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Sample records for dna methyltransferase-3a promoter

  1. DNA methyltransferase 3A promotes cell proliferation by silencing CDK inhibitor p18INK4C in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, He; Zhao, Chengcheng; Gong, Pihai; Wang, Ling; Wu, Huazhang; Zhang, Kun; Zhou, Rongping; Wang, Li; Zhang, Ting; Zhong, Sheng; Fan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the roles of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) in gastric carcinogenesis. Here, we reported that the exogenous expression of DNMT3A promoted gastric cancer (GC) cell proliferation by accelerating the G1/S transition. Subsequently, p18INK4C was identified as a downstream target of DNMT3A. The elevated expression of DNMT3A suppressed p18INK4C at least at the transcriptional level. Depletion of p18INK4C expression in GC cells induced cell cycle progression, whereas its re-expression alleviated the effect of DNMT3A overexpression on G1/S transition. Furthermore, we found that DNMT3A modulated p18INK4C by directly binding to and silencing the p18INK4C gene via promoter hypermethylation. In clinical GC tissue specimens analyzed, the level of methylation of p18INK4C detected in tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in paired non-tumor tissues. Moreover, elevated level of DNMT3A expression was associated with the differentiation of GC tissues and was negatively correlated with the p18INK4C expression level. Taken together, our results found that DNMT3A contributes to the dysregulation of the cell cycle by repressing p18INK4C in a DNA methylation-dependent manner, suggesting that DNMT3A-p18INK4C axis involved in GC. These findings provide new insights into gastric carcinogenesis and a potential therapeutic target for GC that may be further investigated in the future. PMID:26350239

  2. Cyclical DNA Methyltransferase 3a Expression Is a Seasonal and Estrus Timer in Reproductive Tissues.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Eloise W J; Coyle, Chris S; Lorgen, Marlene; Campbell, Ewan M; Bowman, Alan S; Stevenson, Tyler J

    2016-06-01

    It is becoming clear that epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation can be dynamic and, in many cases, reversible. Here we investigated the photoperiod and hormone regulation of DNA methylation in testes, ovaries, and uterine tissue across multiple time scales. We hypothesized that DNA methyltransferase 3a (dnmt3a) is driven by photoperiodic treatment and exhibits natural variation across the female reproductive cycle and that melatonin increases whereas estrogen reduces DNA methylation. We used Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) due to their robust changes in reproductive physiology across seasonal and estrus time scales. Our findings indicate that short-day (SD) winter-like conditions significantly increased global DNA methylation and dnmt3a expression in the testes. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirm that increased dnmt3a expression was primarily localized to spermatogonium. Conversely, the ovaries did not exhibit variation in DNA methylation or dnmt3a/3b expression. However, exposure to SD significantly increased uterine dnmt3a expression. We then determined that dnmt3a was significantly decreased during the estrus stage. Next, we ovariectomized females and subsequently identified that a single estrogen+progesterone injection was sufficient to rapidly inhibit dnmt3a and dnmt3b expression. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of human embryonic kidney-293 cells with melatonin significantly increased both dnmt3a and dnmt3b expression, suggesting that long-duration nocturnal signaling in SD may be involved in the regulation of DNA methylation in both sexes. Overall, our data indicate that dnmt3a shows marked photoperiod and estrus plasticity that likely has broad downstream effects on the timing of the genomic control of reproductive function. PMID:27105384

  3. DNA methyltransferase 3a rs1550117 genetic polymorphism predicts poor survival in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuan; Jia, Zhifang; Ma, Hongxi; Cao, Donghui; Wu, Xing; Wen, Simin; You, Lili; Cao, Xueyuan; Jiang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3a) have been suggested to play a crucial role in human cancer prognosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNMT3a genes may have an impact on the prognosis of cancers. This study aimed to investigate the association between SNPs of DNMT3a gene and prognosis of gastric cancer (GC). Two sites of DNMT3a SNPs, rs1550117 and rs13420827 were selected and genotyped using TaqMan assay in 447 GC patients who received gastrectomy. Effects of genotypes on clinical outcomes of GC were calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression model. We found that the AG or AA genotype of rs1550117 was associated with significantly poorer survival and increased death risk of GC compared with GG genotype (dominant model: HR=1.35, 95% CI=1.01-1.80, P=0.043). Further multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that in addition to the known factors including male, larger tumor sizes and high clinical stage, rs1550117 variant was an independently predictive factor for survival in GC patients. No significant association was found between rs13420827 genetic variants and GC prognosis. Our findings first demonstrated that DNMT3a rs1550117 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker in predicting overall survival of GC patients. PMID:26823816

  4. PML-RARA requires DNA methyltransferase 3A to initiate acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher B; Verdoni, Angela M; Ketkar, Shamika; Leight, Elizabeth R; Russler-Germain, David A; Lamprecht, Tamara L; Demeter, Ryan T; Magrini, Vincent; Ley, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B are primarily responsible for de novo methylation of specific cytosine residues in CpG dinucleotides during mammalian development. While loss-of-function mutations in DNMT3A are highly recurrent in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), DNMT3A mutations are almost never found in AML patients with translocations that create oncogenic fusion genes such as PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, and MLL-AF9. Here, we explored how DNMT3A is involved in the function of these fusion genes. We used retroviral vectors to express PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, or MLL-AF9 in bone marrow cells derived from WT or DNMT3A-deficient mice. Additionally, we examined the phenotypes of hematopoietic cells from Ctsg-PML-RARA mice, which express PML-RARA in early hematopoietic progenitors and myeloid precursors, with or without DNMT3A. We determined that the methyltransferase activity of DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, is required for aberrant PML-RARA-driven self-renewal ex vivo and that DNMT3A is dispensable for RUNX1-RUNX1T1- and MLL-AF9-driven self-renewal. Furthermore, both the PML-RARA-driven competitive transplantation advantage and development of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) required DNMT3A. Together, these findings suggest that PML-RARA requires DNMT3A to initiate APL in mice. PMID:26595813

  5. Association of DNA Methyltransferases 3A and 3B Polymorphisms, and Plasma Folate Levels with the Risk of Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chi-Jung; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Huang, Chi-Ping; Chang, Yi-Huei; Chien, Ssu-Ning; Tsai, Ping-Huan; Hsieh, Hui-An

    2014-01-01

    Background Interindividual genetic variations of human DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), which involve the methyl donor from the folate-related one-carbon metabolism pathway, are hypothesized as a risk factor for urothelial carcinoma (UC). Therefore, we evaluated the role of gene-environment interaction in UC carcinogenesis. Methods A hospital-based case-control study was conducted by recruiting 192 patients with UC and 381 controls. Their plasma folate levels were measured using a competitive immunoassay kit. In addition, DNMT3A −448A>G and DNMT3B −579G>T genotyping was evaluated using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Multivariate logistic regression and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were applied to estimate the UC risk. Results We observed that patients with UC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of folate insufficiency (folate levels ≤6 ng/mL) compared with the controls (35.94% and 18.37%, respectively). Furthermore, folate levels were higher in the prevalent UC patients than in the incident UC patients. However, folate insufficiency was similarly associated with a nearly two-fold increase in the risk of UC regardless of the UC patient group. In addition, the frequencies of the variant alleles for DNMT3A and DNMT3B were 0.80 and 0.92, respectively, and no association was observed with UC risk. However, participants with a variant homozygous genotype of DNMT3B −579G>T and folate insufficiency or with high cumulative cigarette smoking exhibited an increased risk of UC. Conclusion Overall, environmental factors may contribute more significantly to UC carcinogenesis compared with genetic susceptibility. Future studies should investigate other polymorphisms of DNMT3A and DNMT3B to determine genetic susceptibility. PMID:25126948

  6. Properly substituted analogues of BIX-01294 lose inhibition of G9a histone methyltransferase and gain selective anti-DNA methyltransferase 3A activity.

    PubMed

    Rotili, Dante; Tarantino, Domenico; Marrocco, Biagina; Gros, Christina; Masson, Véronique; Poughon, Valérie; Ausseil, Fréderic; Chang, Yanqi; Labella, Donatella; Cosconati, Sandro; Di Maro, Salvatore; Novellino, Ettore; Schnekenburger, Michael; Grandjenette, Cindy; Bouvy, Celine; Diederich, Marc; Cheng, Xiaodong; Arimondo, Paola B; Mai, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    Chemical manipulations performed on the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases (G9a/GLP) inhibitor BIX-01294 afforded novel desmethoxyquinazolines able to inhibit the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A at low micromolar levels without any significant inhibition of DNMT1 and G9a. In KG-1 cells such compounds, when tested at sub-toxic doses, induced the luciferase re-expression in a stable construct controlled by a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter silenced by methylation (CMV-luc assay). Finally, in human lymphoma U-937 and RAJI cells, the N-(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)quinazolin-4-amine induced the highest proliferation arrest and cell death induction starting from 10 µM, in agreement with its DNMT3A inhibitory potency. PMID:24810902

  7. Phenotypic switching induced by damaged matrix is associated with DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) activity and nuclear localization in smooth muscle cells (SMC).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Xin; Aitken, Karen J; Sotiropoulos, Chris; Sotiropolous, Chris; Kirwan, Tyler; Panchal, Trupti; Zhang, Nicole; Pu, Shuye; Wodak, Shoshana; Tolg, Cornelia; Bägli, Darius J

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix changes are often crucial inciting events for fibroproliferative disease. Epigenetic changes, specifically DNA methylation, are critical factors underlying differentiated phenotypes. We examined the dependency of matrix-induced fibroproliferation and SMC phenotype on DNA methyltransferases. The cooperativity of matrix with growth factors, cell density and hypoxia was also examined. Primary rat visceral SMC of early passage (0-2) were plated on native collagen or damaged/heat-denatured collagen. Hypoxia was induced with 3% O2 (balanced 5% CO2 and 95% N2) over 48 hours. Inhibitors were applied 2-3 hours after cells were plated on matrix, or immediately before hypoxia. Cells were fixed and stained for DNMT3A and smooth muscle actin (SMA) or smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. Illumina 450 K array of CpG sites was performed on bisulfite-converted DNA from smooth muscle cells on damaged matrix vs native collagen. Matrix exquisitely regulates DNMT3A localization and expression, and influences differentiation in SMCs exposed to denatured matrix +/- hypoxia. Analysis of DNA methylation signatures showed that Matrix caused significant DNA methylation alterations in a discrete number of CpG sites proximal to genes related to SMC differentiation. Matrix has a profound effect on the regulation of SMC phenotype, which is associated with altered expression, localization of DNMTs and discrete changes DNA methylation. PMID:24282625

  8. Structural basis for recognition of histone H3K36me3 nucleosome by human de novo DNA methyltransferases 3A and 3B.

    PubMed

    Rondelet, Grégoire; Dal Maso, Thomas; Willems, Luc; Wouters, Johan

    2016-06-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in chromatin organization and gene expression. The function of DNA methylation depends on cell context and is correlated with histone modification patterns. In particular, trimethylation of Lys36 on histone H3 tail (H3K36me3) is associated with DNA methylation and elongation phase of transcription. PWWP domains of the de novo DNA methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B read this epigenetic mark to guide DNA methylation. Here we report the first crystal structure of the DNMT3B PWWP domain-H3K36me3 complex. Based on this structure, we propose a model of the DNMT3A PWWP domain-H3K36me3 complex and build a model of DNMT3A (PWWP-ADD-CD) in a nucleosomal context. The trimethylated side chain of Lys36 (H3K36me3) is inserted into an aromatic cage similar to the "Royal" superfamily domains known to bind methylated histones. A key interaction between trimethylated Lys36 and a conserved water molecule stabilized by Ser270 explains the lack of affinity of mutated DNMT3B (S270P) for the H3K36me3 epigenetic mark in the ICF (Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability and Facial abnormalities) syndrome. The model of the DNMT3A-DNMT3L heterotetramer in complex with a dinucleosome highlights the mechanism for recognition of nucleosome by DNMT3s and explains the periodicity of de novo DNA methylation. PMID:26993463

  9. DNA methyltransferase 3, a target of microRNA-29c, contributes to neuronal proliferation by regulating the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guoshuai; Song, Yanmin; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Deng, Yidong; Liu, Tao; Weng, Guohu; Yu, Dan; Pan, Suyue

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia in the aged population, presents an increasing clinical challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Neurodegeneration is one of the hallmarks of AD, which consequently induces cognitive impairment. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neuroprotective factor, has been implicated in neuronal survival and proliferation. The epigenetic mechanism of BDNF methylation may be responsible for the reduced expression of BDNF in patients with AD. DNA methyltransferase may contribute to the methylation of BDNF, which is involved in neuroprotection in AD. In addition, epigenetic modifications, including a combination of microRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) and DNA methylation, have been suggested as regulatory mechanisms in the control of neuronal survival. In the present study, the expression of miR-29c was determined in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with AD and of healthy control individuals. A marked decrease in the expression of miR-29c was observed in the AD group compared with the normal control group, accompanied by a decreased in the expression of BDNF. Additionally, a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyltransferase 3 (DNMT3) was observed in the CSF from the patients with AD. Correlation analysis revealed that the expression of miR-29c was positively correlated with BDNF and negatively correlated with DNMT3 protein in the CSF of patients with AD. In addition, the regulatory association between miR-29c, DNMT3 and BDNF were also examined in vitro. It was demonstrated that miR-29c directly targeted DNMT3 and contributed to neuronal proliferation by regulating the expression of BDNF, at least partially, through enhancing the activity of the tyrosine receptor kinase B/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study suggested that miR-29c may be a promising potential therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. PMID:25815896

  10. DNA signals at isoform promoters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  11. DNA signals at isoform promoters.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  12. Autophagy promotes DNA-protein crosslink clearance.

    PubMed

    Mu, Haibo; Liu, Qianjin; Niu, Hong; Wang, Dongdong; Tang, Jiangjiang; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-02-01

    Toxic DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) can result from exposure to radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. DPCs can also accumulate during aging or stress. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying clearance of DPCs remain largely unknown. Here, we have identified an important role of autophagy in the processing of DPCs induced by three representative agents: formaldehyde, a chemical used widely in industry; UV light; and camptothecin, a cytotoxic anticancer drug. Autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ), promoted the accumulation of DPCs in damaged cells and injured organs. siRNA-mediated silencing of Atg5 or Atg7, two essential components for the formation of the autophagosome, gave similar results. In contrast, the autophagy inducer rapamycin (RAP) attenuated DPCs in vitro and in vivo. Our findings reveal the importance of autophagy in controlling the level of DPCs, and may open up a new avenue for understanding the formation and clearance of this detrimental DNA adduct. PMID:26921017

  13. UV damage in DNA promotes nucleosome unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2010-08-20

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA damage by UV radiation. We find that FRET efficiency is reduced in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the presence of UV photoproducts enhances spontaneous unwrapping of DNA from histones. Furthermore, this UV-induced shift in unwrapping dynamics is associated with increased restriction enzyme accessibility of histone-bound DNA after UV treatment. Surprisingly, the increased unwrapping dynamics is even observed in nucleosome core particles containing a single UV lesion at a specific site. These results highlight the potential for increased "intrinsic exposure" of nucleosome-associated DNA lesions in chromatin to repair proteins. PMID:20562439

  14. In vitro footprinting of promoter regions within supercoiled plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Daekyu

    2010-01-01

    Polypurine/polypyrimidine (pPU/pPY) tracts, which exist in the promoter regions of many growth-related genes, have been proposed to be very dynamic in their conformation. In this chapter, we describe a detailed protocol for DNase I and S1 nuclease footprinting experiments with supercoiled plasmid DNA containing such the promoter regions to probe whether there are conformational transitions to B-type DNA, melted DNA and G-quadruplex structures within this tract. This is demonstrated with the proximal promoter region of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, which also contains multiple binding sites for Sp1 and Egr-1 transcription factors. PMID:19997887

  15. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  16. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations.

  17. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations. PMID:23350029

  18. Equilibrious strand exchange promoted by DNA conformational switching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations. PMID:23350029

  19. Bayesian classification for promoter prediction in human DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercher, J.-F.; Jardin, P.; Duriez, B.

    2006-11-01

    Many Computational methods are yet available for data retrieval and analysis of genomic sequences, but some functional sites are difficult to characterize. In this work, we examine the problem of promoter localization in human DNA sequences. Promoters are regulatory regions that governs the expression of genes, and their prediction is reputed difficult, so that this issue is still open. We present the Chaos Game representation (CGR) of DNA sequences which has many interesting properties, and the notion of `genomic signature' that proved relevant in phylogeny applications. Based on this notion, we develop a (naïve) bayesian classifier, evaluate its performances, and show that its adaptive implementation enable to reveal or assess core-promoter positions along a DNA sequence.

  20. Prediction of fine-tuned promoter activity from DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Siwo, Geoffrey; Rider, Andrew; Tan, Asako; Pinapati, Richard; Emrich, Scott; Chawla, Nitesh; Ferdig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative prediction of transcriptional activity of genes using promoter sequence is fundamental to the engineering of biological systems for industrial purposes and understanding the natural variation in gene expression. To catalyze the development of new algorithms for this purpose, the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) organized a community challenge seeking predictive models of promoter activity given normalized promoter activity data for 90 ribosomal protein promoters driving expression of a fluorescent reporter gene. By developing an unbiased modeling approach that performs an iterative search for predictive DNA sequence features using the frequencies of various k-mers, inferred DNA mechanical properties and spatial positions of promoter sequences, we achieved the best performer status in this challenge. The specific predictive features used in the model included the frequency of the nucleotide G, the length of polymeric tracts of T and TA, the frequencies of 6 distinct trinucleotides and 12 tetranucleotides, and the predicted protein deformability of the DNA sequence. Our method accurately predicted the activity of 20 natural variants of ribosomal protein promoters (Spearman correlation r = 0.73) as compared to 33 laboratory-mutated variants of the promoters (r = 0.57) in a test set that was hidden from participants. Notably, our model differed substantially from the rest in 2 main ways: i) it did not explicitly utilize transcription factor binding information implying that subtle DNA sequence features are highly associated with gene expression, and ii) it was entirely based on features extracted exclusively from the 100 bp region upstream from the translational start site demonstrating that this region encodes much of the overall promoter activity. The findings from this study have important implications for the engineering of predictable gene expression systems and the evolution of gene expression in naturally occurring

  1. Mechanism of promoter repression by Lac repressor-DNA loops.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James; Lionberger, Troy A

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon encodes the first genetic switch to be discovered, and lac remains a paradigm for studying negative and positive control of gene expression. Negative control is believed to involve competition of RNA polymerase and Lac repressor for overlapping binding sites. Contributions to the local Lac repressor concentration come from free repressor and repressor delivered to the operator from remote auxiliary operators by DNA looping. Long-standing questions persist concerning the actual role of DNA looping in the mechanism of promoter repression. Here, we use experiments in living bacteria to resolve four of these questions. We show that the distance dependence of repression enhancement is comparable for upstream and downstream auxiliary operators, confirming the hypothesis that repressor concentration increase is the principal mechanism of repression loops. We find that as few as four turns of DNA can be constrained in a stable loop by Lac repressor. We show that RNA polymerase is not trapped at repressed promoters. Finally, we show that constraining a promoter in a tight DNA loop is sufficient for repression even when promoter and operator do not overlap. PMID:23143103

  2. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism. PMID:16277552

  3. Promoting DNA loading on magnetic nanoparticles using a DNA condensation strategy.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhi; Jiang, Youjun; Guo, Mengyu; Bennett, J Craig; Li, Xianghai; Tian, Hefeng; Oakes, Ken; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Yi; Huang, Qianming; Chen, Huaping

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing DNA loading on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is crucial for their successful utilization in gene transfer, DNA isolation, and bio-analytical applications. This enhancement is typically achieved by altering particle size and surfaces as well as charge density and ionic strength. We demonstrate a novel route for promoting DNA loading on amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (ASMNPs) by prior condensation of elongated DNA to a compact globule before adsorption. The enhanced DNA-loading capacity, as demonstrated by a reduction in the number of ASMNPs needed to achieve complexation, was presumably due to the elimination of DNA wrapping around nanoparticles and substantially reduced electrostatic interactions of DNA with nanoparticles because the compacted DNA globule conformation decreases its exposed surface charge. The maximum loading capacity of ASMNPs for condensed DNA was 4.4 times greater than that for elongated coiled DNA, achieving the highest ever reported value of 385 μg mg(-1). Practical applications for plasmid DNA isolation from cleared lysate confirmed the reliability of the proposed method. PMID:25454752

  4. Gadd45a promotes DNA demethylation through TDG.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Gu, Tian-Peng; Weber, Alain R; Shen, Jia-Zhen; Li, Bin-Zhong; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Ruichuan; Guo, Fan; Liu, Xiaomeng; Tang, Fuchou; Wang, Hailin; Schär, Primo; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-04-30

    Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 (Gadd45) family members have been implicated in DNA demethylation in vertebrates. However, it remained unclear how they contribute to the demethylation process. Here, we demonstrate that Gadd45a promotes active DNA demethylation through thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) which has recently been shown to excise 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) generated in Ten-eleven-translocation (Tet)-initiated oxidative demethylation. The connection of Gadd45a with oxidative demethylation is evidenced by the enhanced activation of a methylated reporter gene in HEK293T cells expressing Gadd45a in combination with catalytically active TDG and Tet. Gadd45a interacts with TDG physically and increases the removal of 5fC and 5caC from genomic and transfected plasmid DNA by TDG. Knockout of both Gadd45a and Gadd45b from mouse ES cells leads to hypermethylation of specific genomic loci most of which are also targets of TDG and show 5fC enrichment in TDG-deficient cells. These observations indicate that the demethylation effect of Gadd45a is mediated by TDG activity. This finding thus unites Gadd45a with the recently defined Tet-initiated demethylation pathway. PMID:25845601

  5. Gadd45a promotes DNA demethylation through TDG

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Gu, Tian-Peng; Weber, Alain R.; Shen, Jia-Zhen; Li, Bin-Zhong; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Ruichuan; Guo, Fan; Liu, Xiaomeng; Tang, Fuchou; Wang, Hailin; Schär, Primo; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 (Gadd45) family members have been implicated in DNA demethylation in vertebrates. However, it remained unclear how they contribute to the demethylation process. Here, we demonstrate that Gadd45a promotes active DNA demethylation through thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) which has recently been shown to excise 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) generated in Ten-eleven-translocation (Tet)—initiated oxidative demethylation. The connection of Gadd45a with oxidative demethylation is evidenced by the enhanced activation of a methylated reporter gene in HEK293T cells expressing Gadd45a in combination with catalytically active TDG and Tet. Gadd45a interacts with TDG physically and increases the removal of 5fC and 5caC from genomic and transfected plasmid DNA by TDG. Knockout of both Gadd45a and Gadd45b from mouse ES cells leads to hypermethylation of specific genomic loci most of which are also targets of TDG and show 5fC enrichment in TDG-deficient cells. These observations indicate that the demethylation effect of Gadd45a is mediated by TDG activity. This finding thus unites Gadd45a with the recently defined Tet-initiated demethylation pathway. PMID:25845601

  6. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  7. Promoter DNA demethylation of Keap1 gene in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang-Zhi; Zhang, Xue-Song; Zhang, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Researches have shown that the onset of diabetes is closely associated with oxidative stress and the chronic exposure leads to the development of complications such as diabetic cardiomyopathy. One of the central adaptive responses against the oxidative stresses is the activation of the nuclear transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which then activates more than 20 different antioxidative enzymes. Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets and binds to Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of Nrf2 mediated antioxidant system in myocardial biopsies of non-diabetic (NDM) and type-2 diabetic (DM-T2) cardiomyopathy patients. The western blot analysis of antioxidant proteins, real-time PCR analysis of Nrf2/Keap1 gene and bisulphate DNA sequencing analysis to study the methylation status of the CpG islands of Keap1 promoter DNA were performed. The immunoblot analysis showed the decreased level of antioxidant proteins other than Keap1 in the diabetic cardiopathy patients. Similarly, mRNA levels of Keap1 showed 5-fold increase in diabetic patients. Further analysis on promoter region of Keap1 gene revealed 80% demethylation in diabetic patients. Altogether, our results indicated that demethylation of the CpG islands in the Keap1 promoter will activate the expression of Keap1 protein, which then increases the targeting of Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. Decreased Nrf2 activity represses the transcription of many antioxidant enzyme genes and alters the redox-balance up on diabetes. Thus, our study clearly demonstrates the failure of Nrf2 mediated antioxidant system revealed in biopsies of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25674242

  8. SA1 and TRF1 synergistically bind to telomeric DNA and promote DNA-DNA pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jiangguo; Countryman, Preston; Pan, Hai; Parminder Kaur Team; Robert Riehn Team; Patricia Opresko Team; Jane Tao Team; Susan Smith Team

    Impaired telomere cohesion leads to increased aneuploidy and early onset of tumorigenesis. Cohesion is thought to occur through the entrapment of two DNA strands within tripartite cohesin ring(s), along with a fourth subunit (SA1/SA2). Surprisingly, cohesion rings are not essential for telomere cohesion, which instead requires SA1 and shelterin proteins including TRF1. However, neither this unique cohesion mechanism at telomeres or DNA-binding properties of SA1 is understood. Here, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging of quantum dot-labeled proteins on DNA we discover that while SA1 diffuses across multiple telomeric and non-telomeric regions, the diffusion mediated through its N-terminal domain is slower at telomeric regions. However, addition of TRF1 traps SA1 within telomeric regions, which form longer DNA-DNA pairing tracts than with TRF1 alone, as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Together, these experimental results and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest that TRF1 and SA1 synergistically interact with DNA to support telomere cohesion without cohesin rings.

  9. Stalled transcription complexes promote DNA repair at a distance

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Nia M.; Kim, Young-In T.; Smith, Abigail J.; Savery, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR) accelerates the removal of noncoding lesions from the template strand of active genes, and hence contributes to genome-wide variations in mutation frequency. Current models for TCR suppose that a lesion must cause RNA polymerase (RNAP) to stall if it is to be a substrate for accelerated repair. We have examined the substrate requirements for TCR using a system in which transcription stalling and damage location can be uncoupled. We show that Mfd-dependent TCR in bacteria involves the formation of a damage search complex that can detect lesions downstream of a stalled RNAP, and that the strand specificity of the accelerated repair pathway is independent of the requirement for a lesion to stall RNAP. We also show that an ops (operon polarity suppressor) transcription pause site, which causes backtracking of RNAP, can promote the repair of downstream lesions when those lesions do not themselves cause the polymerase to stall. Our findings indicate that the transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd, which is an ATP-dependent superfamily 2 helicase that binds to RNAP, continues to translocate along DNA after RNAP has been displaced until a lesion in the template strand is located. The discovery that pause sites can promote the repair of nonstalling lesions suggests that TCR pathways may play a wider role in modulating mutation frequencies in different parts of the genome than has previously been suspected. PMID:24554077

  10. Identification of procollagen promoter DNA-binding proteins: effects of dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, C.; Cutroneo, K.R.

    1987-05-01

    Glucocorticoids selectively decrease procollagen synthesis by decreasing procollagen mRNA transcription. Dexamethasone coordinately decreased total cellular type I and type III procollagen mRNAs in mouse embryonic skin fibroblasts. Since sequence specific DNA-binding proteins are known to modulate eukaryotic gene expression the authors identified in mouse fibroblasts nuclear proteins which bind to types I and III procollagen promoter DNAs. Nuclear proteins were electrophoresed, blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with /sup 32/P-end-labeled type I and type III procollagen promoter DNAs in the presence of equimolar amounts of /sup 32/P-end-labeled vector DNA. Differences in total DNA binding were noted by the densitometric scans of the nuclear proteins. Dexamethasone treatment enhanced total DNA binding. Increasing the NaCl concentration decreased the number of promoter DNA-binding proteins without altering the relative specificity for the promoter DNAs. Promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was also inhibited by increasing concentrations of E. coli DNA. The number of DNA-binding proteins was greater for type III procollagen promoter DNA. The effect of dexamethasone treatment on promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was determined.

  11. Reprogrammable CRISPR/Cas9-based system for inducing site-specific DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James I.; Celik, Hamza; Rois, Lisa E.; Fishberger, Gregory; Fowler, Tolison; Rees, Ryan; Kramer, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Edwards, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advances in sequencing technology allow researchers to map genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in development and disease. However, there is a lack of experimental tools to site-specifically manipulate DNA methylation to discern the functional consequences. We developed a CRISPR/Cas9 DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) fusion to induce DNA methylation at specific loci in the genome. We induced DNA methylation at up to 50% of alleles for targeted CpG dinucleotides. DNA methylation levels peaked within 50 bp of the short guide RNA (sgRNA) binding site and between pairs of sgRNAs. We used our approach to target methylation across the entire CpG island at the CDKN2A promoter, three CpG dinucleotides at the ARF promoter, and the CpG island within the Cdkn1a promoter to decrease expression of the target gene. These tools permit mechanistic studies of DNA methylation and its role in guiding molecular processes that determine cellular fate. PMID:27170255

  12. Reprogrammable CRISPR/Cas9-based system for inducing site-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James I; Celik, Hamza; Rois, Lisa E; Fishberger, Gregory; Fowler, Tolison; Rees, Ryan; Kramer, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Edwards, John R; Challen, Grant A

    2016-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology allow researchers to map genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in development and disease. However, there is a lack of experimental tools to site-specifically manipulate DNA methylation to discern the functional consequences. We developed a CRISPR/Cas9 DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) fusion to induce DNA methylation at specific loci in the genome. We induced DNA methylation at up to 50% of alleles for targeted CpG dinucleotides. DNA methylation levels peaked within 50 bp of the short guide RNA (sgRNA) binding site and between pairs of sgRNAs. We used our approach to target methylation across the entire CpG island at the CDKN2A promoter, three CpG dinucleotides at the ARF promoter, and the CpG island within the Cdkn1a promoter to decrease expression of the target gene. These tools permit mechanistic studies of DNA methylation and its role in guiding molecular processes that determine cellular fate. PMID:27170255

  13. Promoters responsive to DNA bending: a common theme in prokaryotic gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, J; Rojo, F; de Lorenzo, V

    1994-01-01

    The early notion of DNA as a passive target for regulatory proteins has given way to the realization that higher-order DNA structures and DNA-protein complexes are at the basis of many molecular processes, including control of promoter activity. Protein binding may direct the bending of an otherwise linear DNA, exacerbate the angle of an intrinsic bend, or assist the directional flexibility of certain sequences within prokaryotic promoters. The important, sometimes essential role of intrinsic or protein-induced DNA bending in transcriptional regulation has become evident in virtually every system examined. As discussed throughout this article, not every function of DNA bends is understood, but their presence has been detected in a wide variety of bacterial promoters subjected to positive or negative control. Nonlinear DNA structures facilitate and even determine proximal and distal DNA-protein and protein-protein contacts involved in the various steps leading to transcription initiation. PMID:8078436

  14. Genome-wide Mapping Reveals Conservation of Promoter DNA Methylation Following Chicken Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues. PMID:25735894

  15. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  16. A viral satellite DNA vector-induced transcriptional gene silencing via DNA methylation of gene promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zheng; Wang, Lei; Cao, Dongyan; Zuo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2016-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been widely used for plant functional genomics study at the post-transcriptional level using various DNA or RNA viral vectors. However, while virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS) via DNA methylation of gene promoter was achieved using several plant RNA viral vectors, it has not yet been done using a satellite DNA viral vector. In this study, a viral satellite DNA associated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which has been modified as a VIGS vector in previous research, was developed as a VITGS vector. Firstly, the viral satellite DNA VIGS vector was further optimized to a more convenient p1.7A+2mβ vector with high silencing efficiency of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Secondly, the constructed VITGS vector (TYLCCNV:35S), which carried a portion of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, could successfully induce heritable transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene in the 35S-GFP transgenic N. benthamiana line 16c plants. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing results revealed higher methylated cytosine residues at CG, CHG and CHH sites of the 35S promoter sequence in TYLCCNV:35S-inoculated plants than in TYLCCNV-inoculated line 16c plants (control). Overall, these results demonstrated that the viral satellite DNA vector could be used as an effective VITGS vector to study DNA methylation in plant genomes. PMID:27422476

  17. Bacterial promoter repression by DNA looping without protein–protein binding competition

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Nicole A.; Greiner, Alexander M.; Peters, Justin P.; Maher, L. James

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose operon provides a paradigm for understanding gene control by DNA looping where the lac repressor (LacI) protein competes with RNA polymerase for DNA binding. Not all promoter loops involve direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase. This raises the possibility that positioning a promoter within a tightly constrained DNA loop is repressive per se, an idea that has previously only been considered in vitro. Here, we engineer living E. coli bacteria to measure repression due to promoter positioning within such a tightly constrained DNA loop in the absence of protein–protein binding competition. We show that promoters held within such DNA loops are repressed ∼100-fold, with up to an additional ∼10-fold repression (∼1000-fold total) dependent on topological positioning of the promoter on the inner or outer face of the DNA loop. Chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest that repression involves inhibition of both RNA polymerase initiation and elongation. These in vivo results show that gene repression can result from tightly looping promoter DNA even in the absence of direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase binding. PMID:24598256

  18. Bacterial promoter repression by DNA looping without protein-protein binding competition.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Greiner, Alexander M; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James

    2014-05-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose operon provides a paradigm for understanding gene control by DNA looping where the lac repressor (LacI) protein competes with RNA polymerase for DNA binding. Not all promoter loops involve direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase. This raises the possibility that positioning a promoter within a tightly constrained DNA loop is repressive per se, an idea that has previously only been considered in vitro. Here, we engineer living E. coli bacteria to measure repression due to promoter positioning within such a tightly constrained DNA loop in the absence of protein-protein binding competition. We show that promoters held within such DNA loops are repressed ∼100-fold, with up to an additional ∼10-fold repression (∼1000-fold total) dependent on topological positioning of the promoter on the inner or outer face of the DNA loop. Chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest that repression involves inhibition of both RNA polymerase initiation and elongation. These in vivo results show that gene repression can result from tightly looping promoter DNA even in the absence of direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase binding. PMID:24598256

  19. DNA damage promotes Herpes Simplex Virus-1 protein expression in a neuroblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Volcy, Ketna; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the induction of the cellular DNA damage response by Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection of epithelial cells in tissue culture promotes productive infection, there has been no experimental observation of the effect of the cellular DNA damage response on HSV-1 infection in vivo or in neuronal derived cell lines in tissue culture. Thus, it has been speculated that the lack of cellular DNA damage induction during infection of neurons may promote latency in these cells. This work examines the profile of HSV-1 promoter induction and protein expression, in the absence or presence of infection; using cellular DNA damage inducing topoisomerase inhibitors (Camptothecin and Etoposide) on a neuroblastoma cell line (C1300) in which HSV-1 infection fails to induce the DNA damage response. In the absence of infection, a plasmid expressing the immediate early ICP0 promoter was the most induced by the DNA damage drug treatments compared to the early (RR) and late (VP16) gene promoters. Similarly, drug treatment of C1300 cells infected with HSV-1 virus showed enhanced protein expression for ICP0, but not ICP4 and VP16 proteins. However, when the cells were infected with a HSV-1 virus defective in the immediate early gene trans-activator VP16 (in814) and treated with the DNA damaging drugs, there was enhanced expression of immediate early and late HSV-1 proteins. Although, viral infection of the neuroblastoma cell alone did not induce DNA damage, cellular DNA damage induced by drug treatments facilitated viral promoter induction and viral protein expression. This implicates a mechanism by which HSV-1 viral genes in a quiescent or latent state may become induced by cellular DNA damage in neuronal cells to facilitate productive infection. PMID:23354549

  20. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  1. Characterization of a T-DNA promoter trap line of Arabidopsis thaliana uncovers a cryptic bi-directional promoter.

    PubMed

    Pratibha, Pritu; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Isha; Kumar, Ravi; Srinivasan, Ramamurthy; Bhat, Shripad Ramachandra; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2013-07-15

    Investigation of the transgenic Arabidopsis promoter trap line GFP-868 that showed GFP expression only in anthers revealed the T-DNA insertion at 461bp upstream to the hypothetical gene At4g10596 with the GFP reporter gene in head-to-head orientation to the At4g10596 gene. The expression of the At4g10596 gene in wild type and in GFP-868 plant homozygous for T-DNA insertion was comparable and found in all tissues tested, while the GFP expression was restricted to anthers of the GFP-868 plants suggesting that the 461bp fragment separating the two genes in the GFP-868 line is functioning as bi-directional promoter. This 461bp fragment was cloned upstream to the GUS gene in two orientations to test for bi-directional promoter activity. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying either of these constructs showed GUS activity in anthers indicating that this fragment behaves as bi-directional promoter specific to anthers. These results were also supported by the presence of cis-acting motifs such as TATA box and POLLEN1LELAT52 (AGAAA) within the 461bp sequence in both orientations. However, transcripts corresponding to the upstream sequences beyond -461 nucleotides were not detected in the wild type suggesting that this 461bp fragment is a cryptic promoter. The significance of the promoter trap approach and the usefulness of this type of promoter are discussed. PMID:23612249

  2. Defective removal of ribonucleotides from DNA promotes systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Claudia; Kind, Barbara; Reijns, Martin A.M.; Berndt, Nicole; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Wolf, Christine; Tüngler, Victoria; Chara, Osvaldo; Lee, Young Ae; Hübner, Norbert; Bicknell, Louise; Blum, Sophia; Krug, Claudia; Schmidt, Franziska; Kretschmer, Stefanie; Koss, Sarah; Astell, Katy R.; Ramantani, Georgia; Bauerfeind, Anja; Morris, David L.; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Bubeck, Doryen; Leitch, Andrea; Ralston, Stuart H.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Gahr, Manfred; Witte, Torsten; Vyse, Timothy J.; Melchers, Inga; Mangold, Elisabeth; Nöthen, Markus M.; Aringer, Martin; Kuhn, Annegret; Lüthke, Kirsten; Unger, Leonore; Bley, Annette; Lorenzi, Alice; Isaacs, John D.; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Conrad, Karsten; Dahl, Andreas; Roers, Axel; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is continuously challenged by the DNA damage that arises during normal cell metabolism. Biallelic mutations in the genes encoding the genome surveillance enzyme ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), a pediatric disorder that shares features with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we determined that heterozygous parents of AGS patients exhibit an intermediate autoimmune phenotype and demonstrated a genetic association between rare RNASEH2 sequence variants and SLE. Evaluation of patient cells revealed that SLE- and AGS-associated mutations impair RNase H2 function and result in accumulation of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA. The ensuing chronic low level of DNA damage triggered a DNA damage response characterized by constitutive p53 phosphorylation and senescence. Patient fibroblasts exhibited constitutive upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and an enhanced type I IFN response to the immunostimulatory nucleic acid polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and UV light irradiation, linking RNase H2 deficiency to potentiation of innate immune signaling. Moreover, UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation was markedly enhanced in ribonucleotide-containing DNA, providing a mechanism for photosensitivity in RNase H2–associated SLE. Collectively, our findings implicate RNase H2 in the pathogenesis of SLE and suggest a role of DNA damage–associated pathways in the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:25500883

  3. Promoted electron transfer of mitoxantrone binding with DNA by cytochrome c

    SciTech Connect

    Li Nan; Yang Xiurong . E-mail: xryang@ns.ciac.jl.cn

    2005-06-17

    A promoted electron transfer of an antitumor drug, mitoxantrone (MTX), intercalating into DNA duplex was successfully obtained upon addition of cytochromes c (cyt. c) in NaAc-HAc buffer solution (pH 4.5). The experimental results suggested that co-existence of MTX and cyt. c in the DNA helix is an important factor for accelerated electron transfer of MTX, where the promoter, cyt. c, operated smoothly through the DNA bridge. The UV/Vis spectroscopic experiments further confirmed the interaction process. Furthermore, a possible mechanism of such reaction was also discussed in this paper.

  4. Polymer Multilayers that Promote the Rapid Release and Contact Transfer of DNA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Si, Yi; Bechler, Shane L; Liu, Bo; Lynn, David M

    2015-09-14

    We report a layer-by-layer approach to the fabrication of thin polymer-based multilayers that release DNA rapidly in physiologically relevant environments. This approach exploits the properties of a weak anionic polyelectrolyte [poly(acrylic acid); PAA] to disrupt ionic interactions and promote disassembly in coatings that otherwise erode slowly. We investigated this approach using multilayers fabricated from plasmid DNA and linear poly(ethylenimine) (LPEI), a model synthetic cationic polymer used widely for DNA delivery. LPEI/DNA multilayers erode and release DNA slowly over ∼4 days when incubated in PBS buffer. In contrast, substitution of every other layer of DNA with PAA lead to thin films that released DNA rapidly, with >60% being released in the first 5 min. These quick-release coatings release bioactive DNA and can be used to fabricate uniform coatings on a variety of objects, including the tips of inflatable balloon catheters. We demonstrate that these coatings can promote high levels of cell transfection in vitro and the robust contact transfer and expression of DNA in vascular tissue in vivo using a rat model of vascular injury. These materials provide useful alternatives to multilayers and other coatings that promote the prolonged release of DNA. More broadly, approaches that depart from the use of degradable polymers to promote film erosion create opportunities to design new gene delivery coatings using a broader range of polymer-based building blocks designed for other gene delivery applications. With further development, this approach could thus provide a new and useful platform for the rapid contact transfer of DNA to cells and tissues of interest in a range of fundamental and applied contexts. PMID:26285737

  5. DNA supercoiling and the leu-500 promoter mutation of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, S M; Higgins, C F; Lilley, D M

    1988-01-01

    DNA supercoiling is an important, but relatively poorly understood factor which influences promoter function. leu-500 is a point mutation in the promoter of the leucine operon of Salmonella typhimurium which confers leucine auxotrophy. It can be phenotypically suppressed by mutations in the topA gene, which encodes topoisomerase I, implicating DNA supercoiling in the regulation of this promoter. We have demonstrated that phenotypic suppression of this mutant promoter is transcriptional, and that topA mutations restore function to the mutant promoter. Transcription from the leu-500 promoter was examined in a series of strains harbouring topA and tos (presumptive gyr) mutations, each of which exhibits a different level of in vivo plasmid supercoiling. Promoter function did not correlate with the level of supercoiling but rather with the presence or absence of a functional topA gene. Furthermore, when cloned onto a multicopy plasmid, the leu-500 promoter failed to function, even in a topA background. Thus, local rather than global changes in DNA topology are implicated in the activation of this promoter. Images PMID:2844526

  6. Screening of promoters from rhizosphere metagenomic DNA using a promoter-trap vector and flow cytometric cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Lee, Hyo Jung; Jeon, Che Ok

    2011-02-01

    We constructed a facilitative and efficient promoter-trap vector, pCM-EGFP, for capturing and analyzing functional promoters from environmental DNA. The pCM-EGFP vector showed good chloramphenicol sensitivity and no enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene expression. Promoter libraries were constructed for screening promoters responding to naringenin, a key molecule released from plant roots. After electroporation, E. coli transformants were incubated in LB broth containing chloramphenicol (10 μg/ml) to select against transformants with no cloned promoter. E. coli cells were sorted using flow cytometry without naringenin, and then sorted again with high fluorescence after incubation in LB broth with naringenin (1 mM) at 28 °C for 12 h. The inducible properties of approximately 400 sorted cells were evaluated, with most cells showing only strong EGFP gene expression without inducible properties. Two clones (5-4E and 15-3D) displayed naringenin inducibility, and both contained a promoter bounded by a TetR-family regulator. The regulator knock-out mutant of the 5-4E clone lost its ability to be induced by naringenin. In conclusion, the pCM-EGFP vector may be used as an efficient promoter-trap vector and a combination of the vector with flow cytometric cell sorting was demonstrated to be an useful method for screening promoters responding to specific conditions or inducers. PMID:21259288

  7. Evolutionary Transition of Promoter and Gene Body DNA Methylation across Invertebrate–Vertebrate Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Thomas E.; Han, Priscilla; Yi, Soojin V.

    2016-01-01

    Genomes of invertebrates and vertebrates exhibit highly divergent patterns of DNA methylation. Invertebrate genomes tend to be sparsely methylated, and DNA methylation is mostly targeted to a subset of transcription units (gene bodies). In a drastic contrast, vertebrate genomes are generally globally and heavily methylated, punctuated by the limited local hypo-methylation of putative regulatory regions such as promoters. These genomic differences also translate into functional differences in DNA methylation and gene regulation. Although promoter DNA methylation is an important regulatory component of vertebrate gene expression, its role in invertebrate gene regulation has been little explored. Instead, gene body DNA methylation is associated with expression of invertebrate genes. However, the evolutionary steps leading to the differentiation of invertebrate and vertebrate genomic DNA methylation remain unresolved. Here we analyzed experimentally determined DNA methylation maps of several species across the invertebrate–vertebrate boundary, to elucidate how vertebrate gene methylation has evolved. We show that, in contrast to the prevailing idea, a substantial number of promoters in an invertebrate basal chordate Ciona intestinalis are methylated. Moreover, gene expression data indicate significant, epigenomic context-dependent associations between promoter methylation and expression in C. intestinalis. However, there is no evidence that promoter methylation in invertebrate chordate has been evolutionarily maintained across the invertebrate–vertebrate boundary. Rather, body-methylated invertebrate genes preferentially obtain hypo-methylated promoters among vertebrates. Conversely, promoter methylation is preferentially found in lineage- and tissue-specific vertebrate genes. These results provide important insights into the evolutionary origin of epigenetic regulation of vertebrate gene expression. PMID:26715626

  8. Fission Yeast Pxd1 Promotes Proper DNA Repair by Activating Rad16XPF and Inhibiting Dna2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Min; Liu, Xiao-Man; Ding, Yue-He; Xiong, Liang-Yao; Ren, Jing-Yi; Zhou, Zhi-Xiong; Wang, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Mei-Jun; Yu, Yang; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Du, Li-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Structure-specific nucleases play crucial roles in many DNA repair pathways. They must be precisely controlled to ensure optimal repair outcomes; however, mechanisms of their regulation are not fully understood. Here, we report a fission yeast protein, Pxd1, that binds to and regulates two structure-specific nucleases: Rad16XPF-Swi10ERCC1 and Dna2-Cdc24. Strikingly, Pxd1 influences the activities of these two nucleases in opposite ways: It activates the 3′ endonuclease activity of Rad16-Swi10 but inhibits the RPA-mediated activation of the 5′ endonuclease activity of Dna2. Pxd1 is required for Rad16-Swi10 to function in single-strand annealing, mating-type switching, and the removal of Top1-DNA adducts. Meanwhile, Pxd1 attenuates DNA end resection mediated by the Rqh1-Dna2 pathway. Disabling the Dna2-inhibitory activity of Pxd1 results in enhanced use of a break-distal repeat sequence in single-strand annealing and a greater loss of genetic information. We propose that Pxd1 promotes proper DNA repair by differentially regulating two structure-specific nucleases. PMID:25203555

  9. Structural Basis for DNA-Hairpin Promoter Recognition by the Bacteriophage N4 Virion RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Gleghorn, M.; Davydova, E; Rothman-Denes, L; Murakami, K

    2008-01-01

    Coliphage N4 virion-encapsidated RNA polymerase (vRNAP) is a member of the phage T7-like single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) family. Its central domain (mini-vRNAP) contains all RNAP functions of the full-length vRNAP, which recognizes a 5 to 7 base pair stem and 3 nucleotide loop hairpin DNA promoter. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of mini-vRNAP bound to promoters. Mini-vRNAP uses four structural motifs to recognize DNA sequences at the hairpin loop and stem and to unwind DNA. Despite their low sequence similarity, three out of four motifs are shared with T7 RNAP that recognizes a double-stranded DNA promoter. The binary complex structure and results of engineered disulfide linkage experiments reveal that the plug and motif B loop, which block the access of template DNA to the active site in the apo-form mini-vRNAP, undergo a large-scale conformational change upon promoter binding, explaining the restricted promoter specificity that is critical for N4 phage early transcription.

  10. DNA damage-induced type I interferon promotes senescence and inhibits stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Christopher J.; Zhao, Bin; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V.; Zheng, Hui; Guha, Manti; Li, Ning; Chen, Qijun; Yang, Ting; Lengner, Christopher J.; Greenberg, Roger A.; Johnson, F. Brad; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of type I interferons (IFN) can be induced by DNA damaging agents but the mechanisms and significance of this regulation are not completely understood. We found that the transcription factor IRF3, activated in an ATM-IKKα/β dependent manner, stimulates cell-autonomous IFNβ expression in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. Cells and tissues with accumulating DNA damage produce endogenous IFNβ and stimulate IFN signaling in vitro and in vivo. In turn, IFN acts to amplify DNA damage responses, activate the p53 pathway, promote senescence and inhibit stem cells function in response to telomere shortening. Inactivation of the IFN pathway abrogates the development of diverse progeric phenotypes and extends the life span of Terc knockout mice. These data identify DNA damage response-induced IFN signaling as a critical mechanism that links accumulating DNA damage with senescence and premature aging. PMID:25921537

  11. DNA/Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Nanospheres Promote Low-dose DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Dorian; Barteau, Benoît; Cany, Jeannette; Richard, Peggy; Gourden, Clothilde; Conchon, Sophie; Pitard, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) DNA vaccination induces strong cellular immune responses in the mouse, but only at DNA doses that cannot be achieved in humans. Because antigen expression is weak after naked DNA injection, we screened five nonionic block copolymers of poly(ethyleneoxide)-poly(propyleneoxide) (PEO-PPO) for their ability to enhance DNA vaccination using a β-galactosidase (βGal) encoding plasmid, pCMV-βGal, as immunogen. At a high DNA dose, formulation with the tetrafunctional block copolymers 304 (molecular weight [MW] 1,650) and 704 (MW 5,500) and the triblock copolymer Lutrol (MW 8,600) increased βGal-specific interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) responses 2–2.5-fold. More importantly, 704 allowed significant reductions in the dose of antigen-encoding plasmid. A single injection of 2 µg pCMV-βGal with 704 gave humoral and ELISPOT responses equivalent to those obtained with 100 µg naked DNA and conferred protection in tumor vaccination models. However, 704 had no adjuvant properties for βGal protein, and immune responses were only elicited by low doses of pCMV-βGal formulated with 704 if noncoding carrier DNA was added to maintain total DNA dose at 20 µg. Overall, these results show that formulation with 704 and carrier DNA can reduce the dose of antigen-encoding plasmid by at least 50-fold. PMID:19417740

  12. Eukaryotic and archaeal TBP and TFB/TF(II)B follow different promoter DNA bending pathways.

    PubMed

    Gietl, Andreas; Holzmeister, Phil; Blombach, Fabian; Schulz, Sarah; von Voithenberg, Lena Voith; Lamb, Don C; Werner, Finn; Tinnefeld, Philip; Grohmann, Dina

    2014-06-01

    During transcription initiation, the promoter DNA is recognized and bent by the basal transcription factor TATA-binding protein (TBP). Subsequent association of transcription factor B (TFB) with the TBP-DNA complex is followed by the recruitment of the ribonucleic acid polymerase resulting in the formation of the pre-initiation complex. TBP and TFB/TF(II)B are highly conserved in structure and function among the eukaryotic-archaeal domain but intriguingly have to operate under vastly different conditions. Employing single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we monitored DNA bending by eukaryotic and archaeal TBPs in the absence and presence of TFB in real-time. We observed that the lifetime of the TBP-DNA interaction differs significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic system. We show that the eukaryotic DNA-TBP interaction is characterized by a linear, stepwise bending mechanism with an intermediate state distinguished by a distinct bending angle. TF(II)B specifically stabilizes the fully bent TBP-promoter DNA complex and we identify this step as a regulatory checkpoint. In contrast, the archaeal TBP-DNA interaction is extremely dynamic and TBP from the archaeal organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strictly requires TFB for DNA bending. Thus, we demonstrate that transcription initiation follows diverse pathways on the way to the formation of the pre-initiation complex. PMID:24744242

  13. FBH1 promotes DNA double-strand breakage and apoptosis in response to DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon-Tae; Rossi, Mario; Cermak, Lukas; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Sung, Patrick; Schildkraut, Carl L; Schildkraut, Carl; Pagano, Michele

    2013-01-21

    Proper resolution of stalled replication forks is essential for genome stability. Purification of FBH1, a UvrD DNA helicase, identified a physical interaction with replication protein A (RPA), the major cellular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein complex. Compared with control cells, FBH1-depleted cells responded to replication stress with considerably fewer double-strand breaks (DSBs), a dramatic reduction in the activation of ATM and DNA-PK and phosphorylation of RPA2 and p53, and a significantly increased rate of survival. A minor decrease in ssDNA levels was also observed. All these phenotypes were rescued by wild-type FBH1, but not a FBH1 mutant lacking helicase activity. FBH1 depletion had no effect on other forms of genotoxic stress in which DSBs form by means that do not require ssDNA intermediates. In response to catastrophic genotoxic stress, apoptosis prevents the persistence and propagation of DNA lesions. Our findings show that FBH1 helicase activity is required for the efficient induction of DSBs and apoptosis specifically in response to DNA replication stress. PMID:23319600

  14. Uracil-DNA Glycosylase UNG Promotes Tet-mediated DNA Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jian-Huang; Xu, Gui-Fang; Gu, Tian-Peng; Chen, Guo-Dong; Han, Bin-Bin; Xu, Zhi-Mei; Bjørås, Magnar; Krokan, Hans E; Xu, Guo-Liang; Du, Ya-Rui

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, active DNA demethylation involves oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) by Tet dioxygenases and excision of these two oxidized bases by thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG). Although TDG is essential for active demethylation in embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, it is hardly expressed in mouse zygotes and dispensable in pronuclear DNA demethylation. To search for other factors that might contribute to demethylation in mammalian cells, we performed a functional genomics screen based on a methylated luciferase reporter assay. UNG2, one of the glycosylases known to excise uracil residues from DNA, was found to reduce DNA methylation, thus activating transcription of a methylation-silenced reporter gene when co-transfected with Tet2 into HEK293T cells. Interestingly, UNG2 could decrease 5caC from the genomic DNA and a reporter plasmid in transfected cells, like TDG. Furthermore, deficiency in Ung partially impaired DNA demethylation in mouse zygotes. Our results suggest that UNG might be involved in Tet-mediated DNA demethylation. PMID:26620559

  15. Neil DNA glycosylases promote substrate turnover by Tdg during DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Khelifa; Kienhöfer, Sabine; von Seggern, Annika; Niehrs, Christof

    2016-01-01

    DNA 5-methylcytosine is a dynamic epigenetic mark which plays important roles in development and disease. In the Tet-Tdg demethylation pathway, methylated cytosine is iteratively oxidized by Tet dioxygenases and unmodified cytosine is restored via thymine DNA glycosylase (Tdg). Here we show that human NEIL1 and NEIL2 DNA glycosylases coordinate abasic site processing during TET–TDG DNA demethylation. NEIL1 and NEIL2 cooperate with TDG during base excision: TDG occupies the abasic site and is displaced by NEILs, which further process the baseless sugar, thereby stimulating TDG substrate turnover. In early Xenopus embryos Neil2 cooperates with Tdg to remove oxidized methylcytosines and to specify neural crest development together with Tet3. Thus, Neils function as AP lyases in the coordinated AP site hand-over during oxidative DNA demethylation. PMID:26751644

  16. TDP1 promotes assembly of non-homologous end joining protein complexes on DNA.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinho; Li, Jing; Summerlin, Matthew; Hays, Annette; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J; Nitiss, Karin C; Nitiss, John L; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2015-06-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is central to the maintenance of genomic integrity. In tumor cells, the ability to repair DSBs predicts response to radiation and many cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. DSB repair pathways include homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ is a template-independent mechanism, yet many NHEJ repair products carry limited genetic changes, which suggests that NHEJ includes mechanisms to minimize error. Proteins required for mammalian NHEJ include Ku70/80, the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), XLF/Cernunnos and the XRCC4:DNA ligase IV complex. NHEJ also utilizes accessory proteins that include DNA polymerases, nucleases, and other end-processing factors. In yeast, mutations of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP1) reduced NHEJ fidelity. TDP1 plays an important role in repair of topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage and 3'-blocking DNA lesions, and mutation of the human TDP1 gene results in an inherited human neuropathy termed SCAN1. We found that human TDP1 stimulated DNA binding by XLF and physically interacted with XLF to form TDP1:XLF:DNA complexes. TDP1:XLF interactions preferentially stimulated TDP1 activity on dsDNA as compared to ssDNA. TDP1 also promoted DNA binding by Ku70/80 and stimulated DNA-PK activity. Because Ku70/80 and XLF are the first factors recruited to the DSB at the onset of NHEJ, our data suggest a role for TDP1 during the early stages of mammalian NHEJ. PMID:25841101

  17. FANCM interacts with PCNA to promote replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Rohleder, Florian; Huang, Jing; Xue, Yutong; Kuper, Jochen; Round, Adam; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    FANCM is a highly conserved DNA remodeling enzyme that promotes the activation of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway and facilitates replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks. However, how FANCM interacts with the replication machinery to promote traverse remains unclear. Here, we show that FANCM and its archaeal homolog Hef from Thermoplasma acidophilum interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential co-factor for DNA polymerases in both replication and repair. The interaction is mediated through a conserved PIP-box; and in human FANCM, it is strongly stimulated by replication stress. A FANCM variant carrying a mutation in the PIP-box is defective in promoting replication traverse of interstrand crosslinks and is also inefficient in promoting FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a key step of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Our data reveal a conserved interaction mode between FANCM and PCNA during replication stress, and suggest that this interaction is essential for FANCM to aid replication machines to traverse DNA interstrand crosslinks prior to post-replication repair. PMID:26825464

  18. FANCM interacts with PCNA to promote replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Rohleder, Florian; Huang, Jing; Xue, Yutong; Kuper, Jochen; Round, Adam; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-04-20

    FANCM is a highly conserved DNA remodeling enzyme that promotes the activation of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway and facilitates replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks. However, how FANCM interacts with the replication machinery to promote traverse remains unclear. Here, we show that FANCM and its archaeal homolog Hef from Thermoplasma acidophilum interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential co-factor for DNA polymerases in both replication and repair. The interaction is mediated through a conserved PIP-box; and in human FANCM, it is strongly stimulated by replication stress. A FANCM variant carrying a mutation in the PIP-box is defective in promoting replication traverse of interstrand crosslinks and is also inefficient in promoting FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a key step of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Our data reveal a conserved interaction mode between FANCM and PCNA during replication stress, and suggest that this interaction is essential for FANCM to aid replication machines to traverse DNA interstrand crosslinks prior to post-replication repair. PMID:26825464

  19. Developmental- and differentiation-specific patterns of human gamma- and beta-globin promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Mabaera, Rodwell; Richardson, Christine A; Johnson, Kristin; Hsu, Mei; Fiering, Steven; Lowrey, Christopher H

    2007-08-15

    The mechanisms underlying the human fetal-to-adult beta-globin gene switch remain to be determined. While there is substantial experimental evidence to suggest that promoter DNA methylation is involved in this process, most data come from studies in nonhuman systems. We have evaluated human gamma- and beta-globin promoter methylation in primary human fetal liver (FL) and adult bone marrow (ABM) erythroid cells. Our results show that, in general, promoter methylation and gene expression are inversely related. However, CpGs at -162 of the gamma promoter and -126 of the beta promoter are hypomethylated in ABM and FL, respectively. We also studied gamma-globin promoter methylation during in vitro differentiation of erythroid cells. The gamma promoters are initially hypermethylated in CD34(+) cells. The upstream gamma promoter CpGs become hypomethylated during the preerythroid phase of differentiation and are then remethylated later, during erythropoiesis. The period of promoter hypomethylation correlates with transient gamma-globin gene expression and may explain the previously observed fetal hemoglobin production that occurs during early adult erythropoiesis. These results provide the first comprehensive survey of developmental changes in human gamma- and beta-globin promoter methylation and support the hypothesis that promoter methylation plays a role in human beta-globin locus gene switching. PMID:17456718

  20. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. PMID:23598277

  1. Mesoscopic model and free energy landscape for protein-DNA binding sites: analysis of cyanobacterial promoters.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojo, Rafael; Mazo, Juan José; Hernández, José Ángel; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F; Falo, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The identification of protein binding sites in promoter sequences is a key problem to understand and control regulation in biochemistry and biotechnological processes. We use a computational method to analyze promoters from a given genome. Our approach is based on a physical model at the mesoscopic level of protein-DNA interaction based on the influence of DNA local conformation on the dynamics of a general particle along the chain. Following the proposed model, the joined dynamics of the protein particle and the DNA portion of interest, only characterized by its base pair sequence, is simulated. The simulation output is analyzed by generating and analyzing the Free Energy Landscape of the system. In order to prove the capacity of prediction of our computational method we have analyzed nine promoters of Anabaena PCC 7120. We are able to identify the transcription starting site of each of the promoters as the most populated macrostate in the dynamics. The developed procedure allows also to characterize promoter macrostates in terms of thermo-statistical magnitudes (free energy and entropy), with valuable biological implications. Our results agree with independent previous experimental results. Thus, our methods appear as a powerful complementary tool for identifying protein binding sites in promoter sequences. PMID:25275384

  2. Mesoscopic Model and Free Energy Landscape for Protein-DNA Binding Sites: Analysis of Cyanobacterial Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Tapia-Rojo, Rafael; Mazo, Juan José; Hernández, José Ángel; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F.; Falo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The identification of protein binding sites in promoter sequences is a key problem to understand and control regulation in biochemistry and biotechnological processes. We use a computational method to analyze promoters from a given genome. Our approach is based on a physical model at the mesoscopic level of protein-DNA interaction based on the influence of DNA local conformation on the dynamics of a general particle along the chain. Following the proposed model, the joined dynamics of the protein particle and the DNA portion of interest, only characterized by its base pair sequence, is simulated. The simulation output is analyzed by generating and analyzing the Free Energy Landscape of the system. In order to prove the capacity of prediction of our computational method we have analyzed nine promoters of Anabaena PCC 7120. We are able to identify the transcription starting site of each of the promoters as the most populated macrostate in the dynamics. The developed procedure allows also to characterize promoter macrostates in terms of thermo-statistical magnitudes (free energy and entropy), with valuable biological implications. Our results agree with independent previous experimental results. Thus, our methods appear as a powerful complementary tool for identifying protein binding sites in promoter sequences. PMID:25275384

  3. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-03-18

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  4. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  5. Differential DNA repair underlies mutation hotspots at active promoters in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Perera, Dilmi; Poulos, Rebecca C; Shah, Anushi; Beck, Dominik; Pimanda, John E; Wong, Jason W H

    2016-04-14

    Promoters are DNA sequences that have an essential role in controlling gene expression. While recent whole cancer genome analyses have identified numerous hotspots of somatic point mutations within promoters, many have not yet been shown to perturb gene expression or drive cancer development. As such, positive selection alone may not adequately explain the frequency of promoter point mutations in cancer genomes. Here we show that increased mutation density at gene promoters can be linked to promoter activity and differential nucleotide excision repair (NER). By analysing 1,161 human cancer genomes across 14 cancer types, we find evidence for increased local density of somatic point mutations within the centres of DNase I-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in gene promoters. Mutated DHSs were strongly associated with transcription initiation activity, in which active promoters but not enhancers of equal DNase I hypersensitivity were most mutated relative to their flanking regions. Notably, analysis of genome-wide maps of NER shows that NER is impaired within the DHS centre of active gene promoters, while XPC-deficient skin cancers do not show increased promoter mutation density, pinpointing differential NER as the underlying cause of these mutation hotspots. Consistent with this finding, we observe that melanomas with an ultraviolet-induced DNA damage mutation signature show greatest enrichment of promoter mutations, whereas cancers that are not highly dependent on NER, such as colon cancer, show no sign of such enrichment. Taken together, our analysis has uncovered the presence of a previously unknown mechanism linking transcription initiation and NER as a major contributor of somatic point mutation hotspots at active gene promoters in cancer genomes. PMID:27075100

  6. Structures, folding patterns, and functions of intramolecular DNA G-quadruplexes found in eukaryotic promoter regions

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yong; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    In its simplest form, a DNA G-quadruplex is a four-stranded DNA structure that is composed of stacked guanine tetrads. G-quadruplex-forming sequences have been identified in eukaryotic telomeres, as well as in non-telomeric genomic regions, such as gene promoters, recombination sites, and DNA tandem repeats. Of particular interest are the G-quadruplex structures that form in gene promoter regions, which have emerged as potential targets for anticancer drug development. Evidence for the formation of G-quadruplex structures in living cells continues to grow. In this review, we examine recent studies on intramolecular G-quadruplex structures that form in the promoter regions of some human genes in living cells and discuss the biological implications of these structures. The identification of G-quadruplex structures in promoter regions provides us with new insights into the fundamental aspects of G-quadruplex topology and DNA sequence–structure relationships. Progress in G-quadruplex structural studies and the validation of the biological role of these structures in cells will further encourage the development of small molecules that target these structures to specifically modulate gene transcription. PMID:18355457

  7. Effect of oxidative DNA damage in promoter elements on transcription factor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, R; Mitchell, D L

    1999-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species produced by endogenous metabolic activity and exposure to a multitude of exogenous agents impact cells in a variety of ways. The DNA base damage 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is a prominent indicator of oxidative stress and has been well-characterized as a premutagenic lesion in mammalian cells and putative initiator of the carcinogenic process. Commensurate with the recent interest in epigenetic pathways of cancer causation we investigated how 8-oxodG alters the interaction between cis elements located on gene promoters and sequence-specific DNA binding proteins associated with these promoters. Consensus binding sequences for the transcription factors AP-1, NF-kappaB and Sp1 were modified site-specifically at guanine residues and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed to assess DNA-protein interactions. Our results indicate that whereas a single 8-oxodG was sufficient to inhibit transcription factor binding to AP-1 and Sp1 sequences it had no effect on binding to NF-kappaB, regardless of its position. We conclude from these data that minor alterations in base composition at a crucial position within some, but not all, promoter elements have the ability to disrupt transcription factor binding. The lack of inhibition by damaged NF-kappaB sequences suggests that DNA-protein contact sites may not be as determinative for stable p50 binding to this promoter as other, as yet undefined, structural parameters. PMID:10454620

  8. Nuclear interferon-inducible protein 16 promotes silencing of herpesviral and transfected DNA

    PubMed Central

    Orzalli, Megan H.; Conwell, Sara E.; Berrios, Christian; DeCaprio, James A.; Knipe, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian cells have evolved mechanisms to silence foreign DNA introduced by viruses or by transfection. Upon herpesviral infection of cells, the viral genome is chromatinized in an attempt by the host cell to restrict expression of the viral genome. HSV ICP0 acts to counter host-intrinsic and innate responses to viral infection. We have found that nuclear interferon (IFN)-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) acts as a restriction factor against ICP0-null herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to limit viral replication and immediate–early gene expression. IFI16 promoted the addition of heterochromatin marks and the reduction of euchromatin marks on viral chromatin. IFI16 also restricted the expression of plasmid DNAs introduced by transfection but did not restrict SV40 DNA introduced into the cellular nucleus in the form of nucleosomal chromatin by viral infection. These results argue that IFI16 restricts unchromatinized DNA when it enters the cell nucleus by promoting the loading of nucleosomes and the addition of heterochromatin marks. Furthermore, these results indicate that IFI16 provides a broad surveillance role against viral and transfected DNA by promoting restriction of gene expression from the exogenous DNA and inducing innate immune responses. PMID:24198334

  9. Nuclear interferon-inducible protein 16 promotes silencing of herpesviral and transfected DNA.

    PubMed

    Orzalli, Megan H; Conwell, Sara E; Berrios, Christian; DeCaprio, James A; Knipe, David M

    2013-11-19

    Mammalian cells have evolved mechanisms to silence foreign DNA introduced by viruses or by transfection. Upon herpesviral infection of cells, the viral genome is chromatinized in an attempt by the host cell to restrict expression of the viral genome. HSV ICP0 acts to counter host-intrinsic and innate responses to viral infection. We have found that nuclear interferon (IFN)-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) acts as a restriction factor against ICP0-null herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to limit viral replication and immediate-early gene expression. IFI16 promoted the addition of heterochromatin marks and the reduction of euchromatin marks on viral chromatin. IFI16 also restricted the expression of plasmid DNAs introduced by transfection but did not restrict SV40 DNA introduced into the cellular nucleus in the form of nucleosomal chromatin by viral infection. These results argue that IFI16 restricts unchromatinized DNA when it enters the cell nucleus by promoting the loading of nucleosomes and the addition of heterochromatin marks. Furthermore, these results indicate that IFI16 provides a broad surveillance role against viral and transfected DNA by promoting restriction of gene expression from the exogenous DNA and inducing innate immune responses. PMID:24198334

  10. Rep provides a second motor at the replisome to promote duplication of protein-bound DNA.

    PubMed

    Guy, Colin P; Atkinson, John; Gupta, Milind K; Mahdi, Akeel A; Gwynn, Emma J; Rudolph, Christian J; Moon, Peter B; van Knippenberg, Ingeborg C; Cadman, Chris J; Dillingham, Mark S; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2009-11-25

    Nucleoprotein complexes present challenges to genome stability by acting as potent blocks to replication. One attractive model of how such conflicts are resolved is direct targeting of blocked forks by helicases with the ability to displace the blocking protein-DNA complex. We show that Rep and UvrD each promote movement of E. coli replisomes blocked by nucleoprotein complexes in vitro, that such an activity is required to clear protein blocks (primarily transcription complexes) in vivo, and that a polarity of translocation opposite that of the replicative helicase is critical for this activity. However, these two helicases are not equivalent. Rep but not UvrD interacts physically and functionally with the replicative helicase. In contrast, UvrD likely provides a general means of protein-DNA complex turnover during replication, repair, and recombination. Rep and UvrD therefore provide two contrasting solutions as to how organisms may promote replication of protein-bound DNA. PMID:19941825

  11. Compilation and analysis of DNA sequences associated with apparent streptomycete promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, W R

    1992-01-01

    The DNA sequences associated with 139 apparent streptomycete transcriptional start sites are compiled and compared. Of these, 29 promoters appeared to belong to a group which are similar to those recognized by eubacterial RNA polymerases containing sigma 70-like subunits. The other 110 putative promoter regions contain a wide diversity of sequences; several of these promoters have obvious sequence similarities in the -10 and/or -35 regions. The apparent Shine-Dalgarno regions of 44 streptomycete genes are also examined and compared. These were found to have a wide range of degree of complementarity to the 3' end of streptomycete 16S rRNA. Eleven streptomycete genes are described and compared in which transcription and translation are proposed to be initiated from the same or nearby nucleotide. An updated consensus sequence for the E sigma 70-like promoters is proposed and a potential group of promoter sequences containing guanine-rich -35 regions also is identified. PMID:1549509

  12. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  13. Mechanism of Microhomology-Mediated End-Joining Promoted by Human DNA Polymerase Theta

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Tatiana; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; McDevitt, Shane Michael; Ozdemir, Ahmet Y.; Pomerantz, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    Microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) is an error-prone alternative double-strand break repair pathway that utilizes sequence microhomology to recombine broken DNA. Although MMEJ is implicated in cancer development, the mechanism of this pathway is unknown. We demonstrate that purified human DNA polymerase θ (Polθ) performs MMEJ of DNA containing 3’ single-strand DNA overhangs with two or more base-pairs of homology, including DNA modeled after telomeres, and show that MMEJ is dependent on Polθ in human cells. Our data support a mechanism whereby Polθ facilitates end-joining and microhomology annealing then utilizes the opposing overhang as a template in trans which stabilizes the DNA synapse. Polθ exhibits a preference for DNA containing a 5’-terminal phosphate, similar to polymerases involved in non-homologous end-joining. Lastly, we identify a conserved loop domain that is essential for MMEJ and higher-order structures of Polθ which likely promote DNA synapse formation. PMID:25643323

  14. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5'-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  15. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5′-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  16. Conserved Promoter Motif Is Required for Cell Cycle Timing of dnaX Transcription in Caulobacter

    PubMed Central

    Keiler, Kenneth C.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2001-01-01

    Cells use highly regulated transcriptional networks to control temporally regulated events. In the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, many cellular processes are temporally regulated with respect to the cell cycle, and the genes required for these processes are expressed immediately before the products are needed. Genes encoding factors required for DNA replication, including dnaX, dnaA, dnaN, gyrB, and dnaK, are induced at the G1/S-phase transition. By analyzing mutations in the dnaX promoter, we identified a motif between the −10 and −35 regions that is required for proper timing of gene expression. This motif, named RRF (for repression of replication factors), is conserved in the promoters of other coordinately induced replication factors. Because mutations in the RRF motif result in constitutive gene expression throughout the cell cycle, this sequence is likely to be the binding site for a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional repressor. Consistent with this hypothesis, Caulobacter extracts contain an activity that binds specifically to the RRF in vitro. PMID:11466289

  17. DNA Polymerase δ Is Preferentially Recruited during Homologous Recombination To Promote Heteroduplex DNA Extension▿

    PubMed Central

    Maloisel, Laurent; Fabre, Francis; Gangloff, Serge

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerases play a central role during homologous recombination (HR), but the identity of the enzyme(s) implicated remains elusive. The pol3-ct allele of the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase δ (Polδ) has highlighted a role for this polymerase in meiotic HR. We now address the ubiquitous role of Polδ during HR in somatic cells. We find that pol3-ct affects gene conversion tract length during mitotic recombination whether the event is initiated by single-strand gaps following UV irradiation or by site-specific double-strand breaks. We show that the pol3-ct effects on gene conversion are completely independent of mismatch repair, indicating that shorter gene conversion tracts in pol3-ct correspond to shorter extensions of primed DNA synthesis. Interestingly, we find that shorter repair tracts do not favor synthesis-dependent strand annealing at the expense of double-strand-break repair. Finally, we show that the DNA polymerases that have been previously suspected to mediate HR repair synthesis (Polɛ and Polη) do not affect gene conversion during induced HR, including in the pol3-ct background. Our results argue strongly for the preferential recruitment of Polδ during HR. PMID:18086882

  18. Hematopoietic gene promoters subjected to a group-combinatorial study of DNA samples: identification of a megakaryocytic selective DNA signature

    PubMed Central

    Hazony, Yehonathan; Lu, Jun; St. Hilaire, Cynthia; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Identification of common sub-sequences for a group of functionally related DNA sequences can shed light on the role of such elements in cell-specific gene expression. In the megakaryocytic lineage, no one single unique transcription factor was described as linage specific, raising the possibility that a cluster of gene promoter sequences presents a unique signature. Here, the megakaryocytic gene promoter group, which consists of both human and mouse 5′ non-coding regions, served as a case study. A methodology for group-combinatorial search has been implemented as a customized software platform. It extracts the longest common sequences for a group of related DNA sequences and allows for single gaps of varying length, as well as double- and multiple-gap sequences. The results point to common DNA sequences in a group of genes that is selectively expressed in megakaryocytes, and which does not appear in a large group of control, random and specific sequences. This suggests a role for a combination of these sequences in cell-specific gene expression in the megakaryocytic lineage. The data also point to an intrinsic cross-species difference in the organization of 5′ non-coding sequences within the mammalian genomes. This methodology may be used for the identification of regulatory sequences in other lineages. PMID:16936310

  19. The Transcription Factor TFII-I Promotes DNA Translesion Synthesis and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Fattah, Farjana J.; Hara, Kodai; Fattah, Kazi R.; Yang, Chenyi; Wu, Nan; Warrington, Ross; Chen, David J.; Zhou, Pengbo; Boothman, David A.; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) enables DNA replication through damaged bases, increases cellular DNA damage tolerance, and maintains genomic stability. The sliding clamp PCNA and the adaptor polymerase Rev1 coordinate polymerase switching during TLS. The polymerases Pol η, ι, and κ insert nucleotides opposite damaged bases. Pol ζ, consisting of the catalytic subunit Rev3 and the regulatory subunit Rev7, then extends DNA synthesis past the lesion. Here, we show that Rev7 binds to the transcription factor TFII-I in human cells. TFII-I is required for TLS and DNA damage tolerance. The TLS function of TFII-I appears to be independent of its role in transcription, but requires homodimerization and binding to PCNA. We propose that TFII-I bridges PCNA and Pol ζ to promote TLS. Our findings extend the general principle of component sharing among divergent nuclear processes and implicate TLS deficiency as a possible contributing factor in Williams-Beuren syndrome. PMID:24922507

  20. APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases in Double-Strand DNA Break Repair and Cancer Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions were identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with ssDNA, double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs and clustered mutations. PMID:23598277

  1. Architecture of the bacteriophage T4 activator MotA/promoter DNA interaction during sigma appropriation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Meng-Lun; James, Tamara D; Knipling, Leslie; Waddell, M Brett; White, Stephen; Hinton, Deborah M

    2013-09-20

    Gene expression can be regulated through factors that direct RNA polymerase to the correct promoter sequence at the correct time. Bacteriophage T4 controls its development in this way using phage proteins that interact with host RNA polymerase. Using a process called σ appropriation, the T4 co-activator AsiA structurally remodels the σ(70) subunit of host RNA polymerase, while a T4 activator, MotA, engages the C terminus of σ(70) and binds to a DNA promoter element, the MotA box. Structures for the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of MotA are available, but no structure exists for MotA with or without DNA. We report the first molecular map of the MotA/DNA interaction within the σ-appropriated complex, which we obtained by using the cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). We conjugated surface-exposed, single cysteines in MotA with FeBABE and performed cleavage reactions in the context of stable transcription complexes. The DNA cleavage sites were analyzed using ICM Molsoft software and three-dimensional physical models of MotA(NTD), MotA(CTD), and the DNA to investigate shape complementarity between the protein and the DNA and to position MotA on the DNA. We found that the unusual "double wing" motif present within MotA(CTD) resides in the major groove of the MotA box. In addition, we have used surface plasmon resonance to show that MotA alone is in a very dynamic equilibrium with the MotA element. Our results demonstrate the utility of fine resolution FeBABE mapping to determine the architecture of protein-DNA complexes that have been recalcitrant to traditional structure analyses. PMID:23902794

  2. The POLD3 subunit of DNA polymerase δ can promote translesion synthesis independently of DNA polymerase ζ.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kouji; Yoshikiyo, Kazunori; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Murai, Junko; Tsuda, Masataka; Phillips, Lara G; Narita, Takeo; Nishihara, Kana; Kobayashi, Kaori; Yamada, Kouich; Nakamura, Jun; Pommier, Yves; Lehmann, Alan; Sale, Julian E; Takeda, Shunichi

    2015-02-18

    The replicative DNA polymerase Polδ consists of a catalytic subunit POLD1/p125 and three regulatory subunits POLD2/p50, POLD3/p66 and POLD4/p12. The ortholog of POLD3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pol32, is required for a significant proportion of spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis through its additional role in translesion synthesis (TLS) as a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ. Remarkably, chicken DT40 B lymphocytes deficient in POLD3 are viable and able to replicate undamaged genomic DNA with normal kinetics. Like its counterpart in yeast, POLD3 is required for fully effective TLS, its loss resulting in hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents, a diminished ability to maintain replication fork progression after UV irradiation and a significant decrease in abasic site-induced mutagenesis in the immunoglobulin loci. However, these defects appear to be largely independent of Polζ, suggesting that POLD3 makes a significant contribution to TLS independently of Polζ in DT40 cells. Indeed, combining polη, polζ and pold3 mutations results in synthetic lethality. Additionally, we show in vitro that POLD3 promotes extension beyond an abasic by the Polδ holoenzyme suggesting that while POLD3 is not required for normal replication, it may help Polδ to complete abasic site bypass independently of canonical TLS polymerases. PMID:25628356

  3. XLF-Cernunnos promotes DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 re-adenylation following ligation.

    PubMed

    Riballo, Enriqueta; Woodbine, Lisa; Stiff, Thomas; Walker, Sarah A; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Jeggo, Penny A

    2009-02-01

    XLF-Cernunnos (XLF) is a component of the DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 (LX) complex, which functions during DNA non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here, we use biochemical and cellular approaches to probe the impact of XLF on LX activities. We show that XLF stimulates adenylation of LX complexes de-adenylated by pyrophosphate or following LX decharging during ligation. XLF enhances LX ligation activity in an ATP-independent and dependent manner. ATP-independent stimulation can be attributed to enhanced end-bridging. Whilst ATP alone fails to stimulate LX ligation activity, addition of XLF and ATP promotes ligation in a manner consistent with XLF-stimulated readenylation linked to ligation. We show that XLF is a weakly bound partner of the tightly associated LX complex and, unlike XRCC4, is dispensable for LX stability. 2BN cells, which have little, if any, residual XLF activity, show a 3-fold decreased ability to repair DNA double strand breaks covering a range of complexity. These findings strongly suggest that XLF is not essential for NHEJ but promotes LX adenylation and hence ligation. We propose a model in which XLF, by in situ recharging DNA ligase IV after the first ligation event, promotes double stranded ligation by a single LX complex. PMID:19056826

  4. DNA strand annealing is promoted by the yeast Rad52 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, U H; Bendixen, C; Sunjevaric, I; Rothstein, R

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 gene plays a pivotal role in genetic recombination. Here we demonstrate that yeast Rad52 is a DNA binding protein. To show that the interaction between Rad52 and DNA is direct and not mediated by other yeast proteins and to facilitate protein purification, a recombinant expression system was developed. The recombinant protein can bind both single- and double-stranded DNA and the addition of either Mg2+ or ATP does not enhance the binding of single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, a DNA binding domain was found in the evolutionary conserved N terminus of the protein. More importantly, we show that the protein stimulates DNA annealing even in the presence of a large excess of nonhomologous DNA. Rad52-promoted annealing follows second-order kinetics and the rate is 3500-fold faster than that of the spontaneous reaction. How this annealing activity relates to the genetic phenotype associated with rad52 mutant cells is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855248

  5. Lamin A Is an Endogenous SIRT6 Activator and Promotes SIRT6-Mediated DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shrestha; Liu, Baohua; Wang, Yi; Hao, Quan; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2015-11-17

    The nuclear lamins are essential for various molecular events in the nucleus, such as chromatin organization, DNA replication, and provision of mechanical support. A specific point mutation in the LMNA gene creates a truncated prelamin A termed progerin, causing Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). SIRT6 deficiency leads to defective genomic maintenance and accelerated aging similar to HGPS, suggesting a potential link between lamin A and SIRT6. Here, we report that lamin A is an endogenous activator of SIRT6 and facilitates chromatin localization of SIRT6 upon DNA damage. Lamin A promotes SIRT6-dependent DNA-PKcs (DNA-PK catalytic subunit) recruitment to chromatin, CtIP deacetylation, and PARP1 mono-ADP ribosylation in response to DNA damage. The presence of progerin jeopardizes SIRT6 activation and compromises SIRT6-mediated molecular events in response to DNA damage. These data reveal a critical role for lamin A in regulating SIRT6 activities, suggesting that defects in SIRT6 functions contribute to impaired DNA repair and accelerated aging in HGPS. PMID:26549451

  6. RAGE is a nucleic acid receptor that promotes inflammatory responses to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sirois, Cherilyn M.; Jin, Tengchuan; Miller, Allison L.; Bertheloot, Damien; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Horvath, Gabor L.; Mian, Abubakar; Jiang, Jiansheng; Schrum, Jacob; Bossaller, Lukas; Pelka, Karin; Garbi, Natalio; Brewah, Yambasu; Tian, Jane; Chang, ChewShun; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Sims, Gary P.; Kolbeck, Roland; Coyle, Anthony J.; Humbles, Alison A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of DNA and RNA molecules derived from pathogens or self-antigen is one way the mammalian immune system senses infection and tissue damage. Activation of immune signaling receptors by nucleic acids is controlled by limiting the access of DNA and RNA to intracellular receptors, but the mechanisms by which endosome-resident receptors encounter nucleic acids from the extracellular space are largely undefined. In this study, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) promoted DNA uptake into endosomes and lowered the immune recognition threshold for the activation of Toll-like receptor 9, the principal DNA-recognizing transmembrane signaling receptor. Structural analysis of RAGE–DNA complexes indicated that DNA interacted with dimers of the outermost RAGE extracellular domains, and could induce formation of higher-order receptor complexes. Furthermore, mice deficient in RAGE were unable to mount a typical inflammatory response to DNA in the lung, indicating that RAGE is important for the detection of nucleic acids in vivo. PMID:24081950

  7. In simple synthetic promoters YY1-induced DNA bending is important in transcription activation and repression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Shapiro, D J

    1996-01-01

    Depending on promoter context, YY1 can activate or repress transcription, or provide a site for transcription initiation. To investigate whether the ability of YY1 to induce DNA bending influenced its ability to activate and repress transcription, simple synthetic promoters were constructed in which the YY1 binding site was inserted between the TATA box and either the NF1 or AP1 recognition sequences. In transient transfections of COS cells, the NF1YY1TATA and NF1RYY1TATA promoters exhibited a dramatic 15-20-fold increase in correctly initiated transcription. These promoters exhibited even larger 60-80-fold increases in transcription in HeLa cells. Neither multiple copies of the YY1 binding site alone, nor placement of a YY1 site upstream of the NF1 site activated transcription. Deletion of 4 bp between the NF1 and YY1 sites, which changes the phase of the DNA bends, abolished the 16-fold activation of transcription by NF1YY1TATA. Insertion of the YY1 site between the AP1 site and the TATA box decreased transcription approximately 3-fold. Replacing the YY1 binding site with an intrinsic DNA bending sequence mimicked this transcription repression. Sequences of similar length which do not bend DNA fail to repress AP1-mediated transcription. Gel mobility shift assays were used to show that binding of YY1 to its recognition sequence did not repress binding of AP1 to its recognition sequences. Our data indicate that YY1-induced DNA bending may activate and repress transcription by changing the spatial relationships between transcription activators and components of the basal transcription apparatus. PMID:8932392

  8. Defined DNA sequences promote the assembly of a bacterial protein into distinct amyloid nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    RepA, the replication initiator protein of Pseudomonas pPS10 plasmid, is made of two winged-helix (WH) domains. RepA dimers undergo a structural transformation upon binding to origin DNA sequences (iterons), resulting in monomerization and α-helix into β-strand conversion. This affects the N-terminal domain (WH1) and generates a metastable intermediate. Here it is shown that the interaction of short dsDNA oligonucleotides, including iteron or operator RepA targets, with the isolated WH1 domain promotes the assembly of different nanostructures. These range from irregular aggregates to amyloid spheroids and fibers. Their intrinsic order inversely correlates with the extent of the transformation induced by each DNA sequence on RepA. However, DNA is not a constituent of the assembled fibers, in agreement with the protein-only principle for amyloid structure. Thus, the RepA-WH1 domain on DNA binding mimics the behavior of the mammalian prion protein. The stretch of amino acids responsible for WH1 aggregation has been identified, leading to the design of mutants with enhanced or reduced amyloidogenicity and the synthesis of a peptide that assembles into a cross-β structure. RepA amyloid assemblies could have a role in the negative regulation of plasmid replication. This article underlines the potential of specific nucleic acid sequences in promoting protein amyloidogenesis at nearly physiological conditions. PMID:17959784

  9. Condensin promotes the juxtaposition of DNA flanking its loading site in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xindan; Le, Tung B K; Lajoie, Bryan R; Dekker, Job; Laub, Michael T; Rudner, David Z

    2015-08-01

    SMC condensin complexes play a central role in compacting and resolving replicated chromosomes in virtually all organisms, yet how they accomplish this remains elusive. In Bacillus subtilis, condensin is loaded at centromeric parS sites, where it encircles DNA and individualizes newly replicated origins. Using chromosome conformation capture and cytological assays, we show that condensin recruitment to origin-proximal parS sites is required for the juxtaposition of the two chromosome arms. Recruitment to ectopic parS sites promotes alignment of large tracks of DNA flanking these sites. Importantly, insertion of parS sites on opposing arms indicates that these "zip-up" interactions only occur between adjacent DNA segments. Collectively, our data suggest that condensin resolves replicated origins by promoting the juxtaposition of DNA flanking parS sites, drawing sister origins in on themselves and away from each other. These results are consistent with a model in which condensin encircles the DNA flanking its loading site and then slides down, tethering the two arms together. Lengthwise condensation via loop extrusion could provide a generalizable mechanism by which condensin complexes act dynamically to individualize origins in B. subtilis and, when loaded along eukaryotic chromosomes, resolve them during mitosis. PMID:26253537

  10. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator.

    PubMed

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  11. Condensin promotes the juxtaposition of DNA flanking its loading site in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xindan; Le, Tung B.K.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Dekker, Job; Laub, Michael T.; Rudner, David Z.

    2015-01-01

    SMC condensin complexes play a central role in compacting and resolving replicated chromosomes in virtually all organisms, yet how they accomplish this remains elusive. In Bacillus subtilis, condensin is loaded at centromeric parS sites, where it encircles DNA and individualizes newly replicated origins. Using chromosome conformation capture and cytological assays, we show that condensin recruitment to origin-proximal parS sites is required for the juxtaposition of the two chromosome arms. Recruitment to ectopic parS sites promotes alignment of large tracks of DNA flanking these sites. Importantly, insertion of parS sites on opposing arms indicates that these “zip-up” interactions only occur between adjacent DNA segments. Collectively, our data suggest that condensin resolves replicated origins by promoting the juxtaposition of DNA flanking parS sites, drawing sister origins in on themselves and away from each other. These results are consistent with a model in which condensin encircles the DNA flanking its loading site and then slides down, tethering the two arms together. Lengthwise condensation via loop extrusion could provide a generalizable mechanism by which condensin complexes act dynamically to individualize origins in B. subtilis and, when loaded along eukaryotic chromosomes, resolve them during mitosis. PMID:26253537

  12. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  13. cDNA cloning and promoter analysis of rat caspase-9.

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, J; Yi, X; Venkatachalam, M A; Dong, Z

    2001-01-01

    Caspase-9 is the apex caspase of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, which plays a critical role in apoptotic initiation and progression. However, gene regulation of caspase-9 is largely unknown. This is in part due to the lack of information on the gene promoter. Here we have cloned the full-length cDNA of rat caspase-9 and have isolated promoter regions of this gene. The rat caspase-9 cDNA of 2058 bp predicts a protein of 454 amino acids, which contains a caspase-recruitment domain ('CARD') at the N-terminus and enzymic domains at the C-terminus. The enzyme's active site, with a characteristic motif of QACGG, was also identified. Overall, rat and human caspase-9 have 71% identity. With the cDNA sequence, we subsequently isolated the proximal 5'-flanking regions of rat caspase-9 by the procedure of genomic walking. The 2270 bp genomic segment is 'TATA-less', but contains several GC boxes. Elements binding known transcription factors such as Sp-1, Pit-1, CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP), glucocorticoid receptor and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) were also identified. When cloned into reporter gene vectors, the genomic segment showed significant promoter activity, indicating that the 5'-flanking regions isolated by genomic walking contain the gene promoter of rat caspase-9. Of significance is that the cloned promoter segments were activated by severe hypoxia, conditions inducing caspase-9 transcription. Thus, the genomic sequences reported here contain not only the basal promoter of rat caspase-9 but also regulatory elements responsive to pathophysiological stimuli including hypoxia. PMID:11695991

  14. Cernunnos/XLF promotes the ligation of mismatched and noncohesive DNA ends.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun J; Kim, Sunny A; Chu, Gilbert

    2007-05-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repairs DNA double-strand breaks created by ionizing radiation or V(D)J recombination of the immunoglobulin genes. The breaks often leave mismatched or nonligatable ends, and NHEJ must repair the breaks with high efficiency and minimal nucleotide loss. Here, the NHEJ proteins Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, XRCC4/Ligase IV, and Cernunnos/XRCC4-like factor joined mismatched and noncohesive DNA ends in the absence of processing factors. Depending on the mismatch, Cernunnos stimulated joining 8- to 150-fold. For substrates with a blunt end and a 3' overhanging end, Ku, XRCC4/Ligase IV, and Cernunnos ligated the 3' overhanging hydroxyl group to the 5' phosphate of the blunt end, leaving the other strand unjoined. This activity provides a mechanism for retaining 3' overhang sequences, as observed during V(D)J recombination in vivo. Thus, Cernunnos/XRCC4-like factor promotes a mismatched end (MEnd) DNA ligase activity to facilitate joining and to preserve DNA sequence. Furthermore, MEnd ligase activity may have applications in recombinant DNA technology. PMID:17470781

  15. Smad4 loss promotes lung cancer formation but increases sensitivity to DNA topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Haeger, S M; Thompson, J J; Kalra, S; Cleaver, T G; Merrick, D; Wang, X-J; Malkoski, S P

    2016-02-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a common malignancy with a poor prognosis. Despite progress targeting oncogenic drivers, there are no therapies targeting tumor-suppressor loss. Smad4 is an established tumor suppressor in pancreatic and colon cancer; however, the consequences of Smad4 loss in lung cancer are largely unknown. We evaluated Smad4 expression in human NSCLC samples and examined Smad4 alterations in large NSCLC data sets and found that reduced Smad4 expression is common in human NSCLC and occurs through a variety of mechanisms, including mutation, homozygous deletion and heterozygous loss. We modeled Smad4 loss in lung cancer by deleting Smad4 in airway epithelial cells and found that Smad4 deletion both initiates and promotes lung tumor development. Interestingly, both Smad4(-/-) mouse tumors and human NSCLC samples with reduced Smad4 expression demonstrated increased DNA damage, whereas Smad4 knockdown in lung cancer cells reduced DNA repair and increased apoptosis after DNA damage. In addition, Smad4-deficient NSCLC cells demonstrated increased sensitivity to both chemotherapeutics that inhibit DNA topoisomerase and drugs that block double-strand DNA break repair by non-homologous end joining. In sum, these studies establish Smad4 as a lung tumor suppressor and suggest that the defective DNA repair phenotype of Smad4-deficient tumors can be exploited by specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:25893305

  16. Distal enhancer regulation by promoter derepression in topologically constrained DNA in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Michelle Craig; Madani, Navid; Emerson, Beverly M.

    1997-01-01

    Long-range promoter–enhancer interactions are a crucial regulatory feature of many eukaryotic genes yet little is known about the mechanisms involved. Using cloned chicken βA-globin genes, either individually or within the natural chromosomal locus, enhancer-dependent transcription is achieved in vitro at a distance of 2 kb with developmentally staged erythroid extracts. This occurs by promoter derepression and is critically dependent upon DNA topology. In the presence of the enhancer, genes must exist in a supercoiled conformation to be actively transcribed, whereas relaxed or linear templates are inactive. Distal protein–protein interactions in vitro may be favored on supercoiled DNA because of topological constraints. In this system, enhancers act primarily to increase the probability of rapid and efficient transcription complex formation and initiation. Repressor and activator proteins binding within the promoter, including erythroid-specific GATA-1, mediate this process. PMID:9207078

  17. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; Stemler, Kristina M.; White, Lynn S.; Loza, Andrew J.; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M.; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26644583

  18. TH17 cells promote microbial killing and innate immune sensing of DNA via interleukin 26

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Stephan; Domizio, Jeremy Di; Voo, Kui S; Friedrich, Heike C; Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Conrad, Curdin; Gregorio, Josh; Roy, Didier Le; Roger, Thierry; Ladbury, John E; Homey, Bernhard; Watowich, Stanley; Modlin, Robert L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Liu, Yong-Jun; Arold, Stefan T; Gilliet, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 17–producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) have a major role in protection against infections and in mediating autoimmune diseases, yet the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. We found that interleukin 26 (IL-26), a human TH17 cell–derived cytokine, is a cationic amphipathic protein that kills extracellular bacteria via membrane-pore formation. Furthermore, TH17 cell–derived IL-26 formed complexes with bacterial DNA and self-DNA released by dying bacteria and host cells. The resulting IL-26–DNA complexes triggered the production of type I interferon by plasmacytoid dendritic cells via activation of Toll-like receptor 9, but independently of the IL-26 receptor. These findings provide insights into the potent antimicrobial and proinflammatory function of TH17 cells by showing that IL-26 is a natural human antimicrobial that promotes immune sensing of bacterial and host cell death. PMID:26168081

  19. Condensin Promotes Position Effects within Tandem DNA Repeats via the RITS complex

    PubMed Central

    He, Haijin; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Danni; Hochwagen, Andreas; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tandem repetitive DNA is highly abundant in eukaryotic genomes, and contributes to transcription control and genome stability. However, how the individual sequences within tandem repeats behave remains largely unknown. Here we develop a collection of fission yeast strains with a reporter gene inserted at different units in a tandem repeat array. We show that, contrary to what is usually assumed, transcriptional silencing and replication timing among the individual repeats differ significantly. RNAi-mediated H3K9 methylation is essential for the silencing position effect. A short hairpin RNA of ura4+ induces silencing in trans within the tandem array in a position-dependent manner. Importantly, the position effect depends on the condensin subunit, cut3+. Cut3 promotes the position effect via interaction with the RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complex. This study reveals variations in silencing within tandem DNA repeats and provides mechanistic insights into how DNA repeats at the individual level are regulated. PMID:26832414

  20. DNA methylation dynamics in the rat EGF gene promoter after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Deming; Fan, Jinyu; Li, Ziwei; Xu, Cunshuan

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a multifunctional growth factor, is a regulator in a wide variety of physiological processes. EGF plays an important role in the regulation of liver regeneration. This study was aimed at investigating the methylation level of EGF gene throughout liver regeneration. DNA of liver tissue from control rats and partial hepatectomy (PH) rats at 10 time points was extracted and a 354 bp fragment including 10 CpG sites from the transcription start was amplified after DNA was modified by sodium bisulfate. The result of sequencing suggested that methylation ratio of four CpG sites was found to be significantly changed when PH group was compared to control group, in particular two of them were extremely striking. mRNA expression of EGF was down-regulated in total during liver regeneration. We think that the rat EGF promoter region is regulated by variation in DNA methylation during liver regeneration. PMID:25071410

  1. Was cDNA sequences modulate transgene expression of was promoter-driven lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel G; Benabdellah, Karim; Muñoz, Pilar; Frecha, Cecilia; Cobo, Marién; Martín, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Abstract The development of vectors that express a therapeutic transgene efficiently and specifically in hematopoietic cells (HCs) is an important goal for gene therapy of hematological disorders. We have previously shown that a 500-bp fragment from the proximal Was gene promoter in a lentiviral vector (LV) was sufficient to achieve more than 100-fold higher levels of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein in HCs than in nonhematopoietic cells (non-HCs). We show now that this differential was reduced up to 10 times when the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (eGFP) was expressed instead of Was in the same LV backbone. Insertion of Was cDNA sequences downstream of eGFP in these LVs had a negative effect on transgene expression. This effect varied in different cell types but, overall, Was cDNA sequences increased the hematopoietic specificity of Was promoter-driven LV. We have characterized the minimal fragment required to increase hematopoietic specificity and have demonstrated that the mechanism involves Was promoter regulation and RNA processing. In addition, we have shown that Was cDNA sequences interfere with the enhancer activity of the woodchuck posttranscriptional regulatory element. These results represent the first data showing the role of Was intragenic sequences in gene regulation. PMID:19630517

  2. Rescue of Newcastle disease virus from cloned cDNA using an RNA polymerase II promoter.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Yu; Li, Xue-Rui; Lan, Xi; Yin, Xiang-Pin; Li, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Bin; Liu, Ji-Xing

    2011-06-01

    A new system was developed to improve the efficiency and simplify the procedure of recovery of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from cloned cDNA. A full-length cDNA clone of mesogenic NDV vaccine strain Mukteswar was assembled from five subgenomic cDNA fragments and cloned into a plasmid allowing transcription driven by cellular RNA polymerase II. The full-length viral cDNA was flanked by hammerhead ribozyme (HamRz) and hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HdvRz) sequences, resulted in the synthesis of antigenomic RNA with exact termini. Without supplying T7 RNA polymerase, infectious NDV could be generated efficiently in some eukaryotic cell lines by simultaneous transcription of antigenomic RNA from the full-length plasmid and expression of NP, P and L proteins from helper plasmids introduced by cotransfection. The efficiency of recovery with the conventional T7 promoter system based on BRS-T7 cells and the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter system was compared, and the results demonstrate that the new system facilitates the generation of recombinant NDV and more efficient than the T7 rescue system using BRS-T7. PMID:21327786

  3. Use of yeast nuclear DNA sequences to define the mitochondrial RNA polymerase promoter in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Marczynski, G T; Schultz, P W; Jaehning, J A

    1989-01-01

    We have extended an earlier observation that the TATA box for the nuclear GAL10 gene serves as a promoter for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase in in vitro transcription reactions (C. S. Winkley, M. J. Keller, and J. A. Jaehning, J. Biol. Chem. 260:14214-14223, 1985). In this work, we demonstrate that other nuclear genes also have upstream sequences that function in vitro as mitochondrial RNA polymerase promoters. These genes include the GAL7 and MEL1 genes, which are regulated in concert with the GAL10 gene, the sigma repetitive element, and the 2 microns plasmid origin of replication. We used in vitro transcription reactions to test a large number of nuclear DNA sequences that contain critical mitochondrial promoter sequences as defined by Biswas et al. (T. K. Biswas, J. C. Edwards, M. Rabinowitz, and G. S. Getz, J. Biol. Chem. 262:13690-13696, 1987). The results of these experiments allowed us to extend the definition of essential promoter elements. This extended sequence, -ACTATAAACGatcATAG-, was frequently found in the upstream regulatory regions of nuclear genes. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that either (i) a catalytic RNA polymerase related to the mitochondrial enzyme functions in the nucleus of the yeast cell or (ii) a DNA sequence recognition factor is shared by the two genetic compartments. By using cells deficient in the catalytic core of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (rpo41-) and sensitive assays for transcripts initiating from the nuclear promoter sequences, we have conclusively ruled out a role for the catalytic RNA polymerase in synthesizing transcripts from all of the nuclear sequences analyzed. The possibility that a DNA sequence recognition factor functions in both the nucleus and the mitochondria remains to be tested. Images PMID:2677667

  4. Sequence Features and Transcriptional Stalling within Centromere DNA Promote Establishment of CENP-A Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Catania, Sandra; Pidoux, Alison L.; Allshire, Robin C.

    2015-01-01

    Centromere sequences are not conserved between species, and there is compelling evidence for epigenetic regulation of centromere identity, with location being dictated by the presence of chromatin containing the histone H3 variant CENP-A. Paradoxically, in most organisms CENP-A chromatin generally occurs on particular sequences. To investigate the contribution of primary DNA sequence to establishment of CENP-A chromatin in vivo, we utilised the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. CENP-ACnp1 chromatin is normally assembled on ∼10 kb of central domain DNA within these regional centromeres. We demonstrate that overproduction of S. pombe CENP-ACnp1 bypasses the usual requirement for adjacent heterochromatin in establishing CENP-ACnp1 chromatin, and show that central domain DNA is a preferred substrate for de novo establishment of CENP-ACnp1 chromatin. When multimerised, a 2 kb sub-region can establish CENP-ACnp1 chromatin and form functional centromeres. Randomization of the 2 kb sequence to generate a sequence that maintains AT content and predicted nucleosome positioning is unable to establish CENP-ACnp1 chromatin. These analyses indicate that central domain DNA from fission yeast centromeres contains specific information that promotes CENP-ACnp1 incorporation into chromatin. Numerous transcriptional start sites were detected on the forward and reverse strands within the functional 2 kb sub-region and active promoters were identified. RNAPII is enriched on central domain DNA in wild-type cells, but only low levels of transcripts are detected, consistent with RNAPII stalling during transcription of centromeric DNA. Cells lacking factors involved in restarting transcription—TFIIS and Ubp3—assemble CENP-ACnp1 on central domain DNA when CENP-ACnp1 is at wild-type levels, suggesting that persistent stalling of RNAPII on centromere DNA triggers chromatin remodelling events that deposit CENP-ACnp1. Thus, sequence-encoded features of centromeric DNA create an

  5. Bidirectional promoter trapping T-DNA for insertional mutagenesis in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Transfer DNA (T-DNA)-based random insertional mutagenesis is a universal forward genetic approach for gene identification and cloning in many phytopathogenic fungi. In a large number of randomly selected transformants, screening for mutants with a specific phenotype is laborious, especially for pathogenicity-defective mutants. To accelerate mutant screening and gene identification, a bidirectional promoter-trapping Ti binary vector, 1300-bisGFP-hyg, was constructed and deployed in this study. More than 6000 Verticillium dahliae transformants were obtained by the mediation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the vector. One thousand randomly selected transformants were cultured on Czapek-Dox and on Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media plates. The cultured transformants with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression or changes in phenotype were selected and used in virulence or promoter-trapping assays. Based on the virulence assay of 60 transformants, the pathogenicity of 17 of these mutants was compromised. Ten pathogenicity-defective mutants were found with GFP expression, and 6 with expression in Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media specifically. Using TAIL-PCR (thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction), the T-DNA insertion sites were identified in 8 GFP-expressing transformants, including 5 pathogenicity-defective mutants and 3 unaffected transformants. Promoters of 6 genes were successfully trapped using the T-DNA method in this study. The nonpathogenic transformant 24C9 was the subject of additional investigation. It displayed strong GFP expression on water agar medium supplemented with cotton root extracts and on cotton seedling stems. The results obtained by Southern blot and quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that the transcription level of VdUGPU (encoding UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase) was significantly reduced owing to T-DNA insertion in the gene promoter region. These results indicate that the bidirectional

  6. Large conserved domains of low DNA methylation maintained by Dnmt3a

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mira; Sun, Deqiang; Luo, Min; Huang, Yun; Challen, Grant A.; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Chavez, Lukas; Wang, Hui; Hannah, Rebecca; Kim, Sang-Bae; Yang, Liubin; Ko, Myunggon; Chen, Rui; Göttgens, Berthold; Lee, Ju-Seog; Gunaratne, Preethi; Godley, Lucy A.; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Rao, Anjana; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Gains and losses in DNA methylation are prominent features of mammalian cell types. To gain insight into mechanisms that could promote shifts in DNA methylation and contribute to cell fate changes, including malignant transformation, we performed genome-wide mapping of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in purified murine hematopoietic stem cells. We discovered extended regions of low methylation (Canyons) that span conserved domains frequently containing transcription factors and are distinct from CpG islands and shores. The genes in about half of these methylation Canyons are coated with repressive histone marks while the remainder are covered by activating histone marks and are highly expressed in HSCs. Canyon borders are demarked by 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and become eroded in the absence of DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a). Genes dysregulated in human leukemias are enriched for Canyon-associated genes. The novel epigenetic landscape we describe may provide a mechanism for the regulation of hematopoiesis and may contribute to leukemia development. PMID:24270360

  7. Structure of the FoxM1 DNA-recognition domain bound to a promoter sequence

    PubMed Central

    Littler, D. R.; Alvarez-Fernández, M.; Stein, A.; Hibbert, R. G.; Heidebrecht, T.; Aloy, P.; Medema, R. H.; Perrakis, A.

    2010-01-01

    FoxM1 is a member of the Forkhead family of transcription factors and is implicated in inducing cell proliferation and some forms of tumorigenesis. It binds promoter regions with a preference for tandem repeats of a consensus ‘TAAACA’ recognition sequence. The affinity of the isolated FoxM1 DNA-binding domain for this site is in the micromolar range, lower than observed for other Forkhead proteins. To explain these FoxM1 features, we determined the crystal structure of its DNA-binding domain in complex with a tandem recognition sequence. FoxM1 adopts the winged-helix fold, typical of the Forkhead family. Neither ‘wing’ of the fold however, makes significant contacts with the DNA, while the second, C-terminal, wing adopts an unusual ordered conformation across the back of the molecule. The lack of standard DNA–‘wing’ interactions may be a reason for FoxM1’s relatively low affinity. The role of the ‘wings’ is possibly undertaken by other FoxM1 regions outside the DBD, that could interact with the target DNA directly or mediate interactions with other binding partners. Finally, we were unable to show a clear preference for tandem consensus site recognition in DNA-binding, transcription activation or bioinformatics analysis; FoxM1's moniker, ‘Trident’, is not supported by our data. PMID:20360045

  8. Promoter hypomethylation and expression is conserved in mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia induced by decreased or inactivated Dnmt3a

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Staci L.; Upchurch, G. Michael; Opavska, Jana; Klinkebiel, David; Hlady, Ryan A.; Suresh, Abhinav; Pirruccello, Samuel J.; Shukla, Vipul; Lu, Runqing; Costinean, Stefan; Rizzino, Angie; Karpf, Adam R.; Joshi, Shantaram; Swanson, Patrick; Opavsky, Rene

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3A) catalyzes the formation of 5-methyl-cytosine in mammalian genomic DNA and it is frequently mutated in human hematologic malignancies. Bi-allelic loss of Dnmt3a in mice results in leukemia and lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here we investigate whether mono-allelic loss of Dnmt3a is sufficient to induce disease. We show that by 16 months of age, 65% of Dnmt3a+/− mice develop a CLL-like disease and 15% of mice develop non-malignant myeloproliferation. Genome-wide methylation analysis reveals that reduced Dnmt3a levels induce promoter hypomethylation at similar loci in Dnmt3a+/− and Dnmt3aΔ/Δ CLL, suggesting that promoters are particularly sensitive to Dnmt3a levels. Gene-expression analysis identified 26 hypomethylated and over-expressed genes common to both Dnmt3a+/− and Dnmt3aΔ/Δ CLL as putative oncogenic drivers. Our data provide evidence that Dnmt3a is a haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor in CLL and highlights the importance of deregulated molecular events in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27134162

  9. Promoter Hypomethylation and Expression Is Conserved in Mouse Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Induced by Decreased or Inactivated Dnmt3a.

    PubMed

    Haney, Staci L; Upchurch, G Michael; Opavska, Jana; Klinkebiel, David; Hlady, Ryan A; Suresh, Abhinav; Pirruccello, Samuel J; Shukla, Vipul; Lu, Runqing; Costinean, Stefan; Rizzino, Angie; Karpf, Adam R; Joshi, Shantaram; Swanson, Patrick; Opavsky, Rene

    2016-05-10

    DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3A) catalyzes the formation of 5-methyl-cytosine in mammalian genomic DNA, and it is frequently mutated in human hematologic malignancies. Bi-allelic loss of Dnmt3a in mice results in leukemia and lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we investigate whether mono-allelic loss of Dnmt3a is sufficient to induce disease. We show that, by 16 months of age, 65% of Dnmt3a(+/-) mice develop a CLL-like disease, and 15% of mice develop non-malignant myeloproliferation. Genome-wide methylation analysis reveals that reduced Dnmt3a levels induce promoter hypomethylation at similar loci in Dnmt3a(+/-) and Dnmt3a(Δ/Δ) CLL, suggesting that promoters are particularly sensitive to Dnmt3a levels. Gene expression analysis identified 26 hypomethylated and overexpressed genes common to both Dnmt3a(+/-) and Dnmt3a(Δ/Δ) CLL as putative oncogenic drivers. Our data provide evidence that Dnmt3a is a haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor in CLL and highlights the importance of deregulated molecular events in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27134162

  10. A novel DNA replication origin identified in the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Taira, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1994-01-01

    A general and sensitive method for the mapping of initiation sites of DNA replication in vivo, developed by Vassilev and Johnson, has revealed replication origins in the region of simian virus 40 ori, in the regions upstream from the human c-myc gene and downstream from the Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase gene, and in the enhancer region of the mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene. Here we report that the region containing the promoter of the human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene was identified as a DNA replication origin in HeLa cells by this method. Several segments of the region were cloned into pUC19 and examined for autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) activity. The plasmids carrying the segments replicated episomally and semiconservatively when transfected into HeLa cells. The segments of ARS activity contained the sequences previously identified as binding sequences for a c-myc protein complex (T. Taira, Y. Negishi, F. Kihara, S. M. M. Iguchi-Ariga, and H. Ariga, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1130:166-174, 1992). Mutations introduced within the c-myc protein complex binding sequences abolished the ARS activity. Moreover, the ARS plasmids stably replicated at episomal state for a long time in established cell lines. The results suggest that the promoter region of the human hsp70 gene plays a role in DNA replication as well as in transcription. Images PMID:8065368

  11. The complete sequence of soybean chlorotic mottle virus DNA and the identification of a novel promoter.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, A; Verver, J; Shimada, A; Saito, M; Goldbach, R; Van Kammen, A; Miki, K; Kameya-Iwaki, M; Hibi, T

    1989-12-11

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of soybean chlorotic mottle virus (SoyCMV) DNA was determined and compared with those of three other caulimoviruses, cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), carnation etched ring virus and figwort mosaic virus. The double-stranded DNA genome of SoyCMV (8,175 bp) contained nine open reading frames (ORFs) and one large intergenic region. The primer binding sites, gene organization and size of ORFs were similar to those of the other caulimoviruses, except for ORF I, which was split into ORF Ia and Ib. The amino acid sequences deduced from each ORF showed only short, highly homologous regions in several of the corresponding ORFs of the three other caulimoviruses. A promoter fragment of 378 bp in SoyCMV ORF III showed a strong expression activity, comparable to that of the CaMV 35S promoter, in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts as determined by a beta-glucuronidase assay using electrotransfection. The fragment contained CAAT and TATA boxes but no transcriptional enhancer signal as reported for the CaMV 35S promoter. Instead, it had sequences homologous to a part of the translational enhancer signal reported for the 5'-leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA. PMID:2602148

  12. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in rat and mouse liver by various tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Büsser, M T; Lutz, W K

    1987-10-01

    In order to investigate whether the stimulation of liver DNA synthesis might be used to detect one class of hepatic tumor promoters, the incorporation of orally administered radiolabelled thymidine into liver DNA was determined in rats and mice 24 h after a single oral gavage of test compounds at various dose levels. Three DNA-binding hepatocarcinogens, aflatoxin B1, benzidine and carbon tetrachloride, did not stimulate but rather inhibited DNA synthesis (not for CCl4). Four hepatic tumor promoters, clofibrate, DDT, phenobarbital and thioacetamide, gave rise to a stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Single oral doses between 0.02 and 0.3 mmol/kg were required to double the level of thymidine incorporation into liver DNA (= doubling dose, DD). Differences between species or sex as observed in long-term carcinogenicity studies were reflected by a different stimulation of liver DNA synthesis. In agreement with the bioassay data, aldrin was positive only in male mice (DD = 0.007 mmol/kg) but not in male rats of female mice. 2,3,7,8-TCDD was positive in male mice (DD = 10(-6) mmol/kg) and in female rats (DD = 2 X 10(-6) mmol/kg) but not in male rats. The assay was also able to distinguish between structural isomers with different carcinogenicities. [alpha]Hexachlorocyclohexane stimulated liver DNA synthesis with a doubling dose of about 0.2 mmol/kg in male rats whereas the [gamma]-isomer was ineffective even at 1 mmol/kg. So far, only one result was inconsistent with carcinogenicity bioassay data. The different carcinogenicity of di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (negative in rats) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (positive) was not detectable. Both plasticizers were positive in this short-term system with DD's of 0.7 mmol/kg for DEHA and 0.5 mmol/kg for DEHP. The proposed assay is discussed as an attempt to devise short-term assays for carcinogens not detected by the routine genotoxicity test systems. PMID:2443263

  13. Metallothionein cDNA, promoter, and genomic sequences of the tropical green mussel, Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, H W; Patel, K H

    1999-09-01

    The primary structure of the cDNA and metallothionein (MT) genomic sequences of the tropical green mussel (Perna viridis) was determined. The complete cDNA sequences were obtained using degenerate primers designed from known metallothionein consensus amino acid sequences from the temperate species Mytilus edulis. The amino acid sequences of P. viridis metallothionein deduced from the coding region consisted of 72 amino acids with 21 cysteine residues and 9 Cys-X-Cys motifs corresponding to Type I MT class of other species. Two different genomic sequences coding for the same mRNA were obtained. Each putative gene contained a unique 5'UTR and two unique introns located at the same splice sites. The promoters for both genes were different in length and both contained metal responsive elements and active protein-binding sites. The structures of the genomic clones were compared with those of other species. J. Exp. Zool. 284:445-453, 1999. PMID:10451422

  14. DNA bending and binding factors of the human. beta. -actin promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Takeshi; Makino, Kozo; Orita, Satoshi; Nakata, Atsuo; Kakunaga, Takeo )

    1989-01-25

    Transcription of the {beta}-actin gene is rapidly inducible in response to serum stimulation. To determine the regions responsible for serum inducible and basal level expression, the human {beta}-actin promoter was subjected to mutational analysis. Two distinct elements, the CCAAT homology and the {beta}-actin specific conserved sequences, were found by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression assay and sequence comparisons, and then analyzed for possible functions. Using a DNA bend assay, it was shown that the conserved sequences included the core of a sequence-directed bend of DNA. Gel mobility shift and DNase I protection assays revealed that the conserved sequences and the CCAAT homology were recognized by binding factors in HeLa cell extracts.

  15. INTRANUCLEAR MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES PROMOTE DNA DAMAGE AND APOPTOSIS INDUCED BY OXYGEN–GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION IN NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    HILL, J. W.; PODDAR, R.; THOMPSON, J. F.; ROSENBERG, G. A.; YANG, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix by elevated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity following ischemia/reperfusion is implicated in blood–brain barrier disruption and neuronal death. In contrast to their characterized extracellular roles, we previously reported that elevated intranuclear MMP-2 and -9 (gelatinase) activity degrades nuclear DNA repair proteins and promotes accumulation of oxidative DNA damage in neurons in rat brain at 3-h reperfusion after ischemic stroke. Here, we report that treatment with a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor significantly reduced neuronal apoptosis in rat ischemic hemispheres at 48-h reperfusion after a 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Since extracellular gelatinases in brain tissue are known to be neurotoxic during acute stroke, the contribution of intranuclear MMP-2 and -9 activities in neurons to neuronal apoptosis has been unclear. To confirm and extend our in vivo observations, oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion, was employed. Primary cortical neurons were subjected to 2-h OGD with reoxygenation. Increased intranuclear gelatinase activity was detected immediately after reoxygenation onset and was maximal at 24 h, while extracellular gelatinase levels remained unchanged. We detected elevated levels of both MMP-2 and -9 in neuronal nuclear extracts and gelatinase activity in neurons co-localized primarily with MMP-2. We found a marked decrease in PARP1, XRCC1, and OGG1, and decreased PARP1 activity. Pretreatment of neurons with selective MMP-2/9 inhibitor II significantly decreased gelatinase activity and downregulation of DNA repair enzymes, decreased accumulation of oxidative DNA damage, and promoted neuronal survival after OGD. Our results confirm the nuclear localization of gelatinases and their nuclear substrates observed in an animal stroke model, further supporting a novel role for intranuclear gelatinase activity in an intrinsic apoptotic pathway in neurons

  16. Use of liposome-mediated DNA transfection to determine promoter activity in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P

    1999-01-01

    The transfer and expression of DNA plasmids containing promoter fragments of heterologous genes linked to reporter cDNAs in mammalian cells has become an invaluable technique for studying the regulation of gene expression. Several reporter genes such as luciferase, β-galactosidase, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, and green flourescent protein are ideal to study promoter activities as their gene products are not endogenous to smooth muscle cells (SMC) and their expression can be readily detected using convenient assays (1). Among these genes, a popular choice is the firefly luciferase, as its expression can be easily detected in cells using a highly sensitive chemiluminescent assay (2). The firefly luciferase catalyses a rapid, ATP-dependent oxidation of the substrate, luciferin, which then emits light. Reactions catalyzed by firefly luciferase are: [Formula: see text]. PMID:21341022

  17. c-Myc inhibits TP53INP1 expression via promoter methylation in esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Wenhao; Yang, Qinyuan; Huang, Miaolong; Qiao, Yongxia; Xie, Yuan; Yu, Yongchun; Jing, An; Li, Zhi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} TP53INP1 expression is down-regulated in esophageal carcinoma and is associated with CGI-131 methylation. {yields} Inhibition of CGI-131 methylation upregulates TP53INP1 expression in ESCC cell lines. {yields} Ectopic expression of TP53INP1 inhibits growth of ESCC cells by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell cycle progression. {yields} c-Myc binds to the promoter of TP53INP1 in vivo and vitro and recruits DNMT3A to TP53INP1 promoter for CGI-131 methylation. -- Abstract: Tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) is a well known stress-induced protein that plays a role in both cell cycle arrest and p53-mediated apoptosis. Loss of TP53INP1 expression has been reported in human melanoma, breast carcinoma, and gastric cancer. However, TP53INP1 expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unclear. Our findings are in agreement with previous reports in that the expression of TP53INP1 was downregulated in 28% (10/36 cases) of ESCC lesions, and this was accompanied by significant promoter methylation. Overexpression of TP53INP1 induced G1 cell cycle arrest and increased apoptosis in ESCC cell lines (EC-1, EC-109, EC-9706). Furthermore, our study showed that the oncoprotein c-Myc bound to the core promoter of TP53INP1 and recruited DNA methyltransferase 3A to methylate the local promoter region, leading to the inhibition of TP53INP1 expression. Our findings revealed that TP53INP1 is a tumor suppressor in ESCC and that c-Myc-mediated DNA methylation-associated silencing of TP53INP1 contributed to the pathogenesis of human ESCC.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of phage Mu activator protein C in a complex with promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik K.; Ravichandran, Manimekalai; Howe, Martha M.; Park, Hee-Won

    2007-07-01

    The isolation and preliminary X-ray analysis of crystals of phage Mu activator protein C bound to promoter DNA are reported. Bacteriophage Mu C protein is an activator of the four Mu late promoters that drive the expression of genes encoding DNA-modification as well as phage head and tail morphogenesis proteins. This report describes the purification and cocrystallization of wild-type and selenomethionine-substituted C protein with a synthetic late promoter P{sub sym}, together with preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis using SAD phasing. The selenomethionine peak data set was collected from a single crystal which diffracted to 3.1 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 1} or P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.9, c = 187.6 Å and two complexes per asymmetric unit. The structure will reveal the amino acid–DNA interactions and any conformational changes associated with DNA binding.

  19. A 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase/lyase demethylates the retrotransposon Tos17 and promotes its transposition in rice

    PubMed Central

    La, Honggui; Ding, Bo; Mishra, Gyan P.; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Hongmei; Bellizzi, Maria del Rosario; Chen, Songbiao; Meyers, Blake C.; Peng, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2011-01-01

    DNA 5-methylcytosine (5-meC) is an important epigenetic mark for transcriptional gene silencing in many eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyases actively remove 5-meC to counteract transcriptional gene silencing in a locus-specific manner, and have been suggested to maintain the expression of transposons. However, it is unclear whether plant DNA demethylases can promote the transposition of transposons. Here we report the functional characterization of the DNA glycosylase/lyase DNG701 in rice. DNG701 encodes a large (1,812 amino acid residues) DNA glycosylase domain protein. Recombinant DNG701 protein showed 5-meC DNA glycosylase and lyase activities in vitro. Knockout or knockdown of DNG701 in rice plants led to DNA hypermethylation and reduced expression of the retrotransposon Tos17. Tos17 showed less transposition in calli derived from dng701 knockout mutant seeds compared with that in wild-type calli. Overexpression of DNG701 in both rice calli and transgenic plants substantially reduced DNA methylation levels of Tos17 and enhanced its expression. The overexpression also led to more frequent transposition of Tos17 in calli. Our results demonstrate that rice DNG701 is a 5-meC DNA glycosylase/lyase responsible for the demethylation of Tos17 and this DNA demethylase plays a critical role in promoting Tos17 transposition in rice calli. PMID:21896764

  20. Altered DNA conformations detected by mung bean nuclease occur in promoter and terminator regions of supercoiled pBR322 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sheflin, L G; Kowalski, D

    1985-01-01

    Mung bean nuclease was used to probe for recognizable DNA unwinding and unpairing in the plasmid pBR322. In negatively supercoiled DNA, but not relaxed DNA, cleavages occurred preferentially in non-coding regions of the genome. The types of nucleotide sequences cleaved and which non-coding regions were cleaved depended upon environmental conditions. At 37 degrees C, cleavages occurred in an 84 bp A+T-rich sequence in the terminator region of the ampicillin-resistance gene. Recognition is likely based on a novel DNA conformation which occurs in the longest, most dA+dT-rich region of pBR322. In the presence of 1 mM Mg2+, cleavages occurred in inverted repeated sequences in the promoter regions of the RNA primer for DNA replication and ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistance genes as well as the terminator of RNA-1. Potential loops of hairpin (cruciform) structures were cleaved. At 27 degrees C, cleavages occurred near a promoter activated by cAMP receptor protein in vitro and in the 3' non-coding region of the tetracycline-resistance gene. Thus, in supercoiled pBR322 DNA, recognizable DNA unwinding and unpairing occurs preferentially in regulatory regions for transcription and DNA replication. Images PMID:2995917

  1. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  2. Endothelial cells mitigate DNA damage and promote the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells after radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Zachman, Derek K.; Leon, Ronald P.; Das, Prerna; Goldman, Devorah C.; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Guha, Chandan; Fleming, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an essential component of the hematopoietic microenvironment, which maintains and regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although ECs can support the regeneration of otherwise lethally-irradiated HSCs, the mechanisms are not well understood. To further understand this phenomenon, we studied HSC regeneration from irradiated bone marrow using co-culture with human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Co-culture with HAECs induced a 24-fold expansion of long-term HSCs (CD150+, lineagelo, Sca-1+, c-Kit+; CD150+LSK cells) in vitro. These cells gave rise to functional hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with colony-forming activity, multilineage reconstitution and serial transplantation potential. Furthermore, HAECs significantly reduced DNA damage in irradiated LSK cells within 24 hours. Remarkably, we were able to delay the exposure of irradiated bone marrow to the regenerative, HAEC-derived signals for up to 48 hours and still rescue functional HSCs. G-CSF is the gold standard for promoting hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. However, when compared to HAECs, in vitro G-CSF treatment promoted lineage differentiation and regenerated 5-fold fewer CD150+LSK cells. Together, our results show that HAECs are powerful, direct mitigators of HSC injury and DNA damage. Identification of the HAEC-derived factors that rescue HSCs may lead to improved therapies for hematopoietic regeneration after radiation injury. PMID:23939266

  3. The use of polyethylenimine-DNA to topically deliver hTERT to promote hair growth.

    PubMed

    Jan, H-M; Wei, M-F; Peng, C-L; Lin, S-J; Lai, P-S; Shieh, M-J

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the efficacy of polyethylenimine (PEI)-DNA complex that expressed human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to transfect hair follicle stem cells and produce sufficient hTERT to stimulate hair growth. Transfection with pLC-hTERT-DNA-PEI complex (D+P group) in vitro induced expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in 35.8% of the purified stem cell population, suggesting enhanced cell proliferation. In vivo transfection efficiency of rat dorsal skin was determined by staining for β-gal activity. Cells positive for β-gal were located in the bulge region and dermal sheath of hair follicles. The follicles in the hTERT-transfected region entered anagenon day 15 after transfection, whereas non-transfected (Neg) controls remained in telogen. The similar effect was observed in 50-day-old rat dorsal skin. D+P group displayed a specific expression of hTERT and sufficient to initiate a transition to the anagen phase and promote new hair synthesis 18 days after the transfection. hTERT promoted follicle neogenesis following wounding. In all, 60 days after wounding, tissues of the D+P group showed more newly regenerating hair follicles (83±52 regenerated follicles per rat) in contrast to control group tissues (15±15 regenerated follicles per rat). These studies provide a potential approach for gene therapy of skin disease. PMID:21593794

  4. DNA-histone interactions are sufficient to position a single nucleosome juxtaposing Drosophila Adh adult enhancer and distal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J R; Benyajati, C

    1993-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster is transcribed from two tandem promoters in distinct developmental and tissue-specific patterns. Both promoters are regulated by separate upstream enhancer regions. In its wild-type context the adult enhancer specifically stimulates only the distal promoter, approximately 400 bp downstream, and not the proximal promoter, which is approximately 700 bp further downstream. Genomic footprinting and micrococcal nuclease analyses have revealed a specifically positioned nucleosome between the distal promoter and adult enhancer. In vitro reconstitution of this nucleosome demonstrated that DNA-core histone interactions alone are sufficient to position the nucleosome. Based on this observation and sequence periodicities in the underlying DNA, the mechanism of positioning appears to involve specific DNA structural features (ie flexibility or curvature). We have observed this nucleosome positioned early during development, before tissue differentiation, and before non-histone protein-DNA interactions are established at the distal promoter or adult enhancer. This nucleosome positioning element in the Adh regulatory region could be involved in establishing a specific tertiary nucleoprotein structure that facilitates specific cis-element accessibility and/or distal promoter-adult enhancer interactions. Images PMID:8451195

  5. Cigarette Smoking, BPDE-DNA Adducts, and Aberrant Promoter Methylations of Tumor Suppressor Genes (TSGs) in NSCLC from Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yongtang; Xu, Peiwei; Liu, Xinneng; Zhang, Chunye; Tan, Cong; Chen, Chunmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is related to the genetic and epigenetic factors. The goal of this study was to determine association of cigarette smoking and BPDE-DNA adducts with promoter methylations of several genes in NSCLC. Methylation of the promoters of p16, RARβ, DAPK, MGMT, and TIMP-3 genes of tumor tissues from 199 lung cancer patients was analyzed with methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and BPDE-DNA adduct level in lung cancer tissue was obtained by ELISA. Level of BPDE-DNA adduct increased significantly in males, aged people (over 60 years), and smokers; however, no significant difference was found while comparing the BPDE-DNA adduct levels among different tumor types, locations, and stages. Cigarette smoking was also associated with increased BPDE-DNA adducts level (OR = 2.43, p > .05) and increased methylation level in at least 1 gene (OR = 5.22, p < .01), both in dose-response manner. Similarly, cigarette smoking also significantly increase the risk of p16 or DAPK methylation (OR = 3.02, p < .05 for p16, and 3.66, p < .05 for DAPK). The highest risk of BPDE-DNA adducts was detected among individuals with cigarette smoking for more than 40 pack-years (OR = 4.21, p < .01). Furthermore, the present study did not show that BPDE-DNA adducts are significantly associated with abnormal TSGs methylations in NSCLC, including SCC and AdO, respectively. Conclusively, cigarette smoking is significantly associated with the increase of BPDE-DNA adduct level, promoter hypermethylation of p16 and DAPK genes, while BPDE-DNA adduct was not significantly related to abnormal promoter hypermethylation in TSGs, suggesting that BPDE-DNA adducts and TSGs methylations play independent roles in NSCLC. PMID:27042875

  6. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis. PMID:26844814

  7. Asymmetric Arginine dimethylation of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 promotes DNA targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Henrik; Barth, Stephanie; Mamiani, Alfredo; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; West, Michelle J.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Graesser, Friedrich A.

    2010-02-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) growth-transforms B-lymphocytes. The virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) is essential for transformation and activates gene expression by association with DNA-bound transcription factors such as RBPJkappa (CSL/CBF1). We have previously shown that EBNA2 contains symmetrically dimethylated Arginine (sDMA) residues. Deletion of the RG-repeat results in a reduced ability of the virus to immortalise B-cells. We now show that the RG repeat also contains asymmetrically dimethylated Arginines (aDMA) but neither non-methylated (NMA) Arginines nor citrulline residues. We demonstrate that only aDMA-containing EBNA2 is found in a complex with DNA-bound RBPJkappa in vitro and preferentially associates with the EBNA2-responsive EBV C, LMP1 and LMP2A promoters in vivo. Inhibition of methylation in EBV-infected cells results in reduced expression of the EBNA2-regulated viral gene LMP1, providing additional evidence that methylation is a prerequisite for DNA-binding by EBNA2 via association with the transcription factor RBPJkappa.

  8. HyCCAPP as a tool to characterize promoter DNA-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Rao, Prahlad K; Levenstein, Mark E; Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Perumalla, Danu S; Jadhav, Avinash Y L; Glenn, Jeremy P; Ludwig-Kubinski, Amy; Drigalenko, Eugene; Montoya, Maria J; Göring, Harald H; Anderson, Corianna D; Scalf, Mark; Gildersleeve, Heidi I S; Cole, Regina; Greene, Alexandra M; Oduro, Akua K; Lazarova, Katarina; Cesnik, Anthony J; Barfknecht, Jared; Cirillo, Lisa A; Gasch, Audrey P; Shortreed, Michael R; Smith, Lloyd M; Olivier, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Currently available methods for interrogating DNA-protein interactions at individual genomic loci have significant limitations, and make it difficult to work with unmodified cells or examine single-copy regions without specific antibodies. In this study, we describe a physiological application of the Hybridization Capture of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics (HyCCAPP) methodology we have developed. Both novel and known locus-specific DNA-protein interactions were identified at the ENO2 and GAL1 promoter regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and revealed subgroups of proteins present in significantly different levels at the loci in cells grown on glucose versus galactose as the carbon source. Results were validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Overall, our analysis demonstrates that HyCCAPP is an effective and flexible technology that does not require specific antibodies nor prior knowledge of locally occurring DNA-protein interactions and can now be used to identify changes in protein interactions at target regions in the genome in response to physiological challenges. PMID:27184763

  9. Arabidopsis EDM2 promotes IBM1 distal polyadenylation and regulates genome DNA methylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Mingguang; La, Honggui; Lu, Kun; Wang, Pengcheng; Miki, Daisuke; Ren, Zhizhong; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Tang, Kai; Zeng, Liang; Yang, Lan; Zhang, Heng; Nie, Wenfeng; Liu, Pan; Zhou, Jianping; Liu, Renyi; Zhong, Yingli; Liu, Dong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is important for the silencing of transposons and other repetitive elements in many higher eukaryotes. However, plant and mammalian genomes have evolved to contain repetitive elements near or inside their genes. How these genes are kept from being silenced by DNA methylation is not well understood. A forward genetics screen led to the identification of the putative chromatin regulator Enhanced Downy Mildew 2 (EDM2) as a cellular antisilencing factor and regulator of genome DNA methylation patterns. EDM2 contains a composite Plant Homeo Domain that recognizes both active and repressive histone methylation marks at the intronic repeat elements in genes such as the Histone 3 lysine 9 demethylase gene Increase in BONSAI Methylation 1 (IBM1) and is necessary for maintaining the expression of these genes by promoting mRNA distal polyadenylation. Because of its role in maintaining IBM1 expression, EDM2 is required for preventing CHG methylation in the bodies of thousands of genes. Our results thus increase the understanding of antisilencing, genome methylation patterns, and regulation of alternative RNA processing by intronic heterochromatin. PMID:24248388

  10. Inhibition of DNA methylation promotes breast tumor sensitivity to netrin-1 interference.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Mélodie; Mathot, Pauline; Devailly, Guillaume; Bidet, Yannick; Ghantous, Akram; Favrot, Clementine; Gibert, Benjamin; Gadot, Nicolas; Puisieux, Isabelle; Herceg, Zdenko; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick; Dante, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In a number of human cancers, NTN1 upregulation inhibits apoptosis induced by its so-called dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H, thus promoting tumor progression. In other cancers however, the selective inhibition of this dependence receptor death pathway relies on the silencing of pro-apoptotic effector proteins. We show here that a substantial fraction of human breast tumors exhibits simultaneous DNA methylation-dependent loss of expression of NTN1 and of DAPK1, a serine threonine kinase known to transduce the netrin-1 dependence receptor pro-apoptotic pathway. The inhibition of DNA methylation by drugs such as decitabine restores the expression of both NTN1 and DAPK1 in netrin-1-low cancer cells. Furthermore, a combination of decitabine with NTN1 silencing strategies or with an anti-netrin-1 neutralizing antibody potentiates tumor cell death and efficiently blocks tumor growth in different animal models. Thus, combining DNA methylation inhibitors with netrin-1 neutralizing agents may be a valuable strategy for combating cancer. PMID:27378792

  11. DNA polymorphisms and mutations of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) promoter in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH).

    PubMed

    Wu, W S; McClain, K L

    1997-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of dendritic histiocytes expressing elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). The cause of the increased cytokine levels is unknown, but DNA sequence changes in promoters could alter expression. The TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma promoter DNA sequences of 12 LCH patients were studied and compared with normal individuals by dideoxy fingerprinting and DNA sequencing. Functional consequences of polymorphic or mutated sequences were assessed by cloning altered and control promoter sequences into a luciferase reporter gene vector. Electrophoretic mobility shifts (EMSA) after binding of nuclear extracts from a macrophage cell line (U-937) by mutated promoters were compared with controls. Five of 12 LCH patients had alterations in the TNF-alpha promoter DNA sequence. None were found in the IFN-gamma gene promoter. Of the 5 with TNF-alpha DNA alterations, 2 were at position -308, which has been described as a G-A polymorphism associated with upregulation of TNF-alpha in some patients with infections or immune-mediated diseases. The polymorphism at -308 but not the other TNF-alpha promoter mutations caused a 3-fold to 7-fold increased production of the luciferase reporter gene. EMSA showed that the -308 mutant promoters bound fewer nuclear proteins than normals. Polymorphisms of the TNF-alpha promoter in LCH patients could increase the production of that cytokine. PMID:9355965

  12. Src Family Kinases Promote Silencing of ATR-Chk1 Signaling in Termination of DNA Damage Checkpoint*

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Kubota, Sho; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Honda, Takuya; Okamoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Iwama, Atsushi; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint arrests cell cycle progression to allow time for repair. Once DNA repair is completed, checkpoint signaling is terminated. Currently little is known about the mechanism by which checkpoint signaling is terminated, and the disappearance of DNA lesions is considered to induce the end of checkpoint signaling; however, here we show that the termination of checkpoint signaling is an active process promoted by Src family tyrosine kinases. Inhibition of Src activity delays recovery from the G2 phase DNA damage checkpoint following DNA repair. Src activity is required for the termination of checkpoint signaling, and inhibition of Src activity induces persistent activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Rad3-related (ATR) and Chk1 kinases. Src-dependent nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation and v-Src expression suppress the ATR-mediated Chk1 and Rad17 phosphorylation induced by DNA double strand breaks or DNA replication stress. Thus, Src family kinases promote checkpoint recovery through termination of ATR- and Chk1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint. These results suggest a model according to which Src family kinases send a termination signal between the completion of DNA repair and the initiation of checkpoint termination. PMID:24634213

  13. DAF-16/FoxO and EGL-27/GATA promote developmental growth in response to persistent somatic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Vipin; Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Frommolt, Peter; Williams, Ashley B.; Greiss, Sebastian; Schneider, Jennifer I.; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Genome maintenance defects cause complex disease phenotypes characterized by developmental failure, cancer susceptibility, and premature aging. It remains poorly understood how DNA damage responses function during organismal development and maintain tissue functionality when DNA damage accumulates with aging. Here we show that the FoxO transcription factor DAF-16 is activated in response to DNA damage during development while the DNA damage responsiveness of DAF-16 declines with aging. We find that in contrast to its established role in mediating starvation arrest, DAF-16 alleviates DNA damage-induced developmental arrest and even in the absence of DNA repair promotes developmental growth and enhances somatic tissue functionality. We demonstrate that the GATA transcription factor EGL-27 co-regulates DAF-16 target genes in response to DNA damage and together with DAF-16 promotes developmental growth. We propose that EGL-27/GATA activity specifies DAF-16 mediated DNA damage responses to enable developmental progression and to prolong tissue functioning when DNA damage persists. PMID:25419847

  14. SUVH1, a Su(var)3–9 family member, promotes the expression of genes targeted by DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaofang; Liu, Lin; Li, Shengben; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Kim, Yun Ju; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are found throughout the genomes of all organisms. Repressive marks such as DNA methylation and histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation silence these elements and maintain genome integrity. However, how silencing mechanisms are themselves regulated to avoid the silencing of genes remains unclear. Here, an anti-silencing factor was identified using a forward genetic screen on a reporter line that harbors a LUCIFERASE (LUC) gene driven by a promoter that undergoes DNA methylation. SUVH1, a Su(var)3–9 homolog, was identified as a factor promoting the expression of the LUC gene. Treatment with a cytosine methylation inhibitor completely suppressed the LUC expression defects of suvh1, indicating that SUVH1 is dispensable for LUC expression in the absence of DNA methylation. SUVH1 also promotes the expression of several endogenous genes with promoter DNA methylation. However, the suvh1 mutation did not alter DNA methylation levels at the LUC transgene or on a genome-wide scale; thus, SUVH1 functions downstream of DNA methylation. Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) trimethylation was reduced in suvh1; in contrast, H3K9 methylation levels remained unchanged. This work has uncovered a novel, anti-silencing function for a member of the Su(var)3–9 family that has previously been associated with silencing through H3K9 methylation. PMID:26400170

  15. Chromatin inactivation precedes de novo dna methylation during the progressive epigenetic silencing of the rassf1a promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Strunnikova Maria; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga; Kehlen, Astrid; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Dammann, Reinhard

    2005-02-23

    Epigenetic inactivation of the RASSF1A tumor suppressor by CpG island methylation was frequently detected in cancer. However, the mechanisms of this aberrant DNA methylation are unknown. In the RASSF1A promoter, we characterized four Sp1 sites, which are frequently methylated in cancer. We examined the functional relationship between DNA methylation, histone modification, Sp1 binding, and RASSF1A expression in proliferating human mammary epithelial cells. With increasing passages, the transcription of RASSF1A was dramatically silenced. This inactivation was associated with deacetylation and lysine 9 trimethylation of histone H3 and an impaired binding of Sp1 at the RASSF1A promoter. In mammary epithelial cells that had overcome a stress-associated senescence barrier, a spreading of DNA methylation in the CpG island promoter was observed. When the RASSF1A-silenced cells were treated with inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase, binding of Sp1 and expression of RASSF1 A reoccurred. In summary, we observed that histone H3 deacetylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation occur in the same time window as gene inactivation and precede DNA methylation. Our data suggest that in epithelial cells, histone inactivation may trigger de novo DNA methylation of the RASSF1A promoter and this system may serve as a model for CpG island inactivation of tumor suppressor genes.

  16. SUVH1, a Su(var)3-9 family member, promotes the expression of genes targeted by DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaofang; Liu, Lin; Li, Shengben; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Kim, Yun Ju; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-01-29

    Transposable elements are found throughout the genomes of all organisms. Repressive marks such as DNA methylation and histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation silence these elements and maintain genome integrity. However, how silencing mechanisms are themselves regulated to avoid the silencing of genes remains unclear. Here, an anti-silencing factor was identified using a forward genetic screen on a reporter line that harbors a LUCIFERASE (LUC) gene driven by a promoter that undergoes DNA methylation. SUVH1, a Su(var)3-9 homolog, was identified as a factor promoting the expression of the LUC gene. Treatment with a cytosine methylation inhibitor completely suppressed the LUC expression defects of suvh1, indicating that SUVH1 is dispensable for LUC expression in the absence of DNA methylation. SUVH1 also promotes the expression of several endogenous genes with promoter DNA methylation. However, the suvh1 mutation did not alter DNA methylation levels at the LUC transgene or on a genome-wide scale; thus, SUVH1 functions downstream of DNA methylation. Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) trimethylation was reduced in suvh1; in contrast, H3K9 methylation levels remained unchanged. This work has uncovered a novel, anti-silencing function for a member of the Su(var)3-9 family that has previously been associated with silencing through H3K9 methylation. PMID:26400170

  17. High-frequency deletion in recovered retrovirus vectors containing exogenous DNA with promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Emerman, M; Temin, H M

    1984-01-01

    We previously described infectious retrovirus vectors constructed from spleen necrosis virus which contain the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and the mouse alpha-globin gene (K. Shimotohno and H. M. Temin, Nature [London] 299:255-268, 1982). In the present study we report that when TK- chicken cells infected with a virus containing the mouse alpha-globin promoter and other 5' noncoding sequences in addition to the alpha-globin coding sequences were selected for thymidine kinase (TK) activity, all virus-producing TK+ cell clones shed virus with a deletion. These deletions were of different sizes and included the mouse alpha-globin coding sequences and the mouse alpha-globin transcriptional promoter. One of the deleted viruses was molecularly cloned. DNA sequencing showed that the deleted sequences are flanked by a short direct repeat. This deleted virus was also shown to have an advantage over the nondeleted parent both in multiplication and in its specific TK-transforming unit titer. In contrast to the results described above, TK+ cell clones established with viruses that contained only the coding sequences from the mouse alpha-globin gene did not delete and were stable over many cell passages. The implications of the high-frequency deletion of the viruses with internal promoters are discussed in terms of the evolution of retroviruses and the construction of retrovirus vectors. Images PMID:6321798

  18. Compilation and analysis of Bacillus subtilis sigma A-dependent promoter sequences: evidence for extended contact between RNA polymerase and upstream promoter DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Helmann, J D

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of 236 promoters recognized by the Bacillus subtilis sigma A-RNA polymerase reveals an extended promoter structure. The most highly conserved bases include the -35 and -10 hexanucleotide core elements and a TG dinucleotide at position -15, -14. In addition, several weakly conserved A and T residues are present upstream of the -35 region. Analysis of dinucleotide composition reveals A2- and T2-rich sequences in the upstream promoter region (-36 to -70) which are phased with the DNA helix: An tracts are common near -43, -54 and -65; Tn tracts predominate at the intervening positions. When compared with larger regions of the genome, upstream promoter regions have an excess of An and Tn sequences for n > 4. These data indicate that an RNA polymerase binding site affects DNA sequence as far upstream as -70. This sequence conservation is discussed in light of recent evidence that the alpha subunits of the polymerase core bind DNA and that the promoter may wrap around RNA polymerase. PMID:7630711

  19. MAPK15 upregulation promotes cell proliferation and prevents DNA damage in male germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Matteo; Colecchia, David; Ilardi, Gennaro; Acunzo, Mario; Nigita, Giovanni; Sasdelli, Federica; Celetti, Angela; Strambi, Angela; Staibano, Stefania; Croce, Carlo Maria; Chiariello, Mario

    2016-04-12

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common malignancies in males between 15 and 35 years of age. Despite the high cure rate, achieved through chemotherapy and/or surgery, the molecular basis of GCT etiology is still largely obscure. Here, we show a positive correlation between MAPK15 (ERK8; ERK7) expression and specific GCT subtypes, with the highest levels found in the aggressive embryonal carcinomas (EC). Indeed, in corresponding cellular models for EC, MAPK15 enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo and promoted cell proliferation in vitro, supporting a role for this kinase in human GCT. At molecular level, we demonstrated that endogenous MAPK15 is necessary to sustain cell cycle progression of EC cells, by limiting p53 activation and preventing the triggering of p53-dependent mechanisms resulting in cell cycle arrest.To understand MAPK15-dependent mechanisms impinging on p53 activation, we demonstrate that this kinase efficiently protects cells from DNA damage. Moreover, we show that the ability of MAPK15 to control the autophagic process is necessary for basal management of DNA damage and for tumor formation controlled by the kinase.In conclusion, our findings suggest that MAPK15 overexpression may contribute to the malignant transformation of germ cells by controlling a "stress support" autophagic pathway, able to prevent DNA damage and the consequent activation of the p53 tumor suppressor. Moreover, in light of these results, MAPK15-specific inhibitors might represent new tools to enhance the therapeutic index of cytotoxic therapy in GCT treatment, and to increase the sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in other chemotherapy-resistant human tumors. PMID:26988910

  20. MAPK15 upregulation promotes cell proliferation and prevents DNA damage in male germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ilardi, Gennaro; Acunzo, Mario; Nigita, Giovanni; Sasdelli, Federica; Celetti, Angela; Strambi, Angela; Staibano, Stefania; Croce, Carlo Maria; Chiariello, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common malignancies in males between 15 and 35 years of age. Despite the high cure rate, achieved through chemotherapy and/or surgery, the molecular basis of GCT etiology is still largely obscure. Here, we show a positive correlation between MAPK15 (ERK8; ERK7) expression and specific GCT subtypes, with the highest levels found in the aggressive embryonal carcinomas (EC). Indeed, in corresponding cellular models for EC, MAPK15 enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo and promoted cell proliferation in vitro, supporting a role for this kinase in human GCT. At molecular level, we demonstrated that endogenous MAPK15 is necessary to sustain cell cycle progression of EC cells, by limiting p53 activation and preventing the triggering of p53-dependent mechanisms resulting in cell cycle arrest. To understand MAPK15-dependent mechanisms impinging on p53 activation, we demonstrate that this kinase efficiently protects cells from DNA damage. Moreover, we show that the ability of MAPK15 to control the autophagic process is necessary for basal management of DNA damage and for tumor formation controlled by the kinase. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MAPK15 overexpression may contribute to the malignant transformation of germ cells by controlling a “stress support” autophagic pathway, able to prevent DNA damage and the consequent activation of the p53 tumor suppressor. Moreover, in light of these results, MAPK15-specific inhibitors might represent new tools to enhance the therapeutic index of cytotoxic therapy in GCT treatment, and to increase the sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in other chemotherapy-resistant human tumors. PMID:26988910

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase POLG1 Disease Mutations and Germline Variants Promote Tumorigenic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupendra; Owens, Kjerstin M.; Bajpai, Prachi; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Singh, Keshav K.

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG1) induce mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, depletion, and decrease oxidative phosphorylation. Earlier, we identified somatic mutations in POLG1 and the contribution of these mutations in human cancer. However, a role for germline variations in POLG1 in human cancers is unknown. In this study, we examined a role for disease associated germline variants of POLG1, POLG1 gene expression, copy number variation and regulation in human cancers. We analyzed the mutations, expression and copy number variation in POLG1 in several cancer databases and validated the analyses in primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. We discovered 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine led epigenetic regulation of POLG1, mtDNA-encoded genes and increased mitochondrial respiration. We conducted comprehensive race based bioinformatics analyses of POLG1 gene in more than 33,000 European-Americans and 5,000 African-Americans. We identified a mitochondrial disease causing missense variation in polymerase domain of POLG1 protein at amino acid 1143 (E1143G) to be 25 times more prevalent in European-Americans (allele frequency 0.03777) when compared to African-American (allele frequency 0.00151) population. We identified T251I and P587L missense variations in exonuclease and linker region of POLG1 also to be more prevalent in European-Americans. Expression of these variants increased glucose consumption, decreased ATP production and increased matrigel invasion. Interestingly, conditional expression of these variants revealed that matrigel invasion properties conferred by these germline variants were reversible suggesting a role of epigenetic regulators. Indeed, we identified a set of miRNA whose expression was reversible after variant expression was turned off. Together, our studies demonstrate altered genetic and epigenetic regulation of POLG1 in human cancers and suggest a role for POLG1 germline variants in promoting tumorigenic

  2. DNA duplex stability as discriminative characteristic for Escherichia coli σ(54)- and σ(28)- dependent promoter sequences.

    PubMed

    de Avila e Silva, Scheila; Forte, Franciele; T S Sartor, Ivaine; Andrighetti, Tahila; J L Gerhardt, Günther; Longaray Delamare, Ana Paula; Echeverrigaray, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The advent of modern high-throughput sequencing has made it possible to generate vast quantities of genomic sequence data. However, the processing of this volume of information, including prediction of gene-coding and regulatory sequences remains an important bottleneck in bioinformatics research. In this work, we integrated DNA duplex stability into the repertoire of a Neural Network (NN) capable of predicting promoter regions with augmented accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. We took our method beyond a simplistic analysis based on a single sigma subunit of RNA polymerase, incorporating the six main sigma-subunits of Escherichia coli. This methodology employed successfully re-discovered known promoter sequences recognized by E. coli RNA polymerase subunits σ(24), σ(28), σ(32), σ(38), σ(54) and σ(70), with highlighted accuracies for σ(28)- and σ(54)- dependent promoter sequences (values obtained were 80% and 78.8%, respectively). Furthermore, the discrimination of promoters according to the σ factor made it possible to extract functional commonalities for the genes expressed by each type of promoter. The DNA duplex stability rises as a distinctive feature which improves the recognition and classification of σ(28)- and σ(54)- dependent promoter sequences. The findings presented in this report underscore the usefulness of including DNA biophysical parameters into NN learning algorithms to increase accuracy, specificity and sensitivity in promoter beyond what is accomplished based on sequence alone. PMID:24172230

  3. Establishment of a promoter-based chromatin architecture on recently replicated DNA can accommodate variable inter-nucleosome spacing

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Ross T.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the fundamental subunits of eukaryotic chromatin, are organized with respect to transcriptional start sites. A major challenge to the persistence of this organization is the disassembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication. Here, we use complimentary approaches to map the locations of nucleosomes on recently replicated DNA. We find that nucleosomes are substantially realigned with promoters during the minutes following DNA replication. As a result, the nucleosomal landscape is largely re-established before newly replicated chromosomes are partitioned into daughter cells and can serve as a platform for the re-establishment of gene expression programmes. When the supply of histones is disrupted through mutation of the chaperone Caf1, a promoter-based architecture is generated, but with increased inter-nucleosomal spacing. This indicates that the chromatin remodelling enzymes responsible for spacing nucleosomes are capable of organizing nucleosomes with a range of different linker DNA lengths. PMID:27106059

  4. Tunable DNA cleavage activity promoted by copper(ii) ternary complexes with N-donor heterocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, T; Silva-Caldeira, P P; Pich, C T; Pereira-Maia, E C; Terenzi, H

    2016-06-01

    Several small molecules have the capacity to cleave DNA promptly at high yields, even under mild conditions. Usually, this activity has no constraints, occurring without external or user control. Here, we demonstrate that UV-light exposure can greatly enhance the DNA cleavage activity promoted by four ternary copper(ii) complexes. A remarkable photocontrolled activity was achieved, which may be interesting for chemical and biochemical applications. PMID:27168172

  5. Interleukin-6 Promotes Tumorigenesis by Altering DNA Methylation in Oral Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gasche, Jacqueline A.; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for more than 100,000 deaths each year. Chronic inflammation constitutes one of the key risk factors for OSCC. Accumulating evidence suggests that aberrant DNA methylation may contribute to OSCC tumorigenesis. This study investigated whether chronic inflammation alters DNA methylation and expression of cancer-associated genes in OSCC. We established an in-vitro model of interleukin (IL)-6 mediating chronic inflammation in OSCC cell lines. Thereafter, we measured the ability of IL-6 to induce global hypomethylation of LINE-1 sequences, as well as CpG methylation changes using multiple methodologies including quantitative pyrosequencing, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and sensitive melting analysis after real-time methylation specific PCR. Gene expression was investigated by quantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR. IL-6 induced significant global LINE-1 hypomethylation (p=0.016) in our in-vitro model of inflammatory stress in OSCC cell lines. Simultaneously, IL-6 induced CpG promoter methylation changes in several important putative tumor suppressor genes including CHFR, GATA5, and PAX6. Methylation changes correlated inversely with the changes in the expression of corresponding genes. Our results indicate that IL-6-induced inflammation promotes tumorigenesis in the oral cavity by altering global LINE-1 hypomethylation. In addition, concurrent hypermethylation of multiple tumor suppressor genes by IL-6 suggests that epigenetic gene silencing may be an important consequence of chronic inflammation in the oral cavity. These findings have clinical relevance, as both methylation and inflammation are suitable targets for developing novel preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:21710491

  6. Histone Methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2-Mediated ABCA1 Promoter DNA Methylation Contributes to the Progression of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yun-Cheng; Tang, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Ping; Wan, Wei; Yao, Feng; He, Ping-Ping; Xie, Wei; Mo, Zhong-Cheng; Shi, Jin-Feng; Wu, Jian-Feng; Peng, Juan; Liu, Dan; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Xiang-Yang; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a critical role in maintaining cellular cholesterol homeostasis. The purpose of this study is to identify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying ABCA1 epigenetic modification and determine its potential impact on ABCA1 expression in macrophage-derived foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development. DNA methylation induced foam cell formation from macrophages and promoted atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a large CpG island (CGI) located in the promoter region of ABCA1. Histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) downregulated ABCA1 mRNA and protein expression in THP-1 and RAW264.7 macrophage-derived foam cells. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) with 5-Aza-dC or knockdown of DNMT1 prevented the downregulation of macrophage ABCA1 expression, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in ABCA1 expression. Polycomb protein EZH2 induced DNMT1 expression and methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) recruitment, and stimulated the binding of DNMT1 and MeCP2 to ABCA1 promoter, thereby promoting ABCA1 gene DNA methylation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of DNMT1 inhibited EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 in macrophages. Conversely, EZH2 overexpression stimulated DNMT1-induced ABCA1 gene promoter methylation and atherosclerosis. EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 gene expression promotes foam cell formation and the development of atherosclerosis by DNA methylation of ABCA1 gene promoter. PMID:27295295

  7. Histone Methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2-Mediated ABCA1 Promoter DNA Methylation Contributes to the Progression of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Wei; Yao, Feng; He, Ping-Ping; Xie, Wei; Mo, Zhong-Cheng; Shi, Jin-Feng; Wu, Jian-Feng; Peng, Juan; Liu, Dan; Cayabyab, Francisco S.; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Xiang-Yang; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a critical role in maintaining cellular cholesterol homeostasis. The purpose of this study is to identify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying ABCA1 epigenetic modification and determine its potential impact on ABCA1 expression in macrophage-derived foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development. DNA methylation induced foam cell formation from macrophages and promoted atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a large CpG island (CGI) located in the promoter region of ABCA1. Histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) downregulated ABCA1 mRNA and protein expression in THP-1 and RAW264.7 macrophage-derived foam cells. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) with 5-Aza-dC or knockdown of DNMT1 prevented the downregulation of macrophage ABCA1 expression, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in ABCA1 expression. Polycomb protein EZH2 induced DNMT1 expression and methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) recruitment, and stimulated the binding of DNMT1 and MeCP2 to ABCA1 promoter, thereby promoting ABCA1 gene DNA methylation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of DNMT1 inhibited EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 in macrophages. Conversely, EZH2 overexpression stimulated DNMT1-induced ABCA1 gene promoter methylation and atherosclerosis. EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 gene expression promotes foam cell formation and the development of atherosclerosis by DNA methylation of ABCA1 gene promoter. PMID:27295295

  8. Interaction of Individual Structural Domains of hnRNP LL with the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif DNA.

    PubMed

    Roy, Basab; Talukder, Poulami; Kang, Hyun-Jin; Tsuen, Shujian S; Alam, Mohammad P; Hurley, Laurence H; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-08-31

    The recently discovered role of the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2 gene) promoter i-motif DNA in modulation of gene expression via interaction with the ribonucleoprotein hnRNP L-like (hnRNP LL) has prompted a more detailed study of the nature of this protein-DNA interaction. The RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of hnRNP LL were expressed individually, and both RRM1 and RRM2 were found to bind efficiently to the BCL2 i-motif DNA, as well as being critical for transcriptional activation, whereas RRM3-4 bound only weakly to this DNA. Binding was followed by unfolding of the DNA as monitored by changes in the CD spectrum. Mutational analysis of the i-motif DNA revealed that binding involved primarily the lateral loops of the i-motif. The kinetics of binding of the DNA with RRM1 was explored by recording CD spectra at predetermined times following admixture of the protein and DNA. The change in molar ellipticity was readily apparent after 30 s and largely complete within 1 min. A more detailed view of protein-DNA interaction was obtained by introducing the fluorescence donor 6-CNTrp in RRM1 at position 137, and the acceptor 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one (Cf) in lieu of cytidine22 in the i-motif DNA. The course of binding of the two species was monitored by FRET, which reflected a steady increase in energy transfer over a period of several minutes. The FRET signal could be diminished by the further addition of (unlabeled) RRM2, no doubt reflecting competition for binding to the i-motif DNA. These experiments using the individual RRM domains from hnRNP LL confirm the role of this transcription factor in activation of BCL2 transcription via the i-motif in the promoter element. PMID:27483029

  9. Association between early promoter-specific DNA methylation changes and outcome in older acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Achille, Nicholas J; Othus, Megan; Phelan, Kathleen; Zhang, Shubin; Cooper, Kathrine; Godwin, John E; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Radich, Jerald P; Erba, Harry P; Nand, Sucha; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J

    2016-03-01

    Treatment options for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) range from supportive care alone to full-dose chemotherapy. Identifying factors that predict response to therapy may help increase efficacy and avoid toxicity. The phase II SWOG S0703 study investigated the use of hydroxyurea and azacitidine with gemtuzumab ozogamicin in the elderly AML population and found survival rates similar to those expected with standard AML regimens, with less toxicity. As part of this study, global DNA methylation along with promoter DNA methylation and expression analysis of six candidate genes (CDKN2A, CDKN2B, HIC1, RARB, CDH1 and APAF1) were determined before and during therapy to investigate whether very early changes are prognostic for clinical response. Global DNA methylation was not associated with a clinical response. Samples after 3 or 4 days of treatment with azacitidine showed significantly decreased CDKN2A promoter DNA methylation in patients achieving complete remission (CR) compared to those who did not. Samples from day 7 of treatment showed significantly decreased RARB, CDKN2B and CDH1 promoter DNA methylation in responders compared to nonresponders. Gene-specific DNA methylation analysis of peripheral blood samples may help early identification of those older AML patients most likely to benefit from demethylating agent therapy. PMID:26818573

  10. [DNA bend sites in the promoter region of the human estrogen receptor alpha gene].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, K; Sakuma, Y

    1998-12-01

    DNA bend sites in the promoter region of the human estrogen receptor a gene were determined by the circular permutation assay. Among a total of five sites (ERB -4 to -1, and ERB + 1) mapped in the 3 kb region, three matched with the positions of the predicted periodicity while the other two did not. Most of the sites were accompanied by the short poly (dA)-poly (dT) tracts including the potential bend core sequence A2N8A2N8A2 (A/A/A). Fine mapping of the ERB-2 site indicated that this A/A/A and the immediate franking sequences contained motifs for the estrogen response element. This region had a higher affinity for the nuclear scaffold and was included in the core region of the nucleosome structure. However, binding of the nuclear factor(s) to the motifs and disruption of nucleosome structure occurred without ATP. These results suggest that a class of periodic bent DNA could act as a site of multiple interactions among the nuclear scaffold, core histones and nuclear factors. PMID:9893449

  11. Tousled-like kinases phosphorylate Asf1 to promote histone supply during DNA replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimovskaia, Ilnaz M.; Young, Clifford; Strømme, Caroline B.; Menard, Patrice; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Mejlvang, Jakob; Ask, Katrine; Ploug, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L.; Jensen, Ole N.; Groth, Anja

    2014-03-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes are rapidly assembled on newly synthesized DNA to restore chromatin organization. Asf1, a key histone H3-H4 chaperone required for this process, is phosphorylated by Tousled-like kinases (TLKs). Here, we identify TLK phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry and dissect how phosphorylation has an impact on human Asf1 function. The divergent C-terminal tail of Asf1a is phosphorylated at several sites, and this is required for timely progression through S phase. Consistent with this, biochemical analysis of wild-type and phospho-mimetic Asf1a shows that phosphorylation enhances binding to histones and the downstream chaperones CAF-1 and HIRA. Moreover, we find that TLK phosphorylation of Asf1a is induced in cells experiencing deficiency of new histones and that TLK interaction with Asf1a involves its histone-binding pocket. We thus propose that TLK signalling promotes histone supply in S phase by targeting histone-free Asf1 and stimulating its ability to shuttle histones to sites of chromatin assembly.

  12. Differentiated, Promoter-specific Response of [4Fe-4S] NsrR DNA Binding to Reaction with Nitric Oxide*

    PubMed Central

    Crack, Jason C.; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Munnoch, John; Thomson, Andrew J.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Le Brun, Nick E.

    2016-01-01

    NsrR is an iron-sulfur cluster protein that regulates the nitric oxide (NO) stress response of many bacteria. NsrR from Streptomyces coelicolor regulates its own expression and that of only two other genes, hmpA1 and hmpA2, which encode HmpA enzymes predicted to detoxify NO. NsrR binds promoter DNA with high affinity only when coordinating a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Here we show that reaction of [4Fe-4S] NsrR with NO affects DNA binding differently depending on the gene promoter. Binding to the hmpA2 promoter was abolished at ∼2 NO per cluster, although for the hmpA1 and nsrR promoters, ∼4 and ∼8 NO molecules, respectively, were required to abolish DNA binding. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the NO reaction revealed a rapid, multi-phase, non-concerted process involving up to 8–10 NO molecules per cluster, leading to the formation of several iron-nitrosyl species. A distinct intermediate was observed at ∼2 NO per cluster, along with two further intermediates at ∼4 and ∼6 NO. The NsrR nitrosylation reaction was not significantly affected by DNA binding. These results show that NsrR regulates different promoters in response to different concentrations of NO. Spectroscopic evidence indicates that this is achieved by different NO-FeS complexes. PMID:26887943

  13. Differentiated, Promoter-specific Response of [4Fe-4S] NsrR DNA Binding to Reaction with Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Crack, Jason C; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Munnoch, John; Thomson, Andrew J; Hutchings, Matthew I; Le Brun, Nick E

    2016-04-15

    NsrR is an iron-sulfur cluster protein that regulates the nitric oxide (NO) stress response of many bacteria. NsrR from Streptomyces coelicolor regulates its own expression and that of only two other genes, hmpA1 and hmpA2, which encode HmpA enzymes predicted to detoxify NO. NsrR binds promoter DNA with high affinity only when coordinating a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Here we show that reaction of [4Fe-4S] NsrR with NO affects DNA binding differently depending on the gene promoter. Binding to the hmpA2 promoter was abolished at ∼2 NO per cluster, although for the hmpA1 and nsrR promoters, ∼4 and ∼8 NO molecules, respectively, were required to abolish DNA binding. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies of the NO reaction revealed a rapid, multi-phase, non-concerted process involving up to 8-10 NO molecules per cluster, leading to the formation of several iron-nitrosyl species. A distinct intermediate was observed at ∼2 NO per cluster, along with two further intermediates at ∼4 and ∼6 NO. The NsrR nitrosylation reaction was not significantly affected by DNA binding. These results show that NsrR regulates different promoters in response to different concentrations of NO. Spectroscopic evidence indicates that this is achieved by different NO-FeS complexes. PMID:26887943

  14. BRUCE regulates DNA double-strand break response by promoting USP8 deubiquitination of BRIT1

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Chunmin; Che, Lixiao; Ren, Jinyu; Pandita, Raj K.; Lu, Jing; Li, Kaiyi; Pandita, Tej K.; Du, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is crucial for genomic integrity. BRIT1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene C terminus-repeat inhibitor of human telomerase repeat transcriptase expression), a tumor suppressor and early DDR factor, is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by phosphorylated H2A histone family, member X (γ-H2AX), where it promotes chromatin relaxation by recruiting the switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI–SNF) chromatin remodeler to facilitate DDR. However, regulation of BRIT1 recruitment is not fully understood. The baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (BRUCE) is an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Here, we report a non-IAP function of BRUCE in the regulation of the BRIT1–SWI–SNF DSB-response pathway and genomic stability. We demonstrate that BRIT1 is K63 ubiquitinated in unstimulated cells and that deubiquitination of BRIT1 is a prerequisite for its recruitment to DSB sites by γ-H2AX. We show mechanistically that BRUCE acts as a scaffold, bridging the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8) and BRIT1 in a complex to coordinate USP8-catalyzed deubiquitination of BRIT1. Loss of BRUCE or USP8 impairs BRIT1 deubiquitination, BRIT1 binding with γ-H2AX, the formation of BRIT1 DNA damage foci, and chromatin relaxation. Moreover, BRUCE-depleted cells display reduced homologous recombination repair, and BRUCE-mutant mice exhibit repair defects and genomic instability. These findings identify BRUCE and USP8 as two hitherto uncharacterized critical DDR regulators and uncover a deubiquitination regulation of BRIT1 assembly at damaged chromatin for efficient DDR and genomic stability. PMID:25733871

  15. Genome-wide study predicts promoter-G4 DNA motifs regulate selective functions in bacteria: radioresistance of D. radiodurans involves G4 DNA-mediated regulation

    PubMed Central

    Beaume, Nicolas; Pathak, Rajiv; Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kota, Swathi; Misra, Hari S.; Gautam, Hemant K.; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2013-01-01

    A remarkable number of guanine-rich sequences with potential to adopt non-canonical secondary structures called G-quadruplexes (or G4 DNA) are found within gene promoters. Despite growing interest, regulatory role of quadruplex DNA motifs in intrinsic cellular function remains poorly understood. Herein, we asked whether occurrence of potential G4 (PG4) DNA in promoters is associated with specific function(s) in bacteria. Using a normalized promoter-PG4-content (PG4P) index we analysed >60 000 promoters in 19 well-annotated species for (a) function class(es) and (b) gene(s) with enriched PG4P. Unexpectedly, PG4-associated functional classes were organism specific, suggesting that PG4 motifs may impart specific function to organisms. As a case study, we analysed radioresistance. Interestingly, unsupervised clustering using PG4P of 21 genes, crucial for radioresistance, grouped three radioresistant microorganisms including Deinococcus radiodurans. Based on these predictions we tested and found that in presence of nanomolar amounts of the intracellular quadruplex-binding ligand N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMM), radioresistance of D. radiodurans was attenuated by ∼60%. In addition, important components of the RecF recombinational repair pathway recA, recF, recO, recR and recQ genes were found to harbour promoter-PG4 motifs and were also down-regulated in presence of NMM. Together these results provide first evidence that radioresistance may involve G4 DNA-mediated regulation and support the rationale that promoter-PG4s influence selective functions. PMID:23161683

  16. Threonine phosphorylation prevents promoter DNA binding of the Group B Streptococcus response regulator CovR.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Jung; Walthers, Don; Connelly, James E; Burnside, Kellie; Jewell, Kelsea A; Kenney, Linda J; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2009-03-01

    All living organisms communicate with the external environment for their survival and existence. In prokaryotes, communication is achieved by two-component systems (TCS) comprising histidine kinases and response regulators. In eukaryotes, signalling is accomplished by serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. Although TCS and serine/threonine kinases coexist in prokaryotes, direct cross-talk between these families was first described in Group B Streptococcus (GBS). A serine/threonine kinase (Stk1) and a TCS (CovR/CovS) co-regulate toxin expression in GBS. Typically, promoter binding of regulators like CovR is controlled by phosphorylation of the conserved active site aspartate (D53). In this study, we show that Stk1 phosphorylates CovR at threonine 65. The functional consequence of threonine phosphorylation of CovR in GBS was evaluated using phosphomimetic and silencing substitutions. GBS encoding the phosphomimetic T65E allele are deficient for CovR regulation unlike strains encoding the non-phosphorylated T65A allele. Further, compared with wild-type or T65A CovR, the T65E CovR is unable to bind promoter DNA and is decreased for phosphorylation at D53, similar to Stk1-phosphorylated CovR. Collectively, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of response regulator control that enables GBS (and possibly other prokaryotes) to fine-tune gene expression for environmental adaptation. PMID:19170889

  17. A dynamic CTCF chromatin binding landscape promotes DNA hydroxymethylation and transcriptional induction of adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Oger, Frédérik; Dehondt, Hélène; Firmin, François F; Gheeraert, Céline; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional transcription factor characterized by chromatin binding patterns often described as largely invariant. In this context, how CTCF chromatin recruitment and functionalities are used to promote cell type-specific gene expression remains poorly defined. Here, we show that, in addition to constitutively bound CTCF binding sites (CTS), the CTCF cistrome comprises a large proportion of sites showing highly dynamic binding patterns during the course of adipogenesis. Interestingly, dynamic CTCF chromatin binding is positively linked with changes in expression of genes involved in biological functions defining the different stages of adipogenesis. Importantly, a subset of these dynamic CTS are gained at cell type-specific regulatory regions, in line with a requirement for CTCF in transcriptional induction of adipocyte differentiation. This relates to, at least in part, CTCF requirement for transcriptional activation of both the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and its target genes. Functionally, we show that CTCF interacts with TET methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET) enzymes and promotes adipogenic transcriptional enhancer DNA hydroxymethylation. Our study reveals a dynamic CTCF chromatin binding landscape required for epigenomic remodeling of enhancers and transcriptional activation driving cell differentiation. PMID:25183525

  18. A dynamic CTCF chromatin binding landscape promotes DNA hydroxymethylation and transcriptional induction of adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Oger, Frédérik; Dehondt, Hélène; Firmin, François F.; Gheeraert, Céline; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a ubiquitously expressed multifunctional transcription factor characterized by chromatin binding patterns often described as largely invariant. In this context, how CTCF chromatin recruitment and functionalities are used to promote cell type-specific gene expression remains poorly defined. Here, we show that, in addition to constitutively bound CTCF binding sites (CTS), the CTCF cistrome comprises a large proportion of sites showing highly dynamic binding patterns during the course of adipogenesis. Interestingly, dynamic CTCF chromatin binding is positively linked with changes in expression of genes involved in biological functions defining the different stages of adipogenesis. Importantly, a subset of these dynamic CTS are gained at cell type-specific regulatory regions, in line with a requirement for CTCF in transcriptional induction of adipocyte differentiation. This relates to, at least in part, CTCF requirement for transcriptional activation of both the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and its target genes. Functionally, we show that CTCF interacts with TET methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET) enzymes and promotes adipogenic transcriptional enhancer DNA hydroxymethylation. Our study reveals a dynamic CTCF chromatin binding landscape required for epigenomic remodeling of enhancers and transcriptional activation driving cell differentiation. PMID:25183525

  19. TFIIIB subunit locations on U6 gene promoter DNA mapped by site-specific protein-DNA photo-cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Joo; Kang, Yoon Soon; Stumph, William E

    2016-05-01

    RNA polymerase III-transcribed U6 snRNA genes have gene-external promoters that contain TATA boxes. U6 TATA sequences are bound by TFIIIB that in Drosophila contains the three subunits TBP, Brf1, and Bdp1. The overall structure of TFIIIB is still not well understood. We have therefore studied the mode of TFIIIB binding to DNA by site-specific protein-DNA photo-cross-linking. The results indicate that a portion of Brf1 is sandwiched between Bdp1 and TBP upstream of the TATA box. Furthermore, Bdp1 traverses the DNA under the N-terminal stirrup of TBP to interact with the DNA (and very likely Brf1) downstream of the TATA sequence. PMID:27112515

  20. The roles of DNA polymerase ζ and the Y family DNA polymerases in promoting or preventing genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpy; Helchowski, Corey M.; Canman, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display numerous abnormal characteristics which are initiated and maintained by elevated mutation rates and genome instability. Chromosomal DNA is continuously surveyed for the presence of damage or blocked replication forks by the DNA Damage Response (DDR) network. The DDR is complex and includes activation of cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, gene transcription, and induction of apoptosis. Duplicating a damaged genome is associated with elevated risks to fork collapse and genome instability. Therefore, the DNA Damage Tolerance (DDT) pathway is also employed to enhance survival and involves the recruitment of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases to sites of replication fork blockade or single stranded DNA gaps left after the completion of replication in order to restore DNA to its double stranded form before mitosis. TLS polymerases are specialized for inserting nucleotides opposite DNA adducts, abasic sites, or DNA crosslinks. By definition, the DDT pathway is not involved in the actual repair of damaged DNA, but provides a mechanism to tolerate DNA lesions during replication thereby increasing survival and lessening the chance for genome instability. However this may be associated with increased mutagenesis. In this review, we will describe the specialized functions of Y family polymerases (Rev1, Polη, Polι and Polκ) and DNA polymerase ζ in lesion bypass, mutagenesis, and prevention of genome instability, the latter due to newly appreciated roles in DNA repair. The recently described role of the Fanconi anemia pathway in regulating Rev1 and Polζ-dependent TLS is also discussed in terms of their involvement in TLS, interstrand crosslink repair, and homologous recombination. PMID:23195997

  1. Naturally Extended CT · AG Repeats Increase H-DNA Structures and Promoter Activity in the Smooth Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yoo-Jeong; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2008-01-01

    Naturally occurring repeat sequences capable of adopting H-DNA structures are abundant in promoters of disease-related genes. In support of this, we found (CT)22 · (AG)22 repeats in the promoter of smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK), a key regulator of vascular smooth muscle function. We also found an insertion mutation that adds another six pairs of CT · AG repeats and increases smMLCK promoter activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Therefore, we used the smMLCK promoters from normotensive and hypertensive rats as a model system to determine how CT · AG repeats form H-DNA, an intramolecular triplex, and regulate promoter activity. High-resolution mapping with a chemical probe selective for H-DNA showed that the CT · AG repeats adopt H-DNA structures at a neutral pH. Importantly, the SHR promoter forms longer H-DNA structures than the promoter from normotensive rats. Reconstituting nucleosomes on the promoters, in vitro, showed no difference in nucleosome positioning between the two promoters. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that histone acetylations are greater in the hypertensive promoter. Thus, our findings suggest that the extended CT · AG repeats in the SHR promoter increase H-DNA structures, histone modifications, and promoter activity of the smMLCK, perhaps contributing to vascular disorders in hypertension. PMID:17991897

  2. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  3. BETA DEFENSIN 2 AND 3 PROMOTE THE UPTAKE OF SELF OR CpG DNA, ENHANCE IFN-α PRODUCTION BY HUMAN PLASMACYTOID DENDRITIC CELLS AND PROMOTE INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Tewary, Poonam; dela Rosa, Gonzalo; Sharma, Neeraj; Rodriguez, Luis G; Tarasov, Sergey G; Howard, OM Zack; Shirota, Hidekazu; Steinhagen, Folkert; Klinman, Dennis M.; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2013-01-01

    Alarmins are a group of structurally diverse host defense antimicrobial peptides that are important immune activators. Here we present a novel role of two potent alarmins, human beta defensin 2 and 3 (HBD2 and 3) in promoting IFN-α production by human plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). We demonstrate that HBD2 and 3 activate pDCs by enhancing the intracellular uptake of CpG and self DNA and promote DNA induced IFN-α production in a TLR9 dependent manner. Both CpG and host DNA form aggregates that resemble DNA nets when combined with HBD2 and 3. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) studies to elucidate the nature of HBD3-CpG complexes demonstrates involvement of enthalpy driven interactions in addition to hydrophobic interactions with the formation of complexes at a molar ratio of 2:1 defensin/CpG. Intravenous administration of HBD3-CpG complexes induced proinflammatory cytokines like IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-6, IFN-α and IL-10 in serum associated with an increased recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen. Subcutaneous injections of these complexes showed enhanced infiltration of inflammatory cells at injection site indicating a potential pathophysiological role of alarmin/DNA complexes in contributing to inflammation. Intraperitoneal immunization of HBD3/CpG complexes with OVA enhanced both cellular and humoral responses in response to OVA as compared to OVA/HBD3 or OVA/CPG alone, indicative of a much more potent adjuvant effect of the HBD3/CpG complexes. Thus the ability of defensins to enhance cellular uptake of nucleic acids can lead to improved vaccine formulations by promoting their uptake by various cells resulting in an enhanced immune response. PMID:23776172

  4. Crystal Structure of Mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding Domain in Complex with Type II TGF-[beta] Receptor Promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-08-18

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-{beta} receptor gene (T{beta}R-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, the A-site and the B-site. Here, we report the 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter DNA (mT{beta}R-II{sub DNA}). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from a major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity.

  5. Stimulation of ribosomal RNA gene promoter by transcription factor Sp1 involves active DNA demethylation by Gadd45-NER pathway.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Pallavi; Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    The well-studied Pol II transcription factor Sp1 has not been investigated for its regulatory role in rDNA transcription. Here, we show that Sp1 bound to specific sites on rDNA and localized into the nucleoli during the G1 phase of cell cycle to activate rDNA transcription. It facilitated the recruitment of Pol I pre-initiation complex and impeded the binding of nucleolar remodeling complex (NoRC) to rDNA resulting in the formation of euchromatin active state. More importantly, Sp1 also orchestrated the site-specific binding of Gadd45a-nucleotide excision repair (NER) complex resulting in active demethylation and transcriptional activation of rDNA. Interestingly, knockdown of Sp1 impaired rDNA transcription due to reduced engagement of the Gadd45a-NER complex and hypermethylation of rDNA. Thus, the present study unveils a novel role of Sp1 in rDNA transcription involving promoter demethylation. PMID:27156884

  6. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Yasunori Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  7. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  8. Progranulin promotes Temozolomide resistance of glioblastoma by orchestrating DNA repair and tumor stemness.

    PubMed

    Bandey, I; Chiou, S-H; Huang, A-P; Tsai, J-C; Tu, P-h

    2015-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults with a dismal prognosis. Current therapy of surgical removal combined with Temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy only slightly prolongs the survival of GBM patients. Thus, it is essential to elucidate mechanism underlying its highly malignant properties in order to develop efficacious therapeutic regimens. In this study, we showed that progranulin (PGRN) was overexpressed in most GBM cell lines and the majority of human tumor samples. PGRN overexpression conferred GBM cells with tumorigenic properties and TMZ resistance by upregulating DNA repair (PARP, ATM, BRCA1, Rad51, XRCC1 and so on) and cancer stemness (CD133, CD44, ABCG2) genes, in part via an AP-1 transcription factor, specifically cFos/JunB. Curcumin, an AP-1 inhibitor, was also found to regulate PGRN promoter activity and expression including its downstream effectors aforementioned. These data suggested a feedforward loop between PGRN signaling and AP-1. PGRN depletion significantly decreased unlimited self-renewal and multilineage differentiation and the malignant properties of GBMs cells S1R1, and enhanced their vulnerability to TMZ. In addition, S1R1 depleted of PGRN also lost the ability to form tumor in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. In conclusion, PGRN had a critical role in the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of GBM and functioned at the top of the hierarchy of cellular machinery that modulates both DNA repair pathways and cancer stemness. Our data suggest that a new strategy combining current regimens with compounds targeting PGRN/AP-1 loop like curcumin may significantly improve the therapeutic outcome of GBM. PMID:24793792

  9. DNA Methylation in the Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) Promoter in Relation to Asthma and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Reinius, Lovisa E.; Gref, Anna; Sääf, Annika; Acevedo, Nathalie; Joerink, Maaike; Kupczyk, Maciej; D'Amato, Mauro; Bergström, Anna; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Söderhäll, Cilla; Kere, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and allergy are complex disorders influenced by both inheritance and environment, a relationship that might be further clarified by epigenetics. Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) has been associated with asthma and allergy and a study suggested modulation of the genetic risk by environmental factors. We aimed to study DNA methylation in the promoter region of NPSR1 in relation to asthma and environmental exposures. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to investigate potential functional roles of both genotypes and methylation status in the NPSR1 promoter. DNA methylation was analysed using EpiTYPER in blood samples from two well-characterized cohorts; the BIOAIR study of severe asthma in adults and the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE. We observed that DNA methylation and genetic variants in the promoter influenced the binding of nuclear proteins to DNA, suggesting functional relevance. Significant, although small, differences in methylation were related to both adult severe asthma (p = 0.0001) and childhood allergic asthma (p = 0.01). Furthermore, DNA methylation was associated with exposures such as current smoking in adults for two CpG sites (p = 0.005 and 0.04), parental smoking during infancy in the children (p = 0.02) and in which month the sample was taken (p = 0.01). In summary, DNA methylation levels in the promoter of NPSR1 showed small but significant associations with asthma, both in adults and in children, and to related traits such as allergy and certain environmental exposures. Both genetic variation and the methylated state of CpG sites seem to have an effect on the binding of nuclear proteins in the regulatory region of NPSR1 suggesting complex regulation of this gene in asthma and allergy. PMID:23372674

  10. Rapid release of plasmid DNA from surfaces coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers promoted by the application of electrochemical potentials.

    PubMed

    Aytar, Burcu S; Prausnitz, Mark R; Lynn, David M

    2012-05-01

    We report an approach to the rapid release of DNA based on the application of electrochemical potentials to surfaces coated with polyelectrolyte-based thin films. We fabricated multilayered polyelectrolyte films (or "polyelectrolyte multilayers", PEMs) using plasmid DNA and a model hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (polymer 1) on stainless steel substrates using a layer-by-layer approach. The application of continuous reduction potentials in the range of -1.1 to -0.7 V (vs a Ag/AgCl electrode) to film-coated electrodes in PBS at 37 °C resulted in the complete release of DNA over a period of 1-2 min. Film-coated electrodes incubated under identical conditions in the absence of applied potentials required 1-2 days for complete release. Control over the magnitude of the applied potential provided control over the rate at which DNA was released. The results of these and additional physical characterization experiments are consistent with a mechanism of film disruption that is promoted by local increases in pH at the film/electrode interface (resulting from electrochemical reduction of water or dissolved oxygen) that disrupt ionic interactions in these materials. The results of cell-based experiments demonstrated that DNA was released in a form that remains intact and able to promote transgene expression in mammalian cells. Finally, we demonstrate that short-term (i.e., non-continuous) electrochemical treatments can also be used to promote faster film erosion (e.g., over 1-2 h) once the potential is removed. Past studies demonstrate that PEMs fabricated using polymer 1 can promote surface-mediated transfection of cells and tissues in vitro and in vivo. With further development, the electrochemical approaches reported here could thus provide new methods for the rapid, triggered, or spatially patterned transfer of DNA (or other agents) from surfaces of interest in a variety of fundamental and applied contexts. PMID:22551230

  11. Indirubin derivatives alter DNA binding activity of the transcription factor NF-Y and inhibit MDR1 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toru; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Saito, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Takashi; Tabata, Keiichi; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyairi, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    2014-10-15

    Indirubin derivatives exert antitumor activity. However, their effects on the expression of multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) have not been investigated. Here we found three derivatives that inhibit the MDR1 gene promoter. To investigate the effects of indirubins on the DNA binding of NF-Y, a major MDR1 gene transcription factor that recognizes an inverted CCAAT element in the promoter, gel mobility shift assay was performed using the element as a probe with nuclear extracts from NG108-15, MCF7, HepG2, C2C12, and SK-N-SH cells. Among 17 compounds, 5-methoxyindirubin inhibited the DNA binding of NF-Y significantly, whereas indirubin-3'-oxime and 7-methoxyindirubin 3'-oxime increased the binding considerably. After evaluating a suitable concentration of each compound for transcription analysis using living tumor cells, we performed a reporter gene assay using a reporter DNA plasmid containing EGFP cDNA fused to the MDR1 gene promoter region. Indirubin-3'-oxime exerted a significant inhibitory effect on the MDR1 promoter activity in MCF7 and HepG2 cells, and 5-methoxyindirubin inhibited the activity only in MCF7 cells; 7-methoxyindirubin 3'-oxime suppressed the activity in all of the cell lines. We further confirmed that the compounds reduced endogenous MDR1 transcription without any inhibitory effect on NF-Y expression. Moreover, each compound increased the doxorubicin sensitivity of MCF7 cells. These results indicate that each indirubin derivative acts on the DNA binding of NF-Y and represses the MDR1 gene promoter with tumor cell-type specificity. PMID:25066113

  12. A critical re-assessment of DNA repair gene promoter methylation in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Do, Hongdo; Wong, Nicholas C.; Murone, Carmel; John, Thomas; Solomon, Benjamin; Mitchell, Paul L.; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair genes that have been inactivated by promoter methylation offer potential therapeutic targets either by targeting the specific repair deficiency, or by synthetic lethal approaches. This study evaluated promoter methylation status for eight selected DNA repair genes (ATM, BRCA1, ERCC1, MGMT, MLH1, NEIL1, RAD23B and XPC) in 56 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumours and 11 lung cell lines using the methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) methodology. Frequent methylation in NEIL1 (42%) and infrequent methylation in ERCC1 (2%) and RAD23B (2%) are reported for the first time in NSCLC. MGMT methylation was detected in 13% of the NSCLCs. Contrary to previous studies, methylation was not detected in ATM, BRCA1, MLH1 and XPC. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) was consistent with these findings. The study emphasises the importance of using appropriate methodology for accurate assessment of promoter methylation. PMID:24569633

  13. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Safer, B.; Cohen, R.B.; Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. /sup 32/P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of /sup 32/P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors.

  14. Hepatitis B virus basal core promoter mutations show lower replication fitness associated with cccDNA acetylation status.

    PubMed

    Koumbi, Lemonica; Pollicino, Teresa; Raimondo, Giovanni; Stampoulis, Dimitrios; Khakoo, Salim; Karayiannis, Peter

    2016-07-15

    In chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, variants with mutations in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore region predominate and associate with more severe disease forms. Studies on their effect on viral replication remain controversial. Increasing evidence shows that epigenetic modifications of cccDNA regulate HBV replication and disease outcome. Here we determined the transcription and viral replication efficiency of well-defined BCP and precore mutations and their effect on cccDNA epigenetic control. HBV monomers bearing BCP mutations A1762T/G1764A and A1762T/G1764A/C1766T, and precore mutations G1896A, G1899A and G1896A/G1899A, were transfected into HepG2 cells using a plasmid-free approach. Viral RNA transcripts were detected by Northern blot hybridization and RT PCR, DNA replicative intermediates by Southern blotting and RT PCR, and viral release was measured by ELISA. Acetylation of cccDNA-bound histones was assessed by Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation (ChIP) assay and methylation of cccDNA by bisulfite sequencing. BCP mutations resulted in low viral release, mRNA transcription and pgRNA/cccDNA ratios that paralleled the acetylation of cccDNA-bound H4 histone and inversely correlated with the HDAC1 recruitment onto cccDNA. Independently of the mutations, cccDNA was a target for methylation, accompanied by the upregulation of DNMT1 expression and DNMT1 recruitment onto cccDNA. Our results suggest that BCP mutations decrease viral replication capacity possibly by modulating the acetylation and deacetylation of cccDNA-bound histones while precore mutations do not have a significant effect on viral replication. These data provide evidence that epigenetic factors contribute to the regulation of HBV viral replication. PMID:27132039

  15. TP53INP2/DOR, a mediator of cell autophagy, promotes rDNA transcription via facilitating the assembly of the POLR1/RNA polymerase I preinitiation complex at rDNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinfeng; Wan, Wei; Shou, Xin; Huang, Rui; You, Zhiyuan; Shou, Yanhong; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Tianhua; Liu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Cells control their metabolism through modulating the anabolic and catabolic pathways. TP53INP2/DOR (tumor protein p53 inducible nuclear protein 2), participates in cell catabolism by serving as a promoter of autophagy. Here we uncover a novel function of TP53INP2 in protein synthesis, a major biosynthetic and energy-consuming anabolic process. TP53INP2 localizes to the nucleolus through its nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) located at the C-terminal domain. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays detected an association of TP53INP2 with the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), when exclusion of TP53INP2 from the nucleolus repressed rDNA promoter activity and the production of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and proteins. The removal of TP53INP2 also impaired the association of the POLR1/RNA polymerase I preinitiation complex (PIC) with rDNA. Further, TP53INP2 interacts directly with POLR1 PIC, and is required for the assembly of the complex. These data indicate that TP53INP2 promotes ribosome biogenesis through facilitating rRNA synthesis at the nucleolus, suggesting a dual role of TP53INP2 in cell metabolism, assisting anabolism on the nucleolus, and stimulating catabolism off the nucleolus. PMID:27172002

  16. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-[beta] receptor promoter DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-10-08

    Ets proteins are transcription factors that activate or repress the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, development, transformation and apoptosis. Like other Ets-family members, Elf3 functions as a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcriptional factor. A mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment (amino-acid residues 269-371) containing the DNA-binding domain has been crystallized in complex with mouse type II TGF-{beta} receptor promoter (TR-II) DNA. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.66, b = 52, c = 99.78 {angstrom}, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom}.

  17. Tissue-specific Leptin promoter DNA methylation is associated with maternal and infant perinatal factors.

    PubMed

    Lesseur, Corina; Armstrong, David A; Paquette, Alison G; Koestler, Devin C; Padbury, James F; Marsit, Carmen J

    2013-12-01

    Leptin a regulator of body weight is involved in reproductive and developmental functions. Leptin promoter DNA methylation (LEP) regulates gene expression in a tissue-specific manner and has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes. In non-pathologic human pregnancies, we assessed LEP methylation, genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2167270 in placental (n=81), maternal and cord blood samples (n=60), and examined the association between methylation, genotype, and perinatal factors. Maternal blood LEP methylation was lower in pre-pregnancy obese women (P=0.01). Cord blood LEP methylation was higher in small for gestational age (SGA) (P=4.6×10(-3)) and A/A genotype (P=1.6×10(-4)), lower (-1.47, P=0.03) in infants born to pre-pregnancy obese mothers and correlated (P=0.01) with maternal blood LEP. Gender was associated with placental LEP methylation (P=0.05). These results suggest that LEP epigenetic control may be influenced by perinatal factors including: maternal obesity, infant growth, genotype and gender in a tissue-specific manner and may have multigenerational implications. PMID:23911897

  18. Promoter-cDNA-directed heterologous protein expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Swick, A G; Janicot, M; Cheneval-Kastelic, T; McLenithan, J C; Lane, M D

    1992-01-01

    Heterologous proteins can be expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by cytoplasmic microinjection of mRNA. To circumvent limitations inherent in this approach we investigate direct nuclear injection of strong viral expression vectors to drive transcription and subsequent translation of cDNAs encoding cytoplasmic, secreted, and plasma membrane proteins. After several viral promoters had been tested, the pMT2 vector was found to be a superior expression vector for X. laevis oocytes capable of directing expression of high levels of functional heterologous proteins. Typically the amount of protein derived from transcription-translation of the microinjected cDNA accounts for approximately 1% of total non-yolk protein. Moreover, the inefficiency usually associated with nuclear injections was overcome by coinjection of pMT2 driving expression of a secreted alkaline phosphatase as an internal control to select positive-expressing oocytes. Using this method, we have successfully expressed high levels of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, the adipocyte-specific cytosolic 422(aP2) protein, and the membrane-associated glucose transporter GLUT1. The system described should be applicable to a wide variety of proteins for which cDNAs are available. Hence, the cumbersome and often inefficient in vitro synthesis of mRNA for studying ion channels, receptors, and transporters as well as for expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes should no longer be necessary. Images PMID:1542676

  19. Gastric cancer associated variant of DNA polymerase beta (Leu22Pro) promotes DNA replication associated double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rozacky, Jenna; Nemec, Antoni A.; Sweasy, Joann B.; Kidane, Dawit

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase beta (Pol β) is a key enzymefor the protection against oxidative DNA lesions via itsrole in base excision repair (BER). Approximately 1/3 of tumors studied to date express Pol β variant proteins, and several tumors overexpress Pol β. Pol β possesses DNA polymerase and dRP lyase activities, both of which are known to be important for efficient BER. The dRP lyase activity resides within the 8kDa amino terminal domain of Pol β, is responsible for removal of the 5′ phosphate group (5′-dRP). The DNA polymerase subsequently fills the gaps. Previously, we demonstrated that the human gastric cancer-associated variant of Pol β (Leu22Pro (L22P)) lacks dRP lyase function in vitro. Here, we report that L22P-expressing cells harbor significantly increased replication associated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and defective maintenance of the nascent DNA strand (NDS) during replication stress. Moreover, L22P-expressing cells are sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors, which suggests trapped PARP1 binds to the 5′-dRP group and blocks replications forks, resulting in fork collapse and DSBs. Our data suggest that the normal function of the dRP lyase is critical to maintain replication fork integrity and prevent replication fork collapse to DSBs and cellular transformation. PMID:26090616

  20. Gastric cancer associated variant of DNA polymerase beta (Leu22Pro) promotes DNA replication associated double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rozacky, Jenna; Nemec, Antoni A; Sweasy, Joann B; Kidane, Dawit

    2015-09-15

    DNA polymerase beta (Pol β) is a key enzyme for the protection against oxidative DNA lesions via its role in base excision repair (BER). Approximately 1/3 of tumors studied to date express Pol β variant proteins, and several tumors overexpress Pol β. Pol β possesses DNA polymerase and dRP lyase activities, both of which are known to be important for efficient BER. The dRP lyase activity resides within the 8kDa amino terminal domain of Pol β, is responsible for removal of the 5' phosphate group (5'-dRP). The DNA polymerase subsequently fills the gaps. Previously, we demonstrated that the human gastric cancer-associated variant of Pol β (Leu22Pro (L22P)) lacks dRP lyase function in vitro. Here, we report that L22P-expressing cells harbor significantly increased replication associated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and defective maintenance of the nascent DNA strand (NDS) during replication stress. Moreover, L22P-expressing cells are sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors, which suggests trapped PARP1 binds to the 5'-dRP group and blocks replications forks, resulting in fork collapse and DSBs. Our data suggest that the normal function of the dRP lyase is critical to maintain replication fork integrity and prevent replication fork collapse to DSBs and cellular transformation. PMID:26090616

  1. Crystal structure of mouse Elf3 C-terminal DNA-binding domain in complex with type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Agarkar, Vinod B.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Rizzino, Angie; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2010-01-01

    The Ets family of transcription factors is composed of more than 30 members. One of its members, Elf3, is expressed in virtually all epithelial cells as well as in many tumors, including breast tumors. Several studies observed that the promoter of the type II TGF-β receptor gene (TβR-II) is strongly stimulated by Elf3 via two adjacent Elf3 binding sites, A-site and B-site. Here we report the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a mouse Elf3 C-terminal fragment, containing the DNA-binding Ets domain, in complex with the B-site of mouse type II TGF-β receptor promoter DNA (mTβR-IIDNA). Elf3 contacts the core GGAA motif of the B-site from major groove similar to that of known Ets proteins. However, unlike other Ets proteins, Elf3 also contacts sequences of the A-site from the minor groove of the DNA. DNA binding experiments and cell-based transcription studies indicate that minor groove interaction by Arg349 located in the Ets domain is important for Elf3 function. Equally interesting, previous studies have shown that the C-terminal region of Elf3, which flanks the Ets domain, is required for Elf3 binding to DNA. In this study, we determined that Elf3 amino acid residues within this flanking region, including Trp361, are important for the structural integrity of the protein as well as for the Efl3 DNA binding and transactivation activity. PMID:20079749

  2. Enhanced GSH synthesis by Bisphenol A exposure promoted DNA methylation process in the testes of adult rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cong; Zhang, Yingying; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zaizhao

    2016-09-01

    DNA methylation is a commonly studied epigenetic modification. The mechanism of BPA on DNA methylation is poorly understood. The present study aims to explore whether GSH synthesis affects DNA methylation in the testes of adult male rare minnow Gobiocypris rarus in response to Bisphenol A (BPA). Male G. rarus was exposed to 1, 15 and 225μgL(-1) BPA for 7 days. The levels of global DNA methylation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and glutathione (GSH) in the testes were analyzed. Meanwhile, the levels of enzymes involved in DNA methylation and de novo GSH synthesis, and the substrate contents for GSH production were measured. Furthermore, gene expression profiles of the corresponding genes of all studied enzymes were analyzed. Results indicated that BPA at 15 and 225μgL(-1) caused hypermethylation of global DNA in the testes. The 15μgL(-1) BPA resulted in significant decrease of ten-eleven translocation proteins (TETs) while 225μgL(-1) BPA caused significant increase of DNA methyltransferase proteins (DNMTs). Moreover, 225μgL(-1) BPA caused significant increase of H2O2 and GSH levels, and the de novo GSH synthesis was enhanced. These results indicated that the significant decrease of the level of TETs may be sufficient to cause the DNA hypermethylation by 15μgL(-1) BPA. However, the significantly increased of DNMTs contributed to the significant increase of DNA methylation levels by 225μgL(-1) BPA. Moreover, the elevated de novo GSH synthesis may promote the DNA methylation process. PMID:27474941

  3. Presymptomatic Alterations in Amino Acid Metabolism and DNA Methylation in the Cerebellum of a Murine Model of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Barry E; Hundert, Amos S; Goguen, Donna; Weaver, Ian C G; Karten, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is caused in most cases by mutations in NPC1, which encodes the late endosomal NPC1 protein. Loss of NPC1 disrupts cholesterol trafficking from late endosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane, causing cholesterol accumulation in late endosomes/lysosomes. Neurons are particularly vulnerable to this cholesterol trafficking defect, but the pathogenic mechanisms through which NPC1 deficiency causes neuronal dysfunction remain largely unknown. Herein, we have investigated amino acid metabolism in cerebella of NPC1-deficient mice at different stages of NPC disease. Imbalances in amino acid metabolism were evident from increased branched chain amino acid and asparagine levels and altered expression of key enzymes of glutamine/glutamate metabolism in presymptomatic and early symptomatic NPC1-deficient cerebellum. Increased levels of several amino acid intermediates of one-carbon metabolism indicated disturbances in folate and methylation pathways. Alterations in DNA methylation were apparent in decreased expression of DNA methyltransferase 3a and methyl-5'-cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine-domain binding proteins, reduced 5-methylcytosine immunoreactivity in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers, demethylation of genome-wide repetitive LINE-1 elements, and hypermethylation in specific promoter regions of single-copy genes in NPC1-deficient cerebellum at early stages of the disease. Alterations in amino acid metabolism and epigenetic changes in the cerebellum at presymptomatic stages of NPC disease represent previously unrecognized mechanisms of NPC pathogenesis. PMID:27083515

  4. The downregulation of the RNA-binding protein Staufen2 in response to DNA damage promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Trépanier, Véronique; Beaujois, Remy; Viranaicken, Wildriss; Drobetsky, Elliot; DesGroseillers, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Staufen2 (Stau2) is an RNA-binding protein involved in cell fate decision by controlling several facets of mRNA processing including localization, splicing, translation and stability. Herein we report that exposure to DNA-damaging agents that generate replicative stress such as camptothecin (CPT), 5-fluoro-uracil (5FU) and ultraviolet radiation (UVC) causes downregulation of Stau2 in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. In contrast, other agents such as doxorubicin and ionizing radiation had no effect on Stau2 expression. Consistently, Stau2 expression is regulated by the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) signaling pathway but not by the DNA-PK or ataxia telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2 pathways. Stau2 downregulation is initiated at the level of transcription, independently of apoptosis induction. Promoter analysis identified a short 198 bp region which is necessary and sufficient for both basal and CPT-regulated Stau2 expression. The E2F1 transcription factor regulates Stau2 in untreated cells, an effect that is abolished by CPT treatment due to E2F1 displacement from the promoter. Strikingly, Stau2 downregulation enhances levels of DNA damage and promotes apoptosis in CPT-treated cells. Taken together our results suggest that Stau2 is an anti-apoptotic protein that could be involved in DNA replication and/or maintenance of genome integrity and that its expression is regulated by E2F1 via the ATR signaling pathway. PMID:26843428

  5. The downregulation of the RNA-binding protein Staufen2 in response to DNA damage promotes apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Trépanier, Véronique; Beaujois, Remy; Viranaicken, Wildriss; Drobetsky, Elliot; DesGroseillers, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Staufen2 (Stau2) is an RNA-binding protein involved in cell fate decision by controlling several facets of mRNA processing including localization, splicing, translation and stability. Herein we report that exposure to DNA-damaging agents that generate replicative stress such as camptothecin (CPT), 5-fluoro-uracil (5FU) and ultraviolet radiation (UVC) causes downregulation of Stau2 in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. In contrast, other agents such as doxorubicin and ionizing radiation had no effect on Stau2 expression. Consistently, Stau2 expression is regulated by the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) signaling pathway but not by the DNA-PK or ataxia telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2 pathways. Stau2 downregulation is initiated at the level of transcription, independently of apoptosis induction. Promoter analysis identified a short 198 bp region which is necessary and sufficient for both basal and CPT-regulated Stau2 expression. The E2F1 transcription factor regulates Stau2 in untreated cells, an effect that is abolished by CPT treatment due to E2F1 displacement from the promoter. Strikingly, Stau2 downregulation enhances levels of DNA damage and promotes apoptosis in CPT-treated cells. Taken together our results suggest that Stau2 is an anti-apoptotic protein that could be involved in DNA replication and/or maintenance of genome integrity and that its expression is regulated by E2F1 via the ATR signaling pathway. PMID:26843428

  6. A novel fluorescent biosensor for detection of target DNA fragment from the transgene cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-shan; Lin, Yi-bing; Lu, Yu-Jing; Lin, Zhen-yu; Wong, Kwok-Yin; Chen, Guo-nan

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, we reported a convenient fluorescence method for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). As it is known that the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is widely used in most transgenic plants (Schnurr and Guerra, 2000), we thus design a simple method based on the detection of a section target DNA (DNA-T) from the transgene CaMV 35S promoter. In this method, the full-length guanine-rich single-strand sequences were split into fragments (Probe 1 and 2) and each part of the fragment possesses two GGG repeats. In the presence of K(+) ion and berberine, if a complementary target DNA of the CaMV 35S promoter was introduced to hybridize with Probe 1 and 2, a G-quadruplex-berberine complex was thus formed and generated a strong fluorescence signal. The generation of fluorescence signal indicates the presence of CaMV 35S promoter. This method is able to identify and quantify Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), and it shows wide linear ranges from 5.0×10(-9) to 9.0×10(-7) mol/L with a detection limit of 2.0×10(-9) mol/L. PMID:22959013

  7. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors promote pro-caspase-8 dimerization that sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damaging therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Tian; Qian, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Yan; Li, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Rui-Yan; Ji, Jiao; Jiao, Lin; Li, Xuan; Kong, Peng-Fei; Chen, Wen-Dan; Feng, Gong-Kan; Deng, Rong; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2015-07-10

    The combination of time and order-dependent chemotherapeutic strategies has demonstrated enhanced efficacy in killing cancer cells while minimizing adverse effects. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. Our results showed that pre-treatment of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib or lapatinib significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of DNA-damaging agents compared to coadministration of the EGFR inhibitor and DNA-damaging agent. Sequential application of erlotinib and doxorubicin increased activated caspase-8 by promoting pro-caspase-8 homodimerization and autocatalytical cleavage, whereas coadministration did not. We found that EGFR inhibitors promoted pro-caspase-8 homodimerization by inhibiting ERK pathway signaling, while doxorubicin promoted it. Our data highlight that ERK has the potential to inhibit the formation of pro-caspase-8 homodimers by phosphorylating pro-caspase-8 at S387. In conclusion, the pretreatment of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors promote pro-caspase-8 dimerization that sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings provide rationale for novel strategies for the implementation of combined targeted and cytotoxic chemotherapy within a new framework of time and order-dependent therapy. PMID:26036637

  8. Structure and dynamics of polymyxin-resistance-associated response regulator PmrA in complex with promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yuan-Chao; Weng, Tsai-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Chuan; Kao, Yi-Fen; Lin, Wei-Feng; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chou, Shan-Ho; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Chen, Chinpan

    2015-01-01

    PmrA, an OmpR/PhoB family response regulator, manages genes for antibiotic resistance. Phosphorylation of OmpR/PhoB response regulator induces the formation of a symmetric dimer in the N-terminal receiver domain (REC), promoting two C-terminal DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to recognize promoter DNA to elicit adaptive responses. Recently, determination of the KdpE–DNA complex structure revealed an REC–DBD interface in the upstream protomer that may be necessary for transcription activation. Here, we report the 3.2-Å-resolution crystal structure of the PmrA–DNA complex, which reveals a similar yet different REC–DBD interface. However, NMR studies show that in the DNA-bound state, two domains tumble separately and an REC–DBD interaction is transiently populated in solution. Reporter gene analyses of PmrA variants with altered interface residues suggest that the interface is not crucial for supporting gene expression. We propose that REC–DBD interdomain dynamics and the DBD–DBD interface help PmrA interact with RNA polymerase holoenzyme to activate downstream gene transcription. PMID:26564787

  9. EBV-LMP1 suppresses the DNA damage response through DNA-PK/AMPK signaling to promote radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingchen; Tang, Min; Li, Hongde; Xu, Zhijie; Weng, Xinxian; Li, Jiangjiang; Yu, Xinfang; Zhao, Luqing; Liu, Hongwei; Hu, Yongbin; Tan, Zheqiong; Yang, Lifang; Zhong, Meizuo; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Bode, Ann M; Yi, Wei; Gao, Jinghe; Sun, Lunquan; Cao, Ya

    2016-09-28

    We conducted this research to explore the role of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in modulating the DNA damage response (DDR) and its regulatory mechanisms in radioresistance. Our results revealed that LMP1 repressed the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by inhibiting DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) phosphorylation and activity. Moreover, LMP1 reduced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and changed its subcellular location after irradiation, which appeared to occur through a disruption of the physical interaction between AMPK and DNA-PK. The decrease in AMPK activity was associated with LMP1-mediated glycolysis and resistance to apoptosis induced by irradiation. The reactivation of AMPK significantly promoted radiosensitivity both in vivo and in vitro. The AMPKα (Thr172) reduction was associated with a poorer clinical outcome of radiation therapy in NPC patients. Our data revealed a new mechanism of LMP1-mediated radioresistance and provided a mechanistic rationale in support of the use of AMPK activators for facilitating NPC radiotherapy. PMID:27255972

  10. Pif1 helicase and Polδ promote recombination-coupled DNA synthesis via bubble migration

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Marenda A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Chi, Peter; Niu, Hengyao; Mayle, Ryan; Chen, Xuefeng; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Ira, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    During DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR), DNA synthesis copies information from a template DNA molecule. Multiple DNA polymerases have been implicated in repair-specific DNA synthesis1–3, but it has remained unclear whether a DNA helicase is involved in this reaction. A good candidate is Pif1, an evolutionarily conserved helicase in S. cerevisiae important for break-induced replication (BIR)4 as well as HR-dependent telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase5 found in 10–15% of all cancers6. Pif1 plays a role in DNA synthesis across hard-to-replicate sites7, 8 and in lagging strand synthesis with Polδ9–11. Here we provide evidence that Pif1 stimulates DNA synthesis during BIR and crossover recombination. The initial steps of BIR occur normally in Pif1-deficient cells, but Polδ recruitment and DNA synthesis are decreased, resulting in premature resolution of DNA intermediates into half crossovers. Purified Pif1 protein strongly stimulates Polδ-mediated DNA synthesis from a D-loop made by the Rad51 recombinase. Importantly, Pif1 liberates the newly synthesized strand to prevent the accumulation of topological constraint and to facilitate extensive DNA synthesis via the establishment of a migrating D-loop structure. Our results uncover a novel function of Pif1 and provide insights into the mechanism of HR. PMID:24025768

  11. Rare k-mer DNA: Identification of sequence motifs and prediction of CpG island and promoter.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Hashim, Ezzeddin Kamil; Abdullah, Rosni

    2015-12-21

    Empirical analysis on k-mer DNA has been proven as an effective tool in finding unique patterns in DNA sequences which can lead to the discovery of potential sequence motifs. In an extensive study of empirical k-mer DNA on hundreds of organisms, the researchers found unique multi-modal k-mer spectra occur in the genomes of organisms from the tetrapod clade only which includes all mammals. The multi-modality is caused by the formation of the two lowest modes where k-mers under them are referred as the rare k-mers. The suppression of the two lowest modes (or the rare k-mers) can be attributed to the CG dinucleotide inclusions in them. Apart from that, the rare k-mers are selectively distributed in certain genomic features of CpG Island (CGI), promoter, 5' UTR, and exon. We correlated the rare k-mers with hundreds of annotated features using several bioinformatic tools, performed further intrinsic rare k-mer analyses within the correlated features, and modeled the elucidated rare k-mer clustering feature into a classifier to predict the correlated CGI and promoter features. Our correlation results show that rare k-mers are highly associated with several annotated features of CGI, promoter, 5' UTR, and open chromatin regions. Our intrinsic results show that rare k-mers have several unique topological, compositional, and clustering properties in CGI and promoter features. Finally, the performances of our RWC (rare-word clustering) method in predicting the CGI and promoter features are ranked among the top three, in eight of the CGI and promoter evaluations, among eight of the benchmarked datasets. PMID:26427337

  12. Orientation-Specific Joining of AID-initiated DNA Breaks Promotes Antibody Class Switching

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Volpi, Sabrina A.; Meyers, Robin M.; Ho, Yu-Jui; Du, Zhou; Robbiani, Davide F.; Meng, Feilong; Gostissa, Monica; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Manis, John P.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    During B cell development, RAG endonuclease cleaves immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) V, D, and J gene segments and orchestrates their fusion as deletional events that assemble a V(D)J exon in the same transcriptional orientation as adjacent Cμ constant region exons1,2. In mice, six additional sets of constant region exons (CHs) lie 100-200 kb downstream in the same transcriptional orientation as V(D)J and Cμ exons2. Long repetitive switch (S) regions precede Cμ and downstream CHs. In mature B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) generates different antibody classes by replacing Cμ with a downstream CH2. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) initiates CSR by promoting deamination lesions within Sμ and a downstream acceptor S region2,3; these lesions are converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by general DNA repair factors3. Productive CSR must occur in a deletional orientation by joining the upstream end of an Sμ DSB to the downstream end of an acceptor S region DSB (Fig. 1a). However, the relative frequency of deletional to inversional CSR junctions had not been measured. Thus, whether orientation-specific joining is a programmed mechanistic feature of CSR as it is for V(D)J recombination and, if so, how this is achieved was unknown. To address this question, we adapted high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS)4 into a highly sensitive DSB end-joining assay and applied it to endogenous AID-initiated S region DSBs. We find that CSR indeed is programmed to occur in a productive deletional orientation and does so via an unprecedented mechanism that involves in cis IgH organizational features in combination with frequent S region DSBs initiated by AID. We further implicate ATM-dependent DSB response (DSBR) factors in enforcing this mechanism and provide a solution to the enigma of why CSR is so reliant on the 53BP1 DSBR factor. PMID:26308889

  13. 5-azacytidine promotes microspore embryogenesis initiation by decreasing global DNA methylation, but prevents subsequent embryo development in rapeseed and barley

    PubMed Central

    Solís, María-Teresa; El-Tantawy, Ahmed-Abdalla; Cano, Vanesa; Risueño, María C.; Testillano, Pilar S.

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are reprogrammed by stress in vitro toward embryogenesis. This process is an important tool in breeding to obtain double-haploid plants. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that changes in differentiation and proliferation. We have shown changes in global DNA methylation during microspore reprogramming. 5-Azacytidine (AzaC) cannot be methylated and leads to DNA hypomethylation. AzaC is a useful demethylating agent to study DNA dynamics, with a potential application in microspore embryogenesis. This work analyzes the effects of short and long AzaC treatments on microspore embryogenesis initiation and progression in two species, the dicot Brassica napus and the monocot Hordeum vulgare. This involved the quantitative analyses of proembryo and embryo production, the quantification of DNA methylation, 5-methyl-deoxy-cytidine (5mdC) immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the analysis of chromatin organization (condensation/decondensation) by light and electron microscopy. Four days of AzaC treatments (2.5 μM) increased embryo induction, response associated with a decrease of DNA methylation, modified 5mdC, and heterochromatin patterns compared to untreated embryos. By contrast, longer AzaC treatments diminished embryo production. Similar effects were found in both species, indicating that DNA demethylation promotes microspore reprogramming, totipotency acquisition, and embryogenesis initiation, while embryo differentiation requires de novo DNA methylation and is prevented by AzaC. This suggests a role for DNA methylation in the repression of microspore reprogramming and possibly totipotency acquisition. Results provide new insights into the role of epigenetic modifications in microspore embryogenesis and suggest a potential benefit of inhibitors, such as AzaC, to improve the process efficiency in biotechnology and breeding programs. PMID:26161085

  14. 5-azacytidine promotes microspore embryogenesis initiation by decreasing global DNA methylation, but prevents subsequent embryo development in rapeseed and barley.

    PubMed

    Solís, María-Teresa; El-Tantawy, Ahmed-Abdalla; Cano, Vanesa; Risueño, María C; Testillano, Pilar S

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are reprogrammed by stress in vitro toward embryogenesis. This process is an important tool in breeding to obtain double-haploid plants. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that changes in differentiation and proliferation. We have shown changes in global DNA methylation during microspore reprogramming. 5-Azacytidine (AzaC) cannot be methylated and leads to DNA hypomethylation. AzaC is a useful demethylating agent to study DNA dynamics, with a potential application in microspore embryogenesis. This work analyzes the effects of short and long AzaC treatments on microspore embryogenesis initiation and progression in two species, the dicot Brassica napus and the monocot Hordeum vulgare. This involved the quantitative analyses of proembryo and embryo production, the quantification of DNA methylation, 5-methyl-deoxy-cytidine (5mdC) immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the analysis of chromatin organization (condensation/decondensation) by light and electron microscopy. Four days of AzaC treatments (2.5 μM) increased embryo induction, response associated with a decrease of DNA methylation, modified 5mdC, and heterochromatin patterns compared to untreated embryos. By contrast, longer AzaC treatments diminished embryo production. Similar effects were found in both species, indicating that DNA demethylation promotes microspore reprogramming, totipotency acquisition, and embryogenesis initiation, while embryo differentiation requires de novo DNA methylation and is prevented by AzaC. This suggests a role for DNA methylation in the repression of microspore reprogramming and possibly totipotency acquisition. Results provide new insights into the role of epigenetic modifications in microspore embryogenesis and suggest a potential benefit of inhibitors, such as AzaC, to improve the process efficiency in biotechnology and breeding programs. PMID:26161085

  15. Characterization and isolation of a T-DNA tagged banana promoter active during in vitro culture and low temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Efrén; Remy, Serge; Thiry, Els; Windelinckx, Saskia; Swennen, Rony; Sági, László

    2009-01-01

    Background Next-generation transgenic plants will require a more precise regulation of transgene expression, preferably under the control of native promoters. A genome-wide T-DNA tagging strategy was therefore performed for the identification and characterization of novel banana promoters. Embryogenic cell suspensions of a plantain-type banana were transformed with a promoterless, codon-optimized luciferase (luc+) gene and low temperature-responsive luciferase activation was monitored in real time. Results Around 16,000 transgenic cell colonies were screened for baseline luciferase activity at room temperature 2 months after transformation. After discarding positive colonies, cultures were re-screened in real-time at 26°C followed by a gradual decrease to 8°C. The baseline activation frequency was 0.98%, while the frequency of low temperature-responsive luciferase activity was 0.61% in the same population of cell cultures. Transgenic colonies with luciferase activity responsive to low temperature were regenerated to plantlets and luciferase expression patterns monitored during different regeneration stages. Twenty four banana DNA sequences flanking the right T-DNA borders in seven independent lines were cloned via PCR walking. RT-PCR analysis in one line containing five inserts allowed the identification of the sequence that had activated luciferase expression under low temperature stress in a developmentally regulated manner. This activating sequence was fused to the uidA reporter gene and back-transformed into a commercial dessert banana cultivar, in which its original expression pattern was confirmed. Conclusion This promoter tagging and real-time screening platform proved valuable for the identification of novel promoters and genes in banana and for monitoring expression patterns throughout in vitro development and low temperature treatment. Combination of PCR walking techniques was efficient for the isolation of candidate promoters even in a multicopy T-DNA

  16. Δ113p53/Δ133p53 converts P53 from a repressor to a promoter of DNA double-stand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lu; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In response to DNA damage, p53 (TP53, best known as p53) is quickly activated leading to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis to ensure genomic integrity; however, this represses DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Our recent work revealed that Δ113p53/Δ133p53 protein is accumulated at a later stage upon DNA DSB stress to switch p53 signaling from repression to promotion of DNA DSB repair. PMID:27308550

  17. Local generation of fumarate promotes DNA repair through inhibition of histone H3 demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuhui; Qian, Xu; Shen, Jianfeng; Wang, Yugang; Li, Xinjian; Liu, Rui; Xia, Yan; Chen, Qianming; Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Histone methylation regulates DNA repair. However, the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of histone methylation during this repair remain to be further defined. Here, we show that ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation of nuclear fumarase at T236, which leads to an interaction between fumarase and the histone variant H2A.Z at DNA double-strand break (DSB) regions. Locally generated fumarate inhibits KDM2B histone demethylase activity, resulting in enhanced dimethylation of histone H3 K36; in turn, this increases the accumulation of the Ku70-containing DNA-PK at DSB regions for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair and cell survival. These findings reveal a feedback mechanism that underlies DNA-PK regulation by chromatin-associated fumarase and an instrumental function of fumarase in regulating histone H3 methylation and DNA repair. PMID:26237645

  18. Structure elucidation of the Pribnow box consensus promoter sequence by racemic DNA crystallography.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Srivastava, Suresh C; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    It has previously been shown that the use of racemic mixtures of naturally chiral macromolecules such as protein and DNA can significantly aid the crystallogenesis process, thereby addressing one of the major bottlenecks to structure determination by X-ray crystallographic methods-that of crystal growth. Although previous studies have provided convincing evidence of the applicability of the racemic crystallization technique to DNA through the study of well-characterized DNA structures, we sought to apply this method to a historically challenging DNA sequence. For this purpose we chose a non-self-complementary DNA duplex containing the biologically-relevant Pribnow box consensus sequence 'TATAAT'. Four racemic crystal structures of this previously un-crystallizable DNA target are reported (with resolutions in the range of 1.65-2.3 Å), with further crystallographic studies and structural analysis providing insight into the racemic crystallization process as well as structural details of this highly pertinent DNA sequence. PMID:27137886

  19. Systematic E2 screening reveals a UBE2D-RNF138-CtIP axis promoting DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christine K; Galanty, Yaron; Sczaniecka-Clift, Matylda; Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Demir, Mukerrem; Cornwell, Matthew; Beli, Petra; Jackson, Stephen P

    2015-11-01

    Ubiquitylation is crucial for proper cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these highly cytotoxic lesions cause genome instability, tumorigenesis, neurodegeneration or premature ageing. Here, we conduct a comprehensive, multilayered screen to systematically profile all human ubiquitin E2 enzymes for impacts on cellular DSB responses. With a widely applicable approach, we use an exemplary E2 family, UBE2Ds, to identify ubiquitylation-cascade components downstream of E2s. Thus, we uncover the nuclear E3 ligase RNF138 as a key homologous recombination (HR)-promoting factor that functions with UBE2Ds in cells. Mechanistically, UBE2Ds and RNF138 accumulate at DNA-damage sites and act at early resection stages by promoting CtIP ubiquitylation and accrual. This work supplies insights into regulation of DSB repair by HR. Moreover, it provides a rich information resource on E2s that can be exploited by follow-on studies. PMID:26502057

  20. Systematic E2 screening reveals a UBE2D-RNF138-CtIP axis promoting DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Sczaniecka-Clift, Matylda; Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Demir, Mukerrem; Cornwell, Matthew; Beli, Petra; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is crucial for proper cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these highly cytotoxic lesions cause genome instability, tumourigenesis, neurodegeneration or premature ageing. Here, we conduct a comprehensive, multilayered screen to systematically profile all human ubiquitin E2-enzymes for impacts on cellular DSB responses. Applying a widely applicable approach, we use an exemplary E2 family, UBE2Ds, to identify ubiquitylation-cascade components downstream of E2s. Thus, we uncover the nuclear E3-ligase RNF138 as a key homologous recombination (HR)-promoting factor that functions with UBE2Ds in cells. Mechanistically, UBE2Ds and RNF138 accumulate at DNA-damage sites and act at early resection stages by promoting CtIP ubiquitylation and accrual. This work supplies insights into regulation of DSB repair by HR. Moreover, it provides a rich information resource on E2s that can be exploited by follow-on studies. PMID:26502057

  1. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  2. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-12-15

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  3. PAXX, a paralog of XRCC4 and XLF, interacts with Ku to promote DNA double-strand break repair**

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Mehmood, Shahid; Tamura, Naoka; Travers, Jon; Wu, Qian; Draviam, Viji M.; Robinson, Carol V.; Blundell, Tom L.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4 and XLF are two structurally-related proteins that function in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we identify human PAXX (PAralog of XRCC4 and XLF; also called C9orf142) as a new XRCC4-superfamily member, and show that its crystal structure resembles that of XRCC4. PAXX interacts directly with the DSB-repair protein Ku and is recruited to DNA-damage sites in cells. Using RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 to generate PAXX−/− cells, we demonstrate that PAXX functions with XRCC4 and XLF to mediate DSB repair and cell survival in response to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we reveal that PAXX promotes Ku-dependent DNA ligation in vitro, and assembly of core non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factors on damaged chromatin in cells. These findings identify PAXX as a new component of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:25574025

  4. Ca2+ promoted the low transformation efficiency of plasmid DNA exposed to PAH contaminants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Fuxing; Wang, Hong; Gao, Yanzheng; Long, Jian; Wang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The effects of interactions between genetic materials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on gene expression in the extracellular environment remain to be elucidated and little information is currently available on the effect of ionic strength on the transformation of plasmid DNA exposed to PAHs. Phenanthrene and pyrene were used as representative PAHs to evaluate the transformation of plasmid DNA after PAH exposure and to determine the role of Ca(2+) during the transformation. Plasmid DNA exposed to the test PAHs demonstrated low transformation efficiency. In the absence of PAHs, the transformation efficiency was 4.7 log units; however, the efficiency decreased to 3.72-3.14 log units with phenanthrene/pyrene exposures of 50 µg · L(-1). The addition of Ca(2+) enhanced the low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAHs. Based on the co-sorption of Ca(2+) and phenanthrene/pyrene by DNA, we employed Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the mechanisms involved in PAH-induced DNA transformation. The observed low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to either phenanthrene or pyrene can be attributed to a broken hydrogen bond in the double helix caused by planar PAHs. Added Ca(2+) formed strong electrovalent bonds with "-POO(-)-" groups in the DNA, weakening the interaction between PAHs and DNA based on weak molecular forces. This decreased the damage of PAHs to hydrogen bonds in double-stranded DNA by isolating DNA molecules from PAHs and consequently enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAH contaminants. The findings provide insight into the effects of anthropogenic trace PAHs on DNA transfer in natural environments. PMID:23484001

  5. Ca2+ Promoted the Low Transformation Efficiency of Plasmid DNA Exposed to PAH Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzheng; Long, Jian; Wang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The effects of interactions between genetic materials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on gene expression in the extracellular environment remain to be elucidated and little information is currently available on the effect of ionic strength on the transformation of plasmid DNA exposed to PAHs. Phenanthrene and pyrene were used as representative PAHs to evaluate the transformation of plasmid DNA after PAH exposure and to determine the role of Ca2+ during the transformation. Plasmid DNA exposed to the test PAHs demonstrated low transformation efficiency. In the absence of PAHs, the transformation efficiency was 4.7 log units; however, the efficiency decreased to 3.72–3.14 log units with phenanthrene/pyrene exposures of 50 µg·L–1. The addition of Ca2+ enhanced the low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAHs. Based on the co-sorption of Ca2+ and phenanthrene/pyrene by DNA, we employed Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and mass spectrometry (MS) to determine the mechanisms involved in PAH-induced DNA transformation. The observed low transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to either phenanthrene or pyrene can be attributed to a broken hydrogen bond in the double helix caused by planar PAHs. Added Ca2+ formed strong electrovalent bonds with “–POO––” groups in the DNA, weakening the interaction between PAHs and DNA based on weak molecular forces. This decreased the damage of PAHs to hydrogen bonds in double-stranded DNA by isolating DNA molecules from PAHs and consequently enhanced the transformation efficiency of DNA exposed to PAH contaminants. The findings provide insight into the effects of anthropogenic trace PAHs on DNA transfer in natural environments. PMID:23484001

  6. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA Damage Checkpoint Promotes Androgen Induced Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Liu, Ji; Tang, Kaidun; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2012-01-01

    The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR) to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:23272087

  7. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2014-12-16

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  8. XLF interacts with the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex to promote DNA nonhomologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Ahnesorg, Peter; Smith, Philippa; Jackson, Stephen P

    2006-01-27

    DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a predominant pathway of DNA double-strand break repair in mammalian cells, and defects in it cause radiosensitivity at the cellular and whole-organism levels. Central to NHEJ is the protein complex containing DNA Ligase IV and XRCC4. By searching for additional XRCC4-interacting factors, we identified a previously uncharacterized 33 kDa protein, XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also named Cernunnos), that has weak sequence homology with XRCC4 and is predicted to display structural similarity to XRCC4. We show that XLF directly interacts with the XRCC4-Ligase IV complex in vitro and in vivo and that siRNA-mediated downregulation of XLF in human cell lines leads to radiosensitivity and impaired NHEJ. Furthermore, we establish that NHEJ-deficient 2BN cells derived from a radiosensitive and immune-deficient patient lack XLF due to an inactivating frameshift mutation in its gene, and that reintroduction of wild-type XLF into such cells corrects their radiosensitivity and NHEJ defects. XLF thus constitutes a novel core component of the mammalian NHEJ apparatus. PMID:16439205

  9. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  10. Development and Functional Analysis of Novel Genetic Promoters Using DNA Shuffling, Hybridization and a Combination Thereof

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Patro, Sunita; Pradhan, Bhubaneswar; Kumar, Alok; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of novel synthetic promoters with enhanced regulatory activity is of great value for a diverse range of plant biotechnology applications. Methodology Using the Figwort mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter (F) and the sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS) sequences, we generated two single shuffled promoter libraries (LssF and LssFS), two multiple shuffled promoter libraries (LmsFS-F and LmsF-FS), two hybrid promoters (FuasFScp and FSuasFcp) and two hybrid-shuffled promoter libraries (LhsFuasFScp and LhsFSuasFcp). Transient expression activities of approximately 50 shuffled promoter clones from each of these libraries were assayed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi) protoplasts. It was observed that most of the shuffled promoters showed reduced activity compared to the two parent promoters (F and FS) and the CaMV35S promoter. In silico studies (computer simulated analyses) revealed that the reduced promoter activities of the shuffled promoters could be due to their higher helical stability. On the contrary, the hybrid promoters FuasFScp and FSuasFcp showed enhanced activities compared to F, FS and CaMV 35S in both transient and transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis plants. Northern-blot and qRT-PCR data revealed a positive correlation between transcription and enzymatic activity in transgenic tobacco plants expressing hybrid promoters. Histochemical/X-gluc staining of whole transgenic seedlings/tissue-sections and fluorescence images of ImaGene Green™ treated roots and stems expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the FuasFScp and FSuasFcp promoters also support the above findings. Furthermore, protein extracts made from protoplasts expressing the human defensin (HNP-1) gene driven by hybrid promoters showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to the CaMV35S promoter. Significance/Conclusion Both shuffled and hybrid promoters developed in the present study can be used as molecular tools to study the

  11. Fundamental differences in promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation between human cancer and genetically engineered mouse models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diede, Scott J; Yao, Zizhen; Keyes, C Chip; Tyler, Ashlee E; Dey, Joyoti; Hackett, Christopher S; Elsaesser, Katrina; Kemp, Christopher J; Neiman, Paul E; Weiss, William A; Olson, James M; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations are essential for the initiation and progression of human cancer. We previously reported that primary human medulloblastomas showed extensive cancer-specific CpG island DNA hypermethylation in critical developmental pathways. To determine whether genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of medulloblastoma have comparable epigenetic changes, we assessed genome-wide DNA methylation in three mouse models of medulloblastoma. In contrast to human samples, very few loci with cancer-specific DNA hypermethylation were detected, and in almost all cases the degree of methylation was relatively modest compared with the dense hypermethylation in the human cancers. To determine if this finding was common to other GEMMs, we examined a Burkitt lymphoma and breast cancer model and did not detect promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation, suggesting that human cancers and at least some GEMMs are fundamentally different with respect to this epigenetic modification. These findings provide an opportunity to both better understand the mechanism of aberrant DNA methylation in human cancer and construct better GEMMs to serve as preclinical platforms for therapy development. PMID:24107773

  12. Differential promoter methylation of kinesin family member 1a in plasma is associated with breast cancer and DNA repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Hadar, Tal; Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Soudry, Ethan; Echenique, Miguel; Ili-Gangas, Carmen; Pérez, Gabriela; Perez, Jimena; Brebi-Mieville, Priscilla; Deschamps, José; Morales, Luisa; Bayona, Manuel; Sidransky, David; Matta, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    Methylation alterations of CpG islands, CpG island shores and first exons are key events in the formation and progression of human cancer, and an increasing number of differentially methylated regions and genes have been identified in breast cancer. Recent studies of the breast cancer methylome using deep sequencing and microarray platforms are providing a novel insight on the different roles aberrant methylation plays in molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Accumulating evidence from a subset of studies suggests that promoter methylation of tumor-suppressor genes associated with breast cancer can be quantified in circulating DNA. However, there is a paucity of studies that examine the combined presence of genetic and epigenetic alterations associated with breast cancer using blood-based assays. Dysregulation of DNA repair capacity (DRC) is a genetic risk factor for breast cancer that has been measured in lymphocytes. We isolated plasma DNA from 340 participants in a breast cancer case control project to study promoter methylation levels of five genes previously shown to be associated with breast cancer in frozen tissue and in cell line DNA: MAL, KIF1A, FKBP4, VGF and OGDHL. Methylation of at least one gene was found in 49% of the cases compared to 20% of the controls. Three of the four genes had receiver characteristic operator curve values of ≥ 0.50: MAL (0.64), KIF1A (0.51) and OGDHL (0.53). KIF1A promoter methylation was associated with breast cancer and inversely associated with DRC. This is the first evidence of a significant association between genetic and epigenetic alterations in breast cancer using blood-based tests. The potential diagnostic utility of these biomarkers and their relevance for breast cancer risk prediction should be examined in larger cohorts. PMID:24927296

  13. Large sex differences in chicken behavior and brain gene expression coincide with few differences in promoter DNA-methylation.

    PubMed

    Nätt, Daniel; Agnvall, Beatrix; Jensen, Per

    2014-01-01

    While behavioral sex differences have repeatedly been reported across taxa, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms in the brain are mostly lacking. Birds have previously shown to have only limited dosage compensation, leading to high sex bias of Z-chromosome gene expression. In chickens, a male hyper-methylated region (MHM) on the Z-chromosome has been associated with a local type of dosage compensation, but a more detailed characterization of the avian methylome is limiting our interpretations. Here we report an analysis of genome wide sex differences in promoter DNA-methylation and gene expression in the brain of three weeks old chickens, and associated sex differences in behavior of Red Junglefowl (ancestor of domestic chickens). Combining DNA-methylation tiling arrays with gene expression microarrays we show that a specific locus of the MHM region, together with the promoter for the zinc finger RNA binding protein (ZFR) gene on chromosome 1, is strongly associated with sex dimorphism in gene expression. Except for this, we found few differences in promoter DNA-methylation, even though hundreds of genes were robustly differentially expressed across distantly related breeds. Several of the differentially expressed genes are known to affect behavior, and as suggested from their functional annotation, we found that female Red Junglefowl are more explorative and fearful in a range of tests performed throughout their lives. This paper identifies new sites and, with increased resolution, confirms known sites where DNA-methylation seems to affect sexually dimorphic gene expression, but the general lack of this association is noticeable and strengthens the view that birds do not have dosage compensation. PMID:24782041

  14. Large Sex Differences in Chicken Behavior and Brain Gene Expression Coincide with Few Differences in Promoter DNA-Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Nätt, Daniel; Agnvall, Beatrix; Jensen, Per

    2014-01-01

    While behavioral sex differences have repeatedly been reported across taxa, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms in the brain are mostly lacking. Birds have previously shown to have only limited dosage compensation, leading to high sex bias of Z-chromosome gene expression. In chickens, a male hyper-methylated region (MHM) on the Z-chromosome has been associated with a local type of dosage compensation, but a more detailed characterization of the avian methylome is limiting our interpretations. Here we report an analysis of genome wide sex differences in promoter DNA-methylation and gene expression in the brain of three weeks old chickens, and associated sex differences in behavior of Red Junglefowl (ancestor of domestic chickens). Combining DNA-methylation tiling arrays with gene expression microarrays we show that a specific locus of the MHM region, together with the promoter for the zinc finger RNA binding protein (ZFR) gene on chromosome 1, is strongly associated with sex dimorphism in gene expression. Except for this, we found few differences in promoter DNA-methylation, even though hundreds of genes were robustly differentially expressed across distantly related breeds. Several of the differentially expressed genes are known to affect behavior, and as suggested from their functional annotation, we found that female Red Junglefowl are more explorative and fearful in a range of tests performed throughout their lives. This paper identifies new sites and, with increased resolution, confirms known sites where DNA-methylation seems to affect sexually dimorphic gene expression, but the general lack of this association is noticeable and strengthens the view that birds do not have dosage compensation. PMID:24782041

  15. Evaluation of INK4A promoter methylation using pyrosequencing and circulating cell-free DNA from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jason L.; Merwat, Shehzad N.; Ju, Hyunsu; Soloway, Roger D.; Wieck, Lucas R.; Li, Albert; Okorodudu, Anthony O.; Petersen, John R.; Abdulla, Nihal E.; Duchini, Andrea; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana; Hu, Peter C.; Dong, Jianli

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyper-methylation of CpG dinucleotides in the promoter region of inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A (INK4A) has been reported in 60%–80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As INK4A promoter hypermethylation event occurs early in HCC progression, the quantification of INK4A promoter methylation in blood sample may represent a useful biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis and prediction of response to therapy. Methods We examined INK4A promoter methylation using circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) in a total of 109 serum specimens, including 66 HCC and 43 benign chronic liver diseases. Methylation of the individual seven CpG sites was examined using pyrosequencing. Results Our results showed that there were significantly higher levels of methylated INK4A in HCC specimens than controls and that the seven CpG sites had different levels of methylation and might exist in different PCR amplicons. The area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.82, with 65.3% sensitivity and 87.2% specificity at 5% (LOD), 39.0% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity at 7% LOD, and 20.3% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity at 10% LOD, respectively. Conclusions Our results support additional studies incorporating INK4A methylation testing of ccfDNA to further validate the diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic characteristics of this biomarker in HCC patients. The knowledge of the existence of epi-alleles should help improve assay design to maximize detection. PMID:24406287

  16. Prenatal stress-induced programming of genome-wide promoter DNA methylation in 5-HTT-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Schraut, K G; Jakob, S B; Weidner, M T; Schmitt, A G; Scholz, C J; Strekalova, T; El Hajj, N; Eijssen, L M T; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Haaf, T; Ortega, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Lesch, K P; Van den Hove, D L

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT/SLC6A4)-linked polymorphic region has been suggested to have a modulatory role in mediating effects of early-life stress exposure on psychopathology rendering carriers of the low-expression short (s)-variant more vulnerable to environmental adversity in later life. The underlying molecular mechanisms of this gene-by-environment interaction are not well understood, but epigenetic regulation including differential DNA methylation has been postulated to have a critical role. Recently, we used a maternal restraint stress paradigm of prenatal stress (PS) in 5-HTT-deficient mice and showed that the effects on behavior and gene expression were particularly marked in the hippocampus of female 5-Htt+/− offspring. Here, we examined to which extent these effects are mediated by differential methylation of DNA. For this purpose, we performed a genome-wide hippocampal DNA methylation screening using methylated-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Promoter 1.0 R arrays. Using hippocampal DNA from the same mice as assessed before enabled us to correlate gene-specific DNA methylation, mRNA expression and behavior. We found that 5-Htt genotype, PS and their interaction differentially affected the DNA methylation signature of numerous genes, a subset of which showed overlap with the expression profiles of the corresponding transcripts. For example, a differentially methylated region in the gene encoding myelin basic protein (Mbp) was associated with its expression in a 5-Htt-, PS- and 5-Htt × PS-dependent manner. Subsequent fine-mapping of this Mbp locus linked the methylation status of two specific CpG sites to Mbp expression and anxiety-related behavior. In conclusion, hippocampal DNA methylation patterns and expression profiles of female prenatally stressed 5-Htt+/− mice suggest that distinct molecular mechanisms, some of which are promoter methylation-dependent, contribute to the behavioral effects of the 5-Htt

  17. Structure elucidation of the Pribnow box consensus promoter sequence by racemic DNA crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Pradeep K.; Collie, Gavin W.; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the use of racemic mixtures of naturally chiral macromolecules such as protein and DNA can significantly aid the crystallogenesis process, thereby addressing one of the major bottlenecks to structure determination by X-ray crystallographic methods—that of crystal growth. Although previous studies have provided convincing evidence of the applicability of the racemic crystallization technique to DNA through the study of well-characterized DNA structures, we sought to apply this method to a historically challenging DNA sequence. For this purpose we chose a non-self-complementary DNA duplex containing the biologically-relevant Pribnow box consensus sequence ‘TATAAT’. Four racemic crystal structures of this previously un-crystallizable DNA target are reported (with resolutions in the range of 1.65–2.3 Å), with further crystallographic studies and structural analysis providing insight into the racemic crystallization process as well as structural details of this highly pertinent DNA sequence. PMID:27137886

  18. Methyl Supplementation Attenuates Cocaine-Seeking Behaviors and Cocaine-Induced c-Fos Activation in a DNA Methylation-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Katherine N.; Hollis, Fiona; Duclot, Florian; Dossat, Amanda M.; Strong, Caroline E.; Francis, T. Chase; Mercer, Roger; Feng, Jian; Dietz, David M.; Lobo, Mary Kay; Nestler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, regulate responsiveness to drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, but relatively little is known about the regulation of addictive-like behaviors by DNA methylation. To investigate the influence of DNA methylation on the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and on drug-seeking behavior, rats receiving methyl supplementation via chronic l-methionine (MET) underwent either a sensitization regimen of intermittent cocaine injections or intravenous self-administration of cocaine, followed by cue-induced and drug-primed reinstatement. MET blocked sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement, with no effect on cue-induced reinstatement or sucrose self-administration and reinstatement. Furthermore, upregulation of DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b and global DNA hypomethylation were observed in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc), but not in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), of cocaine-pretreated rats. Glutamatergic projections from the mPFC to the NAc are critically involved in the regulation of cocaine-primed reinstatement, and activation of both brain regions is seen in human addicts when reexposed to the drug. When compared with vehicle-pretreated rats, the immediate early gene c-Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) was upregulated in the NAc and mPFC of cocaine-pretreated rats after cocaine-primed reinstatement, and chronic MET treatment blocked its induction in both regions. Cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the NAc was associated with reduced methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the c-Fos gene promoter, effects reversed by MET treatment. Overall, these data suggest that drug-seeking behaviors are, in part, attributable to a DNA methylation-dependent process, likely occurring at specific gene loci (e.g., c-Fos) in the reward pathway. PMID:26063926

  19. Methyl supplementation attenuates cocaine-seeking behaviors and cocaine-induced c-Fos activation in a DNA methylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wright, Katherine N; Hollis, Fiona; Duclot, Florian; Dossat, Amanda M; Strong, Caroline E; Francis, T Chase; Mercer, Roger; Feng, Jian; Dietz, David M; Lobo, Mary Kay; Nestler, Eric J; Kabbaj, Mohamed

    2015-06-10

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, regulate responsiveness to drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, but relatively little is known about the regulation of addictive-like behaviors by DNA methylation. To investigate the influence of DNA methylation on the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and on drug-seeking behavior, rats receiving methyl supplementation via chronic l-methionine (MET) underwent either a sensitization regimen of intermittent cocaine injections or intravenous self-administration of cocaine, followed by cue-induced and drug-primed reinstatement. MET blocked sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine and attenuated drug-primed reinstatement, with no effect on cue-induced reinstatement or sucrose self-administration and reinstatement. Furthermore, upregulation of DNA methyltransferase 3a and 3b and global DNA hypomethylation were observed in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc), but not in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), of cocaine-pretreated rats. Glutamatergic projections from the mPFC to the NAc are critically involved in the regulation of cocaine-primed reinstatement, and activation of both brain regions is seen in human addicts when reexposed to the drug. When compared with vehicle-pretreated rats, the immediate early gene c-Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) was upregulated in the NAc and mPFC of cocaine-pretreated rats after cocaine-primed reinstatement, and chronic MET treatment blocked its induction in both regions. Cocaine-induced c-Fos expression in the NAc was associated with reduced methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the c-Fos gene promoter, effects reversed by MET treatment. Overall, these data suggest that drug-seeking behaviors are, in part, attributable to a DNA methylation-dependent process, likely occurring at specific gene loci (e.g., c-Fos) in the reward pathway. PMID:26063926

  20. Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation promotes gap-filling DNA synthesis in nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunhua; Wani, Gulzar; Zhao, Ran; Qian, Jiang; Sharma, Nidhi; He, Jinshan; Zhu, Qianzheng; Wang, Qi-En; Wani, Altaf A

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) protein is a structure-specific repair endonuclease, which cleaves DNA strands on the 3' side of the DNA damage during nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG also plays a crucial role in initiating DNA repair synthesis through recruitment of PCNA to the repair sites. However, the fate of XPG protein subsequent to the excision of DNA damage has remained unresolved. Here, we show that XPG, following its action on bulky lesions resulting from exposures to UV irradiation and cisplatin, is subjected to proteasome-mediated proteolytic degradation. Productive NER processing is required for XPG degradation as both UV and cisplatin treatment-induced XPG degradation is compromised in NER-deficient XP-A, XP-B, XP-C, and XP-F cells. In addition, the NER-related XPG degradation requires Cdt2, a component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL4(Cdt2). Micropore local UV irradiation and in situ Proximity Ligation assays demonstrated that Cdt2 is recruited to the UV-damage sites and interacts with XPG in the presence of PCNA. Importantly, Cdt2-mediated XPG degradation is crucial to the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ and DNA repair synthesis. Collectively, our data support the idea of PCNA recruitment to damage sites which occurs in conjunction with XPG, recognition of the PCNA-bound XPG by CRL4(Cdt2) for specific ubiquitylation and finally the protein degradation. In essence, XPG elimination from DNA damage sites clears the chromatin space needed for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerase δ to the damage site and completion of gap-filling DNA synthesis during the final stage of NER. PMID:25483071

  1. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A.; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q.; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response. PMID:26717153

  2. Homocysteine Triggers Inflammatory Responses in Macrophages through Inhibiting CSE-H2S Signaling via DNA Hypermethylation of CSE Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Qian; Du, Hua-Ping; Wang, Ya-Li; You, Shou-Jiang; Wang, Fen; Xu, Xing-Shun; Cheng, Jian; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Unfortunately, Hcy-lowering strategies were found to have limited effects in reducing cardiovascular events. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Increasing evidence reveals a role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of HHcy. Homocysteine (Hcy) is a precursor of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is formed via the transsulfuration pathway catalyzed by cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and serves as a novel modulator of inflammation. In the present study, we showed that methionine supplementation induced mild HHcy in mice, associated with the elevations of TNF-α and IL-1β in the plasma and reductions of plasma H2S level and CSE expression in the peritoneal macrophages. H2S-releasing compound GYY4137 attenuated the increases of TNF-α and IL-1β in the plasma of HHcy mice and Hcy-treated raw264.7 cells while CSE inhibitor PAG exacerbated it. Moreover, the in vitro study showed that Hcy inhibited CSE expression and H2S production in macrophages, accompanied by the increases of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) expression and DNA hypermethylation in cse promoter region. DNMT inhibition or knockdown reversed the decrease of CSE transcription induced by Hcy in macrophages. In sum, our findings demonstrate that Hcy may trigger inflammation through inhibiting CSE-H2S signaling, associated with increased promoter DNA methylation and transcriptional repression of cse in macrophages. PMID:26047341

  3. Surface-promoted aggregation of amphiphilic quadruplex ligands drives their selectivity for alternative DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Aurélien; Chang, Yi; Pirrotta, Marc; Desbois, Nicolas; Gros, Claude P; Lesniewska, Eric; Monchaud, David

    2015-07-01

    Scientists are currently truly committed to enhance the specificity of chemotherapeutics that target DNA. To this end, sequence-specific drugs have progressively given way to structure-specific therapeutics. However, while numerous strategies have been implemented to design high-affinity candidates, strategies devoted to the design of high-selectivity ligands are still rare. Here we report on such an approach via the study of an amphiphilic compound, TEGPy, that self-assembles at a liquid/solid interface to provide nanosized objects that are stable in water. The resulting aggregates, identified through atomic force microscopy measurements, were found to disassemble upon interaction with DNA in a structure-specific manner (quadruplex- versus duplex-DNA). Our results provide a fertile ground for devising new strategies aiming at concomitantly enhancing DNA structural specificity and the water-solubility of aggregation-prone ligands. PMID:26040925

  4. Lamin A/C-dependent interaction with 53BP1 promotes cellular responses to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Lamins A/C have been implicated in DNA damage response pathways. We show that the DNA repair protein 53BP1 is a lamin A/C binding protein. In undamaged human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), 53BP1 is a nucleoskeleton protein. 53BP1 binds to lamins A/C via its Tudor domain, and this is abrogated by DNA damage. Lamins A/C regulate 53BP1 levels and consequently lamin A/C-null HDF display a 53BP1 null-like phenotype. Our data favour a model in which lamins A/C maintain a nucleoplasmic pool of 53BP1 in order to facilitate its rapid recruitment to sites of DNA damage and could explain why an absence of lamin A/C accelerates aging. PMID:25645366

  5. Nongenic, bidirectional transcription precedes and may promote developmental DNA deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, Douglas L.; Yao, Meng-Chao

    2001-01-01

    A large number of DNA segments are excised from the chromosomes of the somatic nucleus during development of Tetrahymena thermophila. How these germline-limited sequences are recognized and excised is still poorly understood. We have found that many of these noncoding DNAs are transcribed during nuclear development. Transcription of the germline-limited M element occurs from both DNA strands and results in heterogeneous transcripts of < 200 b to > 1 kb. Transcripts are most abundant when developing micro- and macronuclei begin their differentiation. Transcription is normally restricted to unrearranged DNA of micronuclei and/or developing nuclei, but germline-limited DNAs can induce their own transcription when placed into somatic macronuclei. Brief actinomycin D treatment of conjugating cells blocked M-element excision, providing evidence that transcription is important for efficient DNA rearrangement. We propose that transcription targets these germline-limited sequences for elimination by altering chromatin to ensure their accessibility to the excision machinery. PMID:11358871

  6. A DNA break- and phosphorylation-dependent positive feedback loop promotes immunoglobulin class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Bao Q; Herrick-Reynolds, Kayleigh; Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Pucella, Joseph N; Ucher, Anna J; Donghia, Nina M; Gu, Xiwen; Nicolas, Laura; Nowak, Urszula; Rahman, Numa; Strout, Matthew P; Mills, Kevin D; Stavnezer, Janet; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2013-11-01

    The ability of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to efficiently mediate class-switch recombination (CSR) is dependent on its phosphorylation at Ser38; however, the trigger that induces AID phosphorylation and the mechanism by which phosphorylated AID drives CSR have not been elucidated. Here we found that phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 was induced by DNA breaks. Conversely, in the absence of AID phosphorylation, DNA breaks were not efficiently generated at switch (S) regions in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (Igh), consistent with a failure of AID to interact with the endonuclease APE1. Additionally, deficiency in the DNA-damage sensor ATM impaired the phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 and the interaction of AID with APE1. Our results identify a positive feedback loop for the amplification of DNA breaks at S regions through the phosphorylation- and ATM-dependent interaction of AID with APE1. PMID:24097111

  7. Baculoviruses Modulate a Proapoptotic DNA Damage Response To Promote Virus Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan K.

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) initiates apoptosis in diverse insects through events triggered by virus DNA (vDNA) replication. To define the proapoptotic pathway and its role in antivirus defense, we investigated the link between the host's DNA damage response (DDR) and apoptosis. We report here that AcMNPV elicits a DDR in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Replication of vDNA activated DDR kinases, as evidenced by ATM-driven phosphorylation of the Drosophila histone H2AX homolog (H2Av), a critical regulator of the DDR. Ablation or inhibition of ATM repressed H2Av phosphorylation and blocked virus-induced apoptosis. The DDR kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU55933 also prevented virus-induced apoptosis in cells derived from the permissive AcMNPV host, Spodoptera frugiperda. This block occurred at a step upstream of virus-mediated depletion of the cellular inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein, an event that initiates apoptosis in Spodoptera and Drosophila. Thus, the DDR is a conserved, proapoptotic response to baculovirus infection. DDR inhibition also repressed vDNA replication and reduced virus yields 100,000-fold, demonstrating that the DDR contributes to virus production, despite its recognized antivirus role. In contrast to virus-induced phosphorylation of Drosophila H2Av, AcMNPV blocked phosphorylation of the Spodoptera H2AX homolog (SfH2AX). Remarkably, AcMNPV also suppressed SfH2AX phosphorylation following pharmacologically induced DNA damage. These findings indicate that AcMNPV alters canonical DDR signaling in permissive cells. We conclude that AcMNPV triggers a proapoptotic DDR that is subsequently modified, presumably to stimulate vDNA replication. Thus, manipulation of the DDR to facilitate multiplication is an evolutionarily conserved strategy among DNA viruses of insects and mammals. PMID:23035220

  8. Polyelectrolyte multilayers promote stent-mediated delivery of DNA to vascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Saurer, Eric M; Jewell, Christopher M; Roenneburg, Drew A; Bechler, Shane L; Torrealba, Jose R; Hacker, Timothy A; Lynn, David M

    2013-05-13

    We report an approach to deliver DNA to vascular tissue in vivo using intravascular stents coated with degradable, DNA-containing polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). Ionically cross-linked multilayers ∼120 nm thick were fabricated layer-by-layer on the surfaces of balloon-mounted stainless steel stents using plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable poly(β-amino ester) (polymer 1). Characterization of stents coated using a fluorescently end-labeled analog of polymer 1 revealed film erosion to be uniform across the surfaces of the stents; differential stresses experienced upon balloon expansion did not lead to faster film erosion or dose dumping of DNA in areas near stent joints when stents were incubated in physiologically relevant media. The ability of film-coated stents to transfer DNA and transfect arterial tissue in vivo was then investigated in pigs and rabbits. Stents coated with films fabricated using fluorescently labeled DNA resulted in uniform transfer of DNA to sub-endothelial tissue in the arteries of pigs in patterns corresponding to the locations and geometries of stent struts. Stents coated with films fabricated using polymer 1 and plasmid DNA encoding EGFP resulted in expression of EGFP in the medial layers of stented tissue in both pigs and rabbits two days after implantation. The results of this study, combined with the modular and versatile nature of layer-by-layer assembly, provide a polymer-based platform that is well suited for fundamental studies of stent-mediated gene transfer. With further development, this approach could also prove useful for the design of nonviral, gene-based approaches for prevention of complications that arise from the implantation of stents and other implantable interventional devices. PMID:23597075

  9. Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Promote Stent-Mediated Delivery of DNA to Vascular Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Saurer, Eric M.; Jewell, Christopher M.; Roenneburg, Drew A.; Bechler, Shane L.; Torrealba, Jose R.

    2013-01-01

    We report an approach to deliver DNA to vascular tissue in vivo using intravascular stents coated with degradable, DNA-containing polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). Ionically-crosslinked multilayers ~120 nm thick were fabricated layer-by-layer on the surfaces of balloon-mounted stainless steel stents using plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable poly(β-amino ester) (polymer 1). Characterization of stents coated using a fluorescently end-labeled analog of polymer 1 revealed film erosion to be uniform across the surfaces of the stents; differential stresses experienced upon balloon expansion did not lead to faster film erosion or dose dumping of DNA in areas near stent joints when stents were incubated in physiologically relevant media. The ability of film-coated stents to transfer DNA and transfect arterial tissue in vivo was then investigated in pigs and rabbits. Stents coated with films fabricated using fluorescently labeled DNA resulted in uniform transfer of DNA to sub-endothelial tissue in the arteries of pigs in patterns corresponding to the locations and geometries of stent struts. Stents coated with films fabricated using polymer 1 and plasmid DNA encoding EGFP resulted in expression of EGFP in the medial layers of stented tissue in both pigs and rabbits two days after implantation. The results of this study, combined with the modular and versatile nature of layer-by-layer assembly, provide a polymer-based platform that is well suited for fundamental studies of stent-mediated gene transfer. With further development, this approach could also prove useful for the design of non-viral, gene-based approaches to preventing complications that arise from the implantation of stents and other implantable interventional devices. PMID:23597075

  10. Role of Bacillus subtilis error prevention oxidized guanine system in counteracting hexavalent chromium-promoted oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Santos-Escobar, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Corona, J Félix; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Chromium pollution is potentially detrimental to bacterial soil communities, compromising carbon and nitrogen cycles that are essential for life on earth. It has been proposed that intracellular reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] may cause bacterial death by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage; the molecular basis of the phenomenon was investigated in this work. Here, we report that Bacillus subtilis cells lacking a functional error prevention oxidized guanine (GO) system were significantly more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cells of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that oxidative damage to DNA is involved in the deleterious effects of the oxyanion. In agreement with this suggestion, Cr(VI) dramatically increased the ROS concentration and induced mutagenesis in a GO-deficient B. subtilis strain. Alkaline gel electrophoresis (AGE) analysis of chromosomal DNA of WT and ΔGO mutant strains subjected to Cr(VI) treatment revealed that the DNA of the ΔGO strain was more susceptible to DNA glycosylase Fpg attack, suggesting that chromium genotoxicity is associated with 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-G) lesions. In support of this notion, specific monoclonal antibodies detected the accumulation of 8-oxo-G lesions in the chromosomes of B. subtilis cells subjected to Cr(VI) treatment. We conclude that Cr(VI) promotes mutagenesis and cell death in B. subtilis by a mechanism that involves radical oxygen attack of DNA, generating 8-oxo-G, and that such effects are counteracted by the prevention and repair GO system. PMID:24973075

  11. Role of Bacillus subtilis Error Prevention Oxidized Guanine System in Counteracting Hexavalent Chromium-Promoted Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Escobar, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Corona, J. Félix

    2014-01-01

    Chromium pollution is potentially detrimental to bacterial soil communities, compromising carbon and nitrogen cycles that are essential for life on earth. It has been proposed that intracellular reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] may cause bacterial death by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage; the molecular basis of the phenomenon was investigated in this work. Here, we report that Bacillus subtilis cells lacking a functional error prevention oxidized guanine (GO) system were significantly more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cells of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that oxidative damage to DNA is involved in the deleterious effects of the oxyanion. In agreement with this suggestion, Cr(VI) dramatically increased the ROS concentration and induced mutagenesis in a GO-deficient B. subtilis strain. Alkaline gel electrophoresis (AGE) analysis of chromosomal DNA of WT and ΔGO mutant strains subjected to Cr(VI) treatment revealed that the DNA of the ΔGO strain was more susceptible to DNA glycosylase Fpg attack, suggesting that chromium genotoxicity is associated with 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-G) lesions. In support of this notion, specific monoclonal antibodies detected the accumulation of 8-oxo-G lesions in the chromosomes of B. subtilis cells subjected to Cr(VI) treatment. We conclude that Cr(VI) promotes mutagenesis and cell death in B. subtilis by a mechanism that involves radical oxygen attack of DNA, generating 8-oxo-G, and that such effects are counteracted by the prevention and repair GO system. PMID:24973075

  12. Dynamic DNA methylation orchestrates cardiomyocyte development, maturation and disease.

    PubMed

    Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Grüning, Björn A; Schnick, Tilman; Burger, Lukas; Benes, Vladimir; Würch, Andreas; Bönisch, Ulrike; Günther, Stefan; Backofen, Rolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Schübeler, Dirk; Hein, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a highly specialized organ with essential function for the organism throughout life. The significance of DNA methylation in shaping the phenotype of the heart remains only partially known. Here we generate and analyse DNA methylomes from highly purified cardiomyocytes of neonatal, adult healthy and adult failing hearts. We identify large genomic regions that are differentially methylated during cardiomyocyte development and maturation. Demethylation of cardiomyocyte gene bodies correlates strongly with increased gene expression. Silencing of demethylated genes is characterized by the polycomb mark H3K27me3 or by DNA methylation. De novo methylation by DNA methyltransferases 3A/B causes repression of fetal cardiac genes, including essential components of the cardiac sarcomere. Failing cardiomyocytes partially resemble neonatal methylation patterns. This study establishes DNA methylation as a highly dynamic process during postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes and their adaptation to pathological stress in a process tightly linked to gene regulation and activity. PMID:25335909

  13. Dynamic DNA methylation orchestrates cardiomyocyte development, maturation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Grüning, Björn A.; Schnick, Tilman; Burger, Lukas; Benes, Vladimir; Würch, Andreas; Bönisch, Ulrike; Günther, Stefan; Backofen, Rolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Schübeler, Dirk; Hein, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a highly specialized organ with essential function for the organism throughout life. The significance of DNA methylation in shaping the phenotype of the heart remains only partially known. Here we generate and analyse DNA methylomes from highly purified cardiomyocytes of neonatal, adult healthy and adult failing hearts. We identify large genomic regions that are differentially methylated during cardiomyocyte development and maturation. Demethylation of cardiomyocyte gene bodies correlates strongly with increased gene expression. Silencing of demethylated genes is characterized by the polycomb mark H3K27me3 or by DNA methylation. De novo methylation by DNA methyltransferases 3A/B causes repression of fetal cardiac genes, including essential components of the cardiac sarcomere. Failing cardiomyocytes partially resemble neonatal methylation patterns. This study establishes DNA methylation as a highly dynamic process during postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes and their adaptation to pathological stress in a process tightly linked to gene regulation and activity. PMID:25335909

  14. A Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB1 Promotes Chromatin Remodeling and Translesion DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Adelmant, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Yang, Kailin; Marto, Jarrod A.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Timely DNA replication across damaged DNA is critical for maintaining genomic integrity. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) allows bypass of DNA lesions using error-prone TLS polymerases. The E3 ligase RAD18 is necessary for PCNA monoubiquitination and TLS polymerase recruitment; however, the regulatory steps upstream of RAD18 activation are less understood. Here, we show that the UBZ4 domain-containing transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 is a critical upstream regulator of TLS. The UBZ4 motif is required for PCNA monoubiquitination and survival after UV damage. ZBTB1 associates with KAP-1, a transcriptional repressor whose phosphorylation relaxes chromatin after DNA damage. ZBTB1 depletion impairs formation of phospho-KAP-1 at UV damage sites and reduces RAD18 recruitment. Furthermore, phosphorylation of KAP-1 is necessary for efficient PCNA modification. We propose that ZBTB1 is required for PCNA monoubiquitination, by localizing phospho-KAP-1 to chromatin and enhancing RAD18 accessibility. Collectively, our study implicates a new ubiquitin-binding protein in orchestrating chromatin remodeling during DNA repair. PMID:24657165

  15. APOBEC3G enhances lymphoma cell radioresistance by promoting cytidine deaminase-dependent DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Wilner, Ofer I; Cheshin, Ori; Shahar, Or D; Kenig, Edan; Baraz, Leah; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Arnon; Harris, Reuben S; Goldberg, Michal; Willner, Itamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2012-07-12

    APOBEC3 proteins catalyze deamination of cytidines in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), providing innate protection against retroviral replication by inducing deleterious dC > dU hypermutation of replication intermediates. APOBEC3G expression is induced in mitogen-activated lymphocytes; however, no physiologic role related to lymphoid cell proliferation has yet to be determined. Moreover, whether APOBEC3G cytidine deaminase activity transcends to processing cellular genomic DNA is unknown. Here we show that lymphoma cells expressing high APOBEC3G levels display efficient repair of genomic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation and enhanced survival of irradiated cells. APOBEC3G transiently accumulated in the nucleus in response to ionizing radiation and was recruited to DSB repair foci. Consistent with a direct role in DSB repair, inhibition of APOBEC3G expression or deaminase activity resulted in deficient DSB repair, whereas reconstitution of APOBEC3G expression in leukemia cells enhanced DSB repair. APOBEC3G activity involved processing of DNA flanking a DSB in an integrated reporter cassette. Atomic force microscopy indicated that APOBEC3G multimers associate with ssDNA termini, triggering multimer disassembly to multiple catalytic units. These results identify APOBEC3G as a prosurvival factor in lymphoma cells, marking APOBEC3G as a potential target for sensitizing lymphoma to radiation therapy. PMID:22645179

  16. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carrolo, Margarida; Frias, Maria João; Pinto, Francisco Rodrigues; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages) residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population. PMID:21187931

  17. RhoB Promotes γH2AX Dephosphorylation and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mamouni, Kenza; Cristini, Agnese; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Monferran, Sylvie; Lemarié, Anthony; Faye, Jean-Charles; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other Rho GTPases, RhoB is rapidly induced by DNA damage, and its expression level decreases during cancer progression. Because inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can lead to cancer, we investigated whether camptothecin, an anticancer drug that produces DSBs, induces RhoB expression and examined its role in the camptothecin-induced DNA damage response. We show that in camptothecin-treated cells, DSBs induce RhoB expression by a mechanism that depends notably on Chk2 and its substrate HuR, which binds to RhoB mRNA and protects it against degradation. RhoB-deficient cells fail to dephosphorylate γH2AX following camptothecin removal and show reduced efficiency of DSB repair by homologous recombination. These cells also show decreased activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a phosphatase for γH2AX and other DNA damage and repair proteins. Thus, we propose that DSBs activate a Chk2-HuR-RhoB pathway that promotes PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of γH2AX and DSB repair. Finally, we show that RhoB-deficient cells accumulate endogenous γH2AX and chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that RhoB loss increases DSB-mediated genomic instability and tumor progression. PMID:24912678

  18. Osmotic pressure: resisting or promoting DNA ejection from phage? Internal capsid-pressure dependence of viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evilevitch, Alex; Jeembaeva, Meerim; Koester, Sarah; Castelnovo, Martin; Weitz, David

    2009-03-01

    Recent in vitro experiments have shown that DNA ejection from phage can be partially stopped by surrounding osmotic pressure when ejected DNA is digested by DNase I on the course of ejection. We argue in this work by combination of experimental techniques (UV absorbance, pulse-field electrophoresis, and cryo-EM) that intact genome (i.e. undigested) ejection in a crowded environment is, on the contrary, enhanced or eventually complete with the help of a pulling force resulting from DNA condensation induced by the osmotic stress itself. This demonstrates that in vivo, the osmotically stressed cell cytoplasm will promote phage DNA ejection rather than resisting it. While, in vitro, the ejection depends sensitively on internal pressure within the virus capsid, the effect of internal pressure on infection of bacteria is unknown. We use microfluidics to monitor individual cells and determine the distribution of lysis due to infection as the capsid pressure is varied. The lysis probability decreases markedly with decreased capsid pressure.

  19. FANCD2 Maintains Fork Stability in BRCA1/2-Deficient Tumors and Promotes Alternative End-Joining DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Kais, Zeina; Rondinelli, Beatrice; Holmes, Amie; O'Leary, Colin; Kozono, David; D'Andrea, Alan D; Ceccaldi, Raphael

    2016-06-14

    BRCA1/2 proteins function in homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair and cooperate with Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins to maintain genomic integrity through replication fork stabilization. Loss of BRCA1/2 proteins results in DNA repair deficiency and replicative stress, leading to genomic instability and enhanced sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Recent studies have shown that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors upregulate Polθ-mediated alternative end-joining (alt-EJ) repair as a survival mechanism. Whether other mechanisms maintain genomic integrity upon loss of BRCA1/2 proteins is currently unknown. Here we show that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors also upregulate FANCD2 activity. FANCD2 is required for fork protection and fork restart in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors. Moreover, FANCD2 promotes Polθ recruitment at sites of damage and alt-EJ repair. Finally, loss of FANCD2 in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors enhances cell death. These results reveal a synthetic lethal relationship between FANCD2 and BRCA1/2, and they identify FANCD2 as a central player orchestrating DNA repair pathway choice at the replication fork. PMID:27264184

  20. Extensive RPA2 hyperphosphorylation promotes apoptosis in response to DNA replication stress in CHK1 inhibited cells.

    PubMed

    Zuazua-Villar, Pedro; Ganesh, Anil; Phear, Geraldine; Gagou, Mary E; Meuth, Mark

    2015-11-16

    The replication protein A (RPA)-ssDNA complex formed at arrested replication forks recruits key proteins to activate the ATR-CHK1 signalling cascade. When CHK1 is inhibited during DNA replication stress, RPA2 is extensively hyperphosphorylated. Here, we investigated the role of RPA2 hyperphosphorylation in the fate of cells when CHK1 is inhibited. We show that proteins normally involved in DNA repair (RAD51) or control of RPA phosphorylation (the PP4 protein phosphatase complex) are not recruited to the genome after treatment with CHK1 and DNA synthesis inhibitors. This is not due to RPA2 hyperphosphorylation as suppression of this response does not restore loading suggesting that recruitment requires active CHK1. To determine whether RPA2 hyperphosphorylation protects stalled forks from collapse or induction of apoptosis in CHK1 inhibited cells during replication stress, cells expressing RPA2 genes mutated at key phosphorylation sites were characterized. Mutant RPA2 rescued cells from RPA2 depletion and reduced the level of apoptosis induced by treatment with CHK1 and replication inhibitors however the incidence of double strand breaks was not affected. Our data indicate that RPA2 hyperphosphorylation promotes cell death during replication stress when CHK1 function is compromised but does not appear to be essential for replication fork integrity. PMID:26271993

  1. Analysis of the spacer DNA between the cyclic AMP receptor protein binding site and the lac promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Flatow, U; Rajendrakumar, G V; Garges, S

    1996-01-01

    The role of the spacer region DNA between the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) site and the RNA polymerase in the lac promoter was examined. We wanted to determine whether the wild-type DNA sequence of this region was an absolute requirement for CRP activation of lac transcription. The sequence of a 9-bp stretch of the spacer, from -41 to -49 relative to the start of transcription, was randomized, and the effect of randomization on lac expression was investigated in vitro and in vivo. We found that the spacer contains no specific sequence determinants for CRP activation of lac transcription; fewer than 1% of the mutants displayed greater than a 50% decrease in CRP activation of lac transcription. PMID:8636052

  2. The Vaccine Adjuvant Chitosan Promotes Cellular Immunity via DNA Sensor cGAS-STING-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jin, Lei; Mori, Andres; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Oleszycka, Ewa; Moran, Hannah B T; Mansouri, Samira; McEntee, Craig P; Lambe, Eimear; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Cunningham, Colm; Hertzog, Paul; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bowie, Andrew G; Lavelle, Ed C

    2016-03-15

    The cationic polysaccharide chitosan is an attractive candidate adjuvant capable of driving potent cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanism by which it acts is not clear. We show that chitosan promotes dendritic cell maturation by inducing type I interferons (IFNs) and enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1) responses in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner. The induction of type I IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes and dendritic cell maturation by chitosan required the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS and STING, implicating this pathway in dendritic cell activation. Additionally, this process was dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the presence of cytoplasmic DNA. Chitosan-mediated enhancement of antigen specific Th1 and immunoglobulin G2c responses following vaccination was dependent on both cGAS and STING. These findings demonstrate that a cationic polymer can engage the STING-cGAS pathway to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:26944200

  3. Guanylate-binding proteins promote AIM2 inflammasome activation during Francisella novicida infection by inducing cytosolic bacteriolysis and DNA release

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Roland F.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Anton, Leonie; Rühl, Sebastian; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Dick, Mathias S.; Kistner, Anne; Rigard, Mélanie; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Henry, Thomas; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The AIM2 inflammasome detects double-stranded DNA in the cytosol and induces caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis as well as release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. AIM2 is critical for host defense against DNA viruses and bacteria that replicate in the cytosol, such as Francisella novicida. AIM2 activation by F. novicida requires bacteriolysis, yet whether this process is accidental or a host-driven immune mechanism remained unclear. Using siRNA screening for nearly 500 interferon-stimulated genes, we identified guanylate-binding proteins GBP2 and GBP5 as key AIM2 activators during F. novicida infection. Their prominent role was validated in vitro and in a mouse model of tularemia. Mechanistically, these two GBPs target cytosolic F. novicida and promote bacteriolysis. Thus, besides their role in host defense against vacuolar pathogens, GBPs also facilitate the presentation of ligands by directly attacking cytosolic bacteria. PMID:25774716

  4. Sex-dichotomous effects of NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation on intracranial aneurysm and brain arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhepei; Zhao, Jikuang; Sun, Jie; Nie, Sheng; Li, Keqing; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Tiefeng; Duan, Shiwei; Di, Yazhen; Huang, Yi; Gao, Xiang

    2016-05-16

    The goal of this study was to investigate the contribution of NOS1AP-promoter DNA methylation to the risk of intracranial aneurysm (IA) and brain arteriovenous malformation (BAVM) in a Han Chinese population. A total of 48 patients with IAs, 22 patients with BAVMs, and 26 control individuals were enrolled in the study. DNA methylation was tested using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. We detected significantly higher DNA methylation levels in BAVM patients than in IA patients based on the multiple testing correction (CpG4-5 methylation: 5.86±1.04% vs. 4.37±2.64%, P=0.006). In women, CpG4-5 methylation levels were much lower in IA patients (3.64±1.97%) than in BAVM patients (6.11±1.20%, P<0.0001). However, in men, CpG1-3 methylation levels were much higher in the controls (6.92±0.78%) than in BAVM patients (5.99±0.70%, P=0.008). Additionally, there was a gender-based difference in CpG1 methylation within the controls (men vs. women: 5.75±0.50% vs. 4.99±0.53%, P=0.003) and BAVM patients (men vs. women: 4.70±0.74% vs. 5.50±0.87%, P=0.026). A subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher CpG3 methylation in patients who smoked than in those who did not (P=0.041). Our results suggested that gender modulated the interaction between NOS1AP promoter DNA methylation in IA and BAVM patients. Our results also confirmed that regular tobacco smoking was associated with increased NOS1AP methylation in humans. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:27080431

  5. Histone chaperone Anp32e removes H2A.Z from DNA double-strand breaks and promotes nucleosome reorganization and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ayrapetov, Marina K.; Price, Brendan D.

    2015-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires open, flexible chromatin domains. The NuA4–Tip60 complex creates these flexible chromatin structures by exchanging histone H2A.Z onto nucleosomes and promoting acetylation of histone H4. Here, we demonstrate that the accumulation of H2A.Z on nucleosomes at DSBs is transient, and that rapid eviction of H2A.Z is required for DSB repair. Anp32e, an H2A.Z chaperone that interacts with the C-terminal docking domain of H2A.Z, is rapidly recruited to DSBs. Anp32e functions to remove H2A.Z from nucleosomes, so that H2A.Z levels return to basal within 10 min of DNA damage. Further, H2A.Z removal by Anp32e disrupts inhibitory interactions between the histone H4 tail and the nucleosome surface, facilitating increased acetylation of histone H4 following DNA damage. When H2A.Z removal by Anp32e is blocked, nucleosomes at DSBs retain elevated levels of H2A.Z, and assume a more stable, hypoacetylated conformation. Further, loss of Anp32e leads to increased CtIP-dependent end resection, accumulation of single-stranded DNA, and an increase in repair by the alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway. Exchange of H2A.Z onto the chromatin and subsequent rapid removal by Anp32e are therefore critical for creating open, acetylated nucleosome structures and for controlling end resection by CtIP. Dynamic modulation of H2A.Z exchange and removal by Anp32e reveals the importance of the nucleosome surface and nucleosome dynamics in processing the damaged chromatin template during DSB repair. PMID:26034280

  6. Frataxin Deficiency Promotes Excess Microglial DNA Damage and Inflammation that Is Rescued by PJ34

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; McMackin, Marissa Z.; Shan, Yuxi; Raetz, Alan; David, Sheila; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-01-01

    An inherited deficiency in the frataxin protein causes neurodegeneration of the dorsal root ganglia and Friedreich's ataxia (FA). Frataxin deficiency leads to oxidative stress and inflammatory changes in cell and animal models; however, the cause of the inflammatory changes, and especially what causes brain microglial activation is unclear. Here we investigated: 1) the mechanism by which frataxin deficiency activates microglia, 2) whether a brain-localized inflammatory stimulus provokes a greater microglial response in FA animal models, and 3) whether an anti-inflammatory treatment improves their condition. Intracerebroventricular administration of LPS induced higher amounts of microglial activation in the FA mouse model vs controls. We also observed an increase in oxidative damage in the form of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) and the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 in cerebellar microglia of FA mutant mice. We hypothesized that frataxin deficiency increases DNA damage and DNA repair genes specifically in microglia, activating them. siRNA-mediated frataxin knockdown in microglial BV2 cells clearly elevated DNA damage and the expression of DNA repair genes MUTYH and PARP-1. Frataxin knockdown also induced a higher level of PARP-1 in MEF cells, and this was suppressed in MUTYH-/- knockout cells. Administration of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34 attenuated the microglial activation induced by intracerebroventricular injection of LPS. The combined administration of LPS and angiotensin II provoke an even stronger activation of microglia and neurobehavioral impairment. PJ34 treatment attenuated the neurobehavioral impairments in FA mice. These results suggest that the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 may form a pathway regulating microglial activation initiated by DNA damage, and inhibition of microglial PARP-1 induction could be an important therapeutic target in Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:26954031

  7. Frataxin Deficiency Promotes Excess Microglial DNA Damage and Inflammation that Is Rescued by PJ34.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; McMackin, Marissa Z; Shan, Yuxi; Raetz, Alan; David, Sheila; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-01-01

    An inherited deficiency in the frataxin protein causes neurodegeneration of the dorsal root ganglia and Friedreich's ataxia (FA). Frataxin deficiency leads to oxidative stress and inflammatory changes in cell and animal models; however, the cause of the inflammatory changes, and especially what causes brain microglial activation is unclear. Here we investigated: 1) the mechanism by which frataxin deficiency activates microglia, 2) whether a brain-localized inflammatory stimulus provokes a greater microglial response in FA animal models, and 3) whether an anti-inflammatory treatment improves their condition. Intracerebroventricular administration of LPS induced higher amounts of microglial activation in the FA mouse model vs controls. We also observed an increase in oxidative damage in the form of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) and the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 in cerebellar microglia of FA mutant mice. We hypothesized that frataxin deficiency increases DNA damage and DNA repair genes specifically in microglia, activating them. siRNA-mediated frataxin knockdown in microglial BV2 cells clearly elevated DNA damage and the expression of DNA repair genes MUTYH and PARP-1. Frataxin knockdown also induced a higher level of PARP-1 in MEF cells, and this was suppressed in MUTYH-/- knockout cells. Administration of the PARP-1 inhibitor PJ34 attenuated the microglial activation induced by intracerebroventricular injection of LPS. The combined administration of LPS and angiotensin II provoke an even stronger activation of microglia and neurobehavioral impairment. PJ34 treatment attenuated the neurobehavioral impairments in FA mice. These results suggest that the DNA repair proteins MUTYH and PARP-1 may form a pathway regulating microglial activation initiated by DNA damage, and inhibition of microglial PARP-1 induction could be an important therapeutic target in Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:26954031

  8. Modulation of Promoter Occupancy by Cooperative DNA Binding and Activation-Domain Function is a Major Determinant of Transcriptional Regulation by Activators in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masafumi

    1996-04-01

    Binding of transcriptional activators to a promoter is a prerequisite process in transcriptional activation. It is well established that the efficiency of activator binding to a promoter is determined by the affinity of direct interactions between the DNA-binding domain of an activator and its specific target sequences. However, I describe here that activator binding to a promoter is augmented in vivo by the effects of two other determinants that have not been generally appreciated: (i) the number of activator binding sites present in a promoter and (ii) the potency of activation domains of activators. Multiple sites within a promoter can cooperatively recruit cognate factors regardless of whether they contain an effective activation domain. This cooperativity can result in the synergistic activation of transcription. The second effect is the enhancement of activator binding to a promoter by the presence of activation domains. In this case, activation domains are not simply tethered to the promoter by the DNA-binding domain but instead assist the DNA-binding domain being tethered onto the promoter. This effect of activation domains on DNA binding is instrumental in determining how potent activators can induce steep transcriptional increases at low concentrations.

  9. Repetitive elements and enforced transcriptional repression co-operate to enhance DNA methylation spreading into a promoter CpG-island

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repression of many tumor suppressor genes in cancer is concurrent with aberrantly increased DNA methylation levels at promoter CpG islands (CGIs). About one-fourth of empirically defined human promoters are surrounded by or contain clustered repetitive elements. It was previously observed that a sha...

  10. The Rad9 protein enhances survival and promotes DNA repair following exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Patrick D.; Helt, Christopher E.; Keng, Peter C.; Bambara, Robert A. . E-mail: robert_bambara@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-08-18

    Following DNA damage cells initiate cell cycle checkpoints to allow time to repair sustained lesions. Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 proteins form a toroidal complex, termed the 9-1-1 complex, that is involved in checkpoint signaling. 9-1-1 shares high structural similarity to the DNA replication protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and 9-1-1 has been shown in vitro to stimulate steps of the repair process known as long patch base excision repair. Using a system that allows conditional repression of the Rad9 protein in human cell culture, we show that Rad9, and by extension, the 9-1-1 complex, enhances cell survival, is required for efficient exit from G2-phase arrest, and stimulates the repair of damaged DNA following ionizing radiation. These data provide in vivo evidence that the human 9-1-1 complex participates in DNA repair in addition to its previously described role in DNA damage sensing.