic DNA extraction methodologies on an average of 7.70E6 (± 9.05%), 4.77E8 (± 31.0%), and 5.93E8 (± 4.69%) colony forming units (CFU) associated with 3 cultures (n = 3) each of Brochothrix thermosphacta (Bt), Shigella sonnei (Ss), and Esch...

  5. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Reynolds, P Dominic; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jerwood, David; Anderson, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is partly caused by oxidative stress from free radicals and reduced antioxidant levels. Using hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress in vitro in peripheral lymphocytes we investigated the induction of DNA damage supplemented with ethanolic extract of Chaga mushroom as a protective antioxidant. Lymphocytes were obtained from 20 IBD patients and 20 healthy volunteers. For treatment, a constant H_{2}O_{2 } dose (50 microg/ml) was used with variable doses of Chaga extract (10-500 microg/ml). DNA damage was evaluated in 50 cells per individual and dose using the Comet assay (making 1000 observations per experimental point ensuring appropriate statistical power). Chaga supplementation resulted in a 54.9% (p < 0.001) reduction of H_{2}O_{2 } induced DNA damage within the patient group and 34.9% (p < 0.001) within the control group. Lymphocytes from Crohn's disease (CD) patients had a greater basic DNA damage than Ulcerative Colitis (UC) patients (p < 0.001). Conclusively, Chaga extract reduces oxidative stress in lymphocytes from IBD patients and also healthy individuals when challenged in vitro. Thus, Chaga extract could be a possible and valuable supplement to inhibit oxidative stress in general. PMID:18997282

  6. Nucleotide-excision repair of DNA in cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Wu, X; Friedberg, E C

    1993-01-01

    A wide spectrum of DNA lesions are repaired by the nucleotide-excision repair (NER) pathway in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We have developed a cell-free system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that supports NER. NER was monitored by measuring repair synthesis in DNA treated with cisplatin or with UV radiation. Repair synthesis in vitro was defective in extracts of rad1, rad2, and rad10 mutant cells, all of which have mutations in genes whose products are known to be required for NER in vivo. Additionally, repair synthesis was complemented by mixing different mutant extracts, or by adding purified Rad1 or Rad10 protein to rad1 or rad10 mutant extracts, respectively. The latter observation demonstrates that the Rad1 and Rad10 proteins directly participate in the biochemical pathway of NER. NER supported by nuclear extracts requires ATP and Mg2+ and is stimulated by polyethylene glycol and by small amounts of whole cell extract containing overexpressed Rad2 protein. The nuclear extracts also contain base-excision repair activity that is present at wild-type levels in rad mutant extracts. This cell-free system is expected to facilitate studies on the biochemical pathway of NER in S. cerevisiae. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8506335

  7. Validation of a one-step extraction/methylation method for determination of fatty acids and cholesterol in marine tissues.

    PubMed

    Meier, Sonnich; Mjøs, Svein A; Joensen, Horaldur; Grahl-Nielsen, Otto

    2006-02-01

    A simple and fast direct extraction/methylation with methanolic hydrogen chloride was validated for determination of fatty acids (FA) in marine tissues. Three parameters: reaction time, temperature and presence of non-polar solvent, were studied by an experimental 2(3) full factorial design. The method was validated for five different types of samples; cod liver (high lipid content >60%, mainly triacylglycerol), cod muscle (low lipid content, approximately 1%, mainly phospholipids), cod plasma (lipid content, approximately 2%, mainly lipoprotein complex, high water amount), cod testis (lipid content approximately 3%, high levels of cholesterol), and herring muscle (lipid content approximately 7%). The one-step procedure for extraction/methylation of wet tissues was compared with the traditional procedure of extraction of the lipids by the Folch method (chloroform/methanol, 2:1, v/v), followed by methylation. The two methods gave similar FA profiles. The one-step extraction/methylation procedure gave a higher recovery of the total FA than the traditional procedure. Problems with carry-over peaks of cholesterol from previous samples were avoided by application of extra long GC temperature programs. The cholesterol decomposed to some degree under the preceding methanolysis step, giving several peaks in the chromatograms. The decomposition peaks were identified by mass spectrometry as cholestdienes originating from dehydration of cholesterol, a metylether of cholesterol and a cholesteryl chloride. These cholesterol artefacts can be used for quantitative determination of cholesterol in the samples. Standard samples of cholesterol were determined with high accuracy, (R(2)>0.99), and cholesterol in cod plasma was compared with good agreement (R(2)=0.97) to an enzymatic method. PMID:16343517

  8. Optimized DNA extraction methods for encysted embryos of the endangered fairy shrimp, Branchinecta sandiegonensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, A.N.; Simovich, M.A.; Pepino, D.; Schroeder, K.M.; Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The San Diego fairy shrimp Branchinecta sandiegonensis is a federally endangered species endemic to vernal pools in southern California, USA. Filling events in these habitats are highly variable, with some pools failing to hold water long enough for reproduction over many successive years. Studies of this species are thus hindered by the relatively rare appearance of aquatically active life history phases. Because diapausing cysts are abundant and present at all times, they provide an underutilized opportunity for both species identification and genetic studies. However, methods for extracting DNA from cysts are technically challenging because of their structure and size. Here we present a protocol for extracting DNA from B. sandiegonensis cysts in sufficient quantities for "DNA Barcoding", microsatellite analysis and other genotyping and sequencing applications. The technique will aid in population genetic studies and species identification (since taxonomic keys only distinguish among adults), and will be applicable to other crustaceans with similar diapausing cysts. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  9. A New Method to Extract Dental Pulp DNA: Application to Universal Detection of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Hung, Lam; Tran-Thi, Ny; Aboudharam, Gérard; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background Dental pulp is used for PCR-based detection of DNA derived from host and bacteremic microorganims. Current protocols require odontology expertise for proper recovery of the dental pulp. Dental pulp specimen exposed to laboratory environment yields contaminants detected using universal 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a new protocol by encasing decontaminated tooth into sterile resin, extracting DNA into the dental pulp chamber itself and decontaminating PCR reagents by filtration and double restriction enzyme digestion. Application to 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria in 144 teeth collected in 86 healthy people yielded a unique sequence in only 14 teeth (9.7%) from 12 individuals (14%). Each individual yielded a unique 16S rDNA sequence in 1–2 teeth per individual. Negative controls remained negative. Bacterial identifications were all confirmed by amplification and sequencing of specific rpoB sequence. Conclusions/Significance The new protocol prevented laboratory contamination of the dental pulp. It allowed the detection of bacteria responsible for dental pulp colonization from blood and periodontal tissue. Only 10% such samples contained 16S rDNA. It provides a new tool for the retrospective diagnostic of bacteremia by allowing the universal detection of bacterial DNA in animal and human, contemporary or ancient tooth. It could be further applied to identification of host DNA in forensic medicine and anthropology. PMID:17957246

  10. DNA degradation by aqueous extract of Aloe vera in the presence of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Shoa; Ullah, M F; Hadi, S M

    2010-06-01

    The plant Aloe vera has long been used in medicine, as dietary supplements and for cosmetic purposes. Aloe vera extracts are a rich source of polyphenols, such as aloin and aloe emodin and have shown a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. The bioactive component aloe emodin has been reported to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. Many of the biological activities of Aloe vera have been attributed to its antioxidant properties. However, most plant-derived polyphenols that are also present in Aloe vera may exhibit pro-oxidant properties either alone or in the presence of transition metals, such as copper. Previous reports from this laboratory have implicated the pro-oxidant action as one of the mechanisms for their anti-cancer properties. In the present paper, we show that aqueous extract of Aloe vera is also able to cause DNA degradation in the presence of copper ions. Further, the extract is also able to reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I) and generate reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals in a dose-dependent manner, which correlates with ability of the extract to cause DNA breakage. Thus, the study shows that in addition to antioxidant activity, Aloe vera extract also possess pro-oxidant properties, leading to oxidative DNA breakage. PMID:20653287

  11. An Improved DNA Extraction Method for Efficient and Quantitative Recovery of Phytoplankton Diversity in Natural Assemblages.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are highly diverse with different species possessing different cell coverings, posing challenges for thoroughly breaking the cells in DNA extraction yet preserving DNA integrity. While quantitative molecular techniques have been increasingly used in phytoplankton research, an effective and simple method broadly applicable to different lineages and natural assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we developed a bead-beating protocol based on our previous experience and tested it against 9 species of phytoplankton representing different lineages and different cell covering rigidities. We found the bead-beating method enhanced the final yield of DNA (highest as 2 folds) in comparison with the non-bead-beating method, while also preserving the DNA integrity. When our method was applied to a field sample collected at a subtropical bay located in Xiamen, China, the resultant ITS clone library revealed a highly diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other micro-eukaryotes, including Archaea, Amoebozoa, Chlorophyta, Ciliphora, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Fungi, Metazoa, etc. The appearance of thecate dinoflagellates, thin-walled phytoplankton and "naked" unicellular organisms indicates that our method could obtain the intact DNA of organisms with different cell coverings. All the results demonstrate that our method is useful for DNA extraction of phytoplankton and environmental surveys of their diversity and abundance. PMID:26218575

  12. An Improved DNA Extraction Method for Efficient and Quantitative Recovery of Phytoplankton Diversity in Natural Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are highly diverse with different species possessing different cell coverings, posing challenges for thoroughly breaking the cells in DNA extraction yet preserving DNA integrity. While quantitative molecular techniques have been increasingly used in phytoplankton research, an effective and simple method broadly applicable to different lineages and natural assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we developed a bead-beating protocol based on our previous experience and tested it against 9 species of phytoplankton representing different lineages and different cell covering rigidities. We found the bead-beating method enhanced the final yield of DNA (highest as 2 folds) in comparison with the non-bead-beating method, while also preserving the DNA integrity. When our method was applied to a field sample collected at a subtropical bay located in Xiamen, China, the resultant ITS clone library revealed a highly diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other micro-eukaryotes, including Archaea, Amoebozoa, Chlorophyta, Ciliphora, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Fungi, Metazoa, etc. The appearance of thecate dinoflagellates, thin-walled phytoplankton and “naked” unicellular organisms indicates that our method could obtain the intact DNA of organisms with different cell coverings. All the results demonstrate that our method is useful for DNA extraction of phytoplankton and environmental surveys of their diversity and abundance. PMID:26218575

  13. An economical and effective high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for molecular marker analysis in honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraction of DNA from tissue samples can be expensive both in time and monetary resources and can often require handling and disposal of hazardous chemicals. We have developed a high throughput protocol for extracting DNA from honey bees that is of a high enough quality and quantity to enable hundr...

  14. Comparison of Eight Methods for the Extraction of Bacillus atrophaeus Spore DNA from Eleven Common Interferents and a Common Swab

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Helen L.; Dewey, Caroline A.; Ely, Morgan S.; Willoughby, Sarah L.; Parsons, Tanya M.; Cox, Victoria; Spencer, Phillippa M.; Weller, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Eight DNA extraction products or methods (Applied Biosystems PrepFiler Forensic DNA Extraction Kit; Bio-Rad Instagene Only, Bio-Rad Instagene & Spin Column Purification; EpiCentre MasterPure DNA & RNA Kit; FujiFilm QuickGene Mini80; Idaho Technologies 1-2-3 Q-Flow Kit; MoBio UltraClean Microbial DNA Isolation Kit; Sigma Extract-N-Amp Plant and Seed Kit) were adapted to facilitate extraction of DNA under BSL3 containment conditions. DNA was extracted from 12 common interferents or sample types, spiked with spores of Bacillus atropheaus. Resulting extracts were tested by real-time PCR. No one method was the best, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types. Statistical analysis indicated that the PrepFiler method was the best method from six dry powders (baking, biological washing, milk, plain flour, filler and talcum) and one solid (Underarm deodorant), the UltraClean method was the best from four liquids (aftershave, cola, nutrient broth, vinegar), and the MasterPure method was the best from the swab sample type. The best overall method, in terms of DNA extraction, across all sample types evaluated was the UltraClean method. PMID:21818364

  15. Rapid DNA extraction for specific detection and quantitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in sputum specimens using Taqman assays.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Diana I; Mullin, Caroline S; Mora-Guzmán, Francisco; Crespo-Solis, J Gonzalo; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B; Restrepo, Blanca I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid tuberculosis (TB) detection is critical for disease control, and further quantitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in sputum is valuable for epidemiological and clinical studies. We evaluated a simple, robust and cost-efficient in-house DNA extraction and downstream Taqman approach for detection and quantitation of Mtb genomes from sputum of newly-diagnosed TB patients and non-TB controls. DNA was extracted using guanidine isothiocyanate and silica-based spin columns in less than 2 h, stored frozen, and Taqman assays were used to detect Mtb with IS6110 and quantify it targeting RD1 and IS1081. The Taqmans had a sensitivity >95% in 108 culture-confirmed TB patients and specificity of 100% in 43 non-TB controls. Genome counts were correlated with the Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tubes' (MGIT) time-to-detection values (1/TTD × 1000; rho = 0.66; p < 0.001) in 91 TB patients (33 excluded with MGIT contamination). This linear relationship was nearly identical between mycobacteria isolated from sputum and H37Rv Mtb grown in-vitro to its log phase. TB treatment between 3 and 7 days was associated with lower 1/TTD × 1000 values but not with genome counts. Together, our protocol provides rapid, specific, inexpensive and quantitative detection of Mtb DNA in fresh or stored sputa making it a robust tool for prompt TB diagnosis, and with potential use for clinical and epidemiologic studies. PMID:22088321

  16. New sorbent in the dispersive solid phase extraction step of quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe for the extraction of organic contaminants in drinking water treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Maristela B R; Caldas, Sergiane S; Primel, Ednei G

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have shown a decrease in the concentration of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PCPs) in water after treatment. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that these compounds may adhere to the sludge; however, investigation of these compounds in drinking water treatment sludge has been scarce. The sludge generated by drinking water treatment plants during flocculation and decantation steps should get some special attention not only because it has been classified as non-inert waste but also because it is a very complex matrix, consisting essentially of inorganic (sand, argil and silt) and organic (humic substances) compounds. In the first step of this study, three QuEChERS methods were used, and then compared, for the extraction of pesticides (atrazine, simazine, clomazone and tebuconazole), pharmaceuticals (amitriptyline, caffeine, diclofenac and ibuprofen) and PCPs (methylparaben, propylparaben, triclocarban and bisphenol A) from drinking water treatment sludge. Afterwards, the study of different sorbents in the dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) step was evaluated. Finally, a new QuEChERS method employing chitin, obtained from shrimp shell waste, was performed in the d-SPE step. After having been optimized, the method showed limits of quantification (LOQ) between 1 and 50 ?g kg(-1) and the analytical curves showed r values higher than 0.98, when liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was employed. Recoveries ranged between 50 and 120% with RSD?15%. The matrix effect was evaluated and compensated with matrix-matched calibration. The method was applied to drinking water treatment sludge samples and methylparaben and tebuconazole were found in concentration

  17. Impact of metagenomic DNA extraction procedures on the identifiable endophytic bacterial diversity in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Maropola, Mapula Kgomotso Annah; Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Trindade, Marla

    2015-05-01

    Culture-independent studies rely on the quantity and quality of the extracted environmental metagenomic DNA (mDNA). To fully access the plant tissue microbiome, the extracted plant mDNA should allow optimal PCR applications and the genetic content must be representative of the total microbial diversity. In this study, we evaluated the endophytic bacterial diversity retrieved using different mDNA extraction procedures. Metagenomic DNA from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) stem and root tissues were extracted using two classical DNA extraction protocols (CTAB- and SDS-based) and five commercial kits. The mDNA yields and quality as well as the reproducibility were compared. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) was used to assess the impact on endophytic bacterial community structures observed. Generally, the classical protocols obtained high mDNA yields from sorghum tissues; however, they were less reproducible than the commercial kits. Commercial kits retrieved higher quality mDNA, but with lower endophytic bacterial diversities compared to classical protocols. The SDS-based protocol enabled access to the highest sorghum endophytic diversities. Therefore, "SDS-extracted" sorghum root and stem microbiome diversities were analysed via 454 pyrosequencing, and this revealed that the two tissues harbour significantly different endophytic communities. Nevertheless, both communities are dominated by agriculturally important genera such as Microbacterium, Agrobacterium, Sphingobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Erwinia, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas; which have previously been shown to play a role in plant growth promotion. This study shows that DNA extraction protocols introduce biases in culture-independent studies of environmental microbial communities by influencing the mDNA quality, which impacts the microbial diversity analyses and evaluation. Using the broad-spectrum SDS-based DNA extraction protocol allows the recovery of the most diverse endophytic communities associated with sorghum tissues and, as such, establishes a reliable basis for future study of endophytic communities. PMID:25775938

  18. Antioxidant Activity of Lawsonia inermis Extracts Inhibits Chromium(VI)-Induced Cellular and DNA Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Gunjan; Rajkumar, V.; Kumar, R. Ashok; Mathew, Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a very strong oxidant which consequently causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress. Prevention of Cr(VI)-induced cellular damage has been sought in this study in aqueous and methanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Lythraceae), commonly known as Henna. The extracts showed significant (P < .05) potential in scavenging free radicals (DPPH• and ABTS•+) and Fe3+, and in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. DNA damage caused by exposure of pBR322 to Cr(VI)-UV is markedly inhibited by both extracts in varying degrees. A distinct decline in Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity was noticed in MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma) cells with an increase in dosage of both extracts individually. Furthermore, both extracts proved to contain a high content of phenolic compounds which were found to have a strong and significant (P < .05) positive correlation to the radical scavenging potential, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and cyto-protective efficiency against Cr(VI)-induced oxidative cellular damage. HPLC analysis identified some of the major phenolic compounds in both extracts, which might be responsible for the antioxidant potential and the properties of DNA and cyto-protection. This study contributes to the search for natural resources that might yield potent therapeutic drugs against Cr(VI)-induced oxidative cell damage. PMID:20008460

  19. High-Capacity Conductive Nanocellulose Paper Sheets for Electrochemically Controlled Extraction of DNA Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Aamir; Nyström, Gustav; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Nyholm, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Highly porous polypyrrole (PPy)-nanocellulose paper sheets have been evaluated as inexpensive and disposable electrochemically controlled three-dimensional solid phase extraction materials. The composites, which had a total anion exchange capacity of about 1.1 mol kg−1, were used for extraction and subsequent release of negatively charged fluorophore tagged DNA oligomers via galvanostatic oxidation and reduction of a 30–50 nm conformal PPy layer on the cellulose substrate. The ion exchange capacity, which was, at least, two orders of magnitude higher than those previously reached in electrochemically controlled extraction, originated from the high surface area (i.e. 80 m2 g−1) of the porous composites and the thin PPy layer which ensured excellent access to the ion exchange material. This enabled the extractions to be carried out faster and with better control of the PPy charge than with previously employed approaches. Experiments in equimolar mixtures of (dT)6, (dT)20, and (dT)40 DNA oligomers showed that all oligomers could be extracted, and that the smallest oligomer was preferentially released with an efficiency of up to 40% during the reduction of the PPy layer. These results indicate that the present material is very promising for the development of inexpensive and efficient electrochemically controlled ion-exchange membranes for batch-wise extraction of biomolecules. PMID:22195031

  20. A Two-Step Double Filter Method to Extract Open Water Surfaces from Landsat ETM+ Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijing; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, lakes and temporal ponds play a significant role in agriculture and livelihood of local communities as well as in ecology. Monitoring the changes of these open water bodies allows to draw conclusions on water use as well as climatic impacts and can assist in the formulation of a sustainable resource management strategy. The simultaneous monitoring of larger numbers of water bodies with respect to their stage and area is feasible with the aid of remote sensing. Here the monitoring of lake surface areas is discussed. Landsat TM and ETM+ images provide a medium resolution of 30m, and offer an easily available data source to monitor the long term changes of water surfaces in arid and semi-arid regions. In the past great effort was put into developing simple indices to extract water surfaces from satellite images. However, there is a common problem in achieving accurate results with these indices: How to select a threshold value for water pixels without introducing excessive subjective judgment. The threshold value would also have to vary with location, land features and seasons, allowing for inherent uncertainty. A new method was developed using Landsat ETM+ imaginary (30 meter resolution) to extract open water surfaces. This method uses the Normalized Difference of Vegetation Index (NDVI) as the basis for an objective way of selecting threshold values of Modified Normalized Difference of Water Index (MNDWI) and Stress Degree Days (SDD), which were used as a combined filter to extract open water surfaces. We choose two study areas to verify the method. One study area is in Northeast China, where bigger lakes, smaller muddy ponds and wetlands are interspersed with agricultural land and salt crusts. The other one is Kafue Flats in Zambia, where seasonal floods of the Zambezi River create seasonal wetlands in addition to the more permanent water ponds and river channels. For both sites digital globe images of 0.5 meter resolution are available, which were taken within a few days of Landsat passing dates and which will serve here as ground truth information. On their basis the new method was compared to other available methods for extracting water pixels. Compared to the other methods, the new method can extract water surface not only from deep lakes/reservoirs and wetlands but also from small mud ponds in alkali flats and irrigation ponds in the fields. For the big and deep lakes, the extracted boundary of the lakes fits accurately the observed boundary. Five test sites in the study area in Northeast China with only shallow water surfaces were chosen and tested. The extracted water surfaces were compared with each site's digital globe maps, respectively to determine the accuracy of the method. The comparison shows that the method could extract all completely wet pixels (water area covering 100% of the pixel area) in all test sites. For partially wet pixels (50-100% of pixel area), the model can detect 91% of all pixels. No dry pixels were mistaken by the model as water pixels. Keywords: Remote sensing, Landsat ETM+ imaginary, Water Surface, NDVI, MNDWI, and SDD

  1. Differential efficiency among DNA extraction methods influences detection of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Bletz, M C; Rebollar, E A; Harris, R N

    2015-02-10

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is responsible for massive declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. The most common method for detecting Bd is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). qPCR is a highly sensitive detection technique, but its ability to determine the presence and accurately quantify the amount of Bd is also contingent on the efficiency of the DNA extraction method used prior to PCR. Using qPCR, we compared the extraction efficiency of 3 different extraction methods commonly used for Bd detection across a range of zoospore quantities: PrepMan Ultra Reagent, Qiagen DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit, and Mobio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit. We show that not all extraction methods led to successful detection of Bd for the low zoospore quantities and that there was variation in the estimated zoospore equivalents among the methods, which demonstrates that these methods have different extraction efficiencies. These results highlight the importance of considering the extraction method when comparing across studies. The Qiagen DNeasy kit had the highest efficiency. We also show that replicated estimates of less than 1 zoospore can result from known zoospore concentrations; therefore, such results should be considered when obtained from field data. Additionally, we discuss the implications of our findings for interpreting previous studies and for conducting future Bd surveys. It is imperative to use the most efficient DNA extraction method in tandem with the highly sensitive qPCR technique in order to accurately diagnose the presence of Bd as well as other pathogens. PMID:25667331

  2. Sequential one-step extraction and analysis of triacylglycerols and fatty acids in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Noemí; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael

    2003-06-15

    A method for plant tissue digestion and triacylglycerol (TAG) extraction followed by transmethylation of TAGs to produce the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from small storage tissue samples is presented. The method allows the analysis of both TAGs and FAMEs from the same sample. Several reagent mixtures and different experimental conditions were tested on sliced sunflower seeds. The best results were obtained using a mixture that was 33.3% a solution of NaCl (0.17 M) in methanol and 66.6% heptane by volume. The TAGs in the heptane solution were transmethylated with a mixture containing methanol:toluene:dimethoxypropane:H(4)SO(2) (39:20:5:2, by vol). The method was also tested on other oil seed storage tissue (soybean) and fruit tissues from olive and acorn. In all cases, sunflower, soybean, olive, and acorn, the TAGs and FAMEs composition data obtained by this method were quite similar to data from a standard analysis method. In samples with high protein content, such as soybean and sunflower seeds, the TAG extraction was incomplete. The water content of fruit samples did not interfere with TAG extraction obtained by this method. PMID:12758264

  3. Single step aqueous two-phase extraction for downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Chethana, S; Nayak, Chetan A; Madhusudhan, M C; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2015-04-01

    C-phycocyanin, a natural food colorant, is gaining importance worldwide due to its several medical and pharmaceutical applications. In the present study, aqueous two-phase extraction was shown to be an attractive alternative for the downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis. By employing differential partitioning, C-phycocyanin selectively partitioned to the polymer rich (top) phase in concentrated form and contaminant proteins to the salt rich (bottom) phase. This resulted in an increase in the product purity (without losing much of the yield) in a single step without the need of multiple processing steps. Effect of process parameters such as molecular weight, tie line length, phase volume ratio, concentration of phase components on the partitioning behavior of C-phycocyanin was studied. The results were explained based on relative free volume of the phase systems. C-phycocyanin with a purity of 4.32 and yield of about 79 % was obtained at the standardized conditions. PMID:25829627

  4. To beat or not to beat a tick: comparison of DNA extraction methods for ticks (Ixodes scapularis)

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are important disease vectors in the United States, known to transmit a variety of pathogens to humans, including bacteria, protozoa, and viruses. Their importance as a disease vector necessitates reliable and comparable methods for extracting microbial DNA from ticks. Furthermore, to explore the population genetics or genomics of this tick, appropriate DNA extraction techniques are needed for both the vector and its microbes. Although a few studies have investigated different methods of DNA isolation from ticks, they are limited in the number and types of DNA extraction and lack species-specific quantification of DNA yield. Methods. Here we determined the most efficient and consistent method of DNA extraction from two different developmental stages of I. scapularis—nymph and adult—that are the most important for disease transmission. We used various methods of physical disruption of the hard, chitinous exoskeleton, as well as commercial and non-commercial DNA isolation kits. To gauge the effectiveness of these methods, we quantified the DNA yield and confirmed the DNA quality via PCR of both tick and microbial genetic material. Results. DNA extraction using the Thermo GeneJET Genomic DNA Purification Kit resulted in the highest DNA yields and the most consistent PCR amplification when combined with either cutting or bead beating with select matrices across life stages. DNA isolation methods using ammonium hydroxide as well as the MoBio PowerSoil kit also produced strong and successful PCR amplification, but only for females. Discussion. We contrasted a variety of readily available methods of DNA extraction from single individual blacklegged ticks and presented the results through a quantitative and qualitative assessment. PMID:26290800

  5. Comparison of eleven methods for genomic DNA extraction suitable for large-scale whole-genome genotyping and long-term DNA banking using blood samples.

    PubMed

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals. PMID:25635817

  6. Comparison of Eleven Methods for Genomic DNA Extraction Suitable for Large-Scale Whole-Genome Genotyping and Long-Term DNA Banking Using Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I.; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L.; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals. PMID:25635817

  7. Development and validation of an inexpensive and efficient method for the extraction of Theileria orientalis DNA from blood.

    PubMed

    Bogema, D R; Fell, S A; O'Rourke, B A; Collins, D; Eamens, G J; Jenkins, C

    2015-09-15

    Theileria orientalis is an emerging bovine pathogen in Australasia. PCR-based detection methods for this parasite are sensitive but relatively expensive, partly due to costs associated with DNA extraction. An inexpensive and efficient technique was developed for the extraction of T. orientalis DNA from blood based on hypotonic erythrocyte lysis and detergent-proteinase K treatment (DPK method). The DPK method compares favourably to a commercial extraction kit when paired with a T. orientalis multiplex qPCR. PMID:26319198

  8. Radiostrontium separation and measurement in a single step using plastic scintillators plus selective extractants. Application to aqueous sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Bagán, H; Tarancón, A; Rauret, G; García, J F

    2011-02-01

    This study describes a new protocol for (90)Sr determination in water samples based on the use of a selective extractant (DtBuCH18C6) and plastic scintillator microspheres. The proposed procedure unifies chemical separation and sample measurement preparation in a single step to reduce the effort, time and reagents required for analysis. In addition, the final measurement does not produce mixed waste. The minimum activity detectable for 10 mL of sample solution is 0.46 Bq L(-1). Relative errors for the determination of (90)Sr activity in drinking, sea and river waters are less than 4%. PMID:21237307

  9. Simultaneous and selective preconcentration of trace Cu and Ag by one-step displacement cloud point extraction for FAAS determination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Wu, Peng; Li, Wei; Xuan, Yuelan; Hou, Xiandeng

    2010-04-15

    A simple, rapid and selective one-step displacement cloud point extraction (D-CPE) procedure was developed for the simultaneous preconcentration of trace Cu and Ag followed by flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) measurement. In this proposed procedure, Ni-DDTC complex instead of DDTC was used to achieve one-step extraction. Since the stability of Cu-DDTC and Ag-DDTC is higher than that of Ni-DDTC, simultaneous preconcentration of Cu and Ag can be achieved in a single step. Up to 15,000 mg L(-1) Co(2+), 10,000 mg L(-1) Zn(2+), 5000 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) and 5000 mg L(-1) Al(3+) did not cause significant interferences for the determination of 50 microg L(-1) Cu by FAAS, while 8000 mg L(-1) Zn(2+), 4000 mg L(-1) Co(2+), 4000 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) and 5000 mg L(-1) Al(3+) had no distinct effect on the determination of 80 microg L(-1) Ag. The limits of detection (LODs) of 0.5 microg L(-1) for Cu and 1.0 microg L(-1) for Ag, respectively, were obtained by FAAS detection. The accuracy of the proposed method is validated by analyzing certified reference materials (GBW 07405, GBW 07311 and GBW 07260) with satisfactory results. Furthermore, the one-step D-CPE was also applied for the preconcentration/separation of Cu and Ag in high-purity salts and artificial seawater, followed by FAAS or inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) determination. PMID:20188966

  10. Single-step electronic detection of femtomolar DNA by target-induced strand displacement in an electrode-bound duplex

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yi; Lubin, Arica A.; Baker, Brian R.; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Heeger, Alan J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a signal-on, electronic DNA (E-DNA) sensor that is label-free and achieves a subpicomolar detection limit. The sensor, which is based on a target-induced strand displacement mechanism, is composed of a “capture probe” attached by its 5? terminus to a gold electrode and a 5? methylene blue-modified “signaling probe” that is complementary at both its 3? and 5? termini to the capture probe. In the absence of target, hybridization between the capture and signaling probes minimizes contact between the methylene blue and electrode surface, limiting the observed redox current. Target hybridization displaces the 5? end of the signaling probe, generating a short, flexible single-stranded DNA element and producing up to a 7-fold increase in redox current. The observed signal gain is sufficient to achieve a demonstrated (not extrapolated) detection limit of 400 fM, which is among the best reported for single-step electronic DNA detection. Moreover, because sensor fabrication is straightforward, the approach appears to provide a ready alternative to the more cumbersome femtomolar electrochemical assays described to date. PMID:17065320

  11. Robust and effective methodologies for cryopreservation and DNA extraction from anaerobic gut fungi.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Kevin V; Henske, John K; Theodorou, Michael K; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2016-04-01

    Cell storage and DNA isolation are essential to developing an expanded suite of microorganisms for biotechnology. However, many features of non-model microbes, such as an anaerobic lifestyle and rigid cell wall, present formidable challenges to creating strain repositories and extracting high quality genomic DNA. Here, we establish accessible, high efficiency, and robust techniques to store lignocellulolytic anaerobic gut fungi long term without specialized equipment. Using glycerol as a cryoprotectant, gut fungal isolates were preserved for a minimum of 23 months at -80 °C. Unlike previously reported approaches, this improved protocol is non-toxic and rapid, with samples surviving twice as long with negligible growth impact. Genomic DNA extraction for these isolates was optimized to yield samples compatible with next generation sequencing platforms (e.g. Illumina, PacBio). Popular DNA isolation kits and precipitation protocols yielded preps that were unsuitable for sequencing due to carbohydrate contaminants from the chitin-rich cell wall and extensive energy reserves of gut fungi. To address this, we identified a proprietary method optimized for hardy plant samples that rapidly yielded DNA fragments in excess of 10 kb with minimal RNA, protein or carbohydrate contamination. Collectively, these techniques serve as fundamental tools to manipulate powerful biomass-degrading gut fungi and improve their accessibility among researchers. PMID:26620247

  12. CDSbank: taxonomy-aware extraction, selection, renaming and formatting of protein-coding DNA or amino acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein-coding DNA sequences and their corresponding amino acid sequences are routinely used to study relationships between sequence, structure, function, and evolution. The rapidly growing size of sequence databases increases the power of such comparative analyses but it makes it more challenging to prepare high quality sequence data sets with control over redundancy, quality, completeness, formatting, and labeling. Software tools for some individual steps in this process exist but manual intervention remains a common and time consuming necessity. Description CDSbank is a database that stores both the protein-coding DNA sequence (CDS) and amino acid sequence for each protein annotated in Genbank. CDSbank also stores Genbank feature annotation, a flag to indicate incomplete 5? and 3? ends, full taxonomic data, and a heuristic to rank the scientific interest of each species. This rich information allows fully automated data set preparation with a level of sophistication that aims to meet or exceed manual processing. Defaults ensure ease of use for typical scenarios while allowing great flexibility when needed. Access is via a free web server at http://hazeslab.med.ualberta.ca/CDSbank/. Conclusions CDSbank presents a user-friendly web server to download, filter, format, and name large sequence data sets. Common usage scenarios can be accessed via pre-programmed default choices, while optional sections give full control over the processing pipeline. Particular strengths are: extract protein-coding DNA sequences just as easily as amino acid sequences, full access to taxonomy for labeling and filtering, awareness of incomplete sequences, and the ability to take one protein sequence and extract all synonymous CDS or identical protein sequences in other species. Finally, CDSbank can also create labeled property files to, for instance, annotate or re-label phylogenetic trees. PMID:24580755

  13. Usefulness of FTA® cards as a Pneumocystis-DNA extraction method in bronchoalveolar lavage samples.

    PubMed

    Rodiño, Jenniffer M; Aguilar, Yudy A; Rueda, Zulma Vanessa; Vélez, Lázaro A

    2016-05-01

    Background FTA® cards (Fast Technology for Analysis of Nucleic Acids) are an alternative DNA extraction method in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples for Pneumocystis jirovecii molecular analyses. The goal was to evaluate the usefulness of FTA® cards to detect P. jirovecii-DNA by PCR in BAL samples compared to silica adsorption chromatography (SAC). Methods This study used 134 BAL samples from immunocompromised patients previously studied to establish microbiological aetiology of pneumonia, among them 15 cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) documented by staining and 119 with other alternative diagnoses. The FTA® system and SAC were used for DNA extraction and then amplified by nested PCR to detect P. jirovecii. Performance and concordance of the two DNA extraction methods compared to P. jirovecii microscopy were calculated. The influence of the macroscopic characteristics, transportation of samples and the duration of the FTA® card storage (1, 7, 10 or 12 months) were also evaluated. Results Among 134 BAL samples, 56% were positive for P. jirovecii-DNA by SAC and 27% by FTA®. All 15 diagnosed by microscopy were detected by FTA® and SAC. Specificity of the FTA® system and SAC were 82.4% and 49.6%, respectively. Compared to SAC, positivity by FTA® decreased with the presence of blood in BAL (62% vs 13.5%). The agreement between samples at 7, 10 and 12 months was 92.5% for FTA®. Positive cases by FTA® remained the same after shipment by mail. Conclusions Results suggest that FTA® is a practical, safe and economical method to preserve P. jirovecii-DNA in BAL samples for molecular studies. PMID:26950684

  14. Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods for Microbial Community Profiling with an Application to Pediatric Bronchoalveolar Lavage Samples

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Dana; Daly, Joshua; Whiley, David; Grimwood, Keith; Wainwright, Claire E.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Barcoded amplicon sequencing is rapidly becoming a standard method for profiling microbial communities, including the human respiratory microbiome. While this approach has less bias than standard cultivation, several steps can introduce variation including the type of DNA extraction method used. Here we assessed five different extraction methods on pediatric bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples and a mock community comprised of nine bacterial genera to determine method reproducibility and detection limits for these typically low complexity communities. Additionally, using the mock community, we were able to evaluate contamination and select a relative abundance cut-off threshold based on the geometric distribution that optimizes the trade off between detecting bona fide operational taxonomic units and filtering out spurious ones. Using this threshold, the majority of genera in the mock community were predictably detected by all extraction methods including the hard-to-lyse Gram-positive genus Staphylococcus. Differences between extraction methods were significantly greater than between technical replicates for both the mock community and BAL samples emphasizing the importance of using a standardized methodology for microbiome studies. However, regardless of method used, individual patients retained unique diagnostic profiles. Furthermore, despite being stored as raw frozen samples for over five years, community profiles from BAL samples were consistent with historical culturing results. The culture-independent profiling of these samples also identified a number of anaerobic genera that are gaining acceptance as being part of the respiratory microbiome. This study should help guide researchers to formulate sampling, extraction and analysis strategies for respiratory and other human microbiome samples. PMID:22514642

  15. Comparison of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Gasi?ska, Anna

    2015-05-01

    A proper extraction method from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks is essential to obtain DNA of satisfactory quality/quantity. We compared the effectiveness of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction based on 10 FFPE tissues. Kits differed significantly in terms of DNA yield, purity, and quality. Using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen) and the ReliaPrep FFPE gDNA Miniprep System (Promega), we obtained DNA of the highest quality and acceptable quantity. We also demonstrated that overnight digestion of samples usually improved DNA yield and/or purity. For precious or limited material, double elution is recommended for obtaining up to 42% higher amount of DNA. PMID:25640584

  16. Phenolic extracts of brewers' spent grain (BSG) as functional ingredients - assessment of their DNA protective effect against oxidant-induced DNA single strand breaks in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Aoife L; O'Callaghan, Yvonne C; Connolly, Alan; Piggott, Charles O; Fitzgerald, Richard J; O'Brien, Nora M

    2012-09-15

    Brewers' spent grain (BSG), a by-product of the brewing industry, contains high amounts of phenolic acids, which have antioxidant effects. The present study examined the ability of BSG extracts to protect against the genotoxic effects of oxidants, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) and tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) in U937 cells. Four pale (P1-P4) and four black (B1-B4) BSG extracts were investigated. U937 cells were pre-incubated with BSG extracts, exposed to the oxidants and the DNA damage was measured by the Comet assay. The black BSG extracts (B1-B4) significantly protected against H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage. Extract B2, which had the highest phenol content, provided the greatest protection. Extracts P2, B2, B3 and B4 provided significant protection against SIN-1-induced DNA damage. None of the extracts protected against DNA damage induced by t-BOOH and 4-NQO. The DNA protective effects of the BSG phenolic extracts may be related to iron chelation. PMID:23107673

  17. Extraction of DNA from mucilaginous tissues of a sea slug (Elysia chlorotica).

    PubMed

    Rumpho, M E; Mujer, C V; Andrews, D L; Manhart, J R; Pierce, S K

    1994-12-01

    Efforts to study the cellular and molecular biology of the symbiotic association between opisthobranch molluscs and algal chloroplasts have been hampered by the copious amounts of mucus produced by the animals. We report for the first time a procedure for isolating total DNA free of contaminating mucilaginous compounds from the mollusc Elysia chlorotica Gould that harbors photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the siphonaceous alga, Vaucheria litorea C. Agardh. This method involves an initial extraction of fresh or freeze-dried Elysia tissue in absolute ethanol and differential processing of the resultant two-phase pellet. Final purification by CsCl-gradient centrifugation produces high molecular weight DNA suitable for molecular analysis. PMID:7873179

  18. Single-step purification and characterization of MBP (maltose binding protein)-DnaJ fusion protein and its utilization for structure-function analysis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Y; Sonezaki, S; Iwasaki, Y; Tauchi, E; Shingu, Y; Okita, K; Ogawa, H I; Kato, Y; Kondo, A

    1998-10-01

    DnaJ is a molecular chaperone, which contains a zinc finger-like motif and cooperates with DnaK to mediate the folding of newly synthesized and denatured proteins. DnaJ was overproduced and purified using the maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion vector. The fusion protein (MBP-DnaJ) was expressed in a soluble form in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity using amylose resin in a single step. The UV-visible absorption spectrum of MBP-DnaJ showed peaks at 355 and 475 nm. Moreover, these absorption peaks disappeared upon treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or p-hydroxymercuriphenylsulfonic acid (PMPS). Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry demonstrated that MBP-DnaJ contains Fe ions as well as Zn ions. MBP-DnaJ mediated the replication of the lambda phage in vivo, stimulated the ATPase activity of DnaK and prevented the aggregation of denatured rhodanase, indicating that fusion of MBP to the N-terminal of DnaJ does not affect the functions of DnaJ. To study the roles of bound metal ions, metal-free MBP-DnaJ, and MBP-DnaJ containing 2 Zn ions were prepared. MBP-DnaJ containing Fe and Zn ions, and MBP-DnaJ containing 2 Zn ions stimulated the ATPase activity of DnaK, prevented the aggregation of denatured rhodanase and bound to DNA to similar extents. On the other hand, metal-free MBP-DnaJ showed much lower DNA-binding ability and lower ability to prevent rhodanese aggregation. Therefore, the bound metal species do not affect the function of the zinc finger-like motif of DnaJ, whereas removal of the metal ions from DnaJ diminishes its binding ability as to DNA and denatured proteins. PMID:9756632

  19. Influence of DNA extraction methods, PCR inhibitors and quantification methods on real-time PCR assay of biotechnology-derived traits.

    PubMed

    Demeke, Tigst; Jenkins, G Ronald

    2010-03-01

    Biotechnology-derived varieties of canola, cotton, corn and soybean are being grown in the USA, Canada and other predominantly grain exporting countries. Although the amount of farmland devoted to production of biotechnology-derived crops continues to increase, lingering concerns that unintended consequences may occur provide the EU and most grain-importing countries with justification to regulate these crops. Legislation in the EU requires traceability of grains/oilseeds, food and feed products, and labelling, when a threshold level of 0.9% w/w of genetically engineered trait is demonstrated to be present in an analytical sample. The GE content is routinely determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and plant genomic DNA provides the template for the initial steps in this process. A plethora of DNA extraction methods exist for qPCR applications. Implementing standardized methods for detection of genetically engineered traits is necessary to facilitate grain marketing. The International Organization for Standardization draft standard 21571 identifies detergent-based methods and commercially available kits that are widely used for DNA extraction, but also indicates that adaptations may be necessary depending upon the sample matrix. This review assesses advantages and disadvantages of various commercially available DNA extraction kits, as well as modifications to published cetyltrimethylammonium bromide methods. Inhibitors are a major obstacle for efficient amplification in qPCR. The types of PCR inhibitors and techniques to minimize inhibition are discussed. Finally, accurate quantification of DNA for applications in qPCR is not trivial. Many confounders contribute to differences in analytical measurements when a particular DNA quantification method is applied and different methods do not always provide concordant results on the same DNA sample. How these differences impact measurement uncertainty in qPCR is considered. PMID:19789856

  20. Pentacyclic triterpenes in birch bark extract inhibit early step of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Heidary Navid, M; Laszczyk-Lauer, M N; Reichling, J; Schnitzler, P

    2014-09-25

    Antiviral agents frequently applied for treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and its derivatives. The antiviral effect of a triterpene extract of birch bark and its major pentacyclic triterpenes, i.e. betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid against acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSV type 1 strains was examined. The cytotoxic effect of a phytochemically defined birch bark triterpene extract (TE) as well as different pentacyclic triterpenes was analyzed in cell culture, and revealed a moderate cytotoxicity on RC-37 cells. TE, betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests with IC50 values ranging between 0.2 and 0.5 ?g/ml. Infectivity of acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strains was significantly reduced by all tested compounds and a direct concentration- and time-dependent antiherpetic activity could be demonstrated. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action, TE and the compounds were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Addition of these drugs to uninfected cells prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells during intracellular replication had low effect on virus multiplication. Minor virucidal activity of triterpenes was observed, however both TE and tested compounds exhibited high anti-herpetic activity when viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Pentacyclic triterpenes inhibit acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant clinical isolates of HSV-1 in the early phase of infection. PMID:25172789

  1. DNA analysis of soil extracts can be used to investigate fine root depth distribution of trees

    PubMed Central

    Bithell, Sean L.; Tran-Nguyen, Lucy T. T.; Hearnden, Mark N.; Hartley, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the root distribution of trees by soil coring is time-consuming as it requires the separation of roots from soil and classification of roots into particular size classes. This labour-intensive process can limit sample throughput and therefore sampling intensity. We investigated the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on soil DNA extractions to determine live fine root DNA density (RDD, mg DNA m−2) for mango (Mangifera indica) trees. The specificity of the qPCR was tested against DNA extracted from 10 mango cultivars and 14 weed species. All mango cultivars and no weeds were detected. Mango DNA was successfully quantified from control soil spiked with mango roots and weed species. The DNA yield of mango root sections stored in moist soil at 23–28 °C declined after 15 days to low concentrations as roots decayed, indicating that dead root materials in moist soil would not cause false-positive results. To separate large roots from samples, a root separation method for field samples was used to target the root fragments remaining in sieved (minimum 2 mm aperture) soil for RDD comparisons. Using this method we compared the seasonal RDD values of fine roots for five mango rootstock cultivars in a field trial. The mean cultivar DNA yields by depth from root fragments in the sieved soil samples had the strongest relationship (adjusted multiple R2 = 0.9307, P < 0.001) with the dry matter (g m−2) of fine (diameter <0.64 mm) roots removed from the soil by sieving. This method provides a species-specific and rapid means of comparing the distribution and concentration of live fine roots of trees in orchards using soil samples up to 500 g. PMID:25552675

  2. Comparative evaluation of three different extraction methods for rice (Oryza sativa L.) genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Naoki; Monma, Kimio; Ibe, Akihiro; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2009-04-01

    Recently, more immediate and precise cultivar-identifying methods targeting the specific and/or introduced gene(s) have been put into practical use for various rice cultivars. However trustworthy and innovative the biotechnological analyses may be, DNA purity and quality do have unpredictable influences upon the identification. Extraction methods of rice DNA have hardly ever been compared in a comprehensive manner. In this study, we investigated extraction characteristics of three methods by using 10 rice cultivars and then examined template availability of rice DNAs thereby extracted. An UV spectrophotometric study with a view toward methods revealed three different facts: The Isoplant II kit method with inhibitor absorption yielded the most DNAs, the Takara kit method with magnetic trapping produced the best DNAs free from contaminative proteins, and the enzymatic digestion method exclusively with enzymatic digestions prepared the best DNAs free from contaminative polysaccharides. Moreover, with a view toward cultivars, an insignificant difference in yield was not entirely bore out, and some difference in cultivar might cause significant difference in yield; however, no significant difference in purity was found among the cultivars used. On the other hand, electrophoretic images of the DNAs from the same cultivars showed considerable differences in quality among the methods. Furthermore, the DNA extracts from certain brands of rice proved really available for cultivar identification by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) related to sequence-tagged sites. Therefore, this study suggested that these extraction methods may be used as the situation demands and that the DNAs thereby extracted might work successfully even in cultivar-identifying PCRs. PMID:19253951

  3. One-step DNA-programmed growth of luminescent and biofunctionalized nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Nan; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2009-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are widely used as lumiphores in biological imaging because their luminescence is both strong and stable, and because they can be biofunctionalized. During synthesis, nanocrystals are typically passivated with hydrophobic organic ligands, so it is then necessary either to replace these ligands or encapsulate the nanocrystals with hydrophilic moieties to make the lumiphores soluble in water. Finally, biological labels must be added to allow the detection of nucleic acids, proteins and specific cell types. This multistep process is time- and labour-intensive and thus out of reach of many researchers who want to use luminescent nanocrystals as customized lumiphores. Here, we show that a single designer ligand-a chimeric DNA molecule-can controllably program both the growth and the biofunctionalization of the nanocrystals. One part of the DNA sequence controls the nanocrystal passivation and serves as a ligand, while another part controls the biorecognition. The synthetic protocol reported here is straightforward and produces a homogeneous dispersion of nanocrystal lumiphores functionalized with a single biomolecular receptor. The nanocrystals exhibit strong optical emission in the visible region, minimal toxicity and have hydrodynamic diameters of ~6 nm, which makes them suitable for bioimaging. We show that the nanocrystals can specifically bind DNA, proteins or cells that have unique surface recognition markers.

  4. Effects of deletion and site-directed mutations on ligation steps of NAD+-dependent DNA ligase: a biochemical analysis of BRCA1 C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hong; Parker, Jeremy M; Lu, Jing; Cao, Weiguo

    2004-10-01

    DNA strand joining entails three consecutive steps: enzyme adenylation to form AMP-ligase, substrate adenylation to form AMP-DNA, and nick closure. In this study, we investigate the effects on ligation steps by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain using NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Thermus species AK16D. Deletion of the BRCT domain resulted in substantial loss of ligation activity, but the mutant was still able to form an AMP-ligase intermediate, suggesting that the defects caused by deletion of the entire BRCT domain occur primarily at steps after enzyme adenylation. The lack of AMP-DNA accumulation by the domain deletion mutant as compared to the wild-type ligase indicates that the BRCT domain plays a role in the substrate adenylation step. Gel mobility shift analysis suggests that the BRCT domain and helix-hairpin-helix subdomain play a role in DNA binding. Similar to the BRCT domain deletion mutant, the G617I mutant showed a low ligation activity and lack of accumulation of AMP-DNA intermediate. However, the G617I mutant was only weakly adenylated, suggesting that a point mutation in the BRCT domain could also affect the enzyme adenylation step. The significant reduction of ligation activity by G634I appears to be attributable to a defect at the substrate adenylation step. The greater ligation of mismatched substrates by G638I is accountable by accelerated conversion of the AMP-DNA intermediate to a ligation product at the final nick closure step. The mutational effects of the BRCT domain on ligation steps in relation to protein-DNA and potential protein-protein interactions are discussed. PMID:15449954

  5. Extraction of high-quality host DNA from feces and regurgitated seeds: a useful tool for vertebrate ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Patricia; Fregel, Rosa; Cabrera, Vicente M; Nogales, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    DNA extraction methods for genotyping non-invasive samples have led to great advances in molecular research for ecological studies, and have been particularly useful for analyzing threatened species. However, scarce amounts of fragmented DNA and the presence of Taq polymerase inhibitors in non-invasive samples are potential problems for subsequent PCR amplifications. In this study we describe a novel technique for extracting DNA from alimentary tract cells found on external surfaces of feces and regurgitated seeds. The presence of contaminants and inhibitors is minimized and samples are preserved intact for use in other ecological research (e.g. trophic studies). The amplification efficiency and purity of the extracted DNA from feces were significantly higher than in commonly used extraction procedures. Moreover, DNA of two bird species was identified from seeds expelled by regurgitation. Therefore, this method may be suitable for future ecological studies of birds, and other vertebrate groups. PMID:19746259

  6. Determination of oil reservoir radiotracer (S14CN-) in a single step using a plastic scintillator extractive resin.

    PubMed

    Bagán, H; Tarancón, A; Stavsetra, L; Rauret, G; García, J F

    2012-07-29

    The analysis of radiotracers is important in the study of oil reservoir dynamics. One of the most widely used radiotracer is S(14)CN(-). Prior to activity measurements by Liquid Scintillation (LS), routine determinations require the pretreatment steps of purification and concentration of the samples using anion exchange columns. The final elution media produces samples with high salt concentration that may lead to problems with phase separation during the LS measurement. Plastic Scintillation (PS) is an alternative technique that provides a solid surface that can be used as a platform for the immobilisation of selective extractants to obtain a PS resin. The proposed procedure unifies chemical separation and sample measurement preparation in a single step, serving to reduce the number of reagents needed and manpower required for the analysis while also avoiding mixed waste production by LS. The objective of this study is to develop a PS resin for the determination of (14)C-labelled thiocyanate radiotracer in water samples. For this purpose, the immobilisation procedure was optimised, including optimisation of the proportion of PS microspheres:extractant and the use of a control blank to monitor the PS resin immobilisation process. The breakthrough volume was studied and the detection and quantification limits for 100 mL of sample were determined to be 0.08 Bq L(-1) and 0.31 Bq L(-1), respectively. The established procedure was applied to active samples from oil reservoirs and errors lower than 5% in the sample determinations were obtained. PMID:22769002

  7. Development of an Ammonium Sulfate DNA Extraction Method for Obtaining Amplifiable DNA in a Small Number of Cells and Its Application to Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seo Young; Kim, Wook Youn; Hwang, Tae Sook; Han, Hye Seung; Lim, So Dug; Kim, Wan Seop

    2013-01-01

    DNA extraction from microdissected cells has become essential for handling clinical specimens with advances in molecular pathology. Conventional methods have limitations for extracting amplifiable DNA from specimens containing a small number of cells. We developed an ammonium sulfate DNA extraction method (A) and compared it with two other methods (B and C). DNA quality and quantity, ?-globin amplification, and detectability of two cancer associated gene mutations were evaluated. Method A showed the best DNA yield, particularly when the cell number was very low. Amplification of the ?-globin gene using DNA from the SNU 790 cell line and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells extracted with Method A demonstrated the strongest band. BRAFV600E mutation analysis using ethanol-fixed PTC cells from a patient demonstrated both a “T” peak increase and an adjacent “A” peak decrease when 25 and 50 cells were extracted, whereas mutant peaks were too low to be analyzed using the other two methods. EGFR mutation analysis using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lung cancer tissues demonstrated a mutant peak with Method A, whereas the mutant peak was undetectable with Methods B or C. Method A yielded the best DNA quantity and quality with outstanding efficiency, particularly when paucicellular specimens were used. PMID:23691506

  8. Development of an efficient fungal DNA extraction method to be used in random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid mold producers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Mar; Casado, Eva M; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2008-12-01

    A variety of previously established mechanical and chemical treatments to achieve fungal cell lysis combined with a semiautomatic system operated by a vacuum pump were tested to obtain DNA extract to be directly used in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid-producing and -nonproducing mold strains. A DNA extraction method that includes digestion with proteinase K and lyticase prior to using a mortar and pestle grinding and a semiautomatic vacuum system yielded DNA of high quality in all the fungal strains and species tested, at concentrations ranging from 17 to 89 ng/microl in 150 microl of the final DNA extract. Two microliters of DNA extracted with this method was directly used for RAPD-PCR using primer (GACA)4. Reproducible RAPD fingerprints showing high differences between producer and nonproducer strains were observed. These differences in the RAPD patterns did not differentiate all the strains tested in clusters by cyclopiazonic acid production but may be very useful to distinguish cyclopiazonic acid producer strains from nonproducer strains by a simple RAPD analysis. Thus, the DNA extracts obtained could be used directly without previous purification and quantification for RAPD analysis to differentiate cyclopiazonic acid producer from nonproducer mold strains. This combined analysis could be adaptable to other toxigenic fungal species to enable differentiation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic molds, a procedure of great interest in food safety. PMID:19244904

  9. Robust Automated Step Extraction From Time-Series Contact Force Data Using the PDShoe.

    PubMed

    Winfree, Kyle N; Pretzer-Aboff, Ingrid; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a method of stride identification, extraction, and analysis of data sets of time-series contact force data for ambulating subjects both with and without Parkinson's disease (PD). This method has been made robust with the use of seeded K-Means clustering, fast Fourier transformation (FFT) spectral analysis, and minimum window size rejection. These methods combine to produce well selected strides of active walking data. We are able to calculate quality of walking measures of stride duration, stance duration (as percent of gait cycle - %GC), swing duration (%GC), time to maximum heel force (%GC), time to maximum toe force (%GC), time spent in heel contact (%GC), and time spent in toe contact (%GC). PMID:25532188

  10. Step-arrest mutants of FLP recombinase: Implications for the catalytic mechanism of DNA recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, R.L.; Prasad, P.V.; Harshey, R.M.; Jayaram, M.

    1988-08-01

    The site-specific recombinase (FLP) encoded by the yeast plasmid 2..mu..m circle belongs to the integrase (of phage lambda) family of recombinases. The sparse homology within the members of this family contrasts with the invariance of three residues. His-396, Arg-399, and Tyr-433 (the numbers correspond to the family alignment positions), among them. The authors' report here results on substrate recognition and catalysis by FLP proteins altered at these residues. Mutations of the conserved His and Tyr that aborted the reaction at specific steps of catalysis permitted genetic dissection of the possible biochemical steps of recombination. They provide indirect evidence that recombination by FLP proceeds through a Holliday junction intermediate.

  11. Nanofluidic laboratory-on-chip device for mapping of single molecule DNA extracted from single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahshid, Sara; Berard, Daniel; Sladek, Robert; Leslie, Sabrina; Reisner, Walter

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this project is to create a nanofluidic platform to provide comprehensive maps of single-cell genomes at 1 kbp resolution based on the direct analysis of single 1-10 Mbp extended DNA molecules extracted from individual cells on-chip. We have developed a nanodevice in which all biochemical processing of single cells (cell lysis, DNA purification and fragmentation) is performed in situ. The platform has the following three components: (1) a micro-cavity (50 ×20 micron in dimension) for trapping and biochemical processing of single cells; (2) post arrays (1 micron depth) for untangling the released genomic contents and (3) parallel nanochannel arrays (100 nm) for extension of ~ 1-10 Mbp DNA for high-throughput optical mapping. Moreover, we use ``Convex Lense-Induced Nanoconfinement'' (CLIC) technique for trapping of single cell and dragging DNA into nanochannels. The principle is that a convex lens is pushed down to deform a flexible coverslip lid above the aforesaid platform containing nano/micro patterns, creating a locally confined region that pins molecules in the embedded nano/micro features. CLIC is used to lower the device lid over a cell isolated in the microcavity with an adjustable gap for buffer exchange. The released DNA is untangled using 1 micron-deep post arrays and driven into nanochannel array where its genomic content is revealed. In particular, using CLIC we were able to successfully trap 20 micron lymphoblast cells inside microcavity and lyse the trapped cell to drive out DNA.

  12. A magnetic nanoparticles-based method for DNA extraction from the saliva of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Li; Huang, Ying; Wu, Ting; Wu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    C677T polymorphism in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is a risk factor for stroke, suggesting that widespread detection could help to prevent stroke. DNA from 70 stroke patients and 70 healthy controls was extracted from saliva using a magnetic nanoparticles-based method and from blood using conventional methods. Real-time PCR results revealed that the C677T polymorphism was genotyped by PCR using DNA extracted from both saliva and blood samples. The genotype results were confirmed by gene sequencing, and results for saliva and blood samples were consistent. The mutation TT genotype frequency was significantly higher in the stroke group than in controls. Homocysteine levels were significantly higher than controls in both TT genotype groups. Therefore, this noninvasive magnetic nanoparticles-based method using saliva samples could be used to screen for the MTHFR C677T polymorphism in target populations. PMID:25206624

  13. One-step RNA pathogen detection with reverse transcriptase activity of a mutated thermostable Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Kranaster, Ramon; Drum, Matthias; Engel, Nicole; Weidmann, Manfred; Hufert, Frank T; Marx, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    We describe the cloning and characterization of a mutated thermostable DNA polymerase from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) that exhibits an increased reverse transcriptase activity and is therefore designated for one-step PCR pathogen detection using established real-time detection methods. We demonstrate that this Taq polymerase mutant (Taq M1) has similar PCR sensitivity and nuclease activity as the respective Taq wild-type DNA polymerase. In addition, and in marked contrast to the wild-type, Taq M1 exhibits a significantly increased reverse transcriptase activity especially at high temperatures (>60 degrees C). RNA generally hosts highly stable secondary structure motifs, such as hairpins and G-quadruplexes, which complicate, or in the worst case obviate, reverse transcription (RT). Thus, RT at high temperatures is desired to weaken or melt secondary structure motifs. To demonstrate the ability of Taq M1 for RNA detection of pathogens, we performed TaqMan probe-based diagnostics of Dobrava viruses by one-step RT-PCR. We found similar detection sensitivities compared to commercially available RT-PCR systems without further optimization of reaction parameters, thus making this enzyme highly suitable for any PCR probe-based RNA detection method. PMID:20108275

  14. DNA extraction from arborescent monocots and how to deal with other challenging hosts.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nigel A; Davis, Robert E; Helmick, Ericka E

    2013-01-01

    Detection of pathogen DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays is the most widely used method for diagnosing phytoplasma diseases. Reliable and efficient detection of phytoplasmas, especially in woody perennial plants, is challenging due to the unusually low abundance and sporadic distribution of phytoplasmas within infected host tissues. Detection success depends largely upon the host species and sampling procedures and, to a lesser extent, on the protocol used for DNA extraction. Here we describe a simple, straightforward, nondestructive stem sampling protocol to confirm phytoplasma infection of palms and other arborescent monocots of large stature. The protocol requires minimal processing of excised tissues and yields phytoplasma DNA preparations in suitable quantity for reliable detection by nested PCR assays. PMID:22987413

  15. SLiCE: a novel bacterial cell extract-based DNA cloning method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel cloning method termed SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (≥15 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from Bacteria Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost effective as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. In addition, the cloning efficiencies and capabilities of these strains can be greatly improved by simple genetic modifications. As an example, we modified the DH10B Escherichia coli strain to express an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system. This strain, termed PPY, facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies and demonstrates the versatility of the method. PMID:22241772

  16. Cytotoxic and DNA interaction activities of extracts from medicinal plants used in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mongelli, E; Pampuro, S; Coussio, J; Salomon, H; Ciccia, G

    2000-07-01

    Eight crude extracts from seven Argentine plants with cancer-related ethnobotanical uses have been subjected to a bioscreening study to detect cytotoxic activity. The plants studied were: Aristolochia triangularis, Baccharis grisebachii, Bolax gummifera, Eupatorium hecatanthum, Erythrina crista-galli, Pterocaulon polystachium and Salpichroa origanifolia. Crown gall tumour inhibition, DNA interaction and cytotoxicity towards KB cells were assayed using the potato disc, the DNA-methyl green (DNA-MG) and the KB cells cytotoxicity bioassays respectively. The results obtained indicate that A. triangularis (ED50=47 microg/ml), B. gummifera (ED50=32 microg/ml) and E. hecatanthum (ED50=35 microg/ml) contained cytotoxic compounds against KB cells. All of the plants studied inhibited the growth of crown gall tumours, showing correlation between the experimental data and the uses reported for these plants. Moreover, the results obtained for the extracts of E. hecatanthum and P. polystachium indicate the presence of compounds that interact with DNA (48 and 22% of absorbance decrease, respectively). The results obtained suggest that cytotoxicity could play an important role in the activities claimed for the plants under study. PMID:10904157

  17. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Yih-Yih; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Naidu, Rakesh; Lai, Pey-Jiun; Ling, Shui-Nyuk; Mak, Joon-Wah; Lim, Patricia Kim-Chooi; Balraj, Pauline; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC50<0.01 µg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28 000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC50=2.9 µg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1’a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC50=1.38 µg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV. PMID:21528487

  18. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kok, Yih-Yih; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Naidu, Rakesh; Lai, Pey-Jiun; Ling, Shui-Nyuk; Mak, Joon-Wah; Lim, Patricia Kim-Chooi; Balraj, Pauline; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)<0.01 µg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC(50)=2.9 µg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1'a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)=1.38 µg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV. PMID:21528487

  19. Protocols for metagenomic DNA extraction and Illumina amplicon library preparation for faecal and swab samples.

    PubMed

    Vo, A-T E; Jedlicka, J A

    2014-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has extraordinarily enhanced the scope of research in the life sciences. To broaden the application of NGS to systems that were previously difficult to study, we present protocols for processing faecal and swab samples into amplicon libraries amenable to Illumina sequencing. We developed and tested a novel metagenomic DNA extraction approach using solid phase reversible immobilization (SPRI) beads on Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) samples stored in RNAlater. Compared with the MO BIO PowerSoil Kit, the current standard for the Human and Earth Microbiome Projects, the SPRI-based method produced comparable 16S rRNA gene PCR amplification from faecal extractions but significantly greater DNA quality, quantity and PCR success for both cloacal and oral swab samples. We furthermore modified published protocols for preparing highly multiplexed Illumina libraries with minimal sample loss and without post-adapter ligation amplification. Our library preparation protocol was successfully validated on three sets of heterogeneous amplicons (16S rRNA gene amplicons from SPRI and PowerSoil extractions as well as control arthropod COI gene amplicons) that were sequenced across three independent, 250-bp, paired-end runs on Illumina's MiSeq platform. Sequence analyses revealed largely equivalent results from the SPRI and PowerSoil extractions. Our comprehensive strategies focus on maximizing efficiency and minimizing costs. In addition to increasing the feasibility of using minimally invasive sampling and NGS capabilities in avian research, our methods are notably not avian-specific and thus applicable to many research programmes that involve DNA extraction and amplicon sequencing. PMID:24774752

  20. Comparative Study of Seven Commercial Kits for Human DNA Extraction from Urine Samples Suitable for DNA Biomarker-Based Public Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    El Bali, Latifa; Diman, Aurélie; Bernard, Alfred; Roosens, Nancy H. C.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Human genomic DNA extracted from urine could be an interesting tool for large-scale public health studies involving characterization of genetic variations or DNA biomarkers as a result of the simple and noninvasive collection method. These studies, involving many samples, require a rapid, easy, and standardized extraction protocol. Moreover, for practicability, there is a necessity to collect urine at a moment different from the first void and to store it appropriately until analysis. The present study compared seven commercial kits to select the most appropriate urinary human DNA extraction procedure for epidemiological studies. DNA yield has been determined using different quantification methods: two classical, i.e., NanoDrop and PicoGreen, and two species-specific real-time quantitative (q)PCR assays, as DNA extracted from urine contains, besides human, microbial DNA also, which largely contributes to the total DNA yield. In addition, the kits giving a good yield were also tested for the presence of PCR inhibitors. Further comparisons were performed regarding the sampling time and the storage conditions. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, an important gene related to smoking has been genotyped using the developed tools. We could select one well-performing kit for the human DNA extraction from urine suitable for molecular diagnostic real-time qPCR-based assays targeting genetic variations, applicable to large-scale studies. In addition, successful genotyping was possible using DNA extracted from urine stored at −20°C for several months, and an acceptable yield could also be obtained from urine collected at different moments during the day, which is particularly important for public health studies. PMID:25365790

  1. Initial steps towards a production platform for DNA sequence analysis on the grid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics is confronted with a new data explosion due to the availability of high throughput DNA sequencers. Data storage and analysis becomes a problem on local servers, and therefore it is needed to switch to other IT infrastructures. Grid and workflow technology can help to handle the data more efficiently, as well as facilitate collaborations. However, interfaces to grids are often unfriendly to novice users. Results In this study we reused a platform that was developed in the VL-e project for the analysis of medical images. Data transfer, workflow execution and job monitoring are operated from one graphical interface. We developed workflows for two sequence alignment tools (BLAST and BLAT) as a proof of concept. The analysis time was significantly reduced. All workflows and executables are available for the members of the Dutch Life Science Grid and the VL-e Medical virtual organizations All components are open source and can be transported to other grid infrastructures. Conclusions The availability of in-house expertise and tools facilitates the usage of grid resources by new users. Our first results indicate that this is a practical, powerful and scalable solution to address the capacity and collaboration issues raised by the deployment of next generation sequencers. We currently adopt this methodology on a daily basis for DNA sequencing and other applications. More information and source code is available via http://www.bioinformaticslaboratory.nl/ PMID:21156038

  2. Next-generation DNA sequencing of HEXA: a step in the right direction for carrier screening.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jodi D; Greger, Valerie; Strovel, Erin T; Blitzer, Miriam G; Umbarger, Mark A; Kennedy, Caleb; Bishop, Brian; Saunders, Patrick; Porreca, Gregory J; Schienda, Jaclyn; Davie, Jocelyn; Hallam, Stephanie; Towne, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is the prototype for ethnic-based carrier screening, with a carrier rate of ∼1/27 in Ashkenazi Jews and French Canadians. HexA enzyme analysis is the current gold standard for TSD carrier screening (detection rate ∼98%), but has technical limitations. We compared DNA analysis by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) plus an assay for the 7.6 kb deletion to enzyme analysis for TSD carrier screening using 74 samples collected from participants at a TSD family conference. Fifty-one of 74 participants had positive enzyme results (46 carriers, five late-onset Tay-Sachs [LOTS]), 16 had negative, and seven had inconclusive results. NGS + 7.6 kb del screening of HEXA found a pathogenic mutation, pseudoallele, or variant of unknown significance (VUS) in 100% of the enzyme-positive or obligate carrier/enzyme-inconclusive samples. NGS detected the B1 allele in two enzyme-negative obligate carriers. Our data indicate that NGS can be used as a TSD clinical carrier screening tool. We demonstrate that NGS can be superior in detecting TSD carriers compared to traditional enzyme and genotyping methodologies, which are limited by false-positive and false-negative results and ethnically focused, limited mutation panels, respectively, but is not ready for sole use due to lack of information regarding some VUS. PMID:24498621

  3. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the genomic DNA extracted from GMO and non-GMO foodstuffs with four different extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Peano, Clelia; Samson, Maria Cristina; Palmieri, Luisa; Gulli, Mariolina; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2004-11-17

    The presence of DNA in foodstuffs derived from or containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) is the basic requirement for labeling of GMO foods in Council Directive 2001/18/CE (Off. J. Eur. Communities 2001, L1 06/2). In this work, four different methods for DNA extraction were evaluated and compared. To rank the different methods, the quality and quantity of DNA extracted from standards, containing known percentages of GMO material and from different food products, were considered. The food products analyzed derived from both soybean and maize and were chosen on the basis of the mechanical, technological, and chemical treatment they had been subjected to during processing. Degree of DNA degradation at various stages of food production was evaluated through the amplification of different DNA fragments belonging to the endogenous genes of both maize and soybean. Genomic DNA was extracted from Roundup Ready soybean and maize MON810 standard flours, according to four different methods, and quantified by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), with the aim of determining the influence of the extraction methods on the DNA quantification through real-time PCR. PMID:15537304

  4. Single-step procedure for labeling DNA strand breaks with fluorescein- or BODIPY-conjugated deoxynucleotides: Detection of apoptosis and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Xun Li; Traganos, F.; Melamed, M.R.; Darzynkiewicz, Z.

    1995-06-01

    The methods of in situ labeling of DNA strand breaks have been used to identify apoptotic cells and/or DNA replicating cells. While discrimination of apoptotic cells is based on the inherent presence of numerous DNA strand breaks in their chromatin, DNA proliferating cells can be discriminated by the selective DNA strand break induction by photolysis (SBIP) methodology at the sites that contain incorporated bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) or iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd). In both instances, DNA strand breaks are labeled with biotin- or digoxygenin-conjugated deoxynucleotides, preferably in the reaction catalyzed by exogenous terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase; fluorescein tagged avidin (streptavidin) or digoxygenin antibody is used in the second step of the reaction. In the present study, DNA strand break labeling was simplified by using directly labeled deoxynucleotides, in a single-step reaction. Apoptotic cells in HL-60 cultures treated with camptothecin or in primary cultures of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma cells treated with prednisolone were easily identified utilizing BODIPY-conjugated dUTP (B-dUTP). The single-step procedure, requiring fewer centrifugation steps, resulted in less cell loss compared to the two-step cell labeling technique. The morphology of cells subjected to SBIP was excellent, allowing visualization of distinct DNA replication points. Because, unlike the immunocytochemical methods used to detect BrdUrd incorporation, the SBIP methodology does not require DNA denaturation by heat or acid, nuclear proteins are expected to remain undenatured in situ, allowing one to study colocalization of various constituents, detected immunocytochemically, at the DNA replication points. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Antioxidant, antibacterial and DNA protective activities of protein extracts from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Sa-Ard, Piyawan; Sarnthima, Rakrudee; Khammuang, Saranyu; Kanchanarach, Watchara

    2015-05-01

    Crude proteins of cultured mycelia and fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum were investigated for antioxidant, antibacterial and DNA protective activities. It was found that the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the mycelia protein and fruiting bodies protein extracts against 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radical (ABTS(•+)) were 2.47?±?0.01 and 2.77?±?0.11 ?g protein/ml and against 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(•)) were 2.5?±?0.01 and 3.42?±?0.01 ?g protein/ml, respectively. The ferric reducing-antioxidant power (FRAP) values of those samples were 1.73?±?0.01 and 2.62?±?0.01 ?mole trolox/?g protein respectively. Protein hydrolysates prepared by pronase exhibited a weaker antioxidant activity. Both crude proteins showed antibacterial activity, whereas only the mycelia protein extract could protect DNA damage by hydroxyl ((•)OH) radicals. This protein extract was partial purified by Diethyl amino ethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose column and Sulfopropyl (SP)-Sepharose column, obtained major protein with molecular weight about 45 kilo Dalton (kDa). In conclusion, G. lucidum protein extracts have promise potential for applications as antioxidant and antibacterial agents. PMID:25892797

  6. Optimization of DNA extraction from seeds and leaf tissues of Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum indicum) for polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Saba; Prakash, Jyoti; Vashishtha, Abhinav; Sharma, Agnivesh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Sagar, Faizuddin; Khan, Nausheen; Dwivedi, Keshav; Jain, Payal; Shukla, Saransh; Gupta, Swati Prakash; Mishra, Saumya

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemums constitute approximately 30 species of perennial flowering plants, belonging to the family Asteraceae, native to Asia and Northeastern Europe. Chrysanthemum is a natural cosmetic additive extracted from Chinese herb by modern biochemical technology. It has the properties of anti-bacterial, anti-viral, reducing (detoxification) and anti-inflammation. It possesses antioxidant characteristics, which could assist in minimizing free-radical induced damage. Therefore, it is widely used in skin and hair care products. Chemical composition of this herbal remedy includes kikkanols, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, various essential oils containing camphor, cineole, sabinol, borneole and other elements that interfere with DNA, causing erroneous or no PCR products. In the present study, testing and modification of various standard protocols for isolation of high-quality DNA from leaf tissues and seeds of C. indicum was done. It was observed that the DNA obtained from seeds and leaf tissues with a modified cetyltrimethylammonium bromide buffer protocol was of good quality, with no colored pigments and contaminants. Also, DNA could be extracted from leaf tissues without using liquid nitrogen. Quality of DNA extracted from seeds was much better as compared to that extracted from leaf tissues. The extracted DNA was successfully amplified by PCR using arbitrary RAPD primers. The same protocol will probably be useful for extraction of high-molecular weight DNA from other plant materials containing large amounts of secondary metabolites and essential oils. PMID:22493524

  7. Optimization of DNA extraction from seeds and leaf tissues of Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum indicum) for polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Saba; Prakash, Jyoti; Vashishtha, Abhinav; Sharma, Agnivesh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Sagar, Faizuddin; Khan, Nausheen; Dwivedi, Keshav; Jain, Payal; Shukla, Saransh; Gupta, Swati Prakash; Mishra, Saumya

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemums constitute approximately 30 species of perennial flowering plants, belonging to the family Asteraceae, native to Asia and Northeastern Europe. Chrysanthemum is a natural cosmetic additive extracted from Chinese herb by modern biochemical technology. It has the properties of anti-bacterial, anti-viral, reducing (detoxification) and anti-inflammation. It possesses antioxidant characteristics, which could assist in minimizing free-radical induced damage. Therefore, it is widely used in skin and hair care products. Chemical composition of this herbal remedy includes kikkanols, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, various essential oils containing camphor, cineole, sabinol, borneole and other elements that interfere with DNA, causing erroneous or no PCR products. In the present study, testing and modification of various standard protocols for isolation of high-quality DNA from leaf tissues and seeds of C. indicum was done. It was observed that the DNA obtained from seeds and leaf tissues with a modified cetyltrimethylammonium bromide buffer protocol was of good quality, with no colored pigments and contaminants. Also, DNA could be extracted from leaf tissues without using liquid nitrogen. Quality of DNA extracted from seeds was much better as compared to that extracted from leaf tissues. The extracted DNA was successfully amplified by PCR using arbitrary RAPD primers. The same protocol will probably be useful for extraction of high-molecular weight DNA from other plant materials containing large amounts of secondary metabolites and essential oils. PMID:22493524

  8. Modified salting-out method: high-yield, high-quality genomic DNA extraction from whole blood using laundry detergent.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, H; Forouzandeh, M; Rasaee, M J; Rahbarizadeh, F

    2005-01-01

    Different approaches have been used to extract DNA from whole blood. In most of these methods enzymes (such as proteinase K and RNAse A) or toxic organic solvents (such as phenol or guanidine isothiocyanate) are used. Since these enzymes are expensive, and most of the materials that are used routinely are toxic, it is desirable to apply an efficient DNA extraction procedure that does not require the use of such materials. In this study, genomic DNA was extracted by the salting-out method, but instead of using an analytical-grade enzyme and chemical detergents, as normally used for DNA isolation, a common laundry powder was used. Different concentrations of the powder were tested, and proteins were precipitated by NaCl-saturated distilled water. Finally, DNA precipitation was performed with the use of 96% ethanol. From the results, we conclude that the optimum concentration of laundry powder for the highest yield and purity of isolated DNA is 30 mg/mL. The procedure was optimized, and a final protocol is suggested. Following the same protocol, DNA was extracted from 100 blood samples, and their amounts were found to be >50 microg/mL of whole blood. The integrity of the DNA fragments was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, the extracted DNA was used as a template for PCR reaction. The results obtained from PCR showed that the final solutions of extracted DNA did not contain any inhibitory material for the enzyme used in the PCR reaction, and indicated that the isolated DNA was of good quality. These results show that this method is simple, fast, safe, and cost-effective, and can be used in medical laboratories and research centers. PMID:16302208

  9. Aqueous extracts of Lippia turbinata and Aloysia citriodora (Verbenaceae): assessment of antioxidant capacity and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Portmann, Erika; Nigro, Marcela M López; Reides, Claudia G; Llesuy, Susana; Ricco, Rafael A; Wagner, Marcelo L; Gurni, Alberto A; Carballo, Marta A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to make a contribution to the knowledge of aqueous extracts of Lippia turbinata and Aloysia citriodora (Verbenaceae; infusion and decoction) in relation with the establishment of its antioxidant activity and lack of DNA damage, for its potential use in therapeutics. The cytogenotoxic profile was evaluated through genotoxic biomarkers such as mitotic index, cellular proliferation kinetics, sister chromatid exchanges, single-cell gel electrophoresis assay, and micronucleus test in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. No statistical differences were found (P > .05) between control and exposed cultures, even between both aqueous extracts. The total antioxidant capacity was shown to be higher in the decoction than in the infusion and both aqueous extracts protected against protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation, the decoction being more efficient than the infusion (P < .005). These results suggest the safe use of these medicinal plants as chemoecologic agents in therapeutics. PMID:22427199

  10. DNA Fingerprinting in a Forensic Teaching Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Stacy A.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an experiment designed to provide students, in a classroom laboratory setting, a hands-on demonstration of the steps used in DNA forensic analysis by performing DNA extraction, DNA fingerprinting, and statistical analysis of the data. This experiment demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting is performed and how long it takes. It…

  11. DNA Fingerprinting in a Forensic Teaching Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Stacy A.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an experiment designed to provide students, in a classroom laboratory setting, a hands-on demonstration of the steps used in DNA forensic analysis by performing DNA extraction, DNA fingerprinting, and statistical analysis of the data. This experiment demonstrates how DNA fingerprinting is performed and how long it takes. It…

  12. Evaluation of Sample Stability and Automated DNA Extraction for Fetal Sex Determination Using Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Maternal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez, Elena; Rueda, Laura; Cañadas, M. Paz; Fuster, Carme; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The detection of paternally inherited sequences in maternal plasma, such as the SRY gene for fetal sexing or RHD for fetal blood group genotyping, is becoming part of daily routine in diagnostic laboratories. Due to the low percentage of fetal DNA, it is crucial to ensure sample stability and the efficiency of DNA extraction. We evaluated blood stability at 4°C for at least 24 hours and automated DNA extraction, for fetal sex determination in maternal plasma. Methods. A total of 158 blood samples were collected, using EDTA-K tubes, from women in their 1st trimester of pregnancy. Samples were kept at 4°C for at least 24 hours before processing. An automated DNA extraction was evaluated, and its efficiency was compared with a standard manual procedure. The SRY marker was used to quantify cfDNA by real-time PCR. Results. Although lower cfDNA amounts were obtained by automated DNA extraction (mean 107,35?GE/mL versus 259,43?GE/mL), the SRY sequence was successfully detected in all 108 samples from pregnancies with male fetuses. Conclusion. We successfully evaluated the suitability of standard blood tubes for the collection of maternal blood and assessed samples to be suitable for analysis at least 24 hours later. This would allow shipping to a central reference laboratory almost from anywhere in Europe. PMID:24222898

  13. Towards standardisation of cell-free DNA measurement in plasma: controls for extraction efficiency, fragment size bias and quantification.

    PubMed

    Devonshire, Alison S; Whale, Alexandra S; Gutteridge, Alice; Jones, Gerwyn; Cowen, Simon; Foy, Carole A; Huggett, Jim F

    2014-10-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is becoming an important clinical analyte for prenatal testing, cancer diagnosis and cancer monitoring. The extraction stage is critical in ensuring clinical sensitivity of analytical methods measuring minority nucleic acid fractions, such as foetal-derived sequences in predominantly maternal cfDNA. Consequently, quality controls are required for measurement of extraction efficiency, fragment size bias and yield for validation of cfDNA methods. We evaluated the utility of an external DNA spike for monitoring these parameters in a study comparing three specific cfDNA extraction methods [QIAamp circulating nucleic acid (CNA) kit, NucleoSpin Plasma XS (NS) kit and FitAmp plasma/serum DNA isolation (FA) kit] with the commonly used QIAamp DNA blood mini (DBM) kit. We found that the extraction efficiencies of the kits ranked in the order CNA kit > DBM kit > NS kit > FA kit, and the CNA and NS kits gave a better representation of smaller DNA fragments in the extract than the DBM kit. We investigated means of improved reporting of cfDNA yield by comparing quantitative PCR measurements of seven different reference gene assays in plasma samples and validating these with digital PCR. We noted that the cfDNA quantities based on measurement of some target genes (e.g. TERT) were, on average, more than twofold higher than those of other assays (e.g. ERV3). We conclude that analysis and averaging of multiple reference genes using a GeNorm approach gives a more reliable estimate of total cfDNA quantity. PMID:24853859

  14. Protective effects of black tea extract against oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ježovi?ová, Miriam; Ko?ariková, Katarína; ?ura?ková, Zde?ka; Keresteš, Ján; Králik, Gabriel; Žit?anová, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the genoprotective and radioprotective effects of black tea extract (BTE) against the induction of single strand DNA breaks in human lymphocytes subjected to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or gamma?rays (2 Gy dose). Lymphocytes were incubated with or without different concentrations of BTE (0.005?500 µg/ml) for 30 min, followed by treatment with or without H2O2 (0.088 µmol/l) for 5 min. To examine the radioprotective effect of BTE, the lymphocytes were incubated with or without BTE for 30 and 60 min prior to and following in vitro irradiation. Oxidative damage to DNA was monitored using a comet assay. BTE at lower concentrations prevented H2O2?induced DNA damage. An increase in BTE concentrations resulted in increased formation of single strand DNA breaks. BTE also exerted significant protective effects against gamma radiation?induced total DNA damage in healthy lymphocytes during their 30 or 60 min incubation with BTE prior to or following irradiation. Therefore, the protective effect of BTE against irradiation was time?dependent. The results contribute to the research on potential beneficial effects of natural compounds, such as BTE, in cancer and its protective effects of normal tissue during radiation therapy. PMID:26718244

  15. KRAS detection in colonic tumors by DNA extraction from FTA paper: the molecular touch-prep.

    PubMed

    Petras, Melissa L; Lefferts, Joel A; Ward, Brian P; Suriawinata, Arief A; Tsongalis, Gregory J

    2011-12-01

    DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is usually more degraded and contains more polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors than DNA isolated from nonfixed tissue. In addition, the tumor size and cellular heterogeneity found in tissue sections can often impact testing for molecular biomarkers. As a potential remedy to this situation, we evaluated the use of Whatman FTA paper cards for collection of colorectal tumor samples before tissue fixation and for isolation of DNA for use in a real-time PCR-based KRAS mutation assay. Eleven colon tumor samples were collected by making a cut into the fresh tumor and applying the Whatman FTA paper to the cut surface. Matched FFPE tissue blocks from these tumors were also collected for comparison. KRAS mutation analysis was carried out using the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Real-time PCR System using 7 independent custom TaqMan PCR assays. Of the 11 colon tumors sampled, 6 were positive for KRAS mutations in both the Whatman FTA paper preparations and corresponding FFPE samples. Whatman FTA paper cards for collection of colorectal tumor samples before tissue fixation and for isolation of DNA have many advantages including ease of use, intrinsic antimicrobial properties, long storage potential (stability of DNA over time), and a faster turnaround time for results. Extracted DNA should be suitable for most molecular diagnostic assays that use PCR techniques. This novel means of DNA preservation from surgical specimens would benefit from additional study and validation as a dependable and practical technique to preserve specimens for molecular testing. PMID:22089345

  16. Sources of Pre-Analytical Variations in Yield of DNA Extracted from Blood Samples: Analysis of 50,000 DNA Samples in EPIC

    PubMed Central

    Caboux, Elodie; Lallemand, Christophe; Ferro, Gilles; Hémon, Bertrand; Mendy, Maimuna; Biessy, Carine; Sims, Matt; Wareham, Nick; Britten, Abigail; Boland, Anne; Hutchinson, Amy; Siddiq, Afshan; Vineis, Paolo; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Gunter, Marc J.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Travis, Ruth; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Canzian, Federico; Sánchez, Maria-José; Skeie, Guri; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Lund, Eiliv; Bilbao, Roberto; Sala, Núria; Barricarte, Aurelio; Palli, Domenico; Navarro, Carmen; Panico, Salvatore; Redondo, Maria Luisa; Polidoro, Silvia; Dossus, Laure; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Lagiou, Pagona; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Hainaut, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88%) performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies. PMID:22808065

  17. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT METHODS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF DNA FROM FUNGAL CONIDIA BY QUANTITATIVE COMPETITIVE PCR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five different DNA extraction methods were evaluated for their effectiveness in recovering PCR templates from the conidia of a series of fungal species often encountered in indoor air. The test organisms were Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium chrysogenum, Stachybotrys chartaru...

  18. Validation of the Isotropic Fractionator: Comparison with Unbiased Stereology and DNA Extraction for Quantification of Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bahney, Jami; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The “isotropic fractionator” (IF) is a novel cell counting technique that homogenizes fixed tissue, recovers cell nuclei in solution, and samples and quantifies nuclei by extrapolation. Studies using this technique indicate that the ratio of glia to neurons in the human brain is approximately 1:1 rather than the 10:1 or 50:1 ratio previously assumed. Although some results obtained with the IF have been similar to those obtained by stereology, the IF has never been calibrated or validated. It is conceivable that only a fraction of glial cell nuclei are recovered intact or recognized after the homogenization step. New Method To rule out this simple explanation for the claim of a 1:1 glia-neuron ratio, we compared cell numbers obtained from adjacent, weight-normalized samples of human and macaque monkey white matter using three techniques: the IF, unbiased stereology of histological sections in exhaustively sectioned samples, and cell numbers calculated from DNA extraction. Results and comparison of methods In primate forebrains, the IF yielded 73,000–90,000 nuclei/mg white matter, unbiased stereology yielded 75,000–92,000 nuclei/mg, with coefficients of error ranging from 0.013–0.063, while DNA extraction yielded only 4,000–23,000 nuclei/mg in fixed white matter tissues. Conclusions Since the IF revealed about 100% of the numbers produced by unbiased stereology, there is no significant underestimate of glial cells. This confirms the notion that the human brain overall contains glial cells and neurons with a ratio of about 1:1 far from the originally assumed ratio of 10:1 in favor of glial cells. PMID:24239779

  19. Trace DNA from insect skins: a comparison of five extraction protocols and direct PCR on chironomid pupal exuviae.

    PubMed

    Kranzfelder, Petra; Ekrem, Torbjørn; Stur, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Insect skins (exuviae) are of extracellular origin and shed during moulting. The skins do not contain cells or DNA themselves, but epithelial cells and other cell-based structures might accidentally attach as they are shed. This source of trace DNA can be sufficient for PCR amplification and sequencing of target genes and aid in species identification through DNA barcoding or association of unknown life stages. Species identification is essential for biomonitoring programs, as species vary in sensitivities to environmental factors. However, it requires a DNA isolation protocol that optimizes the output of target DNA. Here, we compare the relative effectiveness of five different DNA extraction protocols and direct PCR in isolation of DNA from chironomid pupal exuviae. Chironomidae (Diptera) is a species-rich group of aquatic macroinvertebrates widely distributed in freshwater environments and considered a valuable bioindicator of water quality. Genomic DNA was extracted from 61.2% of 570 sampled pupal exuviae. There were significant differences in the methods with regard to cost, handling time, DNA quantity, PCR success, sequence success and the ability to sequence target taxa. The NucleoSpin(®) Tissue XS Kit, DNeasy(®) Blood and Tissue kit, and QuickExtract(™) DNA Extraction Solution provided the best results in isolating DNA from single pupal exuviae. Direct PCR and DTAB/CTAB methods gave poor results. While the observed differences in DNA isolation methods on trace DNA will be relevant to research that focuses on aquatic macroinvertebrate ecology, taxonomy and systematics, they should also be of interest for studies using environmental barcoding and metabarcoding of aquatic environments. PMID:26186122

  20. Determination of chloropropanols in foods by one-step extraction and derivatization using pressurized liquid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Racamonde, I; González, P; Lorenzo, R A; Carro, A M

    2011-09-28

    3-Chloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol (1,3-DCP) were determined for the first time in bakery foods using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) combined with in situ derivatization and GC-MS analysis. This one-step protocol uses N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as silylation reagent. Initially, screening experimental design was applied to evaluate the effects of the variables potentially affecting the extraction process, namely extraction time (min) and temperature (°C), number of cycles, dispersant reagent (diatomaceous earth in powder form and as particulate matter with high pore volume Extrelut NT) and percent of flush ethyl acetate volume (%). To reduce the time of analysis and improve the sensitivity, derivatization of the compounds was performed in the cell extraction. Conditions, such as the volume of BSTFA, temperature and time for the in situ derivatization of analytes using PLE, were optimized by a screening design followed to a Doehlert response surface design. The effect of the in-cell dispersants/adsorbents with diatomaceous earth, Florisil and sodium sulfate anhydrous was investigated using a Box-Behnken design. Using the final best conditions, 1 g of sample dispersed with 0.1 g of sodium sulfate anhydrous and 2.5 g diatomaceous earth was extracted with ethyl acetate. 1 g of Florisil, as clean-up adsorbent, and 70 ?L of BSTFA were used for 3 min at 70°C. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.9994) and precision (relative standard deviation, RSD?2.4%) within the tested ranges. The limits of quantification for 1,3-DCP and 3-MCDP, 1.6 and 1.7 ?g kg(-1), respectively, are far below the established limits in the European and American legislations. The accuracy, precision, linearity, and limits of quantification provided make this analytical method suitable for routine control. The method was applied to the analysis of several toasted bread, snacks, cookies and cereal samples, none of which contained chloropropanols at concentrations above the legislation levels. PMID:21875707

  1. Self assembly of functionalised graphene nanostructures by one step reduction of graphene oxide using aqueous extract of Artemisia vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chettri, Prajwal; Vendamani, V. S.; Tripathi, Ajay; Pathak, Anand P.; Tiwari, Archana

    2016-01-01

    We report self assembly and organisation of graphene sheets to form a macroscopically ordered array of graphene layers using one step reduction of graphene oxide. Aqueous extract of dry leaves of Artemisia vulgaris is used for de-oxygenation of graphene oxide. The reduced graphene oxide samples are investigated for two different reflux times viz. for 6 h and 12 h. It is found that for an efficient reduction of graphene oxide and for the minimal damage to the crystal structure 6 h of reflux is the most favourable. Besides reducing graphene oxide, the phytomolecules also functionalise the graphene layers with electron withdrawing groups by virtue of which three dimensional nanostructures are formed on its surface.

  2. RecA-dependent programmable endonuclease Ref cleaves DNA in two distinct steps.

    PubMed

    Ronayne, Erin A; Cox, Michael M

    2014-04-01

    The bacteriophage P1 recombination enhancement function (Ref) protein is a RecA-dependent programmable endonuclease. Ref targets displacement loops formed when an oligonucleotide is bound by a RecA filament and invades homologous double-stranded DNA sequences. Mechanistic details of this reaction have been explored, revealing that (i) Ref is nickase, cleaving the two target strands of a displacement loop sequentially, (ii) the two strands are cleaved in a prescribed order, with the paired strand cut first and (iii) the two cleavage events have different requirements. Cutting the paired strand is rapid, does not require RecA-mediated ATP hydrolysis and is promoted even by Ref active site variant H153A. The displaced strand is cleaved much more slowly, requires RecA-mediated ATP hydrolysis and does not occur with Ref H153A. The two cleavage events are also affected differently by solution conditions. We postulate that the second cleavage (displaced strand) is limited by some activity of RecA protein. PMID:24371286

  3. An Easy, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Method for DNA Extraction from Various Lichen Taxa and Specimens Suitable for Analysis of Fungal and Algal Strains

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sook-Young; Jang, Seol-Hwa; Oh, Soon-Ok; Kim, Jung A

    2014-01-01

    Lichen studies, including biodiversity, phylogenetic relationships, and conservation concerns require definitive species identification, however many lichens can be challenging to identify at the species level. Molecular techniques have shown efficacy in discriminating among lichen taxa, however, obtaining genomic DNA from herbarium and fresh lichen thalli by conventional methods has been difficult, because lichens contain high proteins, polysaccharides, and other complex compounds in their cell walls. Here we report a rapid, easy, and inexpensive protocol for extracting PCR-quality DNA from various lichen species. This method involves the following two steps: first, cell breakage using a beadbeater; and second, extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The procedure requires approximately 10 mg of lichen thalli and can be completed within 20 min. The obtained DNAs were of sufficient quality and quantity to amplify the internal transcribed spacer region from the fungal and algal lichen components, as well as to sequence the amplified products. In addition, 26 different lichen taxa were tested, resulting in successful PCR products. The results of this study validated the experimental protocols, and clearly demonstrated the efficacy and value of our KCl extraction method applied in the fungal and algal samples. PMID:25606001

  4. An easy, rapid, and cost-effective method for DNA extraction from various lichen taxa and specimens suitable for analysis of fungal and algal strains.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook-Young; Jang, Seol-Hwa; Oh, Soon-Ok; Kim, Jung A; Hur, Jae-Seoun

    2014-12-01

    Lichen studies, including biodiversity, phylogenetic relationships, and conservation concerns require definitive species identification, however many lichens can be challenging to identify at the species level. Molecular techniques have shown efficacy in discriminating among lichen taxa, however, obtaining genomic DNA from herbarium and fresh lichen thalli by conventional methods has been difficult, because lichens contain high proteins, polysaccharides, and other complex compounds in their cell walls. Here we report a rapid, easy, and inexpensive protocol for extracting PCR-quality DNA from various lichen species. This method involves the following two steps: first, cell breakage using a beadbeater; and second, extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The procedure requires approximately 10 mg of lichen thalli and can be completed within 20 min. The obtained DNAs were of sufficient quality and quantity to amplify the internal transcribed spacer region from the fungal and algal lichen components, as well as to sequence the amplified products. In addition, 26 different lichen taxa were tested, resulting in successful PCR products. The results of this study validated the experimental protocols, and clearly demonstrated the efficacy and value of our KCl extraction method applied in the fungal and algal samples. PMID:25606001

  5. Polyhydroxyalkanoate quantification in organic wastes and pure cultures using a single-step extraction and 1H NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Linton, Elisabeth; Rahman, Asif; Viamajala, Sridhar; Sims, Ronald C; Miller, Charles D

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) method was developed to quantitatively analyze polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) content in Cupriavidus necator H16, Azotobacter vinelandii AvOP, and mixed microbial cultures from the effluent of an agricultural waste treatment anaerobic digester. In contrast to previous methods, a single-step PHA extractive method using deuterated chloroform was established, thereby facilitating direct 1H NMR analysis. The accuracy of the method was verified through comparison with well-established gas chromatography (GC) methanolysis techniques. Nile blue fluorescence staining was also carried out to serve as an independent and qualitative indicator of intracellular PHA content. The results indicate that the 1H NMR method is appropriate for rapid and non-destructive quantification of overall PHA content and determination of PHA copolymer composition in a variety of cultures. Notably, this technique was effective in measuring PHA content in full-strength waste samples where high concentrations of background impurities and organic compounds are present. The straightforward procedures minimize error-introducing steps, require less time and materials, and result in an accurate method suitable for routine analyses. PMID:22797227

  6. A two-step nanofiltration process for the production of phenolic-rich fractions from artichoke aqueous extracts.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Alfredo; Conidi, Carmela; Figueroa, René Ruby; Muñoz, Roberto Castro

    2015-01-01

    Commercial nanofiltration (NF) membranes in spiral-wound configuration (NP030 from Microdyn Nadir and Desal DK from GE Water & Process Technologies) were used in a sequential design in order to produce a separated fraction of phenolic and sugar compounds from an aqueous artichoke extract. For both membranes, the effect of transmembrane pressure (TMP) on the permeation flux was evaluated. In optimized conditions of TMP, the NP030 membrane exhibited high rejections of apigenin, cynarin and chlorogenic acid (higher than 85%); on the other hand, very low rejections of fructose, glucose and sucrose (lower than 4%) were measured. Starting from an extract with a total antioxidant activity (TAA) of 5.28 mM trolox a retentate fraction with a TAA of 47.75 mM trolox was obtained. The NF permeate from the NP030 membrane was processed with the Desal DK membrane in optimized conditions of TMP producing a permeate stream free of phenolic and sugar compounds. Accordingly, as most part of phenolic compounds was removed in the first NF step, the concentration of sugar compounds in the NF retentate had much higher results than that of phenolic compounds. PMID:25913377

  7. A Two-Step Nanofiltration Process for the Production of Phenolic-Rich Fractions from Artichoke Aqueous Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Alfredo; Conidi, Carmela; Ruby Figueroa, René; Castro Muñoz, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Commercial nanofiltration (NF) membranes in spiral-wound configuration (NP030 from Microdyn Nadir and Desal DK from GE Water & Process Technologies) were used in a sequential design in order to produce a separated fraction of phenolic and sugar compounds from an aqueous artichoke extract. For both membranes, the effect of transmembrane pressure (TMP) on the permeation flux was evaluated. In optimized conditions of TMP, the NP030 membrane exhibited high rejections of apigenin, cynarin and chlorogenic acid (higher than 85%); on the other hand, very low rejections of fructose, glucose and sucrose (lower than 4%) were measured. Starting from an extract with a total antioxidant activity (TAA) of 5.28 mM trolox a retentate fraction with a TAA of 47.75 mM trolox was obtained. The NF permeate from the NP030 membrane was processed with the Desal DK membrane in optimized conditions of TMP producing a permeate stream free of phenolic and sugar compounds. Accordingly, as most part of phenolic compounds was removed in the first NF step, the concentration of sugar compounds in the NF retentate had much higher results than that of phenolic compounds. PMID:25913377

  8. Efficient preparation of catechin thio conjugates by one step extraction/depolymerization of pine (Pinus pinaster) bark procyanidins.

    PubMed

    Selga, Ariadna; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2005-10-01

    The skin penetrating antioxidant cysteamine derivative of (-)-epicatechin as well as other thio conjugates were efficiently obtained with high yields from pine (Pinus pinaster) bark by simultaneous one pot extraction and depolymerization using water and cysteamine hydrochloride. The influence of the concentration of bark, acid, and cysteamine, as well as the reaction time on the total conversion, was studied. The total conversion into the epicatechin and catechin conjugates was as high as 47 g/kg pine bark with 1666 g cysteamine/kg bark and 28 g/kg with 166 g cysteamine/kg bark. A fast cleanup step by absorption/desorption on XAD-16 greatly facilitated further purification of the active major component. At a pilot scale, 4beta-(2-aminoethylthio)epicatechin (1) (conversion 263 g, purity 35% by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography/weight) was obtained from 17 kg of pine bark after simultaneous extraction/depolymerization followed by cleanup with the polymeric resin in approximately 10 h. The results show that pine (P. pinaster) bark is a suitable source of flavanols for the preparation of active thio derivatives. Conditions are given for the fast and efficient preparation of the conjugates. PMID:16190628

  9. A Modular, DNA-Based Beacon for Single-Step Fluorescence Detection of Antibodies and Other Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ranallo, Simona; Rossetti, Marianna; Plaxco, Kevin W; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Ricci, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    A versatile platform for the one-step fluorescence detection of both monovalent and multivalent proteins has been developed. This system is based on a conformation-switching stem-loop DNA scaffold that presents a small-molecule, polypeptide, or nucleic-acid recognition element on each of its two stem strands. The steric strain associated with the binding of one (multivalent) or two (monovalent) target molecules to these elements opens the stem, enhancing the emission of an attached fluorophore/quencher pair. The sensors respond rapidly (<10?min) and selectively, enabling the facile detection of specific proteins even in complex samples, such as blood serum. The versatility of the platform was demonstrated by detecting five bivalent proteins (four antibodies and the chemokine platelet-derived growth factor) and two monovalent proteins (a Fab fragment and the transcription factor TBP) with low nanomolar detection limits and no detectable cross-reactivity. PMID:26337144

  10. The Extraction and Partial Purification of Bacterial DNA as a Practical Exercise for GCE Advanced Level Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, A. C.; Hayes, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a relatively simple method of extraction and purification of bacterial DNA. This technique permits advanced secondary-level science students to obtain adequate amounts of DNA from very small pellets of bacteria and to observe some of its polymer properties. (ML)

  11. Extraction of DNA from orange juice, and detection of bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jinhe; Baldwin, Elizabeth; Liao, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Kostenyuk, Igor; Burns, Jacqueline; Irey, Mike

    2013-10-01

    Orange juice processed from Huanglongbing (HLB) affected fruit is often associated with bitter taste and/or off-flavor. HLB disease in Florida is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), a phloem-limited bacterium. The current standard to confirm CLas for citrus trees is to take samples from midribs of leaves, which are rich in phloem tissues, and use a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test to detect the 16S rDNA gene of CLas. It is extremely difficult to detect CLas in orange juice because of the low CLas population, high sugar and pectin concentration, low pH, and possible existence of an inhibitor to DNA amplification. The objective of this research was to improve extraction of DNA from orange juice and detection of CLas by qPCR. Homogenization using a sonicator increased DNA yield by 86% in comparison to mortar and pestle extraction. It is difficult to separate DNA from pectin; however, DNA was successfully extracted by treating the juice with pectinase. Application of an elution column successfully removed the unidentified inhibitor to DNA amplification. This work provided a protocol to extract DNA from whole orange juice and detect CLas in HLB-affected fruit. PMID:24047134

  12. COMPARISON OF RAPID METHODS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF BACTERIAL DNA FROM COLONIC AND CECAL LUMEN CONTENTS OF THE PIG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing use of DNA methodologies to study the microflora of the pig gastrointestinal tract requires an efficient recovery of bacterial DNA from intestinal samples. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine which extraction methods are most effective for colonic and cecal lumen sampl...

  13. Automated and Manual Methods of DNA Extraction for Aspergillus fumigatus and Rhizopus oryzae Analyzed by Quantitative Real-Time PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Francesconi, Andrea; Kasai, Miki; Harrington, Susan M.; Beveridge, Mara G.; Petraitiene, Ruta; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Schaufele, Robert L.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) may improve the detection of fungal pathogens. Extraction of DNA from fungal pathogens is fundamental to optimization of qPCR; however, the loss of fungal DNA during the extraction process is a major limitation to molecular diagnostic tools for pathogenic fungi. We therefore studied representative automated and manual extraction methods for Aspergillus fumigatus and Rhizopus oryzae. Both were analyzed by qPCR for their ability to extract DNA from propagules and germinated hyphal elements (GHE). The limit of detection of A. fumigatus and R. oryzae GHE in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid with either extraction method was 1 GHE/ml. Both methods efficiently extracted DNA from A. fumigatus, with a limit of detection of 1 × 102 conidia. Extraction of R. oryzae by the manual method resulted in a limit of detection of 1 × 103 sporangiospores. However, extraction with the automated method resulted in a limit of detection of 1 × 101 sporangiospores. The amount of time to process 24 samples by the automated method was 2.5 h prior to transferring for automation, 1.3 h of automation, and 10 min postautomation, resulting in a total time of 4 h. The total time required for the manual method was 5.25 h. The automated and manual methods were similar in sensitivity for DNA extraction from A. fumigatus conidia and GHE. For R. oryzae, the automated method was more sensitive for DNA extraction of sporangiospores, while the manual method was more sensitive for GHE in BAL fluid. PMID:18353931

  14. A one-step extraction procedure for the screening of cocaine, amphetamines and cannabinoids in postmortem blood samples.

    PubMed

    Pelição, Fabrício Souza; Peres, Mariana Dadalto; Pissinate, Jauber Fornaciari; De Martinis, Bruno Spinosa

    2014-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous detection and quantification in postmortem whole blood samples of cocaine (COC), amphetamines (AMPs) and cannabis; the main drugs involved in cases of impaired driving in Brazil. The analytes were extracted by solid-phase extraction by means of Bond-Elute Certify cartridges, derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide at 80°C for 30 min and analyzed by GC-MS. Linearity ranged from 10 to 500 ng/mL, except for ecgonine methyl ester, for which linearity ranged from 10 to 100 ng/mL. Inter- and intra-day imprecision ranged from 2.8 to 18.4% and from 1.5 to 14.9%, respectively. Accuracy values lay between 86.9 and 104.4%. The limit of quantitation for all drugs was 10 ng/mL and recoveries were >74% for all analytes, except for cannabinoids, which showed poor recovery (?30%). The developed method was applied to real samples collected from deceased victims due to traffic accidents. These samples were selected according to the results obtained in immunoassay screening on collected urine samples. Five samples were positive for the presence of COC and metabolites, four samples were positive for cannabinoids, six samples were positive for AMPs and two samples were drug negative. Some samples were positive for more than one class of drug. Results obtained from whole blood samples showed good agreement with urine screening. The developed method proved capable of quantifying all three classes of drugs of abuse proposed in this study, through a one-step extraction procedure. PMID:24782143

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plant Extracts on Interactions between Transcription Factors and Target DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lampronti, Ilaria; Khan, Mahmud T.H.; Borgatti, Monica; Bianchi, Nicoletta

    2008-01-01

    Several transcription factors (TFs) play crucial roles in governing the expression of different genes involved in the immune response, embryo or cell lineage development, cell apoptosis, cell cycle progression, oncogenesis, repair and fibrosis processes and inflammation. As far as inflammation, TFs playing pivotal roles are nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), activator protein (AP-1), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STATs), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and GATA-1 factors. All these TFs regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human disorders, particularly those with an inflammatory component. Since several medicinal plants can be employed to produce extracts exhibiting biological effects and because alteration of gene transcription represents a very interesting approach to control the expression of selected genes, this study sought to verify the ability of several extracts derived from Bangladeshi medicinal plants in interfering with molecular interactions between different TFs and specific DNA sequences. We first analyzed the antiproliferative activity of 19 medicinal plants on different human cell lines, including erythroleukemia K562, B lymphoid Raji and T lymphoid Jurkat cell lines. Secondly, we employed the electrophoretic mobility shift assay as a suitable technique for a fast screening of plant extracts altering the binding between NF-kB, AP-1, GATA-1, STAT-3, CREB and the relative target DNA elements. PMID:18830455

  16. The efficacy of uracil DNA glycosylase pretreatment in amplicon-based massively parallel sequencing with DNA extracted from archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded esophageal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Masakuni; Yokota, Tomoya; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Kusafuka, Kimihide; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takashi; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Advances in mutation testing for molecular-targeted cancer therapies have led to the increased use of archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors. However, DNA extracted from FFPE tumors (FFPE DNA) is problematic for mutation testing, especially for amplicon-based massively parallel sequencing (MPS), owing to DNA fragmentation and artificial C:G?>?T:A single nucleotide variants (SNVs) caused by deamination of cytosine to uracil. Therefore, to reduce artificial C:G?>?T:A SNVs in amplicon-based MPS using FFPE DNA, we evaluated the efficacy of uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) pretreatment, which can eliminate uracil-containing DNA molecules, with 126 archived FFPE esophageal cancer specimens. We also examined the association between the frequency of C:G?>?T:A SNVs and DNA quality, as assessed by a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based assay. UDG pretreatment significantly lowered the frequency of C:G?>?T:A SNVs in highly fragmented DNA (by approximately 60%). This effect was not observed for good- to moderate-quality DNA, suggesting that a predictive assay (i.e., DNA quality assessment) needs to be performed prior to UDG pretreatment. These results suggest that UDG pretreatment is efficacious for mutation testing by amplicon-based MPS with fragmented DNA from FFPE samples. PMID:26194062

  17. Rapid, one step staining procedures for analysis of cellular DNA and protein by single and dual laser flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, H.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed, simplified techniques are described for simultaneous staining and analysis of DNA and protein in a number of mammalian cell types. Cell staining involves the addition of appropriate dye mixtures to unfixed or ethanol-fixed cells and subsequent analysis of cell populations in the staining reagents generally within 10 to 20 minutes. The approach is novel in that no centrifugation steps are involved during the staining procedure, thus, eliminating cell clumping and cell loss and making the procedures appropriate for samples containing limited numbers of cells. For single wavelength analysis, staining of DNA and protein in ethanol-fixed cells was accomplished with a dye solution containing propidium iodide, fluorescein isothimocyanate and RNase. After 20 minutes at room temperature cells were analyzed using the 488 nanometer (nm) laser excitation line. For dual laser analysis the following dye combinations were employed without RNase: mithramycin-rhodamine 640, mithramycin-substituted rhodamine isothiocyanate, Hoechst 33342-rhodamine 640 and Hoechst 33342-rhodamine isothiocyanate. Unfixed cells were also stained with the Hoechst 33342-rhodamine 640 dye combination. Mithramycin was excited at 457.9 nm, Hoechst 33342 at 333-363 nm, and rhodamine dyes at 568 nm. Cell types analyzed included Chinese hamster ovary cells, cultured mouse colon 26 cells, mouse embryo forelimb bud cells, and rat cell obtained by lung lavage.

  18. Two separable functions of Ctp1 in the early steps of meiotic DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lijuan; Milman, Neta; Nambiar, Mridula; Smith, Gerald R.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is essential for crossing-over and viable gamete formation and requires removal of Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes from 5? ends (clipping) and their resection to generate invasive 3?-end single-stranded DNA (resection). Ctp1 (Com1, Sae2, CtIP homolog) acting with the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is required in both steps. We isolated multiple S. pombe ctp1 mutants deficient in clipping but proficient in resection during meiosis. Remarkably, all of the mutations clustered in or near the conserved CxxC or RHR motif in the C-terminal portion. The mutants tested, like ctp1?, were clipping-deficient by both genetic and physical assays­. But, unlike ctp1?, these mutants were recombination-proficient for Rec12 (Spo11 homolog)-independent break-repair and resection-proficient by physical assay. We conclude that the intracellular Ctp1 C-terminal portion is essential for clipping, while the N-terminal portion is sufficient for DSB end-resection. This conclusion agrees with purified human CtIP resection and endonuclease activities being independent. Our mutants provide intracellular evidence for separable functions of Ctp1. Some mutations truncate Ctp1 in the same region as one of the CtIP mutations linked to the Seckel and Jawad severe developmental syndromes, suggesting that these syndromes are caused by a lack of clipping at DSB ends that require repair. PMID:26130711

  19. Transient kinetics measured with force steps discriminate between double-stranded DNA elongation and melting and define the reaction energetics

    PubMed Central

    Bongini, Lorenzo; Melli, Luca; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Bianco, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Under a tension of ?65 pN, double-stranded DNA undergoes an overstretching transition from its basic (B-form) conformation to a 1.7 times longer conformation whose nature is only recently starting to be understood. Here we provide a structural and thermodynamic characterization of the transition by recording the length transient following force steps imposed on the ?-phage DNA with different melting degrees and temperatures (10–25°C). The shortening transient following a 20–35 pN force drop from the overstretching force shows a sequence of fast shortenings of double-stranded extended (S-form) segments and pauses owing to reannealing of melted segments. The lengthening transients following a 2–35 pN stretch to the overstretching force show the kinetics of a two-state reaction and indicate that the whole 70% extension is a B-S transition that precedes and is independent of melting. The temperature dependence of the lengthening transient shows that the entropic contribution to the B-S transition is one-third of the entropy change of thermal melting, reinforcing the evidence for a double-stranded S-form that maintains a significant fraction of the interstrand bonds. The cooperativity of the unitary elongation (22 bp) is independent of temperature, suggesting that structural factors, such as the nucleic acid sequence, control the transition. PMID:24353317

  20. Evaluation of five protocols for DNA extraction from leaves of Malus sieversii, Vitis vinifera, and Armeniaca vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Aubakirova, K; Omasheva, M; Ryabushkina, N; Tazhibaev, T; Kampitova, G; Galiakparov, N

    2014-01-01

    Leaves of Malus sieversii, Vitis vinifera, and Armeniaca vulgaris contain substantial amounts of secondary metabolites, which limit the high-quality DNA extraction performance. In this study, five extraction protocols were compared for their ability to produce good quality DNA from fresh and dried (with silica gel) leaves of these species. The modified protocol of Dellaporta et al., using polyvinylpyrrolidone to bind the phenolic compounds and a high molar concentration of potassium acetate to inhibit co-precipitation of polysaccharides with DNA, produced the best DNA quality for all species tested. DNA extracted by this method had a 1.77-1.96 A260/280 nm ratio and successful amplification of the 18S ribosomal DNA gene. DNA concentrations of dried leaves were lower than those obtained from fresh leaves, which was likely due to aspects of the drying procedure. All five methods for grapevine produced DNA of obvious better quality from green canes compared to leaves, due to the relatively low content of secondary metabolites in the former. For grapevine and apricot, three methods can be equally used to obtain DNA of good quality: the Doyle and Doyle modified method using CTAB and high concentration of NaCl, the Jobes et al. modified method, and the sodium dodecyl sulfate mini preparation method of Edwards et al. The protocol of Jobes et al. using LiCl for RNA removal showed the best results for most of the M. sieversii samples examined. PMID:24634185

  1. The effect of various stain carriers on the quality and quantity of DNA extracted from dried bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Prinz, M; Berghaus, G

    1990-01-01

    Bloodstains were made with 200 microliters blood on each of 11 different common substrates to examine the effect of the stain carrier on the amount and quality of DNA recoverable. High-molecular-weight DNA was extracted from all samples after 2 days. The yield of DNA from each sample varied considerably, not only between the different stain carriers but also within a given category. With a DNA yield of up to 10 micrograms, paper, glass, nylon, wood, smooth leather and wool gave the best results, followed by blue denim and wallpaper (up to 6 micrograms), cotton fabric and carpeting (up to 4 micrograms) and suede (up to 2 micrograms). For several stain carriers the DNA-containing solution was contaminated by chemical substances, which in the case of the blue denim, suede, and carpet samples inhibited the digestion of the DNA with restriction enzymes and prevented DNA typing. The different textures of the stain carriers tested and (as for varying yields on the same carrier) the differing degree of loss of DNA during extraction and the physiological variation in the number of leukocytes in human blood are discussed as possible reasons for the wide range of variation in the amounts of DNA it was possible to extract. PMID:1968692

  2. Protective Effects of Extracts from Fructus rhodomyrti against Oxidative DNA Damage In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yuebin; Xu, Xinyun; Wu, Shuang; Huang, Juan; Misra, Hara; Li, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the potential protective effects of extracts from Fructus rhodomyrti (FR) against oxidative DNA damage using a cellular system and the antioxidant ability on potassium bromate- (KBrO3-) mediated oxidative stress in rats. Methods. The effects of FR on DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were evaluated by comet assay in primary spleen lymphocytes cultures. The effects of FR on the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the levels of GSH, hydroperoxides, and 8-OHdG were determined in the plasma and tissues of rats treated with KBrO3. Results. FR was shown to effectively protect against DNA damage induced by H2O2??in vitro, and the maximum protective effect was observed when FR was diluted 20 times. Endogenous antioxidant status, namely, the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the levels of GSH were significantly decreased in the plasma, the liver, and the kidney of the KBrO3-treated rats, while the pretreatment of FR prevented the decreases of these parameters. In addition, the pretreatment of FR was also able to prevent KBrO3-induced increases in the levels of hydroperoxides and 8-OHdG in the plasma, the liver, and the kidney in rats. Conclusions. Our findings suggested that FR might act as a chemopreventive agent with antioxidant properties offering effective protection against oxidative DNA damage in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24089629

  3. Ancient Microbes from Halite Fluid Inclusions: Optimized Surface Sterilization and DNA Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Timofeeff, Michael N.; Spathis, Rita; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Lum, J. Koji

    2011-01-01

    Fluid inclusions in evaporite minerals (halite, gypsum, etc.) potentially preserve genetic records of microbial diversity and changing environmental conditions of Earth's hydrosphere for nearly one billion years. Here we describe a robust protocol for surface sterilization and retrieval of DNA from fluid inclusions in halite that, unlike previously published methods, guarantees removal of potentially contaminating surface-bound DNA. The protocol involves microscopic visualization of cell structures, deliberate surface contamination followed by surface sterilization with acid and bleach washes, and DNA extraction using Amicon centrifugal filters. Methods were verified on halite crystals of four different ages from Saline Valley, California (modern, 36 ka, 64 ka, and 150 ka), with retrieval of algal and archaeal DNA, and characterization of the algal community using ITS1 sequences. The protocol we developed opens up new avenues for study of ancient microbial ecosystems in fluid inclusions, understanding microbial evolution across geological time, and investigating the antiquity of life on earth and other parts of the solar system. PMID:21694765

  4. Ancient microbes from halite fluid inclusions: optimized surface sterilization and DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Timofeeff, Michael N; Spathis, Rita; Lowenstein, Tim K; Lum, J Koji

    2011-01-01

    Fluid inclusions in evaporite minerals (halite, gypsum, etc.) potentially preserve genetic records of microbial diversity and changing environmental conditions of Earth's hydrosphere for nearly one billion years. Here we describe a robust protocol for surface sterilization and retrieval of DNA from fluid inclusions in halite that, unlike previously published methods, guarantees removal of potentially contaminating surface-bound DNA. The protocol involves microscopic visualization of cell structures, deliberate surface contamination followed by surface sterilization with acid and bleach washes, and DNA extraction using Amicon centrifugal filters. Methods were verified on halite crystals of four different ages from Saline Valley, California (modern, 36 ka, 64 ka, and 150 ka), with retrieval of algal and archaeal DNA, and characterization of the algal community using ITS1 sequences. The protocol we developed opens up new avenues for study of ancient microbial ecosystems in fluid inclusions, understanding microbial evolution across geological time, and investigating the antiquity of life on earth and other parts of the solar system. PMID:21694765

  5. Rapid extraction of genomic DNA from medically important yeasts and filamentous fungi by high-speed cell disruption.

    PubMed

    Müller, F M; Werner, K E; Kasai, M; Francesconi, A; Chanock, S J; Walsh, T J

    1998-06-01

    Current methods of DNA extraction from different fungal pathogens are often time-consuming and require the use of toxic chemicals. DNA isolation from some fungal organisms is difficult due to cell walls or capsules that are not readily susceptible to lysis. We therefore investigated a new and rapid DNA isolation method using high-speed cell disruption (HSCD) incorporating chaotropic reagents and lysing matrices in comparison to standard phenol-chloroform (PC) extraction protocols for isolation of DNA from three medically important yeasts (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Trichosporon beigelii) and two filamentous fungi (Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium solani). Additional extractions by HSCD were performed on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudallescheria boydii, and Rhizopus arrhizus. Two different inocula (10(8) and 10(7) CFU) were compared for optimization of obtained yields. The entire extraction procedure was performed on as many as 12 samples within 1 h compared to 6 h for PC extraction. In comparison to the PC procedure, HSCD DNA extraction demonstrated significantly greater yields for 10(8) CFU of C. albicans, T. beigelii, A. fumigatus, and F. solani (P < or = 0.005), 10(7) CFU of C. neoformans (P < or = 0.05), and 10(7) CFU of A. fumigatus (P < or = 0.01). Yields were within the same range for 10(8) CFU of C. neoformans and l0(7) CFU of C. albicans for both HSCD extraction and PC extraction. For 10(7) CFU of T. beigelii, PC extraction resulted in a greater yield than did HSCD (P < or = 0.05). Yields obtained from 10(8) and 10(7) CFU were significantly greater for filamentous fungi than for yeasts by the HSCD extraction procedure (P < 0.0001). By the PC extraction procedure, differences were not significant. For all eight organisms, the rapid extraction procedure resulted in good yield, integrity, and quality of DNA as demonstrated by restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR, and random amplified polymorphic DNA. We conclude that mechanical disruption of fungal cells by HSCD is a safe, rapid, and efficient procedure for extracting genomic DNA from medically important yeasts and especially from filamentous fungi. PMID:9620390

  6. Evaluation of antibacterial, antioxidant and DNA protective capacity of Chenopodium album's ethanolic leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Elif Korcan, S; Aksoy, Onur; Erdo?mu?, S Feyza; Ci?erci, ? Hakk?; Konuk, Muhsin

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the antibacterial effects of Chenopodium album's ethanolic leaf extract (CAE) on all the Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms and evaluated the protective effects of CAE on both yeast and human mononuclear leukocytes' genomic DNA upon oxidative shock. Antibacterial activity was recorded on Bacillus subtilis with 13 mm of inhibition zone. Total oxidative status (TOS) and the total antioxidative status (TAS) levels were determined to evaluate the antioxidant activity of CAE. Results indicated that there was a good correlation between dose of CAE and TAS levels. We also observed that CAE protect the DNA of both yeast and mononuclear leukocytes against the damaging effect of hydrogen peroxide. The comet assay, applied on both Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 (MATa his3?1 leu2?0 met15?0 ura3?0) and human leukocytes, results suggested that there was statistically significant correlation between CAE dilutions and antigenotoxic activity. PMID:22897836

  7. A novel reliable method of DNA extraction from olive oil suitable for molecular traceability.

    PubMed

    Raieta, Katia; Muccillo, Livio; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2015-04-01

    Extra virgin olive oil production has a worldwide economic impact. The use of this brand, however, is of great concern to Institutions and private industries because of the increasing number of fraud and adulteration attempts to the market products. Here, we present a novel, reliable and not expensive method for extracting the DNA from commercial virgin and extra virgin olive oils. The DNA is stable overtime and amenable for molecular analyses; in fact, by carrying out simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers analysis, we characterise the genetic profile of monovarietal olive oils. By comparing the oil-derived pattern with that of the corresponding tree, we can unambiguously identify four cultivars from Samnium, a region of Southern Italy, and distinguish them from reference and more widely used varieties. Through a parentage statistical analysis, we also identify the putative pollinators, establishing an unprecedented and powerful tool for olive oil traceability. PMID:25442596

  8. DNA Extraction from Dry Museum Beetles without Conferring External Morphological Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Moore, Wendy; Melchior, Linea; Worobey, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background A large number of dry-preserved insect specimens exist in collections around the world that might be useful for genetic analyses. However, until now, the recovery of nucleic acids from such specimens has involved at least the partial destruction of the specimen. This is clearly undesirable when dealing with rare species or otherwise important specimens, such as type specimens. Methodology We describe a method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from dry insects without causing external morphological damage. Using PCR to amplify ?220 bp of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I, and 250–345 bp fragments of the multi-copy, nuclear 28s ribosomal DNA gene, we demonstrate the efficacy of this method on beetles collected up to 50 years ago. Conclusions This method offers a means of obtaining useful genetic information from rare insects without conferring external morphological damage. PMID:17342206

  9. A novel approach on fluid dispensing for a DNA/RNA extraction chip package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ling; Premachandran, C. S.; Chew, Michelle; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Diao; Pinjala, D.

    2008-02-01

    Micro fluidic package with integrated reservoirs has been developed for DNA /RNA extraction application. A membrane based pump which consists of a reservoir to store reagents and a pin valve to control the fluid is developed to dispense the reagents into the chip. A programmable external actuator is fabricated to dispense the fluid from the membrane pump into the DNA chip. An elastic and high elongation thin rubber membrane is used to seal the membrane pump and at the same time prevent actuator from mixing with different reagents in the micro fluidic package. Break displacement during actuation of membrane pump sealing material is studied with different ratios of PDMS and other types of rubber materials. The fluid flow from the reservoir to the chip is controlled by a pin valve which is activated during the external actuation. A CFD simulation is performed to study the pumping action dusting the external actuation and is validated with experimental results.

  10. Extraction of protoporphyrin disodium and its inhibitory effects on HBV-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao-Pin; Xu, Li-Fa; Liu, Qun-Hong; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Yu-Xia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore an ideal method for extracting protoporphyrin disodium (PPN) from unanticoagulated animal blood, and to study the inhibitory effects of PPN on HBV-DNA duplication and its cytotoxicity to 2.2.15 cell strain. METHODS: Protoporphyrin methyl ester and other intermediate products were prepared with protoheme separated from protein hydrolysates of coagulated animal blood, which were finally made into PPN and detected quantitatively with an ultraviolet fluorescent analyzer. Ten ?g/ml, 20 ?g/ml, 40 ?g/ml, 80 ?g/ml and 160 ?g/ml of PPN-aqueous solution were added into culture medium for 2.2.15 cells respectively. Eight days later, the drug concentration in supernatant from the culture medium was detected when inhibition rate of HBeAg, cell survival rate when inhibition rate of HBeAg was 50% (ID50), and when survival cells in experimental group were 50% of those in control group (CD50), and the therapeutic index (TI) was also detected. PPN with different concentration of 10 ?g/ml, 20 ?g/ml, 40 ?g/ml, 80 ?g/ml and 160 ?g/ml was respectively mixed and cultivated with HepG2 2.2.15 cell suspension, and then the inhibition of PPN against HBV-DNA was judged by PCR. RESULTS: The extract of henna crystal was identified to be PPN. When the concentrations of PPN were 160 ?g/ml and 80 ?g/ml, the inhibition rates of HBeAg were 89.8% and 82.4%, and the cell survival rates were 98.7% and 99.2%. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that PPN can be extracted from unanticoagulated animal blood. PPN can inhibit HBV-DNA expression and duplication in vitro, and has no cytotoxicity to liver cells. Further study and application of PPN are warranted. PMID:14760773

  11. Antioxidant and DNA Repair Stimulating Effect of Extracts from Transformed and Normal Roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides against Induced Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in CHO Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skała, Ewa; Sitarek, Przemysław; Różalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Szemraj, Janusz; Wysokińska, Halina; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Rhaponticum carthamoides has a long tradition of use in Siberian folk medicine. The roots and rhizomes of this species are used in various dietary supplements or nutraceutical preparations to increase energy level or eliminate physical weakness. This is the first report to reveal the protective and DNA repair stimulating abilities of R. carthamoides root extracts in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to an oxidative agent. Both transformed root extract (TR extract) and extract of soil-grown plant roots (NR extract) may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, but CHO cells stimulated with extract from the transformed roots demonstrated significantly stronger properties than cells treated with the soil-grown plant root extract. These differences in biological activity may be attributed to the differences in the content of phenolic compounds in these root extracts. Preincubation of the CHO cells with TR and NR extracts showed an increase in gene expression and protein levels of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2). R. carthamoides may possess antioxidant properties that protect CHO cells against oxidative stress.

  12. A microfluidic chip integrating DNA extraction and real-time PCR for the detection of bacteria in saliva

    PubMed Central

    Oblath, Emily A.; Henley, W. Hampton; Alarie, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic chip integrating DNA extraction, amplification, and detection for the identification of bacteria in saliva is described. The chip design integrated a monolithic aluminum oxide membrane (AOM) for DNA extraction with seven parallel reaction wells for real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR) amplification of the extracted DNA. Samples were first heated to lyse target organisms and then added to the chip and filtered through the nanoporous AOM to extract the DNA. PCR reagents were added to each of the wells and the chip was thermocycled. Identification of Streptococcus mutans in a saliva sample is demonstrated along with the detection of 300 fg (100–125 copies) of both methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) genomic DNA (gDNA) spiked into a saliva sample. Multiple target species and strains of bacteria can be simultaneously identified in the same sample by varying the primers and probes used in each of the seven reaction wells. In initial tests, as little as 30 fg (8–12 copies) of MSSA gDNA in buffer has been successfully amplified and detected with this device. PMID:23370016

  13. [DNA extraction from coagulated human blood for application in genotyping techniques for human leukocyte antigen and immunoglobulin-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Guelsin, Gláucia Andréia; Clementino, Samaia Laface; Melo, Fabiano Cavalcante de; Braga, Marco Antônio; Souza, Cleonice de; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize a method for extracting high-quality DNA from samples of coagulated blood. Forty-eight samples of human coagulated blood were used for DNA extraction by means of the EZ-DNA commercial kit (Biological Industries, Beit Haemek, Israel), the Neoscience column kit (One Lambda Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and a modified salting-out method. Only the salting-out method was able to extract high concentrations of DNA (mean, 180 ng/(1/4)microl), which were measured using the Qubit fluorescence detector (Invitrogen, USA). This method enabled amplification of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) genes using the Luminex PCR-SSO (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific oligonucleotide) technology, which demands good quality DNA, and amplification of KIR (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) genes using an in-house PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific primer) technique, which demands a specific concentration of DNA (10 ng/(1/4)microl). We concluded that the modified salting-out technique was very efficient, simple and fast for DNA extraction from human coagulated blood samples, with the aim of genotyping the HLA and KIR genes. PMID:20209349

  14. Five commercial DNA extraction systems tested and compared on a stool sample collection.

    PubMed

    Persson, Søren; de Boer, Richard F; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M D; Olsen, Katharina E P

    2011-03-01

    In this study, 5 different commercial DNA extraction systems were tested on a stool sample collection containing 81 clinical stool specimens that were culture-positive for diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica, or Clostridium difficile. The purified DNAs were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) directed toward the relevant organisms. The results showed that conventional PCR combined with the extraction systems BioRobot EZ1 (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), Bugs'n Beads (Genpoint, Oslo, Norway), ChargeSwitch (Invitrogen, Paisley, UK), QIAamp Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen), and 2 protocols (generic and Specific A) for EasyMag (BioMérieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France) were able to identify 89%, 62%, 85%, 88%, 85%, and 91%, respectively, of the pathogens originally identified by conventional culture-based methods. When TaqMan PCR was combined with the EasyMag Specific A protocol, 99% of the samples were correctly identified. The results demonstrate that the extraction efficiencies can vary significantly among different extraction systems, careful optimization may have a significant positive effect, and the use of sensitive and specific detection methods like TaqMan PCR is an ideal choice for this type of analysis. PMID:21353945

  15. Improved methods for capture, extraction, and quantitative assay of environmental DNA from Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.).

    PubMed

    Turner, Cameron R; Miller, Derryl J; Coyne, Kathryn J; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  16. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening approach.

  17. Improved Methods for Capture, Extraction, and Quantitative Assay of Environmental DNA from Asian Bigheaded Carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cameron R.; Miller, Derryl J.; Coyne, Kathryn J.; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  18. In vitro free radical scavenging and DNA damage protective property of Coriandrum sativum L. leaves extract.

    PubMed

    Harsha, S N; Anilakumar, K R

    2014-08-01

    Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander), an everyday spice in the Indian kitchen is known to add flavor to the cuisine. It is an annual herb belonging to the Apiaceae (Umbellifera) family. The hydro-alcohol extract of Coriandrum sativum L. at the dose of 1 mg/ml was subjected to a series of in vitro assays viz. 2, 2'- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, lipid peroxidation by thiobarbituric acid, reducing power and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging in order to study its antioxidant efficacy in detail. The amount of flavonoids in 70% ethanol extract was found to be 44.5 ?g and that of the total phenols was 133.74 ?g gallic acid equivalents per mg extract. The extracts of the leaves showed metal chelating power, with IC50 values, 368.12 ?g/ml where as that of standard EDTA was 26.7 ?g/ml. The IC50 values for 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical scavenging was 222 ?g/ml where as that of standard ascorbic acid was 22.6 ?g/ml. The NO scavenging activity of the extract of the leaves showed IC50 value of 815.6 ?g/ml; at the same time the standard BHA had 49.1 ?g/ml. All the plant extracts provided DNA damage protection; however, the protection provided at the dose of 8 ?g/ml was comparable to that of standard gallic acid. The Coriandrum sativum leaf extract was able to prevent in vitro lipid peroxidation with IC50 values; 589.6 ?g/ml where as that of standard BHA was 16.3 ?g/ml. Our results also showed significant ferric reducing power indicating the hydrogen donating ability of the extract. This study indicated the potential of the leaf extract as a source of natural antioxidants or nutraceuticals that could be of use in food industry with potential application to reduce oxidative stress in living system. PMID:25114344

  19. Quantitation of 35S promoter in maize DNA extracts from genetically modified organisms using real-time polymerase chain reaction, part 2: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Max; Fernandez, Sophie; Cassard, Sylvanie; Bertheau, Yves

    2005-01-01

    The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and the European Network of GMO Working Laboratories have proposed development of a modular strategy for stepwise validation of complex analytical techniques. When applied to the quantitation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food products, the instrumental quantitation step of the technique is separately validated from the DNA extraction step to better control the sources of uncertainty and facilitate the validation of GMO-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. This paper presents the results of an interlaboratory study on the quantitation step of the method standardized by CEN for the detection of a regulatory element commonly inserted in GMO maize-based foods. This is focused on the quantitation of P35S promoter through using the quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR). Fifteen French laboratories participated in the interlaboratory study of the P35S quantitation operating procedure on DNA extract samples using either the thermal cycler ABI Prism 7700 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) or Light Cycler (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN). Attention was focused on DNA extract samples used to calibrate the method and unknown extract samples. Data were processed according to the recommendations of ISO 5725 standard. Performance criteria, obtained using the robust algorithm, were compared to the classic data processing after rejection of outliers by the Cochran and Grubbs tests. Two laboratories were detected as outliers by the Grubbs test. The robust precision criteria gave values between the classical values estimated before and after rejection of the outliers. Using the robust method, the relative expanded uncertainty by the quantitation method is about 20% for a 1% Bt176 content, whereas it can reach 40% for a 0.1% Bt176. The performances of the quantitation assay are relevant to the application of the European regulation, which has an accepted tolerance interval of about +/-50%. These data were fitted to a power model (r2 = 0.96). Thanks to this model, it is possible to propose an estimation of uncertainty of the QRT-PCR quantitation step and an uncertainty budget depending on the analytical conditions. PMID:15859084

  20. Pathogen Quantitation in Complex Matrices: A Multi-Operator Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods with a Novel Assessment of PCR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pontiroli, Alessandra; Travis, Emma Rachel; Sweeney, Francis Patrick; Porter, David; Gaze, William Hugo; Mason, Sam; Hibberd, Victoria; Holden, Jennifer; Courtenay, Orin; Wellington, Elizabeth Margaret Helen

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium bovis is the aetiological agent of bovine tuberculosis (bTB), an important recrudescent zoonosis, significantly increasing in British herds in recent years. Wildlife reservoirs have been identified for this disease but the mode of transmission to cattle remains unclear. There is evidence that viable M. bovis cells can survive in soil and faeces for over a year. Methodology/Principal Findings We report a multi-operator blinded trial for a rigorous comparison of five DNA extraction methods from a variety of soil and faecal samples to assess recovery of M. bovis via real-time PCR detection. The methods included four commercial kits: the QIAamp Stool Mini kit with a pre-treatment step, the FastDNA® Spin kit, the UltraClean™ and PowerSoil™ soil kits and a published manual method based on phenol:chloroform purification, termed Griffiths. M. bovis BCG Pasteur spiked samples were extracted by four operators and evaluated using a specific real-time PCR assay. A novel inhibition control assay was used alongside spectrophotometric ratios to monitor the level of inhibitory compounds affecting PCR, DNA yield, and purity. There were statistically significant differences in M. bovis detection between methods of extraction and types of environmental samples; no significant differences were observed between operators. Processing times and costs were also evaluated. To improve M. bovis detection further, the two best performing methods, FastDNA® Spin kit and Griffiths, were optimised and the ABI TaqMan environmental PCR Master mix was adopted, leading to improved sensitivities. Conclusions M. bovis was successfully detected in all environmental samples; DNA extraction using FastDNA® Spin kit was the most sensitive method with highest recoveries from all soil types tested. For troublesome faecal samples, we have used and recommend an improved assay based on a reduced volume, resulting in detection limits of 4.25×105 cells g?1 using Griffiths and 4.25×106 cells g?1 using FastDNA® Spin kit. PMID:21448453

  1. Distribution of cytotoxic and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity in crude extracts from butterflies among the family Pieridae

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuko; Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Odagiri, Ken-Ichi; Yata, Osamu; Koyama, Kotaro; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    Cabbage butterflies, Pieris rapae and Pieris brassicae, contain strong cytotoxic proteins, designated as pierisin-1 and -2, against cancer cell lines. These proteins exhibit DNA ADP-ribosylating activity. To determine the distribution of substances with cytotoxicity and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity among other species, crude extracts from 20 species of the family Pieridae were examined for cytotoxicity in HeLa cells and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity. Both activities were detected in extracts from 13 species: subtribes Pierina (Pieris rapae, Pieris canidia, Pieris napi, Pieris melete, Pieris brassicae, Pontia daplidice, and Talbotia naganum), Aporiina (Aporia gigantea, Aporia crataegi, Aporia hippia, and Delias pasithoe), and Appiadina (Appias nero and Appias paulina). All of these extracts contained substances recognized by anti-pierisin-1 antibodies, with a molecular mass of ≈100 kDa established earlier for pierisin-1. Moreover, sequences containing NAD-binding sites, conserved in ADP-ribosyltransferases, were amplified from genomic DNA from 13 species of butterflies with cytotoxicity and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity by PCR. Extracts from seven species, Appias lyncida, Leptosia nina, Anthocharis scolymus, Eurema hecabe, Catopsilia pomona, Catopsilia scylla, and Colias erate, showed neither cytotoxicity nor DNA ADP-ribosylating activity, and did not contain substances recognized by anti-pierisin-1 antibodies. Sequences containing NAD-binding sites were not amplified from genomic DNA from these seven species. Thus, pierisin-like proteins, showing cytotoxicity and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity, are suggested to be present in the extracts from butterflies not only among the subtribe Pierina, but also among the subtribes Aporiina and Appiadina. These findings offer insight to understanding the nature of DNA ADP-ribosylating activity in the butterfly. PMID:18256183

  2. Rapid method for DNA extraction from the honey bee Apis mellifera and the parasitic bee mite Varroa destructor using lysis buffer and proteinase K.

    PubMed

    Issa, M R C; Figueiredo, V L C; De Jong, D; Sakamoto, C H; Simões, Z L P

    2013-01-01

    We developed a rapid method for extraction of DNA from honey bees, Apis mellifera, and from the parasitic bee mite, Varroa destructor. The advantages include fast processing and low toxicity of the substances that are utilized. We used lysis buffer with nonionic detergents to lyse cell walls and proteinase K to digest proteins. We tested whole thorax, thoracic muscle mass, legs, and antennae from individual bees; the mites were processed whole (1 mite/sample). Each thorax was incubated whole, without cutting, because exocuticle color pigment darkened the extraction solution, interfering with PCR results. The procedure was performed with autoclaved equipment and laboratory gloves. For each sample, we used 100 µL lysis buffer (2 mL stock solution of 0.5 M Tris/HCl, pH 8.5, 10 mL stock solution of 2 M KCl, 500 µL solution of 1 M MgCl2, 2 mL NP40, and 27.6 g sucrose, completed to 200 mL with bidistilled water and autoclaved) and 2 µL proteinase K (10 mg/mL in bidistilled water previously autoclaved, as proteinase K cannot be autoclaved). Tissues were incubated in the solutions for 1-2 h in a water bath (62°-68 °C) or overnight at 37 °C. After incubation, the tissues were removed from the extraction solution (lysis buffer + proteinase K) and the solution heated to 92 °C for 10 min, for proteinase K inactivation. Then, the solution with the extracted DNA was stored in a refrigerator (4°-8 °C) or a freezer (-20 °C). This method does not require centrifugation or phenol/chloroform extraction. The reduced number of steps allowed us to sample many individuals/day. Whole mites and bee antennae were the most rapidly processed. All bee tissues gave the same quality DNA. This method, even using a single bee antenna or a single mite, was adequate for extraction and analysis of bee genomic and mitochondrial DNA and mite genomic DNA. PMID:24301746

  3. 5-Methylation of Cytosine in CG:CG Base-pair Steps: A Physicochemical Mechanism for the Epigenetic Control of DNA Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals density functional theory is integrated with analysis of a non-redundant set of protein-DNA crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database to study the stacking energetics of CG:CG base-pair steps, specifically the role of cytosine 5-methylation. Principal component analysis of the steps reveals the dominant collective motions to correspond to a tensile ‘opening’ mode and two shear ‘sliding’ and ‘tearing’ modes in the orthogonal plane. The stacking interactions of the methyl groups globally inhibit CG:CG step overtwisting while simultaneously softening the modes locally via potential energy modulations that create metastable states. Additionally, the indirect effects of the methyl groups on possible base-pair steps neighboring CG:CG are observed to be of comparable importance to their direct effects on CG:CG. The results have implications for the epigenetic control of DNA mechanics. PMID:24313757

  4. 5-Methylation of cytosine in CG:CG base-pair steps: a physicochemical mechanism for the epigenetic control of DNA nanomechanics.

    PubMed

    Yusufaly, Tahir I; Li, Yun; Olson, Wilma K

    2013-12-27

    van der Waals density functional theory is integrated with analysis of a non-redundant set of protein-DNA crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database to study the stacking energetics of CG:CG base-pair steps, specifically the role of cytosine 5-methylation. Principal component analysis of the steps reveals the dominant collective motions to correspond to a tensile "opening" mode and two shear "sliding" and "tearing" modes in the orthogonal plane. The stacking interactions of the methyl groups globally inhibit CG:CG step overtwisting while simultaneously softening the modes locally via potential energy modulations that create metastable states. Additionally, the indirect effects of the methyl groups on possible base-pair steps neighboring CG:CG are observed to be of comparable importance to their direct effects on CG:CG. The results have implications for the epigenetic control of DNA mechanics. PMID:24313757

  5. Comparison of different DNA-extraction techniques to investigate the bacterial community of marine copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Petra; Gerdts, Gunnar; Boersma, Maarten; Wiltshire, Karen H.; Wichels, Antje

    2010-12-01

    Marine zooplanktic organisms, such as copepods, are usually associated with large numbers of bacteria. Some of these bacteria live attached to copepods’ exoskeleton, while others prevail in their intestine and faecal pellets. Until now, general conclusions concerning the identity of these bacteria are problematic since the majority of previous studies focused on cultivable bacteria only. Hence, to date little is known on whether copepod genera or species harbour distinct bacterial populations and about the nature of this association. To shed more light on these copepod/bacteria consortia, the focus of this study was the development and evaluation of a suitable approach to extract bacterial DNA from different North Sea copepod genera. Furthermore, the bacterial DNA was analysed by PCR-DGGE and subsequent sequencing of excised bands. The result of this work was an appropriate extraction method for batches of ten to one copepod specimens and offered first insights as to which bacteria are attached to the copepods Acartia sp . and Temora sp . from Helgoland Roads (German Bight) and a laboratory-grown Acartia tonsa culture. It revealed the prevalence of Alphaproteobacteria.

  6. Determination of gold, indium, tellurium and thallium in the same sample digest of geological materials by atomic-absorption spectroscopy and two-step solvent extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubert, A.E.; Chao, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    A rock, soil, or stream-sediment sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric acid, aqua regia, and hydrobromic acid-bromine solution. Gold, thallium, indium and tellurium are separated and concentrated from the sample digest by a two-step MIBK extraction at two concentrations of hydrobromic add. Gold and thallium are first extracted from 0.1M hydrobromic acid medium, then indium and tellurium are extracted from 3M hydrobromic acid in the presence of ascorbic acid to eliminate iron interference. The elements are then determined by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The two-step solvent extraction can also be used in conjunction with electrothermal atomic-absorption methods to lower the detection limits for all four metals in geological materials. ?? 1985.

  7. No Evidence for Interference of Hematoxylin and Eosin (HE) Staining in DNA Testing: Utility of DNA Extraction from HE-Stained Archival Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Teppei; Shima, Kaori; Kuchiba, Aya; Yamauchi, Mai; Tanaka, Noriko; Imamura, Yu; Liao, Xiaoyun; Qian, Zhi Rong; Brahmandam, Mohan; Longtine, Janina A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ogino, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Although histochemical staining has been believed to inhibit DNA amplification reaction, no previous study has systematically evaluated the influence of histochemical staining on downstream molecular assays. To evaluate an influence of hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining on DNA testing, we isolated DNA from 10 unstained, 10 hematoxylin-stained, 10 eosin-stained or 10 HE-stained tissue sections (ie, 4 groups), from each of 5 colon cancers. Among those 4 groups, we did not observe any significant or appreciable difference in DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis; in DNA amplification by real-time PCR; in microsatellite PCR fragment analyses; or in PCR-Pyrosequencing. As a proof-of-principle study, we successfully performed microsatellite instability analysis and sequencing of KRAS and BRAF on over 1300 colorectal cancers using DNA extracted from HE stained tissue sections. Our data provide no evidence for interfering effect of HE staining on DNA testing, suggesting that DNA from HE-stained sections can be effectively used for routine DNA testing. PMID:22706867

  8. Extraction platform evaluations: a comparison of AutoMate Express™, EZ1® Advanced XL, and Maxwell® 16 Bench-top DNA extraction systems.

    PubMed

    Davis, Carey P; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce; Eisenberg, Arthur J; Turnbough, Meredith A

    2012-01-01

    The DNA extraction performance of three low-throughput extraction systems was evaluated. The instruments and respective chemistries all use a similar extraction methodology that involves binding DNA to a coated magnetic resin in the presence of chaotropic salt, washing of the resin to remove undesirable compounds, and elution of DNA from the particles in a low-salt solution. The AutoMate Express™ (Life Technologies Corporation, Carlsbad, CA), EZ1® Advanced XL (Qiagen Inc., Valencia, CA), and Maxwell® 16 (Promega Corporation, Madison, WI) were compared using a variety of samples including: blood on swabs, blood on denim, blood on cotton, blood mixed with inhibitors (a mixture of indigo, hematin, humic acid, and urban dust) on cotton, blood on FTA® paper, saliva residue on cigarette butt paper, epithelial cells on cotton swabs, neat semen on cotton, hair roots, bones, and teeth. Each instrument had a recommended pre-processing protocol for each sample type, and these protocols were followed strictly to reduce user bias. All extractions were performed in triplicate for each sample type. The three instruments were compared on the basis of quantity of DNA recovered (as determined by real-time PCR), relative level of inhibitors present in the extract (shown as shifts in the C(T) value for the internal PCR control in the real-time PCR assay), STR peak heights, use of consumables not included in the extraction kits, ease of use, and application flexibility. All three systems performed well; however extraction efficiency varied by sample type and with the preprocessing protocol applied to the various samples. PMID:22182593

  9. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  10. Multiplex PCR for the simultaneous identification and detection of Meloidogyne incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica using DNA extracted directly from individual galls.

    PubMed

    Hu, M X; Zhuo, K; Liao, J L

    2011-11-01

    Meloidogyne incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica are the most widespread species of root-knot nematodes in South China, affecting many economically important crops, ornamental plants, and fruit trees. In this study, one pair of Meloidogyne universal primers was designed and three pairs of species-specific primers were employed successfully to rapidly detect and identify M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA extracted from individual galls. Multiplex PCR from all M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica isolates generated two fragments of ≈500 and 1,000, 500 and 200, and 500 and 700 bp, respectively. The 500-bp fragment is the internal positive control fragment of rDNA 28S D2/D3 resulting from the use of the universal primers. Other Meloidogyne spp. included in this study generated only one fragment of ≈500 bp in size. Using this approach, M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica were identified and detected using DNA extracted directly from individual galls containing the Meloidogyne spp. at various stages of their life cycle. Moreover, the percentage of positive PCR amplification increased with nematode development and detection was usually easy after the late stage of the second-stage juvenile. The protocol was applied to galls from naturally infested roots and the results were found to be fast, sensitive, robust, and accurate. This present study is the first to provide a definitive diagnostic tool for M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica using DNA extracted directly from individual galls using a one-step multiplex PCR technique. PMID:21770774

  11. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of accuracy and automation. PMID:22947281

  12. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences.

    PubMed

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W; Taylor, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  13. Evaluating variation in human gut microbiota profiles due to DNA extraction method and inter-subject differences

    PubMed Central

    Wagner Mackenzie, Brett; Waite, David W.; Taylor, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    The human gut contains dense and diverse microbial communities which have profound influences on human health. Gaining meaningful insights into these communities requires provision of high quality microbial nucleic acids from human fecal samples, as well as an understanding of the sources of variation and their impacts on the experimental model. We present here a systematic analysis of commonly used microbial DNA extraction methods, and identify significant sources of variation. Five extraction methods (Human Microbiome Project protocol, MoBio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep, phenol:chloroform-based DNA isolation) were evaluated based on the following criteria: DNA yield, quality and integrity, and microbial community structure based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the V4 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. Our results indicate that the largest portion of variation within the model was attributed to differences between subjects (biological variation), with a smaller proportion of variation associated with DNA extraction method (technical variation) and intra-subject variation. A comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of technical variation on the human gut microbiota will help limit preventable bias, enabling more accurate diversity estimates. PMID:25741335

  14. Simplified protocol for DNA extraction and amplification of 2 molecular markers to detect and type Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Uda-Shimoda, Carla Fernanda; Colli, Cristiane Maria; Pavanelli, Mariana Felgueira; Falavigna-Guilherme, Ana Lúcia; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of 3 kits: QIAmp® DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), PureLink PCR Purification®, and PureLink™ Genomic DNA® (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) for DNA extraction, and of 2 molecular markers (heat shock protein [HSP] and ?-giardin genes) for detection and genotyping of Giardia duodenalis stool samples. The detection and typing limits of the markers were determined by the DNA concentration of trophozoites and cysts and were tested in 26 clinical samples. Of the 3 kits tested, the PureLink PCR Purification gave the best results when tested with clinical samples with low, intermediate, and high numbers of cysts. The DNA extracted from trophozoites and cysts was diluted successively in 1:2 ratios until it was no longer possible to observe the amplified product in polyacrylamide gel. Similarly, a suspension of cysts was diluted until no cysts were observed, and then the DNA was extracted. The amount of DNA of trophozoites and cysts for the typing of the parasite was smaller for the HSP marker than for ?-giardin. Combined use of both markers allowed us to detect DNA of Giardia in parasitologically positive samples in a higher percentage (75%) than the results obtained for each marker and in 1 parasitologically negative sample, indicating that this combination increased the potential to accurately detect and genotype this parasite. We also concluded that the HSP marker has a higher limit of detection and typing than the ?-giardin marker and that the DNA extraction method tested for G. duodenalis is simpler and more efficient than those that are currently in use and can be applied on a large scale. PMID:24207076

  15. Technical Reproducibility of Single-Nucleotide and Size-Based DNA Biomarker Assessment Using DNA Extracted from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shenli; Tan, Iain B.; Sapari, Nur S.; Grabsch, Heike I.; Okines, Alicia; Smyth, Elizabeth C.; Aoyama, Toru; Hewitt, Lindsay C.; Inam, Imran; Bottomley, Dan; Nankivell, Matthew; Stenning, Sally P.; Cunningham, David; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Tsuburaya, Akira; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Soong, Richie; Tan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues has been used in the past to analyze genetic polymorphisms. We evaluated the technical reproducibility of different types of assays for gene polymorphisms using DNA extracted from FFPE material. By using the MassARRAY iPLEX system, we investigated polymorphisms in DPYD (rs1801159 and rs3918290), UMPS (rs1801019), ERCC1 (rs11615), ERCC1 (rs3212986), and ERCC2 (rs13181) in 56 FFPE DNA samples. By using PCR, followed by size-based gel electrophoresis, we also examined TYMS 5? untranslated region 2R/3R repeats and GSTT1 deletions in 50 FFPE DNA samples and 34 DNAs extracted from fresh-frozen tissues and cell lines. Each polymorphism was analyzed by two independent runs. We found that iPLEX biomarker assays measuring single-nucleotide polymorphisms provided consistent concordant results. However, by using FFPE DNA, size-based PCR biomarkers (GSTT1 and TYMS 5? untranslated region) were discrepant in 32.7% (16/49, with exact 95% CI, 19.9%–47.5%; exact binomial confidence limit test) and 4.2% (2/48, with exact 95% CI, 0.5%–14.3%) of cases, respectively, whereas no discrepancies were observed using intact genomic DNA. Our findings suggest that DNA from FFPE material can be used to reliably test single-nucleotide polymorphisms. However, results based on size-based PCR biomarkers, and particularly GSTT1 deletions, using FFPE DNA need to be interpreted with caution. Independent repeated assays should be performed on all cases to assess potential discrepancies. PMID:25746798

  16. Technical reproducibility of single-nucleotide and size-based DNA biomarker assessment using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenli; Tan, Iain B; Sapari, Nur S; Grabsch, Heike I; Okines, Alicia; Smyth, Elizabeth C; Aoyama, Toru; Hewitt, Lindsay C; Inam, Imran; Bottomley, Dan; Nankivell, Matthew; Stenning, Sally P; Cunningham, David; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Tsuburaya, Akira; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Soong, Richie; Tan, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues has been used in the past to analyze genetic polymorphisms. We evaluated the technical reproducibility of different types of assays for gene polymorphisms using DNA extracted from FFPE material. By using the MassARRAY iPLEX system, we investigated polymorphisms in DPYD (rs1801159 and rs3918290), UMPS (rs1801019), ERCC1 (rs11615), ERCC1 (rs3212986), and ERCC2 (rs13181) in 56 FFPE DNA samples. By using PCR, followed by size-based gel electrophoresis, we also examined TYMS 5' untranslated region 2R/3R repeats and GSTT1 deletions in 50 FFPE DNA samples and 34 DNAs extracted from fresh-frozen tissues and cell lines. Each polymorphism was analyzed by two independent runs. We found that iPLEX biomarker assays measuring single-nucleotide polymorphisms provided consistent concordant results. However, by using FFPE DNA, size-based PCR biomarkers (GSTT1 and TYMS 5' untranslated region) were discrepant in 32.7% (16/49, with exact 95% CI, 19.9%-47.5%; exact binomial confidence limit test) and 4.2% (2/48, with exact 95% CI, 0.5%-14.3%) of cases, respectively, whereas no discrepancies were observed using intact genomic DNA. Our findings suggest that DNA from FFPE material can be used to reliably test single-nucleotide polymorphisms. However, results based on size-based PCR biomarkers, and particularly GSTT1 deletions, using FFPE DNA need to be interpreted with caution. Independent repeated assays should be performed on all cases to assess potential discrepancies. PMID:25746798

  17. Detection of tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus by PCR without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Ieamkhang, Supaporn; Riangwong, Lumpueng; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan

    2005-11-01

    We report the simple and rapid method for detection of tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus (TYLCTHV) based on the direct capture of virus particles to the surface of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tube. This method allowed PCR without the time-consuming procedures of DNA extraction from infected plant tissue. A small amount of tomato tissue (approximately 10 mg) was ground in extraction buffer to release viruses from plant tissues. The constituents of the plant extract that might inhibit PCR activity were discarded by washing the tube with PBST buffer before adding the PCR mixture to the tube. This method was used for detection of TYLCTHV with plant sap solution diluted up to 1:20,000 and was more sensitive than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. In addition, this method can be used for detection of TYLCTHV in viruliferous whiteflies. The PCR tubes with captured TYLCTHV could be used for PCR, after storage at 4 degrees C for 4 wk. The method presented here was used for detection of begomoviruses in cucurbit and pepper. In addition, this method was effectively used to detect papaya ringspot virus in papaya and zucchini yellow mosaic virus in cucumber by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. PMID:16230773

  18. Meta-barcoded evaluation of the ISO standard 11063 DNA extraction procedure to characterize soil bacterial and fungal community diversity and composition

    PubMed Central

    Terrat, Sebastien; Plassart, Pierre; Bourgeois, Emilie; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Adele-Dit-De-Renseville, Nathalie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Bispo, Antonio; Chabbi, Abad; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Ranjard, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of three soil DNA extraction procedures, namely the International Organization for Standardization (ISO-11063, GnS-GII and modified ISO procedure (ISOm), on the taxonomic diversity and composition of soil bacterial and fungal communities. The efficacy of each soil DNA extraction method was assessed on five soils, differing in their physico-chemical characteristics and land use. A meta-barcoded pyrosequencing approach targeting 16S and 18S rRNA genes was applied to characterize soil microbial communities. We first observed that the GnS-GII introduced some heterogeneity in bacterial composition between replicates. Then, although no major difference was observed between extraction procedures for soil bacterial diversity, we saw that the number of fungal genera could be underestimated by the ISO-11063. In particular, this procedure underestimated the detection in several soils of the genera Cryptococcus, Pseudallescheria, Hypocrea and Plectosphaerella, which are of ecological interest. Based on these results, we recommend using the ISOm method for studies focusing on both the bacterial and fungal communities. Indeed, the ISOm procedure provides a better evaluation of bacterial and fungal communities and is limited to the modification of the mechanical lysis step of the existing ISO-11063 standard. PMID:25195809

  19. Meta-barcoded evaluation of the ISO standard 11063 DNA extraction procedure to characterize soil bacterial and fungal community diversity and composition.

    PubMed

    Terrat, Sebastien; Plassart, Pierre; Bourgeois, Emilie; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Dequiedt, Samuel; Adele-Dit-De-Renseville, Nathalie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Bispo, Antonio; Chabbi, Abad; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Ranjard, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of three soil DNA extraction procedures, namely the International Organization for Standardization (ISO-11063, GnS-GII and modified ISO procedure (ISOm), on the taxonomic diversity and composition of soil bacterial and fungal communities. The efficacy of each soil DNA extraction method was assessed on five soils, differing in their physico-chemical characteristics and land use. A meta-barcoded pyrosequencing approach targeting 16S and 18S rRNA genes was applied to characterize soil microbial communities. We first observed that the GnS-GII introduced some heterogeneity in bacterial composition between replicates. Then, although no major difference was observed between extraction procedures for soil bacterial diversity, we saw that the number of fungal genera could be underestimated by the ISO-11063. In particular, this procedure underestimated the detection in several soils of the genera Cryptococcus, Pseudallescheria, Hypocrea and Plectosphaerella, which are of ecological interest. Based on these results, we recommend using the ISOm method for studies focusing on both the bacterial and fungal communities. Indeed, the ISOm procedure provides a better evaluation of bacterial and fungal communities and is limited to the modification of the mechanical lysis step of the existing ISO-11063 standard. PMID:25195809

  20. Comparative analysis of four methods to extract DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues: effect on downstream molecular applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A large portion of tissues stored worldwide for diagnostic purposes is formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE). These FFPE-archived tissues are an extremely valuable source for retrospective (genetic) studies. These include mutation screening in cancer-critical genes as well as pathogen detection. In this study we evaluated the impact of several widely used DNA extraction methods on the quality of molecular diagnostics on FFPE tissues. Findings We compared 4 DNA extraction methods from 4 identically processed FFPE mammary-, prostate-, colon- and lung tissues with regard to PCR inhibition, real time SNP detection and amplifiable fragment size. The extraction methods, with and without proteinase K pre-treatment, tested were: 1) heat-treatment, 2) QIAamp DNA-blood-mini-kit, 3) EasyMAG NucliSens and 4) Gentra Capture-Column-kit. Amplifiable DNA fragment size was assessed by multiplexed 200-400-600 bp PCR and appeared highly influenced by the extraction method used. Proteinase K pre-treatment was a prerequisite for proper purification of DNA from FFPE. Extractions with QIAamp, EasyMAG and heat-treatment were found suitable for amplification of fragments up to 400 bp from all tissues, 600 bp amplification was marginally successful (best was QIAamp). QIAamp and EasyMAG extracts were found suitable for downstream real time SNP detection. Gentra extraction was unsuitable. Hands-on time was lowest for heat-treatment, followed by EasyMAG. Conclusions We conclude that the extraction method plays an important role with regard to performance in downstream molecular applications. PMID:20840759

  1. Cyclin B-Cdk1 Kinase Stimulates ORC- and Cdc6-Independent Steps of Semiconservative Plasmid Replication in Yeast Nuclear Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Duncker, Bernard P.; Pasero, Philippe; Braguglia, Diego; Heun, Patrick; Weinreich, Michael; Gasser, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells synchronized in S phase support the semiconservative replication of supercoiled plasmids in vitro. We examined the dependence of this reaction on the prereplicative complex that assembles at yeast origins and on S-phase kinases that trigger initiation in vivo. We found that replication in nuclear extracts initiates independently of the origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6p, and an autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) consensus. Nonetheless, quantitative density gradient analysis showed that S- and M-phase nuclear extracts consistently promote semiconservative DNA replication more efficiently than G1-phase extracts. The observed semiconservative replication is compromised in S-phase nuclear extracts deficient for the Cdk1 kinase (Cdc28p) but not in extracts deficient for the Cdc7p kinase. In a cdc4-1 G1-phase extract, which accumulates high levels of the specific Clb-Cdk1 inhibitor p40SIC1, very low levels of semiconservative DNA replication were detected. Recombinant Clb5-Cdc28 restores replication in a cdc28-4 S-phase extract yet fails to do so in the cdc4-1 G1-phase extract. In contrast, the addition of recombinant Xenopus CycB-Cdc2, which is not sensitive to inhibition by p40SIC1, restores efficient replication to both extracts. Our results suggest that in addition to its well-characterized role in regulating the origin-specific prereplication complex, the Clb-Cdk1 complex modulates the efficiency of the replication machinery itself. PMID:9891057

  2. Ethanolic extract of the Goldenseal, Hydrastis canadensis, has demonstrable chemopreventive effects on HeLa cells in vitro: Drug-DNA interaction with calf thymus DNA as target.

    PubMed

    Saha, Santu Kumar; Sikdar, Sourav; Mukherjee, Avinaba; Bhadra, Kakali; Boujedaini, Naoual; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-07-01

    This study tested chemotherapeutic potential of Hydrastis canadensis (HC) extract in HeLa cells in vitro, with emphasis on its drug-DNA interaction and apoptosis induction ability. Nuclear uptake of HC by DAPI, Ao/Eb staining and internucleosomal DNA damage by comet assay was studied through fluorescence microscopy. Possible changes in MMP and apoptotic signalling events were critically analyzed. Cell cycle progression studied through FACS and fragmented DNA through "TUNEL" assay were critically analyzed. RT-PCR studies were conducted for analyzing Cyt-C and Bax translocation in mitochondrial and cytosolic extracts, and Caspase 3 in whole cell lysate. Role of p53-mediated regulation of NF-?? and TNF-? was elucidated by Western blot analysis. Data of CD and Tm profile of CT-DNA were analyzed. Overall results indicated anti-cancer potential of HC through its ability to induce apoptosis, and interaction with CT-DNA that changed structural conformation of DNA, proving HC to be a promising candidate for chemoprevention. PMID:23628949

  3. Sensing cocaine in saliva with attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy combined with a one-step extraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, Kerstin M.-C.; Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-03-01

    On-site drug tests have gained importance, e.g., for protecting the society from impaired drivers. Since today's drug tests are majorly only positive/negative, there is a great need for a reliable, portable and preferentially quantitative drug test. In the project IrSens we aim to bridge this gap with the development of an optical sensor platform based on infrared spectroscopy and focus on cocaine detection in saliva. We combine a one-step extraction method, a sample drying technique and infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy. As a first step we have developed an extraction technique that allows us to extract cocaine from saliva to an almost infrared-transparent solvent and to record ATR spectra with a commercially available Fourier Transform-infrared spectrometer. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that such a simple and easy-to-use one-step extraction method is used to transfer cocaine from saliva into an organic solvent and detect it quantitatively. With this new method we are able to reach a current limit of detection around 10 μg/ml. This new extraction method could also be applied to waste water monitoring and controlling caffeine content in beverages.

  4. 5-Methylation of Cytosine in CG:CG Base-Pair Steps: A Physicochemical Mechanism for the Epigenetic Control of DNA Nanomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Olson, Wilma; Li, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals density functional theory is integrated with analysis of a non-redundant set of protein-DNA crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database to study the stacking energetics of CG:CG base-pair steps, specifically the role of cytosine 5-methylation. Principal component analysis of the steps reveals the dominant collective motions to correspond to a tensile ``opening'' mode and two shear ``sliding'' and ``tearing'' modes in the orthogonal plane. The stacking interactions of the methyl groups are observed to globally inhibit CG:CG step overtwisting while simultaneously softening the modes locally via potential energy modulations that create metastable states. The results have implications for the epigenetic control of DNA mechanics.

  5. Comparison of commercial extraction systems and PCR assays for quantification of Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Germi, Raphaële; Lupo, Julien; Semenova, Touyana; Larrat, Sylvie; Magnat, Nelly; Grossi, Laurence; Seigneurin, Jean-Marie; Morand, Patrice

    2012-04-01

    The automation of DNA extraction and the use of commercial quantitative real-time PCR assays could help obtain more reliable results for the quantification of Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads (EBV VL). This study compared two automated extraction platforms and two commercial PCRs for measurement of EBV VL in 10 EBV specimens from Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) and in 200 whole-blood (WB) specimens from transplant (n = 137) and nontransplant (n = 63) patients. The WB specimens were extracted using the QIAcube or MagNA Pure instrument; VL were quantified with the EBV R-gene quantification kit (Argene) or the artus EBV RG PCR kit (Qiagen) on the Rotor-Gene 6000 real-time analyzer; and the results were compared with those of a laboratory-developed PCR. DNA was extracted from the QCMD specimens by use of the QIAamp DNA minikit and was quantified by the three PCR assays. The extraction platforms and the PCR assays showed good correlation (R, >0.9; P, <0.0001), but as many as 10% discordant results were observed, mostly for low viral loads (<3 log(10) copies/ml), and standard deviations reached as high as 0.49 log(10) copy/ml. In WB but not in QCMD samples, Argene PCR tended to give higher VL values than artus PCR or the laboratory-developed PCR (mean difference for the 200 WB VL, -0.42 or -0.36, respectively). In conclusion, the two automated extraction platforms and the two PCRs provided reliable and comparable VL results, but differences greater than 0.5 log(10) copy/ml remained between the two commercial PCRs after common DNA extraction. PMID:22238432

  6. Selective Single-Step Separation of a Mixture of Three Metal Ions by a Triphasic Ionic-Liquid-Water-Ionic-Liquid Solvent Extraction System.

    PubMed

    Vander Hoogerstraete, Tom; Blockx, Jonas; De Coster, Hendrik; Binnemans, Koen

    2015-08-10

    In a conventional solvent extraction system, metal ions are distributed between two immiscible phases, typically an aqueous and an organic phase. In this paper, the proof-of-principle is given for the distribution of metal ions between three immiscible phases, two ionic liquid phases with an aqueous phase in between them. Three-liquid-phase solvent extraction allows separation of a mixture of three metal ions in a single step, whereas at least two steps are required to separate three metals in the case of two-liquid-phase solvent extraction. In the triphasic system, the lower organic phase is comprised of the ionic liquid betainium- or choline bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, whereas the upper organic phase is comprised of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide. The triphasic system was used for the separation of a mixture of tin(II), yttrium(III), and scandium(III) ions. PMID:26178665

  7. Enhanced DPPH radical scavenging activity and DNA protection effect of litchi pericarp extract by Aspergillus awamori bioconversion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) pericarp is a major byproduct which contains a significant amount of polyphenol. This study was designed to biotransformation litchi pericarp extract (LPE) by Aspergillus awamori to produce more bioactive compounds with stronger antioxidant activities. Results The study exhibited that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activities significantly (p < 0.05) increased from 15.53% to 18.23% in the water-extracted fraction and from 25.41% to 36.82% in the ethyl acetate-extracted fraction. Application of DNA cleavage assay further demonstrated the enhanced protection effect of the fermented phenolics on DNA damage. It is also noted that the water-extracted fraction of the fermented LPE possessed a much stronger capacity than the ethyl acetate-extracted fraction to prevent from damage of supercoiled DNA. Interestingly, it was found that some new compounds such as catechin and quercetin appeared after of A. awamori fermentation of LPE, which could account for the enhanced antioxidant activity. Conclusion The DPPH radical scavenging activity and DNA protection effect of LPE were increased by Aspergillus awamori bioconversion while some compounds responsible for the enhanced antioxidant activity were identified. This study provided an effective way of utilizing fruit pericarp as a readily accessible source of the natural antioxidants in food industry and, thus, extended the application area such as fruit by-products. PMID:23016522

  8. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    2012-04-01

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study, DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples; however, differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six different primer pairs targeting 16S rRNA genes of significant bacterial groups, and the community composition was evaluated by comparing specific ratios of the calculated abundances. In seven of nine cases, the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene ratio was significantly higher in fecal samples that had been frozen compared to identical samples that had not. This effect was further supported by qPCR analysis of bacterial groups within these two phyla. The results demonstrate that storage conditions of fecal samples may adversely affect the determined Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio, which is a frequently used biomarker in gut microbiology. PMID:22325006

  9. Ion-Channel Genosensor for the Detection of Specific DNA Sequences Derived from Plum Pox Virus in Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Malecka, Kamila; Michalczuk, Lech; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    A DNA biosensor for detection of specific oligonucleotides sequences of Plum Pox Virus (PPV) in plant extracts and buffer is proposed. The working principles of a genosensor are based on the ion-channel mechanism. The NH2-ssDNA probe was deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface to form an amide bond between the carboxyl group of oxidized electrode surface and amino group from ssDNA probe. The analytical signals generated as a result of hybridization were registered in Osteryoung square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− as a redox marker. The 22-mer and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences derived from PPV and DNA samples from plants infected with PPV were used as targets. Similar detection limits of 2.4 pM (31.0 pg/mL) and 2.3 pM (29.5 pg/mL) in the concentration range 1–8 pM were observed in the presence of the 22-mer ssDNA and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences of PPV, respectively. The genosensor was capable of discriminating between samples consisting of extracts from healthy plants and leaf extracts from infected plants in the concentration range 10–50 pg/mL. The detection limit was 12.8 pg/mL. The genosensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity. The 20-mer partially complementary DNA sequences with four complementary bases and DNA samples from healthy plants used as negative controls generated low signal. PMID:25302809

  10. What do results of common sequential fractionation and single-step extractions tell us about P binding with Fe and Al compounds in non-calcareous sediments?

    PubMed

    Jan, Ji?í; Borovec, Jakub; Kopá?ek, Ji?í; Hejzlar, Josef

    2013-02-01

    Correct identification of P forms together with their main Fe and Al binding partners in non-calcareous sediments is of crucial importance for evaluation of P cycling in water bodies. In this paper, we assess extraction methods frequently used for this purpose, i.e., a sequential five-step fractionation (water, bicarbonate buffered dithionite solution (BD), NaOH, HCl, nitric-perchloric acid), ascorbate extraction (pH ~7.5), and oxalate extraction (pH ~3), directly on a range of laboratory prepared Fe and Al minerals enriched with adsorbed P. Extraction selectivity and efficiency for particular P, Fe and Al forms were also verified by specific combinations of these extraction methods applied on freshwater sediment samples. In the sequential fractionation, BD was highly effective in dissolving both amorphous and crystalline Fe (hydr)oxides and the associated P, while neither FeS nor Al (hydr)oxides were dissolved. The following NaOH extraction effectively dissolved both amorphous and crystalline Al (hydr)oxides. The high solubilizing power of BD and NaOH to dissolve crystalline Fe and Al oxides that have only a small P-sorption ability prevents the use of resulting Fe/P and Al/P ratios as simple predictors of total P sorption capacity of sediments and soils. Ascorbate non-selectively extracted small proportions of FeS and amorphous Fe and Al (hydr)oxides, but significant amounts of adsorbed P, which hinders its use for the characterization of P forms in non-calcareous sediments. Similar nonselective characteristics were found for oxalate extractions. As oxalate extracts most of the adsorbed phosphate, it is not possible to use it unambiguously to determine specific Fe/P and Al/P ratios of active complexes. However, this method is convenient (and more selective than NaOH step in the sequential fractionation) for the determination of amorphous Al (hydr)oxides. PMID:23218245

  11. Extraction of transcription regulatory signals from genome-wide DNA–protein interaction data

    PubMed Central

    Garten, Yael; Kaplan, Shai; Pilpel, Yitzhak

    2005-01-01

    Deciphering gene regulatory network architecture amounts to the identification of the regulators, conditions in which they act, genes they regulate, cis-acting motifs they bind, expression profiles they dictate and more complex relationships between alternative regulatory partnerships and alternative regulatory motifs that give rise to sub-modalities of expression profiles. The ‘location data’ in yeast is a comprehensive resource that provides transcription factor–DNA interaction information in vivo. Here, we provide two contributions: first, we developed means to assess the extent of noise in the location data, and consequently for extracting signals from it. Second, we couple signal extraction with better characterization of the genetic network architecture. We apply two methods for the detection of combinatorial associations between transcription factors (TFs), the integration of which provides a global map of combinatorial regulatory interactions. We discover the capacity of regulatory motifs and TF partnerships to dictate fine-tuned expression patterns of subsets of genes, which are clearly distinct from those displayed by most genes assigned to the same TF. Our findings provide carefully prioritized, high-quality assignments between regulators and regulated genes and as such should prove useful for experimental and computational biologists alike. PMID:15684410

  12. Extracting kinetics from single-molecule force spectroscopy: nanopore unzipping of DNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Dudko, Olga K; Mathé, Jérôme; Szabo, Attila; Meller, Amit; Hummer, Gerhard

    2007-06-15

    Single-molecule force experiments provide powerful new tools to explore biomolecular interactions. Here, we describe a systematic procedure for extracting kinetic information from force-spectroscopy experiments, and apply it to nanopore unzipping of individual DNA hairpins. Two types of measurements are considered: unzipping at constant voltage, and unzipping at constant voltage-ramp speeds. We perform a global maximum-likelihood analysis of the experimental data at low-to-intermediate ramp speeds. To validate the theoretical models, we compare their predictions with two independent sets of data, collected at high ramp speeds and at constant voltage, by using a quantitative relation between the two types of measurements. Microscopic approaches based on Kramers theory of diffusive barrier crossing allow us to estimate not only intrinsic rates and transition state locations, as in the widely used phenomenological approach based on Bell's formula, but also free energies of activation. The problem of extracting unique and accurate kinetic parameters of a molecular transition is discussed in light of the apparent success of the microscopic theories in reproducing the experimental data. PMID:17384066

  13. Detection of polychlorinated biphenyl degradation genes in polluted sediments by direct DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Erb, R W; Wagner-Döbler, I

    1993-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to specifically detect the DNA sequences for the bphC gene, the meta-cleavage enzyme of the aerobic catabolic pathway for biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyl degradation, in aquatic sediments without prior cultivation of microorganisms by using extraction of total DNA, PCR amplification of bphC sequences, and detection with specific gene probes. The direct DNA extraction protocol used was modified to enhance lysis efficiency. Crude extracts of DNA were further purified by gel filtration, which yielded DNA that could be used for the PCR. PCR primers were designed for conserved regions of the bphC gene from a sequence alignment of five known sequences. The specificity of PCR amplification was verified by using digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes which were located internal to the amplified gene sequence. The detection limit for the bphC gene of Pseudomonas paucimobilis Q1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 was 100 cells per g (wet weight) or approximately five copies of the target sequence per PCR reaction mixture. In total-DNA extracts of aerobic top layers of sediment samples obtained from three different sampling sites along the Elbe River, which has a long history of anthropogenic pollution, Pseudomonas sp. strain LB 400-like sequences for the bphC gene were detected, but P. paucimobilis Q1 sequences were not detected. No bphC sequences were detected in an unpolluted lake sediment. A restriction analysis did not reveal any heterogeneity in the PCR product, and the possibility that sequences highly related to the bphC gene (namely, nahC and todE) were present was excluded.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8285706

  14. Short Communication An efficient method for simultaneous extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from various plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R R; Viana, A J C; Reátegui, A C E; Vincentz, M G A

    2015-01-01

    Determination of gene expression is an important tool to study biological processes and relies on the quality of the extracted RNA. Changes in gene expression profiles may be directly related to mutations in regulatory DNA sequences or alterations in DNA cytosine methylation, which is an epigenetic mark. Correlation of gene expression with DNA sequence or epigenetic mark polymorphism is often desirable; for this, a robust protocol to isolate high-quality RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample is required. Although commercial kits and protocols are available, they are mainly optimized for animal tissues and, in general, restricted to RNA or DNA extraction, not both. In the present study, we describe an efficient and accessible method to extract both RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample of various plant tissues, using small amounts of starting material. The protocol was efficient in the extraction of high-quality nucleic acids from several Arabidopsis thaliana tissues (e.g., leaf, inflorescence stem, flower, fruit, cotyledon, seedlings, root, and embryo) and from other tissues of non-model plants, such as Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae), Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), Paspalum notatum (Poaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae). The obtained nucleic acids were used as templates for downstream analyses, such as mRNA sequencing, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite treatment, and others; the results were comparable to those obtained with commercial kits. We believe that this protocol could be applied to a broad range of plant species, help avoid technical and sampling biases, and facilitate several RNA- and DNA-dependent analyses. PMID:26782533

  15. Novel DNA Extraction Method Unveiled the Ancient Hot Deep Biosphere Concealed in Terrestrial Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouduka, M.; Suko, T.; Okuzawa, K.; Fukuda, A.; Nanba, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Sakata, S.; Ito, K.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-12-01

    It has been proposed that the hot deep biosphere is distributed deeply in the crust of the Earth. Below the upper limit of life, prokaryotic habitats extend at a depth of 4 km within a typical range of thermal gradients (2.5-3°C/100m). In contrary, large geothermal gradients allow the hot deep biosphere approaching to the Earth’s surface. We conducted aseptic and deoxygenated drilling targeting Miocene marine siliceous rocks in a tectonically stable inland fore-arc basin in central Japan. Although the in-situ groundwater temperature was 30.2°C at a maximum drilling depth of 352 mbgl, opal-CT and clinoptilolite, which commonly form as a result of progressive burial at 30-60°C and over 70°C, respectively, were detected by XRD analysis. However, burial-driven degradation and transformation of sterols (sterene to sterane) was not evident in the core samples. As presented by Y. Suzuki et al. in this meeting, extant microbial populations were dominated by Pseudomonas spp. and Flavobacterium spp. with cell numbers ranging ~107-108 cells/cm3 rock. Despite the abundance of microbial cells, DNA were not extracted from the core samples by conventional methods. We developed a DNA extraction method to avoid binding of DNA onto the siliceous mineral matrix by heating under alkaline conditions, which resulted in the successful retrieval of PCR-amplifiable DNA. Unexpectedly, 16S rRNA gene sequences closely related thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Thermus thermophilus were dominant in the clone libraries from 300- and 350-m deep core samples, while those almost identical to the Pseudomonas spp. were minor. Based on the correlation between the GC contents of 16S rRNA gene sequences and growth temperatures of prokaryotes, the estimated growth temperatures were 90.0°C (G+C=66.3%) and 67.5°C (G+C=61.3%) for G. stearothermophilus and T. thermophilus, respectively. From these results, it is implied that temperature rise in the past led to the colonization o