Sample records for dna extraction step

  1. An improved protocol and a new grinding device for extraction of genomic DNA from microorganisms by a two-step extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S S; Chen, D; Lu, Q

    2012-01-01

    Current protocols to extract genomic DNA from microorganisms are still laborious, tedious and costly, especially for the species with thick cell walls. In order to improve the effectiveness of extracting DNA from microbial samples, a novel protocol, defined as two-step extraction method, along with an improved tissue-grinding device, was developed. The protocol included two steps, disruption of microbial cells or spores by grinding the sample together with silica sand in a new device and extraction of DNA with an effective buffer containing cell lysis chemicals. The device was prepared by using a commercial electric mini-grinder, adapted with a grinding stone, and a sample cup processed by lathing from a polytetrafluoroethylene rod. We tested the method with vegetative cells of four microbial species and two microbial spores that have thick cell walls and are therefore hard to process; these included Escherichia coli JM109, Bacillus subtilis WB600, Sacchromyces cerevisiae INVSc1, Trichoderma viride AS3.3711, and the spores of S. cerevisiae and T. viride, respectively, representing Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, yeast, filamentous fungi. We found that this new method and device extracted usable quantities of genomic DNA from the samples. The DNA fragments that were extracted exceeded 23 kb. The target sequences up to about 5 kb were successfully and exclusively amplified by PCR using extracted DNA as the template. In addition, the DNA extraction was finalized within 1.5 h. Thus, we conclude that this two-step extraction method is an effective and improved protocol for extraction of genomic DNA from microbial samples. PMID:22653603

  2. DNA Extraction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Teachers' Domain presents this interactive, adapted from the University of Nebraska's Plant and Soil Science eLibrary, with reading material and animations to help students learn the basics of DNA extraction. The lesson is divided into and introduction and the four processes involved: cell lysis, dismantling the cell membrane, removing unwanted cell parts, and precipitating the DNA. On the site, visitors will also find a supplemental background essay, discussion questions, and standards alignment from Teachers' Domain.

  3. Extracting DNA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Netlinks

    2002-03-28

    This lesson for students in grades 9-12 introduces DNA, genes, chromosomes, the chemicals that make up DNA. After the basic information, students will do an experiment in which they will separate out DNA from peas. Knowing that DNA can be separated will give them a base of understanding for future lessons in biology, evolution, biotechnology, and health technology.

  4. Stepping stones in DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Stranneheim, Henrik; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there have been tremendous advances in our ability to rapidly and cost-effectively sequence DNA. This has revolutionized the fields of genetics and biology, leading to a deeper understanding of the molecular events in life processes. The rapid technological advances have enormously expanded sequencing opportunities and applications, but also imposed strains and challenges on steps prior to sequencing and in the downstream process of handling and analysis of these massive amounts of sequence data. Traditionally, sequencing has been limited to small DNA fragments of approximately one thousand bases (derived from the organism's genome) due to issues in maintaining a high sequence quality and accuracy for longer read lengths. Although many technological breakthroughs have been made, currently the commercially available massively parallel sequencing methods have not been able to resolve this issue. However, recent announcements in nanopore sequencing hold the promise of removing this read-length limitation, enabling sequencing of larger intact DNA fragments. The ability to sequence longer intact DNA with high accuracy is a major stepping stone towards greatly simplifying the downstream analysis and increasing the power of sequencing compared to today. This review covers some of the technical advances in sequencing that have opened up new frontiers in genomics. PMID:22887891

  5. Introduction to DNA Extractions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hays, Lana

    This lab exercise, authored by Lana Hays of Access Excellence at the National Health Museum, giving instructions for the extraction of DNA from several different starting materials. The lab employs everyday material which can be found at your local grocery store. The exercise is designed for the 6-12 grade level.

  6. Development of a rapid DNA extraction method and one-step nested PCR for the detection of Naegleria fowleri from the environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Arine Fadzlun; Lonnen, James; Andrew, Peter W; Kilvington, Simon

    2011-10-15

    Naegleria fowleri is a small free-living amoebo-flagellate found in natural and manmade thermal aquatic habitats worldwide. The organism is pathogenic to man causing fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Infection typically results from bathing in contaminated water and is usually fatal. It is, therefore, important to identify sites containing N. fowleri in the interests of preventive public health microbiology. Culture of environmental material is the conventional method for the isolation of N. fowleri but requires several days incubation and subsequent biochemical or molecular tests to confirm identification. Here, a nested one-step PCR test, in conjunction with a direct DNA extraction from water or sediment material, was developed for the rapid and reliable detection of N. fowleri from the environment. Here, the assay detected N, fowleri in 18/109 river water samples associated with a nuclear power plant in South West France and 0/10 from a similar site in the UK. Although culture of samples yielded numerous thermophilic free-living amoebae, none were N. fowleri or other thermophilic Naegleria spp. The availability of a rapid, reliable and sensitive one-step nested PCR method for the direct detection of N. fowleri from the environment may aid ecological studies and enable intervention to prevent PAM cases. PMID:21855956

  7. Automated DNA extraction for large numbers of plant samples.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Nataša; Nikoli?, Petra; Rupar, Matevž; Boben, Jana; Ravnikar, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The method described here is a rapid, total DNA extraction procedure applicable to a large number of plant samples requiring pathogen detection. The procedure combines a simple and quick homogenization step of crude extracts with DNA extraction based upon the binding of DNA to magnetic beads. DNA is purified in an automated process in which the magnetic beads are transferred through a series of washing buffers. The eluted DNA is suitable for efficient amplification in PCR reactions. PMID:22987412

  8. Back to basics: an evaluation of NaOH and alternative rapid DNA extraction protocols for DNA barcoding, genotyping,

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Back to basics: an evaluation of NaOH and alternative rapid DNA extraction protocols for DNA for population genetics and epidemiology, rapid and dependable DNA extraction methods scalable from one-step extraction (ROSE), Chelex 100, proteinase K) for their ability to obtain DNA of quantity and quality suitable

  9. DNA Extraction & Staging Laboratory (DESL)

    Cancer.gov

    As part of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR), the DNA Extraction and Staging Laboratory (DESL) located in Frederick, MD, is responsible for the preparation of samples for investigators at NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG).

  10. Extracting the Max From a DNA Extraction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Edmund Marek

    2009-01-01

    Students of all ages get a thrill out of actually seeing clumps or strands of DNA. The Biotechnology/Bioinformatics Discovery! Project, a professional development workshop offered to science teachers, has always included a DNA-extraction activity. Over the course of four years, as the authors conducted these workshops for scores of teachers, they extended and refined the DNA-extraction activity to make it relevant to middle school students. Although the protocol for this exercise is on their project website along with teaching tips, they describe here the use of oral directions to give teachers many opportunities to interact with their students, and to assess how well students can follow directions and stay focused on the task.

  11. MATERIALS AND METHODS 1) DNA extraction

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS 1) DNA extraction · DNA was extracted from the ileo-cecal nodes of 475 Holstein cows from two herds using the Qiagen DNA extraction kit (Valencia, CA). 2) Map detection · Map and Jerome, Idaho, respectively. DNA was extracted from ileo-cecal lymph nodes using the Qiagen (Valencia, CA

  12. How to Extract DNA From Anything Living

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-02-10

    In this genetics activity, learners discover how to extract DNA from green split peas. This resource guide includes a brief explanation of DNA and provides suggestions for ways to experiment with DNA extraction further.

  13. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for recovery of soil protist DNA.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana S; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars H; Winding, Anne

    2015-08-01

    The use of molecular methods to investigate protist communities in soil is in rapid development this decade. Molecular analysis of soil protist communities is usually dependant on direct genomic DNA extraction from soil and inefficient or differential DNA extraction of protist DNA can lead to bias in downstream community analysis. Three commonly used soil DNA extraction methods have been tested on soil samples from three European Long-Term Observatories (LTOs) with different land-use and three protist cultures belonging to different phylogenetic groups in different growth stages. The methods tested were: ISOm-11063 (a version of the ISO-11063 method modified to include a FastPrep ®-24 mechanical lysis step), GnS-GII (developed by the GenoSol platform to extract soil DNA in large-scale soil surveys) and a commercial DNA extraction kit - Power Lyzer™ PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio). DNA yield and quality were evaluated along with DNA suitability for amplification of 18S rDNA fragments by PCR. On soil samples, ISOm-11063 yields significantly higher DNA for two of the three soil samples, however, MoBio extraction favors DNA quality. This method was also more effective to recover copies of 18S rDNA numbers from all soil types. In addition and despite the lower yields, higher DNA quality was observed with DNA extracted from protist cultures with the MoBio method. Likewise, a bead-beating step shows to be a good solution for DNA extraction of soil protists, since the recovery of DNA from protist cultures and from the different soil samples with the ISOm method proved to be efficient in recovering PCR-amplifiable DNA. This study showed that soil DNA extraction methods provide biased results towards the cyst stages of protist organism. PMID:25966645

  14. Determination of an efficient and reliable method for DNA extraction from ticks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taoufik Jamal; Laurence Vial; Renaud Maillard; Antonia Suau; Arnaud Le Menach; Henri-Jean Boulouis; Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2004-01-01

    Molecular detection of pathogenic microorganisms in ticks is based on DNA amplification of the target pathogen; therefore, extraction of DNA from the tick is a major step. In this study, we compared three different tick DNA extraction protocols based on an enzymatic digestion by proteinase K followed by DNA extraction by a commercial kit (method 1), or on mortar crushing,

  15. Automated DNA extraction from pollen in honey.

    PubMed

    Guertler, Patrick; Eicheldinger, Adelina; Muschler, Paul; Goerlich, Ottmar; Busch, Ulrich

    2014-04-15

    In recent years, honey has become subject of DNA analysis due to potential risks evoked by microorganisms, allergens or genetically modified organisms. However, so far, only a few DNA extraction procedures are available, mostly time-consuming and laborious. Therefore, we developed an automated DNA extraction method from pollen in honey based on a CTAB buffer-based DNA extraction using the Maxwell 16 instrument and the Maxwell 16 FFS Nucleic Acid Extraction System, Custom-Kit. We altered several components and extraction parameters and compared the optimised method with a manual CTAB buffer-based DNA isolation method. The automated DNA extraction was faster and resulted in higher DNA yield and sufficient DNA purity. Real-time PCR results obtained after automated DNA extraction are comparable to results after manual DNA extraction. No PCR inhibition was observed. The applicability of this method was further successfully confirmed by analysis of different routine honey samples. PMID:24295710

  16. Development of Procedures for Direct Extraction of Cryptosporidium DNA from Water Concentrates and for Relief of PCR Inhibitors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianlin Jiang; Kerri A. Alderisio; Ajaib Singh; Lihua Xiao

    2005-01-01

    Extraction of high-quality DNA is a key step in PCR detection of Cryptosporidium and other pathogens in environmental samples. Currently, Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples have to be purified from water concentrates before DNA is extracted. This study compared the effectiveness of six DNA extraction methods (DNA extraction with the QIAamp DNA minikit after oocyst purification with immunomagnetic separation and

  17. Extraction of Genomic DNA GTC Method Genomic DNA preps are useful for a number of applications including PCR and Southern

    E-print Network

    Extraction of Genomic DNA ­ GTC Method Genomic DNA preps are useful for a number of applications is a relatively faster protocol then the following CTAB Genomic DNA prep, but the yield of DNA can be variableL cultures). After completion of step 7 in the protocol below, the GTC Genomic DNA prep can be processed

  18. DNA INTERSTRAND CROSSLINK REPAIR IN MAMMALIAN CELLS: STEP BY STEP

    PubMed Central

    Muniandy, Parameswary; Liu, Jia; Majumdar, Alokes; Liu, Su-ting; Seidman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs) are formed by natural products of metabolism and by chemotherapeutic reagents. Work in E. coli identified a two cycle repair scheme involving incisions on one strand on either side of the ICL (unhooking) producing a gapped intermediate with the incised oligonucleotide attached to the intact strand. The gap is filled by recombinational repair or lesion bypass synthesis. The remaining monoadduct is then removed by Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). Despite considerable effort, our understanding of each step in mammalian cells is still quite limited. In part this reflects the variety of crosslinking compounds, each with distinct structural features, used by different investigators. Also, multiple repair pathways are involved, variably operative during the cell cycle. G1 phase repair requires functions from NER, although the mechanism of recognition has not been determined. Repair can be initiated by encounters with the transcriptional apparatus, or a replication fork. In the case of the latter, the reconstruction of a replication fork, stalled or broken by collision with an ICL, adds to the complexity of the repair process. The enzymology of unhooking, the identity of the lesion bypass polymerases required to fill the first repair gap, and the functions involved in the second repair cycle are all subjects of active inquiry. Here we will review current understanding of each step in ICL repair in mammalian cells. PMID:20039786

  19. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanasundaram, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Yeo, W.-H.; Oh, K.; Lee, K.-H.; Kim, M.-H.; Ryew, S.-M.; Ahn, S.-G.; Gao, D.; Cangelosi, G. A.; Chung, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottle neck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab- and saliva samples. DNA is attracted on to a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle 4 microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for one month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol. PMID:23307121

  20. Monitoring of four DNA extraction methods upstream of high-throughput sequencing of Anisakidae nematodes.

    PubMed

    Seesao, Y; Audebert, C; Verrez-Bagnis, V; Merlin, S; Jérôme, M; Viscogliosi, E; Dei-Cas, E; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Gay, M

    2014-07-01

    Different methods were evaluated to extract DNA from pooled nematodes belonging to Anisakis, Contracaecum, Pseudoterranova and Hysterothylacium genera isolated from edible fish. Pooled DNA extraction is the first and compulsory step to allow the identification of a large number of samples through high-throughput DNA sequencing with drastic time and cost reductions. PMID:24845469

  1. A single protocol for extraction of gDNA from bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Vingataramin, Laurie; Frost, Eric H

    2015-03-01

    Guanidine thiocyanate breakage of microorganisms has been the standard initial step in genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction of microbial DNA for two decades, despite the requirement for pretreatments to extract DNA from microorganisms other than Gram-negative bacteria. We report a quick and low-cost gDNA extraction protocol called EtNa that is efficient for bacteria and yeast over a broad range of concentrations. EtNa is based on a hot alkaline ethanol lysis. The solution can be immediately centrifuged to yield a crude gDNA extract suitable for PCR, or it can be directly applied to a silica column for purification. PMID:25757544

  2. Comparison of Five Simple Methods for DNA Extraction from Echinococcus granulosus Protoscoleces for PCR Amplification of Ribosomal DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EB Kia; M Fasihi Harandi; F Zahabiun; H Mirhendi

    Background: Cystic hydatid disease is an important zoonosis, affecting humans and animals and is a significant public health and economic problem throughout the world and Iran. Since extraction of DNA from the parasite is a primary and crucial step which has a principal effect on PCR results, in the current study five simple methods for DNA extraction from protoscoleces of

  3. A simplified universal genomic DNA extraction protocol suitable for PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, T Y; Wang, L; Zhang, J H; Dong, W H

    2011-01-01

    Conventional genomic DNA extraction protocols need expensive and hazardous reagents for decontamination of phenolic compounds from the extracts and are only suited for certain types of tissue. We developed a simple, time-saving and cost-efficient method for genomic DNA extraction from various types of organisms, using relatively innocuous reagents. The protocol employs a single purification step to remove contaminating compounds, using a silica column and a non-hazardous buffer, and a chaotropic-detergent lysing solution that hydrolyzes RNA and allows the selective precipitation of DNA from cell lysates. We used this system to extract genomic DNA from different tissues of various organisms, including algae (Dunaliella salina), human peripheral blood, mouse liver, Escherichia coli, and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Mean DNA yields were 20-30 ?g/cm(3) from fresh tissues (comparable to yields given by commercial extraction kits), and the 260/280 nm absorbance ratio was 1.8-2.0, demonstrating a good degree of purity. The extracted DNA was successfully used in PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and for recombinant selection studies. PMID:21476197

  4. DNA Basepair Step Deformability Inferred from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Filip Lankaš; Ji?í Šponer; Jörg Langowski; Thomas E. Cheatham III

    2003-01-01

    The sequence-dependent DNA deformability at the basepair step level was investigated using large-scale atomic resolution molecular dynamics simulation of two 18-bp DNA oligomers: d(GCCTATAAACGCCTATAA) and d(CTAGGTGGATGACTCATT). From an analysis of the structural fluctuations, the harmonic potential energy functions for all 10 unique steps with respect to the six step parameters have been evaluated. In the case of roll, three distinct

  5. Interlaboratory evaluation of the ISO standard 11063 “Soil quality — Method to directly extract DNA from soil samples”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Petric; L. Philippot; C. Abbate; A. Bispo; T. Chesnot; S. Hallin; K. Laval; T. Lebeau; P. Lemanceau; C. Leyval; K. Lindström; P. Pandard; E. Romero; A. Sarr; M. Schloter; P. Simonet; K. Smalla; B.-M. Wilke; F. Martin-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Extracting DNA directly from micro-organisms living in soil is a crucial step for the molecular analysis of soil microbial communities. However, the use of a plethora of different soil DNA extraction protocols, each with its own bias, makes accurate data comparison difficult. To overcome this problem, a method for soil DNA extraction was proposed to the International Organization for Standardization

  6. Comparison of seven methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from fecal and cecal samples of mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Janina; Patron, Kevin; Legrand-Frossi, Christine; Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Merlin, Christophe; Alauzet, Corentine; Lozniewski, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of bacterial DNA from fecal samples of mice is commonly performed in experimental studies. Although DNA extraction is a critical step in various molecular approaches, the efficiency of methods that may be used for DNA extraction from mice fecal samples has never been evaluated. We compared the efficiencies of six widely used commercial kits (MasterPure™ Gram Positive DNA Purification Kit, QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit; NucliSENS® easyMAG®, ZR Fecal DNA MiniPrep™, FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Feces and FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil) and a non-commercial method for DNA isolation from mice feces and cecal contents. DNA quantity and quality were assessed by fluorometry, spectrophotometry, gel electrophoresis and qPCR. Cell lysis efficiencies were evaluated by qPCR targeting three relevant bacteria in spiked specimens. For both feces and intestinal contents, the most efficient extraction method was the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil. PMID:25093756

  7. An Efficient Method for Genomic DNA Extraction from Different Molluscs Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jorge C.; Chaves, Raquel; Bastos, Estela; Leitão, Alexandra; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    The selection of a DNA extraction method is a critical step when subsequent analysis depends on the DNA quality and quantity. Unlike mammals, for which several capable DNA extraction methods have been developed, for molluscs the availability of optimized genomic DNA extraction protocols is clearly insufficient. Several aspects such as animal physiology, the type (e.g., adductor muscle or gills) or quantity of tissue, can explain the lack of efficiency (quality and yield) in molluscs genomic DNA extraction procedure. In an attempt to overcome these aspects, this work describes an efficient method for molluscs genomic DNA extraction that was tested in several species from different orders: Veneridae, Ostreidae, Anomiidae, Cardiidae (Bivalvia) and Muricidae (Gastropoda), with different weight sample tissues. The isolated DNA was of high molecular weight with high yield and purity, even with reduced quantities of tissue. Moreover, the genomic DNA isolated, demonstrated to be suitable for several downstream molecular techniques, such as PCR sequencing among others. PMID:22174651

  8. A Simple Method to Extract DNA from Hair Shafts Using Enzymatic Laundry Powder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinchuan; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Sicong; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2013-01-01

    A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts was developed by using enzymatic laundry powder at the first step of the process. The whole extraction can be finished in less than 2 hours. The simple extraction reagent proposed here contains only two cheap components: ordinary enzymatic laundry powder and PCR buffer. After extraction, an ultra sensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, PicoGreen, was used for quantifying trace amount of double-stranded DNA in the solution extracted. For further validation of DNA extraction, four primers were employed to amplify DNA microsatellite loci. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and PCR results suggested that this method can extract DNA from hair shafts with good efficiency and repeatability. The study will greatly facilitate the use of hair shafts in future for DNA analyses on genome-wide scale. PMID:23922747

  9. Replication of Colicin E1 Plasmid DNA in Cell Extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshimasa Sakakibara; Jun-Ichi Tomizawa

    1974-01-01

    Cell extracts were prepared from Escherichia coli carrying colicin El plasmid. The DNA in extracts was almost exclusively closed-circular DNA of the plasmid. Labeled deoxyribonucleotides were incorporated into DNA in extracts. DNA of colicin E1 plasmid was the sole DNA product, and was composed of completely replicated molecules and a class of replicative intermediates. The intermediates carried an average of

  10. Molecular techniques: Extracting DNA from dried dots, PCR and sequencing

    E-print Network

    Schall, Joseph J.

    Molecular techniques: Extracting DNA from dried dots, PCR and sequencing Every molecular laboratory, but we are always tinkering with protocols. 1. Extracting DNA from filter paper disks. A piece of a dried results. 2. Extracting DNA from vectors. For several projects we have extracted parasite DNA from vectors

  11. Fern spore extracts can damage DNA.

    PubMed

    Simán, S E; Povey, A C; Ward, T H; Margison, G P; Sheffield, E

    2000-07-01

    The carcinogenicity of the vegetative tissues of bracken fern (Pteridium) has long been established. More recently, the carcinogenic effects of the spores of bracken have also been recognized. Both vegetative tissues and spores of bracken can induce adducts in DNA in animal tissues, but the possible genotoxic or carcinogenic effects of spores from fern species other than bracken are unknown. The single-cell gel electrophoresis ('comet') assay was used to investigate whether fern spores can cause DNA damage in vitro. Extracts of spores from six fern species were administered to cultured human premyeloid leukaemia (K562) cells. Spore extracts of five fern species: Anemia phyllitidis, Dicksonia antarctica, Pteridium aquilinum, Pteris vittata and Sadleria pallida, induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than those in the control groups. Only in one species, Osmunda regalis, was the effect no different from that in the control groups. Using extracts from A. phyllitidis and P. vittata, the extent of DNA damage was increased by increasing the original dose 10 times, whereas an experiment in which exposure times were varied suggested that the highest levels of strand breaks appear after 2 h exposure. Simultaneous incubation with human S9 liver enzyme mix ablated the damaging effect of the extracts. Our data show that fern spore extracts can cause DNA damage in human cells in vitro. Considering the strong correlation between DNA damage and carcinogenic events, the observations made in this report may well have some implications for human health. PMID:10883670

  12. Microscope Titration and Extraction of DNA from Liver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Lois T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive, one-period activity to extract DNA to make the study of DNA less abstract. A microscope titration is used to determine when cells are ready for DNA extraction. (PR)

  13. Plant and metagenomic DNA extraction of mucilaginous seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Simone N.M.; Salazar, Marcela M.; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.; Efraim, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    The pulp surrounding the seeds of some fruits is rich in mucilage, carbohydrates, etc. Some seeds are rich in proteins and polyphenols. Fruit seeds, like cacao (Theobroma cacao) and cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum), are subjected to fermentation to develop flavor. During fermentation, ethanol is produced [2–6]. All of these compounds are considered as interfering substances that hinder the DNA extraction [4–8]. Protocols commonly used in the DNA extraction in samples of plant origin were used, but without success. Thus, a protocol for DNA samples under different conditions that can be used for similar samples was developed and applied with success. The protocol initially described for RNA samples by Zeng et al. [9] and with changes proposed by Provost et al. [5] was adapted for extracting DNA samples from those described. However, several modifications have been proposed:•Samples were initially washed with petroleum ether for fat phase removal.•RNAse was added to the extraction buffer, while spermidin was removed.•Additional steps of extraction with 5 M NaCl, saturated NaCl and CTAB (10%) were included and precipitation was carried out with isopropanol, followed by washing with ethanol.

  14. Evaluation of Methods for the Extraction and Purification of DNA from the Human Microbiome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanqing Yuan; Dora B. Cohen; Jacques Ravel; Zaid Abdo; Larry J. Forney

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundDNA extraction is an essential step in all cultivation-independent approaches to characterize microbial diversity, including that associated with the human body. A fundamental challenge in using these approaches has been to isolate DNA that is representative of the microbial community sampled.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsIn this study, we statistically evaluated six commonly used DNA extraction procedures using eleven human-associated bacterial species and a

  15. Exploring DNA Extraction Erica Butts

    E-print Network

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Genetics Group Forensics@NIST 2012 Meeting Gaithersburg, MD November 28, 2012 #12;Applied Genetics Outline chemicals such as phenol and chloroform · Liquid handling steps may increase risk for contamination and loss · Two common PCR inhibitors found in forensic samples ­ Hemoglobin (Blood) ­ Indigo dye (Denim) #12

  16. Co-extraction of DNA and PLFA from soil samples.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Sheridan; Techtmann, Stephen M; Mahmoudi, Nagissa; Niang, Dijibril; Pfiffner, Susan; Hazen, Terry C

    2015-08-01

    Lipid/DNA co-extraction from one sample is attractive in limiting biases associated with microbial community analysis from separate extractions. We sought to enhance established co-extraction methods and use high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing to identify preferentially extracted taxa from co-extracted DNA. Co-extraction results in low DNA yields and distinct community structure changes. PMID:26027542

  17. Protocol for extraction of genomic DNA from swine solid tissues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Henrique Biase; Maurício Machaim Franco; Luiz Ricardo Goulart; Robson Carlos Antunes

    2002-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics are performed by using DNA from different body tissues. However, it is necessary to obtain genomic DNA of good quality. Due to the impossibility of collecting blood from slaughtered animals, DNA extraction from solid tissues is necessary. The objective of this study was to describe a protocol of DNA extraction from swine skin, adipose, brain, liver, kidney and

  18. DNA extraction techniques for DNA barcoding of minute gall-inhabiting wasps

    E-print Network

    DNA extraction techniques for DNA barcoding of minute gall-inhabiting wasps GUDRUN DITTRICH, South Africa Abstract DNA extraction from minute hymenopterans and their larvae is difficult extraction methods were compared to determine their efficacy in isolating DNA. Success of each method

  19. Experiments in DNA Extraction and PCR Amplification from Bighorn Sheep Feces: the Importance of DNA Extraction Method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Wehausen; R. R. RAMEY II; C. W. EPPS

    2004-01-01

    Reliability of genotyping is an issue for studies using non-invasive sources of DNA. We emphasize the importance of refining DNA extraction methods to maximize reliability and efficiency of genotyping for such DNA sources. We present a simple and general method to quantitatively compare genotyping reliability of various DNA extraction techniques and sample materials used. For bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) fecal

  20. Single-strand DNA translation initiation step analyzed by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, Luminita, E-mail: luminitadamian@microcal.eu.com [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France) [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); IUB, School of Engineering and Science, D-28727 Bremen (Germany); Marty-Detraves, Claire, E-mail: claire.detraves@free.fr [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France) [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Winterhalter, Mathias [IUB, School of Engineering and Science, D-28727 Bremen (Germany)] [IUB, School of Engineering and Science, D-28727 Bremen (Germany); Fournier, Didier, E-mail: Didier.Fournier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France) [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Paquereau, Laurent, E-mail: Laurent.Paquereau@ipbs.fr [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France) [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2009-07-31

    Is single-strand DNA translatable? Since the 60s, the question still remains whether or not DNA could be directly translated into protein. Some discrepancies in the results were reported about functional translation of single-strand DNA but all results converged on a similar behavior of RNA and ssDNA in the initiation step. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry method was used to determine thermodynamic constants of interaction between single-strand DNA and S30 extract of Escherichia coli. Our results showed that the binding was not affected by the nature of the template tested and the dissociation constants were in the same range when ssDNA (K{sub d} = 3.62 {+-} 2.1 x 10{sup -8} M) or the RNA corresponding sequence (K{sub d} = 2.7 {+-} 0.82 x 10{sup -8} M) bearing SD/ATG sequences were used. The binding specificity was confirmed by antibiotic interferences which block the initiation complex formation. These results suggest that the limiting step in translation of ssDNA is the elongation process.

  1. A rapid and simple method for DNA extraction from yeasts and fungi isolated from Agave fourcroydes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raul Tapia-Tussell; Patricia Lappe; Miguel Ulloa; Andrés Quijano-Ramayo; Mirbella Cáceres-Farfán; Alfonso Larqué-Saavedra; Daisy Perez-Brito

    2006-01-01

    A simple and easy protocol for extracting high-quality DNA from different yeast and filamentous fungal species is described.\\u000a This method involves two important steps: first, the disruption of cell walls by mechanical means and freezing; and second,\\u000a the extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The absorbance ratios (A260\\/A280) obtained ranged from 1.6 to 2.0. The main objective of this

  2. Strategy for the extraction of yeast DNA from artisan agave must for quantitative PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Kirchmayr, Manuel Reinhart; Segura-Garcia, Luis Eduardo; Flores-Berrios, Ericka Patricia; Gschaedler, Anne

    2011-11-01

    An efficient method for the direct extraction of yeast genomic DNA from agave must was developed. The optimized protocol, which was based on silica-adsorption of DNA on microcolumns, included an enzymatic cell wall degradation step followed by prolonged lysis with hot detergent. The resulting extracts were suitable templates for subsequent qPCR assays that quantified mixed yeast populations in artisan Mexican mezcal fermentations. PMID:21820955

  3. A rapid and efficient assay for extracting DNA from fungi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Peak, K.K.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A method for the rapid extraction of fungal DNA from small quantities of tissue in a batch-processing format was investigated. Methods and Results: Tissue (< 3.0 mg) was scraped from freshly-grown fungal isolates. The tissue was suspended in buffer AP1 and subjected to seven rounds of freeze/thaw using a crushed dry ice/ethanol bath and a boiling water bath. After a 30 min boiling step, the tissue was quickly ground against the wall of the microfuge tube using a sterile pipette tip. The Qiagen DNeasy Plant Tissue Kit protocol was then used to purify the DNA for PCR/ sequencing applications. Conclusions: The method allowed batch DNA extraction from multiple fungal isolates using a simple yet rapid and reliable assay. Significance and Impact of the Study: Use of this assay will allow researchers to obtain DNA from fungi quickly for use in molecular assays that previously required specialized instrumentation, was time-consuming or was not conducive to batch processing.

  4. Methods for microbial DNA extraction from soil for PCR amplification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Yeates; M. R. Gillings; A. D. Davison; N. Altavilla; D. A. Veal

    1998-01-01

    Amplification of DNA from soil is often inhibited by co-purified contaminants. A rapid, inexpensive, large-scale DNA extraction\\u000a method involving minimal purification has been developed that is applicable to various soil types (1). DNA is also suitable\\u000a for PCR amplification using various DNA targets. DNA was extracted from 100g of soil using direct lysis with glass beads and\\u000a SDS followed by

  5. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  6. Composite system mediates two-step DNA uptake into Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Stingl, Kerstin; Müller, Stephanie; Scheidgen-Kleyboldt, Gerda; Clausen, Martin; Maier, Berenike

    2010-01-19

    The Gram-negative gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori depends on natural transformation for genomic plasticity, which leads to host adaptation and spread of resistances. Here, we show that H. pylori takes up covalently labeled fluorescent DNA preferentially at the cell poles and that uptake is dependent on the type IV secretion system ComB. By titration of external pH and detection of accessibility of the fluorophor by protons, we localized imported fluorescent DNA in the periplasm. Single molecule analysis revealed that outer membrane DNA transport occurred at a velocity of 1.3 kbp x s(-1) and that previously imported DNA was reversibly extracted from the bacterium at pulling forces exceeding 23 pN. Thus, transport velocities were 10-fold higher than in Bacillus subtilis, and stalling forces were substantially lower. dsDNA stained with the intercalator YOYO-1 was transiently detected in the periplasm in wild-type H. pylori but was periplasmatically trapped in a mutant lacking the B. subtilis membrane-channel homolog ComEC. We conclude that H. pylori uses a two-step DNA uptake mechanism in which ComB transports dsDNA across the outer membrane at low force and poor specificity for DNA structure. Subsequently, Hp-ComEC mediates transport into the cytoplasm, leading to the release of the noncovalently bound DNA dye. Our findings fill the gap to propose a model for composite DNA uptake machineries in competent bacteria, all comprising the conserved ComEC channel for cytoplasmic membrane transport in combination with various transporters for access of external DNA to the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:20080542

  7. DNA extraction from a previously recalcitrant plant genus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Webb; Steven J. Knapp

    1990-01-01

    Numerous DNA extraction methods failed to remove contaminants that interfere with restriction digests ofCuphea DNA. The method described here removes those contaminants and maintains relatively high DNA yields. The primary purification\\u000a process consists of washing the DNA with phenol while it is complexed with CTAB and dissolved in 1 M NaCl.

  8. STR typing of ancient DNA extracted from hair shafts of Siberian mummies.

    PubMed

    Amory, S; Keyser, C; Crubézy, E; Ludes, B

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if ancient hair shafts could be suitable for nuclear DNA analysis and to develop an efficient and straightforward protocol for DNA extraction and STR typing of ancient specimens. The developed method was validated on modern and forensic samples and then successfully applied on ancient hairs collected from Siberian mummies dating from the 16th to the early 19th centuries. In parallel extractions including or excluding a washing step were performed at least two times for each sample in order to evaluate the influence on the quantity of nuclear DNA yielded and on the typing efficiency. Twelve ancient individuals were analyzed through our approach and full and reliable profiles were obtained for four of them. These profiles were validated by comparison with those obtained from bone and teeth DNA extracted from the same ancient specimens. The present study demonstrates that the washing step cannot be considered as deleterious for DNA retrieval since the same results were obtained by the two approaches. This finding challenges the hypothesis that recoverable nuclear DNA is only found on the outer surface of hair shafts and provides evidence that nuclear DNA can be successfully extracted from ancient hair shafts. The method described here constitutes a promising way for non-invasive investigations in ancient DNA analysis for precious or historical samples as well as forensic casework analyses. PMID:16839727

  9. The effect of extraction temperature, time and number of steps on the antioxidant capacity of methanolic banana peel extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rafaela González-Montelongo; M. Gloria Lobo; Mónica González

    2010-01-01

    A solvent extraction method was developed to obtain methanolic extracts rich in antioxidants from banana peel. Central composite design “23+star” and response surface methodology were used in order to optimise the number of extraction steps, extraction temperature and extraction time. The number of extractions was statistically the most significant factor in scavenging activity against both DPPH and ABTS+ radicals and

  10. Microbial food safety: Potential of DNA extraction methods for use in diagnostic metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Josefsen, Mathilde H; Andersen, Sandra C; Christensen, Julia; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of ten widely applied DNA extraction protocols was evaluated for suitability for diagnostic metagenomics. The protocols were selected based on a thorough literature study. Chicken fecal samples inoculated with about 1×10(3) and 1×10(6)CFU/g Campylobacter jejuni were used as a model. The evaluation was performed based on total DNA yield measured by fluorometry, and quality and quantity of C. jejuni DNA measured by real-time PCR. There was up to a 25-fold variance between the lowest (NucliSens miniMAG, BIOMÉRIEUX) and highest (PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MO BIO Laboratories) yielding protocols. The PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit performed significantly better than all other protocols tested. Selected protocols were modified, i.e., extended heating and homogenization, resulting in increased yields of total DNA. For QIAamp Fast DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) a 7-fold increase in total DNA was observed following the protocol for human DNA analysis and including a 5min heating step at 70°C. For the PowerLyzer PowerSoil and the PowerFecal DNA Isolation Kit (MO BIO Laboratories) the total DNA fold increase was 1.6 to 1.8 when including an extra 10min of bead-vortexing. There was no correlation between the yield of total DNA and the amount of PCR-amplifiable DNA from C. jejuni. The protocols resulting in the highest yield of total DNA did not show correspondingly increased levels of C. jejuni DNA as determined by PCR. In conclusion, substantial variation in the efficiency of the protocols to extract DNA was observed. The highest DNA yield was obtained with the PowerLyzer PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, whereas the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Feces (MP Biomedicals) resulted in the highest amount of PCR-amplifiable C. jejuni DNA. PMID:25937085

  11. Extraction of DNA from plant and fungus tissues in situ

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When samples are collected in the field and transported to the lab, degradation of the nucleic acids contained in the samples is frequently observed. Immediate extraction and precipitation of the nucleic acids reduces degradation to a minimum, thus preserving accurate sequence information. An extraction method to obtain high quality DNA in field studies is described. Findings DNA extracted immediately after sampling was compared to DNA extracted after allowing the sampled tissues to air dry at 21°C for 48 or 72 hours. While DNA extracted from fresh tissues exhibited little degradation, DNA extracted from all tissues exposed to 21°C air for 48 or 72 hours exhibited varying degrees of degradation. Yield was higher for extractions from fresh tissues in most cases. Four microcentrifuges were compared for DNA yield: one standard electric laboratory microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?16,000×g), two battery-operated microcentrifuges (max rcf?=?5,000 and 3,000 ×g), and one manually-operated microcentrifuge (max rcf?=?120×g). Yields for all centrifuges were similar. DNA extracted under simulated field conditions was similar in yield and quality to DNA extracted in the laboratory using the same equipment. Conclusions This CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) DNA extraction method employs battery-operated and manually-operated equipment to isolate high quality DNA in the field. The method was tested on plant and fungus tissues, and may be adapted for other types of organisms. The method produced high quality DNA in laboratory tests and under simulated field conditions. The field extraction method should prove useful for working in remote sites, where ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen are unavailable; where degradation is likely to occur due to the long distances between the sample site and the laboratory; and in instances where other DNA preservation and transportation methods have been unsuccessful. It may be possible to adapt this method for genomic, metagenomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic projects using samples collected in situ. PMID:22672795

  12. One-stop Genomic DNA Extraction by Salicylic Acid Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Kadam, Ulhas; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared via a modified, one-step synthesis and used for a one-stop extraction of genomic DNA from mammalian cells. The synthesized magnetic particles were used for magnetic separation of cells from the media by non-specific binding of the particles, as well as extraction of genomic DNA from the lysate. The quantity and quality were confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction. The entire process of extraction and isolation can be completed within 30 min. Compared to traditional methods based on centrifugation and filtration, the established method is fast, simple, reliable, and environmentally-friendly. PMID:23911528

  13. Thermodynamics of the DNA Damage Repair Steps of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van’t Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  14. DNA Extraction Strategies for Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Theisen Comey

    ABSTRACT: A polymerase chain reaction-based DNA typing method, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AMP-FLP) analysis, has shown promise as a means of analyzing forensic biological evidence. A variety of DNA extraction methods,were evaluated,for their suitability for AMP-FLP analysis. Factors that were considered in the evaluation included DNA yield, ability of DNA to be amplified, the presence of DNA fragments other than

  15. A Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods using Petunia hybrida Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tamari, Farshad; Hinkley, Craig S.; Ramprashad, Naderia

    2013-01-01

    Extraction of DNA from plant tissue is often problematic, as many plants contain high levels of secondary metabolites that can interfere with downstream applications, such as the PCR. Removal of these secondary metabolites usually requires further purification of the DNA using organic solvents or other toxic substances. In this study, we have compared two methods of DNA purification: the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method that uses the ionic detergent hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and chloroform-isoamyl alcohol and the Edwards method that uses the anionic detergent SDS and isopropyl alcohol. Our results show that the Edwards method works better than the CTAB method for extracting DNA from tissues of Petunia hybrida. For six of the eight tissues, the Edwards method yielded more DNA than the CTAB method. In four of the tissues, this difference was statistically significant, and the Edwards method yielded 27–80% more DNA than the CTAB method. Among the different tissues tested, we found that buds, 4 days before anthesis, had the highest DNA concentrations and that buds and reproductive tissue, in general, yielded higher DNA concentrations than other tissues. In addition, DNA extracted using the Edwards method was more consistently PCR-amplified than that of CTAB-extracted DNA. Based on these results, we recommend using the Edwards method to extract DNA from plant tissues and to use buds and reproductive structures for highest DNA yields. PMID:23997658

  16. A SIMPLE VERSATILE HIGH THROUGHPUT DNA EXTRACTION METHOD SUITABLE FOR PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR has become one of the most popular techniques in functional genomics. Projects in both forward and reverse genetics routinely require PCR amplification of thousands of samples. Processing samples to extract DNA of sufficient purity for PCR is often a limiting step. We have developed a simple ...

  17. A rapid and simple method for DNA extraction from yeasts and fungi isolated from Agave fourcroydes.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Tussell, Raul; Lappe, Patricia; Ulloa, Miguel; Quijano-Ramayo, Andrés; Cáceres-Farfán, Mirbella; Larqué-Saavedra, Alfonso; Perez-Brito, Daisy

    2006-05-01

    A simple and easy protocol for extracting high-quality DNA from different yeast and filamentous fungal species is described. This method involves two important steps: first, the disruption of cell walls by mechanical means and freezing; and second, the extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The absorbance ratios (A(260)/A(280)) obtained ranged from 1.6 to 2.0. The main objective of this procedure is to extract pure DNA from yeast and filamentous fungi, including those with high contents of proteins, polysaccharides, and other complex compounds in their cell walls. The yield and quality of the DNAs obtained were suitable for micro/minisatellite primer-polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) fingerprinting as well as for the sequence of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA. PMID:16691008

  18. Novel extraction strategy of ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from cheese for PCR-based investigations.

    PubMed

    Bonaïti, Catherine; Parayre, Sandrine; Irlinger, Françoise

    2006-03-15

    Cheese microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, constitute a complex ecosystem that plays a central role in cheeses ripening. The molecular study of cheese microbial diversity and activity is essential but the extraction of high quality nucleic acid may be problematic: the cheese samples are characterised by a strong buffering capacity which negatively influenced the yield of the extracted rRNA. The objective of this study is to develop an effective method for the direct and simultaneous isolation of yeast and bacterial ribosomal RNA and genomic DNA from the same cheese samples. DNA isolation was based on a protocol used for nucleic acids isolation from anaerobic digestor, without preliminary washing step with the combined use of the action of chaotropic agent (acid guanidinium thiocyanate), detergents (SDS, N-lauroylsarcosine), chelating agent (EDTA) and a mechanical method (bead beating system). The DNA purification was carried out by two washing steps of phenol-chloroform. RNA was isolated successfully after the second acid extraction step by recovering it from the phenolic phase of the first acid extraction. The novel method yielded pure preparation of undegraded RNA accessible for reverse transcription-PCR. The extraction protocol of genomic DNA and rRNA was applicable to complex ecosystem of different cheese matrices. PMID:16269194

  19. Rapid DNA extraction for molecular epidemiological studies of malaria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Henning; Ingrid Felger; Hans-Peter Beck

    1999-01-01

    DNA isolation from blood samples collected in molecular epidemiological studies is crucial for the quality and reproducibility of data. Blood samples from two malaria endemic sites have been prepared by four different DNA isolation methods with subsequent PCR amplification of the msp2 locus of Plasmodium falciparum. We tested a rapid boiling method; the guanadine isothiocyanate DNA extraction; QIAmp® blood kit;

  20. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  1. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods suitable for PCR-based detection and genotyping of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, Bruna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina; Skiby, Jeffrey E; De Medici, Dario

    2013-09-01

    Sufficient quality and quantity of extracted DNA is critical to detecting and performing genotyping of Clostridium botulinum by means of PCR-based methods. An ideal extraction method has to optimize DNA yield, minimize DNA degradation, allow multiple samples to be extracted, and be efficient in terms of cost, time, labor, and supplies. Eleven botulinum toxin-producing clostridia strains and 25 samples (10 food, 13 clinical, and 2 environmental samples) naturally contaminated with botulinum toxin-producing clostridia were used to compare 4 DNA extraction procedures: Chelex(®) 100 matrix, Phenol-Cloroform-Isoamyl alcohol, NucliSENS(®) magnetic extraction kit, and DNeasy(®) Blood & Tissue kit. Integrity, purity, and amount of amplifiable DNA were evaluated. The results show that the DNeasy(®) Blood & Tissue kit is the best extraction method evaluated because it provided the most pure, intact, and amplifiable DNA. However, Chelex(®) 100 matrix seems to be suitable for PCR-based methods intended for laboratory diagnosis of suspected outbreaks of botulism, because it is faster and cheaper compared to DNeasy(®) Blood & Tissue kit, and for samples in which the mean of Ct values obtained are statistically different (P>0.05) with respect to the best method, no lack of PCR amplification was shown. In addition, molecular methods for laboratory diagnosis currently are based on a microbial enrichment step prior to PCR, and so the differences in amplification seem to not influence the analytical results. PMID:23971807

  2. DNA, RNA, and Protein Extraction: The Past and The Present

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siun Chee; Yiap, Beow Chin

    2009-01-01

    Extraction of DNA, RNA, and protein is the basic method used in molecular biology. These biomolecules can be isolated from any biological material for subsequent downstream processes, analytical, or preparative purposes. In the past, the process of extraction and purification of nucleic acids used to be complicated, time-consuming, labor-intensive, and limited in terms of overall throughput. Currently, there are many specialized methods that can be used to extract pure biomolecules, such as solution-based and column-based protocols. Manual method has certainly come a long way over time with various commercial offerings which included complete kits containing most of the components needed to isolate nucleic acid, but most of them require repeated centrifugation steps, followed by removal of supernatants depending on the type of specimen and additional mechanical treatment. Automated systems designed for medium-to-large laboratories have grown in demand over recent years. It is an alternative to labor-intensive manual methods. The technology should allow a high throughput of samples; the yield, purity, reproducibility, and scalability of the biomolecules as well as the speed, accuracy, and reliability of the assay should be maximal, while minimizing the risk of cross-contamination. PMID:20011662

  3. DNA walks one step at a time in electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Juan; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2011-03-01

    Testing the classical view that in DNA gel electrophoresis, long polymer chains navigate through their gel environment via reptation, we reach a different conclusion: this driven motion proceeds by stick-slip. Our single-molecule experiments visualize fluorescent-labeled lambda-DNA, whose intramolecular conformations are resolved with 30 ms resolution using home-written software. Combining hundreds to thousands of trajectories under amplitudes of electric field ranging from zero to large, we quantify the full statistical distribution of motion with unprecedented statistics. Pauses are seen between steps of driven motion, probably reflecting that the chain is trapped inside the gel matrix. The pausing time is exponentially distributed and decreases with increasing electric field strength, suggesting that the jerky behavior is an activated process, facilitated by electric field. We propose a stretch-assisted mechanism: that the energy barrier to move through the gel environment is first overcome by a leading segment, the ensuing intramolecular stress from stretching causing lagging segments to recoil and follow along.

  4. Comparison of methods of DNA extraction from stream sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Leff, L.G.; Dana, J.R.; Shimkets, L.J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Vaun McArthur, J. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In Upper Three Runs Creek (Aiken, SC) and many other environments, less than 1% of bacteria visible microscopically can be cultured. Exploitation of molecular biology techniques has led to development of new methods, such as extraction of nucleic acids from soils or sediments, to study the dominant, nonculturable bacteria. The purpose of this study was to compare three published methods of DNA extraction that fall into two general categories: those in which cells are lysed in sediments. and those in which cells are removed from sediments prior to lysis. DNA yield varied with extraction method; the Ogram method had a significantly higher yield than the other methods. However, DNA extracted via the Ogram method was badly sheared and contained a smaller proportion of eubacterial DNA. The Tsai method was less time consuming than the other methods, but DNA samples were of lower purity. If DNA purity is of paramount concern (as would be the case if PCR was to be performed) and quantity is not important, the Jacobsen method is recommended because of the low concentration of contaminants. If DNA is to be used directly in DNA-DNA hybridizations, the Ogram method is recommended since it gives maximal yields. However, if a Southern blot is to be performed, the Tsai method is recommended because of the high degree of DNA fragmentation observed with the other methods.

  5. Evaluation of Methods for the Extraction and Purification of DNA from the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sanqing; Cohen, Dora B.; Ravel, Jacques; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA extraction is an essential step in all cultivation-independent approaches to characterize microbial diversity, including that associated with the human body. A fundamental challenge in using these approaches has been to isolate DNA that is representative of the microbial community sampled. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we statistically evaluated six commonly used DNA extraction procedures using eleven human-associated bacterial species and a mock community that contained equal numbers of those eleven species. These methods were compared on the basis of DNA yield, DNA shearing, reproducibility, and most importantly representation of microbial diversity. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from a mock community showed that the observed species abundances were significantly different from the expected species abundances for all six DNA extraction methods used. Conclusions/Significance Protocols that included bead beating and/or mutanolysin produced significantly better bacterial community structure representation than methods without both of them. The reproducibility of all six methods was similar, and results from different experimenters and different times were in good agreement. Based on the evaluations done it appears that DNA extraction procedures for bacterial community analysis of human associated samples should include bead beating and/or mutanolysin to effectively lyse cells. PMID:22457796

  6. Mycobacterial DNA extraction for whole-genome sequencing from early positive liquid (MGIT) cultures.

    PubMed

    Votintseva, Antonina A; Pankhurst, Louise J; Anson, Luke W; Morgan, Marcus R; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah; Walker, Timothy M; Quan, T Phuong; Wyllie, David H; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Wilcox, Mark; Walker, A Sarah; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2015-04-01

    We developed a low-cost and reliable method of DNA extraction from as little as 1 ml of early positive mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) cultures that is suitable for whole-genome sequencing to identify mycobacterial species and predict antibiotic resistance in clinical samples. The DNA extraction method is based on ethanol precipitation supplemented by pretreatment steps with a MolYsis kit or saline wash for the removal of human DNA and a final DNA cleanup step with solid-phase reversible immobilization beads. The protocol yielded ?0.2 ng/?l of DNA for 90% (MolYsis kit) and 83% (saline wash) of positive MGIT cultures. A total of 144 (94%) of the 154 samples sequenced on the MiSeq platform (Illumina) achieved the target of 1 million reads, with <5% of reads derived from human or nasopharyngeal flora for 88% and 91% of samples, respectively. A total of 59 (98%) of 60 samples that were identified by the national mycobacterial reference laboratory (NMRL) as Mycobacterium tuberculosis were successfully mapped to the H37Rv reference, with >90% coverage achieved. The DNA extraction protocol, therefore, will facilitate fast and accurate identification of mycobacterial species and resistance using a range of bioinformatics tools. PMID:25631807

  7. Mycobacterial DNA Extraction for Whole-Genome Sequencing from Early Positive Liquid (MGIT) Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, Louise J.; Anson, Luke W.; Morgan, Marcus R.; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah; Walker, Timothy M.; Quan, T. Phuong; Wyllie, David H.; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Wilcox, Mark; Walker, A. Sarah; Peto, Tim E. A.; Crook, Derrick W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a low-cost and reliable method of DNA extraction from as little as 1 ml of early positive mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) cultures that is suitable for whole-genome sequencing to identify mycobacterial species and predict antibiotic resistance in clinical samples. The DNA extraction method is based on ethanol precipitation supplemented by pretreatment steps with a MolYsis kit or saline wash for the removal of human DNA and a final DNA cleanup step with solid-phase reversible immobilization beads. The protocol yielded ?0.2 ng/?l of DNA for 90% (MolYsis kit) and 83% (saline wash) of positive MGIT cultures. A total of 144 (94%) of the 154 samples sequenced on the MiSeq platform (Illumina) achieved the target of 1 million reads, with <5% of reads derived from human or nasopharyngeal flora for 88% and 91% of samples, respectively. A total of 59 (98%) of 60 samples that were identified by the national mycobacterial reference laboratory (NMRL) as Mycobacterium tuberculosis were successfully mapped to the H37Rv reference, with >90% coverage achieved. The DNA extraction protocol, therefore, will facilitate fast and accurate identification of mycobacterial species and resistance using a range of bioinformatics tools. PMID:25631807

  8. Authenticating DNA Extracted From Ancient Skeletal Remains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. M. Hedges

    1995-01-01

    The survival of DNA, the most informative biological molecule, for periods of at least several thousand years in bone was demonstrated more than four years ago. However, difficulties with authenticating ancient DNA have made diagenetic studies problematic. It is therefore essential that these problems be overcome before the question of DNA survival can be addressed. Here we describe our work

  9. Influence of DNA extraction on oral microbial profiles obtained via 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Abusleme, Loreto; Hong, Bo-Young; Dupuy, Amanda K.; Strausbaugh, Linda D.; Diaz, Patricia I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective The advent of next-generation sequencing has significantly facilitated characterization of the oral microbiome. Despite great efforts in streamlining the processes of sequencing and data curation, upstream steps required for amplicon library generation could still influence 16S rRNA gene-based microbial profiles. Among upstream processes, DNA extraction is a critical step that could represent a great source of bias. Accounting for bias introduced by extraction procedures is important when comparing studies that use different methods. Identifying the method that best portrays communities is also desirable. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate bias introduced by different DNA extraction procedures on oral microbiome profiles. Design Four DNA extraction methods were tested on mock communities consisting of seven representative oral bacteria. Additionally, supragingival plaque samples were collected from seven individuals and divided equally to test two commonly used DNA extraction procedures. Amplicon libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced via 454-pyrosequencing. Results Evaluation of mock communities revealed that DNA yield and bacterial species representation varied with DNA extraction methods. Despite producing the lowest yield of DNA, a method that included bead beating was the only protocol capable of detecting all seven species in the mock community. Comparison of the performance of two commonly used methods (crude lysis and a chemical/enzymatic lysis+column-based DNA isolation) on plaque samples showed no effect of extraction protocols on taxa prevalence but global community structure and relative abundance of individual taxa were affected. At the phylum level, the latter method improved the recovery of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes over crude lysis. Conclusion DNA extraction distorts microbial profiles in simulated and clinical oral samples, reinforcing the importance of careful selection of a DNA extraction protocol to improve species recovery and facilitate data comparison across oral microbiology studies. PMID:24778776

  10. Novel method of DNA extraction from bones assisted DNA identification of World Trade Center victims

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Bille; R Wingrove; M Holland; C Holland; C Cave; J Schumm

    2004-01-01

    DNA identification of many mass fatality victims of the 11 September 2001 attack on the World Trade Centers (WTC) in New York City required development of new analytical methods. Development of novel STR multiplex sets with improved performance using challenged DNA samples is described in an accompanying paper. Here we describe modifications and improvements to procedures used to extract DNA

  11. Proboscidean DNA from Museum and Fossil Specimens: An Assessment of Ancient DNA Extraction and Amplification Techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Yang; Edward M. Golenberg; Jeheskel Shoshani

    1997-01-01

    Applications of reliable DNA extraction and amplification techniques to postmortem samples are critical to ancient DNA research. Commonly used methods for isolating DNA from ancient material were tested and compared using both soft tissue and bones from fossil and contemporary museum proboscideans. DNAs isolated using three principal methods served as templates in subsequent PCR amplifications, and the PCR products were

  12. A modified CTAB DNA extraction procedure for Musa and Ipomoea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. J. Gawel; R. L. Jarret

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of current nucleic acid technologies in crop improvement and phylogenetic studies require the development\\u000a and application of efficient DNA extraction procedures from plants. This paper describes efficient, reliable DNA extraction\\u000a procedures forIpomoea andMusa. These procedures are combinations and modifications of the techniques described by Murray and Thompson (1980) and Saghai-Maroof\\u000a et al. (1984) and are applicable, without further

  13. High efficiency DNA extraction from bone by total demineralization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Odile M. Loreille; Toni M. Diegoli; Jodi A. Irwin; Michael D. Coble; Thomas J. Parsons

    2007-01-01

    In historical cases, missing persons’ identification, mass disasters, and ancient DNA investigations, bone and teeth samples are often the only, and almost always the best, biological material available for DNA typing. This is because of the physical and chemical barrier that the protein:mineral matrix of bone poses to environmental deterioration and biological attack. Most bone extraction protocols utilized in the

  14. Rapid microfluidic solid-phase extraction system for hyper-methylated DNA enrichment and epigenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    De, Arpita; Sparreboom, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin T

    2014-09-01

    Genetic sequence and hyper-methylation profile information from the promoter regions of tumor suppressor genes are important for cancer disease investigation. Since hyper-methylated DNA (hm-DNA) is typically present in ultra-low concentrations in biological samples, such as stool, urine, and saliva, sample enrichment and amplification is typically required before detection. We present a rapid microfluidic solid phase extraction (?SPE) system for the capture and elution of low concentrations of hm-DNA (?1?ng?ml(-1)), based on a protein-DNA capture surface, into small volumes using a passive microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platform. All assay steps have been qualitatively characterized using a real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor, and quantitatively characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. The hm-DNA capture/elution process requires less than 5 min with an efficiency of 71% using a 25??l elution volume and 92% efficiency using a 100??l elution volume. PMID:25538809

  15. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for Bacillus anthracis spores spiked to food and feed matrices at biosafety level 3 conditions.

    PubMed

    Wielinga, Peter R; de Heer, Lianne; de Groot, Astrid; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Bruggeman, Geert; Jordan, Kieran; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2011-11-01

    The DNA extraction efficiency from milk, whey, soy, corn gluten meal, wheat powders and heat-treated corn grain that were spiked with Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis spores was determined. Two steps were critical: lysis of the spores and binding of the free DNA to the DNA binding magnetic beads in the presence of the interfering powders. For the guanidine-thiocyanate based Nuclisens lysis buffer from Biomerieux we found that between 15 and 30% of the spores survived the lysis step. As most lysis buffers in DNA/RNA extraction kits are guanidine based it is likely that other lysis buffers will show a similar partial lysis of the Bacillus spores. Our results show that soybean flour and wheat flour inhibited the DNA extraction process strongest, leading to unreliable DNA extractions when using too much of the matrix. For corn gluten meal, heat-treated corn grain and milk powders, DNA extraction efficiencies in the presence of 100mg and 10mg of powder resulted in 70%-95% reduced DNA recoveries. The inhibition was, however, reliable and intermediate compared to the inhibition by soy and wheat. Whey powder had the lowest inhibitory effect on DNA-extraction efficiency and recoveries of 70-100% could be reached when using 10mg of powder. The results show that reducing the amount of matrix leads to better DNA-extraction efficiencies, particularly for strongly inhibiting powders such as soy and wheat. Based on these results, a standard protocol to directly isolate DNA from micro-organisms present in complex matrixes such as food and feed powders was designed. PMID:21864928

  16. DNA extraction conditions from Porphyra perforata using LiCl

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong-Ki Hong; Sang-Dal Kim; Miriam Polne-Fuller; Aharon Gibor

    1995-01-01

    A rapid and economical method of DNA extraction from a red seaweedPorphyra perforata J. Agardh has been developed by the use of lithium chloride. This paper describes the optimization of extraction conditions. Heat treatment of tissues in a solution (0.8 M LiCl, 0.6% Sarkosyl, 10 mM EDTA, 0.2% PVPP, 5% ß-mercaptoethanol, pH 9.0) at 55 °C for 10 min extracts

  17. Stepped electrophoresis for movement and concentration of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy Wei-Yun; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2005-03-15

    A fluidic channel patterned with a series of thin-film electrodes makes it possible to move and concentrate DNA in a fluid passing through the fluidic channel. The DNA has an inherent negative charge and by applying a voltage between adjacent electrodes the DNA is caused to move. By using a series of electrodes, when one electrode voltage or charge is made negative with respect to adjacent electrodes, the DNA is repelled away from this electrode and attached to a positive charged electrode of the series. By sequentially making the next electrode of the series negative, the DNA can be moved to and concentrated over the remaining positive electrodes.

  18. Statistical assessment of DNA extraction reagent lot variability in real-time quantitative PCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bushon, R.N.; Kephart, C.M.; Koltun, G.F.; Francy, D.S.; Schaefer, F. W., III; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the variability in lots of a DNA extraction kit using real-time PCR assays for Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Vibrio cholerae. Methods and Results: Replicate aliquots of three bacteria were processed in duplicate with three different lots of a commercial DNA extraction kit. This experiment was repeated in triplicate. Results showed that cycle threshold values were statistically different among the different lots. Conclusions: Differences in DNA extraction reagent lots were found to be a significant source of variability for qPCR results. Steps should be taken to ensure the quality and consistency of reagents. Minimally, we propose that standard curves should be constructed for each new lot of extraction reagents, so that lot-to-lot variation is accounted for in data interpretation. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study highlights the importance of evaluating variability in DNA extraction procedures, especially when different reagent lots are used. Consideration of this variability in data interpretation should be an integral part of studies investigating environmental samples with unknown concentrations of organisms. ?? 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Fern spore extracts can damage DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S E Simán; A C Povey; T H Ward; G P Margison; E Sheffield

    2000-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of the vegetative tissues of bracken fern (Pteridium) has long been established. More recently, the carcinogenic effects of the spores of bracken have also been recognized. Both vegetative tissues and spores of bracken can induce adducts in DNA in animal tissues, but the possible genotoxic or carcinogenic effects of spores from fern species other than bracken are unknown.

  20. Extraction of DNA from decomposed human tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per Hoff-Olsen; Bente Mevåg; Eva Staalstrøm; Bente Hovde; Thore Egeland; Bjørnar Olaisen

    1999-01-01

    Hyperpolymorphic short tandem repetitive DNA sequences, STRs or microsatellites, have become widely used in human identification, particularly in criminal cases and in mass disasters. In such cases the substrates for the analyses may be decomposed biological material, a fact that has to be taken into account when choosing the appropriate casework methods. In this paper we report the evaluation of

  1. Optimization of narirutin extraction during washing step of the pectin production from citrus peels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. C. Kim; D. Y. Lee; C. H. Lee; C. W. Kim

    2004-01-01

    Citrus peels can be a valuable source of pectin and narirutin. Narirutin can be extracted during the washing step of citrus peels in the pectin production process. In this study narirutin extraction conditions were optimized to maximize the narirutin extraction yield while minimized pectin loss. Washing temperature, time, and HCl concentration of the washing solution were chosen as independent variables

  2. Optimization and validation of DNA extraction and real-time PCR assay for the quantitative measurement of residual host cell DNA in biopharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Sellers, J; Kupec, J; Ngo, W; Fenton, S; Yang, T-Y; Grebanier, A

    2014-01-01

    Host cell DNA contamination occurs during the production of biopharmaceuticals and must be controlled and monitored for the purity and safety of the drug products. A sodium iodide-based DNA extraction and a subsequent real time PCR assay were developed and validated for the quantitative measurement of residual host cell DNA impurity in monoclonal antibody therapeutic products. A sodium iodide-based commercial kit was optimized for the removal of interfering matrices. Several incubation steps from the kit protocol were combined and a neutralization buffer was introduced to protein digestion step to eliminate any precipitation from the detergent. The elimination of the two washing steps significantly reduced assay variability from loss of DNA pellets. The optimized DNA extraction procedure can recover DNA close to 100% for DNA concentrations from 10 to 100,000pg/mL. Of the published sequences of repetitive interspersed nuclear elements, we identified a nucleotide mismatch from the published CHO probe. Correction of this nucleotide increased DNA amplification by a thousand fold. The optimized assay was further validated for the quantitation of residual CHO DNA according to ICH guidelines with preset assay acceptance criteria. The method met all assay acceptance criteria and was found linear, accurate and precise for the quantitation of residual CHO in the linear range of 10-100,000pg DNA/mL. LOQ was measured at 10pg DNA/mL and LOD at 1pg DNA/mL. No matrix interference to our validated assay was detected from bioreactor harvest, Protein A eluate or eluate from ion exchange columns. PMID:24042121

  3. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  4. A modular method for the extraction of DNA and RNA, and the separation of DNA pools from diverse environmental sample types

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Mark A.; Torti, Andrea; Eickenbusch, Philip; Michaud, Alexander B.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    A method for the extraction of nucleic acids from a wide range of environmental samples was developed. This method consists of several modules, which can be individually modified to maximize yields in extractions of DNA and RNA or separations of DNA pools. Modules were designed based on elaborate tests, in which permutations of all nucleic acid extraction steps were compared. The final modular protocol is suitable for extractions from igneous rock, air, water, and sediments. Sediments range from high-biomass, organic rich coastal samples to samples from the most oligotrophic region of the world's oceans and the deepest borehole ever studied by scientific ocean drilling. Extraction yields of DNA and RNA are higher than with widely used commercial kits, indicating an advantage to optimizing extraction procedures to match specific sample characteristics. The ability to separate soluble extracellular DNA pools without cell lysis from intracellular and particle-complexed DNA pools may enable new insights into the cycling and preservation of DNA in environmental samples in the future. A general protocol is outlined, along with recommendations for optimizing this general protocol for specific sample types and research goals. PMID:26042110

  5. DNA Extraction from Museum Specimens of Parasitic Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jeremy C.; Mills, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    At the same time that molecular researchers are improving techniques to extract DNA from museum specimens, this increased demand for access to museum specimens has created tension between the need to preserve specimens for maintaining collections and morphological research and the desire to conduct molecular analyses. To address these concerns, we examined the suitability of non-invasive DNA extraction techniques on three species of parasitic Hymenoptera (Braconidae), and test the effects of body size (parasitoid species), age (time since collection), and DNA concentration from each extract on the probability of amplifying meaningful fragments of two commonly used genetic loci. We found that age was a significant factor for determining the probability of success for sequencing both 28S and COI fragments. While the size of the braconid parasitoids significantly affected the total amount of extracted DNA, neither size nor DNA concentration were significant factors for the amplification of either gene region. We also tested several primer combinations of various lengths, but were unable to amplify fragments longer than ?150 base pairs. These short fragments of 28S and COI were however sufficient for species identification, and for the discovery of within species genetic variation. PMID:23077493

  6. Genomic DNA Extraction from Cells by Electroporation on an Integrated Microfluidic Platform

    E-print Network

    Lu, Chang

    Genomic DNA Extraction from Cells by Electroporation on an Integrated Microfluidic Platform Tao. However, there has been no experimental confirmation on whether electrical lysis extracts genomic DNA from for DNA adsorption. We envision that electroporation-based DNA extraction will find use in ultrasensitive

  7. TECHNICAL ADVANCES A rapid column-based ancient DNA extraction method for

    E-print Network

    Reich, David

    TECHNICAL ADVANCES A rapid column-based ancient DNA extraction method for increased sample-quality samples. Therefore, a DNA extraction method that optimizes DNA yields from low-quality samples a method that combines the high DNA yield of batch-based silica extraction with the time

  8. Repeat silica extraction: a simple technique for the removal of PCR inhibitors from DNA extracts

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Repeat silica extraction: a simple technique for the removal of PCR inhibitors from DNA extracts; accepted 28 February 2006 Abstract Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors are often co we review previous research on PCR inhibitors and techniques that address their co

  9. DNA walks one step at a time in electrophoresis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Guan; Bo Wang; Steve Granick

    2011-01-01

    Testing the classical view that in DNA gel electrophoresis, long polymer chains navigate through their gel environment via reptation, we reach a different conclusion: this driven motion proceeds by stick-slip. Our single-molecule experiments visualize fluorescent-labeled lambda-DNA, whose intramolecular conformations are resolved with 30 ms resolution using home-written software. Combining hundreds to thousands of trajectories under amplitudes of electric field ranging

  10. Comparison of commercial RNA extraction kits for preparation of DNA-free total RNA from Salmonella cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lydia V Rump; Benedicta Asamoah; Narjol Gonzalez-Escalona

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The isolation of DNA-free RNA is a crucial step in the reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Every RNA extraction procedure results in RNA samples contaminated with genomic DNA, which can cause false-positive outcomes in highly sensitive applications, including a recently developed quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) assay that targets invA mRNA for the detection of live Salmonella cells. The assay of

  11. Development of microfluidic modules for DNA purification via phenol extraction and analyte concentration using transverse electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Mercedes C.

    In this work, microfluidic platforms have been designed and evaluated to demonstrate microscale DNA purification via organic (phenol) extraction as well as analyte trapping and concentration using a transverse electrokinetic force balance. First, in order to evaluate DNA purification via phenol extraction in a microdevice, an aqueous phase containing protein and DNA and an immiscible receiving organic phase were utilized to evaluate microfluidic DNA extraction under both stratified and droplet-based flow conditions using a serpentine microfluidic device. The droplet based flow resulted in a significant improvement of protein partitioning from the aqueous phase due to the flow recirculation inside each droplet improving material convective transport into the organic phase. The plasmid recovery from bacterial lysates using droplet-based flow was high (>92%) and comparable to the recovery achieved using commercial DNA purification kits and standard macroscale phenol extraction. Second, a converging Y-inlet microfluidic channel with integrated coplanar electrodes was used to investigate transverse DNA and protein migration under uniform direct current (DC) electric fields. Negatively charged samples diluted in low and high ionic strength buffers were co-infused with a receiving buffer of the same ionic strength into a main channel where transverse electric fields were applied. Experimental results demonstrated that charged analytes could traverse the channel width and accumulate at the positive bias electrode in a low electroosmotic mobility and high electrophoretic mobility condition (high ionic strength buffer) or migrated towards an equilibrium position within the channel when both electroosmotic mobility and electrophoretic mobility are high (low ionic strength buffer). The different behaviors are the result of a balance between the electrophoretic force and a drag force induced by a recirculating electroosmotic flow generated across the channel width due to the bounding walls. The miniaturization of DNA phenol extraction and the novel electrokinetic trapping techniques presented in this research are the initial steps towards an efficient DNA sample preparation chip which could be integrated with post-extraction DNA manipulations for genomic analysis modules such as capillary electrophoretic separations.

  12. TECHNICAL NOTE Open Access Optimized microbial DNA extraction from

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TECHNICAL NOTE Open Access Optimized microbial DNA extraction from diarrheic stools Emilie Donatin1, Marseille-Cedex 5, France © 2012 Donatin and Drancourt; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access pathogens reportedly causing 50% of cases of diarrhea [2]. As most of these pathogens are fastidious

  13. Site-Specific Initiation of DNA Replication inXenopusEgg Extract Requires Nuclear Structure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID M. GILBERT; HIROSHI MIYAZAWA; ANDMELVIN L. DEPAMPHILIS

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Xenopus egg extract can initiate DNA replication in purified DNA mole- cules once the DNA is organized into a pseudonucleus. DNA replication under these conditions is independent of DNA sequence and begins at many sites distributed randomly throughout the molecules. In contrast, DNA replication in the chromosomes of cultured animal cells initiates at specific, heritable

  14. DNA Extraction from Protozoan Oocysts/Cysts in Feces for Diagnostic PCR

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PCR detection of intestinal protozoa is often restrained by a poor DNA recovery or by inhibitors present in feces. The need for an extraction protocol that can overcome these obstacles is therefore clear. QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) was evaluated for its ability to recover DNA from oocysts/cysts directly from feces. Twenty-five Giardia-positive, 15 Cryptosporidium-positive, 15 Entamoeba histolytica-positive, and 45 protozoa-free samples were processed as control by microscopy and immunoassay tests. DNA extracts were amplified using 3 sets of published primers. Following the manufacturer's protocol, the kit showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% towards Giardia and Entamoeba. However, for Cryptosporidium, the sensitivity and specificity were 60% (9/15) and 100%, respectively. A series of optimization experiments involving various steps of the kit's protocol were conducted using Cryptosporidium-positive samples. The best DNA recoveries were gained by raising the lysis temperature to the boiling point for 10 min and the incubation time of the InhibitEX tablet to 5 min. Also, using a pre-cooled ethanol for nucleic acid precipitation and small elution volume (50-100 µl) were valuable. The sensitivity of the amended protocol to Cryptosporidium was raised to 100%. Cryptosporidium DNA was successfully amplified by either the first or the second primer set. When applied on parasite-free feces spiked with variable oocysts/cysts counts, ? 2 oocysts/cysts were theoretically enough for detection by PCR. To conclude, the Qiagen kit with the amended protocol was proved to be suitable for protozoan DNA extraction directly from feces and support PCR diagnosis. PMID:25031466

  15. DNA extraction from protozoan oocysts/cysts in feces for diagnostic PCR.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yousry

    2014-06-01

    PCR detection of intestinal protozoa is often restrained by a poor DNA recovery or by inhibitors present in feces. The need for an extraction protocol that can overcome these obstacles is therefore clear. QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) was evaluated for its ability to recover DNA from oocysts/cysts directly from feces. Twenty-five Giardia-positive, 15 Cryptosporidium-positive, 15 Entamoeba histolytica-positive, and 45 protozoa-free samples were processed as control by microscopy and immunoassay tests. DNA extracts were amplified using 3 sets of published primers. Following the manufacturer's protocol, the kit showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% towards Giardia and Entamoeba. However, for Cryptosporidium, the sensitivity and specificity were 60% (9/15) and 100%, respectively. A series of optimization experiments involving various steps of the kit's protocol were conducted using Cryptosporidium-positive samples. The best DNA recoveries were gained by raising the lysis temperature to the boiling point for 10 min and the incubation time of the InhibitEX tablet to 5 min. Also, using a pre-cooled ethanol for nucleic acid precipitation and small elution volume (50-100 µl) were valuable. The sensitivity of the amended protocol to Cryptosporidium was raised to 100%. Cryptosporidium DNA was successfully amplified by either the first or the second primer set. When applied on parasite-free feces spiked with variable oocysts/cysts counts, ? 2 oocysts/cysts were theoretically enough for detection by PCR. To conclude, the Qiagen kit with the amended protocol was proved to be suitable for protozoan DNA extraction directly from feces and support PCR diagnosis. PMID:25031466

  16. Two steps away from novelty--principles of bacterial DNA uptake.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Nora-Johanna; Stingl, Kerstin

    2011-05-01

    Transport of DNA across bacterial membranes during natural transformation is a fascinating and elaborate process. It requires the functional integrity of huge multi-protein complexes present in the bacterial envelope at distinct loci. After successful mapping of essential gene products involved in natural transformation, current research focuses on the functional interplay of these components in order to understand the mechanisms how DNA enters the bacterium. Here, we discuss the model of a two-step DNA uptake process in competent Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The first step comprises the transfer of DNA from the bacterial surface to the cytoplasmic membrane. For this purpose, bacteria use a variety of machineries, mostly, but not necessarily, sharing key homologous components. The second step is the translocation of DNA across the cytoplasmic membrane, a tight barrier at which ion gradients are established for energization of the cell. Crossing the latter is mediated by a protein complex harbouring a highly conserved membrane channel. On the basis of current data, at least the first step is uncoupled from the second. This review intends to highlight mechanistic features of both steps of bacterial DNA uptake by the integrative interpretation of genetic, biochemical and biophysical data. PMID:21435041

  17. A simplified genomic DNA extraction protocol for pre-germination genotyping in rice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y B; Zhao, F L; Chen, H D; Li, H; Ni, D H; Wei, P C; Sheng, W; Teng, J T; Zhang, A M; Xue, J P

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping is a critical step for molecular marker-assisted selection in rice. Rice genomic DNA samples for genotyping are typically isolated from living tissues such as seedlings. This requires the germination of all candidate seeds and extraction of DNA from the seedlings. Currently, an ideal individual is selected from a very large number of plants, which is time- and labor-consuming, requiring several transplantations of materials and sampling processes. In this study, we developed a simplified genomic DNA extraction protocol in rice by using amylase to treat half-seeds. The yields of genomic DNA from a half-seed of Indica and Japonica rice were greater than 203.8 ± 32.5 and 143.2 ± 25.5 ng, respectively, and the 260/280 nm absorbance ratio was 1.75-2.10. The DNA was confirmed to be sufficient for polymerase chain reaction amplification and can be used in a marker-assisted selection program. PMID:26125841

  18. Method of preparing an equimolar DNA mixture for one-step DNA assembly of over 50 fragments

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Kenji; Sato, Yukari; Kobayashi, Yuka; Gondo, Maiko; Hasebe, Masako; Togashi, Takashi; Tomita, Masaru; Itaya, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In the era of synthetic biology, techniques for rapidly constructing a designer long DNA from short DNA fragments are desired. To realize this, we attempted to establish a method for one-step DNA assembly of unprecedentedly large numbers of fragments. The basic technology is the Ordered Gene Assembly in Bacillus subtilis (OGAB) method, which uses the plasmid transformation system of B. subtilis. Since this method doesn’t require circular ligation products but needs tandem repeat ligation products, the degree of deviation in the molar concentration of the material DNAs is the only determinant that affects the efficiency of DNA assembly. The strict standardization of the size of plasmids that clone the DNA block and the measurement of the block in the state of intact plasmid improve the reliability of this step, with the coefficient of variation of the molar concentrations becoming 7%. By coupling this method with the OGAB method, one-step assembly of more than 50 DNA fragments becomes feasible. PMID:25990947

  19. The fate of the chemical warfare agent during DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Della A; Hulst, Albert G; de Reuver, Leo P J; van Krimpen, Simon H; van Baar, Ben M L

    2007-11-01

    Forensic laboratories do not have the infrastructure to process or store contaminated DNA samples that have been recovered from a crime scene contaminated with chemical or biological warfare agents. Previous research has shown that DNA profiles can be recovered from blood exposed to several chemical warfare agents after the agent has been removed. The fate of four toxic agents, sulfur mustard, sodium 2-fluoroacetate, sarin, and diazinon, in a lysis buffer used in Promega DNA IQ extraction protocol was studied to determine if extraction would render the samples safe. Two independent analytical methods were used per agent, selected from GC-MS, 1H NMR, 19F NMR, (31)P NMR, or LC-ES MS. The methods were validated before use. Determinations were carried out in a semi-quantitative way, by direct comparison to standards. Agent levels in the elution buffer were found to be below the detectable limits for mustard, sarin, sodium 2-fluoroacetate or low (<0.02 mg/mL) for diazinon. Therefore, once extracted these DNA samples could be safely processed in a forensic laboratory. PMID:18093062

  20. A filter paper-based microdevice for low-cost, rapid, and automated DNA extraction and amplification from diverse sample types.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wupeng; Zhuang, Bin; Zhang, Pengfei; Han, Junping; Li, Cai-Xia; Liu, Peng

    2014-10-01

    A plastic microfluidic device that integrates a filter disc as a DNA capture phase was successfully developed for low-cost, rapid and automated DNA extraction and PCR amplification from various raw samples. The microdevice was constructed by sandwiching a piece of Fusion 5 filter, as well as a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) membrane, between two PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) layers. An automated DNA extraction from 1 ?L of human whole blood can be finished on the chip in 7 minutes by sequentially aspirating NaOH, HCl, and water through the filter. The filter disc containing extracted DNA was then taken out directly for PCR. On-chip DNA purification from 0.25-1 ?L of human whole blood yielded 8.1-21.8 ng of DNA, higher than those obtained using QIAamp® DNA Micro kits. To realize DNA extraction from raw samples, an additional sample loading chamber containing a filter net with an 80 ?m mesh size was designed in front of the extraction chamber to accommodate sample materials. Real-world samples, including whole blood, dried blood stains on Whatman® 903 paper, dried blood stains on FTA™ cards, buccal swabs, saliva, and cigarette butts, can all be processed in the system in 8 minutes. In addition, multiplex amplification of 15 STR (short tandem repeat) loci and Sanger-based DNA sequencing of the 520 bp GJB2 gene were accomplished from the filters that contained extracted DNA from blood. To further prove the feasibility of integrating this extraction method with downstream analyses, "in situ" PCR amplifications were successfully performed in the DNA extraction chamber following DNA purification from blood and blood stains without DNA elution. Using a modified protocol to bond the PDMS and PMMA, our plastic PDMS devices withstood the PCR process without any leakage. This study represents a significant step towards the practical application of on-chip DNA extraction methods, as well as the development of fully integrated genetic analytical systems. PMID:25070548

  1. Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated proteins

    E-print Network

    Blow, J. Julian

    Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated-free system DNA replication Chromatin a b s t r a c t The use of cell-free extracts prepared from eggs apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. DNA added to the extract is first assembled into a nucleus

  2. Kemp Lab Ancient DNA Extraction Protocol-"Old" Method Updated by Brian M. Kemp, September 2012

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Kemp Lab Ancient DNA Extraction Protocol- "Old" Method Updated by Brian M. Kemp, September 2012 to the "new" method as described in the "Kemp Lab Ancient DNA Extraction Protocol- `New' Method" document. Notes on Contamination Control Since DNA extracted from ancient remains is typically recovered in low

  3. Edinburgh Research Explorer The Impact of Different DNA Extraction Kits and Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer The Impact of Different DNA Extraction Kits and Laboratories upon, HJ, Parkhill, J, Lees, CW & Hold, GL 2014, 'The Impact of Different DNA Extraction Kits date: 28. Jun. 2014 #12;The Impact of Different DNA Extraction Kits and Laboratories upon

  4. DNA Extraction From Processed Wood: A Case Study for the Identification of an Endangered

    E-print Network

    Protocols DNA Extraction From Processed Wood: A Case Study for the Identification of an Endangered to the extraction of whole genomic DNA from processed wood samples to explore the possibility of identifying an endangered trop- ical timber species by using DNA sequencing technology. High-yield and high-quality DNA

  5. Comparison of Rapid DNA Extraction Methods Applied to PCR Identification of Medicinal Mushroom Ganoderma spp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuanwei Zhou; Qizhang Li; Jingya Zhao; Kexuan Tang; Juan Lin; Yizhou Yin

    2007-01-01

    Four different DNA extraction methods were used to extract genomic DNA of the medicinal mushroom Lingzhi from its developing stage materials, such as mycelium, dry fruiting body, or sliced and spore powder or sporoderm?broken spore powder. The DNA samples were analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis, UV spectrophotometer, and PCR amplification. According to the average yields and purity of DNA, high

  6. DNA Extraction from Soils: Old Bias for New Microbial Diversity Analysis Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Martin-Laurent; L. Philippot; S. Hallet; R. Chaussod; J. C. Germon; G. Soulas; G. Catroux

    2001-01-01

    The impact of three different soil DNA extraction methods on bacterial diversity was evaluated using PCR-based 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. DNA extracted directly from three soils showing contrasting phys- icochemical properties was subjected to amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and ribosomal inter- genic spacer analysis (RISA). The obtained RISA patterns revealed clearly that both the phylotype abundance and the composition

  7. Fingerprints and DNA: STR typing of DNA extracted from adhesive tape after processing for fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Zamir, A; Springer, E; Glattstein, B

    2000-05-01

    An exhibit that is often received for examination in cases of robbery or terrorist activity is adhesive tape. This type of exhibit can often, but not always, be successfully processed for fingerprints. The question arises whether or not it is possible to extract and type DNA after the tape has been sequentially processed for fingerprints. In this work, various donors left fingerprints on the adhesive side of tapes. The tapes were then sequentially processed for fingerprints using an alternate light source, cyanoacrylate fuming, and staining with BY-40 and then crystal violet. DNA was subsequently successfully extracted, amplified and typed for six STR loci. PMID:10855979

  8. Evaluation of Automated and Manual Commercial DNA Extraction Methods for Recovery of Brucella DNA from Suspensions and Spiked Swabs ?

    PubMed Central

    Dauphin, Leslie A.; Hutchins, Rebecca J.; Bost, Liberty A.; Bowen, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated automated and manual commercial DNA extraction methods for their ability to recover DNA from Brucella species in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) suspension and from spiked swab specimens. Six extraction methods, representing several of the methodologies which are commercially available for DNA extraction, as well as representing various throughput capacities, were evaluated: the MagNA Pure Compact and the MagNA Pure LC instruments, the IT 1-2-3 DNA sample purification kit, the MasterPure Complete DNA and RNA purification kit, the QIAamp DNA blood mini kit, and the UltraClean microbial DNA isolation kit. These six extraction methods were performed upon three pathogenic Brucella species: B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. Viability testing of the DNA extracts indicated that all six extraction methods were efficient at inactivating virulent Brucella spp. Real-time PCR analysis using Brucella genus- and species-specific TaqMan assays revealed that use of the MasterPure kit resulted in superior levels of detection from bacterial suspensions, while the MasterPure kit and MagNA Pure Compact performed equally well for extraction of spiked swab samples. This study demonstrated that DNA extraction methodologies differ in their ability to recover Brucella DNA from PBS bacterial suspensions and from swab specimens and, thus, that the extraction method used for a given type of sample matrix can influence the sensitivity of real-time PCR assays for Brucella. PMID:19846627

  9. Rapid and simple method for DNA extraction from plant and algal species suitable for PCR amplification using a chelating resin Chelex 100

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwon HwangBo; Su Hyun Son; Jong Suk Lee; Sung Ran Min; Suk Min Ko; Jang R. Liu; Dongsu Choi; Won Joong Jeong

    2010-01-01

    A DNA extraction method using Chelex 100 is widely used for bacteria, Chlamydomonas, and animal cell lines, but only rarely for plant materials due to the need for additional time-consuming and tedious steps.\\u000a We have modified the Chelex 100 protocol and successfully developed a rapid and simple method of DNA extraction for efficient\\u000a PCR-based detection of transgenes from a variety

  10. Optimisation of DNA extraction from rumen bacteria L Broudiscou H Geissler A Broudiscou

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimisation of DNA extraction from rumen bacteria L Broudiscou H Geissler A Broudiscou 'INRA into DNA is the use of a DNA extraction procedure which produces a non selective lysis of cells and gives : 5mM, sodium deoxycholate : 4 mM, SDS : 2 mM, Triton X-100 :0.3 mM, SLaS : 17 mM). DNA was extracted

  11. Akonni TruTip® and Qiagen® Methods for Extraction of Fetal Circulating DNA - Evaluation by Real-Time and Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Rebecca C.; Gindlesperger, Alissa; Stokes, Tinsley; Lopez, David; Hyman, Lynn; Freed, Michelle; Belgrader, Phil; Harvey, Jeanne; Li, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Due to the low percentage of fetal DNA present in maternal plasma (< 10%) during early gestation, efficient extraction processes are required for successful downstream detection applications in non-invasive prenatal diagnostic testing. In this study, two extraction methods using similar chemistries but different workflows were compared for isolation efficiency and percent fetal DNA recovery. The Akonni Biosystems TruTip technology uses a binding matrix embedded in a pipette tip; the Circulating Nucleic Acids Kit from Qiagen employs a spin column approach. The TruTip method adds an extra step to decrease the recovery of DNA fragments larger than 600 bp from the sample to yield an overall higher percentage of smaller molecular weight DNA, effectively enriching for fetal DNA. In this evaluation, three separate extraction comparison studies were performed - a dilution series of fragmented DNA in plasma, a set of clinical maternal samples, and a blood collection tube time point study of maternal samples. Both extraction methods were found to efficiently extract small fragment DNA from large volumes of plasma. In the amended samples, the TruTip extraction method was ~15% less efficient with overall DNA recovery, but yielded an 87% increase in % fetal DNA relative to the Qiagen method. The average percent increase of fetal DNA of TruTip extracted samples compared to the Qiagen method was 55% for all sets of blinded clinical samples. A study comparing extraction efficiencies from whole blood samples incubated up to 48 hours prior to processing into plasma resulted in more consistent % fetal DNA recoveries using TruTip. The extracted products were tested on two detection platforms, quantitative real-time PCR and droplet digital PCR, and yielded similar results for both extraction methods. PMID:23936545

  12. Deparaffinization with mineral oil: a simple procedure for extraction of high-quality DNA from archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples.

    PubMed

    Heikal, Nahla; Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Agarwal, Archana M

    2014-09-01

    Extracting DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival samples remains difficult. Successful polymerase chain reactions (PCR) with DNA extracted from FFPE samples is still very low. We extracted DNA from 12 recent and old archival FFPE bone marrow trephine biopsies by use of a simple protocol on the basis of deparaffinization with molecular biology-grade mineral oil followed by DNA extraction with the Qiagen FFPE kit. Comparison of this deparaffinization method with standard protocols, for example, xylene or Hemo-D with subsequent rehydration using graded ethanols, was investigated. The quality and quantity of extracted DNA were tested by a combination of ultraviolet spectroscopy, analysis on a Caliper LabChip GX, and real-time PCR combined with high-resolution melt analysis. Highest quality PCR-amplifiable DNA was obtained by deparaffinization with mineral oil, whereas more variable results were obtained for the other 2 deparaffinization procedures. This result was confirmed by real-time PCR and high-resolution melt analysis. Besides improvements in the quality of extracted DNA, use of mineral oil for deparaffinization has the added benefit of decreased time (20 vs. 75 min) and a significant reduction of hands-on labor (1 step vs. multiple hands-on centrifugation and decanting steps). PMID:24897067

  13. Effect of DNA Extraction Methods on the Apparent Structure of Yak Rumen Microbial Communities as Revealed by 16S rDNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Bing; Lan, Dao-Liang; Tang, Cheng; Yang, Xiao-Nong; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    To more efficiently identify the microbial community of the yak rumen, the standardization of DNA extraction is key to ensure fidelity while studying environmental microbial communities. In this study, we systematically compared the efficiency of several extraction methods based on DNA yield, purity, and 16S rDNA sequencing to determine the optimal DNA extraction methods whose DNA products reflect complete bacterial communities. The results indicate that method 6 (hexadecyltrimethylammomium bromide-lysozyme-physical lysis by bead beating) is recommended for the DNA isolation of the rumen microbial community due to its high yield, operational taxonomic unit, bacterial diversity, and excellent cell-breaking capability. The results also indicate that the bead-beating step is necessary to effectively break down the cell walls of all of the microbes, especially Gram-positive bacteria. Another aim of this study was to preliminarily analyze the bacterial community via 16S rDNA sequencing. The microbial community spanned approximately 21 phyla, 35 classes, 75 families, and 112 genera. A comparative analysis showed some variations in the microbial community between yaks and cattle that may be attributed to diet and environmental differences. Interestingly, numerous uncultured or unclassified bacteria were found in yak rumen, suggesting that further research is required to determine the specific functional and ecological roles of these bacteria in yak rumen. In summary, the investigation of the optimal DNA extraction methods and the preliminary evaluation of the bacterial community composition of yak rumen support further identification of the specificity of the rumen microbial community in yak and the discovery of distinct gene resources. PMID:26094313

  14. Using Concrete & Representational Experiences to Understand the Structure of DNA: A Four-Step Instructional Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Richards, Debbie; Collins, James; Taylor, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    A description of learning experience that uses a four-step instrumentational framework involving concrete and representational experiences to promote conceptual understanding of abstract biological concepts by a series of closely-related activities is presented. The students are introduced to the structure and implications of DNA using four…

  15. Single-Step DNA Immobilization on Antifouling Self-Assembled Monolayers Covalently Bound to Silicon (111)

    E-print Network

    Kilian, Kristopher A.

    Single-Step DNA Immobilization on Antifouling Self-Assembled Monolayers Covalently Bound to Silicon-Hterminatedsiliconsurfaces5,6 (thatis,withoutanintervening oxide layer) provide an alternative self-assembly system-terminatedtri(ethyleneoxide)moietiesonSi-Hsurfacesyieldshomogeneous monolayers for the efficient coupling of biomolecules. The wetting properties of the epoxide

  16. One-step DNA-programmed growth of luminescent and biofunctionalized nanocrystals

    E-print Network

    One-step DNA-programmed growth of luminescent and biofunctionalized nanocrystals Nan Ma1 , Edward H. Sargent2 and Shana O. Kelley1,3 * Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are widely used as lumi- phores- lized. During synthesis, nanocrystals are typically passivated with hydrophobic organic ligands1 , so

  17. 'Direct PCR' optimization yields a rapid, cost-effective, nondestructive and efficient method for obtaining DNA barcodes without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Hing; Tay, Ywee Chieh; Puniamoorthy, Jayanthi; Balke, Michael; Cranston, Peter S; Meier, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    Macroinvertebrates that are collected in large numbers pose major problems in basic and applied biodiversity research: identification to species via morphology is often difficult, slow and/or expensive. DNA barcodes are an attractive alternative or complementary source of information. Unfortunately, obtaining DNA barcodes from specimens requires many steps and thus time and money. Here, we promote a short cut to DNA barcoding, that is, a nondestructive PCR method that skips DNA extraction ('direct PCR') and that can be used for a broad range of invertebrate taxa. We demonstrate how direct PCR can be optimized for the larvae and adults of nonbiting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae), a typical invertebrate group that is abundant, contains important bioindicator species, but is difficult to identify based on morphological features. After optimization, direct PCR yields high PCR success rates (>90%), preserves delicate morphological features (e.g. details of genitalia, and larval head capsules) while allowing for the recovery of genomic DNA. We also document that direct PCR can be successfully optimized for a wide range of other invertebrate taxa that need routine barcoding (flies: Culicidae, Drosophilidae, Dolichopodidae, Sepsidae; sea stars: Oreasteridae). Key for obtaining high PCR success rates is optimizing (i) tissue quantity, (ii) body part, (iii) primer pair and (iv) type of Taq polymerase. Unfortunately, not all invertebrates appear suitable because direct PCR has low success rates for other taxa that were tested (e.g. Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Copepoda, Hymenoptera: Formicidae and Odonata). It appears that the technique is less successful for heavily sclerotized insects and/or those with many exocrine glands. PMID:24816169

  18. Effcient recovery of environmental DNA for expression cloning by indirect extraction methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dick B. Janssen; Erik J. de Vries; Esther M. Gabor

    2003-01-01

    Using direct and cell extraction-based (indirect) isolation methods, DNA was obtained from environmental samples with largely differing characteristics (loam soil, sand soil, sediment, activated sludge, and compost) and evaluated with respect to the comprised bacterial diversity and its suitability for expression cloning in Escherichia coli. Indirect DNA extraction methods yielded 10 to 100-fold lower amounts of DNA than direct procedures,

  19. Effects of Brussels sprouts extracts on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA strand breaks in human lymphocytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C.-Y Zhu; S Loft

    2001-01-01

    Aqueous Brussels sprouts extracts inhibit oxidation of isolated DNA in vitro, possibly through scavenging oxygen radicals. We have studied the effect of preincubating human lymphocytes with aqueous extracts of raw, cooked and autolysed Brussels sprouts and the glucosinolate, sinigrin, on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage, strand breaks and base oxidation, in vitro by means of the Comet assay. DNA repair enzymes

  20. Microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies is improved by avoiding mechanical cell disruption

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Nava, Gerardo M.; Benefiel, Ann C.; Greenberg, Eugene; Gaskins, H. Rex

    2011-01-01

    Currently, standard protocols for microbial DNA extraction from intestinal tissues do not exist. We assessed the efficiency of a commercial kit with and without mechanical disruption. Better quality DNA was obtained without mechanical disruption. Thus, it appears that bead-beating is not required for efficient microbial DNA extraction from intestinal biopsies. PMID:21820015

  1. Nuclear Assembly with k DNA in Fractionated Xenopus Egg Extracts: An Unexpected Role for Glycogen in

    E-print Network

    Forbes, Douglass

    Nuclear Assembly with k DNA in Fractionated Xenopus Egg Extracts: An Unexpected Role for Glycogen. Crude extracts of Xenopus eggs are capable of nuclear assembly around chromatin templates or even around protein-free, naked DNA templates. Here the requirements for nuclear assembly around a naked DNA template

  2. Tissue extraction of DNA and RNA and analysis by the polymerase chain reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D P Jackson; F A Lewis; G R Taylor; A W Boylston; P Quirke

    1990-01-01

    Several DNA extraction techniques were quantitatively and qualitatively compared using both fresh and paraffin wax embedded tissue and their suitability investigated for providing DNA and RNA for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A one hour incubation with proteinase K was the most efficient DNA extraction procedure for fresh tissue. For paraffin wax embedded tissue a five day incubation with proteinase

  3. Rapid techniques for DNA extraction from routinely processed archival tissue for use in PCR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Sepp; I Szabó; H Uda; H Sakamoto

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the ability of four rapid DNA extraction methods to provide DNA for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from routinely fixed, paraffin wax embedded archival tissues. METHODS--Eighteen blocks of various tissues, 18 blocks of cervical cancer specimens, and nine blocks of B cell lymphomas were investigated. Both normal and biopsy specimen sized tissues were studied. DNA was extracted using

  4. A simple and cost-effective method of DNA extraction from small formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue for molecular oncologic testing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraction of DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a critical step in molecular oncologic testing. As molecular oncology testing becomes more important for prognostic and therapeutic decision making and tissue specimens become smaller due to earlier detection of suspicious lesions and the use of fine needle aspiration methods for tissue collection, it becomes more challenging for the typical molecular pathology laboratory to obtain reliable test results. We developed a DNA extraction method to obtain sufficient quantity and high quality genomic DNA from limited FFPE tissue for molecular oncology testing using a combination of H&E stained slides, a matrix capture method and the Qiagen DNA column. Methods Three DNA extraction methods were compared: our standard procedure of manually scraping tissue from unstained slides followed by DNA extraction using the QIAamp FFPE column (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), a glue capture method (Pinpoint Solution, Zymo Research Corp, Inc) on H&E stained slides followed by DNA extraction using either the QIAamp column or the column included with the Pinpoint kit (Zymo Research). The DNA extraction protocol was optimized. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired two-sample student’s t-test. Results The combination of the matrix capture method with the QIAamp column gave an equivalent amount of DNA as our standard extraction method using the unstained slides and a 4.6-fold higher DNA yield than using the Zymo column included in the Pinpoint Slide Solution kit. Several molecular tests were performed and DNA purified using the new method gave the same results as for the previous methods. Conclusions Using H&E stained slides allows visual confirmation of tumor cells during microdissection. The Pinpoint solution made removal of specific tissue from the slides easier and reduced the risk of contamination and tissue loss. This DNA extraction method is simple, cost-effective, and blends with our current workflow requiring no additional equipment. PMID:25067909

  5. Detecting Gene Symbols and Names in Biological Texts: A First Step toward Pertinent Information Extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Jacq; Denys Proux; Francois Rechenmann; Laurent Julliard; Violaine Pillet

    1998-01-01

    Gathering data on molecular interactions to be fed into a specialized database has motivatedthe development of a computer system to help extracting pertinent information from texts, relyingon advanced linguistic tools, completed with object-oriented knowledge modeling capabilities. Asa first step toward this challenging objective, a program for the identification of gene symbols andnames inside sentences has been devised. The main difficulty

  6. Steps and Bumps: Precision Extraction of Discrete States of Molecular Max A. Little,

    E-print Network

    Berry, Richard

    of discrete states observed using advanced experimental techniques such as Fo¨rster resonance energy transfer College London, London, United Kingdom ABSTRACT We report statistical time-series analysis tools providingSteps and Bumps: Precision Extraction of Discrete States of Molecular Machines Max A. Little

  7. Genome of Hepatitis B Virus: Restriction Enzyme Cleavage and Structure of DNA Extracted from Dane Particles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesse Summers; Anna O'Connell; Irving Millman

    1975-01-01

    DNA extracted from Dane particles has been characterized by gel electrophoresis and restriction enzyme cleavage with endonuclease R\\\\cdot HaeIII (from Hemophilus aegyptius). Dane particle DNA is proposed to be a double-stranded circular DNA approximately 3600 nucleotides in length containing a single-stranded gap of 600-2100 nucleotides. The endogenous DNA polymerase (DNA nucleotidyltransferase; deoxynucleosidetriphosphate:DNA deoxynucleotidyltransferase; EC 2.7.7.7) reaction appears to repair this

  8. Comparisons of direct extraction methods of microbial DNA from different paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Rashedul; Sultana, Tahera; Melvin Joe, M.; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Sa, Tongmin

    2012-01-01

    Molecular analyses for the study of soil microbial communities often depend on the direct extraction of DNA from soils. The present work compares the effectiveness of three different methods of extracting microbial DNA from seven different paddy soils. Comparison among different DNA extraction methods against different paddy soil samples revealed a marked variation in DNA yields from 3.18–20.17 ?g DNA/g of dry soil. However, irrespective of the soil samples and extraction methods the DNA fragment size was >10 kb. Among the methods evaluated, method-C (chemical–enzymatic–mechanical) had better cell lysis efficiency and DNA yield. After purification of crude DNA by Purification Kit, A260/A230 and A260/A280 ratios of the DNA obtained by method-C reached up to 2.27 and 1.89, respectively, sustaining the efficacy of this technique in removing humic acid, protein and other contaminants. Results of the comprehensive evaluation of DNA extraction methods suggest that method-C is superior to other two methods (chemical–enzymatic and chemical–mechanical), and was the best choice for extraction of total DNA from soil samples. Since soil type and microbial community characteristics influence DNA recovery, this study provides guidance for choosing appropriate extraction and purification methods according to experimental goals. PMID:23961194

  9. Visualizing the Spatial Relationships between Defined DNA Sequences and the Axial Region of Extracted Metaphase Chromosomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy A Bickmore; Kathy Oghene

    1996-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to extracted metaphase chromosomes, we present visual evidence that specific human DNA sequences occupy distinctive positions with respect to the axial region of chromosomes and that the DNA is organized into loops emanating from this region. In a stretch of unique DNA on chromosome 11, large loops of DNA can be traced and one specific

  10. Comparison of different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from reef corals.

    PubMed

    Santos, H F; Carmo, F L; Leite, D C A; Jesus, H E; Maalouf, P De Carvalho; Almeida, C; Soriano, A U; Altomari, D; Suhett, L; Vólaro, V; Valoni, E; Francisco, M; Vieira, J; Rocha, R; Sardinha, B L; Mendes, L B; João, R R; Lacava, B; Jesus, R F; Sebastian, G V; Pessoa, A; van Elsas, J D; Rezende, R P; Pires, D O; Duarte, G; Castro, C B; Rosado, A S; Peixoto, R S

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to test different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from the coral Mussismilia harttii. Four different commercial kits were tested, three of them based on methods for DNA extraction from soil (FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, MP Bio, PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio, and ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit, Zymo Research) and one kit for DNA extraction from plants (UltraClean Plant DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio). Five polyps of the same colony of M. harttii were macerated and aliquots were submitted to DNA extraction by the different kits. After extraction, the DNA was quantified and PCR-DGGE was used to study the molecular fingerprint of Bacteria and Eukarya. Among the four kits tested, the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount of DNA extracted, yielding about three times more DNA than the other kits. Also, we observed a higher number and intensities of DGGE bands for both Bacteria and Eukarya with the same kit. Considering these results, we suggested that the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit is the best adapted for the study of the microbial communities of corals. PMID:24031859

  11. Comparison of different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Santos, H.F.; Carmo, F.L.; Leite, D.C.A.; Jesus, H.E.; Maalouf, P. De Carvalho; Almeida, C.; Soriano, A.U.; Altomari, D.; Suhett, L.; Vólaro, V.; Valoni, E.; Francisco, M.; Vieira, J.; Rocha, R.; Sardinha, B.L.; Mendes, L.B.; João, R.R.; Lacava, B.; Jesus, R.F.; Sebastian, G.V.; Pessoa, A.; van Elsas, J.D.; Rezende, R.P.; Pires, D.O.; Duarte, G.; Castro, C.B.; Rosado, A.S.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to test different protocols for the extraction of microbial DNA from the coral Mussismilia harttii. Four different commercial kits were tested, three of them based on methods for DNA extraction from soil (FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, MP Bio, PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio, and ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit, Zymo Research) and one kit for DNA extraction from plants (UltraClean Plant DNA Isolation Kit, MoBio). Five polyps of the same colony of M. harttii were macerated and aliquots were submitted to DNA extraction by the different kits. After extraction, the DNA was quantified and PCR-DGGE was used to study the molecular fingerprint of Bacteria and Eukarya. Among the four kits tested, the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount of DNA extracted, yielding about three times more DNA than the other kits. Also, we observed a higher number and intensities of DGGE bands for both Bacteria and Eukarya with the same kit. Considering these results, we suggested that the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit is the best adapted for the study of the microbial communities of corals. PMID:24031859

  12. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  13. Effects of growth medium selection on plasmid DNA production and initial processing steps.

    PubMed

    O'Kennedy, R D; Baldwin, C; Keshavarz-Moore, E

    2000-01-21

    Cultures of recombinant Escherichia coli containing the plasmid pSVbeta were grown in three medium formulations to assess their effects on the characteristics of supercoiled plasmid DNA production for plasmid-based gene therapy. A semi-defined medium containing casamino acids (SDCAS) was found to support higher cell densities and higher plasmid stability than a similar medium containing soya amino acids (SDSOY) or Luria-Bertani medium (LB). Differences were observed in the cell harvest characteristics, plasmid DNA primary recovery, plasmid DNA yield and quality between cells grown on LB and on SDCAS medium. Cells grown on SDCAS medium were more difficult to resuspend after harvest than those grown in LB medium and were less susceptible to alkaline lysis. The plasmid DNA content from SDCAS was predominantly supercoiled and was less contaminated by chromosomal DNA than plasmid DNA extracts derived from cells grown on LB medium. It was hypothesised that the different carbon:nitrogen ratio (C:N) of the medium may have been responsible for changing the cell wall polysaccharide composition resulting in the change in cell harvest and lysis characteristics. Results indicated that changing the C:N ratio of SDCAS medium between 1.21:1 and 12.08:1 resulted in no alteration in cell wall polysaccharide composition or in cell susceptibility to chemical lysis or physical breakage. Plasmid DNA yields increased ten-fold with ten-fold increase in the C:N ratio of SDCAS medium. PMID:10656332

  14. Easy and efficient protocol for oomycete DNA extraction suitable for population genetic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lily X. Zelaya-MolinaMaria; Maria A. Ortega; Anne E. Dorrance

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of work  A simple and rapid DNA extraction protocol capable of obtaining high-quality and quantity DNA from a large number of individuals\\u000a is essential for assaying population and phylogenetic studies of plant pathogens. Most DNA extraction protocols used with\\u000a oomycetes are relatively lengthy and cumbersome for high throughput analysis. Commercial kits are widely used, but low quantities\\u000a of DNA are

  15. Evaluation of soil bacterial biomass using environmental DNA extracted by slow-stirring method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Aoshima; A. Kimura; A. Shibutani; C. Okada; Y. Matsumiya; M. Kubo

    2006-01-01

    A simple and rapid method (slow-stirring method) for extracting environmental DNA (eDNA) from soils was constructed by physical mild stirring with chemical treatment. eDNA was extracted efficiently with minimal damage from various kinds of soil. The amount of eDNA and soil bacterial biomass showed a linear proportional relation [Y=(1.70×108)X, r\\u000a 2=0.96], indicating that bacterial biomass could be evaluated by quantifying

  16. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar.

    PubMed

    Leite, D C A; Balieiro, F C; Pires, C A; Madari, B E; Rosado, A S; Coutinho, H L C; Peixoto, R S

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  17. Comparison of DNA extraction protocols for microbial communities from soil treated with biochar

    PubMed Central

    Leite, D.C.A.; Balieiro, F.C.; Pires, C.A.; Madari, B.E.; Rosado, A.S.; Coutinho, H.L.C.; Peixoto, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the effects of biochar application on soil structure and plant growth. However, there are very few studies describing the effect of biochar on native soil microbial communities. Microbial analysis of environmental samples requires accurate and reproducible methods for the extraction of DNA from samples. Because of the variety among microbial species and the strong adsorption of the phosphate backbone of the DNA molecule to biochar, extracting and purifying high quality microbial DNA from biochar-amended soil is not a trivial process and can be considerably more difficult than the extraction of DNA from other environmental samples. The aim of this study was to compare the relative efficacies of three commercial DNA extraction kits, the FastDNA® SPIN Kit for Soil (FD kit), the PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (PS kit) and the ZR Soil Microbe DNA Kit Miniprep™ (ZR kit), for extracting microbial genomic DNA from sand treated with different types of biochar. The methods were evaluated by comparing the DNA yields and purity and by analysing the bacterial and fungal community profiles generated by PCR-DGGE. Our results showed that the PCR-DGGE profiles for bacterial and fungal communities were highly affected by the purity and yield of the different DNA extracts. Among the tested kits, the PS kit was the most efficient with respect to the amount and purity of recovered DNA and considering the complexity of the generated DGGE microbial fingerprint from the sand-biochar samples. PMID:24948928

  18. DNA Extraction by Isotachophoresis in a Microfluidic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S J

    2011-08-10

    Biological assays have many applications. For example, forensics personnel and medical professionals use these tests to diagnose diseases and track their progression or identify pathogens and the host response to them. One limitation of these tests, however, is that most of them target only one piece of the sample - such as bacterial DNA - and other components (e.g. host genomic DNA) get in the way, even though they may be useful for different tests. To address this problem, it would be useful to extract several different substances from a complex biological sample - such as blood - in an inexpensive and efficient manner. This summer, I worked with Maxim Shusteff at Lawrence Livermore National Lab on the Rapid Automated Sample Prep project. The goal of the project is to solve the aforementioned problem by creating a system that uses a series of different extraction methods to extract cells, bacteria, and DNA from a complex biological sample. Biological assays can then be run on purified output samples. In this device, an operator could input a complex sample such as blood or saliva, and would receive separate outputs of cells, bacteria, viruses, and DNA. I had the opportunity to work this summer with isotachophoresis (ITP), a technique that can be used to extract nucleic acids from a sample. This technique is intended to be the last stage of the purification device. Isotachophoresis separates particles based on different electrophoretic mobilities. This technique is convenient for out application because free solution DNA mobility is approximately equal for DNA longer than 300 base pairs in length. The sample of interest - in our case DNA - is fed into the chip with streams of leading electrolyte (LE) and trailing electrolyte (TE). When an electric field is applied, the species migrate based on their electrophoretic mobilities. Because the ions in the leading electrolyte have a high electrophoretic mobility, they race ahead of the slower sample and trailing electrolyte ions. Conversely, the trailing electrolyte ions have a slow electrophoretic mobility, so they lag behind the sample, thus trapping the species of interest between the LE and TE streams. In a typical isotachophoresis configuration, the electric field is applied in a direction parallel to the direction of flow. The species then form bands that stretch across the width of the channel. A major limitation of that approach is that only a finite amount of sample can be processed at once, and the sample must be processed in batches. For our purposes, a form of free-flow isotachophoresis is more convenient, where the DNA forms a band parallel to the edges of the channel. To achieve this, in our chip, the electric field is applied transversely. This creates a force perpendicular to the direction of flow, which causes the different ions to migrate across the flow direction. Because the mobility of the DNA is between the mobility of the leading and the trailing electrolyte, the DNA is focused in a tight band near the center of the channel. The stream of DNA can then be directed to a different output to produce a highly concentrated outlet stream without batch processing. One hurdle that must be overcome for successful ITP is isolating the electrochemical reactions that result from the application of high voltage for the actual process of isotachophoresis. The electrochemical reactions that occur around metal electrodes produce bubbles and pH changes that are detrimental to successful ITP. The design of the chips we use incorporates polyacrylamide gels to serve as electrodes along the central channel. For our design, the metal electrodes are located away from the chip, and high conductivity buffer streams carry the potential to the chip, functioning as a 'liquid electrode.' The stream then runs alongside a gel barrier. The gel electrode permits ion transfer while simultaneously isolating the separation chamber from any contaminants in the outer, 'liquid electrode' streams. The difference in potential from one side of the chip to the other creates an electric field. Thi

  19. Human {beta}-globin gene polymorphisms characterized in DNA extracted from ancient bones 12,000 years old

    SciTech Connect

    Beraud-Colomb, E. [Genetique Medicale et Developpement, Marseille (France)]|[Laboratoire d`Anthropologie, Marseille (France); Maroc, N. [Genetique Medicale et Developpement, Marseille (France); Roubin, R. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Analyzing the nuclear DNA from ancient human bones is an essential step to the understanding of genetic diversity in current populations, provided that such systematic studies are experimentally feasible. This article reports the successful extraction and amplification of nuclear DNA from the P-globin region from 5 of 10 bone specimens up to 12,000 years old. These have been typed for P-globin frameworks by sequencing through two variable positions and for a polymorphic (AT){sub x}(T){sub y} microsatellite 500 bp upstream of the P-globin gene. These specimens of human remains are somewhat older than those analyzed in previous nuclear gene sequencing reports and considerably older than those used to study high-copy-number human mtDNA. These results show that the systematic study of nuclear DNA polymorphisms of ancient populations is feasible. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. In vitro evaluation of DNA-DNA hybridization as a two-step approach in radioimmunotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bos, E S; Kuijpers, W H; Meesters-Winters, M; Pham, D T; de Haan, A S; van Doornmalen, A M; Kaspersen, F M; van Boeckel, C A; Gougeon-Bertrand, F

    1994-07-01

    The specific delivery of radioisotopes to a tumor at minimal radiation of normal tissue is the ultimate aim of radioimmunotherapy. In this respect a two-step pretargeting regimen generally leads to an improved tumor to normal tissue uptake ratio compared to direct administration of radioimmunoconjugates. In this paper, in vitro studies are described in which the specific hybridization of complementary DNA fragments is the recognition mechanism in a pretargeting regimen comprising tumor cell saturation with a monoclonal antibody (MoAb)-oligonucleotide conjugate, followed by administration of the radiolabeled complementary oligonucleotide. Complementary oligodeoxynucleotides (15-mers; melting temperature, 68 degrees C) were prepared on a DNA synthesizer. The 5'-end was derivatized with a functional group for labeling with iodine, and the 3'-end was substituted with an amino function suitable for conjugation to an antibody (or attachment of a biotin residue). Both terminal modifications ensure stability of the oligonucleotides against exonucleases because the unconjugated form is stable for 24 h and the conjugated form is stable for several days when incubated in human plasma at 37 degrees C. Antibody-DNA conjugates were prepared by introduction of sulfhydryl groups into the oligonucleotide, followed by conjugation to maleimide-substituted MoAbs. Typically, 3 oligonucleotides were conjugated to an IgG, and 4-6 were conjugated to an IgM with preservation of immunoreactivity. Histochemistry on fresh frozen sections of breast cancer tissue demonstrated qualitatively the specificity of our two-step procedure. In vitro experiments with human tumor cell lines and tumor-specific MoAbs showed that, after saturation with tumor-specific MoAb-DNA conjugates, quantitative hybridization of the tumor cell-bound oligonucleotides occurred at a 30-fold excess of the labeled complementary oligonucleotide: hybridization was complete after 30 min of incubation. No reaction was observed with an irrelevant MoAb-DNA conjugate. The oligonucleotide was neither taken up by tumor cells or endothelial cells nor hybridized to a significant extent with human genomic DNA. These data indicate the feasibility of this two-step approach in radioimmunotherapy. PMID:8012970

  1. Summary. We present a method of extracting DNA from medium-sized paper wasps without sacrificing the animal.

    E-print Network

    Starks, Philip

    the animal. From the distal half of a single leg, enough DNA is extracted for 125 PCR reactions. This DNA animals appeared to behave normally. This DNA extraction method is well suited for studies that combineSummary. We present a method of extracting DNA from medium-sized paper wasps without sacrificing

  2. A two-step strategy for constructing specifically self-subtracted cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Laveder, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Toppo, Stefano; Valle, Giorgio; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a new strategy for producing subtracted cDNA libraries that is optimized for connective and epithelial tissues, where a few exceptionally abundant (super-prevalent) RNA species account for a large fraction of the total mRNA mass. Our method consists of a two-step subtraction of the most abundant mRNAs: the first step involves a novel use of oligo-directed RNase H digestion to lower the concentration of tissue-specific, super-prevalent RNAs. In the second step, a highly specific subtraction is achieved through hybridization with probes from a 3'-end ESTs collection. By applying this technique in skeletal muscle, we have constructed subtracted cDNA libraries that are effectively enriched for genes expressed at low levels. We further report on frequent premature termination of transcription in human muscle mitochondria and discuss the importance of this phenomenon in designing subtractive approaches. The tissue-specific collections of cDNA clones generated by our method are particularly well suited for expression profiling. PMID:11972353

  3. A two-step strategy for constructing specifically self-subtracted cDNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    Laveder, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Toppo, Stefano; Valle, Giorgio; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for producing subtracted cDNA libraries that is optimized for connective and epithelial tissues, where a few exceptionally abundant (super-prevalent) RNA species account for a large fraction of the total mRNA mass. Our method consists of a two-step subtraction of the most abundant mRNAs: the first step involves a novel use of oligo-directed RNase H digestion to lower the concentration of tissue-specific, super-prevalent RNAs. In the second step, a highly specific subtraction is achieved through hybridization with probes from a 3?-end ESTs collection. By applying this technique in skeletal muscle, we have constructed subtracted cDNA libraries that are effectively enriched for genes expressed at low levels. We further report on frequent premature termination of transcription in human muscle mitochondria and discuss the importance of this phenomenon in designing subtractive approaches. The tissue-specific collections of cDNA clones generated by our method are particularly well suited for expression profiling. PMID:11972353

  4. One-step purification of metallothionein extracted from two different sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rubens T. Honda; Roziete Mendes Araújo; Bruno Brasil Horta; Adalberto L. Val; Marilene Demasi

    2005-01-01

    We describe a one-step purification of hepatic metallothionein from the Amazon fish Colossoma macropomum injected with cadmium and from the copper-loaded metallothionein from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, performed by affinity chromatography through metal-chelating columns. Yeast metallothionein was purified from Cu2+-loaded resin and eluted by a continuous EDTA gradient whereas hepatic metallothionein extracted from fishes was purified by Ni2+-loaded resin and

  5. Effective one/two step purification of various materials by solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Soltés, L; Sébille, B

    1997-01-01

    Simple one/two step purification procedures based on the solid-phase extraction technique were effectively exploited to clean up radiolabelled drugs represented by dihydrochloride of [6-3H]-stobadine and hydrochloride of [4-3H]-pentacaine, derivatization agents such as 4-nitrobenzoyl chloride or 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl chloride, as well as the aqueous phosphate or triethylamine acetate buffer solutions. PMID:9413613

  6. A high-throughput, high-quality plant genomic DNA extraction protocol.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J; Cong, X H; Duan, Y B; Li, L; Wei, P C; Lu, X Z; Yang, J B

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) is a crucial technique in plant molecular biology. The quality of gDNA determines the reliability of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In this paper, we reported a high-quality gDNA extraction protocol optimized for real-time PCR in a variety of plant species. Performed in a 96-well block, our protocol provides high throughput. Without the need for phenol-chloroform and liquid nitrogen or dry ice, our protocol is safer and more cost-efficient than traditional DNA extraction methods. The method takes 10 mg leaf tissue to yield 5-10 µg high-quality gDNA. Spectral measurement and electrophoresis were used to demonstrate gDNA purity. The extracted DNA was qualified in a restriction enzyme digestion assay and conventional PCR. The real-time PCR amplification was sufficiently sensitive to detect gDNA at very low concentrations (3 pg/µL). The standard curve of gDNA dilutions from our phenol-chloroform-free protocol showed better linearity (R(2) = 0.9967) than the phenol-chloroform protocol (R(2) = 0.9876). The results indicate that the gDNA was of high quality and fit for real-time PCR. This safe, high-throughput plant gDNA extraction protocol could be used to isolate high-quality gDNA for real-time PCR and other downstream molecular applications. PMID:24222228

  7. Characterisation of insect and plant origins using DNA extracted from small volumes of bee honey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ida Bærholm Schnell; Magdalena Fraser; Eske Willerslev; M. Thomas P. Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    A DNA-based tool was validated that potentially enables the characterisation of both plant and insect of origin of small (approximately\\u000a 1 ml) samples of bee honey. Using this method, mitochondrial, nuclear and chloroplast DNA (mtDNA, nuDNA, cpDNA) markers were\\u000a successfully extracted, PCR amplified, and sequenced from a range of honeys, and the relative amount of plant nuDNA and cpDNA,\\u000a and bee

  8. Rapid DNA Extraction Protocol from Stool, Suitable for Molecular Genetic Diagnosis of Colon Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Reza Abbaszadegan; Arash Velayati; Alireza Tavasoli; Ezzat Dadkhah

    2007-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common forms of cancers in the world and is curable if diagnosed at the early stage. Analysis of DNA extracted from stool specimens is a recent advantage to cancer diagnostics. Many protocols have been recommended for DNA extraction from stool, and almost all of them are difficult and time consuming, dealing

  9. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD FOR PCR IDENTIFICATION OF FUNGAL INDOOR AIR CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following air sampling, fungal DNA needs to be extracted and purified to a state suitable for laboratory use. Our laboratory has developed a simple method of extraction and purification of fungal DNA appropriate for enzymatic manipulation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) appli...

  10. A simple method for DNA extraction from sporophyte in the brown alga Laminaria japonica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaoge Wang; Yuhui Li; Peng Xia; Delin Duan

    2005-01-01

    A simple method was developed for extracting DNA from brown algae Laminaria japonica, which possess large amounts of acidic polysaccharides. Firstly, the sporophyte were washed by eliminating polysaccaride buffer to remove the polysaccharides and then ground in liquid nitrogen. Secondly, the powders were treated with lysing buffer. Thirdly, KAc was used to eliminate the remaining acidic polysaccharides. The extracted DNA

  11. Comparison of Alkaline Lysis with Electroextraction and Optimization of Electric Pulses to Extract Plasmid DNA

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    Comparison of Alkaline Lysis with Electroextraction and Optimization of Electric Pulses to Extract. Differ- ent pDNA extraction methods have been described; among them is alkaline lysis, currently the most commonly used. Although alkaline lysis represents an established method for isolation of pDNA, some

  12. Use of neuropathological tissue for molecular genetic studies: parameters affecting DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kösel; M. B. Graeber

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA were extracted from gray matter of human cerebral cortex which had either been formalin-fixed and embedded into paraffin or stored in formalin for up to 26 years. Extraction conditions were optimized for proteinase K digestion, i.e., enzyme concentration, digestion temperature and incubation time. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA was successfully amplified from archival material

  13. Increasing DNA extraction yield from saliva stains with a modified Chelex method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Sweet; Miguel Lorente; Aurora Valenzuela; José A. Lorente; J. Carlos Alvarez

    1996-01-01

    Recovery, preservation and analysis of body fluid stains is an important aspect of forensic science. PCR-based typing of DNA extracted from recovered stains is often a crucial method to identify a perpetrator or exclude an innocent suspect. This paper reports an improved method of extracting genomic DNA from saliva stains deposited on human skin in simulated bite mark situations. Results

  14. RECOVERY OF BULK DNA FROM SOIL USING A RAPID, SMALL-SCALE EXTRACTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe an extraction method that yields restrictable 20-25 kb DNA from one gram of soil. ells are lysed directly in the soil. he crude DNA extract is separated from contaminating humic compounds, concentrated, and purified by CsCl gradient centrifugation and the commercial p...

  15. DNA extraction protocols from dormant buds of twelve woody plant genera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard plant DNA extraction protocols call for samples of newly expanding leaves and shoots yet analysis is sometimes needed when plants are dormant. We evaluated three DNA extraction protocols using dormant buds from 40 species and four hybrids of 12 genera. Two protocols were from ready-to-use ...

  16. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, South Mimms, (United Kingdom))

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  17. Single-step capture and sequencing of natural DNA for detection of BRCA1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John F; Reifenberger, Jeffrey G; Giladi, Eldar; Kerouac, Kristen; Gill, Jaime; Hansen, Erik; Kahvejian, Avak; Kapranov, Philipp; Knope, Travis; Lipson, Doron; Steinmann, Kathleen E; Milos, Patrice M

    2012-02-01

    Genetic testing for disease risk is an increasingly important component of medical care. However, testing can be expensive, which can lead to patients and physicians having limited access to the genetic information needed for medical decisions. To simplify DNA sample preparation and lower costs, we have developed a system in which any gene can be captured and sequenced directly from human genomic DNA without amplification, using no proteins or enzymes prior to sequencing. Extracted whole-genome DNA is acoustically sheared and loaded in a flow cell channel for single-molecule sequencing. Gene isolation, amplification, or ligation is not necessary. Accurate and low-cost detection of DNA sequence variants is demonstrated for the BRCA1 gene. Disease-causing mutations as well as common variants from well-characterized samples are identified. Single-molecule sequencing generates very reproducible coverage patterns, and these can be used to detect any size insertion or deletion directly, unlike PCR-based methods, which require additional assays. Because no gene isolation or amplification is required for sequencing, the exceptionally low costs of sample preparation and analysis could make genetic tests more accessible to those who wish to know their own disease susceptibility. Additionally, this approach has applications for sequencing integration sites for gene therapy vectors, transposons, retroviruses, and other mobile DNA elements in a more facile manner than possible with other methods. PMID:21765009

  18. Implication of DNA Polymerase in Alignment-based Gap Filling for Nonhomologous DNA End Joining in Human Nuclear Extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jae Wan Lee; Luis Blanco; Tong Zhou; Miguel Garcia-Diaz; Katarzyna Bebenek; Thomas A. Kunkel; Zhigang Wang; Lawrence F. Povirk

    2004-01-01

    Accurate repair of free radical-mediated DNA double- strand breaks by the nonhomologous end joining path- way requires replacement of fragmented nucleotides in the aligned ends by a gap-filling DNA polymerase. Nu- clear extracts of human HeLa cells, supplemented with recombinant XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex (XRCC4\\/li- gase IV), were capable of accurately rejoining model double-strand break substrates with a 1- or

  19. Extraction of genomic DNA from filamentous fungi in biofilms on water-based paint coatings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Saad; G. C. Kinsey; S. Kim; C. C. Gaylarde

    2004-01-01

    A method has been developed which can be used to extract DNA efficiently from spores of the genera Acremonium, Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium and Epicoccum on painted surfaces. The method involves spore lysis by incubation of the specimen with the enzyme Lyticase for 60min, followed by bead beating for 15min. DNA is then purified from the lysate with the QIAamp DNA

  20. DNA Extraction 5th Grade Physical Science Standard 1.1

    E-print Network

    DNA Extraction 5th Grade Physical Science Standard 1.1 Concepts and Skills: Mixtures of matter can don't mix. 5. Gently pull DNA strands from the bottom solution into the isopropanol with a stir rod. DNA should precipitate into fine white strands that look like cotton candy. What is happening? Mashing

  1. DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    E-print Network

    DNA is a co-factor for its own replication in Xenopus egg extracts Ronald Lebofsky1 , Antoine M a physiological mechanism, and thus represent a powerful system to understand vertebrate DNA replication. Surprisingly, DNA repli- cation in this system is highly sensitive to plasmid concentration, being undetectable

  2. High-throughput genomic DNA extraction protocol from tilapia's fin tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noam Zilberman; Sharon Reikhav; Gideon Hulata; Micha Ron

    2006-01-01

    We developed a high throughput DNA extraction protocol from tilapia fin tissue that enables the use of 96-well plates using a fluid micro-dispenser robot, thus effectively decreasing the time, cost and handling error of the DNA preparation stage. The method is based on the DNA salting out procedure and all fluid transfers are designed for use with a micro dispenser

  3. Direct DNA Extraction for PCR-Mediated Assays of Soil Organisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TATIANA VOLOSSIOUK; E. JANE ROBB; ANDROSS N. NAZAR

    1995-01-01

    By using the rDNA of a plant wilt pathogen (Verticillium dahliae) as the target sequence, a direct method for the extraction of DNA from soil samples which can be used for PCR-mediated diagnostics without a need for further DNA purification has been developed. The soil organisms are disrupted by grinding in liquid nitrogen with the natural abrasives in soil, and

  4. A comparison of five methods for extraction of bacterial DNA from human faecal samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra L. McOrist; Michelle Jackson; Anthony R. Bird

    2002-01-01

    The purity of DNA extracted from faecal samples is a key issue in the sensitivity and usefulness of biological analyses such as PCR for infectious pathogens and non-pathogens. We have compared the relative efficacy of extraction of bacterial DNA (both Gram negative and positive origin) from faeces using four commercial kits (FastDNA® kit, Bio 101; Nucleospin® C+T kit, Macherey-Nagal; Quantum

  5. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. PMID:24834966

  6. Extracting Strawberry DNA Adapted from http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Education/Modules/StrawberryExtractionInstructions.pdf

    E-print Network

    Gruber, Jonathan

    Extracting Strawberry DNA Adapted from http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Education/Modules/StrawberryExtractionInstructions.pdf for a group of 5 students with an adult moderator Strawberries have enormous genomes. Humans have two copies of the cell. Strawberries have up to eight copies of each chromosome (octoploid genome). Today, we

  7. [Method validation according to ISO 15189 and SH GTA 04: application for the extraction of DNA and its quantitative evaluation by a spectrophotometric assay].

    PubMed

    Harlé, Alexandre; Lion, Maëva; Husson, Marie; Dubois, Cindy; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    According to the French legislation on medical biology (January 16th, 2010), all biological laboratories must be accredited according to ISO 15189 for at least 50% of their activities before the end of 2016. The extraction of DNA from a sample of interest, whether solid or liquid is one of the critical steps in molecular biology and specifically in somatic or constitutional genetic. The extracted DNA must meet a number of criteria such quality and also be in sufficient concentration to allow molecular biology assays such as the detection of somatic mutations. This paper describes the validation of the extraction and purification of DNA using chromatographic column extraction and quantitative determination by spectrophotometric assay, according to ISO 15189 and the accreditation technical guide in Human Health SH-GTA-04. PMID:24113450

  8. PcrA helicase dismantles RecA filaments by reeling in DNA in uniform steps

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeehae; Myong, Sua; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Yu, Jin; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Translocation of helicase-like proteins on nucleic acids underlies key cellular functions. However, it is still unclear how translocation can drive removal of DNA bound proteins, and basic properties like the elementary step size remain controversial. Using single molecule fluorescence analysis on a prototypical superfamily 1 helicase, Bacillus stearothermophilus PcrA, we discovered that PcrA preferentially translocates on the DNA lagging strand instead of unwinding the template duplex. PcrA anchors itself to the template duplex using the 2B subdomain and reels in the lagging strand, extruding a single stranded loop. Static disorder limited previous ensemble studies of PcrA stepping mechanism. Here, highly repetitive looping revealed that PcrA translocates in uniform steps of 1 nt. This reeling-in activity requires the open conformation of PcrA and can rapidly dismantle a preformed RecA filament even at low PcrA concentrations suggesting a mode of action for eliminating potentially deleterious recombination intermediates. PMID:20723756

  9. Automated one-step DNA sequencing based on nanoliter reaction volumes and capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ho-ming; Yeung, Edward S.

    2000-01-01

    An integrated system with a nano-reactor for cycle-sequencing reaction coupled to on-line purification and capillary gel electrophoresis has been demonstrated. Fifty nanoliters of reagent solution, which includes dye-labeled terminators, polymerase, BSA and template, was aspirated and mixed with the template inside the nano-reactor followed by cycle-sequencing reaction. The reaction products were then purified by a size-exclusion chromatographic column operated at 50°C followed by room temperature on-line injection of the DNA fragments into a capillary for gel electrophoresis. Over 450 bases of DNA can be separated and identified. As little as 25 nl reagent solution can be used for the cycle-sequencing reaction with a slightly shorter read length. Significant savings on reagent cost is achieved because the remaining stock solution can be reused without contamination. The steps of cycle sequencing, on-line purification, injection, DNA separation, capillary regeneration, gel-filling and fluidic manipulation were performed with complete automation. This system can be readily multiplexed for high-throughput DNA sequencing or PCR analysis directly from templates or even biological materials. PMID:10908366

  10. Modification of a commercial DNA extraction kit for safe and rapid recovery of DNA and RNA simultaneously from soil, without the use of harmful solvents

    PubMed Central

    Tournier, E.; Amenc, L.; Pablo, A.L.; Legname, E.; Blanchart, E.; Plassard, C.; Robin, A.; Bernard, L.

    2015-01-01

    An optimized method, based on the coupling of two commercial kits, is described for the extraction of soil nucleic acids, with simultaneous extraction and purification of DNA and RNA following a cascade scheme and avoiding the use of harmful solvents. The protocol canmonitor the variations in the recovery yield of DNA and RNA from soils of various types.The quantitative version of the protocol was obtained by testing the starting soil quantity, the grinding parameters and the final elution volumes, in order to avoid saturation of both kits. • A first soil-crushing step in liquid nitrogen could be added for the assessment of fungal parameters. • The protocol was efficienton different tropical soils, including Andosol, while their high contents of clays, including poorly crystalline clays, and Fe and Al oxides usually make the nucleic acid extraction more difficult. • The RNA recovery yield from the previous tropical soils appeared to correlate better to soil respiration than DNA, which is positively influenced by soil clay content.

  11. A DNA extraction method for RAPD analysis from plants rich in soluble polysaccharides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qin-Bao Li; Qinyin Cai; Charles L. Guy

    1994-01-01

    A simple procedure for the isolation of DNA from mature leaf tissue was developed. This procedure purified DNA using Sephacryl\\u000a S-1000 column and PEG 8000 precipitation. Polysaccharide-like components were successfully removed from DNA samples from species\\u000a in which polysaccharides were found to be difficult to remove by phenol\\/chloroform extraction. The DNA obtained by this method\\u000a was suitable for PCR, RAPD,

  12. Effect of DNA extraction and sample preservation method on rumen bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Fliegerova, Katerina; Tapio, Ilma; Bonin, Aurelie; Mrazek, Jakub; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Bani, Paolo; Bayat, Alireza; Vilkki, Johanna; Kope?ný, Jan; Shingfield, Kevin J; Boyer, Frederic; Coissac, Eric; Taberlet, Pierre; Wallace, R John

    2014-10-01

    The comparison of the bacterial profile of intracellular (iDNA) and extracellular DNA (eDNA) isolated from cow rumen content stored under different conditions was conducted. The influence of rumen fluid treatment (cheesecloth squeezed, centrifuged, filtered), storage temperature (RT, -80 °C) and cryoprotectants (PBS-glycerol, ethanol) on quality and quantity parameters of extracted DNA was evaluated by bacterial DGGE analysis, real-time PCR quantification and metabarcoding approach using high-throughput sequencing. Samples clustered according to the type of extracted DNA due to considerable differences between iDNA and eDNA bacterial profiles, while storage temperature and cryoprotectants additives had little effect on sample clustering. The numbers of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were lower (P < 0.01) in eDNA samples. The qPCR indicated significantly higher amount of Firmicutes in iDNA sample frozen with glycerol (P < 0.01). Deep sequencing analysis of iDNA samples revealed the prevalence of Bacteroidetes and similarity of samples frozen with and without cryoprotectants, which differed from sample stored with ethanol at room temperature. Centrifugation and consequent filtration of rumen fluid subjected to the eDNA isolation procedure considerably changed the ratio of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Intracellular DNA extraction using bead-beating method from cheesecloth sieved rumen content mixed with PBS-glycerol and stored at -80 °C was found as the optimal method to study ruminal bacterial profile. PMID:24125910

  13. Steps and Bumps: Precision Extraction of Discrete States of Molecular Machines

    PubMed Central

    Little, Max A.; Steel, Bradley C.; Bai, Fan; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Bilyard, Thomas; Mueller, David M.; Berry, Richard M.; Jones, Nick S.

    2011-01-01

    We report statistical time-series analysis tools providing improvements in the rapid, precision extraction of discrete state dynamics from time traces of experimental observations of molecular machines. By building physical knowledge and statistical innovations into analysis tools, we provide techniques for estimating discrete state transitions buried in highly correlated molecular noise. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on simulated and real examples of steplike rotation of the bacterial flagellar motor and the F1-ATPase enzyme. We show that our method can clearly identify molecular steps, periodicities and cascaded processes that are too weak for existing algorithms to detect, and can do so much faster than existing algorithms. Our techniques represent a step in the direction toward automated analysis of high-sample-rate, molecular-machine dynamics. Modular, open-source software that implements these techniques is provided. PMID:21767501

  14. Estimation of the uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps in pesticide residue analysis of plant commodities.

    PubMed

    Omeroglu, P Yolci; Ambrus, A; Boyacioglu, D

    2013-01-01

    Extraction and clean-up constitute important steps in pesticide residue analysis. For the correct interpretation of analytical results, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps should be taken into account when the combined uncertainty of the analytical result is estimated. In the scope of this study, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps were investigated by spiking (14)C-labelled chlorpyrifos to analytical portions of tomato, orange, apple, green bean, cucumber, jackfruit, papaya and starfruit. After each step, replicate measurements were carried out with a liquid scintillation counter. Uncertainties in extraction and clean-up steps were estimated separately for every matrix and method combination by using within-laboratory reproducibility standard deviation and were characterised with the CV of recoveries. It was observed that the uncertainty of the ethyl acetate extraction step varied between 0.8% and 5.9%. The relative standard uncertainty of the clean-up step with dispersive SPE used in the method known as QuEChERS was estimated to be around 1.5% for tomato, apple and green beans. The highest variation of 4.8% was observed in cucumber. The uncertainty of the clean-up step with gel permeation chromatography ranged between 5.3% and 13.1%, and it was relatively higher than that obtained with the dispersive SPE method. PMID:23216411

  15. Evaluation of extraction and purification methods for obtaining PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost for microbial community analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. LaMontagne; F. C. Michel Jr; P. A. Holden; C. A. Reddy

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of microbial community structure in complex environmental samples using nucleic acid techniques requires efficient unbiased DNA extraction procedures; however, humic acids and other contaminants complicate the isolation of PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost and other organic-rich samples. In this study, combinations of DNA extraction and purification methods were compared based on DNA yield, humic acid contamination, PCR amplifiability, and microbial

  16. A simplified arthropod genomic-DNA extraction protocol for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based specimen identification through barcoding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Venu M. Margam; Emma W. Gachomo; John H. Shukle; Oluwole O. Ariyo; Manfredo J. Seufferheld; Simeon O. Kotchoni

    2010-01-01

    Genomic DNA extraction protocols generally require the use of expensive and hazardous reagents necessary for decontamination\\u000a of phenolic compounds from the extracts. In addition, they are lengthy, hindering large-scale sample extractions necessary\\u000a for high-throughput analyses. Here we describe a simple, time and cost-efficient method for genomic DNA extraction from insects.\\u000a The extracted DNA was successfully used in a Polymerase Chain

  17. Extraction of total DNA and optimization of the RAPD reaction system in Dioscorea opposita Thunb.

    PubMed

    Wen, G Q; Li, J; Liu, X H; Zhang, Y S; Wen, S S

    2014-01-01

    Dioscorea opposita Thunb. has been used as health food and herbal medicinal ingredients in traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, the total DNA of D. opposita Thunb. was extracted using an improved cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method, and the extracted DNA was further used for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) reaction system by design of the L16 (4(4)) orthogonal diagram. The results showed that the improved CTAB method can be used to isolate high-quality and high-concentration DNA, and the optimized protocol can overcome the instability of RAPD reaction system. The knowledge stated here can be used to study the genetic diversity of D. opposita Thunb. PMID:24634232

  18. Comparison of DNA extraction kits and modification of DNA elution procedure for the quantitation of subdominant bacteria from piggery effluents with real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Desneux, Jérémy; Pourcher, Anne-Marie

    2014-08-01

    Four commercial DNA extraction kits and a minor modification in the DNA elution procedure were evaluated for the quantitation of bacteria in pig manure samples. The PowerSoil(®), PowerFecal(®), NucleoSpin(®) Soil kits and QIAamp(®) DNA Stool Mini kit were tested on raw manure samples and on lagoon effluents for their ability to quantify total bacteria and a subdominant bacteria specific of pig manure contamination: Lactobacillus amylovorus. The NucleoSpin(®) Soil kit (NS kit), and to a lesser extent the PowerFecal(®) kit were the most efficient methods. Regardless of the kit utilized, the modified elution procedure increased DNA yield in the lagoon effluent by a factor of 1.4 to 1.8. When tested on 10 piggery effluent samples, compared to the QIAamp kit, the NS kit combined with the modified elution step, increased by a factor up to 1.7 log10 the values of the concentration of L. amylovorus. Regardless of the type of manure, the best DNA quality and the highest concentrations of bacteria were obtained using the NS kit combined with the modification of the elution procedure. The method recommended here significantly improved quantitation of subdominant bacteria in manure. PMID:24838631

  19. Mutants of the base excision repair glycosylase, endonuclease III: DNA charge transport as a first step in lesion detection.

    PubMed

    Romano, Christine A; Sontz, Pamela A; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2011-07-12

    Endonuclease III (EndoIII) is a base excision repair glycosylase that targets damaged pyrimidines and contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. We have proposed a model where BER proteins that contain redox-active [4Fe-4S] clusters utilize DNA charge transport (CT) as a first step in the detection of DNA lesions. Here, several mutants of EndoIII were prepared to probe their efficiency of DNA/protein charge transport. Cyclic voltammetry experiments on DNA-modified electrodes show that aromatic residues F30, Y55, Y75, and Y82 help mediate charge transport between DNA and the [4Fe-4S] cluster. On the basis of circular dichroism studies to measure protein stability, mutations at residues W178 and Y185 are found to destabilize the protein; these residues may function to protect the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Atomic force microscopy studies furthermore reveal a correlation in the ability of mutants to carry out protein/DNA CT and their ability to relocalize onto DNA strands containing a single base mismatch; EndoIII mutants that are defective in carrying out DNA/protein CT do not redistribute onto mismatch-containing strands, consistent with our model. These results demonstrate a link between the ability of the repair protein to carry out DNA CT and its ability to relocalize near lesions, thus pointing to DNA CT as a key first step in the detection of base damage in the genome. PMID:21651304

  20. Rapid alkaline extraction method for the isolation of plasmid DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C. Birnboim

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids are double-stranded circular DNA molecules that have the property of self-replication, independent of chromosomal DNA. Although the presence of a plasmid in a bacterial cell may be detected genetically as a change in phenotype, often it is necessary to isolate plasmid DNA for molecular studies, such as size determination, restriction enzyme mapping, and nucleotide sequencing, or for the construction

  1. DNA Extraction Protocol for Biological Ingredient Analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinwei; Chen, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Huanxin; Han, Maozhen; Bo, Cunpei; Xu, Jian; Bai, Hong; Ning, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW), as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method (TCM-CTAB) and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3–4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations. PMID:24838067

  2. DNA extraction protocol for biological ingredient analysis of Liuwei Dihuang Wan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinwei; Chen, Xiaohua; Su, Xiaoquan; Zhao, Huanxin; Han, Maozhen; Bo, Cunpei; Xu, Jian; Bai, Hong; Ning, Kang

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparations are widely used for healthcare and clinical practice. So far, the methods commonly used for quality evaluation of TCM preparations mainly focused on chemical ingredients. The biological ingredient analysis of TCM preparations is also important because TCM preparations usually contain both plant and animal ingredients, which often include some mis-identified herbal materials, adulterants or even some biological contaminants. For biological ingredient analysis, the efficiency of DNA extraction is an important factor which might affect the accuracy and reliability of identification. The component complexity in TCM preparations is high, and DNA might be destroyed or degraded in different degrees after a series of processing procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an effective protocol for DNA extraction from TCM preparations. In this study, we chose a classical TCM preparation, Liuwei Dihuang Wan (LDW), as an example to develop a TCM-specific DNA extraction method. An optimized cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method (TCM-CTAB) and three commonly-used extraction kits were tested for extraction of DNA from LDW samples. Experimental results indicated that DNA with the highest purity and concentration was obtained by using TCM-CTAB. To further evaluate the different extraction methods, amplification of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and the chloroplast genome trnL intron was carried out. The results have shown that PCR amplification was successful only with template of DNA extracted by using TCM-CTAB. Moreover, we performed high-throughput 454 sequencing using DNA extracted by TCM-CTAB. Data analysis showed that 3-4 out of 6 prescribed species were detected from LDW samples, while up to 5 contaminating species were detected, suggesting TCM-CTAB method could facilitate follow-up DNA-based examination of TCM preparations. PMID:24838067

  3. A new DNA extraction method by controlled alkaline treatments from consolidated subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Kouduka, Mariko; Suko, Takeshi; Morono, Yuki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ito, Kazumasa; Suzuki, Yohey

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities that thrive in subterranean consolidated sediments are largely unknown owing to the difficulty of extracting DNA. As this difficulty is often attributed to DNA binding onto the silica-bearing sediment matrix, we developed a DNA extraction method for consolidated sediment from the deep subsurface in which silica minerals were dissolved by being heated under alkaline conditions. NaOH concentrations (0.07 and 0.33 N), incubation temperatures (65 and 94 °C) and incubation times (30-90 min) before neutralization were evaluated based on the copy number of extracted prokaryotic DNA. Prokaryotic DNA was detected by quantitative PCR analysis after heating the sediment sample at 94 °C in 0.33 N NaOH solution for 50-80 min. Results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the extracted DNA were all consistent with regard to the dominant occurrence of the metallophilic bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans, and Pseudomonas spp. Mineralogical analysis revealed that the dissolution of a silica mineral (opal-CT) during alkaline treatment was maximized at 94 °C in 0.33 N NaOH solution for 50 min, which may have resulted in the release of DNA into solution. Because the optimized protocol for DNA extraction is applicable to subterranean consolidated sediments from a different locality, the method developed here has the potential to expand our understanding of the microbial community structure of the deep biosphere. PMID:22092362

  4. Comparative Analysis of Different DNA Extraction Protocols: A Fast, Universal Maxi-Preparation of High Quality Plant DNA for Genetic Evaluation and Phylogenetic Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. M. Csaikl; H. Bastian; R. Brettschneider; S. Gauch; A. Meir; M. Schauerte; F. Scholz; C. Sperisen; B. Vornam; B. Ziegenhagen

    1998-01-01

    Four DNA extraction protocols were compared for ability to produce DNA from the leaves or needles of several species: oak, elm, pine, fir, poplar and maize (fresh materials) and rhododendron (silica dried or frozen material). With the exception of maize and poplar, the species are known to be difficult for DNA extraction. Two protocols represented classical procedures for lysis and

  5. On-line cell lysis and DNA extraction on a microfluidic biochip fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Cui, Da Fu; Liu, Chang Chun

    2008-05-01

    Integrating cell lysis and DNA purification process into a micrototal analytical system (microTAS) is one critical step for the analysis of nucleic acids. On-chip cell lysis based on a chemical method is realized by sufficient blend of blood sample and the lyzing reagent. In this paper two mixing models, T-type mixing model and sandwich-type mixing model, are proposed and simulation of those models is conducted. Result of simulation shows that the sandwich-type mixing model with coiled channel performs best and this model is further used to construct the microfluidic biochip for on-line cell lysis and DNA extraction. The result of simulation is further verified by experiments. It asserts that more than 80% mixing of blood sample and lyzing reagent which guarantees that completed cell lysis can be achieved near the inlet location when the cell/buffer velocity ratio is less than 1:5. After cell lysis, DNA extraction by means of a solid-phase method is implemented by using porous silicon matrix which is integrated in the biochip. During continuous flow process in the microchip, rapid cell lysis and PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA purification can be achieved within 20 min. The potential of this microfluidic biochip is illustrated by pretreating a whole blood sample, which shows the possibility of integration of sample preparation, PCR, and separation on a single device to work as portable point-of-care medical diagnostic system. PMID:18393339

  6. A SIMPLE VERSATILE HIGH THROUPHPUT DNA EXTRACTION METHOD SUITABLE FOR PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR has become the most popular technique in functional genomics. Both forward and reverse genetic projects routinely require PCR amplification of thousands of samples. Processing the samples for DNA suitable for PCR is usually the limiting step. We have developed a simple high throughput DNA extra...

  7. Comparison of dry- and wet-based fine bead homogenizations to extract DNA from fungal spores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomichi Yamamoto; Yasunari Matsuzaka; Minoru Kimura; Hideaki Matsuki; Yukio Yanagisawa

    2009-01-01

    The present study explored DNA extraction kinetics from fungal spores, i.e., Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum and Cladosporium sphaerospermum, by fine bead mill homogenization. In particular, the study aimed to investigate basic differences between the dry- and wet-based methods. The results showed higher initial rates of the DNA extractions by the dry-based method than by the wet-based method, due to higher

  8. Echinococcus granulosus: DNA Extraction from Germinal Layers Allows Strain Determination in Fertile and Nonfertile Hydatid Cysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Kamenetzky; Sergio G. Canova; Eduardo A. Guarnera; Mara C. Rosenzvit

    2000-01-01

    Kamenetzky, L., Canova, S. G., Guarnera, E. A., and Rosenzvit, M. C. 2000. Echinococcus granulosus: DNA extraction from germinal layers allows strain determination in fertile and nonfertile hydatid cysts. Experimental Parasitology95, 122–127. A method for the isolation of Echinococcus granulosus DNA from germinal layers of hydatid cysts is described. The method includes a hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide\\/chloroform extraction and an adsorption to

  9. A rapid method for high throughput DNA extraction from plant material for PCR amplification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eve Dilworth; Juerg E. Frey

    2000-01-01

    A rapid and reliable method is described for high throughput extraction of DNA from plant material using glass beads in a\\u000a flat-bottomed microtitre plate. This procedure is quick, inexpensive, and allows up to 96 samples to be processed in parallel.\\u000a PCR products produced by the recovered DNA are consistently equivalent to those produced through traditional extraction methods.

  10. Sarcoptes mite from collection to DNA extraction: the lost realm of the neglected parasite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Alasaad; L. Rossi; R. C. Soriguer; L. Rambozzi; D. Soglia; J. M. Pérez; X. Q. Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Sarcoptes mite from collection to DNA extraction forms the cornerstone for studies on Sarcoptes scabiei. Whilst the new science era took a shy leap into the different facets of mite studies, the cornerstone was almost entirely\\u000a neglected. Mite collection, cleaning, storage and DNA extraction were, basically, humble attempts to extrapolate, adapt, modify\\u000a or ‘pirate’ those existing methods to the peculiarities

  11. A Simple Method of Genomic DNA Extraction from Human Samples for PCR-RFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Souvik; Muthukumaran, Rajendra Bose; Nachimuthu, Senthil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Isolation of DNA from blood and buccal swabs in adequate quantities is an integral part of forensic research and analysis. The present study was performed to determine the quality and the quantity of DNA extracted from four commonly available samples and to estimate the time duration of the ensuing PCR amplification. Here, we demonstrate that hair and urine samples can also become an alternate source for reliably obtaining a small quantity of PCR-ready DNA. We developed a rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive method of sample collection and simple DNA extraction from buccal swabs, urine, and hair using the phenol-chloroform method. Buccal samples were subjected to DNA extraction, immediately or after refrigeration (4–6°C) for 3 days. The purity and the concentration of the extracted DNA were determined spectrophotometerically, and the adequacy of DNA extracts for the PCR-based assay was assessed by amplifying a 1030-bp region of the mitochondrial D-loop. Although DNA from all the samples was suitable for PCR, the blood and hair samples provided a good quality DNA for restriction analysis of the PCR product compared with the buccal swab and urine samples. In the present study, hair samples proved to be a good source of genomic DNA for PCR-based methods. Hence, DNA of hair samples can also be used for the genomic disorder analysis in addition to the forensic analysis as a result of the ease of sample collection in a noninvasive manner, lower sample volume requirements, and good storage capability. PMID:24294115

  12. Application of magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for solid phase extraction of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhi; Li, Xianghai; Gao, Yaying; Wang, Xianxiang; Li, Chenglei; Wu, Qi

    2012-06-15

    We developed a facile method for plasmid DNA (pDNA) extraction from crude Escherichia coli lysate using magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (MHapNPs) in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG)/NaCl. DNA condensation induced by PEG/NaCl is a prerequisite for achieving pronounced DNA recovery. The quality and quantity of MHapNP-purified pDNA under optimal binding buffer conditions (0.5 volume of 20% PEG 8000/2M NaCl) were comparable to those obtained using organic solvents or commercial kits. This MHapNP technique is rapid, simple, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly and has the potential to extract DNA from other cell lysates. PMID:22465330

  13. Comparison of protocols for DNA extraction from long-term preserved formalin fixed tissues.

    PubMed

    Paireder, Stefan; Werner, Bettina; Bailer, Josef; Werther, Wolfgang; Schmid, Erich; Patzak, Beatrix; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2013-08-15

    The current study compared the applicability of protocols to extract DNA from formalin fixed heart tissues that have been preserved for more than 50 years. Ten methods were tested: a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) standard protocol, seven variants of this standard protocol, and two commercial kits. In the case of younger specimens (fixed in 1951, 1934, or 1914), extracts with DNA concentrations ? 10.0 ng/?l were obtained with the standard CTAB protocol, two variants of the standard protocol including prolonged tissue digestion (72 h instead of 1-2h), and a commercial kit particularly recommended for DNA extraction from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues (FFPE Kit). With the FFPE Kit, DNA could also be extracted from older tissues (fixed in 1893, 1850/1851, or before 1820). In general, the purity of the DNA extracts, assessed from the ratio of the absorbance at 260 and 280 nm, was not very high. In spite of their rather low purity, the DNA extracts could, however, be used to amplify a 122-bp sequence and, in most cases, also a 171-bp sequence of the gene coding for human albumin by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PMID:23603300

  14. DNA extraction from bristles and quills of Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) using a novel protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. G. Oliveira; R. A. Martinez; F. A. Gaiotto

    2007-01-01

    DNA extraction protocols are as varied as DNA sources. When it comes to endangered species, it is especially important to pay attention to all details that ensure the completion of the study goals and effectiveness in attaining useful data for conserva- tion. Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) is a secretive arboreal porcupine endemic to certain ecosystems of the Brazilian At- lantic

  15. A New Method to Extract Dental Pulp DNA: Application to Universal Detection of Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lam Tran-Hung; Ny Tran-Thi; Gérard Aboudharam; Didier Raoult; Michel Drancourt; Dana Davis

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundDental pulp is used for PCR-based detection of DNA derived from host and bacteremic microorganims. Current protocols require odontology expertise for proper recovery of the dental pulp. Dental pulp specimen exposed to laboratory environment yields contaminants detected using universal 16S rDNA-based detection of bacteria.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe developed a new protocol by encasing decontaminated tooth into sterile resin, extracting DNA into the

  16. Mitochondrial DNA extraction and typing from isolated dentin-experimental evaluation in a Korean population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Pfeiffer; R. Steighner; R. Fisher; H. Mörnstad; C.-L. Yoon; M. M. Holland

    1998-01-01

    This study reports mtDNA polymorphisms in both hypervariable segments HV1 and HV2 of the non coding D-loop region from 60\\u000a unrelated Koreans. In contrast to two previous Korean data base studies, mtDNA was extracted separately from pulp tissue and\\u000a root dentin of teeth obtained from dentists. Dentin turned out to be a reliable source of mitochondrial DNA. This can be

  17. DNA extraction and PCR amplification method suitable for fresh, herbarium-stored, lichenized, and other fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oscar F. Cubero; Ana Crespo; Jamshid Fatehi; Paul D. Bridge

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a DNA extraction method suitable for fresh, herbarium-stored, lichenized and other fungal specimens. The method is fast and reliable, comparatively inexpensive and is suitable for obtaining PCR amplification quality DNA from large numbers of samples in a short time. The method has been tested with over 300 samples ofAscochyta, Phyllosticta, Ramalina, Parmelia andPhysconia. Amplifiable fungal DNA was

  18. Optimized Protocol for Simple Extraction of High-Quality Genomic DNA from Clostridium difficile for Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sim, James Heng Chiak; Anikst, Victoria; Lohith, Akshar; Pourmand, Nader; Banaei, Niaz

    2015-07-01

    Successful sequencing of the Clostridium difficile genome requires high-quality genomic DNA (gDNA) as the starting material. gDNA extraction using conventional methods is laborious. We describe here an optimized method for the simple extraction of C. difficile gDNA using the QIAamp DNA minikit, which yielded high-quality sequence reads on the Illumina MiSeq platform. PMID:25878343

  19. Single-Step Multicolor Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Semiconductor Quantum Dot–DNA Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Bentolila, Laurent A.; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    We report a rapid method for the direct multicolor imaging of multiple subnuclear genetic sequences using novel quantum dot-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes (QD–FISH). Short DNA oligonucleotides were attached on QDs and used in a single hybridization/detection step of target sites in situ. QD–FISH probes penetrate both intact interphase nuclei and metaphase chromosomes and showed good targeting of dense chromatin domains with minimal steric hindrances. We further demonstrated that QD’s broad absorption spectra allowed different colored probes specific for distinct subnuclear genetic sequences to be simultaneously excited with a single excitation wavelength and imaged free of chromatic aberrations in a single exposure. Thus, these results demonstrate that QD–FISH probes are very effective in multicolor FISH applications. This work also documents new possibilities of using QD–FISH probes detection down to the single molecule level. PMID:16679564

  20. The validation of forensic DNA extraction systems to utilize soil contaminated biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kasu, Mohaimin; Shires, Karen

    2015-07-01

    The production of full DNA profiles from biological evidence found in soil has a high failure rate due largely to the inhibitory substance humic acid (HA). Abundant in various natural soils, HA co-extracts with DNA during extraction and inhibits DNA profiling by binding to the molecular components of the genotyping assay. To successfully utilize traces of soil contaminated evidence, such as that found at many murder and rape crime scenes in South Africa, a reliable HA removal extraction system would often be selected based on previous validation studies. However, for many standard forensic DNA extraction systems, peer-reviewed publications detailing the efficacy on soil evidence is either lacking or is incomplete. Consequently, these sample types are often not collected or fail to yield suitable DNA material due to the use of unsuitable methodology. The aim of this study was to validate the common forensic DNA collection and extraction systems used in South Africa, namely DNA IQ, FTA elute and Nucleosave for processing blood and saliva contaminated with HA. A forensic appropriate volume of biological evidence was spiked with HA (0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5mg/ml) and processed through each extraction protocol for the evaluation of HA removal using QPCR and STR-genotyping. The DNA IQ magnetic bead system effectively removed HA from highly contaminated blood and saliva, and generated consistently acceptable STR profiles from both artificially spiked samples and crude soil samples. This system is highly recommended for use on soil-contaminated evidence over the cellulose card-based systems currently being preferentially used for DNA sample collection. PMID:25690910

  1. Extracting DNA twist rigidity from experimental supercoiling data Sebastien Neukirch

    E-print Network

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    ­grained model known as the worm­like chain [1], where DNA is considered as a semi­flexible polymer with bending polymer segments is lost. It can be viewed as the ratio of the elastic bending rigid­ ity K 0#er. In the magnetic tweezer experiment [2] a single DNA molecule (of total contour length L) is anchored on a glass

  2. Extracting DNA twist rigidity from experimental supercoiling data Sebastien Neukirch

    E-print Network

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    as the worm-like chain [1], where DNA is considered as a semi-flexible polymer with bending persistence length segments is lost. It can be viewed as the ratio of the elastic bending rigid- ity K0 to the thermal energy. In the magnetic tweezer experiment [2] a single DNA molecule (of total contour length L) is anchored on a glass

  3. PCR-based typing of DNA extracted from cigarette butts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. Hochmeister; R. Dirnhofer; U. V. Borer; B. Budowle; J. Jung; C. T. Comey

    1991-01-01

    Summary Limited genetic marker information can be obtained from saliva by typing by conventional serological means. Thus, the application of PCR-based DNA typing methods was investigated as a potential approach for typing genetic markers in saliva. DNA was isolated from 200 cigarettes smoked by 10 different individuals (20 cigarettes per individual) and from 3 cigarette butts recovered from 2 crime

  4. Assessment of Bias Associated with Incomplete Extraction of Microbial DNA from Soil?

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, Larry M.; Sul, Woo Jun; Blackwood, Christopher B.

    2009-01-01

    DNA extraction bias is a frequently cited but poorly understood limitation of molecular characterizations of environmental microbial communities. To assess the bias of a commonly used soil DNA extraction kit, we varied the cell lysis protocol and conducted multiple extractions on subsamples of clay, sand, and organic soils. DNA, as well as bacterial and fungal ribosomal gene copies as measured by quantitative PCR, continued to be isolated in successive extractions. When terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used, a significant shift in community composition due to extraction bias was detected for bacteria but not for fungi. Pyrosequencing indicated that the relative abundances of sequences from rarely cultivated groups such as Acidobacteria, Gemmatimonades, and Verrucomicrobia were higher in the first extraction than in the sixth but that the reverse was true for Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. This suggests that the well-known phylum-level bacterial cultivation bias may be partially exaggerated by DNA extraction bias. We conclude that bias can be adequately reduced in many situations by pooling three successive extractions, and additional measures should be considered when divergent soil types are compared or when comprehensive community analysis is necessary. PMID:19561189

  5. Evaluation and Optimization of DNA Extraction and Purification Procedures for Soil and Sediment Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. MILLER; J. E. BRYANT; E. L. MADSEN; W. C. GHIORSE

    1999-01-01

    We compared and statistically evaluated the effectiveness of nine DNA extraction procedures by using frozen and dried samples of two silt loam soils and a silt loam wetland sediment with different organic matter contents. The effects of different chemical extractants (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, phenol, Chelex 100, and guanadinium isothiocyanate), different physical disruption methods (bead mill homogeniza- tion and

  6. K-ras mutations are found in DNA extracted from the plasma of patients with colorectal cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Anker; F Lefort; V Vasioukhin; J Lyautey; C Lederrey; XQ Chen; M Stroun; HE Mulcahy; MJ Farthing

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Circulating DNA can be isolated from the plasma of healthy subjects and from patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to detect K-ras mutations in DNA extracted from the plasma of patients with colorectal cancer. METHODS: Tumor and plasma DNA were extracted from 14 patients with colorectal cancer (stages A-D), and K- ras alterations were

  7. Comparison of three DNA extraction kits to establish maximum yield and quality of coral-associated microbial DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Erin J.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    Coral microbiology is an expanding field, yet there is no standard DNA extraction protocol. Although many researchers depend on commercial extraction kits, no specific kit has been optimized for use with coral samples. Both soil and plant DNA extraction kits from MO BIO Laboratories, Inc., have been used by many research groups for this purpose. MO BIO recently replaced their PowerPlant® kit with an improved PowerPlantPro kit, but it was unclear how these changes would affect the kit’s use with coral samples. In order to determine which kit produced the best results, we conducted a comparison between the original PowerPlant kit, the new PowerPlantPro kit, and an alternative kit, PowerSoil, using samples from several different coral genera. The PowerPlantPro kit had the highest DNA yields, but the lack of 16S rRNA gene amplification in many samples suggests that much of the yield may be coral DNA rather than microbial DNA. The most consistent positive amplifications came from the PowerSoil kit.

  8. Non-destructive high-throughput DNA extraction and genotyping methods for cotton seeds and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuting; Hoegenauer, Kevin A; Maeda, Andrea B V; Wang, Fei; Stelly, David M; Nichols, Robert L; Jones, Don C

    2014-01-01

    Extensive use of targeted PCR-based genotyping is precluded for many plant research laboratories by the cost and time required for DNA extraction. Using cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) as a model for plants with medium-sized seeds, we report here manual procedures for inexpensive non-destructive high-throughput extraction of DNA suitable for PCR-based genotyping of large numbers of individual seeds and seedlings. By sampling only small amounts of cotyledon tissue of ungerminated seed or young seedlings, damage is minimized, and viability is not discernibly affected. The yield of DNA from each seed or seedling is typically sufficient for 1000 or 500 PCR reactions, respectively. For seeds, the tissue sampling procedure relies on a modified 96-well plate that is used subsequently for seed storage. For seeds and seedlings, the DNA is extracted in a strongly basic DNA buffer that is later neutralized and diluted. Extracts can be used directly for high-throughput PCR-based genotyping. Any laboratory can thus extract DNA from thousands of individual seeds/seedlings per person-day at a very modest cost for consumables (~$0.05 per sample). Being non-destructive, our approach enables a wide variety of time- and resource-saving applications, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS), before planting, transplanting, and flowering. PMID:25967902

  9. A Rapid and Economical Method for Efficient DNA Extraction from Diverse Soils Suitable for Metagenomic Applications.

    PubMed

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Radha, Sudhakar; Arunraj, Rex; Curtis, Wayne R; Ramya, Mohandass

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost effective method of metagenomic DNA extraction from soil is a useful tool for environmental microbiology. The present work describes an improved method of DNA extraction namely "powdered glass method" from diverse soils. The method involves the use of sterile glass powder for cell lysis followed by addition of 1% powdered activated charcoal (PAC) as purifying agent to remove humic substances. The method yielded substantial DNA (5.87 ± 0.04 ?g/g of soil) with high purity (A260/280: 1.76 ± 0.05) and reduced humic substances (A340: 0.047 ± 0.03). The quality of the extracted DNA was compared against five different methods based on 16S rDNA PCR amplification, BamHI digestion and validated using quantitative PCR. The digested DNA was used for a metagenomic library construction with the transformation efficiency of 4 X 106 CFU mL-1. Besides providing rapid, efficient and economical extraction of metgenomic DNA from diverse soils, this method's applicability is also demonstrated for cultivated organisms (Gram positive B. subtilis NRRL-B-201, Gram negative E. coli MTCC40, and a microalgae C. sorokiniana UTEX#1666). PMID:26167854

  10. A Rapid and Economical Method for Efficient DNA Extraction from Diverse Soils Suitable for Metagenomic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Radha, Sudhakar; Arunraj, Rex; Curtis, Wayne R.; Ramya, Mohandass

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost effective method of metagenomic DNA extraction from soil is a useful tool for environmental microbiology. The present work describes an improved method of DNA extraction namely “powdered glass method” from diverse soils. The method involves the use of sterile glass powder for cell lysis followed by addition of 1% powdered activated charcoal (PAC) as purifying agent to remove humic substances. The method yielded substantial DNA (5.87 ± 0.04 ?g/g of soil) with high purity (A260/280: 1.76 ± 0.05) and reduced humic substances (A340: 0.047 ± 0.03). The quality of the extracted DNA was compared against five different methods based on 16S rDNA PCR amplification, BamHI digestion and validated using quantitative PCR. The digested DNA was used for a metagenomic library construction with the transformation efficiency of 4 X 106 CFU mL-1. Besides providing rapid, efficient and economical extraction of metgenomic DNA from diverse soils, this method’s applicability is also demonstrated for cultivated organisms (Gram positive B. subtilis NRRL-B-201, Gram negative E. coli MTCC40, and a microalgae C. sorokiniana UTEX#1666). PMID:26167854

  11. Extraction of geminiviral DNA from a highly mucilaginous plant ( Abelmoschus esculentus )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce Jose; R. Usha

    2000-01-01

    A protocol is described for the extraction of geminiviral DNA from bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus-infectedAbelmoschus esculentus (known as bhendi or okra) containing high amounts of mucilage and other phenolic compounds. This method involves extraction\\u000a with a buffer containing sodium citrate at pH 6 and PEG precipitation of the virus followed by alkali lysis. The extraction\\u000a buffer eliminates the mucilage

  12. Attempted DNA extraction from a Rancho La Brea Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi): prospects for ancient DNA from asphalt deposits.

    PubMed

    Gold, David A; Robinson, Jacqueline; Farrell, Aisling B; Harris, John M; Thalmann, Olaf; Jacobs, David K

    2014-02-01

    Fossil-bearing asphalt deposits are an understudied and potentially significant source of ancient DNA. Previous attempts to extract DNA from skeletons preserved at the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, have proven unsuccessful, but it is unclear whether this is due to a lack of endogenous DNA, or if the problem is caused by asphalt-mediated inhibition. In an attempt to test these hypotheses, a recently recovered Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) skeleton with an unusual pattern of asphalt impregnation was studied. Ultimately, none of the bone samples tested successfully amplified M.?columbi DNA. Our work suggests that reagents typically used to remove asphalt from ancient samples also inhibit DNA extraction. Ultimately, we conclude that the probability of recovering ancient DNA from fossils in asphalt deposits is strongly (perhaps fatally) hindered by the organic compounds that permeate the bones and that at the Rancho La Brea tar pits, environmental conditions might not have been ideal for the general preservation of genetic material. PMID:24634719

  13. Dichlorvos exposure impedes extraction and amplification of DNA from insects in museum collections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The insecticides dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene have been commonly used to eradicate pest insects from natural history collections. However, it is not known how these chemicals affect the DNA of the specimens in the collections. We thus tested the effect of dichlorvos, paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene on DNA of insects (Musca domestica) by extracting and amplifying DNA from specimens exposed to insecticides in two different concentrations over increasing time intervals. Results The results clearly show that dichlorvos impedes both extraction and amplification of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA after relatively short time, whereas paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene do not. Conclusion Collections treated with paradichlorobenzene and naphthalene, are better preserved concerning DNA, than those treated with dichlorvos. Non toxic pest control methods should, however, be preferred due to physical damage of specimens and putative health risks by chemicals. PMID:20148102

  14. DNA Extraction from Soils: Old Bias for New Microbial Diversity Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Laurent, F.; Philippot, L.; Hallet, S.; Chaussod, R.; Germon, J. C.; Soulas, G.; Catroux, G.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of three different soil DNA extraction methods on bacterial diversity was evaluated using PCR-based 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. DNA extracted directly from three soils showing contrasting physicochemical properties was subjected to amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). The obtained RISA patterns revealed clearly that both the phylotype abundance and the composition of the indigenous bacterial community are dependent on the DNA recovery method used. In addition, this effect was also shown in the context of an experimental study aiming to estimate the impact on soil biodiversity of the application of farmyard manure or sewage sludge onto a monoculture of maize for 15 years. PMID:11319122

  15. Enzymatic Treatment of Specimens before DNA Extraction Directly Influences Molecular Detection of Infectious Agents

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Pablo; Degorge, Sandrine; Merabet, Lilia; Chaumeil, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Biological samples, pharmaceuticals or food contain proteins, lipids, polymers, ammoniums and macromolecules that alter the detection of infectious agents by DNA amplification techniques (PCR). Moreover the targeted DNA has to be released from the complex cell walls and the compact nucleoprotein matrixes and cleared from potential inhibitors. The goal of the present work was to assess the efficiency of enzymatic pretreatments on infectious agents to make DNA available for further extraction and amplification. Methods Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mitis, Propionibacterium acnes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium solani were mixed with an internal control virus and treated with: 1) proteinase K; 2) lyticase and 3) lyticase followed by proteinase K. DNAs was manually extracted using the QIAmp DNA Mini kit or the MagNA Pure Compact automate. DNA extraction yields and the inhibitors were assessed with a phocid Herpesvirus. Bacterial detection was performed using TaqMan real-time PCR and yeasts and filamentous Fungi with HRM (real-time PCR followed by high-resolution melting analysis). Results Viral DNA was released, extracted and detected using manual and automatic methods without pre enzymatic treatments. Either the manual or the automatic DNA extraction systems did not meet the sensitivity expectations if enzymatic treatments were not performed before: lyticase for Fungi and Proteinase K for Bacteria. The addition of lyticase and proteinase K did not improve results. For Fungi the detection after lyticase was higher than for Proteinase K, for which melting analysis did not allow fungal specification. Discussion Columns and magnetic beads allowed collecting DNA and separate PCR inhibitors. Detection rates cannot be related to DNA-avidity of beads or to elution but to the lack of proteolysis. PMID:24936792

  16. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  17. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  18. Plant DNA detection from grasshopper guts: A step-by-step protocol, from tissue preparation to obtaining plant DNA sequences1

    PubMed Central

    Avanesyan, Alina

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A PCR-based method of identifying ingested plant DNA in gut contents of Melanoplus grasshoppers was developed. Although previous investigations have focused on a variety of insects, there are no protocols available for plant DNA detection developed for grasshoppers, agricultural pests that significantly influence plant community composition. • Methods and Results: The developed protocol successfully used the noncoding region of the chloroplast trnL (UAA) gene and was tested in several feeding experiments. Plant DNA was obtained at seven time points post-ingestion from whole guts and separate gut sections, and was detectable up to 12 h post-ingestion in nymphs and 22 h post-ingestion in adult grasshoppers. • Conclusions: The proposed protocol is an effective, relatively quick, and low-cost method of detecting plant DNA from the grasshopper gut and its different sections. This has important applications, from exploring plant “movement” during food consumption, to detecting plant–insect interactions. PMID:25202604

  19. A comparison of six methods for genomic DNA extraction suitable for PCR-based genotyping applications using ovine milk samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Androniki Psifidi; Chrysostomos I. Dovas; Georgios Banos

    2010-01-01

    Isolation of amplifiable genomic DNA is a prerequisite for the genetic assessment of diseases and disease susceptibility in farm animals. Milk somatic cells are a practical, animal friendly and cost-effective source of genomic DNA in milking ruminants. In this study, six different DNA extraction methods were optimized, evaluated and compared for the isolation of DNA from ovine milk samples. Methods

  20. DNA Extraction from Paraffin Embedded Material for Genetic and Epigenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Heryet; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Disease development and progression are characterized by frequent genetic and epigenetic aberrations including chromosomal rearrangements, copy number gains and losses and DNA methylation. Advances in high-throughput, genome-wide profiling technologies, such as microarrays, have significantly improved our ability to identify and detect these specific alterations. However as technology continues to improve, a limiting factor remains sample quality and availability. Furthermore, follow-up clinical information and disease outcome are often collected years after the initial specimen collection. Specimens, typically formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE), are stored in hospital archives for years to decades. DNA can be efficiently and effectively recovered from paraffin-embedded specimens if the appropriate method of extraction is applied. High quality DNA extracted from properly preserved and stored specimens can support quantitative assays for comparisons of normal and diseased tissues and generation of genetic and epigenetic signatures 1. To extract DNA from paraffin-embedded samples, tissue cores or microdissected tissue are subjected to xylene treatment, which dissolves the paraffin from the tissue, and then rehydrated using a series of ethanol washes. Proteins and harmful enzymes such as nucleases are subsequently digested by proteinase K. The addition of lysis buffer, which contains denaturing agents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), facilitates digestion 2. Nucleic acids are purified from the tissue lysate using buffer-saturated phenol and high speed centrifugation which generates a biphasic solution. DNA and RNA remain in the upper aqueous phase, while proteins, lipids and polysaccharides are sequestered in the inter- and organic-phases respectively. Retention of the aqueous phase and repeated phenol extractions generates a clean sample. Following phenol extractions, RNase A is added to eliminate contaminating RNA. Additional phenol extractions following incubation with RNase A are used to remove any remaining enzyme. The addition of sodium acetate and isopropanol precipitates DNA, and high speed centrifugation is used to pellet the DNA and facilitate isopropanol removal. Excess salts carried over from precipitation can interfere with subsequent enzymatic assays, but can be removed from the DNA by washing with 70% ethanol, followed by centrifugation to re-pellet the DNA 3. DNA is re-suspended in distilled water or the buffer of choice, quantified and stored at -20°C. Purified DNA can subsequently be used in downstream applications which include, but are not limited to, PCR, array comparative genomic hybridization 4 (array CGH), methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and sequencing, allowing for an integrative analysis of tissue/tumor samples. PMID:21490570

  1. CENTRIFUGAL LABTUBE FOR FULLY AUTOMATED DNA EXTRACTION & LAMP AMPLIFICATION BASED ON AN INTEGRATED, LOW-COST HEATING SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Hoehl, Melanie Margarete

    In this paper, we introduce a disposable battery-driven heating system for loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) inside a centrifugally-driven DNA-extraction platform (LabTube). We demonstrate fully automated, ...

  2. Exploring microbial diversity in volcanic environments: a review of methods in DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Aude; Cockell, Charles S

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has been marked by a large number of studies focused on understanding the distribution of microorganisms in volcanic environments. These studies are motivated by the desire to elucidate how the geochemically extreme conditions of such environments can influence microbial diversity both on the surface and in the subsurface of the Earth. The exploration of microbial community diversity has generally not relied on culture-dependent methods, but has been carried out using environmental DNA extraction. Because of the large diversity of chemically and physically complex samples, extracting DNA from volcanic environments is technically challenging. In view of the emerging literature, and our own experience in the optimisation of methods for DNA extraction from volcanic materials, it is timely to provide a methodological comparison. This review highlights and discusses new insights and methods published on DNA extraction methods from volcanic samples, considering the different volcanic environments. A description of a recent method for DNA extraction from basalt and obsidian glass rock samples from Iceland is included. Finally, we discuss these approaches in the wider context of modern work to understand the microbial diversity of volcanic environments. PMID:17540467

  3. Comparison of customized spin-column and salt-precipitation finger-prick blood DNA extraction

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Jun-Jie; Gan, Samuel Ken-En

    2014-01-01

    gDNA (genomic DNA extraction from blood is a fundamental process in many diagnostic, identification and research applications. Numerous extraction methods have been reported and are available commercially. However, there is insufficient understanding of the impact of chemical buffers on DNA yield from either whole or nucleated blood. Moreover, these commercial kits are often costly, constraining less well-funded laboratories to traditional and more cost-effective salt-precipitation methods. Towards this, we compared a salt-precipitation and a customized cost-effective spin-column-based method, studying the impact of different chemical constituents on the yields. This customized method resulted in a shortening of the extraction process, higher gDNA yields, and more successful PCR amplification of gDNA genes compared with the salt-precipitation method. Optimizing different chemical buffers on whole- and nucleated blood materials further revealed that certain chemicals boosted extractions from whole- but not nucleated blood. These findings may be useful to laboratories that do not have ready access to commercial kits, and improve their nucleic acid extractions from blood economically. PMID:25222694

  4. Rapid, one step staining procedures for analysis of cellular DNA and protein by single and dual laser flow cytometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. A. Crissman; J. A. Steinkamp

    1982-01-01

    Detailed, simplified techniques are described for simultaneous staining and analysis of DNA and protein in a number of mammalian cell types. Cell staining involves the addition of appropriate dye mixtures to unfixed or ethanol-fixed cells and subsequent analysis of cell populations in the staining reagents generally within 10 to 20 minutes. The approach is novel in that no centrifugation steps

  5. Validation of a DNA IQ™-based extraction method for TECAN robotic liquid handling workstations for processing casework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chantal J. Frégeau; C. Marc Lett; Ron M. Fourney

    2010-01-01

    A semi-automated DNA extraction process for casework samples based on the Promega DNA IQ™ system was optimized and validated on TECAN Genesis 150\\/8 and Freedom EVO robotic liquid handling stations configured with fixed tips and a TECAN TE-Shake™ unit. The use of an orbital shaker during the extraction process promoted efficiency with respect to DNA capture, magnetic bead\\/DNA complex washes

  6. Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Peter J.; Gambus, Agnieszka; Blow, J. Julian

    2012-01-01

    The use of cell-free extracts prepared from eggs of the South African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, has led to many important discoveries in cell cycle research. These egg extracts recapitulate the key nuclear transitions of the eukaryotic cell cycle in vitro under apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. DNA added to the extract is first assembled into a nucleus and is then efficiently replicated. Progression of the extract into mitosis then allows the separation of paired sister chromatids. The Xenopus cell-free system is therefore uniquely suited to the study of the mechanisms, dynamics and integration of cell cycle regulated processes at a biochemical level. In this article we describe methods currently in use in our laboratory for the preparation of Xenopus egg extracts and demembranated sperm nuclei for the study of DNA replication in vitro. We also detail how DNA replication can be quantified in this system. In addition, we describe methods for isolating chromatin and chromatin-bound protein complexes from egg extracts. These recently developed and revised techniques provide a practical starting point for investigating the function of proteins involved in DNA replication. PMID:22521908

  7. Assessment of DNA extracted from FTA® cards for use on the Illumina iSelect BeadChip

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Matthew C; McKay, Stephanie D; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F

    2009-01-01

    Background As FTA® cards provide an ideal medium for the field collection of DNA we sought to assess the quality of genomic DNA extracted from this source for use on the Illumina BovineSNP50 iSelect BeadChip which requires unbound, relatively intact (fragment sizes ? 2 kb), and high-quality DNA. Bovine blood and nasal swab samples collected on FTA cards were extracted using the commercially available GenSolve kit with a minor modification. The call rate and concordance of genotypes from each sample were compared to those obtained from whole blood samples extracted by standard PCI extraction. Findings An ANOVA analysis indicated no significant difference (P > 0.72) in BovineSNP50 genotype call rate between DNA extracted from FTA cards by the GenSolve kit or extracted from whole blood by PCI. Two sample t-tests demonstrated that the DNA extracted from the FTA cards produced genotype call and concordance rates that were not different to those produced by assaying DNA samples extracted by PCI from whole blood. Conclusion We conclude that DNA extracted from FTA cards by the GenSolve kit is of sufficiently high quality to produce results comparable to those obtained from DNA extracted from whole blood when assayed by the Illumina iSelect technology. Additionally, we validate the use of nasal swabs as an alternative to venous blood or buccal samples from animal subjects for reliably producing high quality genotypes on this platform. PMID:19531223

  8. Purification of papain from Carica papaya latex: Aqueous two-phase extraction versus two-step salt precipitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarote Nitsawang; Rajni Hatti-Kaul; Pawinee Kanasawud

    2006-01-01

    Purification of papain from wet Carica papaya latex by extraction in aqueous two-phase system was studied and compared with the traditional procedure involving a two-step salt precipitation. The papain obtained by the latter method was usually contaminated with other proteins, and its purity was dependent on the initial protein concentration in the material used for processing. Highly pure papain was

  9. A simple extraction method suitable for PCR-based analysis of plant, fungal, and bacterial DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George S. Mahuku

    2004-01-01

    A simple and easy protocol for extracting high-quality DNA from microorganisms and plants is presented. The method involves\\u000a inactivating proteins by using SDS\\/proteinase K and precipitating polysaccharides in the presence of high salt. Further purification\\u000a is based on differential solubility of DNA and high-molecular-weight polysaccharides in aqueous media. The procedure does\\u000a not use the toxic and potentially hazardous phenol and

  10. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes as assessed by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Hyang Burm; Jeon, Eun-Jae; Jung, Hack Sung; Kang, Myung-Hee

    2004-01-01

    The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) is claimed to have beneficial properties for human health, such as anti-bacterial, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant effects of the mushroom may be partly explained by protection of cell components against free radicals. We evaluated the effect of aqueous Chaga mushroom extracts for their potential for protecting against oxidative damage to DNA in human lymphocytes. Cells were pretreated with various concentrations (10, 50, 100 and 500 microg/mL) of the extract for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Cells were then treated with 100 microM of H2O2 for 5 min as an oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative damage was performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation (Comet assay). Using image analysis, the degree of DNA damage was evaluated as the DNA tail moment. Cells pretreated with Chaga extract showed over 40% reduction in DNA fragmentation compared with the positive control (100 micromol H2O2 treatment). Thus, Chaga mushroom treatment affords cellular protection against endogenous DNA damage produced by H2O2. PMID:15630179

  11. DNA extraction from bristles and quills of Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) using a novel protocol.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C G; Martinez, R A; Gaiotto, F A

    2007-01-01

    DNA extraction protocols are as varied as DNA sources. When it comes to endangered species, it is especially important to pay attention to all details that ensure the completion of the study goals and effectiveness in attaining useful data for conservation. Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae) is a secretive arboreal porcupine endemic to certain ecosystems of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. A multidisciplinary study (including genetic data) was performed to create a management plan for the conservation of this species. Individuals from natural populations of the states of Bahia, Espírito Santo and Sergipe were sampled. To obtain a reliable and abundant amount of starting material, non-destructive methods were tested, extracting DNA from the bristles and quills that comprise most of this animal's hide. This method has also been innovative in adapting a DNA extraction protocol traditionally used for plants. Digestion using proteinase K was followed by protein precipitation with CTAB, a chloroform-isoamyl alcohol cleaning and DNA precipitation with isopropyl alcohol. This protocol supplies good-quality DNA for genetic analysis with molecular markers based on PCR. PMID:18050086

  12. Comparison of dry- and wet-based fine bead homogenizations to extract DNA from fungal spores.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Matsuzaka, Yasunari; Kimura, Minoru; Matsuki, Hideaki; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2009-04-01

    The present study explored DNA extraction kinetics from fungal spores, i.e., Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum and Cladosporium sphaerospermum, by fine bead mill homogenization. In particular, the study aimed to investigate basic differences between the dry- and wet-based methods. The results showed higher initial rates of the DNA extractions by the dry-based method than by the wet-based method, due to higher collision efficiency among fine beads and fungal spores. Based on the experimental results, we constructed kinetic models. While the results by the wet-based method were fitted well with an existing first-order release-degradation model, the results by the dry-based method were not fitted well. Meanwhile, a newly constructed first-order release-degradation model, assuming a proportion of the DNA remained inside the disrupted spore cells and protected from further sheer stress, showed good correlations. The real-time PCR assays showed the PCR efficiencies of the DNA obtained by the dry-based method were higher than those by the wet-based method likely due to increased moderate fragmentation of the DNA by the dry-based method. Thus, although wet-based methods have been commonly used, dry-based methods might also be applicable to achieve efficient extraction and PCR amplification of fungal DNA. PMID:19332310

  13. Assessing genetic polymorphisms using DNA extracted from cells present in saliva samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Technical advances following the Human Genome Project revealed that high-quality and -quantity DNA may be obtained from whole saliva samples. However, usability of previously collected samples and the effects of environmental conditions on the samples during collection have not been assessed in detail. In five studies we document the effects of sample volume, handling and storage conditions, type of collection device, and oral sampling location, on quantity, quality, and genetic assessment of DNA extracted from cells present in saliva. Methods Saliva samples were collected from ten adults in each study. Saliva volumes from .10-1.0 ml, different saliva collection devices, sampling locations in the mouth, room temperature storage, and multiple freeze-thaw cycles were tested. One representative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT rs4680) and one representative variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region) were selected for genetic analyses. Results The smallest tested whole saliva volume of .10 ml yielded, on average, 1.43 ± .77 ?g DNA and gave accurate genotype calls in both genetic analyses. The usage of collection devices reduced the amount of DNA extracted from the saliva filtrates compared to the whole saliva sample, as 54-92% of the DNA was retained on the device. An "adhered cell" extraction enabled recovery of this DNA and provided good quality and quantity DNA. The DNA from both the saliva filtrates and the adhered cell recovery provided accurate genotype calls. The effects of storage at room temperature (up to 5 days), repeated freeze-thaw cycles (up to 6 cycles), and oral sampling location on DNA extraction and on genetic analysis from saliva were negligible. Conclusions Whole saliva samples with volumes of at least .10 ml were sufficient to extract good quality and quantity DNA. Using 10 ng of DNA per genotyping reaction, the obtained samples can be used for more than one hundred candidate gene assays. When saliva is collected with an absorbent device, most of the nucleic acid content remains in the device, therefore it is advisable to collect the device separately for later genetic analyses. PMID:22182470

  14. BRCA2: One Small Step for DNA Repair, One Giant Protein Purified

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ryan B.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage, malfunctions in DNA repair, and genomic instability are processes that intersect at the crossroads of carcinogenesis. Underscoring the importance of DNA repair in breast and ovarian tumorigenesis is the familial inherited cancer predisposition gene BRCA2. The role of BRCA2 in DNA double-strand break repair was first revealed based on its interaction with RAD51, a central player in homologous recombination. The RAD51 protein forms a nucleoprotein filament on single-stranded DNA, invades a DNA duplex, and initiates a search for homology. Once a homologous DNA sequence is found, the DNA is used as a template for the high-fidelity repair of the DNA break. Many of the biochemical features that allow BRCA2 to choreograph the activities of RAD51 have been elucidated and include: targeting RAD51 to single-stranded DNA while inhibiting binding to dsDNA, reducing the ATPase activity of RAD51, and facilitating the displacement of the single-strand DNA binding protein, Replication Protein A. These reinforcing activities of BRCA2 culminate in the correct positioning of RAD51 onto a processed DNA double-strand break and initiate its faithful repair by homologous recombination. In this review, I will address current biochemical data concerning the BRCA2 protein and highlight unanswered questions regarding BRCA2 function in homologous recombination and cancer. PMID:24348212

  15. Extraction of PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA from Bacillus anthracisspores

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Tamas

    2003-05-19

    Bacterial endospore disruption and nucleic acid extractionresulting in DNA of PCR-amplifiable quality and quantity are not trivial.Responding to the needs of the Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU),Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, protocols weredeveloped to close these gaps. Effectiveness and reproducibility of thetechniques were validated with laboratory grown pure spores of Bacillusanthracis and its close phylogenetic neighbors, and with spiked soils anddamaged samples.

  16. Comparison of methods of DNA extraction from stream sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LAURA G. LEFF; JAMES R. DANA; L. J. Shimkets; J. Vaun McArthur

    1995-01-01

    In Upper Three Runs Creek (Aiken, SC) and many other environments, less than 1% of bacteria visible microscopically can be cultured. Exploitation of molecular biology techniques has led to development of new methods, such as extraction of nucleic acids from soils or sediments, to study the dominant, nonculturable bacteria. The purpose of this study was to compare three published methods

  17. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Fori?, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as ?Eq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co ?-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with ?-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 ?Eq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  18. Two simple techniques for the safe Sarcoptes collection and individual mite DNA extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominga Soglia; Luisa Rambozzi; Sandra Maione; Veronica Spalenza; Stefano Sartore; Samer Alasaad; Paola Sacchi; Luca Rossi

    2009-01-01

    Availability of mites is a recognized limiting factor of biological and genetic investigations of the genus Sarcoptes. Current methods of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction from individual mites also need substantial improvement in efficiency\\u000a and operator friendliness. We have first developed a technique for efficient and safe extraction of living mites from scabietic\\u000a skin samples (crusts or deep skin scrapings). Its

  19. Extraction and fractionation of RNA and DNA from single cells using selective lysing and isotachophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Santiago, Juan G.

    2015-03-01

    Single cell analyses of RNA and DNA are crucial to understanding the heterogeneity of cell populations. The numbers of approaches to single cells analyses are expanding, but sequence specific measurements of nucleic acids have been mostly limited to studies of either DNA or RNA, and not both. This remains a challenge as RNA and DNA have very similar physical and biochemical properties, and cross-contamination with each other can introduce false positive results. We present an electrokinetic technique which creates the opportunity to fractionate and deliver cytoplasmic RNA and genomic DNA to independent downstream analyses. Our technique uses an on-chip system that enables selective lysing of cytoplasmic membrane, extraction of RNA (away from genomic DNA and nucleus), focusing, absolute quantification of cytoplasmic RNA mass. The absolute RNA mass quantification is performed using fluorescence observation without enzymatic amplification in < 5 min. The cell nucleus is left intact and the relative genomic DNA amount in the nucleus can be measured. We demonstrate the technique using single mouse B lymphocyte cells, for which we extracted an average of 14.1 pg total cytoplasmic RNA per cell. We also demonstrate correlation analysis between the absolute amount of cytoplasmic RNA and relative amount of genomic DNA, showing heterogeneity associated with cell cycle.

  20. Helicase and polymerase move together close to the fork junction and copy DNA in one-nucleotide steps

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manjula; Patel, Smita S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY By simultaneously measuring DNA synthesis and dNTP hydrolysis, we show that T7 DNA polymerase and T7 gp4 helicase move in sync during leading strand synthesis taking one-nucleotide steps and hydrolyzing one dNTP per base-pair unwound-copied. The cooperative catalysis enables the helicase and polymerase to move at a uniformly fast rate without GC-dependency or idling with futile NTP hydrolysis. We show that the helicase and polymerase are located close to the replication fork junction. This architecture enables the polymerase to use its strand-displacement synthesis to increase the unwinding rate while the helicase aids this process by translocating along single-stranded DNA and trapping the unwound bases. Thus, in contrast to the helicase-only unwinding model, our results suggest a new model where the helicase and polymerase are moving in one-nucleotide steps and DNA synthesis drives fork unwinding and a role of the helicase is to trap the unwound bases and prevent DNA reannealing. PMID:24630996

  1. Low Cost Extraction and Isothermal Amplification of DNA for Infectious Diarrhea Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K.; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10?2 pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health. PMID:23555883

  2. Low cost extraction and isothermal amplification of DNA for infectious diarrhea diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shichu; Do, Jaephil; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Fan, Andy; Zhao, Lei; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    In order to counter the common perception that molecular diagnostics are too complicated to work in low resource settings, we have performed a difficult sample preparation and DNA amplification protocol using instrumentation designed to be operated without wall or battery power. In this work we have combined a nearly electricity-free nucleic acid extraction process with an electricity-free isothermal amplification assay to detect the presence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) DNA in the stool of infected patients. We used helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (HDA) to amplify the DNA in a low-cost, thermoplastic reaction chip heated with a pair of commercially available toe warmers, while using a simple Styrofoam insulator. DNA was extracted from known positive and negative stool samples. The DNA extraction protocol utilized an air pressure driven solid phase extraction device run using a standard bicycle pump. The simple heater setup required no electricity or battery and was capable of maintaining the temperature at 65°C±2°C for 55 min, suitable for repeatable HDA amplification. Experiments were performed to explore the adaptability of the system for use in a range of ambient conditions. When compared to a traditional centrifuge extraction protocol and a laboratory thermocycler, this disposable, no power platform achieved approximately the same lower limit of detection (1.25×10(-2) pg of C. difficile DNA) while requiring much less raw material and a fraction of the lab infrastructure and cost. This proof of concept study could greatly impact the accessibility of molecular assays for applications in global health. PMID:23555883

  3. Extraction of RAPD-friendly DNA from Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyta) after enzymatic dissociation of the frozen sporophyte tissues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y.-J. Hu; Z.-G. Zhou

    2001-01-01

    A new extraction protocol has been developed to obtain high quality DNAfrom Laminaria japonica, which involves enzymatic dissociation ofsporophyte tissues and subsequent elimination of the remainingpolysaccharides with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide. Unicells isolatedfrom frozen kelp tissues with alginate lyase prepared from the abalone Haliotis diversicolor were used to extract total DNA; the yield wasapproximately 13 to 22.5 µg DNA g-1 (wet

  4. Volume reduction solid phase extraction of DNA from dilute, large-volume biological samples.

    PubMed

    Reedy, Carmen R; Bienvenue, Joan M; Coletta, Lisa; Strachan, Briony C; Bhatri, Naila; Greenspoon, Susan; Landers, James P

    2010-04-01

    Microdevices are often designed to process sample volumes on the order of tens of microliters and cannot typically accommodate larger volume samples without adversely affecting efficiency and greatly increasing analysis time. However, dilute, large-volume biological samples are frequently encountered, especially in forensic or clinical laboratories. A microdevice, capable of efficiently processing 0.5-1 mL samples has been developed for solid phase extraction (SPE) of DNA. SPE was carried out on a microdevice utilizing magnetic silica particles and an optimized volumetric flow rate and elution buffer, resulting in a 50-fold decrease in volume and a 15-fold increase in DNA concentration. Device characterization studies showed DNA extraction efficiencies comparable with previously reported silica-based purification methods, with robust performance demonstrated by the successful amplification of a fragment from the gelsolin gene extracted from dilute whole blood. In addition, the microchip-based method for SPE of large volume, dilute samples was also used to demonstrate the first successful on-chip purification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from both dilute whole blood and a degraded blood stain. PMID:20215033

  5. 96-well Format DNA Extraction Protocol for Freeze-dried Maize Seedling Leaves

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    1 96-well Format DNA Extraction Protocol for Freeze-dried Maize Seedling Leaves (Last revised tape and lyopholize tissue using a freeze drier immediately after collection. Depending on the amount of tissue, samples are typically dried for 2-3 days. c. Briefly spin down samples. Remove airpore tape

  6. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Reynolds, P Dominic; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jerwood, David; Anderson, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is partly caused by oxidative stress from free radicals and reduced antioxidant levels. Using hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress in vitro in peripheral lymphocytes we investigated the induction of DNA damage supplemented with ethanolic extract of Chaga mushroom as a protective antioxidant. Lymphocytes were obtained from 20 IBD patients and 20 healthy volunteers. For treatment, a constant H_{2}O_{2 } dose (50 microg/ml) was used with variable doses of Chaga extract (10-500 microg/ml). DNA damage was evaluated in 50 cells per individual and dose using the Comet assay (making 1000 observations per experimental point ensuring appropriate statistical power). Chaga supplementation resulted in a 54.9% (p < 0.001) reduction of H_{2}O_{2 } induced DNA damage within the patient group and 34.9% (p < 0.001) within the control group. Lymphocytes from Crohn's disease (CD) patients had a greater basic DNA damage than Ulcerative Colitis (UC) patients (p < 0.001). Conclusively, Chaga extract reduces oxidative stress in lymphocytes from IBD patients and also healthy individuals when challenged in vitro. Thus, Chaga extract could be a possible and valuable supplement to inhibit oxidative stress in general. PMID:18997282

  7. DNA BARCODING Tissue-direct PCR, a rapid and extraction-free method

    E-print Network

    DNA BARCODING Tissue-direct PCR, a rapid and extraction-free method for barcoding of ferns F-W. LI difficult to identify to genus. Here we developed an efficient procedure called `Tissue-direct PCR', in which a slice of fern tissue is mixed with PCR reagents and primers, allowing certain genomic regions

  8. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of diesel and biodiesel exhaust extracts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abstract reports the results of studies assessing the relative DNA damage potential of extracts of exhaust particles resulting from the combustion of petroleum diesel, biodiesel, and petroleum diesel-biodiesel blends. Results indicate that the commercially available B20 petr...

  9. Effects of Sanionia uncinata extracts in protecting against and inducing DNA cleavage by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Andréia da Silva; Mazzei, José Luiz; de Alencar, Alexandre Santos; Evangelista, Heitor; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2011-01-01

    When mosses are exposed to increased quantities of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, they produce more secondary metabolites. Antarctica moss Sanionia uncinata (Hedw.) Loeske has presented high carotenoid contents in response to an increase in UVB radiation. This moss has been recommended as a potential source of antioxidants. In the present work, the protective and enhancing effects of aqueous (AE) and hydroalcoholic (HE) extracts of S. uncinata on the cleavage of supercoiled DNA were evaluated through topological modifications, quantified by densitometry after agarose gel electrophoresis. Total phenolic contents reached 5.89 mg/g. Our data demonstrated that the extract does not induce DNA cleavage. Furthermore, both extracts showed antioxidant activity that protected the DNA against cleavage induced by (i) O(2)(•-), 89% (AE) and 94% (HE) (P<0.05), and (ii) (.)OH, 17% (AE) and 18% (HE). However, the extracts intensified cleavage induced by Fenton-like reactions: (i) Cu(2+)/H(2)O(2), 94% (AE) and 100% (HE) (P<0.05), and (ii) SnCl(2), 62% (AE) and 56% (HE). DNA damages seem to follow different ways: (i) in the presence of Fenton-like reactions could be via reactive oxygen species generation and (ii) with HE/Cu(2+) could have also been triggered by other mechanisms. PMID:22005340

  10. Extracting Kinetics from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy: Nanopore Unzipping of DNA Hairpins

    E-print Network

    Meller, Amit

    Extracting Kinetics from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy: Nanopore Unzipping of DNA Hairpins, Massachusetts ABSTRACT Single-molecule force experiments provide powerful new tools to explore biomolecular (SM) experiments forces can be exerted directly on individual molecules and their response can

  11. A strategy for optimizing quality and quantity of DNA extracted from soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helmut Bürgmann; Manuel Pesaro; Franco Widmer; Josef Zeyer

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of a bead beating method was studied in detail with regard to a variety of factors including beating time and speed, volume and temperature of the buffer, as well as amount and type of beads employed. The results presented here reveal that all of these parameters have a significant effect on yield and quality of DNA extracted from

  12. Improved DNA Extraction Method for Porcine Contaminants, Detection in Imported Meat to The Saudi Market

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ibrahim Abdullah Alaraidh

    A porcine detection methodology based on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a specific porcine fragment was used in this paper. With the advent of mass globalization and the fast growing and rapidly changing halal industry of the international market it is of vital need that a practical scientific system be applied and established in

  13. Evaluation of DNA Extraction and PCR Methods for Detection of Enterocytozoon bienuesi in Stool Specimens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ittisak Subrungruang; Mathirut Mungthin; Porntip Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr; Ram Rangsin; Tawee Naaglor; Saovanee Leelayoova

    2004-01-01

    An evaluation of the sensitivities of three DNA extraction methods, i.e., FTA filter paper, a QIAamp stool mini kit, and a conventional phenol-chloroform method, by using specimens with known concentrations of Enterocytozoon bieneusi spores was performed. FTA filter paper and the QIAamp stool mini kit were the most sensitive methods, which could detect E. bieneusi in specimens with a concentration

  14. GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: CTAB Plant DNA Extraction USER/BILLING AGREEMENT

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: CTAB Plant DNA Extraction USER/BILLING AGREEMENT FOR OFF-CAMPUS USERS Please fill out completely, and email, fax or mail to: Genomic Technologies Facility Manager 2025 Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory Center for Plant Genomics Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011-3650 515

  15. GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: CTAB Plant DNA Extraction USER/BILLING AGREEMENT

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: CTAB Plant DNA Extraction USER/BILLING AGREEMENT FOR ON-CAMPUS USERS Please fill out completely, and email, fax or mail to: Genomic Technologies Facility Manager 2025 Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory Center for Plant Genomics Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011-3650 515

  16. GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: DNA Extraction (Qiagen DNeasy) USER/BILLING AGREEMENT

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: DNA Extraction (Qiagen DNeasy) USER/BILLING AGREEMENT FOR ON-CAMPUS USERS Please fill out completely, and email, fax or mail to: Genomic Technologies Facility Manager 2025 Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory Center for Plant Genomics Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011-3650 515

  17. GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: DNA Extraction (Qiagen DNeasy) USER/BILLING AGREEMENT

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FACILITY: DNA Extraction (Qiagen DNeasy) USER/BILLING AGREEMENT FOR OFF-CAMPUS USERS Please fill out completely, and email, fax or mail to: Genomic Technologies Facility Manager 2025 Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory Center for Plant Genomics Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011-3650 515

  18. Release of Bacterial DNA by Marine Nanoflagellates, an Intermediate Step in Phosphorus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Valentina; Rehnstam, Ann-Sofi; Lundberg, Erik; Hagström, Åke

    1992-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved DNA and nanoflagellates were found to covary during a study of diel dynamics of the microbial food web in the Adriatic Sea. This observation was further investigated in a continuous seawater culture when nanoflagellates were fed bacteria grown in filtered seawater. Analysis of dissolved organic phosphorus and dissolved DNA showed a sixfold increase of dissolved DNA in the presence of the nanoflagellates (Ochromonas sp.). The amount of DNA released suggested that the majority of the consumed bacterial DNA was ejected. Phagotrophic nanoflagellates thus represent an important source of origin for dissolved DNA. The rate of breakdown of dissolved DNA and release of inorganic phosphorus in the pelagic ecosystem is suggested to be dependent on the ambient phosphate pool. In the P-limited northern Adriatic Sea, rapid degradation of the labelled DNA could be demonstrated, whereas the N-limited southern California bight water showed a much lower rate. Phosphorus originating from dissolved DNA was shown to be transferred mainly to organisms in the <3-?m-size fractions. On the basis of the C/P ratios, we suggest that a significant fraction of the phosphorus demand by the autotrophs may be sustained by the released DNA during stratified conditions. Thus, the nucleic acid-rich bacterial biomass grazed by protozoa plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in the marine environment. PMID:16348813

  19. Extraction and analysis of human nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from electron beam irradiated envelopes.

    PubMed

    Withrow, Angela G; Sikorsky, Jan; Downs, J C Upshaw; Fenger, Terry

    2003-11-01

    The United States Postal Service is considering methods such as electron beam irradiation to neutralize biological agents sent through the mail. While this is proven to reduce/eliminate pathogenic organisms, it may also degrade human genomic DNA and therefore hinder the ability to garner forensically informative genetic profiles. To determine the effects of electron beam irradiation on DNA typing, 16 white, standard letter-sized envelopes were licked. Half of the envelopes served as nonirradiated controls while the other half underwent irradiation at dosages sufficient to kill anthrax spores (29.3 and 51.6 kGy). Total cellular DNA was extracted from all envelopes; nuclear short tandem repeat loci, as well as the hypervariable region I from mitochondrial DNA, were amplified by means of the polymerase chain reaction. Short tandem repeat profiles and mitochondrial DNA sequence haplotypes were acquired on an ABI Prism 310 Genetic Analyzer platform. Analysis of data from irradiated samples revealed evidence of DNA degradation; however, the ability to construct full genetic profiles from both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA remained largely unaffected. The use of the polymerase chain reaction, coupled with florescent fragment analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing, should be considered to profile biological material from evidence enduring irradiation to inactivate infectious agents. PMID:14640275

  20. Optimized DNA extraction methods for encysted embryos of the endangered fairy shrimp, Branchinecta sandiegonensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, A.N.; Simovich, M.A.; Pepino, D.; Schroeder, K.M.; Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The San Diego fairy shrimp Branchinecta sandiegonensis is a federally endangered species endemic to vernal pools in southern California, USA. Filling events in these habitats are highly variable, with some pools failing to hold water long enough for reproduction over many successive years. Studies of this species are thus hindered by the relatively rare appearance of aquatically active life history phases. Because diapausing cysts are abundant and present at all times, they provide an underutilized opportunity for both species identification and genetic studies. However, methods for extracting DNA from cysts are technically challenging because of their structure and size. Here we present a protocol for extracting DNA from B. sandiegonensis cysts in sufficient quantities for "DNA Barcoding", microsatellite analysis and other genotyping and sequencing applications. The technique will aid in population genetic studies and species identification (since taxonomic keys only distinguish among adults), and will be applicable to other crustaceans with similar diapausing cysts. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  1. 762 shorT commUnicaTions AN IMPROVED EXTRACTION METHOD TO INCREASE DNA YIELD FROM MOLTED FEATHERS

    E-print Network

    - vasive source of DNA for genetic studies of Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis), we isolated words: Accipiter gentilis, DNA extraction, DNA yield, molted feathers, noninvasive genetic sampling ADN en estudios de Accipiter gentilis, aislamos y cuantificamos ADN de plumas mudadas y comparamos la

  2. DNA MICROARRAY IMAGE INTENSITY EXTRACTION USING EIGENSPOTS Sotirios A. Tsaftaris, Ramandeep Ahuja, Derek Shiell, and Aggelos K. Katsaggelos

    E-print Network

    Tsaftaris, Sotirios

    DNA MICROARRAY IMAGE INTENSITY EXTRACTION USING EIGENSPOTS Sotirios A. Tsaftaris, Ramandeep Ahuja, IL 60208, USA ABSTRACT DNA microarrays are commonly used in the rapid analysis of gene expression-to-noise metric xdev. Index Terms--DNA microarray, biochip, eigenspaces, noise, segmentation. 1. INTRODUCTION

  3. In vitro repair of complex unligatable oxidatively induced DNA double-strand breaks by human cell extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elzbieta Pastwa; Ronald D. Neumann; Thomas A. Winters

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new assay for in vitro repair of oxida- tively induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by HeLa cell nuclear extracts. The assay employs linear plasmid DNA containing DNA DSBs produced by the radiomimetic drug bleomycin. The bleomycin- induced DSB possesses a complex structure similar to that produced by oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. Bleomycin DSBs are composed of

  4. An Improved Method for Soil DNA Extraction to Study the Microbial Assortment within Rhizospheric Region

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Faria

    2014-01-01

    The need for identification of soil microbial community mainly depends on direct extraction of DNA from soil, a multifaceted environment that is a major pool for microbial genetic diversity. The soil DNA extraction procedures usually suffer from two major problems, namely, inappropriate rupturing of cells and contamination with humic substances. In the present study, five protocols for single type of rhizospheric soil were investigated and their comparison indicated that the inclusion of 120?mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for washing and mannitol in the lysis buffer allowed the processing of soil sample in minimal time with no specific equipment requirement. Furthermore, DNA purity and yield were also improved, which allowed the exploitation of genetic potential of soil microbes within soil sample thereby facilitating the amplification of metagenomic DNA. The effectiveness of methods was analyzed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA. The banding patterns revealed that both the abundance and the composition of indigenous microbial community depend on the DNA recovery method. PMID:25302120

  5. One-Step Formation of "Chain-Armor"-Stabilized DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Cassinelli, Valentina; Oberleitner, Birgit; Sobotta, Jessica; Nickels, Philipp; Grossi, Guido; Kempter, Susanne; Frischmuth, Thomas; Liedl, Tim; Manetto, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    DNA-based self-assembled nanostructures are widely used to position organic and inorganic objects with nanoscale precision. A particular promising application of DNA structures is their usage as programmable carrier systems for targeted drug delivery. To provide DNA-based templates that are robust against degradation at elevated temperatures, low ion concentrations, adverse pH conditions, and DNases, we built 6-helix DNA tile tubes consisting of 24 oligonucleotides carrying alkyne groups on their 3'-ends and azides on their 5'-ends. By a mild click reaction, the two ends of selected oligonucleotides were covalently connected to form rings and interlocked DNA single strands, so-called DNA catenanes. Strikingly, the structures stayed topologically intact in pure water and even after precipitation from EtOH. The structures even withstood a temperature of 95?°C when all of the 24 strands were chemically interlocked. PMID:25980669

  6. A viral packaging motor varies its DNA rotation and step size to preserve subunit coordination as the capsid fills.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shixin; Chistol, Gheorghe; Hetherington, Craig L; Tafoya, Sara; Aathavan, K; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-04-24

    Multimeric, ring-shaped molecular motors rely on the coordinated action of their subunits to perform crucial biological functions. During these tasks, motors often change their operation in response to regulatory signals. Here, we investigate a viral packaging machine as it fills the capsid with DNA and encounters increasing internal pressure. We find that the motor rotates the DNA during packaging and that the rotation per base pair increases with filling. This change accompanies a reduction in the motor's step size. We propose that these adjustments preserve motor coordination by allowing one subunit to make periodic, specific, and regulatory contacts with the DNA. At high filling, we also observe the downregulation of the ATP-binding rate and the emergence of long-lived pauses, suggesting a throttling-down mechanism employed by the motor near the completion of packaging. This study illustrates how a biological motor adjusts its operation in response to changing conditions, while remaining highly coordinated. PMID:24766813

  7. Step-gate polysilicon nanowires field effect transistor compatible with CMOS technology for label-free DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wenga, G; Jacques, E; Salaün, A-C; Rogel, R; Pichon, L; Geneste, F

    2013-02-15

    Currently, detection of DNA hybridization using fluorescence-based detection technique requires expensive optical systems and complex bioinformatics tools. Hence, the development of new low cost devices that enable direct and highly sensitive detection stimulates a lot of research efforts. Particularly, devices based on silicon nanowires are emerging as ultrasensitive electrical sensors for the direct detection of biological species thanks to their high surface to volume ratio. In this study, we propose innovative devices using step-gate polycrystalline silicon nanowire FET (poly-Si NW FETs), achieved with simple and low cost fabrication process, and used as ultrasensitive electronic sensor for DNA hybridization. The poly-SiNWs are synthesized using the sidewall spacer formation technique. The detailed fabrication procedure for a step-gate NWFET sensor is described in this paper. No-complementary and complementary DNA sequences were clearly discriminated and detection limit to 1 fM range is observed. This first result using this nano-device is promising for the development of low cost and ultrasensitive polysilicon nanowires based DNA sensors compatible with the CMOS technology. PMID:22841443

  8. Second-step transfer of bacteriophage T5 DNA: purification and characterization of the T5 gene A2 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, C E; Benzinger, R H

    1981-01-01

    Second-step transfer of bacteriophage T5 DNA requires the function of the T5 pre-early proteins A1 and A2. We have isolated and characterized the gene A2 protein as part of an effort to determine the mechanism of second-step transfer. The A2 protein was purified by DNA-cellulose column chromatography followed by gel filtration and ion-exchange column chromatography. The A2 protein's identity was confirmed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and thin-layer gel filtration in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride demonstrated a molecular weight of 15,000 for the A2 polypeptide. Migration of the A2 protein through gel filtration columns under nondenaturing conditions, in combination with sedimentation behavior, indicated dimerization of the A2 polypeptide. The existence of the A2 dimer was confirmed by protein cross-linking with dimethyl suberimidate and analysis of the cross-linked proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid composition, degree of polymerization, DNA-binding ability, and physical characteristics of the T5 gene A2 protein are consistent with a function of the A2 protein in DNA transfer. Images PMID:7288924

  9. Validation of a DNA IQ-based extraction method for TECAN robotic liquid handling workstations for processing casework.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Fourney, Ron M

    2010-10-01

    A semi-automated DNA extraction process for casework samples based on the Promega DNA IQ™ system was optimized and validated on TECAN Genesis 150/8 and Freedom EVO robotic liquid handling stations configured with fixed tips and a TECAN TE-Shake™ unit. The use of an orbital shaker during the extraction process promoted efficiency with respect to DNA capture, magnetic bead/DNA complex washes and DNA elution. Validation studies determined the reliability and limitations of this shaker-based process. Reproducibility with regards to DNA yields for the tested robotic workstations proved to be excellent and not significantly different than that offered by the manual phenol/chloroform extraction. DNA extraction of animal:human blood mixtures contaminated with soil demonstrated that a human profile was detectable even in the presence of abundant animal blood. For exhibits containing small amounts of biological material, concordance studies confirmed that DNA yields for this shaker-based extraction process are equivalent or greater to those observed with phenol/chloroform extraction as well as our original validated automated magnetic bead percolation-based extraction process. Our data further supports the increasing use of robotics for the processing of casework samples. PMID:20457033

  10. Comparison of Eleven Methods for Genomic DNA Extraction Suitable for Large-Scale Whole-Genome Genotyping and Long-Term DNA Banking Using Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Psifidi, Androniki; Dovas, Chrysostomos I.; Bramis, Georgios; Lazou, Thomai; Russel, Claire L.; Arsenos, Georgios; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Over the recent years, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies have revolutionized scientific research with their applications to high-throughput analysis of biological systems. Isolation of high quantities of pure, intact, double stranded, highly concentrated, not contaminated genomic DNA is prerequisite for successful and reliable large scale genotyping analysis. High quantities of pure DNA are also required for the creation of DNA-banks. In the present study, eleven different DNA extraction procedures, including phenol-chloroform, silica and magnetic beads based extractions, were examined to ascertain their relative effectiveness for extracting DNA from ovine blood samples. The quality and quantity of the differentially extracted DNA was subsequently assessed by spectrophotometric measurements, Qubit measurements, real-time PCR amplifications and gel electrophoresis. Processing time, intensity of labor and cost for each method were also evaluated. Results revealed significant differences among the eleven procedures and only four of the methods yielded satisfactory outputs. These four methods, comprising three modified silica based commercial kits (Modified Blood, Modified Tissue, Modified Dx kits) and an in-house developed magnetic beads based protocol, were most appropriate for extracting high quality and quantity DNA suitable for large-scale microarray genotyping and also for long-term DNA storage as demonstrated by their successful application to 600 individuals. PMID:25635817

  11. Study of partitioning and dynamics of metals in contaminated soil using modified four-step BCR sequential extraction procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiberiu Frentiu; Michaela Ponta; Erika Levei; Emil A. Cordos

    2009-01-01

    The modified four-step BCR sequential extraction procedure (exchangeable and weak acid available species, reducible, oxidisable\\u000a and residual fractions) was used to examine the distribution of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn with soil depth in an area (Baia\\u000a Mare — Bozanta, Romania) with both high natural level of elements considered as toxic and historical pollution resulting from\\u000a nonferrous metallurgy.

  12. One-Step Oxidative Desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene Using Cyclohexanone Peroxide in N-Alkyl-imidazolium–Based Ionic Liquid Extraction Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Wang; D. S. Zhao; Z. M. Sun; F. T. Li; Y. Q. Song; C. G. Kou

    2012-01-01

    One-step oxidative desulfurization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) using cyclohexanone peroxide (CYHPO) was performed in the presence of N-alkyl-imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs). CYHPO is an oil-soluble oxidant and ILs are employed as extractants. The effect of the ILs, the molar ratio of CYHPO\\/S (O\\/S), volume ratio (VIL\\/Vmodeloil), reaction time (T), and reaction temperature (t) were investigated in detail. The results showed that

  13. DNA Replication and Postreplication Mismatch Repair in Cell-Free Extracts from Cultured Human Neuroblastoma and Fibroblast Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascale David; Edna Efrati; Georges Tocco; Sharon Wald Krauss; Myron F. Goodman

    1997-01-01

    DNA synthesis and postreplication mismatch repair were mea- sured in vitro using cell-free extracts from cultured human SY5Y neuroblastoma and WI38 fibroblast cells in different growth states. All extracts, including differentiated SY5Y and quiescent WI38 fibroblasts, catalyzed SV40 origin-dependent DNA syn- thesis, totally dependent on SV40 T-antigen. Thus, although differentiated neuroblastoma and quiescent fibroblasts cells were essentially nondividing, their extracts

  14. Unraveling the sequence-dependent polymorphic behavior of d(CpG) steps in B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Dans, Pablo Daniel; Faustino, Ignacio; Battistini, Federica; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Lavery, Richard; Orozco, Modesto

    2014-10-01

    We have made a detailed study of one of the most surprising sources of polymorphism in B-DNA: the high twist/low twist (HT/LT) conformational change in the d(CpG) base pair step. Using extensive computations, complemented with database analysis, we were able to characterize the twist polymorphism in the d(CpG) step in all the possible tetranucleotide environment. We found that twist polymorphism is coupled with BI/BII transitions, and, quite surprisingly, with slide polymorphism in the neighboring step. Unexpectedly, the penetration of cations into the minor groove of the d(CpG) step seems to be the key element in promoting twist transitions. The tetranucleotide environment also plays an important role in the sequence-dependent d(CpG) polymorphism. In this connection, we have detected a previously unexplored intramolecular C-H···O hydrogen bond interaction that stabilizes the low twist state when 3'-purines flank the d(CpG) step. This work explains a coupled mechanism involving several apparently uncorrelated conformational transitions that has only been partially inferred by earlier experimental or theoretical studies. Our results provide a complete description of twist polymorphism in d(CpG) steps and a detailed picture of the molecular choreography associated with this conformational change. PMID:25223784

  15. Unraveling the sequence-dependent polymorphic behavior of d(CpG) steps in B-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dans, Pablo Daniel; Faustino, Ignacio; Battistini, Federica; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Lavery, Richard; Orozco, Modesto

    2014-01-01

    We have made a detailed study of one of the most surprising sources of polymorphism in B-DNA: the high twist/low twist (HT/LT) conformational change in the d(CpG) base pair step. Using extensive computations, complemented with database analysis, we were able to characterize the twist polymorphism in the d(CpG) step in all the possible tetranucleotide environment. We found that twist polymorphism is coupled with BI/BII transitions, and, quite surprisingly, with slide polymorphism in the neighboring step. Unexpectedly, the penetration of cations into the minor groove of the d(CpG) step seems to be the key element in promoting twist transitions. The tetranucleotide environment also plays an important role in the sequence-dependent d(CpG) polymorphism. In this connection, we have detected a previously unexplored intramolecular C-H···O hydrogen bond interaction that stabilizes the low twist state when 3?-purines flank the d(CpG) step. This work explains a coupled mechanism involving several apparently uncorrelated conformational transitions that has only been partially inferred by earlier experimental or theoretical studies. Our results provide a complete description of twist polymorphism in d(CpG) steps and a detailed picture of the molecular choreography associated with this conformational change. PMID:25223784

  16. High-Capacity Conductive Nanocellulose Paper Sheets for Electrochemically Controlled Extraction of DNA Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Aamir; Nyström, Gustav; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert; Nyholm, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Highly porous polypyrrole (PPy)-nanocellulose paper sheets have been evaluated as inexpensive and disposable electrochemically controlled three-dimensional solid phase extraction materials. The composites, which had a total anion exchange capacity of about 1.1 mol kg?1, were used for extraction and subsequent release of negatively charged fluorophore tagged DNA oligomers via galvanostatic oxidation and reduction of a 30–50 nm conformal PPy layer on the cellulose substrate. The ion exchange capacity, which was, at least, two orders of magnitude higher than those previously reached in electrochemically controlled extraction, originated from the high surface area (i.e. 80 m2 g?1) of the porous composites and the thin PPy layer which ensured excellent access to the ion exchange material. This enabled the extractions to be carried out faster and with better control of the PPy charge than with previously employed approaches. Experiments in equimolar mixtures of (dT)6, (dT)20, and (dT)40 DNA oligomers showed that all oligomers could be extracted, and that the smallest oligomer was preferentially released with an efficiency of up to 40% during the reduction of the PPy layer. These results indicate that the present material is very promising for the development of inexpensive and efficient electrochemically controlled ion-exchange membranes for batch-wise extraction of biomolecules. PMID:22195031

  17. Rapid DNA Extraction from Dried Blood Spots on Filter Paper: Potential Applications in Biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Hye; Lee, Sang Kwang; Ihm, Chunhwa; Sohn, Young-Hak

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dried blood spot (DBS) technology is a microsampling alternative to traditional plasma or serum sampling for pharmaco- or toxicokinetic evaluation. DBS technology has been applied to diagnostic screening in drug discovery, nonclinical, and clinical settings. We have developed an improved elution protocol involving boiling of blood spots dried on Whatman filter paper. Methods The purpose of this study was to compare the quality, purity, and quantity of DNA isolated from frozen blood samples and DBSs. We optimized a method for extraction and estimation of DNA from blood spots dried on filter paper (3-mm FTA card). A single DBS containing 40 ?L blood was used. Results DNA was efficiently extracted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or Tris-EDTA (TE) buffer by incubation at 37°C overnight. DNA was stable in DBSs that were stored at room temperature or frozen. The housekeeping genes GAPDH and beta-actin were used as positive standards for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) validation of general diagnostic screening. Conclusion Our simple and convenient DBS storage and extraction methods are suitable for diagnostic screening by using very small volumes of blood collected on filter paper, and can be used in biobanks for blood sample storage. PMID:25562044

  18. Improvement of the BCR three step sequential extraction procedure prior to the certification of new sediment and soil reference materials.

    PubMed

    Rauret, G; López-Sánchez, J F; Sahuquillo, A; Rubio, R; Davidson, C; Ure, A; Quevauviller, P

    1999-02-01

    The Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme (formerly BCR) of the European Commission proposed a three-step sequential extraction procedure for sediment analysis, following extensive expert consultations and two interlaboratory studies. This scheme was recently used to certify the extractable trace element contents of a sediment reference material (CRM 601). Although this procedure offers a means to ensure the comparability of data in this field, some difficulties concerning the interlaboratory reproducibility still remain, and a new project is currently being conducted to determine the causes of poor reproducibility in the extraction scheme. The final objective of the project is the certification of new sediment and soil reference materials for their extractable contents of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. This paper presents the results of a small-scale interlaboratory study, which aimed to test a revised version of the extraction schemes by comparing the original and the modified protocols using the CRM 601 sample. This work offers an improvement to the BCR sequential extraction procedure through intercomparison exercises. This improved procedure will allow the obtaining of CRMs to validate analytical data in the analysis of soils and sediments, and it will also facilitate comparability of data in the European Union. PMID:11529080

  19. Method evaluation of Fusarium DNA extraction from mycelia and wheat for down-stream real-time PCR quantification and correlation to mycotoxin levels.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Elisabeth; Gidlund, Ann; Olsen, Monica; Börjesson, Thomas; Spliid, Niels Henrik Hytte; Simonsson, Magnus

    2008-04-01

    Identification of Fusarium species by traditional methods requires specific skill and experience and there is an increased interest for new molecular methods for identification and quantification of Fusarium from food and feed samples. Real-time PCR with probe technology (Taqman) can be used for the identification and quantification of several species of Fusarium from cereal grain samples. There are several critical steps that need to be considered when establishing a real-time PCR-based method for DNA quantification, including extraction of DNA from the samples. In this study, several DNA extraction methods were evaluated, including the DNeasy Plant Mini Spin Columns (Qiagen), the Bio robot EZ1 (Qiagen) with the DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit (Qiagen), and the Fast-DNA Spin Kit for Soil (Qbiogene). Parameters such as DNA quality and stability, PCR inhibitors, and PCR efficiency were investigated. Our results showed that all methods gave good PCR efficiency (above 90%) and DNA stability whereas the DNeasy Plant Mini Spin Columns in combination with sonication gave the best results with respect to Fusarium DNA yield. The modified DNeasy Plant Mini Spin protocol was used to analyse 31 wheat samples for the presence of F. graminearum and F. culmorum. The DNA level of F. graminearum could be correlated to the level of DON (r(2) = 0.9) and ZEN (r(2) = 0.6) whereas no correlation was found between F. culmorum and DON/ZEA. This shows that F. graminearum and not F. culmorum, was the main producer of DON in Swedish wheat during 2006. PMID:18304664

  20. A continuous method for the large-scale extraction of plasmid DNA by modified boiling lysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kaichun; Jin, Huali; He, Zhonghuai; Zhu, Qinghong; Wang, Bin

    2006-01-01

    This protocol describes a streamlined method of plasmid DNA extraction by continual thermal lysis, a modification of the basic boiling lysis technique, to simplify the processing of large volumes of Escherichia coli cultures. Fermented bacteria are harvested using a hollow fiber-membrane module and pre-treated with lysozyme prior to passing through a thermal exchange coil set at 70 degrees C to lyse the cells, and into a juxtaposed cooling coil on ice. The lysed and cooled bacteria are subsequently separated from the lysate by centrifugation and plasmid DNA is precipitated from the supernatant for further purification. The use of peristaltic pumps and two heating coils at constant temperature without the use of centrifugation enable the lysis process to become constant and controllable, providing a flow-through protocol for cell lysis and plasmid DNA extraction. Large volumes of bacterial cultures (20 l) can be processed in 2 h, yielding approximately 100 mg plasmid DNA l(-1) culture, making this an attractive protocol for consistent and large-scale preparation of plasmid DNA. PMID:17406572

  1. Nonradioactive, photobiotin-labelled DNA probes for routine diagnosis of viroids in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    McInnes, J L; Habili, N; Symons, R H

    1989-03-01

    Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBV), coconut cadang cadang viroid (CCCV), chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSV) and potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTV) were detected in plant extracts by dot-blot hybridization using nonradioactive photobiotin-labelled nucleic acid probes. Recombinant DNA probes, containing full-length monomer viroid inserts in the plasmid vectors pSP64 or pUC9, were biotinylated with photobiotin and used as sonicated double-stranded DNA fragments. Using fresh leaf material, a general method (suitably modified for avocado tissue) was developed for the rapid preparation of purified nucleic acid extracts. Plant extracts from a range of field samples were spotted onto nitrocellulose, subjected to hybridization and the biotin-labelled DNA bound to the target nucleic acid was detected with an avidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate. Under the stated hybridization and washing conditions, each individual viroid probe was specific. Each viroid was readily detected with a sensitivity similar to that obtained with the same (or a like) probe labelled with 32P. Healthy plant extracts gave colourless spots. PMID:2654169

  2. A hyper-step DNA computing system based on surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Lin, Che-Hsin; Yang, Chia-Ning; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2007-01-01

    We reported a reusable DNA computing platform for solving satisfiability (SAT) problem based on surface plamon resonance (SPR) technology in this paper. Three different sequences of 18-mer ssDNAs with thiol terminal were first immobilized on the gold surface and then hybridized with their complementary sequences at specific sites via microfluidic channels under room temperature. We also conjugated monoclonal antibody (human IgG) to these complementary pairs chemically to amplify the hybridization signal and thus enhance the noise margin to distinguish Boolean value of true and false. In order to keep the reaction temperature and SPR measurement stable, repeated DNA annealing and denaturing is doned by varying salt concentration (by adding NaOH to denature DNA) of reaction solution rather than changing reaction temperature. The experimental results successfully demonstrated a multi-channel microfluidic DNA computation system to solve a three variables (X, Y, Z) Boolean SAT problem (formula) with reusability and specificity using protein-ssDNA conjugates to link to complementary ssDNA SAM surface under room temperature within one hour. This technique provide a feasible solution to miniaturize the DNA computation platform for possible iterated hyperstep computing processes.

  3. Comparison of STR profiling from low template DNA extracts with and without the consensus profiling method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The consensus profiling method was introduced to overcome the exaggerated stochastic effects associated with low copy number DNA typing. However, little empirical evidence has been provided which shows that a consensus profile, derived from dividing a sample into separate aliquots and including only alleles seen at least twice, gives the most informative profile, compared to a profile obtained by amplifying the entire low template DNA extract in one reaction. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the quality of consensus profiles compared to profiles obtained using the whole low template extract for amplification. Methods A total of 100 pg and 25 pg DNA samples were amplified with the PowerPlex® ESI 16 Kits using 30 or 34 PCR cycles. A total of 100 pg and 25 pg DNA samples were then divided into three aliquots for a 34-cycle PCR and a consensus profile derived that included alleles that appeared in at least two of the replicates. Profiles from the non-split samples were compared to the consensus profiles focusing on peak heights, allele drop out, locus drop out and allele drop in. Results Performing DNA profiling on non-split extracts produced profiles with a higher percentage of correct loci compared to the consensus profiling technique. Consensus profiling did eliminate any spurious alleles from the final profile. However, there was a notable increase in allele and locus drop out when a LTDNA sample was divided prior to amplification. Conclusions The loss of information that occurs when a sample is split for amplification indicates that consensus profiling may not be producing the most informative DNA profile for samples where the template amount is limited. PMID:22748106

  4. Comparison of Methods for the Extraction of DNA from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Archival Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sengüven, Burcu; Baris, Emre; Oygur, Tulin; Berktas, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Discussing a protocol involving xylene-ethanol deparaffinization on slides followed by a kit-based extraction that allows for the extraction of high quality DNA from FFPE tissues. Methods: DNA was extracted from the FFPE tissues of 16 randomly selected blocks. Methods involving deparaffinization on slides or tubes, enzyme digestion overnight or for 72 hours and isolation using phenol chloroform method or a silica-based commercial kit were compared in terms of yields, concentrations and the amplifiability. Results: The highest yield of DNA was produced from the samples that were deparaffinized on slides, digested for 72 hours and isolated with a commercial kit. Samples isolated with the phenol-chloroform method produced DNA of lower purity than the samples that were purified with kit. The samples isolated with the commercial kit resulted in better PCR amplification. Conclusion: Silica-based commercial kits and deparaffinized on slides should be considered for DNA extraction from FFPE. PMID:24688314

  5. GENESUS: a two-step sequence design program for DNA nanostructure self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Takanobu; Asakawa, Takeshi; Kanegami, Akemi; Okada, Takao; Tahira, Tomoko; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been recognized as an ideal material for bottom-up construction of nanometer scale structures by self-assembly. The generation of sequences optimized for unique self-assembly (GENESUS) program reported here is a straightforward method for generating sets of strand sequences optimized for self-assembly of arbitrarily designed DNA nanostructures by a generate-candidates-and-choose-the-best strategy. A scalable procedure to prepare single-stranded DNA having arbitrary sequences is also presented. Strands for the assembly of various structures were designed and successfully constructed, validating both the program and the procedure. PMID:24724843

  6. DNA extraction Laboratory 1.03g, Donnan Laboratories, Crown Street, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool. L69 7ZD.

    E-print Network

    Steve Kemp

    DNA extraction Laboratory 1.03g, Donnan Laboratories, Crown Street, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool. L69 7ZD. Extraction of DNA from tissue: High salt method. Version 1.0, September://sciencepark.mdanderson.org/mbcore/protocols.html Any comments or suggestions should be sent to Phill Watts at p.c.watts@liv.ac.uk. #12;DNA extraction

  7. Efficient extraction of canthaxanthin from Escherichia coli by a 2-step process with organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark A; Ma, Cynthia A; Armenta, Roberto E

    2012-05-01

    Canthaxanthin has a substantial commercial market in aquaculture, poultry production, and cosmetic and nutraceutical industries. Commercial production is dominated by chemical synthesis; however, changing consumer demands fuel research into the development of biotechnology processes. Highly productive microbial systems to produce carotenoids can be limited by the efficiency of extraction methods. Extraction with hexane, acetone, methanol, 2-propanol, ethanol, 1-butanol, tetrahydrofuran and ethyl acetate was carried out with each solvent separately, and subsequently the most efficient solvents were tested in combination, both as mixtures and sequentially. Sequential application of methanol followed by acetone proved most efficient. Extraction efficiency remained stable over a solvent to biomass range of 100:1 to 55:1, but declined significantly at a ratio of 25:1. Application of this method to a canthaxanthin-producing Escherichia coli production system enabled efficient canthaxanthin extraction of up to 8.5 mg g(-1) dry biomass. PMID:22353211

  8. One-step liquid–liquid extraction of cocaine from urine samples for gas chromatographic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcelo Farina; Maur??cio Yonamine; Ovandir A Silva

    2002-01-01

    An improved technique for cocaine extraction from urine samples for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis is described. Employing a simple liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) of cocaine with a mixture of ethyl ether:isopropanol (9:1) the method presents a mean recovery of 74.49%. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 5 and 20ng\\/ml, respectively. The method is highly precise (coefficient of

  9. Rapid One-Step Selection Method for Generating Nucleic Acid Aptamers: Development of a DNA Aptamer against ?-Bungarotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Lasse H.; Shamaileh, Hadi A.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Taran, Elena; Veedu, Rakesh N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Nucleic acids based therapeutic approaches have gained significant interest in recent years towards the development of therapeutics against many diseases. Recently, research on aptamers led to the marketing of Macugen®, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for the treatment of age related macular degeneration (AMD). Aptamer technology may prove useful as a therapeutic alternative against an array of human maladies. Considering the increased interest in aptamer technology globally that rival antibody mediated therapeutic approaches, a simplified selection, possibly in one-step, technique is required for developing aptamers in limited time period. Principal Findings Herein, we present a simple one-step selection of DNA aptamers against ?-bungarotoxin. A toxin immobilized glass coverslip was subjected to nucleic acid pool binding and extensive washing followed by PCR enrichment of the selected aptamers. One round of selection successfully identified a DNA aptamer sequence with a binding affinity of 7.58 µM. Conclusion We have demonstrated a one-step method for rapid production of nucleic acid aptamers. Although the reported binding affinity is in the low micromolar range, we believe that this could be further improved by using larger targets, increasing the stringency of selection and also by combining a capillary electrophoresis separation prior to the one-step selection. Furthermore, the method presented here is a user-friendly, cheap and an easy way of deriving an aptamer unlike the time consuming conventional SELEX-based approach. The most important application of this method is that chemically-modified nucleic acid libraries can also be used for aptamer selection as it requires only one enzymatic step. This method could equally be suitable for developing RNA aptamers. PMID:22860007

  10. Superparamagnetic-bead Based Method: An Effective DNA Extraction from Dried Blood Spots (DBS) for Diagnostic PCR

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Storing blood as dried spots on filter paper is a trustworthy approach used in genetic screening issues which justifies the necessity for a reliable DNA extraction method. The present work aims to investigate the effectiveness of superparamagnetic-bead based method in extracting DNA from dried blood spots (DBS). Materials and Methods: Sixteen venous blood samples collected in K3-EDTA tubes (400?l of whole blood) were used for the spotting (4 circles each 100?l) on Ahlstrom 226 grad filter papers, for extraction and comparison. To ensure effectiveness, the extracted DNA was checked for quantity using the Quant-iT™ dsDNA Broad-Range Assay Kit and for quality by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 344 bp segment of the HBB gene. Hybridization assays based on the dynamic allele specific hybridization (DASH) technique for two hemoglobin beta (HBB) mutations in genomic DNA extracted from DBS of ß-thalassemia patients were also performed to ensure the quality of extraction. Results: The results revealed a compatible effectiveness of the superparamagnetic-bead based method in extracting DNA from DBS particularly when incubating the DBS with lysis buffers BL+BLM overnight. A mean concentration of 21ng/ ?l was obtained with lysis buffers BL+BLM overnight incubation compared to 5.2 ng/?l for 2 h incubation with lysis buffers BL+BLM and 4.7 ng/?l when extraction performed using the lysis buffer BLM alone. Moreover, PCR amplification of 344 bp segment of the HBB showed a good quality of the extracted DNA. Conclusion: It was concluded that the superparamagnetic-bead based method is a reliable and effective method for DNA extraction from DBS and can be adopted for genetic diagnostic purposes. PMID:24959449

  11. Novel DNA extraction assay for molecular identification of Aedes spp eggs.

    PubMed

    Freitas, M T S; Gomes-Júnior, P P; Batista, M V A; Leal-Balbino, T C; Araujo, A L; Balbino, V Q

    2014-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus represent the two most important species of mosquitoes in relation to dengue virus transmission both in the Americas and Asia. However, the study of theses species generally requires the establishment of a colony for the larvae to hatch, or waiting for the adult development to perform its taxonomic classification, which is time consuming. Thus, the establishment of new methods aimed at obtaining DNA directly from the mosquito eggs is relevant. Accordingly, we compared a new approach based on Chelex(®) 100 resin with the standard STE method to extract DNA from the eggs of Aedes spp to molecularly identify these vectors. The Chelex(®) 100 resin approach was very efficient, as satisfactory amounts of DNA were obtained, making it possible to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial DNA barcode region widely used to identify species. The STE protocol yielded substantial amounts of DNA, but the 260/280 optical density ratio indicated a low quality, precluding amplification. This new method proved quite effective in obtaining DNA from even a single mosquito egg, and it can thus be applied in population genetic studies of various vector insects to enhance monitoring programs. PMID:25366769

  12. A magnetic nanoparticles-based method for DNA extraction from the saliva of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Li; Huang, Ying; Wu, Ting; Wu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    C677T polymorphism in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is a risk factor for stroke, suggesting that widespread detection could help to prevent stroke. DNA from 70 stroke patients and 70 healthy controls was extracted from saliva using a magnetic nanoparticles-based method and from blood using conventional methods. Real-time PCR results revealed that the C677T polymorphism was genotyped by PCR using DNA extracted from both saliva and blood samples. The genotype results were confirmed by gene sequencing, and results for saliva and blood samples were consistent. The mutation TT genotype frequency was significantly higher in the stroke group than in controls. Homocysteine levels were significantly higher than controls in both TT genotype groups. Therefore, this noninvasive magnetic nanoparticles-based method using saliva samples could be used to screen for the MTHFR C677T polymorphism in target populations. PMID:25206624

  13. Rapid techniques for DNA extraction from routinely processed archival tissue for use in PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, R; Szabó, I; Uda, H; Sakamoto, H

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the ability of four rapid DNA extraction methods to provide DNA for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from routinely fixed, paraffin wax embedded archival tissues. METHODS--Eighteen blocks of various tissues, 18 blocks of cervical cancer specimens, and nine blocks of B cell lymphomas were investigated. Both normal and biopsy specimen sized tissues were studied. DNA was extracted using four methods: boiling for 20 minutes in distilled water; boiling for 20 minutes in 5% Chelex-100 resin solution; 3-hour proteinase K digestion; and 3-hour proteinase K digestion, followed by boiling in 5% Chelex-100. Different exons of the p53 gene, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) sequence, and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangement were amplified from the extracts. RESULTS--The Chelex boiling, proteinase K digestion, and proteinase K digestion-Chelex boiling methods produced DNA suitable for amplification in all of the 45 samples. Boiling in water yielded insufficient template for the PCR in three of the 45 cases (7%), and in six of 42 positive cases (14%) much fainter bands were observed, mostly when the processed material was either biopsy specimen sized or a B cell lymphoma sample. Fragments of the p53 gene were successfully amplified up to 408 base pairs in water boiled extracts, up to 647 in Chelex boiled preparates, and up to 984 in proteinase K digested and proteinase K digested-Chelex boiled samples, although with decreased sensitivity in the last case. All of the templates were reusable after 3 months of storage at -20 degrees C. CONCLUSIONS--Chelex boiling, proteinase K digestion, and proteinase K digestion followed by Chelex boiling produce suitable templates for the PCR from a large variety of paraffin wax embedded tissues. As the simple 20 minute boiling method in 5% Chelex-100 solution requires minimal manipulation and time, it could be useful, especially in the routine processing of large amounts of material. Images PMID:8027368

  14. Extracting parameters for base-pair level models of DNA from molecular dynamics simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oscar Gonzalez; John H. Maddocks

    2001-01-01

    .  ?A method is described to extract a complete set of sequence-dependent energy parameters for a rigid base-pair model of DNA\\u000a from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The method is properly consistent with equilibrium statistical mechanics and leads\\u000a to effective inertia parameters for the base-pair units as well as stacking and stiffness parameters for the base-pair junctions.\\u000a We give explicit formulas that

  15. Extracting parameters for base-pair level models of DNA from molecular dynamics simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oscar Gonzalez; John H. Maddocks

    2000-01-01

    . A method is described to extract a completeset of sequence-dependent energy parameters fora rigid base-pair model of DNA from Molecular Dynamics(MD) simulations. The method is properly consistentwith equilibrium statistical mechanics, and leads to eectiveinertia parameters for the base-pair units as well asstacking and stiness parameters for the base-pair junctions.We give explicit formulas that yield a completeset of base-pair model

  16. Extraction of protoporphyrin disodium and its inhibitory effects on HBV-DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao-Pin Li; Li-Fa Xu; Qun-Hong Liu; Chao Zhang; Jian Wang; Yu-Xia Zhu

    AIM: To explore an ideal method for extracting protoporphyrin disodium (PPN) from unanticoagulated animal blood, and to study the inhibitory effects of PPN on HBV-DNA duplication and its cytotoxicity to 2.2.15 cell strain. METHODS: Protoporphyrin methyl ester and other intermediate products were prepared with protoheme separated from protein hydrolysates of coagulated animal blood, which were finally made into PPN and

  17. Single-step electronic detection of femtomolar DNA by target-induced strand displacement in an electrode-bound duplex.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Lubin, Arica A; Baker, Brian R; Plaxco, Kevin W; Heeger, Alan J

    2006-11-01

    We report a signal-on, electronic DNA (E-DNA) sensor that is label-free and achieves a subpicomolar detection limit. The sensor, which is based on a target-induced strand displacement mechanism, is composed of a "capture probe" attached by its 5' terminus to a gold electrode and a 5' methylene blue-modified "signaling probe" that is complementary at both its 3' and 5' termini to the capture probe. In the absence of target, hybridization between the capture and signaling probes minimizes contact between the methylene blue and electrode surface, limiting the observed redox current. Target hybridization displaces the 5' end of the signaling probe, generating a short, flexible single-stranded DNA element and producing up to a 7-fold increase in redox current. The observed signal gain is sufficient to achieve a demonstrated (not extrapolated) detection limit of 400 fM, which is among the best reported for single-step electronic DNA detection. Moreover, because sensor fabrication is straightforward, the approach appears to provide a ready alternative to the more cumbersome femtomolar electrochemical assays described to date. PMID:17065320

  18. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the genomic DNA extracted from GMO and non-GMO foodstuffs with four different extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Peano, Clelia; Samson, Maria Cristina; Palmieri, Luisa; Gulli, Mariolina; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2004-11-17

    The presence of DNA in foodstuffs derived from or containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) is the basic requirement for labeling of GMO foods in Council Directive 2001/18/CE (Off. J. Eur. Communities 2001, L1 06/2). In this work, four different methods for DNA extraction were evaluated and compared. To rank the different methods, the quality and quantity of DNA extracted from standards, containing known percentages of GMO material and from different food products, were considered. The food products analyzed derived from both soybean and maize and were chosen on the basis of the mechanical, technological, and chemical treatment they had been subjected to during processing. Degree of DNA degradation at various stages of food production was evaluated through the amplification of different DNA fragments belonging to the endogenous genes of both maize and soybean. Genomic DNA was extracted from Roundup Ready soybean and maize MON810 standard flours, according to four different methods, and quantified by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), with the aim of determining the influence of the extraction methods on the DNA quantification through real-time PCR. PMID:15537304

  19. DNA extraction from arborescent monocots and how to deal with other challenging hosts.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nigel A; Davis, Robert E; Helmick, Ericka E

    2013-01-01

    Detection of pathogen DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays is the most widely used method for diagnosing phytoplasma diseases. Reliable and efficient detection of phytoplasmas, especially in woody perennial plants, is challenging due to the unusually low abundance and sporadic distribution of phytoplasmas within infected host tissues. Detection success depends largely upon the host species and sampling procedures and, to a lesser extent, on the protocol used for DNA extraction. Here we describe a simple, straightforward, nondestructive stem sampling protocol to confirm phytoplasma infection of palms and other arborescent monocots of large stature. The protocol requires minimal processing of excised tissues and yields phytoplasma DNA preparations in suitable quantity for reliable detection by nested PCR assays. PMID:22987413

  20. New sorbent in the dispersive solid phase extraction step of quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe for the extraction of organic contaminants in drinking water treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Maristela B R; Caldas, Sergiane S; Primel, Ednei G

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have shown a decrease in the concentration of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PCPs) in water after treatment. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that these compounds may adhere to the sludge; however, investigation of these compounds in drinking water treatment sludge has been scarce. The sludge generated by drinking water treatment plants during flocculation and decantation steps should get some special attention not only because it has been classified as non-inert waste but also because it is a very complex matrix, consisting essentially of inorganic (sand, argil and silt) and organic (humic substances) compounds. In the first step of this study, three QuEChERS methods were used, and then compared, for the extraction of pesticides (atrazine, simazine, clomazone and tebuconazole), pharmaceuticals (amitriptyline, caffeine, diclofenac and ibuprofen) and PCPs (methylparaben, propylparaben, triclocarban and bisphenol A) from drinking water treatment sludge. Afterwards, the study of different sorbents in the dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) step was evaluated. Finally, a new QuEChERS method employing chitin, obtained from shrimp shell waste, was performed in the d-SPE step. After having been optimized, the method showed limits of quantification (LOQ) between 1 and 50 ?g kg(-1) and the analytical curves showed r values higher than 0.98, when liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was employed. Recoveries ranged between 50 and 120% with RSD?15%. The matrix effect was evaluated and compensated with matrix-matched calibration. The method was applied to drinking water treatment sludge samples and methylparaben and tebuconazole were found in concentration

  1. Ganoderma lucidum extract protects DNA from strand breakage caused by hydroxyl radical and UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, K C; Kim, I G

    1999-09-01

    The fruit bodies of Ganoderma lucidum have been used for the prevention and treatment of various diseases in the Orient. Its antitumor and immune enhancing properties, along with no cytotoxicity, raise the possibility that it could be effective in preventing oxidative damage and resulting disease. Using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have evaluated the potential of Ganoderma lucidum extract as a radioprotector and antioxidant defense against oxygen radical-mediated damage. Although the evidence presented here is based on in vitro using isolated DNA, the results clearly demonstrate that the hot-water extract of Ganoderma lucidum shows good radioprotective ability, as well as protection against DNA damage induced by metal-catalyzed Fenton reactions and UV irradiation. We also found that the water-soluble polysaccharide isolated from the fruit body of Ganoderma lucidum was as effective as the hot-water extract in protecting against hydroxyl radical-induced DNA strand breaks, indicating that the polysaccharide compound is associated with the protective properties. Our data suggest that Ganoderma mushroom merits investigation as a potential preventive agent in humans. PMID:10425278

  2. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kok, Yih-Yih; Chu, Wan-Loy; Phang, Siew-Moi; Mohamed, Shar Mariam; Naidu, Rakesh; Lai, Pey-Jiun; Ling, Shui-Nyuk; Mak, Joon-Wah; Lim, Patricia Kim-Chooi; Balraj, Pauline; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)<0.01 µg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC(50)=2.9 µg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1'a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC(50)=1.38 µg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV. PMID:21528487

  3. Protocols for metagenomic DNA extraction and Illumina amplicon library preparation for faecal and swab samples.

    PubMed

    Vo, A-T E; Jedlicka, J A

    2014-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has extraordinarily enhanced the scope of research in the life sciences. To broaden the application of NGS to systems that were previously difficult to study, we present protocols for processing faecal and swab samples into amplicon libraries amenable to Illumina sequencing. We developed and tested a novel metagenomic DNA extraction approach using solid phase reversible immobilization (SPRI) beads on Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) samples stored in RNAlater. Compared with the MO BIO PowerSoil Kit, the current standard for the Human and Earth Microbiome Projects, the SPRI-based method produced comparable 16S rRNA gene PCR amplification from faecal extractions but significantly greater DNA quality, quantity and PCR success for both cloacal and oral swab samples. We furthermore modified published protocols for preparing highly multiplexed Illumina libraries with minimal sample loss and without post-adapter ligation amplification. Our library preparation protocol was successfully validated on three sets of heterogeneous amplicons (16S rRNA gene amplicons from SPRI and PowerSoil extractions as well as control arthropod COI gene amplicons) that were sequenced across three independent, 250-bp, paired-end runs on Illumina's MiSeq platform. Sequence analyses revealed largely equivalent results from the SPRI and PowerSoil extractions. Our comprehensive strategies focus on maximizing efficiency and minimizing costs. In addition to increasing the feasibility of using minimally invasive sampling and NGS capabilities in avian research, our methods are notably not avian-specific and thus applicable to many research programmes that involve DNA extraction and amplicon sequencing. PMID:24774752

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the 136 Unique Tetranucleotide Sequences of DNA Oligonucleotides. II: Sequence Context Effects on the Dynamical Structures of the 10 Unique Dinucleotide Steps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Surjit B. Dixit; David L. Beveridge; David A. Case; Thomas E. Cheatham; Emmanuel Giudice; Filip Lankas; Richard Lavery; John H. Maddocks; Roman Osman; Heinz Sklenar; Kelly M. Thayer; Péter Varnai

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations including water and counterions on B-DNA oligomers containing all 136 unique tetranucleotide basepair steps are reported. The objective is to obtain the calculated dynamical structure for at least two copies of each case, use the results to examine issues with regard to convergence and dynamical stability of MD on DNA, and determine the significance of sequence

  5. Single step aqueous two-phase extraction for downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Chethana, S; Nayak, Chetan A; Madhusudhan, M C; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2015-04-01

    C-phycocyanin, a natural food colorant, is gaining importance worldwide due to its several medical and pharmaceutical applications. In the present study, aqueous two-phase extraction was shown to be an attractive alternative for the downstream processing of C-phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis. By employing differential partitioning, C-phycocyanin selectively partitioned to the polymer rich (top) phase in concentrated form and contaminant proteins to the salt rich (bottom) phase. This resulted in an increase in the product purity (without losing much of the yield) in a single step without the need of multiple processing steps. Effect of process parameters such as molecular weight, tie line length, phase volume ratio, concentration of phase components on the partitioning behavior of C-phycocyanin was studied. The results were explained based on relative free volume of the phase systems. C-phycocyanin with a purity of 4.32 and yield of about 79 % was obtained at the standardized conditions. PMID:25829627

  6. Sources of pre-analytical variations in yield of DNA extracted from blood samples: analysis of 50,000 DNA samples in EPIC.

    PubMed

    Caboux, Elodie; Lallemand, Christophe; Ferro, Gilles; Hémon, Bertrand; Mendy, Maimuna; Biessy, Carine; Sims, Matt; Wareham, Nick; Britten, Abigail; Boland, Anne; Hutchinson, Amy; Siddiq, Afshan; Vineis, Paolo; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Gunter, Marc J; Peeters, Petra H M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Travis, Ruth; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Canzian, Federico; Sánchez, Maria-José; Skeie, Guri; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Lund, Eiliv; Bilbao, Roberto; Sala, Núria; Barricarte, Aurelio; Palli, Domenico; Navarro, Carmen; Panico, Salvatore; Redondo, Maria Luisa; Polidoro, Silvia; Dossus, Laure; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Lagiou, Pagona; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Hainaut, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88%) performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies. PMID:22808065

  7. Sources of Pre-Analytical Variations in Yield of DNA Extracted from Blood Samples: Analysis of 50,000 DNA Samples in EPIC

    PubMed Central

    Caboux, Elodie; Lallemand, Christophe; Ferro, Gilles; Hémon, Bertrand; Mendy, Maimuna; Biessy, Carine; Sims, Matt; Wareham, Nick; Britten, Abigail; Boland, Anne; Hutchinson, Amy; Siddiq, Afshan; Vineis, Paolo; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Gunter, Marc J.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Travis, Ruth; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Canzian, Federico; Sánchez, Maria-José; Skeie, Guri; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Lund, Eiliv; Bilbao, Roberto; Sala, Núria; Barricarte, Aurelio; Palli, Domenico; Navarro, Carmen; Panico, Salvatore; Redondo, Maria Luisa; Polidoro, Silvia; Dossus, Laure; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Lagiou, Pagona; Boeing, Heiner; Fisher, Eva; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Hainaut, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) is a long-term, multi-centric prospective study in Europe investigating the relationships between cancer and nutrition. This study has served as a basis for a number of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and other types of genetic analyses. Over a period of 5 years, 52,256 EPIC DNA samples have been extracted using an automated DNA extraction platform. Here we have evaluated the pre-analytical factors affecting DNA yield, including anthropometric, epidemiological and technical factors such as center of subject recruitment, age, gender, body-mass index, disease case or control status, tobacco consumption, number of aliquots of buffy coat used for DNA extraction, extraction machine or procedure, DNA quantification method, degree of haemolysis and variations in the timing of sample processing. We show that the largest significant variations in DNA yield were observed with degree of haemolysis and with center of subject recruitment. Age, gender, body-mass index, cancer case or control status and tobacco consumption also significantly impacted DNA yield. Feedback from laboratories which have analyzed DNA with different SNP genotyping technologies demonstrate that the vast majority of samples (approximately 88%) performed adequately in different types of assays. To our knowledge this study is the largest to date to evaluate the sources of pre-analytical variations in DNA extracted from peripheral leucocytes. The results provide a strong evidence-based rationale for standardized recommendations on blood collection and processing protocols for large-scale genetic studies. PMID:22808065

  8. Should I stay or should I go: VCP/p97-mediated chromatin extraction in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Dantuma, Nico P; Acs, Klara; Luijsterburg, Martijn S

    2014-11-15

    The ordered assembly of DNA repair factors on chromatin has been studied in great detail, whereas we are only beginning to realize that selective extraction of proteins from chromatin plays a central role in the DNA damage response. Interestingly, the protein modifier ubiquitin not only regulates the well-documented recruitment of repair proteins, but also governs the temporally and spatially controlled extraction of proteins from DNA lesions. The facilitator of protein extraction is the ubiquitin-dependent ATPase valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 complex, which, through its segregase activity, directly extracts ubiquitylated proteins from chromatin. In this review, we summarize recent studies that uncovered this important role of VCP/p97 in the cellular response to genomic insults and discuss how ubiquitin regulates two intuitively counteracting activities at sites of DNA damage. PMID:25169698

  9. A simple method to determine bioethanol content in gasoline using two-step extraction and liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Shunji; Saito, Masaaki

    2009-12-01

    A simple method for determining bioethanol content in gasoline containing bioethanol (denoted as E-gasoline in this study) is urgently required. Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was employed based on the principle that (14)C exists in bioethanol but not in synthetic ethanol. Bioethanol was extracted in two steps by water from E-gasoline containing 3% (E3) or 10% (E10) bioethanol. The (14)C radioactivity was measured by LSC and converted to the amount of bioethanol. The bioethanol content in E-gasoline was determined precisely from the partition coefficient in the extraction and the amount of bioethanol in the water phases: 2.98+/-0.10% for E3 and 10.0+/-0.1% for E10 (means+/-SD; n=3). It appears that this method can be used to determine bioethanol content in E-gasoline quickly and easily. PMID:19577920

  10. Evaluation of adsorption and desorption steps in the solid-phase extraction of explosives using carbon/silica gel nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Waldemar; Gun'ko, Vladimir M

    2015-07-01

    New series of carbon/silica gel nanocomposites, carbosils, prepared by the carbonization of starch bound to silica gel, and carbosils additionally silylated with octadecyldimethylchlorosilane were synthesized. These materials were applied as adsorbents in the solid-phase extraction of explosive nitrate esters and nitroaromatics from aqueous solutions. The adsorption and desorption steps were evaluated separately. It was found that both the molecular properties of explosives (dipole moments, orbital energies, solvation effects) and textural properties influenced by carbon deposits or octadecyl moieties have a large impact on the recovery rates. It was shown that the composites with moderate content of carbon deposits or with the highest amounts of carbon deposits and additionally silylated can be used as materials tailored for extraction of explosives from the aqueous solutions. PMID:25914305

  11. A hyper-step DNA computing system based on surface plasmon resonance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsung-Yao Chang; Che-Hsin Lin; Chia-Ning Yang; Chii-Wann Lin

    2007-01-01

    We reported a reusable DNA computing platform for solving satisfiability (SAT) problem based on surface plamon resonance (SPR) technology in this paper. Three different sequences of 18-mer ssDNAs with thiol terminal were first immobilized on the gold surface and then hybridized with their complementary sequences at specific sites via microfluidic channels under room temperature. We also conjugated monoclonal antibody (human

  12. 2872 Biophysical Journal Volume 85 November 2003 28722883 DNA Basepair Step Deformability Inferred from Molecular

    E-print Network

    Langowski, Jörg

    properties by such elastic constants as the bending rigidity (or dynamic bending persistence length), stretch from Molecular Dynamics Simulations Filip Lankas,*y Jiri´ S poner,yz Jo¨rg Langowski,* and Thomas E was investigated using large-scale atomic resolution molecular dynamics simulation of two 18-bp DNA oligomers: d

  13. Validation of the Isotropic Fractionator: Comparison with Unbiased Stereology and DNA Extraction for Quantification of Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bahney, Jami; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The “isotropic fractionator” (IF) is a novel cell counting technique that homogenizes fixed tissue, recovers cell nuclei in solution, and samples and quantifies nuclei by extrapolation. Studies using this technique indicate that the ratio of glia to neurons in the human brain is approximately 1:1 rather than the 10:1 or 50:1 ratio previously assumed. Although some results obtained with the IF have been similar to those obtained by stereology, the IF has never been calibrated or validated. It is conceivable that only a fraction of glial cell nuclei are recovered intact or recognized after the homogenization step. New Method To rule out this simple explanation for the claim of a 1:1 glia-neuron ratio, we compared cell numbers obtained from adjacent, weight-normalized samples of human and macaque monkey white matter using three techniques: the IF, unbiased stereology of histological sections in exhaustively sectioned samples, and cell numbers calculated from DNA extraction. Results and comparison of methods In primate forebrains, the IF yielded 73,000–90,000 nuclei/mg white matter, unbiased stereology yielded 75,000–92,000 nuclei/mg, with coefficients of error ranging from 0.013–0.063, while DNA extraction yielded only 4,000–23,000 nuclei/mg in fixed white matter tissues. Conclusions Since the IF revealed about 100% of the numbers produced by unbiased stereology, there is no significant underestimate of glial cells. This confirms the notion that the human brain overall contains glial cells and neurons with a ratio of about 1:1 far from the originally assumed ratio of 10:1 in favor of glial cells. PMID:24239779

  14. Simultaneous extraction of proteins and DNA by an enzymatic treatment of the cell wall of Palmaria palmata (Rhodophyta)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yolaine Joubert; Joël Fleurence

    2008-01-01

    The extraction of proteins and DNA from seaweed tissue is difficult due to the presence of cell wall anionic polysaccharides\\u000a that, after cell disruption, remain in the extraction medium as hydrocolloidal compounds. These compounds increase medium\\u000a viscosity, thus limiting access to and, consequently, quantification of the soluble macromolecules such as proteins or DNA.\\u000a This study describes a protocol that enables

  15. Protection by Salvia extracts against oxidative and alkylation damage to DNA in human HCT15 and CO115 cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Pedro, Dalila; Collins, Andrew R; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage induced by oxidative and alkylating agents contributes to carcinogenesis, leading to possible mutations if replication proceeds without proper repair. However, some alkylating agents are used in cancer therapy due to their ability to induce DNA damage and subsequently apoptosis of tumor cells. In this study, the genotoxic effects of oxidative hydrogen peroxide (H?O?) and alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitosourea (BCNU) agents were examined in two colon cell lines (HCT15 and CO115). DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay with and without lesion-specific repair enzymes. Genotoxic agents were used for induction of DNA damage in both cell lines. Protective effects of extracts of three Salvia species, Salvia officinalis (SO), Salvia fruticosa (SF), and Salvia lavandulifolia (SL), against DNA damage induced by oxidative and alkylating agents were also determined. SO and SF protected against oxidative DNA damage in HCT15 cells. SO and SL decreased DNA damage induced by MNU in CO115 cells. In addition to chemopreventive effects of sage plant extracts, it was also important to know whether these plant extracts may interfere with alkylating agents such as BCNU used in cancer therapy, decreasing their efficacy. Our results showed that sage extracts tested and rosmarinic acid (RA), the main constituent, protected CO115 cells from DNA damage induced by BCNU. In HCT15 cells, only SF induced a reduction in BCNU-induced DNA damage. Sage water extracts and RA did not markedly change DNA repair protein expression in either cell line. Data showed that sage tea protected colon cells against oxidative and alkylating DNA damage and may also interfere with efficacy of alkylating agents used in cancer therapy. PMID:22788364

  16. Comparison of four methods for extracting DNA from dried blood on filter paper for PCR targeting the mitochondrial Plasmodium genome

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Gro E. A.; Tellevik, Marit G.; Hanevik, Kurt; Langeland, Nina; Blomberg, Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies comparing multiple methods for DNA extraction from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper for PCR targeting the Plasmodium genome have been done. Methods Frequently-used methods for DNA extraction from DBS using Chelex-100, InstaGene Matrix, QIAamp DNA Mini Kit and TE buffer were compared on a dilution series of a standardized Plasmodium falciparum positive sample. The two DNA extraction methods resulting in the lowest limits of detection were compared by testing both on 31 P. falciparum positive samples collected under field conditions and stored for 4 years. Results The Chelex-100, InstaGene Matrix and QIAamp DNA Mini Kit methods performed similarly, resulting in the detection of 0.5 to 2 parasites per microliter (p/µl). The same 13 clinical samples (13/31; 42%) were positive using both DNA extraction methods with the lowest limits of detection. Conclusions Simple and low-cost methods can be sensitive and useful in extracting DNA from DBS. Poor results on stored clinical DBS indicate that further studies on the impact of storage duration and conditions, and choice of filter paper should be performed. PMID:24907711

  17. Factors affecting the amount of genomic DNA extracted from ape faeces and the identification of an improved sample storage method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. NSUBUGA; M. M. ROBBINS; A. D. ROEDER; P. A. MORIN; C. BOESCH; L. VIGILANT

    2004-01-01

    Genetic analysis using noninvasively collected samples such as faeces continues to pose a formidable challenge because of unpredictable variation in the extent to which usable DNA is obtained. We investigated the influence of multiple variables on the quantity of DNA extracted from faecal samples from wild mountain gorillas and chimpanzees. There was a small negative correlation between temperature at time

  18. Procedure for the large-scale isolation of highly purified plasmid DNA using alkaline extraction and binding to glass powder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Marko; R. Chipperfield; H. C. Birnboim

    1982-01-01

    A preparative procedure for obtaining highly purified plasmid DNA from bacterial cells is described. The method is adapted from our earlier procedure, which gave partially purified plasmid in a form suitable for rapid screening of a large number of samples. In the present method, all detectable RNA, chromosomal DNA, and protein are removed without the use of enzymes, phenol extraction,

  19. COMPARISON OF RAPID METHODS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF BACTERIAL DNA FROM COLONIC AND CECAL LUMEN CONTENTS OF THE PIG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing use of DNA methodologies to study the microflora of the pig gastrointestinal tract requires an efficient recovery of bacterial DNA from intestinal samples. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine which extraction methods are most effective for colonic and cecal lumen sampl...

  20. DNA Extraction from small blood volumes and the processing of cellulose blood cards for use in polymerase chain reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karol Mackey; Amy Steinkamp; Piotr Chomczynski

    1998-01-01

    This article describes two procedures for the purification of genomic DNA from small blood volumes of whole blood using DNAzol®BD. In the first procedure, DNA is isolated from 1–20 ?L of whole blood using a fast and simple protocol that is appropriate\\u000a for the simultaneous extraction of a large number of samples. The isolated DNA is suitable for gel electrophoresis

  1. The Effect of Storage and Extraction Methods on Amplification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA from Dried Blood Spots.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Alanna; Baidjoe, Amrish; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Bousema, Teun; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2015-05-01

    Extraction and amplification of DNA from dried blood spots (DBS) collected in field studies is commonly used for detection of Plasmodium falciparum. However, there have been few systematic efforts to determine the effects of storage and extraction methods on the sensitivity of DNA amplification. We investigated the effects of storage conditions, length of storage, and DNA extraction methods on amplification via three PCR-based assays using field samples and laboratory controls. Samples stored as DBS for 2 or more years at ambient temperature showed a significant loss of sensitivity that increased with time; after 10 years only 10% samples with parasite densities > 1,000 parasites/?L were detectable by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Conversely, DBS and extracted DNA stored at -20°C showed no loss of sensitivity with time. Samples with low parasite densities amplified more successfully with saponin/Chelex compared with spin-column-based extraction, though the latter method performed better on samples with higher parasite densities stored for 2 years at ambient temperature. DNA extracted via both methods was stable after 20 freeze-thaw cycles. Our results suggest that DBS should be stored at -20°C or extracted immediately, especially if anticipating 2 or more years of storage. PMID:25758652

  2. Expression cloning of a cDNA for human ceramide glucosyltransferase that catalyzes the first glycosylation step of glycosphingolipid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, S; Sakiyama, H; Suzuki, G; Hidari, K I; Hirabayashi, Y

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding human ceramide glucosyltransferase (glucosylceramide synthase, UDP-glucose:N-acylsphingosine D-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.80) by expression cloning using as a recipient GM-95 cells lacking the enzyme. The enzyme catalyzes the first glycosylation step of glycosphingolipid synthesis and the product, glucosylceramide, serves as the core of more than 300 glycosphingolipids. The cDNA has a G+C-rich 5' untranslated region of 290 nucleotides and the open reading frame encodes 394 amino acids (44.9 kDa). A hydrophobic segment was found near the N terminus that is the potential signal-anchor sequence. In addition, considerable hydrophobicity was detected in the regions close to the C terminus, which may interact with the membrane. A catalytically active enzyme was produced from Escherichia coli transfected with the cDNA. Northern blot analysis revealed a single transcript of 3.5 kb, and the mRNA was widely expressed in organs. The amino acid sequence of ceramide glucosyltransferase shows no significant homology to ceramide galactosyltransferase, which indicates different evolutionary origins of these enzymes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8643456

  3. A Viral Packaging Motor Varies Its DNA Rotation and Step Size to Preserve Subunit Coordination as the Capsid Fills

    PubMed Central

    Tafoya, Sara; Aathavan, K.; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Multimeric, ring-shaped molecular motors rely on the coordinated action of their subunits to perform crucial biological functions. During these tasks, motors often change their operation in response to regulatory signals. Here, we investigate a viral packaging machine as it fills the capsid with DNA and encounters increasing internal pressure. We find that the motor rotates the DNA during packaging and that the rotation per basepair increases with filling. This change accompanies a reduction in the motor’s step size. We propose that these adjustments preserve motor coordination by allowing one subunit to make periodic, specific, and regulatory contacts with the DNA. At high filling, we also observe the down-regulation of the ATP-binding rate and the emergence of long-lived pauses, suggesting a throttling-down mechanism employed by the motor near the completion of packaging. This study illustrates how a biological motor adjusts its operation in response to changing conditions, while remaining highly coordinated. PMID:24766813

  4. Evaluation of five protocols for DNA extraction from leaves of Malus sieversii, Vitis vinifera, and Armeniaca vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Aubakirova, K; Omasheva, M; Ryabushkina, N; Tazhibaev, T; Kampitova, G; Galiakparov, N

    2014-01-01

    Leaves of Malus sieversii, Vitis vinifera, and Armeniaca vulgaris contain substantial amounts of secondary metabolites, which limit the high-quality DNA extraction performance. In this study, five extraction protocols were compared for their ability to produce good quality DNA from fresh and dried (with silica gel) leaves of these species. The modified protocol of Dellaporta et al., using polyvinylpyrrolidone to bind the phenolic compounds and a high molar concentration of potassium acetate to inhibit co-precipitation of polysaccharides with DNA, produced the best DNA quality for all species tested. DNA extracted by this method had a 1.77-1.96 A260/280 nm ratio and successful amplification of the 18S ribosomal DNA gene. DNA concentrations of dried leaves were lower than those obtained from fresh leaves, which was likely due to aspects of the drying procedure. All five methods for grapevine produced DNA of obvious better quality from green canes compared to leaves, due to the relatively low content of secondary metabolites in the former. For grapevine and apricot, three methods can be equally used to obtain DNA of good quality: the Doyle and Doyle modified method using CTAB and high concentration of NaCl, the Jobes et al. modified method, and the sodium dodecyl sulfate mini preparation method of Edwards et al. The protocol of Jobes et al. using LiCl for RNA removal showed the best results for most of the M. sieversii samples examined. PMID:24634185

  5. Determination of oil reservoir radiotracer (S14CN-) in a single step using a plastic scintillator extractive resin.

    PubMed

    Bagán, H; Tarancón, A; Stavsetra, L; Rauret, G; García, J F

    2012-07-29

    The analysis of radiotracers is important in the study of oil reservoir dynamics. One of the most widely used radiotracer is S(14)CN(-). Prior to activity measurements by Liquid Scintillation (LS), routine determinations require the pretreatment steps of purification and concentration of the samples using anion exchange columns. The final elution media produces samples with high salt concentration that may lead to problems with phase separation during the LS measurement. Plastic Scintillation (PS) is an alternative technique that provides a solid surface that can be used as a platform for the immobilisation of selective extractants to obtain a PS resin. The proposed procedure unifies chemical separation and sample measurement preparation in a single step, serving to reduce the number of reagents needed and manpower required for the analysis while also avoiding mixed waste production by LS. The objective of this study is to develop a PS resin for the determination of (14)C-labelled thiocyanate radiotracer in water samples. For this purpose, the immobilisation procedure was optimised, including optimisation of the proportion of PS microspheres:extractant and the use of a control blank to monitor the PS resin immobilisation process. The breakthrough volume was studied and the detection and quantification limits for 100 mL of sample were determined to be 0.08 Bq L(-1) and 0.31 Bq L(-1), respectively. The established procedure was applied to active samples from oil reservoirs and errors lower than 5% in the sample determinations were obtained. PMID:22769002

  6. DNA DNA DNA (d)DNA DNA DNA

    E-print Network

    Hagiya, Masami

    DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA [ 2008] (d)DNA DNA DNA DNA 2 3 DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (a) (c) (b) (d) #12;DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA (b) DNA [Tanaka et al.2008] DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA DNA #12;iGEM MIT MIT

  7. EXTRAÇÃO NÃO-INVASIVA DE DNA DE \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GUSTAVO AUGUSTO LACORTE; MARIA RAQUEL SANTOS

    Molecular genetics has been a powerful aid in animal breeding. DNA extraction is an important step and can be done by several methods, including some noninvasive ones, more attractive in custs and easiness of execution. It was compare five DNA extraction methods applied to samples of hair shafts and oral mucosa cells (swab). Those methods based in Chelex 100 performed

  8. The post-SCF quantum chemistry characteristics of inter- and intra-strand stacking interactions in d(CpG) and d(GpC) steps found in B-DNA, A-DNA and Z-DNA crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piotr Cysewski

    2009-01-01

    The energies of intra- and inter-strand stacking interactions in model d(GpC) and d(CpG) two-base-pair steps were estimated\\u000a by MP2\\/aug-cc-pVDZ single point calculations corrected for basis superposition errors. The stacked two-nucleobase pairs were\\u000a constructed using experimental values of base pair and base step parameters taken from Nucleic Acid Database (http:\\/\\/ndbserver.rutgers.edu\\/). Three distinct polymorphic forms were analysed, namely A-, B- and Z-DNA.

  9. Should acid ammonium oxalate replace hydroxylammonium chloride in step 2 of the revised BCR sequential extraction protocol for soil and sediment?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M Davidson; Andrew S Hursthouse; Donna M Tognarelli; Allan M Ure; Graham J Urquhart

    2004-01-01

    The revised, four-step BCR sequential extraction for soil or sediment has been compared with an alternative procedure in which 0.2moll?1 ammonium oxalate (pH 3) replaced 0.5moll?1 hydroxylammonium chloride (pH 1.5) in step 2, the reducible step. A variety of substrates were studied: BCR CRM601, a sewage sludge amended soil, two industrial soils, and a steel manufacturing by-product (basic oxygen furnace

  10. Evaluating the efficacy of various thermo-stable polymerases against co-extracted PCR inhibitors in ancient DNA samples

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Evaluating the efficacy of various thermo-stable polymerases against co-extracted PCR inhibitors,41] witnessed by a sample cannot be controlled, co-purified PCR inhibitors remain as the greatest threat inhibitors can normally be confirmed visually as DNA extractions ranging from tinged yellow to dark brown

  11. Pentacyclic triterpenes in birch bark extract inhibit early step of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Heidary Navid, M; Laszczyk-Lauer, M N; Reichling, J; Schnitzler, P

    2014-09-25

    Antiviral agents frequently applied for treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and its derivatives. The antiviral effect of a triterpene extract of birch bark and its major pentacyclic triterpenes, i.e. betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid against acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSV type 1 strains was examined. The cytotoxic effect of a phytochemically defined birch bark triterpene extract (TE) as well as different pentacyclic triterpenes was analyzed in cell culture, and revealed a moderate cytotoxicity on RC-37 cells. TE, betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests with IC50 values ranging between 0.2 and 0.5 ?g/ml. Infectivity of acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strains was significantly reduced by all tested compounds and a direct concentration- and time-dependent antiherpetic activity could be demonstrated. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action, TE and the compounds were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Addition of these drugs to uninfected cells prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells during intracellular replication had low effect on virus multiplication. Minor virucidal activity of triterpenes was observed, however both TE and tested compounds exhibited high anti-herpetic activity when viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Pentacyclic triterpenes inhibit acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant clinical isolates of HSV-1 in the early phase of infection. PMID:25172789

  12. One-step DNA melting in the RNA polymerase cleft opens the initiation bubble to form an unstable open complex.

    PubMed

    Gries, Theodore J; Kontur, Wayne S; Capp, Michael W; Saecker, Ruth M; Record, M Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Though opening of the start site (+1) region of promoter DNA is required for transcription by RNA polymerase (RNAP), surprisingly little is known about how and when this occurs in the mechanism. Early events at the lambdaP(R) promoter load this region of duplex DNA into the active site cleft of Escherichia coli RNAP, forming the closed, permanganate-unreactive intermediate I(1). Conversion to the subsequent intermediate I(2) overcomes a large enthalpic barrier. Is I(2) open? Here we create a burst of I(2) by rapidly destabilizing open complexes (RP(o)) with 1.1 M NaCl. Fast footprinting reveals that thymines at positions from -11 to +2 in I(2) are permanganate-reactive, demonstrating that RNAP opens the entire initiation bubble in the cleft in a single step. Rates of decay of all observed thymine reactivities are the same as the I(2) to I(1) conversion rate determined by filter binding. In I(2), permanganate reactivity of the +1 thymine on the template (t) strand is the same as the RP(o) control, whereas nontemplate (nt) thymines are significantly less reactive than in RP(o). We propose that: (i) the +1(t) thymine is in the active site in I(2); (ii) conversion of I(2) to RP(o) repositions the nt strand in the cleft; and (iii) movements of the nt strand are coupled to the assembly and DNA binding of the downstream clamp and jaw that occurs after DNA opening and stabilizes RP(o). We hypothesize that unstable open intermediates at the lambdaP(R) promoter resemble the unstable, transcriptionally competent open complexes formed at ribosomal promoters. PMID:20483995

  13. Quantitation of 35S promoter in maize DNA extracts from genetically modified organisms using real-time polymerase chain reaction, part 2: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Max; Fernandez, Sophie; Cassard, Sylvanie; Bertheau, Yves

    2005-01-01

    The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and the European Network of GMO Working Laboratories have proposed development of a modular strategy for stepwise validation of complex analytical techniques. When applied to the quantitation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food products, the instrumental quantitation step of the technique is separately validated from the DNA extraction step to better control the sources of uncertainty and facilitate the validation of GMO-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. This paper presents the results of an interlaboratory study on the quantitation step of the method standardized by CEN for the detection of a regulatory element commonly inserted in GMO maize-based foods. This is focused on the quantitation of P35S promoter through using the quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR). Fifteen French laboratories participated in the interlaboratory study of the P35S quantitation operating procedure on DNA extract samples using either the thermal cycler ABI Prism 7700 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA) or Light Cycler (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN). Attention was focused on DNA extract samples used to calibrate the method and unknown extract samples. Data were processed according to the recommendations of ISO 5725 standard. Performance criteria, obtained using the robust algorithm, were compared to the classic data processing after rejection of outliers by the Cochran and Grubbs tests. Two laboratories were detected as outliers by the Grubbs test. The robust precision criteria gave values between the classical values estimated before and after rejection of the outliers. Using the robust method, the relative expanded uncertainty by the quantitation method is about 20% for a 1% Bt176 content, whereas it can reach 40% for a 0.1% Bt176. The performances of the quantitation assay are relevant to the application of the European regulation, which has an accepted tolerance interval of about +/-50%. These data were fitted to a power model (r2 = 0.96). Thanks to this model, it is possible to propose an estimation of uncertainty of the QRT-PCR quantitation step and an uncertainty budget depending on the analytical conditions. PMID:15859084

  14. Technical note: Comparative analyses of the quality and yield of genomic DNA from invasive and noninvasive, automated and manual extraction methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Foley; C. O’Farrelly; K. G. Meade

    2011-01-01

    Several new automated methods have recently become available for high-throughput DNA extraction, including the Maxwell 16 System (Promega UK, Southampton, UK). The purpose of this report is to compare automated with manual DNA extraction methods, and invasive with noninvasive sample collection methods, in terms of DNA yield and quality. Milk, blood, and nasal swab samples were taken from 10 cows

  15. Protective effect of extract of Crataegus pinnatifida pollen on DNA damage response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ni; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Hui; Yuan, Jialing; Feng, Fan; Cao, Wei; Zheng, Jianbin

    2013-09-01

    The protective effect of extract of Crataegus pinnatifida (Rosaceae) pollen (ECPP) on the DNA damage response to oxidative stress was investigated and assessed with an alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay and pBR322 plasmid DNA breaks in site-specific and non-site-specific systems. Total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, individual phenolic compounds, antioxidant activities (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), radical scavenging activity, FRAP, and chelating activity) were also determined. The results showed that ECPP possessed a strong ability to protect DNA from being damaged by hydroxyl radicals in both the site-specific system and the non-site-specific system. It also exhibited a cytoprotection effect in mouse lymphocytes against H?O?-induced DNA damage. These protective effects may be related to its high total phenolic content (17.65±0.97 mg GAE/g), total flavonoid content (8.04±0.97 mg rutin/g), strong free radical scavenging activity and considerable ferrous ion chelating ability (14.48±0.21 mg Na?EDTA/g). PMID:23871827

  16. A microfluidic chip integrating DNA extraction and real-time PCR for the detection of bacteria in saliva

    PubMed Central

    Oblath, Emily A.; Henley, W. Hampton; Alarie, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic chip integrating DNA extraction, amplification, and detection for the identification of bacteria in saliva is described. The chip design integrated a monolithic aluminum oxide membrane (AOM) for DNA extraction with seven parallel reaction wells for real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR) amplification of the extracted DNA. Samples were first heated to lyse target organisms and then added to the chip and filtered through the nanoporous AOM to extract the DNA. PCR reagents were added to each of the wells and the chip was thermocycled. Identification of Streptococcus mutans in a saliva sample is demonstrated along with the detection of 300 fg (100–125 copies) of both methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) genomic DNA (gDNA) spiked into a saliva sample. Multiple target species and strains of bacteria can be simultaneously identified in the same sample by varying the primers and probes used in each of the seven reaction wells. In initial tests, as little as 30 fg (8–12 copies) of MSSA gDNA in buffer has been successfully amplified and detected with this device. PMID:23370016

  17. Evaluation of antibacterial, antioxidant and DNA protective capacity of Chenopodium album's ethanolic leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Elif Korcan, S; Aksoy, Onur; Erdo?mu?, S Feyza; Ci?erci, ? Hakk?; Konuk, Muhsin

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the antibacterial effects of Chenopodium album's ethanolic leaf extract (CAE) on all the Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms and evaluated the protective effects of CAE on both yeast and human mononuclear leukocytes' genomic DNA upon oxidative shock. Antibacterial activity was recorded on Bacillus subtilis with 13 mm of inhibition zone. Total oxidative status (TOS) and the total antioxidative status (TAS) levels were determined to evaluate the antioxidant activity of CAE. Results indicated that there was a good correlation between dose of CAE and TAS levels. We also observed that CAE protect the DNA of both yeast and mononuclear leukocytes against the damaging effect of hydrogen peroxide. The comet assay, applied on both Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 (MATa his3?1 leu2?0 met15?0 ura3?0) and human leukocytes, results suggested that there was statistically significant correlation between CAE dilutions and antigenotoxic activity. PMID:22897836

  18. A novel reliable method of DNA extraction from olive oil suitable for molecular traceability.

    PubMed

    Raieta, Katia; Muccillo, Livio; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2015-04-01

    Extra virgin olive oil production has a worldwide economic impact. The use of this brand, however, is of great concern to Institutions and private industries because of the increasing number of fraud and adulteration attempts to the market products. Here, we present a novel, reliable and not expensive method for extracting the DNA from commercial virgin and extra virgin olive oils. The DNA is stable overtime and amenable for molecular analyses; in fact, by carrying out simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers analysis, we characterise the genetic profile of monovarietal olive oils. By comparing the oil-derived pattern with that of the corresponding tree, we can unambiguously identify four cultivars from Samnium, a region of Southern Italy, and distinguish them from reference and more widely used varieties. Through a parentage statistical analysis, we also identify the putative pollinators, establishing an unprecedented and powerful tool for olive oil traceability. PMID:25442596

  19. DNA Extraction from Dry Museum Beetles without Conferring External Morphological Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Moore, Wendy; Melchior, Linea; Worobey, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background A large number of dry-preserved insect specimens exist in collections around the world that might be useful for genetic analyses. However, until now, the recovery of nucleic acids from such specimens has involved at least the partial destruction of the specimen. This is clearly undesirable when dealing with rare species or otherwise important specimens, such as type specimens. Methodology We describe a method for the extraction of PCR-amplifiable mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from dry insects without causing external morphological damage. Using PCR to amplify ?220 bp of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I, and 250–345 bp fragments of the multi-copy, nuclear 28s ribosomal DNA gene, we demonstrate the efficacy of this method on beetles collected up to 50 years ago. Conclusions This method offers a means of obtaining useful genetic information from rare insects without conferring external morphological damage. PMID:17342206

  20. Next-generation DNA sequencing of HEXA: a step in the right direction for carrier screening

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jodi D; Greger, Valerie; Strovel, Erin T; Blitzer, Miriam G; Umbarger, Mark A; Kennedy, Caleb; Bishop, Brian; Saunders, Patrick; Porreca, Gregory J; Schienda, Jaclyn; Davie, Jocelyn; Hallam, Stephanie; Towne, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is the prototype for ethnic-based carrier screening, with a carrier rate of ?1/27 in Ashkenazi Jews and French Canadians. HexA enzyme analysis is the current gold standard for TSD carrier screening (detection rate ?98%), but has technical limitations. We compared DNA analysis by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) plus an assay for the 7.6 kb deletion to enzyme analysis for TSD carrier screening using 74 samples collected from participants at a TSD family conference. Fifty-one of 74 participants had positive enzyme results (46 carriers, five late-onset Tay-Sachs [LOTS]), 16 had negative, and seven had inconclusive results. NGS + 7.6 kb del screening of HEXA found a pathogenic mutation, pseudoallele, or variant of unknown significance (VUS) in 100% of the enzyme-positive or obligate carrier/enzyme-inconclusive samples. NGS detected the B1 allele in two enzyme-negative obligate carriers. Our data indicate that NGS can be used as a TSD clinical carrier screening tool. We demonstrate that NGS can be superior in detecting TSD carriers compared to traditional enzyme and genotyping methodologies, which are limited by false-positive and false-negative results and ethnically focused, limited mutation panels, respectively, but is not ready for sole use due to lack of information regarding some VUS. PMID:24498621

  1. Improved methods for capture, extraction, and quantitative assay of environmental DNA from Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.).

    PubMed

    Turner, Cameron R; Miller, Derryl J; Coyne, Kathryn J; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  2. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn, E-mail: dc17@york.ac.uk

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening approach.

  3. Comparison of Methods of Extracting Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis DNA from Environmental Substrates and Quantification of Organisms by Using a General Internal Procedural Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Klerks; Bruggen van A. H. C; C. Zijlstra; M. Donnikov; Vos de R

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares five commercially available DNA extraction methods with respect to DNA extraction efficiency of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from soil, manure, and compost and uses an Escherichia coli strain harboring a plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein as a general internal procedural control. Inclusion of this general internal procedural control permitted more accurate quantification of extraction and amplification of

  4. Multiplex PCR for the simultaneous identification and detection of Meloidogyne incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica using DNA extracted directly from individual galls.

    PubMed

    Hu, M X; Zhuo, K; Liao, J L

    2011-11-01

    Meloidogyne incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica are the most widespread species of root-knot nematodes in South China, affecting many economically important crops, ornamental plants, and fruit trees. In this study, one pair of Meloidogyne universal primers was designed and three pairs of species-specific primers were employed successfully to rapidly detect and identify M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA extracted from individual galls. Multiplex PCR from all M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica isolates generated two fragments of ?500 and 1,000, 500 and 200, and 500 and 700 bp, respectively. The 500-bp fragment is the internal positive control fragment of rDNA 28S D2/D3 resulting from the use of the universal primers. Other Meloidogyne spp. included in this study generated only one fragment of ?500 bp in size. Using this approach, M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica were identified and detected using DNA extracted directly from individual galls containing the Meloidogyne spp. at various stages of their life cycle. Moreover, the percentage of positive PCR amplification increased with nematode development and detection was usually easy after the late stage of the second-stage juvenile. The protocol was applied to galls from naturally infested roots and the results were found to be fast, sensitive, robust, and accurate. This present study is the first to provide a definitive diagnostic tool for M. incognita, M. enterolobii, and M. javanica using DNA extracted directly from individual galls using a one-step multiplex PCR technique. PMID:21770774

  5. Setting up an ancient DNA laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Tara L

    2012-01-01

    Entering into the world of ancient DNA research is nontrivial. Because the DNA in most ancient specimens is degraded to some extent, the potential for contamination of ancient samples and DNA extracts with modern DNA is considerable. To minimize the risk associated with working with ancient DNA, experimental protocols specific to handling ancient specimens have been introduced. Here, I outline the challenges associated with working with ancient DNA and describe guidelines for setting up a new ancient DNA laboratory. I also discuss steps that can be taken at the sample collection and preparation stage to minimize the potential for contamination with exogenous sources of DNA. PMID:22237515

  6. Rapid, one step staining procedures for analysis of cellular DNA and protein by single and dual laser flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, H.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed, simplified techniques are described for simultaneous staining and analysis of DNA and protein in a number of mammalian cell types. Cell staining involves the addition of appropriate dye mixtures to unfixed or ethanol-fixed cells and subsequent analysis of cell populations in the staining reagents generally within 10 to 20 minutes. The approach is novel in that no centrifugation steps are involved during the staining procedure, thus, eliminating cell clumping and cell loss and making the procedures appropriate for samples containing limited numbers of cells. For single wavelength analysis, staining of DNA and protein in ethanol-fixed cells was accomplished with a dye solution containing propidium iodide, fluorescein isothimocyanate and RNase. After 20 minutes at room temperature cells were analyzed using the 488 nanometer (nm) laser excitation line. For dual laser analysis the following dye combinations were employed without RNase: mithramycin-rhodamine 640, mithramycin-substituted rhodamine isothiocyanate, Hoechst 33342-rhodamine 640 and Hoechst 33342-rhodamine isothiocyanate. Unfixed cells were also stained with the Hoechst 33342-rhodamine 640 dye combination. Mithramycin was excited at 457.9 nm, Hoechst 33342 at 333-363 nm, and rhodamine dyes at 568 nm. Cell types analyzed included Chinese hamster ovary cells, cultured mouse colon 26 cells, mouse embryo forelimb bud cells, and rat cell obtained by lung lavage.

  7. Comparison of different DNA-extraction techniques to investigate the bacterial community of marine copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Petra; Gerdts, Gunnar; Boersma, Maarten; Wiltshire, Karen H.; Wichels, Antje

    2010-12-01

    Marine zooplanktic organisms, such as copepods, are usually associated with large numbers of bacteria. Some of these bacteria live attached to copepods’ exoskeleton, while others prevail in their intestine and faecal pellets. Until now, general conclusions concerning the identity of these bacteria are problematic since the majority of previous studies focused on cultivable bacteria only. Hence, to date little is known on whether copepod genera or species harbour distinct bacterial populations and about the nature of this association. To shed more light on these copepod/bacteria consortia, the focus of this study was the development and evaluation of a suitable approach to extract bacterial DNA from different North Sea copepod genera. Furthermore, the bacterial DNA was analysed by PCR-DGGE and subsequent sequencing of excised bands. The result of this work was an appropriate extraction method for batches of ten to one copepod specimens and offered first insights as to which bacteria are attached to the copepods Acartia sp . and Temora sp . from Helgoland Roads (German Bight) and a laboratory-grown Acartia tonsa culture. It revealed the prevalence of Alphaproteobacteria.

  8. Interlaboratory Evaluation of Different Extraction and Real-Time PCR Methods for Detection of Coxiella burnetii DNA in Serum ?

    PubMed Central

    Tilburg, Jeroen J. H. C.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Pettersson, Annika M.; Rossen, John W. A.; Hermans, Mirjam H. A.; van Hannen, Erik J.; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; de Vries, Maaike C.; Horrevorts, Alphons M.; Klaassen, Corné H. W.

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands, there is an ongoing and unparalleled outbreak of Q fever. Rapid and reliable methods to identify patients infected with Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, are urgently needed. We evaluated the performance of different DNA extraction methods and real-time PCR assays that are in use in seven diagnostic or reference laboratories in the Netherlands. A low degree of variation in the sensitivities of most of the developed real-time PCR assays was observed. However, PCR assays amplifying short DNA fragments yielded better results than those producing large DNA fragments. With regard to DNA extraction, the automated MagNA Pure Compact system and the manual QIAamp DNA mini kit consistently yielded better results than either the MagNA Pure LC system and NucliSens EasyMag (both automated) or the High Pure viral nucleic acid kit (manual). The present study shows that multiple combinations of DNA extraction kits and real-time PCR assays offer equivalent solutions to detect C. burnetii DNA in serum samples from patients suspected to have Q fever. PMID:20826645

  9. Polyhydroxyalkanoate quantification in organic wastes and pure cultures using a single-step extraction and 1H NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Linton, Elisabeth; Rahman, Asif; Viamajala, Sridhar; Sims, Ronald C; Miller, Charles D

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) method was developed to quantitatively analyze polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) content in Cupriavidus necator H16, Azotobacter vinelandii AvOP, and mixed microbial cultures from the effluent of an agricultural waste treatment anaerobic digester. In contrast to previous methods, a single-step PHA extractive method using deuterated chloroform was established, thereby facilitating direct 1H NMR analysis. The accuracy of the method was verified through comparison with well-established gas chromatography (GC) methanolysis techniques. Nile blue fluorescence staining was also carried out to serve as an independent and qualitative indicator of intracellular PHA content. The results indicate that the 1H NMR method is appropriate for rapid and non-destructive quantification of overall PHA content and determination of PHA copolymer composition in a variety of cultures. Notably, this technique was effective in measuring PHA content in full-strength waste samples where high concentrations of background impurities and organic compounds are present. The straightforward procedures minimize error-introducing steps, require less time and materials, and result in an accurate method suitable for routine analyses. PMID:22797227

  10. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 ?L droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3?min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10?min. Following extraction, the 1500?bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10?min for 30?cycles. The total assay time was 23?min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 ?L droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5?min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of accuracy and automation. PMID:22947281

  11. Technical reproducibility of single-nucleotide and size-based DNA biomarker assessment using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenli; Tan, Iain B; Sapari, Nur S; Grabsch, Heike I; Okines, Alicia; Smyth, Elizabeth C; Aoyama, Toru; Hewitt, Lindsay C; Inam, Imran; Bottomley, Dan; Nankivell, Matthew; Stenning, Sally P; Cunningham, David; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Tsuburaya, Akira; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Soong, Richie; Tan, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues has been used in the past to analyze genetic polymorphisms. We evaluated the technical reproducibility of different types of assays for gene polymorphisms using DNA extracted from FFPE material. By using the MassARRAY iPLEX system, we investigated polymorphisms in DPYD (rs1801159 and rs3918290), UMPS (rs1801019), ERCC1 (rs11615), ERCC1 (rs3212986), and ERCC2 (rs13181) in 56 FFPE DNA samples. By using PCR, followed by size-based gel electrophoresis, we also examined TYMS 5' untranslated region 2R/3R repeats and GSTT1 deletions in 50 FFPE DNA samples and 34 DNAs extracted from fresh-frozen tissues and cell lines. Each polymorphism was analyzed by two independent runs. We found that iPLEX biomarker assays measuring single-nucleotide polymorphisms provided consistent concordant results. However, by using FFPE DNA, size-based PCR biomarkers (GSTT1 and TYMS 5' untranslated region) were discrepant in 32.7% (16/49, with exact 95% CI, 19.9%-47.5%; exact binomial confidence limit test) and 4.2% (2/48, with exact 95% CI, 0.5%-14.3%) of cases, respectively, whereas no discrepancies were observed using intact genomic DNA. Our findings suggest that DNA from FFPE material can be used to reliably test single-nucleotide polymorphisms. However, results based on size-based PCR biomarkers, and particularly GSTT1 deletions, using FFPE DNA need to be interpreted with caution. Independent repeated assays should be performed on all cases to assess potential discrepancies. PMID:25746798

  12. A Two-Step Nanofiltration Process for the Production of Phenolic-Rich Fractions from Artichoke Aqueous Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Alfredo; Conidi, Carmela; Ruby Figueroa, René; Castro Muñoz, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Commercial nanofiltration (NF) membranes in spiral-wound configuration (NP030 from Microdyn Nadir and Desal DK from GE Water & Process Technologies) were used in a sequential design in order to produce a separated fraction of phenolic and sugar compounds from an aqueous artichoke extract. For both membranes, the effect of transmembrane pressure (TMP) on the permeation flux was evaluated. In optimized conditions of TMP, the NP030 membrane exhibited high rejections of apigenin, cynarin and chlorogenic acid (higher than 85%); on the other hand, very low rejections of fructose, glucose and sucrose (lower than 4%) were measured. Starting from an extract with a total antioxidant activity (TAA) of 5.28 mM trolox a retentate fraction with a TAA of 47.75 mM trolox was obtained. The NF permeate from the NP030 membrane was processed with the Desal DK membrane in optimized conditions of TMP producing a permeate stream free of phenolic and sugar compounds. Accordingly, as most part of phenolic compounds was removed in the first NF step, the concentration of sugar compounds in the NF retentate had much higher results than that of phenolic compounds. PMID:25913377

  13. Simple DNA extraction protocol for a 16S rDNA study of bacterial diversity in tropical landfarm soil used for bioremediation of oil waste.

    PubMed

    Maciel, B M; Santos, A C F; Dias, J C T; Vidal, R O; Dias, R J C; Gross, E; Cascardo, J C M; Rezende, R P

    2009-01-01

    Landfarm soil is used to bioremediate oil wastes from petrochemical industries. We developed a simplified protocol for microbial DNA extraction of tropical landfarm soil using only direct lysis of macerated material. Two samples of tropical landfarm soil from a Brazilian refinery were analyzed by this protocol (one consisted of crude oil-contaminated soil; the other was continuously enriched for nine months with petroleum). The soil samples were lysed by maceration with liquid nitrogen, eliminating the need for detergents, organic solvents and enzymatic cell lysis. Then, the DNA from the lysed soil sample was extracted using phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol or guanidium isothiocyanate, giving high DNA yields (more than 1 micro g DNA/g soil) from both soil types. This protocol compared favorably with an established method of DNA template preparation that included mechanical, chemical and enzymatic treatment for cell lysis. The efficiency of this extraction protocol was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning assays. Fifty-one different clones were obtained; their sequences were classified into at least seven different phyla of the Eubacteria group (Proteobacteria - alpha, gamma and delta, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Acidobac teria, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes). Forty percent of the sequences could not be classified into these phyla, demonstrating the genetic diversity of this microbial community. Only eight isolates had sequences similar to known sequences of 16S rRNA of cultivable organisms or of known environmental isolates and therefore could be identified to the genus level. This method of DNA extraction is a useful tool for analysis of the bacteria responsible for petroleum degradation in contaminated environments. PMID:19440973

  14. A rapid method for extraction of cotton ( Gossypium spp.) genomic DNA suitable for RFLP or PCR analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew H. Paterson; Curt L. Brubaker; Jonathan F. Wendel

    1993-01-01

    Extraction of high-quality genomic DNA fromGossypium (cotton) species is difficult due to high levels of polysaccharide, oxidizable quinones, and other interfering substances.\\u000a We describe a procedure that consistently permits isolation of cotton genomic DNA of satisfactory size and quality for RFLP\\u000a and PCR analysis, as well as for most routine cloning applications. Several antioxidants, phenol-binding reagents, and phenol\\u000a oxidase inhibitors

  15. Improved genomic\\/nuclear DNA extraction for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine analysis of small amounts of rat liver tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dai Nakae; Yasushi Mizumoto; Eisaku Kobayashi; Osamu Noguchi; Yoichi Konishi

    1995-01-01

    Using two different commercially available extraction kits, genomic\\/nuclear DNA could be recovered from rat liver samples as small as 10 mg. Background 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels in such DNA were low and stable at 0.26–0.30 ± 0.01–0.03\\/105 guanine residues. The minimum tissue wet weight required for the accurate 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine analysis was 25 mg. The present results indicate that routine and reliable assessment

  16. Determination of gold, indium, tellurium and thallium in the same sample digest of geological materials by atomic-absorption spectroscopy and two-step solvent extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubert, A.E.; Chao, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    A rock, soil, or stream-sediment sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric acid, aqua regia, and hydrobromic acid-bromine solution. Gold, thallium, indium and tellurium are separated and concentrated from the sample digest by a two-step MIBK extraction at two concentrations of hydrobromic add. Gold and thallium are first extracted from 0.1M hydrobromic acid medium, then indium and tellurium are extracted from 3M hydrobromic acid in the presence of ascorbic acid to eliminate iron interference. The elements are then determined by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The two-step solvent extraction can also be used in conjunction with electrothermal atomic-absorption methods to lower the detection limits for all four metals in geological materials. ?? 1985.

  17. Replication of UV-irradiated DNA in human cell extracts: Evidence for mutagenic bypass of pyrimidine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.C.; Kunkel, T.A. (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1993-08-15

    The authors have examined the efficiency and fidelity of simian virus 40-origin-dependent replication of UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA in extracts of human cells. Using as a mutational target the [alpha]-complementation domain of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene in bacteriophage M13mp2DNA, replication of undamaged DNA in HeLa cell extracts was highly accurate, whereas replication of DNA irradiated with UV light (280-320 nm) was both less efficient and less accurate. Replication was inhibited by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Nonetheless, covalently closed, monomer-length circular products were generated that were resistant to digestion by Dpn I, showing that they resulted from semiconservative replication. These products were incised by T4 endonuclease V, whereas the undamaged replication products were not, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers were bypassed during replication. When replicated, UV-irradiated DNA was used to transfect an E. coli [alpha]-complementation host strain to score mutant M13mp2 plaques, the mutant plaque frequency was substantially higher than that obtained with either unirradiated, replicated DNA, or unreplicated, UV-irradiated DNA. Both the increased mutagenicity and the inhibition of replication associated with UV irradiation were reversed by treatment of the irradiated DNA with photolyase before replication. Sequence analysis of mutants resulting from replication of UV-irradiated DNA demonstrated that most mutants contained C [yields] T transition errors at dipyrimidine sites. A few mutants contained 1-nt frameshift errors or tandem double CC [yields] TT substitutions. The data are consistent with the interpretation that pyrimidine dimers are bypassed during replication by the multiprotein replication apparatus in human cell extracts and that this bypass is mutagenic primarily via misincorporation of dAMP opposite a cytosine (or uracil) in the dimer. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Ion-channel genosensor for the detection of specific DNA sequences derived from Plum Pox Virus in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Malecka, Kamila; Michalczuk, Lech; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    A DNA biosensor for detection of specific oligonucleotides sequences of Plum Pox Virus (PPV) in plant extracts and buffer is proposed. The working principles of a genosensor are based on the ion-channel mechanism. The NH2-ssDNA probe was deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface to form an amide bond between the carboxyl group of oxidized electrode surface and amino group from ssDNA probe. The analytical signals generated as a result of hybridization were registered in Osteryoung square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- as a redox marker. The 22-mer and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences derived from PPV and DNA samples from plants infected with PPV were used as targets. Similar detection limits of 2.4 pM (31.0 pg/mL) and 2.3 pM (29.5 pg/mL) in the concentration range 1-8 pM were observed in the presence of the 22-mer ssDNA and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences of PPV, respectively. The genosensor was capable of discriminating between samples consisting of extracts from healthy plants and leaf extracts from infected plants in the concentration range 10-50 pg/mL. The detection limit was 12.8 pg/mL. The genosensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity. The 20-mer partially complementary DNA sequences with four complementary bases and DNA samples from healthy plants used as negative controls generated low signal. PMID:25302809

  19. Enhanced DPPH radical scavenging activity and DNA protection effect of litchi pericarp extract by Aspergillus awamori bioconversion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) pericarp is a major byproduct which contains a significant amount of polyphenol. This study was designed to biotransformation litchi pericarp extract (LPE) by Aspergillus awamori to produce more bioactive compounds with stronger antioxidant activities. Results The study exhibited that the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activities significantly (p?extracted fraction and from 25.41% to 36.82% in the ethyl acetate-extracted fraction. Application of DNA cleavage assay further demonstrated the enhanced protection effect of the fermented phenolics on DNA damage. It is also noted that the water-extracted fraction of the fermented LPE possessed a much stronger capacity than the ethyl acetate-extracted fraction to prevent from damage of supercoiled DNA. Interestingly, it was found that some new compounds such as catechin and quercetin appeared after of A. awamori fermentation of LPE, which could account for the enhanced antioxidant activity. Conclusion The DPPH radical scavenging activity and DNA protection effect of LPE were increased by Aspergillus awamori bioconversion while some compounds responsible for the enhanced antioxidant activity were identified. This study provided an effective way of utilizing fruit pericarp as a readily accessible source of the natural antioxidants in food industry and, thus, extended the application area such as fruit by-products. PMID:23016522

  20. Aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus protects against DNA damage in human lymphoblast Cell K562 and enhances antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nadia; Bouhlel, Inès; Chaabane, Fadwa; Bzéouich, Imèn Mokdad; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2014-02-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the cellular antioxidant effect of the aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus and its antigenotoxic potential using human myelogenous cells, K562. The antioxidant capacity of this extract was evaluated by determining its cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) in K562 cells. Also, preceding antigenotoxicity assessment, its eventual genotoxicity property was investigated by evaluating its capacity to induce the DNA degradation of treated cell nuclei. As no genotoxicity was detected at different exposure times, its ability to protect cell DNA against H2O2 oxidative effect was investigated, using the "comet assay." It appears that 800 ?g/mL of extract inhibited the genotoxicity induced by H2O2 with a rate of 41.30 %, after 4 h of incubation. In addition, this extract revealed a significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species in K562 cells. PMID:24347159

  1. A one-step DNA sequencing strategy to HLA type hematopoietic stem cell donors at recruitment - rethinking typing strategies.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Cha, N; Yang, R; Ng, J; Hurley, C K

    2013-03-01

    In order to reduce the time required to identify a match for unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, a one-step DNA sequencing strategy was employed at the time of recruitment. The impact of this strategy on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing resolution and the effect of current registry requirements on resolution and coding of assignments were evaluated. Sanger-based DNA sequencing was used to obtain diploid exons 2 and 3 HLA-A, -B and -C assignments of 2747 unrelated African American and 1822 European American volunteers at recruitment. The results demonstrate the high resolution of the approach and challenge several aspects of the current registry typing strategy. Of the 46% of African American and 74% of European American individuals whose HLA typing resulted in alternative genotypes, the majority (?93%) was predicted to have only a single 'common' genotype among the alternatives. The common practice of adding secondary assays to resolve alternative genotype assignments that include more than two antigen groups was also evaluated. While the percentage of assignments with greater than two antigen groups reached as high as 21% (HLA-A in European Americans), only 1.8% of individuals at most carried two common genotypes encompassing three antigen groups. The assignment of (National Marrow Donor Program) NMDP-designated allele codes to the one-pass results reduced the resolution substantially and introduced genotypes that were not included in the laboratory's assignments. We suggest the alternative strategy of using the exons 2-3 diploid nucleotide sequence as the assignment submitted to the registry with the added benefit of immortalizing the assignment in time regardless of the introduction of novel alleles. To keep pace with current donor selection criteria and with the increasing number of new alleles, it is time to rethink our recruitment typing strategies. PMID:23398508

  2. A systematic molecular dynamics study of nearest-neighbor effects on base pair and base pair step conformations and fluctuations in B-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, Richard; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Beveridge, David; Bishop, Thomas C.; Case, David A.; Cheatham, Thomas; Dixit, Surjit; Jayaram, B.; Lankas, Filip; Laughton, Charles; Maddocks, John H.; Michon, Alexis; Osman, Roman; Orozco, Modesto; Perez, Alberto; Singh, Tanya; Spackova, Nada; Sponer, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    It is well recognized that base sequence exerts a significant influence on the properties of DNA and plays a significant role in protein–DNA interactions vital for cellular processes. Understanding and predicting base sequence effects requires an extensive structural and dynamic dataset which is currently unavailable from experiment. A consortium of laboratories was consequently formed to obtain this information using molecular simulations. This article describes results providing information not only on all 10 unique base pair steps, but also on all possible nearest-neighbor effects on these steps. These results are derived from simulations of 50–100 ns on 39 different DNA oligomers in explicit solvent and using a physiological salt concentration. We demonstrate that the simulations are converged in terms of helical and backbone parameters. The results show that nearest-neighbor effects on base pair steps are very significant, implying that dinucleotide models are insufficient for predicting sequence-dependent behavior. Flanking base sequences can notably lead to base pair step parameters in dynamic equilibrium between two conformational sub-states. Although this study only provides limited data on next-nearest-neighbor effects, we suggest that such effects should be analyzed before attempting to predict the sequence-dependent behavior of DNA. PMID:19850719

  3. High-throughput, Automated Extraction of DNA and RNA from Clinical Samples using TruTip Technology on Common Liquid Handling Robots

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Rebecca C.; Gindlesperger, Alissa; Stokes, Tinsley; Brady, Dane; Thakore, Nitu; Belgrader, Philip; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2013-01-01

    TruTip is a simple nucleic acid extraction technology whereby a porous, monolithic binding matrix is inserted into a pipette tip. The geometry of the monolith can be adapted for specific pipette tips ranging in volume from 1.0 to 5.0 ml. The large porosity of the monolith enables viscous or complex samples to readily pass through it with minimal fluidic backpressure. Bi-directional flow maximizes residence time between the monolith and sample, and enables large sample volumes to be processed within a single TruTip. The fundamental steps, irrespective of sample volume or TruTip geometry, include cell lysis, nucleic acid binding to the inner pores of the TruTip monolith, washing away unbound sample components and lysis buffers, and eluting purified and concentrated nucleic acids into an appropriate buffer. The attributes and adaptability of TruTip are demonstrated in three automated clinical sample processing protocols using an Eppendorf epMotion 5070, Hamilton STAR and STARplus liquid handling robots, including RNA isolation from nasopharyngeal aspirate, genomic DNA isolation from whole blood, and fetal DNA extraction and enrichment from large volumes of maternal plasma (respectively). PMID:23793016

  4. Nuclear assembly with lambda DNA in fractionated Xenopus egg extracts: an unexpected role for glycogen in formation of a higher order chromatin intermediate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Hartl; Eric Olson; Tam Dang; Douglass J. Forbes

    1994-01-01

    Crude extracts of Xenopus eggs are capable of nuclear assembly around chromatin templates or even around protein-free, naked DNA templates. Here the requirements for nuclear assembly around a naked DNA template were investigated. Extracts were sepa- rated by ultracentrifugation into cytosol, membrane, and gelatinous pellet fractions. It was found that, in addition to the cytosolic and membrane fractions, a component

  5. 32P-post-labelling analysis of DNA adducts formed in the upper gastrointestinal tissue of mice fed bracken extract or bracken spores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AC Povey; D Potter; PJ O'Connor

    1996-01-01

    Bracken toxicity to both domestic and laboratory animals is well established and tumours are formed when rodents are treated with either bracken extracts or bracken spores. In this study we have administered bracken spores and extract to mice in order to investigate whether such exposure leads to the formation of DNA adducts. DNA, isolated from the upper gastrointestinal tract and

  6. Comparison of manual and semi-automatic DNA extraction protocols for the barcoding characterization of hematophagous louse flies (Diptera: Hippoboscidae).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-López, Rafael; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Gangoso, Laura; Soriguer, Ramón C; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-06-01

    The barcoding of life initiative provides a universal molecular tool to distinguish animal species based on the amplification and sequencing of a fragment of the subunit 1 of the cytochrome oxidase (COI) gene. Obtaining good quality DNA for barcoding purposes is a limiting factor, especially in studies conducted on small-sized samples or those requiring the maintenance of the organism as a voucher. In this study, we compared the number of positive amplifications and the quality of the sequences obtained using DNA extraction methods that also differ in their economic costs and time requirements and we applied them for the genetic characterization of louse flies. Four DNA extraction methods were studied: chloroform/isoamyl alcohol, HotShot procedure, Qiagen DNeasy® Tissue and Blood Kit and DNA Kit Maxwell® 16LEV. All the louse flies were morphologically identified as Ornithophila gestroi and a single COI-based haplotype was identified. The number of positive amplifications did not differ significantly among DNA extraction procedures. However, the quality of the sequences was significantly lower for the case of the chloroform/isoamyl alcohol procedure with respect to the rest of methods tested here. These results may be useful for the genetic characterization of louse flies, leaving most of the remaining insect as a voucher. PMID:26047179

  7. Effects of the most common methods for the enhancement of latent fingerprints on DNA extraction from forensic samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Gino; M. Omedei

    The aim of the research was to understand if the use of chemicals compounds used to enhance latent fingerprints, might interfere with the extraction and amplification of DNA from biological samples on crime scenes. Only three methods were used: powders (black and white ones, used on non porous surfaces, and here applied on glass), cyanoacrylate (used on non porous surfaces,

  8. Evaluation of rapid DNA extraction methods for the quantitative detection of fungi using real-time PCR analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Haugland; Nichole Brinkman; Stephen J. Vesper

    2002-01-01

    Three comparatively rapid methods for the extraction of DNA from fungal conidia and yeast cells in environmental (air, water and dust) samples were evaluated for use in real-time PCR (TaqMan™) analyses. A simple bead milling method was developed to provide sensitive, accurate and precise quantification of target organisms in air and water (tap and surface) samples. However, quantitative analysis of

  9. Study of the phase equilibrium formed inside the flash tank used at the separation step of a supercritical fluid extraction unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thais M. Takeuchi; Patrícia F. Leal; Rogério Favareto; Lúcio Cardozo-Filho; Marcos L. Corazza; Paulo T. V. Rosa; M. Angela A. Meireles

    2008-01-01

    In the present work the influence of a non-ideal separation step of a supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) unit was studied; the solvent used was carbon dioxide. The behavior of clove bud (Eugenia caryophyllus), vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides), and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) was analyzed. The starting point was a previous study on the same subject, which considered that no solute is

  10. Evaluation of six different DNA extraction methods for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by means of PCR-IS6110: preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Developments in molecular detection and strain differentiation of members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex have proved to be useful. The DNA extraction method influences the amplification efficiency, causing interference on the sensitivity and respective inhibitors. The aim of this study was to standardize a simple and fast DNA extraction method, providing DNA amplification by IS6110-PCR effectively free from undue interferences. Findings The efficiency of the six different protocols tested in M. tuberculosis cultures has varied from 75% to 92.5%. This preliminary study evaluating the IS6110 PCR sensitivity and specificity was developed in DNA extracted from microscope slides, and achieved 100% of efficiency. Conclusions DNA extraction by Chelex?+?NP-40 method from both, cultures of M. tuberculosis and smear slides, resulted in good quantity of interference free DNA, especially in samples with low concentrations of genetic material; therefore, such technique may be used for the molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:24373461

  11. Phenolic composition, DNA damage protective activity and hepatoprotective effect of free phenolic extract from Sphallerocarpus gracilis seeds.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chun-yan; Tian, Cheng-rui; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Run-guang; Lu, Yue-hong

    2014-05-01

    The phenolic composition of the free phenolic extract from Sphallerocarpus gracilis seeds was analyzed by HPLC-MS and predominant compounds were chlorogenic acid, di-caffeoylquinic acid glucoside and luteolin-7-O-glucoside. The free phenolic extract was evaluated for DNA damage protective activity induced by ROO and OH radicals and hepatoprotective effect in vivo and in vitro. Results revealed that the free phenolic extract exhibited significant protective activity against both ROO and OH radical-induced DNA damage and the phenolic extract exerted more potent inhibitory activity against OH radical-induced damage than against that induced by ROO radicals. In vivo experimental results showed that the phenolic extract significantly prevented the increase of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities and hepatic malondialdehyde level caused by CCl4 in rats, and markedly increased hepatic superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase levels. Histopathological examinations further confirmed that the phenolic extract could protect the liver from CCl4-induced damage. In vitro experimental results showed that the phenolic extract could reduce BRL hepatocyte apoptosis and damage induced by CCl4. These findings indicate that the S. gracilis seed could be developed as a medicinal herb for the therapy and prevention of hepatic injury. PMID:24657314

  12. A Method for DNA Extraction from the Desert Cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis and Its Application to Identification of ftsZ

    PubMed Central

    Billi, Daniela; Grilli Caiola, Maria; Paolozzi, Luciano; Ghelardini, Patrizia

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed for extraction of DNA from Chroococcidiopsis that overcomes obstacles posed by bacterial contamination and the presence of a thick envelope surrounding the cyanobacterial cells. The method is based on the resistance of Chroococcidiopsis to lysozyme and consists of a lysozyme treatment followed by osmotic shock that reduces the bacterial contamination by 3 orders of magnitude. Then DNase treatment is performed to eliminate DNA from the bacterial lysate. Lysis of Chroococcidiopsis cells is achieved by grinding with glass beads in the presence of hot phenol. Extracted DNA is further purified by cesium-chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation. This method permitted the first molecular approach to the study of Chroococcidiopsis, and a 570-bp fragment of the gene ftsZ was cloned and sequenced. PMID:9758840

  13. Choice of bacterial DNA extraction method from fecal material influences community structure as evaluated by metagenomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, studies on the human intestinal microbiota have attracted tremendous attention. Application of next generation sequencing for mapping of bacterial phylogeny and function has opened new doors to this field of research. However, little attention has been given to the effects of choice of methodology on the output resulting from such studies. Results In this study we conducted a systematic comparison of the DNA extraction methods used by the two major collaborative efforts: The European MetaHIT and the American Human Microbiome Project (HMP). Additionally, effects of homogenizing the samples before extraction were addressed. We observed significant differences in distribution of bacterial taxa depending on the method. While eukaryotic DNA was most efficiently extracted by the MetaHIT protocol, DNA from bacteria within the Bacteroidetes phylum was most efficiently extracted by the HMP protocol. Conclusions Whereas it is comforting that the inter-individual variation clearly exceeded the variation resulting from choice of extraction method, our data highlight the challenge of comparing data across studies applying different methodologies. PMID:24949196

  14. Automating DNA processing 

    E-print Network

    Wienen, Michael Jan

    1994-01-01

    . I Procedures and Steps Constituting RFLP and RAPD Protocols. . . Table III. 2 TAMU Laboratory RFLP and RAPD Protocols. . . . . Table III. 3 Comparison of Agarose and Polyacrylamide Gels . . . Table III. 4 PCR Buffer Ingredients Table V. 1... path is to use RAPD markers where the only required steps are DNA extraction (by grinding and pulverizing plant tissue), PCR, and then Gel electrophoresis (which is not explicitly shown in Figure lll 1). Though PCR is not required if using RFLP...

  15. What do results of common sequential fractionation and single-step extractions tell us about P binding with Fe and Al compounds in non-calcareous sediments?

    PubMed

    Jan, Ji?í; Borovec, Jakub; Kopá?ek, Ji?í; Hejzlar, Josef

    2013-02-01

    Correct identification of P forms together with their main Fe and Al binding partners in non-calcareous sediments is of crucial importance for evaluation of P cycling in water bodies. In this paper, we assess extraction methods frequently used for this purpose, i.e., a sequential five-step fractionation (water, bicarbonate buffered dithionite solution (BD), NaOH, HCl, nitric-perchloric acid), ascorbate extraction (pH ~7.5), and oxalate extraction (pH ~3), directly on a range of laboratory prepared Fe and Al minerals enriched with adsorbed P. Extraction selectivity and efficiency for particular P, Fe and Al forms were also verified by specific combinations of these extraction methods applied on freshwater sediment samples. In the sequential fractionation, BD was highly effective in dissolving both amorphous and crystalline Fe (hydr)oxides and the associated P, while neither FeS nor Al (hydr)oxides were dissolved. The following NaOH extraction effectively dissolved both amorphous and crystalline Al (hydr)oxides. The high solubilizing power of BD and NaOH to dissolve crystalline Fe and Al oxides that have only a small P-sorption ability prevents the use of resulting Fe/P and Al/P ratios as simple predictors of total P sorption capacity of sediments and soils. Ascorbate non-selectively extracted small proportions of FeS and amorphous Fe and Al (hydr)oxides, but significant amounts of adsorbed P, which hinders its use for the characterization of P forms in non-calcareous sediments. Similar nonselective characteristics were found for oxalate extractions. As oxalate extracts most of the adsorbed phosphate, it is not possible to use it unambiguously to determine specific Fe/P and Al/P ratios of active complexes. However, this method is convenient (and more selective than NaOH step in the sequential fractionation) for the determination of amorphous Al (hydr)oxides. PMID:23218245

  16. Protective effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Portulaca oleracea L. aerial parts on H2O2-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Behravan, Javad; Mosafa, Fatemeh; Soudmand, Negar; Taghiabadi, Elahe; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2011-09-01

    The comet assay is a standard method for measuring DNA damage. In this study, the protective effects of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Portulaca oleracea L. (P. oleracea) on human lymphocyte DNA lesions were evaluated with the comet assay. Lymphocytes were isolated from blood samples taken from healthy volunteers. Human lymphocytes were incubated in H(2)O(2) (50,100, and 200 ?M), aqueous extract (0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2.5mg/ml), and ethanolic extracts (0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2.5mg/ml) of P. oleraceae aerial parts alone with a combination of H(2)O(2) (100 ?M) with either 1 or 2.5mg/ml of both extracts at 4°C for 30 minutes. The extent of DNA migration was measured using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis approach assay, and DNA damage was expressed as percentage tail DNA. We found that the aqueous extract of P. oleracea significantly inhibited DNA damage, while there was no effect of the ethanolic extract. These data suggest that the aqueous extract of P. oleracea can prevent oxidative DNA damage to human lymphocytes, which is likely due to antioxidant constituents in the extract. PMID:21981871

  17. Ancient DNA extracted from Danish aurochs (Bos primigenius): genetic diversity and preservation.

    PubMed

    Gravlund, Peter; Aaris-Sørensen, Kim; Hofreiter, Michael; Meyer, Matthias; Bollback, Jonathan P; Noe-Nygaard, Nanna

    2012-01-20

    We extracted DNA from 39 Danish aurochs specimens and successfully amplified and sequenced a 252 base pair long fragment of the multivariable region I of the mitochondrial control region from 11 specimens. The sequences from these specimens dated back to 9830-2865 14Cyr BP and represent the first study of genetic variation of Danish aurochs. In addition, for all specimens we address correlations between the ability to obtain DNA sequences and various parameters such as the age of the sample, the collagen content, the museum storage period, Danish geography and whether the specimens were found in an archeological or geological context. We find that aurochs from southern Scandinavia display a star-shaped population genetic structure, that is indicative of a local and relatively recent diversification from a few ancestral haplotypes that may have originated in the ancestral Western European population before migration northwards during the retreat of the glaciers. Scenarios suggesting several invasions of genetically distinct aurochs are not supported by these analyses. Rather, our results suggest that a single continuous migration northward occurred. Our findings also suggest, although with only limited support, that aurochs in Northwestern Europe underwent a population expansion beginning shortly after the retreat of the glacial ice from Denmark and had a stable population size until the population decline that must have occurred prior to extinction. The absence of haplotypes similar to modern domestic cattle in our aurochs suggests that introgression between these species must have been limited, if it occurred at all. We found that the successful recovery of genetic material for PCR amplification correlates with sample age and local geographic conditions. However, contrary to other studies, we found no significant correlation between length of time in museum storage or the type of the locality in which a specimen was discovered (archeological or geological) and amplification success. Finally, we found large variances in our estimates of collagen content preventing an evaluation of this as an indicator of preservation quality. PMID:22188739

  18. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Materials and Methods: Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Results: Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). Conclusion: The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method. PMID:25598636

  19. Preparation of magnetite-loaded silica microspheres for solid-phase extraction of genomic DNA from soy-based foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ruobing; Wang, Yucong; Hu, Yunli; Chen, Lei; Wan, Qian-Hong

    2009-09-01

    Solid-phase extraction has been widely employed for the preparation of DNA templates for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analytical methods. Among the variety of adsorbents studied, magnetically responsive silica particles are particularly attractive due to their potential to simplify, expedite, and automate the extraction process. Here we report a facile method for the preparation of such magnetic particles, which entails impregnation of porous silica microspheres with iron salts, followed by calcination and reduction treatments. The samples were characterized using powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD data show that magnetite nanocrystals of about 27.2 nm are produced within the pore channels of the silica support after reduction. SEM images show that the as-synthesized particles exhibit spherical shape and uniform particle size of about 3 microm as determined by the silica support. Nitrogen sorption data confirm that the magnetite-loaded silica particles possess typical mesopore structure with BET surface area of about 183 m(2)/g. VSM data show that the particles display paramagnetic behavior with saturation magnetization of 11.37 emu/g. The magnetic silica microspheres coated with silica shells were tested as adsorbents for rapid extraction of genomic DNA from soybean-derived products. The purified DNA templates were amplified by PCR for screening of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The preliminary results confirm that the DNA extraction protocols using magnetite-loaded silica microspheres are capable of producing DNA templates which are inhibitor-free and ready for downstream analysis. PMID:19632684

  20. Back to Basics – The Influence of DNA Extraction and Primer Choice on Phylogenetic Analysis of Activated Sludge Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Rasmus H.; Nielsen, Per H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA extraction and primer choice have a large effect on the observed community structure in all microbial amplicon sequencing analyses. Although the biases are well known, no comprehensive analysis has been conducted in activated sludge communities. In this study we systematically explored the impact of a number of parameters on the observed microbial community: bead beating intensity, primer choice, extracellular DNA removal, and various PCR settings. In total, 176 samples were subjected to 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, and selected samples were investigated through metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization was used as a DNA extraction-independent method for qualitative comparison. In general, an effect on the observed community was found on all parameters tested, although bead beating and primer choice had the largest effect. The effect of bead beating intensity correlated with cell-wall strength as seen by a large increase in DNA from Gram-positive bacteria (up to 400%). However, significant differences were present at lower phylogenetic levels within the same phylum, suggesting that additional factors are at play. The best primer set based on in silico analysis was found to underestimate a number of important bacterial groups. For 16S rRNA gene analysis in activated sludge we recommend using the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil with four times the normal bead beating and V1-3 primers. PMID:26182345

  1. Assessment of three commercial DNA extraction kits and a laboratory-developed method for detecting Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora in raspberry wash, basil wash and pesto.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joan M; Joo, Jane; Kim, Richard; Murphy, Helen R

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods are often used to identify the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis in foods although little has been published regarding the efficacy of available DNA extraction methods. This study reviewed three commonly used commercial DNA extraction kits: FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, QBiogene (FastDNA), UltraClean™ Soil DNA Isolation Kit, MO BIO Laboratories (MoBio), and QIAamp DNA Mini Stool Kit, Qiagen (QIAamp), as well as a 'homebrew' Universal Nucleic Acid Extraction (UNEX) method. Washes from raspberry and basil as well as commercial pesto samples were seeded with 5000, 500, or 50 C. parvum and C. cayetanensis oocysts. The protocols were assessed for: quantity and quality of the extracted DNA, time to completion, presence of PCR inhibitors and the percentage of samples correctly identified as positive for the two parasites. Real-time and conventional nested PCR assays were used to detect the seeded pathogens. Of the commercial kits, PCR results of samples extracted using FastDNA were statistically similar to QIAamp and both were superior to MoBio. Differences in PCR results among FastDNA, QIAamp and UNEX for detection of Cyclospora were not statistically significant although the UNEX method proved best with Cryptosporidium. Real-time PCR assays targeted the 18S rRNA and the hsp70 genes of C. cayetanensis; overall results were similar to those found using conventional nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. PMID:23147278

  2. Probing Sequence-specific DNA Flexibility in A-tracts and Pyrimidine-purine Steps by NMR 13C Relaxation and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Evgenia N.; Bascom, Gavin D.; Andricioaei, Ioan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA flexibility plays a key role in a variety of cellular interactions that are critical for gene packaging, expression, and regulation. Yet, few studies have experimentally explored the sequence dependence of DNA dynamics that occur on biologically relevant timescales. Here, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) carbon spin relaxation combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the picosecond to nanosecond dynamics in a variety of dinucleotide steps as well as in varying length homopolymeric An•Tn repeats (An-tracts, n = 2, 4 and 6) that exhibit unusual structural and mechanical properties. We extend the NMR spin relaxation timescale sensitivity deeper into the nanosecond regime by using glycerol and a longer DNA duplex to slow down overall tumbling. Our studies reveal a structurally unique A-tract core (for n > 3) that is uniformly rigid, flanked by junction steps that show increasing sugar flexibility with A-tract length. High sugar mobility is observed at pyrimidine residues at the A-tract junctions, which is encoded at the dinucleotide level (CA, TG and CG steps) and increases with A-tract length. The MD simulations reproduce many of these trends, particularly the overall rigidity of A-tract base and sugar sites, and suggest that the sugar-backbone dynamics could involve transitions in sugar pucker and phosphate backbone BI?BII equilibria. Our results reinforce an emerging view that sequence-specific DNA flexibility can be imprinted in dynamics occurring deep within the nanosecond time regime that is difficult to characterize experimentally at the atomic level. Such large amplitude sequence-dependent backbone fluctuations might flag the genome for specific DNA recognition. PMID:23035755

  3. Rapid detection of Pneumocystis carinii in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: use of a simple DNA extraction procedure and nested PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Rabodonirina, M; Raffenot, D; Cotte, L; Boibieux, A; Mayençon, M; Bayle, G; Persat, F; Rabatel, F; Trepo, C; Peyramond, D; Piens, M A

    1997-01-01

    We report on the development of a rapid nested PCR protocol for the detection of Pneumocystis carinii DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens in which the protocol included the use of a commercially available DNA extraction kit (GeneReleaser). GeneReleaser enabled us to obtain amplification-ready DNA within 20 min without requiring the purification of the DNA. The nested PCR was performed with the primers pAZ102-E, pAZ102-H, and pAZ102-L2 (A. E. Wakefield, F. J. Pixley, S. Banerji, K. Sinclair, R. F. Miller, E. R. Moxon, and J. M. Hopkin, Lancet 336:451-453, 1990.). Results were obtained in about 4 h with the adoption of denaturation, annealing, and extension steps shortened to 20 seconds. The sensitivity of the nested PCR was tested with a P. carinii cyst suspension and was found to be less than one cyst (one to eight nuclei). The detection limit was the same with the use of GeneReleaser or proteinase K-phenol chloroform for DNA extraction. The nested PCR assay was prospectively compared with staining with Giemsa and methenamine silver stains for the detection of P. carinii in 127 BAL samples from 105 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients investigated for acute respiratory illness. Twenty-five BAL specimens (20%) were positive by staining and the nested PCR and 25 (20%) were negative by staining and positive by the nested PCR. These 25 BAL specimens with conflicting results were obtained from 23 patients, 82% of whom were receiving prophylactic therapy against P. carinii pneumonia (PCP). Only two patients were diagnosed with possible PCP. The final diagnosis was not PCP for 20 patients who were considered to be colonized or to have a low level of infection. This colonization is not of clinical importance but is of epidemiological importance. Our rapid, simple, and sensitive amplification protocol may be performed in clinical laboratories for the routine diagnosis of PCP with BAL specimens. PMID:9350726

  4. Kinetic Parameter Extraction of Square Wave Voltammograms from DNA-Modified Gold Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Marc; Wohlgamuth, Chris; Slinker, Jason

    2012-10-01

    The field of surface bound electrochemistry is important in a variety of applications specifically sensing. A fundamental understanding of the processes involved could help to improve detection limits, optimize rates of detection and direct changes in device design. Accurate extraction of electrochemical kinetic parameters such as the rate constant k and charge transfer coefficient ? from cyclic voltammograms can be challenging when confronted with large background currents and relatively weak signals. The commonly used technique of Laviron analysis is both time consuming and somewhat subjective. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) is therefore an ideal alternative method given that it maximizes signal while minimizing capacitive effects. In this experiment kinetic parameters of DNA-modified gold electrodes are obtained from SWV curves through background subtraction followed by nonlinear least squares fitting using a first order quasi-reversible surface process model. The fitting is accomplished using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm with standard parameters and a convergence condition of less than 0.0001%. General agreement with experimental data is shown with varying levels of confidence. Difficulties specific to this experiment are discussed as well as the possible benefits of utilizing the Bayesian statistical approach of nested sampling when confronted with multiple peaks of interest and the background source is well defined.

  5. Wheat bran biorefinery: an investigation on the starch derived glucose extraction accompanied by pre- and post-treatment steps.

    PubMed

    Tirpanalan, Özge; Reisinger, Michael; Huber, Florian; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Novalin, Senad

    2014-07-01

    Wheat bran, a side product of the milling industry, can be considered as a feedstock for biorefineries. Unlike other lignocellulosic feedstock, wheat bran contains a reasonable amount of starch, which is not of recalcitrant nature. Therefore, it can be extracted without a costly pretreatment process. The present work evaluates the extraction of starch derived glucose in relation to a wheat bran biorefinery. The purity of free glucose extracted quantitatively was 44%. The extract was concentrated by threefold via nanofiltration, thereby reaching a glucose concentration of 49 g/L. Hydrothermal treatment (180°C - 20 min) of the starch-free bran did not induce the formation of hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid. Interestingly, the furfural level increased compared to the process, in which bran was treated hydrothermally without a preceding starch extraction. By separation of water-extractables prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, the free glucose purity was increased to 58%, however the yield of glucose decreased to 61%. PMID:24835741

  6. Step-gate polysilicon nanowires field effect transistor compatible with CMOS technology for label-free DNA biosensor

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -free DNA biosensor G. Wenga, E. Jacques, A-C. Salaün, R. Rogel, L. Pichon and F. Geneste* Institut d in "Biosensors and Bioelectronics Volume 40, Issue 1 (2013) 141-146" DOI : 10.1016/j.bios.2012.07.001 #12;Polycrystalline silicon nanowire FET (poly-Si NW FET); Bio-sensor; DNA hybridization; Spacer formation technique

  7. Short-step chemical synthesis of DNA by use of MMTrS group for protection of 5'-hydroxyl group.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Miyuki; Utagawa, Eri; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2007-01-01

    4-methoxytrithylthio (MMTrS) group was applied for the appropriately protected four canonical nucleosides. We prepared the phosphoroamidite units by use of these nucleosides and developed the synthesis of oligodeoxynucleotides without any acidic treatment. Moreover, the new DNA synthesis protocol was applied to an automated DNA synthesizer for the synthesis of longer oligodeoxynucleotides. PMID:18029620

  8. Extraction of DNA from decomposed human tissue An evaluation of five extraction methods for short tandem repeat typing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per Hoff-Olsen; Bente Mevag; Eva Staalstrøm; Bente Hovde; Thore Egeland; Bjørnar Olaisen

    1999-01-01

    Hyperpolymorphic short tandem repetitive DNA sequences, STRs or microsatellites, have become widely used in human identification, particularly in criminal cases and in mass disasters. In such cases the substrates for the analyses may be decomposed biological material, a fact that has to be taken into account when choosing the appropriate casework methods. In this paper we report the evaluation of

  9. Efficient genomic DNA extraction protocol from medicinal rich Passiflora foetida containing high level of polysaccharide and polyphenol.

    PubMed

    Lade, Bipin Deochand; Patil, Anita Surendra; Paikrao, Hariprassad Madhukarrao

    2014-01-01

    In Present work, the main objective is to develop less time consuming protocol for genomic DNA isolation from leaves of Passiflora foetida. Optimized protocol is cost effective, as it avoided use of expensive liquid nitrogen. The important parameters of CTAB buffer composition such as Polyvinylpyrrolidone PVP40000 (without PVP, 1%, 2%, 3.5%, 4.0%, 4.5%, 5.0%), CTAB (w, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%), water bath temperature (30°C to 70°C) and duration on water bath for half hr and one and half hr has been optimized. CTAB (2%), PVP (1%), water bath temperature (70%), duration on water bath (1 hr) has efficiently yielded DNA quality of 200-1782 ?g/0.5gm from leaf, stem, root, tendril and flower. However, 168 ?g - 1782 ?g of DNA has been obtained from 0.5 g of leaf of Passiflora foetida. Polyphenol contamination has been overcome using 5M NaCl and PVP. Acetate has been used for obtaining double-stranded DNA in stabilized form. Current DNA extraction protocol takes maximum of four hours for completion, which is many time savings. RAPD-PCR reaction parameters such as DNA concentration (100ng), Primer concentration (2 ?M), Dream Taq polymerase (2 U), annealing temperature (29°C) and number of cycles for amplification of DNA has been optimized. Primer fragment Akansha 7 shows high polymorphism of 7 fragments ranges from 200bp - 2500 bp. Current optimized protocol of DNA isolation is specifically for Passiflora foetida, which can be used for downstream molecular techniques. PMID:25191636

  10. A pressure-driven column-based technique for the efficient extraction of DNA from respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Hirama, Takashi; Mogi, Hajime; Egashira, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Eiji; Kukisaki, Shigenari; Hagiwara, Koichi; Takei, Osamu

    2015-05-20

    Currently molecular techniques are a broadly accepted tool for diagnosis and are able to benefit patients in clinical practice. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been especially incorporated into practical applications that are already in widespread use across the globe. With regard to the initial DNA extraction from clinically relevant samples, a number of commercially available kits are commonly used and are also designed to be easy to handle and less labor-intensive. In this study, the pressure system extracting DNA in column-based kit was developed, and its utility was compared with the centrifuge method using sputum from patients who were diagnosed with pneumonia. Also, due to the compact size and rapid processing time, the practical application of the pressure-based system incorporated into an automated pipetting machine was evaluated through clinical study. Our data suggests that DNA extraction by pressure was capable of serving as a substitute for the centrifuge method, and the compact and automatic nature of the pressure system device provided rapid and valuable information for clinical practice. PMID:25824633

  11. Development of a method to extract and purify target compounds from medicinal plants in a single step: online hyphenation of expanded bed adsorption chromatography and countercurrent chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Min; Ito, Yoichiro; Zhang, Hongyang; Wang, Yuerong; Guo, Xin; Hu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Pure compounds extracted and purified from natural sources are crucial to lead discovery and drug screening. This study presents a novel two-dimensional hyphenation of expanded bed adsorption chromatography (EBAC) and high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) for extraction and purification of target compounds from medicinal plants in a single step. The EBAC and HSCCC were hyphenated via a six-port injection valve as an interface. Fractionation of ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza and Rhizoma coptidis was performed on the hyphenated system to verify its efficacy. An amount each of 52.9 mg of salvianolic acid B and 2.1 mg of rosmarinic acid was obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza by the two-dimensional system in a single step. The purities of the targets were over 96% of salvianolic acid B and 74% of rosmarinic acid. An amount each of 4.6 mg of coptisine and 4.1 mg of berberine was obtained from Rhizoma coptidis each with 98% and 82% purity, respectively. The processing time was nearly 50% that of the multi-step method. These results indicate that the present method is a rapid and green way to harvest targets from medicinal plants in a single step. PMID:24588208

  12. Lipid extracted algae as a source for protein and reduced sugar: a step closer to the biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Faiz Ahmad; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Rawat, Ismail; Guldhe, Abhishek; Bux, Faizal

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using lipid extracted algae (LEA) as a source for protein and reduced sugar, and the effects of various procedural treatments on their yields. LEA provided comparable yields of protein and reduced sugars to those from total algae. Oven drying provided highest yields of all products followed by freeze drying, while sun drying significantly lowered their yields. Effective cell disruption by microwave and autoclave increased the lipid yields from algae, but resulted in increased loss of other compounds with lipid extracting solvents lowering their yields during sequential extraction. Relatively inefficient cell disruption by ultrasonication and osmotic shock lowered the amount of cell protein lost to the lipid extracting solvents. These results highlight the complexity of concurrent extraction of all value added products from algae, and the need for proper selection of the processes to achieve the objectives of integrated biorefinery. PMID:25579230

  13. Validating DNA barcodes: A non-destructive extraction protocol enables simultaneous vouchering of DNA and morphological vouchers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morphology-based keys support accurate identification of many taxa. However, identification can be difficult for taxa that are not well studied, very small, members of cryptic species complexes, or represented by immature stages. For such cases, DNA barcodes may provide diagnostic characters. Ecolog...

  14. Comparison of five commercial DNA extraction kits for the recovery of Francisella tularensis DNA from spiked soil samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris A. Whitehouse; Hannah E. Hottel

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia and is thought to be maintained in the environment principally by various terrestrial and aquatic vertebrate animals. The organism is known to persist in water or mud for long periods of time and Francisella-specific DNA has been identified from water and soil. To gain a better understanding of the

  15. Single-step quantitation of DNA in microchip electrophoresis with linear imaging UV detection and fluorescence detection through comigration with a digest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Jabasini, Mohammad; Zhu, Bingmei; Ying, Ling; Cui, Xuezhi; Arai, Akihiro; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate a convenient single-step quantitation technique for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products based on microchip capillary electrophoresis (micro-CE)/UV or fluorescence detection. PCR products of polymorphisms on the human Y-chromosome related to spermatogenic failure did not need purification. They were premixed and comigrated with a DNA digest whose concentration was known. Hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) dissolved in 5x Tris-borate-EDTA (5x TBE, pH 8.3) was used as a separation matrix in a linear polyacrylamide-coated quartz microchip, while mixed poly(ethyl oxides) (PEOs) of different molar-masses dissolved in 1 x TBE (pH 8.3) containing 1 ng/microl ethidium bromide was used as a separation matrix in an uncoated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchip. Elution profiles were monitored under either real-time linear imaging UV detection in the snapshot mode where the total separation time is fixed, or light-emitting diode (LED) confocal fluorescence detection in the finishline mode where solutes migrate over the same separation length. It is found that, in both modes, a linear relation exists between the peak areas (A) and the multiplication of the digest concentrations (C) and the fragment sizes (L) in a DNA restrictive digest. Using the comigration electropherogram of a single-step experiment, the concentrations of PCR products were directly determined using the A versus LC linear relationship. The sole condition to obey is that the chosen digest has different fragment sizes with the PCR products of interest. This condition is easy to obey, because micro-CE owns high separation ability, and many digests are commercially available. The recovery of the technique was between 98 and 105%. The R.S.D. for chip-to-chip concentration measurements was less than 6.0% (n = 6). Hence, the technique was accurate and reliable for DNA assays. PMID:15532567

  16. A comparison of four DNA extraction methods for the detection of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from two species of citrus using PCR and dot-blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Anthony Johnson, A M; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2008-08-01

    Nucleic acid preparations extracted using four procedures were assessed to determine the suitability of the procedure for PCR-based and DNA dot-blot-based detection of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV) from two citrus species, acid lime and pummelo. It was found that the success of PCR detection depended upon the procedure of DNA extraction whereas the dot-blot detection was successful with all extraction methods examined. CMBV DNA sequences amplified from two citrus species indicated high nucleotide sequence identity to the sequences reported previously from sweet orange. These results will help in choosing the correct DNA extraction procedure to be followed for efficient virus screening of citrus propagules. PMID:18582956

  17. Influence of DNA Extraction Method, 16S rRNA Targeted Hypervariable Regions, and Sample Origin on Microbial Diversity Detected by 454 Pyrosequencing in Marine Chemosynthetic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cruaud, Perrine; Vigneron, Adrien; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Ciron, Pierre Emmanuel; Godfroy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) opens up exciting possibilities for improving our knowledge of environmental microbial diversity, allowing rapid and cost-effective identification of both cultivated and uncultivated microorganisms. However, library preparation, sequencing, and analysis of the results can provide inaccurate representations of the studied community compositions. Therefore, all these steps need to be taken into account carefully. Here we evaluated the effects of DNA extraction methods, targeted 16S rRNA hypervariable regions, and sample origins on the diverse microbes detected by 454 pyrosequencing in marine cold seep and hydrothermal vent sediments. To assign the reads with enough taxonomic precision, we built a database with about 2,500 sequences from Archaea and Bacteria from deep-sea marine sediments, affiliated according to reference publications in the field. Thanks to statistical and diversity analyses as well as inference of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) networks, we show that (i) while DNA extraction methods do not seem to affect the results for some samples, they can lead to dramatic changes for others; and (ii) the choice of amplification and sequencing primers also considerably affects the microbial community detected in the samples. Thereby, very different proportions of pyrosequencing reads were obtained for some microbial lineages, such as the archaeal ANME-1, ANME-2c, and MBG-D and deltaproteobacterial subgroups. This work clearly indicates that the results from sequencing-based analyses, such as pyrosequencing, should be interpreted very carefully. Therefore, the combination of NGS with complementary approaches, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH or quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), would be desirable to gain a more comprehensive picture of environmental microbial communities. PMID:24837380

  18. Archived Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Blocks: A Valuable Underexploited Resource for Extraction of DNA, RNA, and Protein

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Miral S.; McGarvey, Diane; LiVolsi, Virginia A.; Baloch, Zubair W.

    2013-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material presents a readily available resource in the study of various biomarkers. There has been interest in whether the storage period has significant effect on the extracted macromolecules. Thus, in this study, we investigated if the storage period had an effect on the quantity/quality of the extracted nucleic acids and proteins. We systematically examined the quality/quantity of genomic DNA, total RNA, and total protein in the FFPE blocks of malignant tumors of lung, thyroid, and salivary gland that had been stored over several years. We show that there is no significant difference between macromolecules extracted from blocks stored over 11–12 years, 5–7 years, or 1–2 years in comparison to the current year blocks. PMID:24845430

  19. Short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping of keratinised hair Part 2. An optimised genomic DNA extraction procedure reveals donor dependence of STR profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis McNevin; Linzi Wilson-Wilde; James Robertson; Jennelle Kyd; Chris Lennard

    2005-01-01

    A feasibility study of short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping of telogen phase hairs in particular, and hair shaft in general, is presented. A number of extraction procedures in common use were investigated and the quantities of nuclear DNA (nuDNA) delivered were quantified via a real-time PCR assay. The extracts were subjected to two variations on AmpF?STR® Profiler Plus™ PCR amplification

  20. A comparison of four DNA extraction methods for the detection of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from two species of citrus using PCR and dot-blot hybridization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Basanta K. Borah; A. M. Anthony Johnson; D. V. R. Sai Gopal; Indranil Dasgupta

    2008-01-01

    Nucleic acid preparations extracted using four procedures were assessed to determine the suitability of the procedure for PCR-based and DNA dot-blot-based detection of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV) from two citrus species, acid lime and pummelo. It was found that the success of PCR detection depended upon the procedure of DNA extraction whereas the dot-blot detection was successful with

  1. Successful isolation and PCR amplification of DNA from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) herbal dietary supplement standard reference material powders and extracts

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, Matthew T.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-four herbal dietary supplement powder and extract reference standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were investigated using three different commercially available DNA extraction kits to evaluate DNA availability for downstream nucleotide-based applications. The material included samples of Camellia, Citrus, Ephedra, Ginkgo, Hypericum, Serenoa, and Vaccinium. Protocols from Qiagen, MoBio, and Phytopure were used to isolate and purify DNA from the NIST standards. The resulting DNA concentration was quantified using SYBR Green fluorometry. Each of the twenty-four samples yielded DNA, though the concentration of DNA from each approach was notably different. The Phytopure method consistently yielded more DNA. The average yield ratio was 22:3:1 (ng/?L; Phytopure:Qiagen:MoBio). Amplification of the Internal Transcribed Spacer II region using PCR was ultimately successful in twenty-two of the twenty-four samples. Direct sequencing chromatograms of the amplified material suggested most of the samples were comprised of mixtures. However, the sequencing chromatograms of twelve of the twenty-four samples were sufficient to confirm the identity of the target material. The successful extraction, amplification, and sequencing of DNA from these herbal dietary supplement extracts and powders supports a continued effort to explore nucleotide sequence-based tools for the authentication and identification of plants in dietary supplements. PMID:19844865

  2. Evaluation of novel carbon nano-tube particles in the bacterial and viral DNA and RNA extraction from the clinical samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nguyen KC; Vo DXA; Hoang HN; Ho LTT; Pham HV

    2010-01-01

    Molecular techniques have become the most im- portant methods of detecting bacterial and viral pathogens. However, current genomic extraction methods are currently limited in term of automation. In this study, carbon nano-tube was used as the vector to trap DNA and RNA molecules. The capability of carbon nano-tube to trap DNA and RNA was evaluated using samples (TB and HBV

  3. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods for Use in Combination with SYBR Green I Real-Time PCR To Detect Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis in Poultry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dario De Medici; Luciana Croci; Elisabetta Delibato; Simona Di Pasquale; Emma Filetici; Laura Toti

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, reproducible, and robust method for detecting Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in poultry samples. First, for the extraction and purification of DNA from the preenrichment culture, four methods (boiling, alkaline lysis, Nucleospin, and Dynabeads DNA Direct System I) were compared. The most effective method was then combined with a real-time PCR

  4. A routine method of DNA-extraction from extremely small metazoans, e.g. single rotifer specimens for RAPD-PCR analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Leutbecher

    2000-01-01

    A simple and efficient method has been developed for isolating genomic DNA from single specimens of extremely small metazoan animals, e.g. rotifers (Rotifera: Monogononta). The amount and quality of the extracted DNA allows the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Polymerase Chain Reaction (RAPD-PCR) to be employed with up to three random primers per specimen. Reproducibility of RAPD-fingerprints has been checked and

  5. Repair kinetics of acrolein– and (E)-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal–derived DNA adducts in human colon cell extracts

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Sujata; Dyba, Marcin; Pan, Jishen; Roy, Rabindra; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2014-01-01

    ?-3 and ?-6 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play a role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. Upon oxidation, PUFAs generate ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes or enals, such as acrolein (Acr) and (E)-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), which can form cyclic adducts of deoxyguanosine (Acr-dG and HNE-dG, respectively) in DNA. Both Acr-dG and HNE-dG adducts have been detected in human and animal tissues and are potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic. In vivo levels of Acr-dG in DNA are at least two orders of magnitude higher than those of HNE-dG. In addition to the facile reaction with Acr, the higher levels of Acr-dG than HNE-dG in vivo may be due to a lower rate of repair. Previous studies have shown that HNE-dG adducts are repaired by the NER pathway (Choudhury et al., Biochemistry 43 (2004) 7514–7521). We hypothesize that Acr-dG adducts are repaired at a slower rate than HNE-dG and that HNE-dG in DNA may influence the repair of Acr-dG. In this study, using a DNA repair synthesis assay and a LC-MS/MS method, we showed that Acr-dG in a plasmid DNA is repaired by NER proteins, but it is repaired at a much slower rate than HNE-dG in human colon cell extracts, and the slow repair of Acr-dG is likely due to poor recognition/excision of the lesions in DNA. Furthermore, using a plasmid DNA containing both adducts we found the repair of Acr-dG is significantly inhibited by HNE-dG, however, the repair of HNE-dG is not much affected by Acr-dG. This study demonstrates that the NER repair efficiencies of the two major structurally-related in vivo cyclic DNA adducts from lipid oxidation vary greatly. More importantly, the repair of Acr-dG can be significantly retarded by the presence of HNE-dG in DNA. Therefore, this study provides a mechanistic explanation for the higher levels of Acr-dG than HNE-dG observed in tissue DNA. PMID:24113140

  6. Analysis of plasticizers in poly(vinyl chloride) medical devices for infusion and artificial nutrition: comparison and optimization of the extraction procedures, a pre-migration test step.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Lise; Cueff, Régis; Bourdeaux, Daniel; Breysse, Colette; Sautou, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Medical devices (MDs) for infusion and enteral and parenteral nutrition are essentially made of plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The first step in assessing patient exposure to these plasticizers, as well as ensuring that the MDs are free from di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), consists of identifying and quantifying the plasticizers present and, consequently, determining which ones are likely to migrate into the patient's body. We compared three different extraction methods using 0.1 g of plasticized PVC: Soxhlet extraction in diethyl ether and ethyl acetate, polymer dissolution, and room temperature extraction in different solvents. It was found that simple room temperature chloroform extraction under optimized conditions (30 min, 50 mL) gave the best separation of plasticizers from the PVC matrix, with extraction yields ranging from 92 to 100% for all plasticizers. This result was confirmed by supplemented Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) and gravimetric analyses. The technique was used on eight marketed medical devices and showed that they contained different amounts of plasticizers, ranging from 25 to 36% of the PVC weight. These yields, associated with the individual physicochemical properties of each plasticizer, highlight the need for further migration studies. PMID:25577357

  7. Sample preparation for avian and porcine influenza virus cDNA amplification simplified: Boiling vs. conventional RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Sasan R; Starick, Elke; Ziller, Mario; Harder, Timm C; Unger, Hermann; Hamilton, Keith; Globig, Anja

    2015-09-01

    RNA extraction and purification is a fundamental step that allows for highly sensitive amplification of specific RNA targets in PCR applications. However, commercial extraction kits that are broadly used because of their robustness and high yield of purified RNA are expensive and labor-intensive. In this study, boiling in distilled water or a commercial lysis buffer of different sample matrices containing avian or porcine influenza viruses was tested as an alternative. Real-time PCR (RTqPCR) for nucleoprotein gene fragment was used as read out. Results were compared with freshly extracted RNA by use of a commercial extraction kit. Different batches of virus containing materials, including diluted virus positive allantoic fluid or cell culture supernatant, and avian faecal, cloacal or oropharyngeal swab samples were used in this study. Simple boiling of samples without any additional purification steps can be used as an alternative RNA preparation method to detect influenza A virus nucleoprotein RNA in oropharyngeal swab samples, allantoic fluid or cell-culture supernatant. The boiling method is not applicable for sample matrices containing faecal material. PMID:25929989

  8. Extraction of nuclear DNA from rhinoceros horn and characterization of DNA profiling systems for white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros.

    PubMed

    Harper, Cindy K; Vermeulen, Gerhard J; Clarke, Amy B; de Wet, Jacobus I; Guthrie, Alan J

    2013-07-01

    Rhinoceros horn is now worth more, per unit weight, than gold, diamonds, or cocaine. Rhinoceros horn has been used in traditional Asian medicine as a presumed cure for a wide range of ailments. Rhinoceros poaching in South Africa has, on average, more than doubled each year over the past 5 years with the rapid economic growth in east and southeast Asia being assumed to be the primary factor driving the increased demand for horn. Here we report on the characterization of methods for genomic DNA extraction from rhinoceros horn and on DNA profiling systems for white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros. The DNA profiling system described includes 22 short tandem repeat (STR), or microsatellite, markers and a gender marker (ZF1), which have been used previously in various studies on rhinoceros. Using a ? value of 0.1, a conservative estimate of random match probability in 5 white rhinoceros ranged from 1:7.3x10(6) to 1:3.0x10(8). Given that the total population of white rhinoceros is approximately 20,000 such random match probabilities indicate that the genotyping system described provides data which can be used for evidentiary purposes. Furthermore, the methods are appropriate for use in investigations involving trace amounts of rhinoceros horn and the matching of profiles obtained from seized rhinoceros horn with material collected from live animals or poached carcasses. PMID:23768315

  9. Extraction and Analysis of Human Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA from Electron Beam Irradiated Envelopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela G. Withrow; Jan Sikorsky; J. C. Upshaw Downs; Terry Fenger

    The United States Postal Service is considering methods such as electron beam irradiation to neutralize biological agents sent through the mail. While this is proven to reduce\\/eliminate pathogenic organisms, it may also degrade human genomic DNA and ther efore hinder the ability to garner forensically informative genetic profiles. To determine the effects of electron beam irradiation on DNA typin g,

  10. A rapid and easy method for the DNA extraction from Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    DNA isolation from C. neoformans is difficult due to a thick and resistant capsule. We have optimized a new and rapid DNA isolation method for Cryptococcus using a short urea treatment followed by a rapid method using a chelex resin suspension. This procedure is simpler than previously reported methods. PMID:21777412

  11. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction-based Assay for Estimating DNA Yield Extracted from Domestic Cat Specimens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn Menotti-Raymond; Victor David; Leslie Wachter; Naoya Yuhki; Stephen J. O'Brien

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay has been developed for the quantification of genomic DNA ex- tracted from domestic cat samples. The assay, which targets highly repetitive genomic short interspersed nuclear ele- ments (SINE), can be performed rapidly and is highly sensitive, detecting as little as 10 fg of feline genomic DNA. The assay was linear over a 106

  12. Optimization of DNA extraction from a single living ciliate for stable and repetitive PCR amplification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2009-01-01

    Ciliates are undoubtedly one of the most diverse protozoans that play a significant role in ecology. However, molecular examination, based on comparing the DNA sequences, has been done on a limited number of the species. Because most ciliates are uncultivable and their population sizes are often too small, it is usually difficult to obtain sufficient genomic DNA required for PCR

  13. Novel polymeric ionic liquid microspheres with high exchange capacity for fast extraction of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Xing, Ligang; Shu, Yang; Chen, Xuwei; Wang, Jianhua

    2014-07-21

    A novel polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) microsphere, poly(1-vinyl-3-(2-methoxy-2-oxyl ethyl)imidazolium) hexafluorophosphate, is prepared via W/O emulsion polymerization. Rapid ion-exchange between the anionic moieties of PIL and DNA fragments is demonstrated facilitating the exchange equilibrium to be reached within 1 min. The PIL microspheres exhibit a high capacity of 190.7 ?g mg(-1) for DNA adsorption. A fast DNA isolation protocol is thus developed with the PIL microspheres as solid phase adsorbent. It is feasible to facilitate DNA adsorption or stripping from the microspheres by simply regulating the concentration of salt. DNA adsorption is facilitated at low salt concentration, while higher concentration of salt entails DNA recovery from the microspheres. In practice, the retained DNA could be readily recovered with 1.0 mol L(-1) NaCl as stripping reagent, giving rise to a recovery of ca. 80.7%. The PIL microspheres are used for the adsorption/isolation of plasmid DNA from E. coli cell culture, demonstrating a superior adsorption performance with respect to that achieved by a commercial Plasmid Miniprep Kit. PMID:25000859

  14. Small variations in crucial steps of TUNEL assay coupled to flow cytometry greatly affect measures of sperm DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Monica; Tamburrino, Lara; Tocci, Valentina; Costantino, Antonietta; Marchiani, Sara; Giachini, Claudia; Laface, Ilaria; Krausz, Csilla; Meriggiola, Maria Cristina; Forti, Gianni; Baldi, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    Techniques for assessing sperm DNA damage are numerous and various. There are 2 main types of assay: direct and indirect. The former directly detects the amount of sperm DNA damage, whereas the latter reveals the effects of an exogenous insult on sperm chromatin. In addition, even considering the same type of technique, different strategies to reveal or quantify sperm DNA damage, or both, are used. Finally, these techniques, except for sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), lack standardized protocols to which all users can adhere to minimize interlaboratory variations. In this study, we investigated the effects of some of the many ways the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated fluorescein-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay is performed when measuring sperm DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry. In addition, by using an established procedure, we determined the precision of the technique by calculating intra-assay coefficients of variation (CVs). We found that concentration of the fixative, the time of storage of fixed samples, the fluorochrome used to label DNA breaks, and the method used to analyze flow cytometric data all greatly affect the measures of sperm DNA fragmentation. In particular, we found that treatment with paraformaldehyde produced additional damage in most samples, suggesting that TUNEL also can be considered an indirect assay when performed in semen samples treated with such a fixative reagent. We also showed that 2 different methods used to analyze data yielded results that, albeit correlating, were different and associated differently to semen quality. On the contrary, the TUNEL assay, as measured here, showed low intraassay CVs, resulting in a quite precise technique when performed in established conditions. PMID:19959824

  15. Analysis of mutations induced by replication of UV-damaged plasmid DNA in HeLa cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, M.P.; El-Saleh, S.; Dixon, K. [Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We have used an SV40-based shuttle vector, pZ189, to investigate the capacity of HeLa cell extracts to reproduce the in vivo process of mutation fixation. We showed previously that when UV-irradiated pZ189 is replicated in these extracts, bypass of UV photoproducts occurs, resulting in base substitution mutations in the supF gene of the vector. Here we report the DNA sequence characterization of a collection of 60 of these UV-induced mutants. Most of the mutations observed are single or tandem double base substitutions at dipyrimidine sites; of these, approximately 90% are G:C{r_arrow}A:T transitions. Mutations are observed predominantly at a few sites, in particular at positions 155 and 156 in the supF sequence. No dramatic differences in the mutation spectrum were observed when the orientation of the supF gene was reversed with respect to the SV40 origin of replication, suggesting that mutation fixation occurs similarly on both the leading and the lagging strands for DNA replication. Generally, the mutational hot spots observed when UV-irradiated pZ189 was passaged in human or monkey cells in culture. Thus, it appears that the replication and mutagenesis of UV-damaged templates in HeLa cell extracts accurately reflects these processes in the intact cell. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. On-Site DNA Extraction and Real-Time PCR for Detection of Phytophthora ramorum in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, J. A.; Boonham, N.; Hughes, K. J. D.; Griffin, R. L.; Barker, I.

    2005-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum is a recently described pathogen causing oak mortality (sudden oak death) in forests in coastal areas of California and southern Oregon and dieback and leaf blight in a range of tree, shrub, and herbaceous species in the United States and Europe. Due to the threat posed by this organism, stringent quarantine regulations are in place, which restrict the movement of a number of hosts. Fast and accurate diagnostic tests are required in order to characterize the distribution of P. ramorum, prevent its introduction into pathogen-free areas, and minimize its spread within affected areas. However, sending samples to a laboratory for testing can cause a substantial delay between sampling and diagnosis. A rapid and simple DNA extraction method was developed for use at the point of sampling and used to extract DNAs from symptomatic foliage and stems in the field. A sensitive and specific single-round real-time PCR (TaqMan) assay for P. ramorum was performed using a portable real-time PCR platform (Cepheid SmartCycler II), and a cost-effective method for stabilizing PCR reagents was developed to allow their storage and transportation at room temperature. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a method for DNA extraction and molecular testing for a plant pathogen carried out entirely in the field, independent of any laboratory facilities. PMID:16269700

  17. One step green synthesis of silver nano/microparticles using extracts of Trachyspermum ammi and Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Nalini, S P Kamala; Prakash, N Udaya; Madhankumar, D

    2012-06-01

    A novel biosynthesis route for silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) was attempted in this present investigation using aqueous extracts of Trachyspermum ammi and Papaver somniferum. The main constituents in T. ammi are thymol, p-cymene and ?-terpinene, while P. somniferum consists of morphine and codeine. The essential oil in T. ammi was found to be a good reducing agent than the alkaloids present in P. somniferum for the formation of biocompatible Ag-NPs. The effectiveness of both the extracts was investigated by using same dosage of extract in the synthesis of silver nanoparticle. The results showed that for the same dosage of extracts the T. ammi synthesized various size triangular shaped nanoparticles measuring from 87 nm, to a fewer nanoparticles having a size of 998 nm diagonally. P. somniferum resulted in almost spherical shaped particle ranging in size between 3.2 and 7.6 ?m diagonally. Future research based on synthesis of size specific nanoparticle based on the optimization of reaction condition would be an interesting area. PMID:22348989

  18. DNA sequencing by delayed extraction-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Roskey, M T; Juhasz, P; Smirnov, I P; Takach, E J; Martin, S A; Haff, L A

    1996-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight mass spectrometry was used to detect and order DNA fragments generated by Sanger dideoxy cycle sequencing. This was accomplished by improving the sensitivity and resolution of the MALDI method using a delayed ion extraction technique (DE-MALDI). The cycle sequencing chemistry was optimized to produce as much as 100 fmol of each specific dideoxy terminated fragment, generated from extension of a 13-base primer annealed on 40- and 50-base templates. Analysis of the resultant sequencing mixture by DE-MALDI identified the appropriate termination products. The technique provides a new non-gel-based method to sequence DNA which may ultimately have considerable speed advantages over traditional methodologies. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8643470

  19. Protective Effect of Enzymatic Extracts from Microalgae Against DNA Damage Induced by H 2 O 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rohan Karawita; Mahinda Senevirathne; Yasantha Athukorala; Abu Affan; Young-Jae Lee; Se-Kwon Kim; Joon-Baek Lee; You-Jin Jeon

    2007-01-01

    The enzymatic extracts from seven species of microalgae (Pediastrum duplex, Dactylococcopsis fascicularis, Halochlorococcum porphyrae, Oltmannsiellopsis unicellularis, Achnanthes\\u000a longipes, Navicula sp. and Amphora coffeaeformis) collected from three habitats (freshwater, tidal pool, and coastal benthic) at Jeju Island in Korea were investigated for\\u000a their antioxidant activity. Of the extracts tested, the AMG 300 L (an exo 1, 4-?-d-glucosidase) extract of P. duplex, the

  20. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  1. Controlling DNA compaction with cationic amphiphiles for efficient delivery systems A step forward towards non-viral Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savarala, Sushma

    The synthesis of pyridinium cationic lipids, their counter-ion exchange, and the transfection of lipoplexes consisting of these lipids with firefly luciferase plasmid DNA (6.7 KDa), into lung, prostate and breast cancer cell lines was investigated. The transfection ability of these newly synthesized compounds was found to be twice as high as DOTAP/cholesterol and Lipofectamine TM (two commercially available successful transfection agents). The compaction of the DNA onto silica (SiO2) nanoparticles was also investigated. For this purpose, it was necessary to study the stability and fusion studies of colloidal systems composed of DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), a zwitterionic lipid, and mixtures of DMPC with cationic DMTAP (1,2-dimyristoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane).

  2. USING A COMMERCIAL DNA EXTRACTION KIT TO OBTAIN RNA FROM MATURE RICE KERNELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraction of total RNA from starchy plant material such as common food grains is difficult, and especially so from dry rice (Oryza sativa L.) kernels. Most commercial RNA kits are not suited for starchy materials and traditional RNA extraction procedures leave hazardous organic wastes that have ex...

  3. Development of a Nucleic Acid Extraction Procedure for Simultaneous Recovery of DNA and RNA from Diverse Microbes in Water

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Vincent R.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Gallen, Rachel R.; Ferdinand, Karen L.; Cromeans, Theresa; Vinjé, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Drinking and environmental water samples contain a diverse array of constituents that can interfere with molecular testing techniques, especially when large volumes of water are concentrated to the small volumes needed for effective molecular analysis. In this study, a suite of enteric viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites were seeded into concentrated source water and finished drinking water samples, in order to investigate the relative performance of nucleic acid extraction techniques for molecular testing. Real-time PCR and reverse transcription-PCR crossing threshold (CT) values were used as the metrics for evaluating relative performance. Experimental results were used to develop a guanidinium isothiocyanate-based lysis buffer (UNEX buffer) that enabled effective simultaneous extraction and recovery of DNA and RNA from the suite of study microbes. Procedures for bead beating, nucleic acid purification, and PCR facilitation were also developed and integrated in the protocol. The final lysis buffer and sample preparation procedure was found to be effective for a panel of drinking water and source water concentrates when compared to commercial nucleic acid extraction kits. The UNEX buffer-based extraction protocol enabled PCR detection of six study microbes, in 100 L finished water samples from four drinking water treatment facilities, within three CT values (i.e., within 90% difference) of the reagent-grade water control. The results from this study indicate that this newly formulated lysis buffer and sample preparation procedure can be useful for standardized molecular testing of drinking and environmental waters. PMID:26016775

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the 136 Unique Tetranucleotide Sequences of DNA Oligonucleotides. I. Research Design and Results on d(CpG) Steps

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, David L.; Barreiro, Gabriela; Byun, K. Suzie; Case, David A.; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Dixit, Surjit B.; Giudice, Emmanuel; Lankas, Filip; Lavery, Richard; Maddocks, John H.; Osman, Roman; Seibert, Eleanore; Sklenar, Heinz; Stoll, Gautier; Thayer, Kelly M.; Varnai, Péter; Young, Matthew A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe herein a computationally intensive project aimed at carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations including water and counterions on B-DNA oligomers containing all 136 unique tetranucleotide base sequences. This initiative was undertaken by an international collaborative effort involving nine research groups, the “Ascona B-DNA Consortium” (ABC). Calculations were carried out on the 136 cases imbedded in 39 DNA oligomers with repeating tetranucleotide sequences, capped on both ends by GC pairs and each having a total length of 15 nucleotide pairs. All MD simulations were carried out using a well-defined protocol, the AMBER suite of programs, and the parm94 force field. Phase I of the ABC project involves a total of ?0.6 ?s of simulation for systems containing ?24,000 atoms. The resulting trajectories involve 600,000 coordinate sets and represent ?400 gigabytes of data. In this article, the research design, details of the simulation protocol, informatics issues, and the organization of the results into a web-accessible database are described. Preliminary results from 15-ns MD trajectories are presented for the d(CpG) step in its 10 unique sequence contexts, and issues of stability and convergence, the extent of quasiergodic problems, and the possibility of long-lived conformational substates are discussed. PMID:15326025

  5. Evaluation of commercial kits for dual extraction of DNA and RNA from human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Schweighardt, Andrew J; Tate, Courtney M; Scott, Kristina A; Harper, Kathryn A; Robertson, James M

    2015-01-01

    STR typing of DNA evidence can identify the donor with a high power of discrimination but cannot identify the tissue origin of a body-fluid stain. Using RNA to attribute a crime scene stain to a particular tissue may aid in reconstruction efforts. With blood from 10 donors, four DNA and RNA coextraction kits were evaluated by measuring yields and STR and mRNA profiles. T tests indicated some significant differences in kit performance. The Zymo Research ZR-Duet(™) kit performed best based on average DNA (41.4 ng) and mRNA (4.07 ng) yields and was the only kit to provide complete DNA/RNA profiles for all samples. The consistency of this kit was challenged by data from additional blood and saliva donors. Further testing is advised before a superior kit is unequivocally chosen. Stand-alone DNA or RNA purification generally offers higher yield, but coextraction may still allow successful STR profiling and tissue source identification. PMID:25284026

  6. Comparison of extractable DNA from bone following six-month exposure to outdoor conditions, garden loam, mold contamination or room storage.

    PubMed

    Startari, Loïc; Benoit, Jean-Noël; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Carle, Georges; Pognonec, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Femur bone sections from a single donor were exposed for six months to (i) outdoor conditions (exposure to sun, rain, etc.); (ii) water-vapour saturated environment favourable to mould proliferation and (iii) humic-garden soil. Following these treatments, DNA was extracted and yields were compared with that of a control bone fragment kept under optimal laboratory storage conditions. Our results demonstrate that both mould and soil are very detrimental to bone DNA conservation since more than 97% of the bone DNA was lost in these samples as compared with the control condition. Outdoor exposure gives an intermediate result with 30% of the DNA still present in the bone. Thus, environments favourable to microorganisms proliferation appear detrimental to bone DNA conservation and are a bad prognostic should bone remains be used for genetic identification purpose. Comparatively, open-air exposure is much more favourable to bone DNA analysis. PMID:22941520

  7. One-step green synthesis and characterization of leaf extract-mediated biocompatible silver and gold nanoparticles from Memecylon umbellatum

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kantha D; Annamalai, Sathesh Kumar; Hari, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-01-01

    In this experiment, green-synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles were produced rapidly by treating silver and gold ions with an extract of Memecylon umbellatum leaf. The reaction process was simple and easy to handle, and was monitored using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The effect of the phytochemicals present in M. umbellatum, including saponins, phenolic compounds, phytosterols, and quinones, on formation of stable silver and gold nanoparticles was investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology and crystalline phase of the nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that the saponins, phytosterols, and phenolic compounds present in the plant extract play a major role in formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in their respective ions in solution. The characteristics of the nanoparticles formed suggest application of silver and gold nanoparticles as chemical sensors in the future. Given the simple and eco-friendly approach for synthesis, these nanoparticles could easily be commercialized for large-scale production. PMID:23569372

  8. Antioxidant and DNA damage protective properties of anthocyanin-rich extracts from Hibiscus and Ocimum: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Biswatrish; Kumar, Dhananjay; Sasmal, Dinakar; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanin extracts (AEs) from Ocimum tenuiflorum (leaf), Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (petal) and Hibiscus sabdariffa (calyx) were investigated and compared for in vitro antioxidant activity and DNA damage protective property. Total phenolic content (TPC) and total anthocyanin content (TAC) of the AEs were determined and the major anthocyanins were characterised. In vitro antioxidant activities were assessed by ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity, 2-deoxy-D-ribose degradation assay and lipid peroxidation assay. The protective property of the AEs was also examined against oxidative DNA damage by H2O2 and UV using pUC19 plasmid. All the AEs particularly those from O. tenuiflorum demonstrated efficient antioxidant activity and protected DNA from damage. Strong correlation between antioxidant capacity and TPC and TAC was observed. Significant correlation between antioxidant capacity and TPC and TAC ascertained that phenolics and anthocyanins were the major contributors of antioxidant activity. PMID:24730725

  9. UV-induced DNA damage is an intermediate step in UV-induced expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, collagenase, c-fos, and metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, B.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Steffen, A.; Litfin, M.; Herrlich, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-11-01

    UV irradiation of human and murine cells enhances the transcription of several genes. Here we report on the primary target of relevant UV absorption, on pathways leading to gene activation, and on the elements receiving the UV-induced signal in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat, in the gene coding for collagenase, and in the cellular oncogene fos. In order to induce the expression of genes, UV radiation needs to be absorbed by DNA and to cause DNA damage of the kind that cannot be repaired by cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum group A. UV-induced activation of the three genes is mediated by the major enhancer elements (located between nucleotide positions -105 and -79 of HIV-1, between positions -72 and -65 of the collagenase gene, and between positions -320 and -299 of fos). These elements share no apparent sequence motif and bind different trans-acting proteins; a member of the NF kappa B family binds to the HIV-1 enhancer, the heterodimer of Jun and Fos (AP-1) binds to the collagenase enhancer, and the serum response factors p67 and p62 bind to fos. DNA-binding activities of the factors recognizing the HIV-1 and collagenase enhancers are augmented in extracts from UV-treated cells. The increase in activity is due to posttranslational modification. While AP-1 resides in the nucleus and must be modulated there, NF kappa B is activated in the cytoplasm, indicating the existence of a cytoplasmic signal transduction pathway triggered by UV-induced DNA damage. In addition to activation, new synthesis of AP-1 is induced by UV radiation.

  10. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tiberius Dicu; Ion D. Postescu; Vasile Foris; Ioana Brie; Eva Fischer-Fodor; Valentin Cernea; Mircea Moldovan; Constantin Cosma

    2009-01-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50\\/50, v\\/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare-BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu

  11. An optimized and low-cost FPGA-based DNA sequence alignment--a step towards personal genomics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hurmat Ali; Hasan, Laiq; Ahmad, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequence alignment is a cardinal process in computational biology but also is much expensive computationally when performing through traditional computational platforms like CPU. Of many off the shelf platforms explored for speeding up the computation process, FPGA stands as the best candidate due to its performance per dollar spent and performance per watt. These two advantages make FPGA as the most appropriate choice for realizing the aim of personal genomics. The previous implementation of DNA sequence alignment did not take into consideration the price of the device on which optimization was performed. This paper presents optimization over previous FPGA implementation that increases the overall speed-up achieved as well as the price incurred by the platform that was optimized. The optimizations are (1) The array of processing elements is made to run on change in input value and not on clock, so eliminating the need for tight clock synchronization, (2) the implementation is unrestrained by the size of the sequences to be aligned, (3) the waiting time required for the sequences to load to FPGA is reduced to the minimum possible and (4) an efficient method is devised to store the output matrix that make possible to save the diagonal elements to be used in next pass, in parallel with the computation of output matrix. Implemented on Spartan3 FPGA, this implementation achieved 20 times performance improvement in terms of CUPS over GPP implementation. PMID:24110283

  12. An improved method of DNA extraction from Diaphorina citri for HLB detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating disease of citrus that is transmitted by two citrus psyllids. Diaphorina citri transmits Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) and Ca. L. americanus (Lam), and Trioza erytreae transmits Ca. L. africanus (Laf). Ca. Liberibacter species can be detected in DNA ex...

  13. DNA damage in human breast milk cells and its induction by 'early' and 'late' milk extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis L. Martin; Kathleen J. Cole; David Harvey; Gillian Weaver; J. Andrew Williams; Barbara C. Millar; David H. Phillips; Philip L. Grover

    Environmental and dietary factors are thought to be sig- ionizing radiation (4). It has been postulated that lipophilic nificant in breast cancer aetiology. The alkaline single-cell carcinogens could be sequestered in the adipose tissue of the gel electrophoresis ('Comet') assay was used to examine human breast (5), thus exposing mammary epithelial cells, breast milk cells for DNA damage and to

  14. Technical Note: Whole-Genome Amplification of DNA Extracted from Cattle Semen Samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Hawken; J. A. L. Cavanagh; J. R. S. Meadows; M. S. Khatkar; Y. Husaini; K. R. Zenger; S. McClintock; A. E. McClintock; H. W. Raadsma

    2006-01-01

    The bovine genome sequence project and the discov- ery of many thousands of bovine single nucleotide poly- morphisms has opened the door for large-scale genotyp- ing studies to identify genes that contribute to economi- cally important traits with relevance to the beef and dairy industries. Large amounts of DNA will be re- quired for these research projects. This study reports

  15. Non-toxic and efficient DNA extractions for soybean leaf and seed chips for high-throughput and large-scale genotyping.

    PubMed

    King, Zachary; Serrano, Jonathan; Roger Boerma, H; Li, Zenglu

    2014-09-01

    In applied soybean (Glycine max L.) breeding programs, marker-assisted selection has become a necessity to select value-added quantitative trait loci. The goal of this work was to improve marker-assisted selection workflow by developing a reliable, inexpensive, high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for soybean seed and leaf samples that does not generate hazardous waste. The DNA extraction protocol developed allows for the leverage of robust SNP genotyping platforms such as the Simple Probe Assay and KASPar v4.0 SNP Genotyping System to genotype thousands of seeds or leaves non-destructively in a single day with a 95 % success rate. This methodology makes it possible to run up to 150 SNP markers on the DNA extracted from a single seed chip or leaf sample. PMID:24863292

  16. Total inhibition of (1)O2-induced oxidative damage to guanine bases of DNA/RNA by turmeric extracts.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Prakash C; Li, Hsin H; Merchant, Monique; Keane, Thomas C

    2014-09-26

    The guanine base of nucleic acids is known to be very reactive towards degradation by (1)O2-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative reactions of DNA are linked to many human diseases including cancer. Among the various forms of reactive O2 species (OH, (1)O2 or O2(-)), the oxidative stress caused by (1)O2 is of particular physiologic importance because of its selectively long life in aqueous medium and its ability to diffuse through a cell membrane. In this study we investigated the degradation of a model compound guanosine (Guo) by (1)O2, which was generated by riboflavin-induced photosensitization and by molybdate ion catalyzed disproportionation of H2O2. We observed the remarkable ability of an aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) as an extraordinary scavenger of (1)O2 to completely inhibit the degradation of Guo. The alcoholic extracts were more effective in their antioxidant activity than the corresponding water extract. This naturally occurring antioxidant offers a most economical supplement to protect biologically significant molecules from the oxidative stress induced by (1)O2. PMID:25181345

  17. Comparison of conservative DNA extraction methods for two Galliformes: grey partridge ( Perdix perdix italica, Hartert 1917) and red-legged partridge ( Alectoris rufa , Linnaeus 1758)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Lucentini; L. Gigliarelli; M. E. Puletti; L. Volpi; F. Panara

    2010-01-01

    Grey partridge and Red-legged partridge are Galliformes needing special conservation strategies. Reintroduction may represent\\u000a conservation solutions solely with the support of an in-depth genetic and ecologic evaluation, particularly of grey partridge,\\u000a of which an Italian subspecies was described. Protocols for conservative DNA isolation are fundamental to study breeders and\\u000a wild samples. For these reasons, two DNA extraction protocols on different

  18. Real-Time PCR Coupled with Automated DNA Extraction and Detection of Galactomannan Antigen in Serum by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Invasive Aspergillosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Costa; Jean-Marc Costa; Christophe Desterke; Françoise Botterel; Catherine Cordonnier; Stéphane Bretagne

    2002-01-01

    To improve the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA), we developed a LightCycler PCR assay targeted to Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus mitochondrial DNA. To avoid contamination, fully automated nucleic acid extraction with the MagNA Pure LC apparatus was used. The linearity of the results was achieved over a 6-log range of input A. fumigatus DNA, from 0.3 ng to 3

  19. Simple DNA Extraction Method for Dried Blood Spots and Comparison of Two PCR Assays for Diagnosis of Vertical Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transmission in Rwanda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Fischer; C. Lejczak; C. Lambert; J. Servais; N. Makombe; J. Rusine; T. Staub; R. Hemmer; F. Schneider; J. C. Schmit; V. Arendt

    2004-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper facilitate the collection, transport, and storage of blood samples for laboratory use. A rapid and simple DNA extraction procedure from DBS was developed and evaluated for the diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in children by an in-house nested-PCR assay on three genome regions and by the Amplicor HIV-1 DNA

  20. Technical Note: A Simple Salting-Out Method for DNA Extraction from Milk Somatic Cells: Investigation into the Goat CSN1S1 Gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. d’Angelo; A. Santillo; A. Sevi; M. Albenzio

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a sensitive, rapid, and toxic solvent- free method to extract DNA from milk somatic cells was implemented for characterization of the goat ?S1- casein gene (CSN1S1). Methods reported for purifica- tionofDNAfrommilkofteninvolveorganicextraction, overnight incubation, or use of expensive commercial kits. The present method was implemented for goat milkandisbasedonasalting-outprotocol.Themethod yielded an amount of DNA suitable for PCR-RFLP without the

  1. Inhibition of DNA replication fork progression and mutagenic potential of 1, N6-ethenoadenine and 8-oxoguanine in human cell extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel H. Tolentino; Tom J. Burke; Suparna Mukhopadhyay; W. Glenn McGregor; Ashis K. Basu

    2007-01-01

    Comparative mutagenesis of 1,N6-ethenoadenine (eA) and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), two endogenous DNA lesions that are also formed by exogenous DNA damaging agents, have been evaluated in HeLa and xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) cell extracts. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the duplex M13mp2SV vector containing these lesions established that there was significant inhibi- tion of replication fork movement past eA, whereas 8-oxoG caused

  2. Oxidative DNA Damage Is Prevented by Extracts of Olive Oil, Hydroxytyrosol, and Other Olive Phenolic Compounds in Human Blood Mononuclear Cells and HL60 Cells1,2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Fabiani; Patrizia Rosignoli; Angelo De Bartolomeo; Raffaela Fuccelli; Maurizio Servili; Gian Francesco Montedoro; Guido Morozzi

    Ouraiminthisstudywastoprovidefurthersupporttothehypothesisthatphenoliccompoundsmayplayanimportantrolein theanticarcinogenicpropertiesofoliveoil.Wemeasuredtheeffectofoliveoilphenolsonhydrogenperoxide(H2O2)-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL60) using single- cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Hydroxytyrosol (3,4-dyhydroxyphenyl-ethanol (3,4-DHPEA)) and a complex mixture of phenols extracted from both virgin olive oil (OO-PE) and olive mill wastewater (WW-PE) reduced the DNA damage at concentrations as low as 1 mmol\\/L when coincubated in the medium

  3. Homology-dependent cutting in trans of DNA in extracts of Escherichia coli: an approach to the enzymology of genetic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Cassuto, E; Mursalim, J; Howard-Flanders, P

    1978-01-01

    An in vitro system is described in which the cutting of crosslinked phiX replicative form (RF) I DNA molecules by the uvr system of Escherichia coli induces the cutting of homologous undamaged DNA during incubation with crude extracts of thermally induced E. coli (lambda precA+) lysogens. This reaction, which has also been observed in intact E. coli lysogens infected with lambda phages, is dependent on the presence of functional recA+ and uvrB+ gene products. Extracts from thermally induced lambda precA+ lysogens of E. coli proved to be substantially more active than extracts from nonlysogenic cells of the same strain. The results provide preliminary evidence for an endonuclease activity that cuts intact superhelical DNA in response to interaction with homologus damaged DNA. In the present paper, we describe an in vitro system in which both the endonucleolytic cutting of DNA containing crosslinks and the induced cutting of undamaged DNA can be studied without purification of the participating enzymes. Although the information obtained is fragmentary and often puzzling, we feel that this system can contribute to an understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in repair and recombination. PMID:345273

  4. Culture-independent analysis of the microbial composition of the African traditional fermented foods poto poto and dégué by using three different DNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Abriouel, Hikmate; Ben Omar, Nabil; López, Rosario Lucas; Martínez-Cañamero, Madgalena; Keleke, Simon; Gálvez, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    The microbial composition of the traditional fermented foods poto poto (a maize dough from the Rep. of Congo) and dégué (a millet dough from Burkina Faso) was studied by a culture-independent approach using TTGE to separate the amplified target V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from total microbial community, followed by DNA sequencing and homology search. Three different extraction methods were used. Guanidium thiocyanate-based DNA extraction provided better performance regarding purity and DNA yield, allowing the detection of a higher number of DNA bands by TTGE in poto poto. By contrast, all three methods yielded similar results for dégué samples, indicating that the performance of the DNA extraction method largely depends on the food composition. Sequencing of DNA bands from TTGE gels corresponding to poto poto samples revealed the presence of Lactobacillus gasseri, Enterococcus sp., Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum/paraplantarum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus casei. The following bacteria were identified in dégué: L. gasseri, Enterococcus sp., E. coli, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus brevis, and L. casei. PMID:16842876

  5. One-step purification and concentration of DNA in porous membranes for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, S A; Bishop, J D; Lafleur, L; Buser, J R; Lutz, B; Yager, P

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of rapid, user-friendly, point-of-care (POC) diagnostic systems is paving the way for better disease diagnosis and control. Lately, there has been a strong emphasis on developing molecular-based diagnostics due to their potential for greatly increased sensitivity and specificity. One of the most critical steps in developing practical diagnostic systems is the ability to perform sample preparation, especially the purification of nucleic acids (NA), at the POC. As such, we have developed a simple-to-use, inexpensive, and disposable sample preparation system for in-membrane purification and concentration of NAs. This system couples lateral flow in a porous membrane with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide that captures NAs via anion exchange chromatography. The system can also substantially concentrate the NAs. The combination of these capabilities can be used on a wide range of sample types, which are prepared for use in downstream processes, such as qPCR, without further purification. PMID:25989457

  6. Evaluation of four DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus detection by PCR in tissues from experimentally infected cows with the 2308 strain.

    PubMed

    Vejarano, M P; Matrone, M; Keid, L B; Rocha, V C M; Ikuta, C Y; Rodriguez, C A R; Salgado, V R; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Telles, E O; Ferreira Neto, J S

    2013-04-01

    This study compared 4 protocols for DNA extraction from homogenates of 6 different organs of cows infected with the Brucella abortus 2308 strain. The extraction protocols compared were as follows: GT (guanidine isothiocyanate lysis), Boom (GT lysis with the carrying suspension diatomaceous earth), PK (proteinase K lysis), and Santos (lysis by boiling and freezing with liquid nitrogen). Positive and negative gold standard reference groups were generated by classical bacteriological methods. All samples were processed with the 4 DNA extraction protocols and amplified with the B4 and B5 primers. The number of positive samples in the placental cotyledons was higher than that in the other organs. The cumulated results showed that the Santos protocol was more sensitive than the Boom (p=0.003) and GT (p=0.0506) methods and was similar to the PK method (p=0.2969). All of the DNA extraction protocols resulted in false-negative results for PCR. In conclusion, despite the disadvantages of classical bacteriological methods, the best approach for direct diagnosis of B. abortus in organs of infected cows includes the isolation associated with PCR of DNA extracted from the cotyledon by the Santos or PK methods. PMID:23421881

  7. Impact of DNA environment on the intrastrand cross-link lesions: hydrogen atom release as the last step of formation of G[8-5m]T.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José Pedro; Jacquemin, Denis; Dumont, Elise

    2013-12-27

    Oxidative intrastrand cross-links where two nucleobases are covalently tethered form a particularly harmful class of DNA lesions. Their formation follows a radical pathway, as initiated by reactive oxygen species, which often ends with the departure of the hydrogen H8 of guanine to restore a closed-shell adduct. The ease of this abstraction step is investigated here for three systems of increasing complexity, C8-methyleguanine, the guanine-thymine dinucleoside monophosphate (GpT), and GpT embedded in a hexameric DNA sequence. First-principle calculations, combined with semiempirical approaches for the latter system, are performed to determine the energetics of the intermediates and to compare their respective exergonicities, which turned out to significantly depend on the environment. The hydrogen departure path is shown to be strongly favored compared to usual H-abstraction sites for normal guanine, while the impact of the biological environment is evidenced as the H8 departure becomes more difficult when larger structures are considered. A computational assessment of a plausible oxime intermediate is discussed as well. PMID:24313734

  8. Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, A.M. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Santos, A.G. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Natural Principles and Toxicology, Rodovia Araraquara-Jau, km 01, Araraquara (Brazil); Csipak, A.R.; Caliri, C.M.; Silva, I.C. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil); Arbex, M.A. [UNIFESP — Federal University of São Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, São Paulo (Brazil)] [UNIFESP — Federal University of São Paulo, Paulista College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 720, São Paulo (Brazil); Silva, F.S.; Marchi, M.R.R. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Cavalheiro, A.J.; Silva, D.H.S.; Bolzani, V.S. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil)] [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Chemistry Institute, Department of Organic Chemistry, Rua Francisco Degni, S/N, Araraquara (Brazil); Soares, C.P., E-mail: soarescp@hotmail.com [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis, Rua Expedicionários do Brasil, 1621, Araraquara (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract—3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)—or with casearin X—0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW—after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ? We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ? We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ? We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ? We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ? The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

  9. Identification of internal transcribed spacer sequence motifs in truffles: a first step toward their DNA bar coding.

    PubMed

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-08-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (< or = 50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  10. Identification of Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Motifs in Truffles: a First Step toward Their DNA Bar Coding? †

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-01-01

    This work presents DNA sequence motifs from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the nuclear rRNA repeat unit which are useful for the identification of five European and Asiatic truffles (Tuber magnatum, T. melanosporum, T. indicum, T. aestivum, and T. mesentericum). Truffles are edible mycorrhizal ascomycetes that show similar morphological characteristics but that have distinct organoleptic and economic values. A total of 36 out of 46 ITS1 or ITS2 sequence motifs have allowed an accurate in silico distinction of the five truffles to be made (i.e., by pattern matching and/or BLAST analysis on downloaded GenBank sequences and directly against GenBank databases). The motifs considered the intraspecific genetic variability of each species, including rare haplotypes, and assigned their respective species from either the ascocarps or ectomycorrhizas. The data indicate that short ITS1 or ITS2 motifs (?50 bp in size) can be considered promising tools for truffle species identification. A dot blot hybridization analysis of T. magnatum and T. melanosporum compared with other close relatives or distant lineages allowed at least one highly specific motif to be identified for each species. These results were confirmed in a blind test which included new field isolates. The current work has provided a reliable new tool for a truffle oligonucleotide bar code and identification in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:17601808

  11. Online polar two phase countercurrent chromatography×high performance liquid chromatography for preparative isolation of polar polyphenols from tea extract in a single step.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bin; Li, Shu-Qi; Chen, Long-Jiang; Fang, Mei-Juan; Chen, Quan-Cheng; Wu, Zhen; Wu, Yun-Long; Qiu, Ying-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report an on-line two-dimensional system constructed by counter-current chromatography (CCC) coupling with preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (prep-HPLC) for the separation and purification of polar natural products. The CCC was used as the first dimensional isolation column, where an environmental friendly polar two-phase solvent system of isopropanol and 16% sodium chloride aqueous solution (1:1.2, v/v) was introduced for low toxicity and favorable resolution. In addition, by applying the stop-and-go flow technique, effluents pre-fractionated by CCC was further purified by a preparative column packed with octadecyl silane (ODS) as the second dimension. The interface between the two dimensions was comprised of a 6-port switching valve and an electronically controlled 2-position 10-port switching valve connected with two equivalent holding columns. To be highlighted here, this rationally designed interface for the purpose of smooth desalination, absorption and desorption, successfully solved the solvent compatibility problem between the two dimensional separation systems. The present integrated system was successfully applied in a one-step preparative separation and identification of 10 pure compounds from the water extracts of Tieguanyin tea (Chinese oolong tea). In short, all the results demonstrated that the on-line 2D CCC×LC method is an efficient and green approach for harvesting polar targets in a single step, which showed great promise in drug discovery. PMID:26114653

  12. Evaluation of Chlamydophila abortus DNA extraction protocols for polymerase chain reaction diagnosis in paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Nieves; Navarro, José A; Nicolás, Laura; Buendía, Antonio J; Caro, María R; Del Río, Laura; Martínez, Carlos M; Cuello, Francisco; Salinas, Jesús; Gallego, María C

    2007-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has gained increasing importance as a tool for directly demonstrating the presence of Chlamydophila in the placentas of aborted sheep and goats. However, because of the zoonotic potential of the disease, it is advisable to use fixed materials. To evaluate 4 different DNA extraction protocols in paraffin-embedded sections for PCR, previously immunohistochemically diagnosed placental samples from outbreaks of abortions in goats and sheep were used. The samples were also used to evaluate the effect of the duration of fixation in formalin on PCR. A protocol that uses Tris-HCl pH 8.5 with EDTA and subsequent digestion with proteinase K was found to be an easy protocol for obtaining excellent PCR products for Chlamydophila abortus diagnosis from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens. It was also found that if samples are fixed in formalin for more than 2 weeks, the PCR technique is affected more adversely than immunohistochemical methods. PMID:17609356

  13. Arg660Ser mutation in Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I suppresses T?C transitions: implication of wobble base pair formation at the nucleotide incorporation step

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Katsushi; Tosaka, Aki; Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Murate, Takashi; Kasai, Hiroshi; Nimura, Yuji; Ogawa, Masanori; Yoshida, Shonen; Suzuki, Motoshi

    2001-01-01

    We examined the replication fidelity of an Arg660Ser (R660S) mutant of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Taq pol I). In a forward mutation assay, R660S showed a marked reduction in T?C transitions, one of the most frequent errors made by the wild-type enzyme. Steady-state kinetics showed that R660S discriminates against dGTP incorporation at a template T 13-fold better than the wild-type. R660S was also 3.2-fold less efficient than the wild-type at extending a T:dG mismatch. These results indicate that R660S has enhanced fidelity during incorporation and extension, which reduces its T?C transition frequency. Interestingly, R660S also discriminated correct from incorrect nucleotides at the incorporation step of C:dATP, A:dATP, G:dATP and C:8-OH-dGTP mispairs 28-, 6.0-, 4.1- and 6.8-fold better, respectively, than the wild-type, although it may not always be as accurate as the wild-type at the extension step. A structural model suggests that Arg660 may participate in two interactions that influence fidelity; the guanidinium group of Arg660 might interact with the incoming guanine base at the major groove and it might compete for forming another interaction with the primer terminus. Substituting Arg with Ser may eliminate or alter these interactions and destabilize the closed complex with incorrect substrates. Our data also suggest that T:dGTP and C:dATP base pairs form ‘wobble’ structures at the incorporation step of Taq pol I. PMID:11600709

  14. One-step extraction and cleanup procedure for determination of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD, and p,p'-DDE in fish.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, N; Marolt, R S

    1986-01-01

    A simplified method that combines extraction, partitioning, and cleanup in a single step for measuring p,p'-DDT and its metabolites in fish is described. Minced fish samples are emulsified with disodium hydrogen orthophosphate and trisodium citrate, ground with sodium sulfate, and eluted from a chromatographic column prepacked with alumina and silicic acid. The fats and fatty acids are solubilized and easily extracted from the tissues and retained by the column, while p,p'-DDT and its metabolites are quantitatively eluted with 40 mL n-hexane. The eluate is directly applied to a gas chromatographic column. Average recoveries of p,p'-DDT and its metabolites added to fish in vitro are 81%. The average coefficient of variation for recoveries of p,p'-DDT and its metabolites is less than 6.5% and the detection limit is 0.001 micrograms/g for p,p'-DDE, thus making this method very suitable for residue analysis. PMID:3745080

  15. [Nucleic acid testing: Biomerieux Roche technology. Setting up of limits concerning temperature, volume and incubation time during the nucleic extraction step].

    PubMed

    Piquet, Y; Chainier, C; Gauthier, M; Jeanne, M; Ivanovic, Z; Boiron, J M

    2006-12-01

    Nucleic acid testing is carried out in several steps: plasma pooling, nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection. The target values of temperature, volume and incubation time are mentioned in the initial protocol without giving their limit values. The objective of this work was to determine the range of values in which the test remains positives. So we have tested: 1) the temperature and incubation time of plasma in lysis buffer (37 degrees C +/- 3 et 30 min +/- 10); 2) the influence of volume and incubation time of silica (50 mul +/- 10 et 10 min +/- 5); 3) the variation of the eluate volume after nucleic extraction. We have also studied the influence of the internal control volume variation. For each parameter the assays were performed at sensitivity limit of the technique and repeated several times. Our results showed that: 1) for all parameters evaluated the tests remain positive within a wide range of values; 2) It is not necessary to set up a sophisticated measurement process; 3) the technique is robust. PMID:17317259

  16. Multi-step infrared macro-fingerprint features of ethanol extracts from different Cistanche species in China combined with HPLC fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Sun, Suqin; Zhu, Weicheng; Xu, Changhua; Liu, Yougang; Shen, Liang; Shi, Yue; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The genus Cistanche generally has four species in China, including C. deserticola (CD), C. tubulosa (CT), C. salsa (CS) and C. sinensis (CSN), among which CD and CT are official herbal sources of Cistanche Herba (CH). To clarify the sources of CH and ensure the clinical efficacy and safety, a multi-step IR macro-fingerprint method was developed to analyze and evaluate the ethanol extracts of the four species. Through this method, the four species were distinctively distinguished, and the main active components phenylethanoid glycosides (PhGs) were estimated rapidly according to the fingerprint features in the original IR spectra, second derivative spectra, correlation coefficients and 2D-IR correlation spectra. The exclusive IR fingerprints in the spectra including the positions, shapes and numbers of peaks indicated that constitutes of CD were the most abundant, and CT had the highest level of PhGs. The results deduced by some macroscopic features in IR fingerprint were in agreement with the HPLC fingerprint of PhGs from the four species, but it should be noted that the IR provided more chemical information than HPLC. In conclusion, with the advantages of high resolution, cost effective and speediness, the macroscopic IR fingerprint method should be a promising analytical technique for discriminating extremely similar herbal medicine, monitoring and tracing the constituents of different extracts and even for quality control of the complex systems such as TCM.

  17. Novel one-step headspace dynamic in-syringe liquid phase derivatization-extraction technique for the determination of aqueous aliphatic amines by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Sarangapani; Shih, Hou-Kung; Chen, Ying-Fang; Hsiech, Chunming; Ponnusamy, Vinoth Kumar; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2013-06-28

    A novel one-step headspace (HS) dynamic in-syringe (DIS) based liquid-phase derivatization-extraction (LPDE) technique has been developed for the selective determination of two short-chain aliphatic amines (SCAAs) in aqueous samples using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection (FLD). Methylamine (MA) and dimethylamine (DMA) were selected as model compounds of SCAAs. In this method, a micro-syringe pre-filled with derivatizing reagent solution (9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate) in the barrel was applied to achieve the simultaneous derivatization and extraction of two methylamines evolved from alkalized aqueous samples through the automated reciprocated movements of syringe plunger. After the derivatization-extraction process, the derivatized phase was directly injected into HPLC-FLD for analysis. Parameters influencing the evolution of methylamines and the HS-DIS-LPDE efficiency, including sample pH and temperature, sampling time, as well as the composition of derivatization reagent, reaction temperature, and frequency of reciprocated plunger movements, were thoroughly examined and optimized. Under optimal conditions, detections were linear in the range of 25-500?gL(-1) for MA and DMA with correlation coefficients all above 0.995. The limits of detection (based on S/N=3) were 5 and 19ngmL(-1) for MA and DMA, respectively. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated for the determination of MA and DMA in real water samples without any prior cleanup of the sample. The present method provides a simple, selective, automated, low cost and eco-friendly procedure to determine aliphatic amines in aqueous samples. PMID:23591526

  18. Evaluation of the Genotoxic Potential against H2O2-Radical-Mediated DNA Damage and Acute Oral Toxicity of Standardized Extract of Polyalthia longifolia Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Jothy, Subramanion L.; Chen, Yeng; Kanwar, Jagat R.; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been used in medicoculturally diverse countries around the world, where it is a part of a time-honoured tradition that is respected even today. Polyalthia longifolia leaf extract has been previously reported as an efficient antioxidant in vitro. Hence, the genotoxic effects of P. longifolia leaf were investigated by using plasmid relation, comet, and Allium cepa assay. In the presence of???OH radicals, the DNA in supercoil was start nicked into open circular form, which is the product of the single-stranded cleavage of supercoil DNA and quantified as fragmented separate bands on agarose gel in plasmid relation assay. In the plasmid relation and comet assay, the P. longifolia leaf extract exhibited strong inhibitory effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage. A dose-dependent increase of chromosome aberrations was also observed in the Allium cepa assay. The abnormalities scored were stickiness, c-mitosis, bridges, and vagrant chromosomes. Micronucleated cells were also observed at the interphase. The results of Allium cepa assay confirmed that the methanol extracts of P. longifolia exerted no significant genotoxic or mitodepressive effects at 100??g/mL. Thus, this study demonstrated that P. longifolia leaf extract has a beneficial effect against oxidative DNA damage. This experiment is the first report for the protective effect of P. longifolia on DNA damage-induced by hydroxyl radicals. Additionally in acute oral toxicity study, female rats were treated at 5000?mg/kg body weight of P. longifolia leaf extract and observed for signs of toxicity for 14 days. P. longifolia leaf extract did not produce any treatment-related toxic effects in rats. PMID:23878610

  19. The Influence of DNA Extraction Procedure and Primer Set on the Bacterial Community Analysis by Pyrosequencing of Barcoded 16S rRNA Gene Amplicons

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Ingo C.; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different DNA extraction procedures and primer sets on pyrosequencing results regarding the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum of piglets was investigated. Ileal chyme from piglets fed a diet containing different amounts of zinc oxide was used to evaluate a pyrosequencing study with barcoded 16S rRNA PCR products. Two DNA extraction methods (bead beating versus silica gel columns) and two primer sets targeting variable regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes (8f-534r versus 968f-1401r) were considered. The SEED viewer software of the MG-RAST server was used for automated sequence analysis. A total of 5.2 × 105 sequences were used for analysis after processing for read length (150?bp), minimum sequence occurrence (5), and exclusion of eukaryotic and unclassified/uncultured sequences. DNA extraction procedures and primer sets differed significantly in total sequence yield. The distribution of bacterial order and main bacterial genera was influenced significantly by both parameters. However, this study has shown that the results of pyrosequencing studies using barcoded PCR amplicons of bacterial 16S rRNA genes depend on DNA extraction and primer choice, as well as on the manner of downstream sequence analysis. PMID:25120931

  20. DIFFERENCES IN DETECTION OF DNA ADDUCTS IN THE 32P-POSTLABELING ASSAY AFTER EITHER 1-BUTANOL EXTRACTION OR NUCLEASE P1 TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of nuclease Pl treatment and 1-butanol extraction to increase the sensitivity of the 32P-postlabe1ling assay for DNA adducts have been compared. lthough similar results were obtained with the two methods for standard adducts formed with benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide I, nucl...

  1. Power Analysis for Real-Time PCR Quantification of Genes in Activated Sludge and Analysis of the Variability Introduced by DNA Extraction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hebe M. Dionisi; Gerda Harms; Alice C. Layton; Igrid R. Gregory; Jack Parker; Shawn A. Hawkins; Kevin G. Robinson; Gary S. Sayler

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the power of discrimination of the real-time PCR assay for monitoring fluctuations in microbial populations within activated sludge and to identify sample processing points where methodological changes are needed to minimize the variability in target quantification. DNA was extracted using a commercially available kit from mixed liquor samples taken from the aeration

  2. An Optimized Protocol for DNA Extraction from Wheat Seeds and Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) to Detect Fusarium graminearum Contamination of Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsalam, Kamel; Bahkali, Ali; Moslem, Mohamed; Amin, Osama E.; Niessen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and efficient method for isolating genomic DNA from germinated seeds of wheat that is free from polysaccharides and polyphenols is reported. DNA was extracted, treated with RNase, measured and tested for completeness using agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA purification from wheat grains yielded abundant, amplifiable DNA with yields typically between 100 and 200 ng DNA/mg. The effectiveness and reliability of the method was tested by assessing quantity and quality of the isolated DNA using three PCR-based markers. Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) were used to assess the genetic diversity between different wheat varieties. Specific PCR primer pair Tox5-1/Tox5-2 and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) procedure were used to detect genomic DNA of Fusarium graminearum in contaminated wheat seeds. In this method there is no need to use liquid nitrogen for crushing germinated seedlings. The protocol takes approximately one hour to prepare high quality DNA. In combination with the LAMP assay it is a fast and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic methods for the early detection of toxigenic fusaria in cereals. PMID:21747688

  3. Multi-step surface functionalization of polyimide based evanescent wave photonic biosensors and application for DNA hybridization by Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Eva; Bruck, Roman; Hainberger, Rainer; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2011-08-12

    The process of surface functionalization involving silanization, biotinylation and streptavidin bonding as platform for biospecific ligand immobilization was optimized for thin film polyimide spin-coated silicon wafers, of which the polyimide film serves as a wave guiding layer in evanescent wave photonic biosensors. This type of optical sensors make great demands on the materials involved as well as on the layer properties, such as the optical quality, the layer thickness and the surface roughness. In this work we realized the binding of a 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on an oxygen plasma activated polyimide surface followed by subsequent derivatization of the reactive thiol groups with maleimide-PEG(2)-biotin and immobilization of streptavidin. The progress of the functionalization was monitored by using different fluorescence labels for optimization of the chemical derivatization steps. Further, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized for the characterization of the modified surface. These established analytical methods allowed to derive information like chemical composition of the surface, surface coverage with immobilized streptavidin, as well as parameters of the surface roughness. The proposed functionalization protocol furnished a surface density of 144 fmol mm(-2) streptavidin with good reproducibility (13.9% RSD, n=10) and without inflicted damage to the surface. This surface modification was applied to polyimide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer sensors to realize a real-time measurement of streptavidin binding validating the functionality of the MZI biosensor. Subsequently, this streptavidin surface was employed to immobilize biotinylated single-stranded DNA and utilized for monitoring of selective DNA hybridization. These proved the usability of polyimide based evanescent photonic devices for biosensing application. PMID:21704776

  4. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a cDNA for Pterocarpan 4-Dimethylallyltransferase Catalyzing the Key Prenylation Step in the Biosynthesis of Glyceollin, a Soybean Phytoalexin1[W

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Sasaki, Kanako; Aoki, Toshio; Ayabe, Shin-ichi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2009-01-01

    Glyceollins are soybean (Glycine max) phytoalexins possessing pterocarpanoid skeletons with cyclic ether decoration originating from a C5 prenyl moiety. Enzymes involved in glyceollin biosynthesis have been thoroughly characterized during the early era of modern plant biochemistry, and many genes encoding enzymes of isoflavonoid biosynthesis have been cloned, but some genes for later biosynthetic steps are still unidentified. In particular, the prenyltransferase responsible for the addition of the dimethylallyl chain to pterocarpan has drawn a large amount of attention from many researchers due to the crucial coupling process of the polyphenol core and isoprenoid moiety. This study narrowed down the candidate genes to three soybean expressed sequence tag sequences homologous to genes encoding homogentisate phytyltransferase of the tocopherol biosynthetic pathway and identified among them a cDNA encoding dimethylallyl diphosphate: (6aS, 11aS)-3,9,6a-trihydroxypterocarpan [(?)-glycinol] 4-dimethylallyltransferase (G4DT) yielding the direct precursor of glyceollin I. The full-length cDNA encoding a protein led by a plastid targeting signal sequence was isolated from young soybean seedlings, and the catalytic function of the gene product was verified using recombinant yeast microsomes. Expression of the G4DT gene was strongly up-regulated in 5 to 24 h after elicitation of phytoalexin biosynthesis in cultured soybean cells similarly to genes associated with isoflavonoid pathway. The prenyl part of glyceollin I was demonstrated to originate from the methylerythritol pathway by a tracer experiment using [1-13C]Glc and nuclear magnetic resonance measurement, which coincided with the presumed plastid localization of G4DT. The first identification of a pterocarpan-specific prenyltransferase provides new insights into plant secondary metabolism and in particular those reactions involved in the disease resistance mechanism of soybean as the penultimate gene of glyceollin biosynthesis. PMID:19091879

  5. Anion exchange membrane adsorbers for flow-through polishing steps: Part II. Virus, host cell protein, DNA clearance, and antibody recovery.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Justin; Husson, Scott M; Murphy, Louise; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2013-02-01

    Anion exchange membrane adsorbers are used for contaminant removal in flow-through polishing steps in the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals. This contribution describes the clearance of minute virus of mice, DNA, and host cell proteins by three commercially available anion-exchange membranes: Sartobind Q, Mustang Q, and ChromaSorb. The Sartobind Q and Mustang Q products contain quaternary amine ligands; whereas, ChromaSorb contains primary amine based ligands. Performance was evaluated over a range of solution conditions: 0-200?mM NaCl, pH 6.0-9.0, and flow rates of 4-20?membrane?volumes/min in the presence and absence of up to 50?mM phosphate and acetate. In addition contaminant clearance was determined in the presence and absence of 5?g/L monoclonal antibody. The quaternary amine based ligands depend mainly on Coulombic interactions for removal of negatively charged contaminants. Consequently, performance of Sartobind Q and Mustang Q was compromised at high ionic strength. Primary amine based ligands in ChromaSorb enable high capacities at high ionic strength due to the presence of secondary, hydrogen bonding interactions. However, the presence of hydrogen phosphate ions leads to reduced capacity. Monoclonal antibody recovery using primary amine based anion-exchange ligands may be lower if significant binding occurs due to secondary interactions. The removal of a specific contaminant is affected by the level of removal of the other contaminants. The results of this study may be used to help guide selection of commercially available membrane absorbers for flow-through polishing steps. PMID:22951992

  6. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA); Mariella, Raymond P. (Danville, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  7. DNA Nanotechnology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-06-10

    In this activity, learners explore deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), a nanoscale structure that occurs in nature. Learners extract a sample of DNA from split peas and put the sample in an Eppendorf tube to take home. Learners discover that nanoscientists study DNA to understand its biological function and use it to make other nanoscale materials and devices.

  8. Two-step cycle sequencing improves base ambiguities and signal dropouts in DNA sequencing reactions using energy-transfer-based fluorescent Dye terminators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Long Wen

    2001-01-01

    The use of automated fluorescent DNA sequencer systems and PCR-based DNA sequencing methods plays an important role in the\\u000a actual effort to improve the efficiency of large-scale DNA analysis. While dideoxy-terminators labeled with energy-transfer\\u000a dyes (BigDyes) provide the most versatile method of automated DNA sequencing, premature terminations result in a substantially\\u000a reduced reading length of the DNA sequence. Premature terminations

  9. The effect of dilution and the use of a post-extraction nucleic acid purification column on the accuracy, precision, and inhibition of environmental DNA samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mckee, Anna M.; Spear, Stephen F.; Pierson, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of environmental DNA (eDNA) is an increasingly common method for detecting presence and assessing relative abundance of rare or elusive species in aquatic systems via the isolation of DNA from environmental samples and the amplification of species-specific sequences using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Co-extracted substances that inhibit qPCR can lead to inaccurate results and subsequent misinterpretation about a species’ status in the tested system. We tested three treatments (5-fold and 10-fold dilutions, and spin-column purification) for reducing qPCR inhibition from 21 partially and fully inhibited eDNA samples collected from coastal plain wetlands and mountain headwater streams in the southeastern USA. All treatments reduced the concentration of DNA in the samples. However, column purified samples retained the greatest sensitivity. For stream samples, all three treatments effectively reduced qPCR inhibition. However, for wetland samples, the 5-fold dilution was less effective than other treatments. Quantitative PCR results for column purified samples were more precise than the 5-fold and 10-fold dilutions by 2.2× and 3.7×, respectively. Column purified samples consistently underestimated qPCR-based DNA concentrations by approximately 25%, whereas the directional bias in qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed between stream and wetland samples for both dilution treatments. While the directional bias of qPCR-based DNA concentration estimates differed among treatments and locations, the magnitude of inaccuracy did not. Our results suggest that 10-fold dilution and column purification effectively reduce qPCR inhibition in mountain headwater stream and coastal plain wetland eDNA samples, and if applied to all samples in a study, column purification may provide the most accurate relative qPCR-based DNA concentrations estimates while retaining the greatest assay sensitivity.

  10. Microhomology-mediated End Joining and Homologous Recombination share the initial end resection step to repair DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Truong, Lan N; Li, Yongjiang; Shi, Linda Z; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; He, Jing; Wang, Hailong; Razavian, Niema; Berns, Michael W; Wu, Xiaohua

    2013-05-01

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) is a major pathway for Ku-independent alternative nonhomologous end joining, which contributes to chromosomal translocations and telomere fusions, but the underlying mechanism of MMEJ in mammalian cells is not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that, distinct from Ku-dependent classical nonhomologous end joining, MMEJ--even with very limited end resection--requires cyclin-dependent kinase activities and increases significantly when cells enter S phase. We also showed that MMEJ shares the initial end resection step with homologous recombination (HR) by requiring meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (Mre11) nuclease activity, which is needed for subsequent recruitment of Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) and exonuclease 1 (Exo1) to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to promote extended end resection and HR. MMEJ does not require S139-phosphorylated histone H2AX (?-H2AX), suggesting that initial end resection likely occurs at DSB ends. Using a MMEJ and HR competition repair substrate, we demonstrated that MMEJ with short end resection is used in mammalian cells at the level of 10-20% of HR when both HR and nonhomologous end joining are available. Furthermore, MMEJ is used to repair DSBs generated at collapsed replication forks. These studies suggest that MMEJ not only is a backup repair pathway in mammalian cells, but also has important physiological roles in repairing DSBs to maintain cell viability, especially under genomic stress. PMID:23610439

  11. SDA, a DNA Aptamer Inhibiting E- and P-Selectin Mediated Adhesion of Cancer and Leukemia Cells, the First and Pivotal Step in Transendothelial Migration during Metastasis Formation

    PubMed Central

    Faryammanesh, Rassa; Lange, Tobias; Magbanua, Eileen; Haas, Sina; Meyer, Cindy; Wicklein, Daniel; Schumacher, Udo; Hahn, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial (E-) and platelet (P-) selectin mediated adhesion of tumor cells to vascular endothelium is a pivotal step of hematogenous metastasis formation. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectin deficiency significantly reduces metastasis formation in vivo. We selected an E- and P-Selectin specific DNA Aptamer (SDA) via SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) with a Kd value of approximately 100 nM and the capability of inhibiting the interaction between selectin and its ligands. Employing human colorectal cancer (HT29) and leukemia (EOL-1) cell lines we could demonstrate an anti-adhesive effect for SDA in vitro. Under physiological shear stress conditions in a laminar flow adhesion assay, SDA inhibited dynamic tumor cell adhesion to immobilized E- or P-selectin. The stability of SDA for more than two hours allowed its application in cell-cell adhesion assays in cell culture medium. When adhesion of HT29 cells to TNF?-stimulated E-selectin presenting human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was analyzed, inhibition via SDA could be demonstrated as well. In conclusion, SDA is a potential new therapeutic agent that antagonizes selectin-mediated adhesion during metastasis formation in human malignancies. PMID:24699049

  12. Kinship and Y-Chromosome Analysis of 7th Century Human Remains: Novel DNA Extraction and Typing Procedure for Ancient Material

    PubMed Central

    Vanek, Daniel; Saskova, Lenka; Koch, Hubert

    2009-01-01

    Aim To develop novel DNA extraction and typing procedure for DNA identification of the 7th century human remains, determine the familiar relationship between the individuals, estimate the Y-chromosome haplogroup, and compare the Y-chromosome haplotype with the contemporary populations. Methods DNA from preserved femur samples was extracted using the modified silica-based extraction technique. Polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using human identification kits MiniFiler, Identifiler, and Y-filer and also laboratory-developed and validated Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) pentaplexes with short amplicons. Results For 244A, 244B, 244C samples, full autosomal DNA profiles (15 STR markers and Amelogenin) and for 244D, 244E, 244F samples, MiniFiler profiles were produced. Y-chromosome haplotypes consisting of up to 24 STR markers were determined and used to predict the Y-chromosome haplogroups and compare the resulting haplotypes with the current population. Samples 244A, 244B, 244C, and 244D belong to Y-chromosome haplogroup R1b and the samples 244E and 244F to haplogroup G2a. Comparison of ancient haplotypes with the current population yielded numerous close matches with genetic distance bellow 2. Conclusion Application of forensic genetics in archaeology enables retrieving new types of information and helps in data interpretation. The number of successfully typed autosomal and Y-STR loci from ancient specimens in this study is one of the largest published so far for aged samples. PMID:19480023

  13. Advances in forensic DNA quantification: a review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven B; McCord, Bruce; Buel, Eric

    2014-11-01

    This review focuses upon a critical step in forensic biology: detection and quantification of human DNA from biological samples. Determination of the quantity and quality of human DNA extracted from biological evidence is important for several reasons. Firstly, depending on the source and extraction method, the quality (purity and length), and quantity of the resultant DNA extract can vary greatly. This affects the downstream method as the quantity of input DNA and its relative length can determine which genotyping procedure to use-standard short-tandem repeat (STR) typing, mini-STR typing or mitochondrial DNA sequencing. Secondly, because it is important in forensic analysis to preserve as much of the evidence as possible for retesting, it is important to determine the total DNA amount available prior to utilizing any destructive analytical method. Lastly, results from initial quantitative and qualitative evaluations permit a more informed interpretation of downstream analytical results. Newer quantitative techniques involving real-time PCR can reveal the presence of degraded DNA and PCR inhibitors, that provide potential reasons for poor genotyping results and may indicate methods to use for downstream typing success. In general, the more information available, the easier it is to interpret and process the sample resulting in a higher likelihood of successful DNA typing. The history of the development of quantitative methods has involved two main goals-improving precision of the analysis and increasing the information content of the result. This review covers advances in forensic DNA quantification methods and recent developments in RNA quantification. PMID:25088961

  14. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard extraction methods, without the need for specialised equipment or large-volume demineralisation steps. PMID:25992635

  15. Differential nuclear and mitochondrial DNA preservation in post-mortem teeth with implications for forensic and ancient DNA studies.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard extraction methods, without the need for specialised equipment or large-volume demineralisation steps. PMID:25992635

  16. Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Potential and Oxidative DNA Damage Preventive Activity of Trachyspermum ammi L. (Carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (Fennel) Seed Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids results in generation of free radicals in an organism which is the major cause of onset of various degenerative diseases. Antioxidants scavenge these free radicals, thereby protecting the cell from damage. The present study was designed to examine the free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of traditionally used spices Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel). The aqueous, methanolic, and acetonic extracts of T. ammi and F. vulgare seeds were prepared using soxhlet extraction assembly and subjected to qualitative and quantitative estimation of phytochemical constituents. Free radical scavenging potential was investigated using standard methods, namely, DPPH radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay along with the protection against oxidative DNA damage. The results stated that acetonic seed extracts (AAcSE and FAcSE) of both the spices possessed comparatively high amount of total phenolics whereas methanolic seed extracts (AMSE and FMSE) were found to have highest amount of total flavonoids. At 1?mg/mL concentration, highest DPPH radical scavenging activity was shown by FMSE (96.2%), AAcSE was recorded with highest FRAP value (2270.27 ± 0.005??mol/L), and all the seed extracts have been shown to mitigate the damage induced by Fenton reaction on calf thymus DNA. Therefore, the study suggests that T. ammi and F. vulgare seed extracts could contribute as a highly significant bioresource of antioxidants to be used in our day-to-day life and in food and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25143939

  17. Assessment of free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Nandini; Chatterjee, Sreemoyee

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids results in generation of free radicals in an organism which is the major cause of onset of various degenerative diseases. Antioxidants scavenge these free radicals, thereby protecting the cell from damage. The present study was designed to examine the free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of traditionally used spices Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel). The aqueous, methanolic, and acetonic extracts of T. ammi and F. vulgare seeds were prepared using soxhlet extraction assembly and subjected to qualitative and quantitative estimation of phytochemical constituents. Free radical scavenging potential was investigated using standard methods, namely, DPPH radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay along with the protection against oxidative DNA damage. The results stated that acetonic seed extracts (AAcSE and FAcSE) of both the spices possessed comparatively high amount of total phenolics whereas methanolic seed extracts (AMSE and FMSE) were found to have highest amount of total flavonoids. At 1?mg/mL concentration, highest DPPH radical scavenging activity was shown by FMSE (96.2%), AAcSE was recorded with highest FRAP value (2270.27 ± 0.005??mol/L), and all the seed extracts have been shown to mitigate the damage induced by Fenton reaction on calf thymus DNA. Therefore, the study suggests that T. ammi and F. vulgare seed extracts could contribute as a highly significant bioresource of antioxidants to be used in our day-to-day life and in food and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25143939

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the 136 Unique Tetranucleotide Sequences of DNA Oligonucleotides. I. Research Design and Results on d(C pG) Steps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Beveridge; Gabriela Barreiro; K. Suzie Byun; David A. Case; Thomas E. Cheatham; Surjit B. Dixit; Emmanuel Giudice; Filip Lankas; Richard Lavery; John H. Maddocks; Roman Osman; Eleanore Seibert; Heinz Sklenar; Gautier Stoll; Kelly M. Thayer; Péter Varnai; Matthew A. Youngzz

    2004-01-01

    We describe herein a computationally intensive project aimed at carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations including water and counterions on B-DNA oligomers containing all 136 unique tetranucleotide base sequences. This initiative was undertaken by an international collaborative effort involving nine research groups, the “Ascona B-DNA Consortium” (ABC). Calculations were carried out on the 136 cases imbedded in 39 DNA oligomers

  19. [The influence of the extract of Ungernia victoris cultured cells and of some metal cations on Escherichia coli transformation with plasmid DNA].

    PubMed

    Miriuta, A Iu; Pererva, T P; Mozhilevskia, L P; Kunakh, V A

    2005-01-01

    In the system of cation-induced E. coli transformation by the plasmid pBR322 the effects of the extract derived from the biomass of cultured cells of U. victoris on the correlation between yield of transformants, viability of CaCl2 - treated cells and plasmid DNA conformation alterations has been investigated. The data obtained have been compared with effects of some salts of one- and divalent metals on the same parameters. The presence of different mechanisms of the variations of cell population viability and yield of transformants depending on utilization of salts or plant extracts has been shown. PMID:16396317

  20. Ionic liquid-based one-step micellar extraction of multiclass polar compounds from hawthorn fruits by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Yi, Ling; Li, Xing-Ying; Cao, Jun; Ye, Li-Hong; Cao, Wan; Da, Jian-Hua; Dai, Han-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Juan

    2014-06-11

    An ionic liquid (IL)-based one-step micellar extraction procedure was developed for the extraction of multiclass polar analytes (protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, epicatechin, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, quercetin) from hawthorn fruits and their determination using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Compared to conventional organic solvent extractions, this newly proposed method was much easier, more sensitive, environmentally friendly, and effective as well. Several important parameters influencing the micellar extraction efficiency are discussed, such as selection of ILs, surfactant concentration, and extraction time. Under the optimal conditions, good linearity was achieved for each analyte with correlation coefficients (r(2)) ranging from 0.9934 to 0.9999, and the recovery values ranged from 89.3 to 106% with relative standard deviations lower than 5.5%. Results suggest that the IL-based one-step micellar extraction could be an alternative and promising means in future food analysis. PMID:24845828

  1. 'Size leap' algorithm: an efficient extraction of the longest common motifs from a molecular sequence set. Application to the DNA sequence reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Danckaert, A; Chappey, C; Hazout, S

    1991-10-01

    We propose a new method, called 'size leap' algorithm, of search for motifs of maximum size and common to two fragments at least. It allows the creation of a reduced database of motifs from a set of sequences whose size obeys the series of Fibonacci numbers. The convenience lies in the efficiency of the motif extraction. It can be applied in the establishment of overlap regions for DNA sequence reconstruction and multiple alignment of biological sequences. The method of complete DNA sequence reconstruction by extraction of the longest motifs ('anchor motifs') is presented as an application of the size leap algorithm. The details of a reconstruction from three sequenced fragments are given as an example. PMID:1747784

  2. Brassica oleracea L. Var. costata DC and Pieris brassicae L. aqueous extracts reduce methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage in V79 hamster lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Carla; Fernandes, Fátima; Valentão, Patrícia; Rodrigues, António Sebastião; Coelho, Marta; Teixeira, João P; Silva, Susana; Ferreres, Federico; Guedes de Pinho, Paula; Andrade, Paula B

    2012-05-30

    Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC leaves and Pieris brassicae L. larvae aqueous extracts were assayed for their potential to prevent/induce DNA damage. None of them was mutagenic at the tested concentrations in the Ames test reversion assay using Salmonella His(+) TA98 strains, with and without metabolic activation. In the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase mutation assay using mammalian V79 fibroblast cell line, extracts at 500 ?g/mL neither induced mutations nor protected against the mutagenicity caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). In the comet assay, none of the extracts revealed to be genotoxic by itself, and both afforded protection, more pronounced for larvae extracts, against MMS-induced genotoxicity. As genotoxic/antigenotoxic effects of Brassica vegetables are commonly attributed to isothiocyanates, the extracts were screened for these compounds by headspace-solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. No sulfur compound was detected. These findings demonstrate that both extracts could be useful against damage caused by genotoxic compounds, the larvae extract being the most promising. PMID:22582708

  3. Protective Effect of Crocus sativus Stigma Extract and Crocin ( trans -crocin 4) on Methyl Methanesulfonate–Induced DNA Damage in Mice Organs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hossein Hosseinzadeh; Akram Abootorabi; Hamid R. Sadeghnia

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of aqueous extract of Crocus sativus stigmas (CSE) and crocin (trans-crocin 4) on methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage in multiple mice organs using comet assay. Adult male NMRI mice in different groups were treated with either physiological saline (10 mL=Kg, intraperitoneal (ip)), CSE (80 mg=Kg, ip), crocin (400 mg=Kg, ip), MMS (120

  4. Reliability of differential PCR for the detection of EGFR and MDM2 gene amplification in DNA extracted from FFPE glioma tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEPHEN B. HUNTER; KAREN ABBOTT; VIJAY A. VARMA; JEFFREY J. OLSON; DAVID W. BARNETT; C. David James

    1995-01-01

    A series of 43 human gliomas, consisting of 30 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, 3 low grade astrocytomas, 2 ependymomas, and 1 oligodendroglioma, was studied for amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) genes. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections was analyzed by differential PCR and the results were compared with slot blot

  5. A modified protocol for rapid DNA isolation from plant tissues using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M A Flores-Vergara; S Krasynanski; W F Thompson; G C Allen

    2006-01-01

    We describe a modification of the DNA extraction method, in which cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) is used to extract nucleic acids from plant tissues. In contrast to the original method, the modified CTAB procedure is faster, omits the selective precipitation and CsCl gradient steps, uses less expensive and toxic reagents, requires only inexpensive laboratory equipment and is more readily adapted to

  6. Step by Step Tutorials for Selected Lab Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Zeller, Mike

    From Mike Zeller of Iowa State University's Office of Biotechnology, this site presents a number of tutorials for laboratory activities. The activities included here are: Using a Micropipettor, DNA Fingerprinting, DNA in My Food?, Fruit Cup DNA Extraction, High Sucrose Soybean Thin Layer Chromatography, Plasmid Isolation and Analysis, Recombinant DNA, and Transformation. All materials are available in both HTML and PDF versions, and some activities contain special documents for students and teachers.

  7. Antioxidant Activity of Rhodiola rosea Extract on Human Low-density Lipoprotein Oxidation and DNA Strand Scission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eun-Jung Lee; Young-In Kwon; Kalidas Shetty; Hae-Dong Jang

    Water and 75% ethanol extracts of Rhodiola rosea were investigated for reactive oxygen-scavenging activity, metal-chelating activity, and reduction power. The 75% ethanol extract showed higher 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6- sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical- and superoxide anion radical-scavenging activities than water extract. Hydroxyl radical- scavenging activities (IC 50) of water and 75% ethanol extracts were 1.1 and 1.8 mg\\/mL, respectively, indicating water extract scavenged

  8. One-step cell lysis suitable for quantitative bacteria detection in inhibitor-laden sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-04-01

    Complexity and heterogeneity of soils often hinder effective DNA extraction from the soil matrix. In particular, conventional DNA extraction techniques require extensive purification which makes DNA extraction time-consuming and labor-intensive. Other drawbacks include lower recovery yield, degradation, and damage of DNA, which are also caused by intensive purifications during DNA extraction. Therefore a rapid and simple and yet effective DNA pretreatment method is preferred for environmental monitoring and screening. This study has evaluated the feasibility of simple physical pretreatment for effective cell lysis of bacteria in sands. Bead beating method was selected as an effective physical cell lysis method in this study. We examined the capability of this physical lysis for Pseudomonas putida seeded sands without additional chemical purification steps. The lysate from the method was analysed by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay and subsequently compared to that by commercial DNA extraction kit. The best lysis condition (treatment with 0.1 mm glass beads at 3000 rpm for 3 minutes) was selected. The qPCR results of bead beating treated samples showed the better performance than that of conventional DNA extraction kit. Moreover, the qPCR assay was performed to the sands laden with qPCR inhibitors (humic acids, clay, and magnesium), which generally present in environmental samples. Further experiments with the sands containing less than 10 ?g/g of humic acids and 70% of clay showed successful quantification results of qPCR assay. In conclusion, the bead beating method is useful for simplified DNA extraction prior to qPCR analysis for sand samples of particular composition. It is expected that this approach will be beneficial for environmental in-situ analysis or immediate pre-screening. It also provides the groundwork for future studies with real soil samples that have various physico-chemical properties.

  9. Improved method for extraction and detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric biopsies using laser micro-dissection

    PubMed Central

    Loayza, María Fernanda; Villavicencio, Fernando Xavier; Santander, Stephanie Carolina; Baldeón, Manuel; Ponce, Lourdes Karina; Salvador, Iván; Vivar Díaz, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    To assess the molecular events exerted by Helicobacter pylori interacting directly with gastric epithelial cells, an improved procedure for microbial DNA isolation from stained hematoxilin-eosin gastric biopsies was developed based on laser micro-dissection (LM) [1]. Few articles have described the use of LM to select and detect H. pylori genome from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded gastric tissue [2]. To improve the yield and quality of DNA isolated from H. pylori contacting intestinal epithelial cells, the following conditions were established after modification of the QIAamp DNA Micro kit. • Use of at least 25 cut sections of 10–20 ?m of diameter and 3 ?m thick with more than 10 bacteria in each cut. • Lysis with 30 ?L of tissue lysis buffer and 20 ?L of proteinase K (PK) with the tube in an upside-down position. • The use of thin purification columns with 35 ?L of elution buffer. The mean of DNA concentration obtained from 25 LM cut sections was 1.94± 0 .16 ng/?L, and it was efficiently amplified with qPCR in a Bio Rad iCycler instrument. The LM can improve the sample selection and DNA extraction for molecular analysis of H. pylori associated with human gastric epithelium.

  10. DNA damage caused by organic extracts of contaminated sediment, crude, and weathered oil and their fractions recovered up to 5 years after the 2007 Hebei Spirit oil spill off Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Lee, Hyo Jin; Hong, Seongjin; Khim, Jong Seong; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Gi Beum

    2015-06-15

    We examined the degree of DNA damage caused by three fractions (F1, aliphatic hydrocarbons; F2, aromatic hydrocarbons; and F3, polar compounds) of the organic extract of sediments taken from Taean, Korea, following the Hebei Spirit oil spill. DNA damage was measured using the comet assay with blood cells of the striped beakfish (Oplegnathus fasciatus). DNA damage was also examined for fractions of crude oil (Iranian Heavy Crude Oil, IHC), weathered oil and six subfractions (F2.1-F2.6). The greatest DNA damage was found from the Sinduri dune region and DNA damage decreased to 40% weathered oil in F2 fraction compared with crude oil. The DNA damage of the sum of fractions was found higher than the organic extracts of sediments, suggesting antagonistic interactions between the genotoxic compounds. This study confirmed the persistence of potential genotoxicity in sediments of the severely affected regions as long as 5 years after the oil spill. PMID:25869203

  11. A test of the multiplex pre-amplification approach in microsatellite genotyping of wolverine faecal DNA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Hedmark; Hans Ellegren

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a two-step PCR approach, referred to as multiplex pre-amplification, was proposed to improve microsatellite amplification\\u000a from non-invasive samples such as faecal DNA. Here, we compare this new approach to standard PCR with respect to amplification\\u000a success and genotyping error rates in microsatellite analysis (18 markers) of wolverine faecal DNA (48 extracts initially\\u000a shown to contain amplifiable DNA). The multiplex

  12. Evaluation of DNA damage induction on human pulmonary cells exposed to PAHs from organic extract of PM10 collected in a coke-oven plant.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Delia; Ursini, Cinzia L; Pira, Enrico; Romano, Canzio; Maiello, Raffaele; Petyx, Marta; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Occupational exposure of coke oven workers, classified by IARC as human carcinogen, is characterized by the presence of PAHs emitted during pyrolysis of coal. We aimed to clarify the mechanism of action of complex mixtures of PAHs and to identify biomarkers of early biological effect, evaluating on lung epithelial cells (A549) genotoxic and oxidative damage of airborne particulate matter collected in a coke plant. Particulate matter was collected in the oven area on glass filter, extract and analysed by GC/MS. Direct/oxidative DNA damage induced by exposure to extract were evaluated by Fpg comet assay. The cells were exposed for 30 min, 2h and 4h to extract of half filter diluted at 0.004%, 0.008% and 0.02%. We evaluated comet percentage and analysed tail moment values of cells treated with Fpg enzyme (TMenz) and untreated (TM) that indicate respectively oxidative and direct DNA damage. Air sample contained 0.328 microg/m3 of pyrene, 0.33 microg/m3 of benzo(a)anthracene, 1.073 microg/m3 of benzo(b)fluoranthene, 0.22 microg/m3 of benzo(k)fluoranthene, 0.35 microg/m3 of benzo(a)pyrene, 0.079 microg/m3 of dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and 0.40 microg/m3 of benzo(g,h,i)perylene. The dose-dependent increase of TM and TMenz in exposed cells was not significant, indicating only a slight direct and oxidative DNA damage in exposed cells. A small dose-time dependent increase of comet percentage was found. The study shows the high sensitivity of comet assay to measure early DNA damage also at low doses suggesting its use on lung epithelial cells to evaluate the effects of complex mixtures of genotoxic substances on target organ. PMID:18924315

  13. Natural lipid extracts and biomembrane-mimicking lipid compositions are disposed to form nonlamellar phases, and they release DNA from lipoplexes most efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C. (NWU)

    2010-01-18

    A viewpoint now emerging is that a critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection (lipofection) is the structural evolution of lipoplexes upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. Here we report our finding that lipid mixtures mimicking biomembrane lipid compositions are superior to pure anionic liposomes in their ability to release DNA from lipoplexes (cationic lipid/DNA complexes), even though they have a much lower negative charge density (and thus lower capacity to neutralize the positive charge of the lipoplex lipids). Flow fluorometry revealed that the portion of DNA released after a 30-min incubation of the cationic O-ethylphosphatidylcholine lipoplexes with the anionic phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol was 19% and 37%, respectively, whereas a mixture mimicking biomembranes (MM: phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylserine /cholesterol 45:20:20:15 w/w) and polar lipid extract from bovine liver released 62% and 74%, respectively, of the DNA content. A possible reason for this superior power in releasing DNA by the natural lipid mixtures was suggested by structural experiments: while pure anionic lipids typically form lamellae, the natural lipid mixtures exhibited a surprising predilection to form nonlamellar phases. Thus, the MM mixture arranged into lamellar arrays at physiological temperature, but began to convert to the hexagonal phase at a slightly higher temperature, {approx} 40-45 C. A propensity to form nonlamellar phases (hexagonal, cubic, micellar) at close to physiological temperatures was also found with the lipid extracts from natural tissues (from bovine liver, brain, and heart). This result reveals that electrostatic interactions are only one of the factors involved in lipid-mediated DNA delivery. The tendency of lipid bilayers to form nonlamellar phases has been described in terms of bilayer 'frustration' which imposes a nonzero intrinsic curvature of the two opposing monolayers. Because the stored curvature elastic energy in a 'frustrated' bilayer seems to be comparable to the binding energy between cationic lipid and DNA, the balance between these two energies could play a significant role in the lipoplex-membrane interactions and DNA release energetics.

  14. Protective effect of Crocus sativus stigma extract and crocin (trans-crocin 4) on methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage in mice organs.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Abootorabi, Akram; Sadeghnia, Hamid R

    2008-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of aqueous extract of Crocus sativus stigmas (CSE) and crocin (trans-crocin 4) on methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage in multiple mice organs using the comet assay. Adult male NMRI mice in different groups were treated with either physiological saline (10 mL/Kg, intraperitoneal [ip]), CSE (80 mg/Kg, ip), crocin (400 mg/Kg, ip), MMS (120 mg/Kg, ip), and CSE (5, 20, and 80 mg/Kg, ip) 45 min prior to MMS administration or crocin (50, 200, and 400 mg/Kg, ip) 45 min prior to MMS administration. Mice were sacrificed about 3 h after each different treatment, and the alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate the effect of these compounds on DNA damage in different mice organs. The percent of DNA in the comet tail (% tail DNA) was measured. A significant increase in the % tail DNA was seen in nuclei of different organs of MMS-treated mice. In control groups, no significant difference was found in the % tail DNA between CSE- or crocin-pretreated and saline-pretreated mice. The MMS-induced DNA damage in CSE-pretreated mice (80 mg/Kg) was decreased between 2.67-fold (kidney) and 4.48-fold (lung) compared to those of MMS-treated animals alone (p < 0.001). This suppression of DNA damage by CSE was found to be depended on the dose, which pretreatment with CSE (5 mg/Kg) only reduced DNA damage by 6.97%, 6.57%, 7.27%, and 9.90% in liver, lung, kidney, and spleen, respectively (p > 0.05 as compared with MMS-treated group). Crocin also significantly decreased DNA damage by MMS (between 4.69-fold for liver and 6.55-fold for spleen, 400 mg/Kg), in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicate that there is a genoprotective property in CSE and crocin, as revealed by the comet assay, in vivo. PMID:18788978

  15. Solid phase DNA extraction with a flexible bead-packed microfluidic device to detect methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in nasal swabs.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyu-Youn; Kwon, Sung Hong; Jung, Sun-Ok; Namkoong, Kak; Jung, Won-Jong; Kim, Joon-Ho; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Huh, Nam

    2012-09-18

    We have developed a bead-packed microfluidic device with a built-in flexible wall to automate extraction of nucleic acids from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nasal swabs. The flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane was designed to manipulate the surface-to-volume ratio (SVR) of bead-packed chambers in the range of 0.05 to 0.15 (?m(-1)) for a typical solid phase extraction protocol composed of binding, washing, and eluting. In particular, the pneumatically assisted close packing of beads led to an invariant SVR (0.15 ?m(-1)) even with different bead amounts (10-16 mg), which allowed for consistent operation of the device and improved capture efficiency for bacteria cells. Furthermore, vigorous mixing by asynchronous membrane vibration enabled ca. 90% DNA recovery with ca. 10 ?L of liquid solution from the captured cells on the bead surfaces. The full processes to detect MRSA in nasal swabs, i.e., nasal swab collection, prefiltration, on-chip DNA extraction, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, were successfully constructed and carried out to validate the capability to detect MRSA in nasal swab samples. This flexible microdevice provided an excellent analytical PCR detection sensitivity of ca. 61 CFU/swab with 95% confidence interval, which turned out to be higher than or similar to that of the commercial DNA-based MRSA detection techniques. This excellent performance would be attributed to the capability of the flexible bead-packed microdevice to enrich the analyte from a large initial sample (e.g., 1 mL) into a microscale volume of eluate (e.g., 10 ?L). The proposed microdevice will find many applications as a solid phase extraction method toward various sample-to-answer systems. PMID:22908991

  16. The Determination of n-3 Fatty Acid Levels in Food Products Containing Microencapsulated Fish Oil Using the One-Step Extraction Method. Part 1: Measurement in the Raw Ingredient and in Dry Powdered Foods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan M. Curtis; Natalie Berrigan; Prudence Dauphinee

    2008-01-01

    An optimized one-step extraction and methylation method (OSE) for the determination of n-3 fatty acid levels in microencapsulated\\u000a fish oil products has been described. Validation of the method for the food ingredient powder MEG-3® (a commercial microencapsulated fish oil product manufactured by Ocean Nutrition Canada Ltd, with a gelatin shell matrix)\\u000a has been demonstrated and compared to a method that

  17. Rapid 96-well plates DNA extraction and sequencing procedures to identify genome-wide transposon insertion sites in a difficult to lyse bacterium: Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Scornec, Hélène; Tichit, Magali; Bouchier, Christiane; Pédron, Thierry; Cavin, Jean-François; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Licandro-Seraut, Hélène

    2014-11-01

    Random transposon mutagenesis followed by adequate screening methods is an unavoidable procedure to characterize genetics of bacterial adaptation to environmental changes. We have recently constructed a mutant library of Lactobacillus casei and we aimed to fully annotate it. However, we have observed that, for L. casei which is a difficult to lyse bacterium, methods used to identify the transposon insertion site in a few mutants (transposon rescue by restriction and recircularization or PCR-based methods) were not transposable for a larger number because they are too time-consuming and sometimes not reliable. Here, we describe a method for large-scale and reliable identification of transposon insertion sites in a L. casei mutant library of 9250 mutants. DNA extraction procedure based on silica membranes in 96-column format was optimized to obtain genomic DNA from a large number of mutants. Then reliable direct genomic sequencing was improved to fit the obtained genomic DNA extracts. Using this procedure, readable and identifiable sequences were obtained for 87% of the L. casei mutants. This method extends the applications of a library of this type, reduces the number of insertions needed to be screened, and allows selection of specific mutants from an arrayed and stored mutant library. This method is applicable to any already existing mutant library (obtained by transposon or insertional mutagenesis) and could be useful for other bacterial species, especially for highly lysis-resistant bacteria species such as lactic acid bacteria. PMID:25135488

  18. Modulatory role of grape seed extract on age-related oxidative DNA damage in central nervous system of rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muthaiya Balu; Purushotham Sangeetha; Ganesan Murali; Chinnakannu Panneerselvam

    2006-01-01

    Aging is the accumulation of diverse deleterious changes in the cells and tissues leading to increased risk of diseases. Oxidative stress is considered as a major risk factor and contributes to age related increase in DNA oxidation and DNA protein cross-links in central nervous system during aging. In the present study, we have evaluated the salubrious role of grape seed

  19. DNA Pendant

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-11-14

    Broadcast Transcript: It's a symbol of commitment. It's a memento mori. It's the DNA pendant offered by Japan's Eiwa Industry and it's two, two, two things in one. Using genetic extraction, Eiwa removes the DNA from, say, a strand of hair or a...

  20. Xanthium strumarium L. Extracts Produce DNA Damage Mediated by Cytotoxicity in In Vitro Assays but Does Not Induce Micronucleus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piloto Ferrer, Janet; Cozzi, Renata; Cornetta, Tommaso; Stano, Pasquale; Fiore, Mario; Degrassi, Francesca; De Salvia, Rosella; Remigio, Antonia; Francisco, Marbelis; Quiñones, Olga; Valdivia, Dayana; González, Maria L.; Pérez, Carlos; Sánchez-Lamar, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Xanthium strumarium L. is a member of the Asteraceae commonly used in Cuba, mainly as diuretic. Some toxic properties of this plant have also been reported and, to date, very little is known about its genotoxic properties. The present work aims was to evaluate the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic risk of whole extract from Xanthium strumarium L. whole extract of aerial parts. No positive response was observed in a battery of four Salmonella typhimurium strains, when exposed to concentrations up to 5?mg/plate, with and without mammalian metabolic activation (liver microsomal S9 fraction from Wistar rats). In CHO cells, high concentrations (25–100??g/mL) revealed significant reduction in cell viability. Results from sister chromatid exchanges, chromosome aberrations, and comet assay showed that X. strumarium extract is genotoxic at the highest concentration used, when clear cytotoxic effects were also observed. On the contrary, no increase in micronuclei frequency in bone marrow cells was observed when the extract was orally administered to mice (100, 500, and 2000?mg/Kg doses). The data presented here constitute the most complete study on the genotoxic potential of X. strumarium L. and show that the extract can induce in vitro DNA damage at cytotoxic concentrations. PMID:25025061