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Sample records for dna probes

  1. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  2. Probe and method for DNA detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James Henry; Sharma, Jaswinder Kumar; Martinez, Jennifer Suzanne

    2013-07-02

    A hybridization probe containing two linear strands of DNA lights up upon hybridization to a target DNA using silver nanoclusters that have been templated onto one of the DNA strands. Hybridization induces proximity between the nanoclusters on one strand and an overhang on the other strand, which results in enhanced fluorescence emission from the nanoclusters.

  3. DNA probe specific for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Grimont, P A; Grimont, F; Desplaces, N; Tchen, P

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing a DNA probe to be used in the specific detection of Legionella pneumophila by dot or colony hybridization has been devised. When total DNA from L. pneumophila was used as a radioactive probe, cross-hybridization occurred with DNA from many other species belonging to various families (including Legionellaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae). Cross-hybridizing restriction fragments in L. pneumophila ATCC 33152 DNA were identified on Southern blots. When unlabeled DNA from strain ATCC 33152 was cleaved by endonuclease BamHI, the DNA fragments cross-hybridizing with the labeled DNA from all of the other species and genera tested (or with Escherichia coli 16 + 23 S RNA) had a size of 21.4 and 16.2 kilobase pairs (major bands) and 28.0, 12.8, and 10.1 kilobase pairs (minor bands). BamHI restriction fragments of L. pneumophila DNA deprived of the cross-hybridizing fragments were pooled and used as a probe for the detection of L. pneumophila. This probe proved to be specific for L. pneumophila in colony and dot hybridization. It can potentially be used for the detection of L. pneumophila in clinical and water samples. The procedure described can be readily applied to the preparation of probes specific for phylogenetically isolated bacterial species other than L. pneumophila. Images PMID:3980693

  4. Polymer microspheres carrying fluorescent DNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Dai, Zhao; Zhang, Jimei; Xu, Shichao; Wu, Chunrong; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A polymer microspheres carried DNA probe, which was based on resonance energy transfer, was presented in this paper when CdTe quantum dots(QDs) were as energy donors, Au nanoparticles were as energy accepters and poly(4- vinylpyrindine-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) microspheres were as carriers. Polymer microspheres with functional group on surfaces were prepared by distillation-precipitation polymerization when ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was as crosslinker in acetonitrile. CdTe QDs were prepared when 3-mercaptopropionic acid(MPA) was as the stabilizer in aqueous solution. Because of the hydrogen-bonding between the carboxyl groups of MPA on QDs and the pyrindine groups on the microspheres, the QDs were self-assembled onto the surfaces of microspheres. Then, the other parts of DNA probe were finished according to the classic method. The DNA detection results indicated that this novel fluorescent DNA probe system could recognize the existence of complementary target DNA or not.

  5. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  6. Fluorescent silver nanoclusters as DNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescent silver nanoclusters (few atoms, quantum sized) have attracted much attention as promising substitutes for conventional fluorophores. Due to their unique environmental sensitivities, new fluorescent probes have been developed based on silver nanoclusters for the sensitive and specific detection of DNA. In this review we present the recent discoveries of activatable and color-switchable properties of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and discuss the strategies to use these new properties in DNA sensing.

  7. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  8. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  9. SERS gene probe for DNA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, David L.; Allain, Leonardo R.; Isola, Narayana R.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-07-01

    We describe the development of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering gene (SERGen) probe technology for rapid screening for diseases and pathogens through DNA hybridization assays. The technology combines the use of gene probes labeled with SERS-active markers, and nanostructured metallic platforms for inducing the SERS effect. As a result, SERGen-based methods can offer the spectral selectivity and sensitivity of SERS as well as the molecular specificity of DNA sequence hybridization. Furthermore, these new probe s preclude the use of radioactive labels. As illustrated herein, SERGen probes have been used as primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of specific DNA sequences, hence further boosting the sensitivity of the technology. We also describe several approaches to developing SERS-active DNA assay platforms, addressing the challenges of making the SERGen technology accessible and practical for clinical settings. The usefulness of the SERGen approach has been demonstrated in the detection of HIV, BRCA1 breast cancer, and BAX genes. There is great potential for the use of numerous SERGen probes for multiplexed detection of multiple biological targets.

  10. Monoclonals and DNA probes in diagnostic and preventative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Della Povta, G.; Albertini, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Use of DNA Probes for Prenatal and Carrier Diagnosis of Hemophilia and Fragile X Mental Retardation; The Application of DNA Probes to Diagnosis and Research of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Clinical Trial, New Probes and Deletion Mapping; Molecular Genetics of the Human Collagens; Molecular Genetics of Human Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Genes; Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA and Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA: Implications in Diagnosis and Pathogenesis; and DNA Probes to Evaluate the Possible Association of Papovaviruses with Human Tumors.

  11. Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes for chromosome mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Deaven, L.L.; Chen, D.J.; Park, Min S.; MacInnes, M.A.; Salzman, G.C.; Yoshida, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A new strategy is briefly described for employing nucleic acid probes that are directly labeled with fluorochromes in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. These probes will permit the detection, quantitation, and high-precision spatial analysis of multiple DNA sequences along a single chromosome using video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing and analysis. Potential advantages of direct labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization far surpass currently available, indirect DNA probe labeling techniques in ease of use, versatility, and increased signal- to-noise ratio.

  12. Probing transient protein-mediated DNA linkages using nanoconfinement

    PubMed Central

    Roushan, Maedeh; Kaur, Parminder; Karpusenko, Alena; Countryman, Preston J.; Ortiz, Carlos P.; Fang Lim, Shuang; Wang, Hong; Riehn, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytic technique for probing protein-catalyzed transient DNA loops that is based on nanofluidic channels. In these nanochannels, DNA is forced in a linear configuration that makes loops appear as folds whose size can easily be quantified. Using this technique, we study the interaction between T4 DNA ligase and DNA. We find that T4 DNA ligase binding changes the physical characteristics of the DNA polymer, in particular persistence length and effective width. We find that the rate of DNA fold unrolling is significantly reduced when T4 DNA ligase and ATP are applied to bare DNA. Together with evidence of T4 DNA ligase bridging two different segments of DNA based on AFM imaging, we thus conclude that ligase can transiently stabilize folded DNA configurations by coordinating genetically distant DNA stretches. PMID:25379073

  13. Characterization of two DNA probes specific for Serpulina hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulos, C; Smith, S C; Coloe, P J

    1993-01-01

    Two DNA probes, one 1.1- and one 0.75-kb probe, specific for Serpulina hyodysenteriae were isolated from a genomic library generated from virulent S. hyodysenteriae 5380. These probes are highly specific and react with all S. hyodysenteriae strains tested. Under stringent conditions, the DNA probes did not react with the nonpathogenic species Serpulina innocens or with other species of enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli. Both probes are able to detect S. hyodysenteriae in colony blot hybridizations, and when applied to fecal specimens, they can detect 10(4) S. hyodysenteriae cells in 0.1 g of seeded fecal matter. Both probes can detect S. hyodysenteriae in fecal specimens from swine with clinical signs of swine dysentery after experimental challenge and from swine from a herd with an acute outbreak of swine dysentery. These probes have application as a diagnostic tool in veterinary microbiology. Images PMID:8349750

  14. DNA probes for two Microsporidia, Nosema bombycis and Nosema costelytrae.

    PubMed

    Malone, L A; McIvor, C A

    1995-05-01

    Two DNA fragments which hybridize specifically with DNA of Nosema bombycis and Nosema costelytrae, respectively, were obtained from genomic DNA of each microsporidian species and sequenced. Neither fragment hybridized with genomic DNA from four other microsporidian isolates tested: Nosema apis, Vairimorpha sp. from cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae), and two isolates of Vavraia oncoperae, one from New Zealand grass grubs, Costelytrae zealandica, and another from porina caterpillars, Wiseana spp. The probe for N. bombycis did not hybridize with genomic DNA from N. costelytrae or with DNA from silkworms (Bombyx mori), the primary insect host of this microsporidium. Likewise, the probe for N. costelytrae did not hybridize with genomic DNA from N. bombycis or with DNA from grass grubs (C. zealandica). Both fragments were AT-rich (59 and 79% of total bases, respectively), had G+C/A+T ratios of 0.70 and 0.25, respectively, and represented repeated sequences dispersed throughout the genome. PMID:7745281

  15. Chemical method for introducing haptens on to DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.H.; Cumming, C.U.; Huang, D.P.; Manak, M.M.; Ting, R.

    1988-05-01

    The authors developed a versatile chemical method of attaching hapten moieties onto DNA, for the construction of nonisotopic DNA probes. The DNA is reacted with N-bromosuccinimide at alkaline pH, resulting in bromination of a fraction of the thymine, guanine, and cytosine residues, with adenine modified to a lesser extent. The bromine is subsequently displaced by a primary amino group, attached to a linker arm. The other end of the linker arm has a detectable group preattached to it. They have labeled cloned hepatitis B viral (HBV) DNA with the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) and used it in combination with a high affinity rabbit anti-DNP antibody, for the detection of hepatitis B DNA by slot blotting. This probe was sensitive enough to specifically detect 1 x 10/sup -17/ mol (1 x 10/sup 6/ copies) of HBV DNA in total DNA from human serum.

  16. Probing Protein-DNA Interactions by Unzipping DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle

    2003-03-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are essential to cellular processes. In replication, transcription, recombination, DNA repair, and DNA packaging, proteins bind to DNA as activators or repressors, to recruit other proteins, or to carry out various catalytic activities. I will present Unzipping Force Analysis of Protein Association (UFAPA) as a novel and versatile method for detection of the position and dynamic nature of protein-DNA interactions. A single DNA double helix was unzipped in the presence of DNA-binding proteins using a feedback-enhanced optical trap. When the unzipping fork in a DNA reached a bound protein molecule, we observed a dramatic increase in the tension in the DNA, followed by a sudden tension reduction. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout an unbinding "event" revealed information about the spatial location and dynamic nature of the protein-DNA complex.

  17. Detection of toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Sun, Bo; Zheng, Guo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a microscopic parasite that may infect humans, so there is an increasing concern on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. We currently report a rapid and sensitive method for Toxoplasma gondii based on molecular beacon (MB) probe. The probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with a stem-loop DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (energy donor) at 5' end and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) at 3' end, respectively. The probe was synthesized in PBS buffer at pH 8.2, room temperature for 24 h. Then target DNA was injected under the condition of 37°C, hybridization for 2 h, in Tris-HCl buffer. The data from fluorescence spectrum (FS) showed that ca 65% of emitted fluorescence was quenched, and about 50% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed after adding target DNA, which indicated that the target DNA was successfully detected by MB probe. The detecting limitation was determined as ca 5 nM. Moreover, specificity of the probe was investigated by adding target DNA with one-base-pair mismatch, the low fluorescence recovery indicated the high specificity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  18. Probing the Mechanical Unzipping of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, N. K.; Redondo, A.; Bishop, A. R.; Rasmussen, K. Ø.

    2006-06-01

    A study of the micromechanical unzipping of DNA in the framework of the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model is presented. We introduce a Monte Carlo technique that allows accurate determination of the dependence of the unzipping forces on unzipping speed and temperature. Our findings agree quantitatively with experimental results for homogeneous DNA, and for λ-phage DNA we reproduce the recently obtained experimental force-temperature phase diagram. Finally, we argue that there may be fundamental differences between in vivo and in vitro DNA unzipping.

  19. APPLICATIONS FOR DNA PROBES IN BIODEGRADATION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of DNA:DNA hybridization technology in biodegradation studies is investigated. The rate constants for sediments exposed to synthetic oils could be calculated from the NAH(1+) genotypes and this approach would be useful in predicting the kinetics of aromatic hydrocarbon de...

  20. Probing the elastic limit of DNA bending

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tung T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Sharp bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) plays an essential role in genome structure and function. However, the elastic limit of dsDNA bending remains controversial. Here, we measured the opening rates of small dsDNA loops with contour lengths ranging between 40 and 200 bp using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. The relationship of loop lifetime to loop size revealed a critical transition in bending stress. Above the critical loop size, the loop lifetime changed with loop size in a manner consistent with elastic bending stress, but below it, became less sensitive to loop size, indicative of softened dsDNA. The critical loop size increased from ∼60 bp to ∼100 bp with the addition of 5 mM magnesium. We show that our result is in quantitative agreement with the kinkable worm-like chain model, and furthermore, can reproduce previously reported looping probabilities of dsDNA over the range between 50 and 200 bp. Our findings shed new light on the energetics of sharply bent dsDNA. PMID:25122748

  1. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-12-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au-S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5'-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain with absolute pairing with methylated p16 sequence (Met-p16). The probe, paired with Met-p16, clearly changed the color of aggregating GNPs probe in 5 mol/L NaCl solution. Utilizing the probe, p16 gene methylation in HCT116 cells was semi-quantified. Further, the methylation of E-cadherin, p15, and p16 gene in Caco2, HepG2, and HCT116 cell lines were detected by the corresponding probes, constructed with three domains. This simple and cost-effective method was useful for the diagnosis of DNA methylation-related diseases. PMID:27325520

  2. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-06-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au-S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5'-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain with absolute pairing with methylated p16 sequence (Met- p16). The probe, paired with Met- p16, clearly changed the color of aggregating GNPs probe in 5 mol/L NaCl solution. Utilizing the probe, p16 gene methylation in HCT116 cells was semi-quantified. Further, the methylation of E-cadherin, p15, and p16 gene in Caco2, HepG2, and HCT116 cell lines were detected by the corresponding probes, constructed with three domains. This simple and cost-effective method was useful for the diagnosis of DNA methylation-related diseases.

  3. Probing the mechanical unzipping of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, Nikos K.; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim O.

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have made a systematic study of local melting in DNA possible. This provide new insight into important biological processes as replication and transcription. In this work, we present an extensive study of the micromechanical unzipping of DNA in the framework of the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model. The force required to separate the doubled strand is derived through analysis of the force-extension curve, while an estimation of the nucleation bubble size of the unzipping process is obtained by the distribution of the rapture force. Our findings are in very good agreement with existing experimental results; for example the force-temperature phase diagram obtained by the PBD model agrees excellently with recent constant-force experimental measurements of the lambda-phage DNA. Fundamental differences between the in vivo and vitro DNA unzipping, as predicted by the PBD model, are also discussed.

  4. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  5. DNA Stains as Surrogate Nucleobases in Fluorogenic Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Hövelmann, Felix; Seitz, Oliver

    2016-04-19

    The increasing importance assigned to RNA dynamics in cells and tissues calls for probe molecules that enable fluorescence microscopy imaging in live cells. To achieve this goal, fluorescence dyes are conjugated with oligonucleotides so as to provide strong emission upon hybridization with the target molecule. The impressive 10(3)-fold fluorescence intensification observed when DNA stains such as thiazole orange (TO) interact with double-stranded DNA is intriguing and prompted the exploration of oligonucleotide conjugates. However, nonspecific interactions of DNA stains with polynucleotides tend to increase background, which would affect the contrast achievable in live-cell imaging. This Account describes the development of DNA-stain-labeled hybridization probes that provide high signal-to-background. We focus on our contributions in context with related advances from other laboratories. The emphasis will be on the requirements of RNA imaging in live cells. To reduce background, intercalator dyes such as TO were appended to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is less avidly recognized by DNA stains than DNA/RNA. Constraining the TO dye as a nucleobase surrogate in "forced intercalation (FIT) probes" improved the target specificity, presumably by helping to prevent unspecific interactions. The enforcement of TO intercalation between predetermined base pairs upon formation of the probe-target duplex provided for high brightness and enabled match/mismatch selectivity beyond stringency of hybridization. We show examples that highlight the use of PNA FIT probes in the imaging of mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA in living cells. The "FIT approach" was recently extended to DNA probes. Signal brightness can become limiting when low-abundance targets ought to be visualized over cellular autofluorescence. We discuss strategies that further the brightness of signaling by FIT probes. Multilabeling with identical dyes does not solve the brightness issue. To avoid self-quenching, we

  6. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  7. Robust 3D DNA FISH using directly labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Bolland, Daniel J; King, Michelle R; Reik, Wolf; Corcoran, Anne E; Krueger, Christel

    2013-01-01

    3D DNA FISH has become a major tool for analyzing three-dimensional organization of the nucleus, and several variations of the technique have been published. In this article we describe a protocol which has been optimized for robustness, reproducibility, and ease of use. Brightly fluorescent directly labeled probes are generated by nick-translation with amino-allyldUTP followed by chemical coupling of the dye. 3D DNA FISH is performed using a freeze-thaw step for cell permeabilization and a heating step for simultaneous denaturation of probe and nuclear DNA. The protocol is applicable to a range of cell types and a variety of probes (BACs, plasmids, fosmids, or Whole Chromosome Paints) and allows for high-throughput automated imaging. With this method we routinely investigate nuclear localization of up to three chromosomal regions. PMID:23978815

  8. Robust 3D DNA FISH Using Directly Labeled Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Daniel J.; King, Michelle R.; Reik, Wolf; Corcoran, Anne E.; Krueger, Christel

    2013-01-01

    3D DNA FISH has become a major tool for analyzing three-dimensional organization of the nucleus, and several variations of the technique have been published. In this article we describe a protocol which has been optimized for robustness, reproducibility, and ease of use. Brightly fluorescent directly labeled probes are generated by nick-translation with amino-allyldUTP followed by chemical coupling of the dye. 3D DNA FISH is performed using a freeze-thaw step for cell permeabilization and a heating step for simultaneous denaturation of probe and nuclear DNA. The protocol is applicable to a range of cell types and a variety of probes (BACs, plasmids, fosmids, or Whole Chromosome Paints) and allows for high-throughput automated imaging. With this method we routinely investigate nuclear localization of up to three chromosomal regions. PMID:23978815

  9. Diamondoids as DNA methylation and mutation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaraman, Ganesh; Fyta, Maria

    2014-10-01

    In a recent study we proposed derivatives of lower diamondoids as novel biosensors, as well as possible functionalisation candidates of solid-state nanopores for DNA sequencing. A qualitative analysis has shown the abilities of these molecules to distinguish among different DNA nucleobases. In this letter, we extend the analysis and consider also methylated and mutated nucleobases, often being an indication of genetic diseases. Based on the bonding characteristics of these modified nucleobases to a diamondoid derivative, as well as their electronic properties we could reveal the ability of the diamondoid to clearly distinguish the regular from the modified nucleobases. The results show a clear indication that transport properties along these molecules would give distinct current signals.

  10. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jason M.; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides. PMID:22720133

  11. DNA/DNA in situ hybridization with enzyme linked probes

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, S.; Mosher, M.; Charles, P.; Henry, S.; Taub, F.

    1987-05-01

    A non-radioactive in situ nucleic acid hybridization method which requires no antibodies, haptens, avidin or biotin intermediateries is presented. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled nucleic acid probes are hybridized in situ for 2 hours or less, followed by brief washing of hybridized cells and the direct detection of in situ hybrids with diaminobenzidine (DAB). Application of this method to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in human cells is shown.

  12. Probing DNA-lipid membrane interactions with a lipopeptide nanopore.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Andrey; Takemoto, Jon Y; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-04-24

    Association of DNA molecules with lipid bilayer membranes is of considerable interest for a large variety of applications in biotechnology. Here we introduce syringomycin E (SRE), a small pore-forming lipopeptide produced by the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, as a facile sensor for the detection of DNA interactions with lipid membranes. SRE forms highly reproducible pores in cellular and artificial membranes. The pore structure involves bilayer lipids, which have a pronounced influence on open channel conductance and gating. SRE channels act as ionic diodes that serve as current rectifiers sensitive to the charge of the bilayer. We employ this intrinsic property to electronically monitor the association of DNA molecules with the membrane in a variety of different settings. We show that SRE can be used for quantitatively probing electrostatic interactions of DNA and DNA-cholesterol conjugates with a lipid membrane. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SRE channels allow monitoring of hybridization reactions between lipid-anchored probe strands and complementary strands in solution. In the presence of double-stranded DNA, SRE channels display a particularly high degree of rectification. Finally, the formation of multilayered structures assembled from poly-(L)-lysine and DNA oligonucleotides on the membrane was precisely monitored with SRE. PMID:22424398

  13. DNA probes for the identification of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Parsons, L M; Shayegani, M; Waring, A L; Bopp, L H

    1989-07-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi ATCC 33922, a virulent, well-characterized strain, was used to construct a genomic library in a bacteriophage expression vector. Three DNA fragments were selected for use as probes on the basis of their ability to encode H. ducreyi-specific proteins, as demonstrated by reactivity with rabbit polyclonal antiserum. With DNA-DNA hybridization, the three probes, labeled with 32P, reacted strongly with 16 strains of H. ducreyi obtained from a variety of sources. Thirty-seven other bacterial isolates, representing 33 different species and including organisms likely to be encountered in the urogenital tract, were also tested with the three probes. Twenty-eight of these isolates, including the genital pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, showed no hybridization with the probes. In addition, herpes simplex virus-infected tissue culture cells and Treponema pallidum-infected rabbit testicular fluid were also completely nonreactive. Nine isolates, six belonging to other Haemophilus species and three belonging to Pasteurella species, reacted weakly with the probes when approximately 3.0 x 10(7) to 6.0 x 10(7) CFU was tested. When 10(5) to 10(6) CFU of these organisms was tested, the weak reactions could no longer be seen. Yet this number of H. ducreyi still reacted strongly. In fact, the three probes consistently detected 10(4) CFU of H. ducreyi in pure and mixed cultures and even produced a weak signal when only 10(3) CFU was present. It is clear from our results that use of these probes will greatly facilitate the laboratory diagnosis of this genital pathogen. PMID:2788660

  14. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  15. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich-Bode, Karin; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas; Weier, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli

    2008-12-16

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-?B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  16. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-12-04

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-{kappa}B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  17. Photonic Crystal Biosensor with In-Situ Synthesized DNA Probes for Enhanced Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shuren; Zhao, Y.; Retterer, Scott T; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Weiss, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We report on a nearly 8-fold increase in multi-hole defect photonic crystal biosensor response by incorporating in-situ synthesis of DNA probes, as compared to the conventional functionalization method employing pre-synthesized DNA probe immobilization.

  18. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  19. DNA probes and PCR for diagnosis of parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J B

    1995-01-01

    DNA probe and PCR-based assays to identify and detect parasites are technically complex; however, they have high sensitivity, directly detect parasites independent of the immunocompetence or previous clinical history of the patient, and can distinguish between organisms that are morphologically similar. Diagnosis of parasites is often based on direct detection by microscopy, which is insensitive and laborious and can lack specificity. Most PCR-based assays were more sensitive than DNA probe assays. The development of PCR-based diagnostic assays requires multiple steps following the initial selection of oligonucleotide primers and reporter probe. Generally, the ability to detect the DNA of one parasite was attained by PCR; however, advances in the preparation of samples for PCR (extraction of DNA while removing PCR inhibitors) will be required to achieve that sensitivity with human specimens. Preliminary PCR systems have been developed for many different parasites, yet few have been evaluated with a large number of clinical specimens and/or under field conditions. Those evaluations are essential for determination of clinical and field utility and performance and of the most appropriate application of the assay. Several situations in which PCR-based diagnosis will result in epidemiologic, medical, or public health advances have been identified. PMID:7704890

  20. Chemical Biology Probes from Advanced DNA-encoded Libraries.

    PubMed

    Salamon, Hazem; Klika Škopić, Mateja; Jung, Kathrin; Bugain, Olivia; Brunschweiger, Andreas

    2016-02-19

    The identification of bioactive compounds is a crucial step toward development of probes for chemical biology studies. Screening of DNA-encoded small molecule libraries (DELs) has emerged as a validated technology to interrogate vast chemical space. DELs consist of chimeric molecules composed of a low-molecular weight compound that is conjugated to a DNA identifier tag. They are screened as pooled libraries using selection to identify "hits." Screening of DELs has identified numerous bioactive compounds. Some of these molecules were instrumental in gaining a deeper understanding of biological systems. One of the main challenges in the field is the development of synthesis methodology for DELs. PMID:26820267

  1. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  2. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii with a DNA molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cun; Xu, Shichao; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Sun, Shuqing; Feng, Teilin; Zi, Yan; Liang, Chu; Luo, Hao

    2009-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a kind of microscopic parasite that may infect humans, and there are increasing concerns on the early detection of latent Toxoplasma gondii infection in recent years. This research highlights a new type of molecular beacon (MB) fluorescent probe for Toxoplasma DNA testing. We combined high-efficiency fluorescent inorganic core-shell quantum dots-CdTe/ZnS (as fluorescent energy donor) and BHQ-2 (energy acceptor) to the single-strand DNA of Toxoplasma gondii, and a molecular beacon sensing system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was achieved. Core-shell quantum dots CdTe/ZnS was firstly prepared in aqueous solution, and the influencing factor of its fluorescent properties, including CdTe/Na2S/Zn(CH3COO)2 (v/v), dependence of reaction time, temperature, and pH, is investigated systematically. The synthesized quantum dots and molecular beacon were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescent spectrophotometer (FS), respectively. The TEM results showed that CdTe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots is ~11nm in size, and the quantum dots is water-soluble well. The sensing ability of target DNA of assembled MB was investigated, and results showed that the target Toxoplasma gonddi DNA can be successfully detected by measuring the change of fluorescence intensity. The results showed that the current sensing probe will be a useful and convenient tool in Toxoplasma gondii early detection.

  3. Epidemiological typing of Moraxella catarrhalis by using DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, D; Scriver, S; Bergeron, M G; Low, D E; Parr, T R; Patterson, J E; Matlow, A; Roy, P H

    1993-01-01

    Small-fragment restriction enzyme analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization were used to compare 60 strains of Moraxella catarrhalis isolated from various geographic locations. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII resulted in 46 different patterns, 7 of which were shared by more than one isolate. Hybridizations with two DNA probes resulted in 18 different patterns, 11 of which were shared by more than one isolate. Strains with the same restriction enzyme pattern always had the same hybridization pattern. However, of the 50 strains that shared the 11 hybridization patterns, 39 could be further differentiated by restriction enzyme analysis. We found that hybridization is a method that is specific for the epidemiological typing of M. catarrhalis, but because of limited sensitivity, combination with small-fragment restriction enzyme analysis may be necessary to better determine the relatedness of strains. Images PMID:8096219

  4. Probing Nucleosome Remodeling by Unzipping Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    At the core of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.65 turns around an octamer of histone proteins. Even this lowest level of genomic compaction presents a strong barrier to DNA-binding cellular factors that are required for essential processes such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Chromatin remodeling enzymes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to regulate accessibility of the genetic code by altering chromatin structure. While remodeling enzymes have been the subject of extensive research in recent years, their precise mechanism remains unclear. In order to probe the structure of individual nucleosomes and their remodeling, we assembled a histone octamer onto a DNA segment containing a strong nucleosome positioning sequence. As the DNA double helix was unzipped through the nucleosome using a feedback-enhanced optical trap, the presence of the nucleosome was detected as a series of dramatic increases in the tension in the DNA, followed by sudden tension reductions. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout the disruption accurately revealed the spatial location and fine structure of the nucleosome to near base pair precision. Using this approach, we investigate how remodeling enzymes may alter the location and structure of a nucleosome.

  5. Simulation-Guided DNA Probe Design for Consistently Ultraspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Sherry; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization of complementary sequences is one of the central tenets of nucleic acid chemistry; however, the unintended binding of closely related sequences limits the accuracy of hybridization-based approaches for analyzing nucleic acids. Thermodynamics-guided probe design and empirical optimization of reaction conditions have been used to enable discrimination of single nucleotide variants, but typically these approaches provide only an approximate 25-fold difference in binding affinity. Here we show that simulations of the binding kinetics are both necessary and sufficient to design nucleic acid probe systems with consistently high specificity as they enable the discovery of an optimal combination of thermodynamic parameters. Simulation-guided probe systems designed against 44 different target single nucleotide variants sequences showed between 200- and 3000-fold (median 890) higher binding affinity than their corresponding wildtype sequences. As a demonstration of the usefulness of this simulation-guided design approach we developed probes which, in combination with PCR amplification, we use to detect low concentrations of variant alleles (1%) in human genomic DNA. PMID:26100802

  6. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis of Neisseria meningitidis using DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, H.; Knight, A. I.; Cartwright, K. A.; McFadden, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    The genetic relationships between various serotypes and serogroups of meningococcal strains were investigated by restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis using a number of random DNA probes and a probe containing a truncated copy of the meningococcal insertion sequence IS1106. The data were used to estimate genetic distance between all pairs of strains and to construct phylogenetic trees for meningococcal strains. B15:P1.16R strains isolated from cases of systemic meningococcal disease in two health districts with a high incidence of disease were clonal in contrast to similar strains from cases occurring in other parts of the UK. Strains from these areas, which contain a similar genomic deletion, were found to be derived from two distinct lineages within the B15:P1.16R phylogenetic group. RFLP data demonstrated that present serological typing systems for the meningococcus do not necessarily reflect true genetic relationships. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1356820

  7. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  8. Probing DNA hybridization efficiency and single base mismatch by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-Chun; Zhang, Xin; He, Nong-Yue; Lu, Zu-Hong; Chen, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study DNA hybridization. Target DNA labeled with hexachloro-fluorescein (HEX) was hybridized to DNA arrays with four different probes. Each probe dot of the hybridized arrays was detected with XPS. The XPS Cl2p peak areas were found to decrease with an increase in mismatched bases in DNA probes. The Cl2p core-level peak area ratio of a probe perfectly matched to one, two and three base-mismatched probes accorded well with the results of conventional fluorescent imaging, which shows that XPS is a potential tool for analyzing DNA arrays. The DNA arrays' hybridization efficiency was assessed by the molar ratio of chlorine to phosphorus in a DNA strand, which was determined from the relevant XPS Cl2p and P2p core-level peak areas after hybridization. This could provide a new method to detect DNA hybridization efficiency. PMID:19282155

  9. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. Probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations.

  10. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1991-07-02

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. The probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations. No Drawings

  11. [Use of photo-anchoring of DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Nasedkina, T V; Mal'kov, R B; Fedorova, L I; Godovikova, T S; Kolpashchikov, D M; Poletaev, A I

    1998-01-01

    A possibility was investigated to use photo-crosslinking DNA probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). DNA probes were modified by incorporating photonucleotides in these, containing a photoreactive group (tetrafluorobenzazid) and capable of making covalent bonds with the examined DNA, when irradiated in 300-330 nm region. The photonucleotide was incorporated into the probe either by nick-translation, or upon elongation of the hybridized probe by the Kljonow fragment. It has been shown that the DNA probe, cross-linking to a chromosome as a result of covalent bonds, is not removed from the place of hybridization under consequent denaturating washing, which makes it possible to carry out the following DNA hybridization with selective conservation of signals obtained due to previous hybridization. This peculiarity of photo-linking DNA probes makes it possible to use them for the two-step DNA hybridization. To demonstrate this, preparations of human chromosomes were investigated. On the first step, chromosomal DNA was hybridized by means of DNA probe having nucleotide sequences of centromeric regions of chromosomes 13 and 21, the probe being linked to chromosomal DNA by the photonucleotide. Following the denaturation treatment of the preparation, and after the second chromosomal DNA hybridization with cosmid DNA, containing chromosome 13 DNA nucleotide sequence, the signal in chromosome 13 centromeric region was retained to serve a marker of this chromosome, thus fascilitating its easier identification following the hybridization of its DNA with cosmic DNA. The denaturation stability of photo-crosslinking probes opens some new possibilities in technology of DNA in situ hybridization. PMID:9821246

  12. Potentiostatic deposition of DNA for scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, S M; Tao, N J; DeRose, J A; Oden, P I; Lyubchenko YuL; Harrington, R E; Shlyakhtenko, L

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for reversible adsorption of DNA onto a gold electrode maintained under potential control. The adsorbate can be imaged by scanning probe microscopy in situ. Quantitative control of a molecular adsorbate for microscopy is now possible. We found a potential window (between 0 and 180 mV versus a silver wire quasi reference) over which a gold (111) surface under phosphate buffer is positively charged, but is not covered with a dense adsorbate. When DNA is present in these conditions, molecules adsorb onto the electrode and remain stable under repeated scanning with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). They become removed when the surface is brought to a negative charge. When operated at tunnel currents below approximately 0.4 nA, the STM yields a resolution of approximately 1 nm, which is better than can be obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) at present. We illustrate this procedure by imaging a series of DNA molecules made by ligating a 21 base-pair oligonucleotide. We observed the expected series of fragment lengths but small fragments are adsorbed preferentially. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:1617139

  13. Strain differentiation of Onchocerca volvulus from Uganda using DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, P; Bamuhiiga, J; Kilian, A H; Büttner, D W

    1996-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with non-radioactive DNA hybridization was applied for the detection and characterization of a 150 bp tandem repeat of Onchocerca volvulus. DNA of worms from western Uganda was amplified and then probed with a digoxygenin-labelled oligonucleotide, specific for the forest form of O. volvulus and compared to samples from various African countries. Hybridization was only observed with PCR products from the forest in Liberia, south-eastern Ghana, Benin and southern Cameroon, but not with worms from Uganda or the savannah in Burkina Faso and northern Ghana. A nested PCR using primers derived form the forest form-specific DNA sequence confirmed these results. Morphometric studies revealed length differences between the microfilariae of Ugandan O. volvulus to those of West Africa, especially to those of the savannah in Burkina Faso. It is concluded that the forest/savannah classification of O. volvulus from West Africa is not suitable for Simulium neavei-transmitted O. volvulus from Uganda. PMID:8935951

  14. Preparation of Complex DNA Probe Sets for 3D FISH with up to Six Different Fluorochromes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Neusser, Michaela; Köhler, Daniela; Cremer, Marion

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONDNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be generated and labeled by various methods. This protocol describes the conjugation of dUTPs with haptens or fluorochromes, as well as the generation and labeling of DNA probes using those modified dUTPs. Sources of probe DNA include genomic DNA, DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes, bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), and cosmids. DNA amplification and labeling procedures involving degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and multiple displacement amplification (MDA) are provided. Advice is given for setting up complex probe pools, such as those containing large pools of BAC probes. Also included is a method for probe precipitation and preparation of a hybridization mix ready to be used for 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. PMID:21357075

  15. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  16. Mixed-Sequence Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA Using Enzymatically Stable Phosphorothioate Invader Probes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brooke A; Karmakar, Saswata; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Development of probes that allow for sequence-unrestricted recognition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) continues to attract much attention due to the prospect for molecular tools that enable detection, regulation, and manipulation of genes. We have recently introduced so-called Invader probes as alternatives to more established approaches such as triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids and polyamides. These short DNA duplexes are activated for dsDNA recognition by installment of +1 interstrand zippers of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides such as 2'-N-(pyren-1-yl)methyl-2'-N-methyl-2'-aminouridine and 2'-O-(pyren-1-yl)methyluridine, which results in violation of the nearest neighbor exclusion principle and duplex destabilization. The individual probes strands have high affinity toward complementary DNA strands, which generates the driving force for recognition of mixed-sequence dsDNA regions. In the present article, we characterize Invader probes that are based on phosphorothioate backbones (PS-DNA Invaders). The change from the regular phosphodiester backbone furnishes Invader probes that are much more stable to nucleolytic degradation, while displaying acceptable dsDNA-recognition efficiency. PS-DNA Invader probes therefore present themselves as interesting probes for dsDNA-targeting applications in cellular environments and living organisms. PMID:26230684

  17. Detection and classification of Trypanosoma cruzi by DNA hybridization with nonradioactive probes.

    PubMed

    Solari, A; Venegas, J; Gonzalez, E; Vasquez, C

    1991-01-01

    Total or kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from 72 isolates and clones of Trypanosoma cruzi as well as from nine related trypanosomatids were analyzed by dot hybridization using nonradioactive kDNA or cloned minicircle fragments as probes. Biotinylated-kDNA probes generated by nick-translation proved reliable for distinguishing Zymodeme 1 and Zymodeme 2bol of T. cruzi parasites. In contrast, digoxigenin-labeled kDNA obtained by random-priming did not distinguish among T. cruzi isolates but did distinguish among New World leishmanias. Cloned minicircle fragments labeled with digoxigenin gave the same results as digoxigenin-labeled kDNA, except for a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity. Digoxigenin-labeled DNA probes proved useful in unambiguously detecting T. cruzi from different geographic regions of America. However, T. rangeli and T. cruzi marinkellei were not distinguished by these probes. PMID:1667933

  18. Method and apparatus for synthesis of arrays of DNA probes

    DOEpatents

    Cerrina, Francesco; Sussman, Michael R.; Blattner, Frederick R.; Singh-Gasson, Sangeet; Green, Roland

    2002-04-23

    The synthesis of arrays of DNA probes sequences, polypeptides, and the like is carried out using a patterning process on an active surface of a substrate. An image is projected onto the active surface of the substrate utilizing an image former that includes a light source that provides light to a micromirror device comprising an array of electronically addressable micromirrors, each of which can be selectively tilted between one of at least two positions. Projection optics receives the light reflected from the micromirrors along an optical axis and precisely images the micromirrors onto the active surface of the substrate, which may be used to activate the surface of the substrate. The first level of bases may then be applied to the substrate, followed by development steps, and subsequent exposure of the substrate utilizing a different pattern of micromirrors, with further repeats until the elements of a two dimensional array on the substrate surface have an appropriate base bound thereto. The micromirror array can be controlled in conjunction with a DNA synthesizer supplying appropriate reagents to a flow cell containing the active substrate to control the sequencing of images presented by the micromirror array in coordination of the reagents provided to the substrate.

  19. DNA probe for detection of the Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo genotype hardjo-bovis.

    PubMed Central

    LeFebvre, R B

    1987-01-01

    A DNA probe is described for the diagnostic and taxonomic identification of the North American cattle pathogen Leptospira interrogans genotype hardjo-bovis. The probe is specific for this genotype and does not hybridize to genomic DNA of any other leptospire pathogen commonly found in North America. Images PMID:2826538

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Based Nonfluorescent Probe for Multiplex DNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lan; Yu, Chenxu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    To provide rapid and accurate detection of DNA markers in a straightforward, inexpensive and multiplex format, an alternative surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based probe was designed and fabricated to covalently attach both DNA probing sequence and non-fluorescent Raman tags to the surface of gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuP-RTag). The intensity of Raman signal of the probes could be controlled through the surface coverage of the non-fluorescent Raman tags (RTags). Detection sensitivity of these probes could be optimized by fine-tuning the amount of DNA molecules and RTags on the probes. Long-term stability of the DNA-AuP-RTag probes was found to be good (over 3 months). Excellent multiplexing capability of the DNA-AuP-RTag scheme was demonstrated by simultaneous identification of up to eight probes in a mixture. Detection of hybridization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to its complementary targets was successfully accomplished with a long-term goal to use non-fluorescent RTags in a Raman-based DNA microarray platform. PMID:17465531

  1. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. PMID:26879193

  2. Probing Minor Groove Hydrogen Bonding Interactions between RB69 DNA Polymerase and DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Christian, Thomas D.; Wang, Jimin; Konigsberg, William H.

    2012-09-17

    Minor groove hydrogen bonding (HB) interactions between DNA polymerases (pols) and N3 of purines or O2 of pyrimidines have been proposed to be essential for DNA synthesis from results obtained using various nucleoside analogues lacking the N3 or O2 contacts that interfered with primer extension. Because there has been no direct structural evidence to support this proposal, we decided to evaluate the contribution of minor groove HB interactions with family B pols. We have used RB69 DNA pol and 3-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine (3DA), an analogue of 2-deoxyadenosine, which has the same HB pattern opposite T but with N3 replaced with a carbon atom. We then determined pre-steady-state kinetic parameters for the insertion of dAMP opposite dT using primer/templates (P/T)-containing 3DA. We also determined three structures of ternary complexes with 3DA at various positions in the duplex DNA substrate. We found that the incorporation efficiency of dAMP opposite dT decreased 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}-fold even when only one minor groove HB interaction was missing. Our structures show that the HB pattern and base pair geometry of 3DA/dT is exactly the same as those of dA/dT, which makes 3DA an optimal analogue for probing minor groove HB interactions between a DNA polymerase and a nucleobase. In addition, our structures provide a rationale for the observed 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}-fold decrease in the rate of nucleotide incorporation. The minor groove HB interactions between position n-2 of the primer strand and RB69pol fix the rotomer conformations of the K706 and D621 side chains, as well as the position of metal ion A and its coordinating ligands, so that they are in the optinal orientation for DNA synthesis.

  3. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes

    PubMed Central

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Material and methods Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. Results There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. Conclusions The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. PMID:26855801

  4. Value of a DNA probe assay (Gen-Probe) compared with that of culture for diagnosis of gonococcal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Vlaspolder, F; Mutsaers, J A; Blog, F; Notowicz, A

    1993-01-01

    The Gen-Probe PACE 2 system for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GP), which uses a chemiluminescently labeled DNA probe, was compared with conventional culture as the method of reference. A total of 1,750 specimens were collected from 496 females and 623 males visiting the outpatient clinic of the Sexually Transmitted Diseases Department of the Westeinde Hospital, The Hague, The Netherlands, during the year 1991. The prevalences of gonorrhea culture-positive men and women were 14.9 and 7.7%, respectively. The overall positive rate was 8.7%. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of GP were 97.1, 99.1, 90.6, and 99.8%, respectively. A total of 12 of 13 patients with positive GP results and negative cultures may have had a gonococcal infection, a conclusion based on clinical symptoms, positive methylene blue smears, and high relative light unit ratios. The DNA probe test can be useful as a suitable screening and diagnostic test for gonorrheal infection in men and women. An advantage of using this DNA probe technique is that simultaneous testing for Chlamydia trachomatis of the same specimen is possible. We also examined whether (all) rRNA had disappeared after adequate treatment for gonococcal and/or chlamydial infection in 30 patients. None of those positive patients showed a positive result in the DNA probe assay after treatment. PMID:8417014

  5. Detecting the effects of toxic agents on spermatogenesis using DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, N.B.

    1987-10-01

    Advances in the molecular biology of spermatogenesis suggest that DNA probes can be used to monitor the effects of toxic agents in male germ cells of mammals. Molecular hybridization analyses with DNA probes can provide a reproducible methodology capable of detecting changes ranging from massive deletions to single base pair substitutions in the genome of exposed individuals. A constantly increasing number of DNA probes that can be used to detect such alterations in human sperm DNA exist for both ubiquitously expressed proteins and for genes solely expressed in the testis. In this chapter, the currently available testicular stage-specific and/or cell type-specific DNA probes and the techniques by which they can be utilized in reproductive toxicology studies are discussed. The advantages, limitations, and future technological advances of this novel biological marker system for the human male reproductive system are also considered.

  6. Merging Two Strategies for Mixed-Sequence Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA: Pseudocomplementary Invader Probes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brooke A; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2016-04-15

    The development of molecular strategies that enable recognition of specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) regions has been a longstanding goal as evidenced by the emergence of triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), minor groove binding polyamides, and-more recently-engineered proteins such as CRISPR/Cas9. Despite this progress, an unmet need remains for simple hybridization-based probes that recognize specific mixed-sequence dsDNA regions under physiological conditions. Herein, we introduce pseudocomplementary Invader probes as a step in this direction. These double-stranded probes are chimeras between pseudocomplementary DNA (pcDNA) and Invader probes, which are activated for mixed-sequence dsDNA-recognition through the introduction of pseudocomplementary base pairs comprised of 2-thiothymine and 2,6-diaminopurine, and +1 interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, respectively. We demonstrate that certain pseudocomplementary Invader probe designs result in very efficient and specific recognition of model dsDNA targets in buffers of high ionic strength. These chimeric probes, therefore, present themselves as a promising strategy for mixed-sequence recognition of dsDNA targets for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics. PMID:26998918

  7. Detection of specific DNA sequences with short biotin-labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Chu, B C; Orgel, L E

    1985-08-01

    We have developed a simple, general synthesis of nonradioactive DNA probes in which biotin is attached to the 5'-terminal phosphate of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide 16 bases long via an ethylenediamine or hexamethylenediamine linker. The products are stable under normal hybridization conditions. They hybridize to target DNA as efficiently as the underivatized oligodeoxyribonucleotide. Color development, using a commercially available kit, is complete within 3 hr using the biotin-detection method. The sensitivity of detection of homologous DNA with a probe to which biotin was attached via a hexamethylenediamine linker is about one-tenth of that achieved overnight by autoradiography with the corresponding 32P-labeled probe. PMID:4042814

  8. Fluorescent silver nanocluster DNA probes for multiplexed detection using microfluidic capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Fygenson, Deborah K; Pennathur, Sumita

    2015-03-01

    DNA-stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNC DNA) are a new class of fluorophore that are formed by sequence specific interactions between silver and single-stranded DNA. By incorporating both target-binding and fluorescent-reporting sequences into a single synthetic DNA oligomer, AgNC DNA probes eliminate the need to conjugate dye or quencher molecules. In this study, we modify a AgNC DNA probe to demonstrate single-color multiplexed detection of DNA targets. We show that appending different lengths of poly-dT to the probe sequences tunes the electrophoretic mobility of AgNC DNA probes without affecting their fluorescence spectra. We use this to introduce a set of AgNC DNA probes selective for Hepatitis A, B and C target sequences that can be processed together in a simple, single-step protocol and distinguished with a resolution of 3.47 and signal to noise ratio of 17.23 in under 10 seconds by microfluidic capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25601044

  9. A Microfluidic Microbeads Fluorescence Assay with Quantum Dots-Bead-DNA Probe.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, S R; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for the detection of tumor causing N-Ras genes using quantum dots has been developed. Presently, quantum dots-bead-DNA probe based hybridization detection methods are often called as 'bead based assays' and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capability of the microfluidic technology. This study reports the detection of N-Ras cancer gene by fluorescence quenching of quantum dots immobilized on the surface of polystyrene beads. A microfluidic chip was constructed in which the quantum dots-bead-DNA probes were packed in the channel. The target DNA flowed across the beads and hybridized with immobilized probe sequences. The target DNA can be detected by the fluorescence quenching of the quantum dots due to their transfer of emission energy to intercalation dye after DNA hybridization. The mutated gene also induces fluorescence quenching but with less degree than the perfectly complementary target DNA. PMID:27455729

  10. Effect of salts, solvents and buffer on miRNA detection using DNA silver nanocluster (DNA/AgNCs) probes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Choi, Suk Won; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Yang, Seong Wook

    2014-01-31

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs (size ~21 nt to ~25 nt) which regulate a variety of important cellular events in plants, animals and single cell eukaryotes. Especially because of their use in diagnostics of human diseases, efforts have been directed towards the invention of a rapid, simple and sequence selective detection method for miRNAs. Recently, we reported an innovative method for the determination of miRNA levels using the red fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs). Our method is based on monitoring the emission drop of a DNA/AgNCs probe in the presence of its specific target miRNA. Accordingly, the accuracy and efficiency of the method relies on the sensitivity of hybridization between the probe and target. To gain specific and robust hybridization between probe and target, we investigated a range of diverse salts, organic solvents, and buffer to optimize target sensing conditions. Under the newly adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity and the formation of emissive DNA/AgNCs probes were significantly improved. Also, fortification of the Tris-acetate buffer with inorganic salts or organic solvents improved the sensitivity of the DNA/AgNC probes. On the basis of these optimizations, the versatility of the DNA/AgNCs-based miRNA detection method can be expanded. PMID:24393838

  11. Effect of salts, solvents and buffer on miRNA detection using DNA silver nanocluster (DNA/AgNCs) probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun; Waaben Thulstrup, Peter; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Choi, Suk Won; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Yang, Seong Wook

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs (size ˜21 nt to ˜25 nt) which regulate a variety of important cellular events in plants, animals and single cell eukaryotes. Especially because of their use in diagnostics of human diseases, efforts have been directed towards the invention of a rapid, simple and sequence selective detection method for miRNAs. Recently, we reported an innovative method for the determination of miRNA levels using the red fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs). Our method is based on monitoring the emission drop of a DNA/AgNCs probe in the presence of its specific target miRNA. Accordingly, the accuracy and efficiency of the method relies on the sensitivity of hybridization between the probe and target. To gain specific and robust hybridization between probe and target, we investigated a range of diverse salts, organic solvents, and buffer to optimize target sensing conditions. Under the newly adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity and the formation of emissive DNA/AgNCs probes were significantly improved. Also, fortification of the Tris-acetate buffer with inorganic salts or organic solvents improved the sensitivity of the DNA/AgNC probes. On the basis of these optimizations, the versatility of the DNA/AgNCs-based miRNA detection method can be expanded.

  12. A versatile proximity-dependent probe based on light-up DNA-scaffolded silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Liang; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that proximity-dependent probes containing an analyte recognization site and a signal formation domain could be assembled specifically into a sandwich-like structure (probe-analyte-probe) via introducing an analyte. In this work, using the design for zirconium ion (Zr(4+)) detection as the model, we develop a novel and reliable proximity-dependent DNA-scaffolded silver nanocluster (DNA/AgNC) probe for Zr(4+) detection via target-induced emitter proximity. The proposed strategy undergoes the two following processes: target-mediated emitter pair proximity as target recognition implement and the synthesis of DNA/AgNCs with fluorescence as a signal reporter. Upon combination of the rationally designed probe with Zr(4+), the intact templates were obtained according to the -PO3(2-)-Zr(4+)-PO3(2-)- pattern. The resultant structure with an emitter pair serves as a potent template to achieve highly fluorescent DNA/AgNCs. To verify the universality of the proposed proximity-dependent DNA/AgNC probe, we extend the application of the proximity-dependent probe to DNA and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection by virtue of a specific DNA complementary sequence and ATP aptamer as a recognition unit, respectively. The produced fluorescence enhancement of the DNA/AgNCs in response to the analyte concentration allows a quantitative evaluation of the target, including Zr(4+), DNA, and ATP with detection limits of ∼3.00 μM, ∼9.83 nM, and ∼0.81 mM, respectively. The proposed probe possesses good performance with simple operation, cost-effectiveness, good selectivity, and without separation procedures. PMID:26814697

  13. Label-free nucleic acids detection based on DNA templated silver nanoclusters fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Based on DNA templated Ag NCs (DNA/Ag NCs) fluorescent probe, a label-free fluorescent method was developed for the detection of clinical significant DNA fragments from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Firstly, a hairpin probe, containing target DNA recognition sequence and guanine-rich sequence, was designed to hybridize with the target DNA and form a blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex. Then, exonuclease III (Exo III) was employed to stepwise hydrolyze the mononucleotides from formed blunt 3'-terminus DNA duplex, releasing the target DNA and guanine-rich sequence. Finally, DNA/Ag NCs fluorescent probe was introduced to hybridize with the guanine-rich sequence, leading to an enhanced fluorescence signal for detection. The proposed method could detect as low as 2.9×10(-10) mol L(-1) HIV-1 DNA and exhibited excellent selectivity against mismatched target DNA. Furthermore, the method possessed perfect recoveries in cells lysate and human serum, showing potential to be used in biological samples. PMID:25863386

  14. Conditionally fluorescent molecular probes for detecting single base changes in double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Zhang, David Yu; Seelig, Georg

    2013-09-01

    Small variations in nucleic acid sequences can have far-reaching phenotypic consequences. Reliably distinguishing closely related sequences is therefore important for research and clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that conditionally fluorescent DNA probes are capable of distinguishing variations of a single base in a stretch of target DNA. These probes use a novel programmable mechanism in which each single nucleotide polymorphism generates two thermodynamically destabilizing mismatch bubbles rather than the single mismatch formed during typical hybridization-based assays. Up to a 12,000-fold excess of a target that contains a single nucleotide polymorphism is required to generate the same fluorescence as one equivalent of the intended target, and detection works reliably over a wide range of conditions. Using these probes we detected point mutations in a 198 base-pair subsequence of the Escherichia coli rpoB gene. That our probes are constructed from multiple oligonucleotides circumvents synthesis limitations and enables long continuous DNA sequences to be probed.

  15. Hairpin DNA probes based on target-induced in situ generation of luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Wu, Zhengjun; Wong, Kwok-Yin; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-05-14

    Novel hairpin DNA probes are designed and constructed based on target-induced in situ generation of luminescent silver nanoclusters. This design allows specific and versatile detection of diverse targets with easy operation and low cost. PMID:24686790

  16. DNA probes for identification of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, T A; Toledo, M R; Trabulsi, L R; Wood, P K; Morris, J G

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-one Escherichia coli strains belonging to all known invasive O serogroups were tested with two distinct invasiveness probes (pMR17 and pSF55). All 54 Sereny test-positive strains and 5 strains that lost Sereny positivity during storage hybridized with both probes. Probe-positive strains carried a 120- to 140-megadalton plasmid, did not produce lysine decarboxylase, and, with the exception of certain serotypes, were nonmotile. Motile strains of serotype O144:H25 were for the first time characterized as invasive by hybridization with the probes. PMID:3312292

  17. Polyamide fluorescent probes for visualization of repeated DNA sequences in living cells.

    PubMed

    Nozeret, Karine; Loll, François; Escudé, Christophe; Boutorine, Alexandre S

    2015-03-01

    DNA imaging in living cells usually requires transgenic approaches that modify the genome. Synthetic pyrrole-imidazole polyamides that bind specifically to the minor groove of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) represent an attractive approach for in-cell imaging that does not necessitate changes to the genome. Nine hairpin polyamides that target mouse major satellite DNA were synthesized. Their interactions with synthetic target dsDNA fragments were studied by thermal denaturation, gel-shift electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The polyamides had different affinities for the target DNA, and fluorescent labeling of the polyamides affected their affinity for their targets. We validated the specificity of the probes in fixed cells and provide evidence that two of the probes detect target sequences in mouse living cell lines. This study demonstrates for the first time that synthetic compounds can be used for the visualization of the nuclear substructures formed by repeated DNA sequences in living cells. PMID:25639955

  18. [Cu(phen)2](2+) acts as electrochemical indicator and anchor to immobilize probe DNA in electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Xi; Yan, Songling; Ren, Yinna; Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yulin; Zhang, Chaocan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel protocol for sensitive in situ label-free electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization based on copper complex ([Cu(phen)2](2+), where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and graphene (GR) modified glassy carbon electrode. Here, [Cu(phen)2](2+) acted advantageously as both the electrochemical indicator and the anchor for probe DNA immobilization via intercalative interactions between the partial double helix structure of probe DNA and the vertical aromatic groups of phen. GR provided large density of docking site for probe DNA immobilization and increased the electrical conductivity ability of the electrode. The modification procedure was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Square-wave voltammetry (SWV) was used to explore the hybridization events. Under the optimal conditions, the designed electrochemical DNA biosensor could effectively distinguish different mismatch degrees of complementary DNA from one-base mismatch to noncomplementary, indicating that the biosensor had high selectivity. It also exhibited a reasonable linear relationship. The oxidation peak currents of [Cu(phen)2](2+) were linear with the logarithm of the concentrations of complementary target DNA ranging from 1 × 10(-12) to 1 × 10(-6) M with a detection limit of 1.99 × 10(-13) M (signal/noise = 3). Moreover, the stability of the electrochemical DNA biosensor was also studied. PMID:26403602

  19. In-solution multiplex miRNA detection using DNA-templated silver nanocluster probes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pratik; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Cho, Seok Keun; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Choi, Suk Won; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; Yang, Seong Wook

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs (size ∼21nt to ∼25nt) that can be used as biomarkers of disease diagnosis, and efforts have been directed towards the invention of a rapid, simple and sequence-selective detection method for miRNAs. We recently developed a DNA/silver nanoclusters (AgNCs)-based turn-off fluorescence method in the presence of target miRNA. To further advance our method toward multiplex miRNA detection in solution, the design of various fluorescent DNA/AgNCs probes was essential. Therefore, tethering of DNA-12nt scaffolds with 9 different AgNCs emitters to target-sensing DNA sequences was investigated. Interestingly, for the creation of spectrally different DNA/AgNCs probes, not only were the emitters encapsulated in 9 different DNA-12nt scaffolds necessary but the tethered target-sensing DNA sequences are also crucial to tune the fluorescence across the visible to infra-red region. In this study, we obtained three spectrally distinctive emitters of each DNA/AgNCs probes such as green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence. Using these DNA/AgNCs probes, we here show a proof of concept for a rapid, one-step, in-solution multiplex miRNA detection method. PMID:24616905

  20. Redox polymer and probe DNA tethered to gold electrodes for enzyme-amplified amperometric detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2006-04-15

    The detection of nucleic acids based upon recognition surfaces formed by co-immobilization of a redox polymer mediator and DNA probe sequences on gold electrodes is described. The recognition surface consists of a redox polymer, [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2(polyvinylimidazole)(10)Cl](+/2+), and a model single DNA strand cross-linked and tethered to a gold electrode via an anchoring self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of cysteamine. Hybridization between the immobilized probe DNA of the recognition surface and a biotin-conjugated target DNA sequence (designed from the ssrA gene of Listeria monocytogenes), followed by addition of an enzyme (glucose oxidase)-avidin conjugate, results in electrical contact between the enzyme and the mediating redox polymer. In the presence of glucose, the current generated due to the catalytic oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone is measured, and a response is obtained that is binding-dependent. The tethering of the probe DNA and redox polymer to the SAM improves the stability of the surface to assay conditions of rigorous washing and high salt concentration (1 M). These conditions eliminate nonspecific interaction of both the target DNA and the enzyme-avidin conjugate with the recognition surfaces. The sensor response increases linearly with increasing concentration of target DNA in the range of 1 x 10(-9) to 2 x 10(-6) M. The detection limit is approximately 1.4 fmol, (corresponding to 0.2 nM of target DNA). Regeneration of the recognition surface is possible by treatment with 0.25 M NaOH solution. After rehybridization of the regenerated surface with the target DNA sequence, >95% of the current is recovered, indicating that the redox polymer and probe DNA are strongly bound to the surface. These results demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach. PMID:16615783

  1. DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor based on gold nanoparticle amplification for Bacillus anthracis detection.

    PubMed

    Hao, Rong-Zhang; Song, Hong-Bin; Zuo, Guo-Min; Yang, Rui-Fu; Wei, Hong-Ping; Wang, Dian-Bing; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Zhang, ZhiPing; Cheng, Zhen-Xing; Zhang, Xian-En

    2011-04-15

    The rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, has gained much attention since the anthrax spore bioterrorism attacks in the United States in 2001. In this work, a DNA probe functionalized quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor was developed to detect B. anthracis based on the recognition of its specific DNA sequences, i.e., the 168 bp fragment of the Ba813 gene in chromosomes and the 340 bp fragment of the pag gene in plasmid pXO1. A thiol DNA probe was immobilized onto the QCM gold surface through self-assembly via Au-S bond formation to hybridize with the target ss-DNA sequence obtained by asymmetric PCR. Hybridization between the target DNA and the DNA probe resulted in an increase in mass and a decrease in the resonance frequency of the QCM biosensor. Moreover, to amplify the signal, a thiol-DNA fragment complementary to the other end of the target DNA was functionalized with gold nanoparticles. The results indicate that the DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor could specifically recognize the target DNA fragment of B. anthracis from that of its closest species, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, and that the limit of detection (LOD) reached 3.5 × 10(2)CFU/ml of B. anthracis vegetative cells just after asymmetric PCR amplification, but without culture enrichment. The DNA probe functionalized QCM biosensor demonstrated stable, pollution-free, real-time sensing, and could find application in the rapid detection of B. anthracis. PMID:21315574

  2. New reagents for the introduction of reactive functional groups into chemically synthesized DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczynski, Zbigniew; Wayland, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    An efficient and versatile preparative approach is described, allowing for the preparation of DNA probes modified with an aldehyde group at the 3'- or 5'-end. The developed synthetic strategy allows for the preparation of a new family of phosphoramidites and solid supports compatible with the automated synthesis of modified oligonucleotide probes. These new reagents were prepared from intermediates 3 and 3a, obtained from the commercially available aleuritic acid 1. It was demonstrated that the new phosphoramidite reagents also could be used as new types of cleavable linkers. A new and efficient method for the production of 5' aldehyde-labeled DNA probes was developed. PMID:12757390

  3. Commercial DNA Probes for Mycobacteria Incorrectly Identify a Number of Less Frequently Encountered Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Pecorari, Monica; Fabio, Giuliana; Messinò, Massimino; Fabio, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Although commercially available DNA probes for identification of mycobacteria have been investigated with large numbers of strains, nothing is known about the ability of these probes to identify less frequently encountered species. We analyzed, with INNO LiPA MYCOBACTERIA (Innogenetics) and with GenoType Mycobacterium (Hein), 317 strains, belonging to 136 species, 61 of which had never been assayed before. INNO LiPA misidentified 20 taxa, the majority of which cross-reacted with the probes specific for Mycobacterium fortuitum and the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare-Mycobacterium scrofulaceum group. GenoType misidentified 28 taxa, most of which cross-reacted with M. intracellulare and M. fortuitum probes; furthermore, eight species were not recognized as members of the genus Mycobacterium. Among 54 strains investigated with AccuProbe (Gen-Probe), cross-reactions were detected for nine species, with the probes aiming at the M. avium complex being most involved in cross-reactions. PMID:19906898

  4. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  5. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  6. Electrochemical probe for the monitoring of DNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Meunier-Prest, Rita; Bouyon, Alice; Rampazzi, Eve; Raveau, Suzanne; Andreoletti, Pierre; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha

    2010-08-15

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated oligonucleotides on gold substrates provides a convenient way for DNA-functionalized surfaces. Here we describe the development of an electrochemical assay for the detection of DNA-protein interactions based on the modification of the electrochemical response of methylene blue (MB) intercalated in the DNA strands. Using a functionalized electrode with double stranded DNA carrying T3 RNA polymerase binding sequence, we show a substantial attenuation of the current upon the DNA-protein interaction. Moreover, a Langmuir binding isotherm for T3 RNA polymerase (T3 Pol) gives a dissociation constant K(D) equal to 0.46+/-0.23 microM. Such value is 100 times lower than the calculated K(D) for the non-specific interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with T3 Pol promoter. In addition, the use of the T7 RNA polymerase (T7 Pol) promoter instead of the T3 Pol promoter induces an increase of K(D) from 0.46 microM to more than 25 microM. Accordingly, this strong decrease in the affinity of T3 Pol towards an off-target DNA promoter reveals an electrochemical sequence-specific discrimination of DNA-protein interactions. In conclusion, our results show that the developed electrochemical test allows the monitoring of DNA-protein interactions with high specificity and with an in situ protein detection threshold at a nanomolar range. PMID:20447818

  7. Comet-FISH with rDNA probes for the analysis of mutagen-induced DNA damage in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Grabowska, Marta; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Kolano, Bozena

    2012-06-01

    We used comet-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the model plant species Crepis capillaris following exposure of seedlings to maleic hydrazide (MH). FISH with 5S and 25S rDNA probes was applied to comets obtained under alkaline conditions to establish whether these DNA regions were preferentially involved in comet tail formation. MH treatment induced significant fragmentation of nuclear DNA and of rDNA loci. A 24-h post-treatment recovery period allowed a partial reversibility of MH-induced damage on nuclear and rDNA regions. Analyses of FISH signals demonstrated that rDNA sequences were always involved in tail formation and that 5S rDNA was more frequently present in the tail than 25S rDNA, regardless of treatment. The involvement of 25S rDNA in nucleolus formation and differences in chromatin structure between the two loci may explain the different susceptibility of the 25S and 5S rDNA regions to migrate into the tail. This work is the first report on the application of FISH to comet preparations from plants to analyze the distribution and repair of DNA damage within specific genomic regions after mutagenic treatment. Moreover, our work suggests that comet-FISH in plants may be a useful tool for environmental monitoring assessment. PMID:22556029

  8. Mechanisms of small molecule-DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almaqwashi, Ali A; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C

    2016-05-19

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA-ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  9. Self-quenching DNA probes based on aggregation of fluorescent dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Gabriela; Muller, Matthias; Hafner, Bernhard; Habl, Gregor; Nolte, Oliver; Marme, Nicole; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2005-04-01

    Here we present a novel class of self-quenching, double-labeled DNA probes based on the formation of non fluorescent H-type dye dimers. We therefore investigated the aggregation behavior of the red-absorbing oxazine derivative MR121 and found a dimerization constant of about 3000 M-1. This dye was successfully used to develop hairpin-structured as well as linear self-quenching DNA probes that report the presence of the target DNA by an increase of the fluorescence intensity by a factor of 3 to 12. Generally fluorescence quenching of the hairpin-structure probes is more efficient compared to the linear probes, whereas the kinetic of the fluorescence increase is significantly slower. The new probes were used for the identification of different mycobacteria and their antibiotic resistant species. As a test system a probe for the identification of a DNA sequence specific for the Mycobacterium xenopi was synthesized differing from the sequence of the Mycobacterium fortuitum by 6 nucleotides. Furthermore we developed a method for the discrimination between the sequences of the wild type and an antibiotic resistant species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both sequences differ by just 2 nucleotides and were detected specifically by the use of competing olignonucleotides.

  10. New hairpin-structured DNA probes: alternatives to classical molecular beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Achim; Habl, Gregor; Sauer, Markus; Wolfrum, Jürgen; Hoheisel, Jörg; Marmé, Nicole; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2007-02-01

    In this article we report on two different classes of self-quenching hairpin-structured DNA probes that can be used as alternatives to Molecular Beacons. Compared to other hairpin-structured DNA probes, the so-called smart probes are labeled with only one extrinsic dye. The fluorescence of this dye is efficiently quenched by intrinsic guanine bases via a photo-induced electron transfer reaction in the closed hairpin. After hybridization to a target DNA, the distance between dye and the guanines is enlarged and the fluorescence is restored. The working mechanism of the second class of hairpin DNA probes is similar, but the probe oligonucleotide is labeled at both ends with an identical chromophore and thus the fluorescence of the closed hairpin is reduced due to formation of non-fluorescent dye dimers. Both types of probes are appropriate for the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms and in combination with confocal single-molecule spectroscopy sensitivities in the picomolar range can be achieved.

  11. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  12. A novel means to develop strain-specific DNA probes for detecting bacteria in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, V G; Munakata-Marr, J; Hopkins, G D; McCarty, P L; Tiedje, J M; Forney, L J

    1997-01-01

    A simple means to develop strain-specific DNA probes for use in monitoring the movement and survival of bacteria in natural and laboratory ecosystems was developed. The method employed amplification of genomic DNA via repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) using primers specific for repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements, followed by cloning of the amplified fragments. The cloned fragments were screened to identify those which were strain specific, and these were used as probes for total genomic DNA isolated from microbial communities and subjected to rep-PCR. To evaluate the utility of the approach, we developed probes specific for Burkholderia cepacia G4 and used them to determine the persistence of the strain in aquifer sediment microcosms following bioaugmentation. Two of four probes tested were found to specifically hybridize to DNA fragments of the expected sizes in the rep-PCR fingerprint of B. cepacia G4 but not to 64 genetically distinct bacteria previously isolated from the aquifer. One of these probes, a 650-bp fragment, produced a hybridization signal when as few as 10 CFU of B. cepacia G4 were present in a mixture with 10(6) CFU nontarget strains, indicating that the sensitivity of these probes was comparable to those of other PCR-based detection methods. The probes were used to discriminate groundwater and microcosm samples that contained B. cepacia G4 from those which did not. False-positive results were obtained with a few samples, but these were readily identified by using hybridization to the second probe as a confirmation step. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated by constructing probes specific to three other environmental isolates. PMID:9212434

  13. Probing the Conformational Distributions of Sub-Persistence Length DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Sivak, David; Geissler, Phillip; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-06-08

    We have measured the bending elasticity of short double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) chains through small-angle X-ray scattering from solutions of dsDNA-linked dimers of gold nanoparticles. This method, which does not require exertion of external forces or binding to a substrate, reports on the equilibrium distribution of bending fluctuations, not just an average value (as in ensemble FRET) or an extreme value (as in cyclization), and in principle provides a more robust data set for assessing the suitability of theoretical models. Our experimental results for dsDNA comprising 42-94 basepairs (bp) are consistent with a simple worm-like chain model of dsDNA elasticity, whose behavior we have determined from Monte Carlo simulations that explicitly represent nanoparticles and their alkane tethers. A persistence length of 50 nm (150 bp) gave a favorable comparison, consistent with the results of single-molecule force-extension experiments on much longer dsDNA chains, but in contrast to recent suggestions of enhanced flexibility at these length scales.

  14. Mechanisms of small molecule–DNA interactions probed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Almaqwashi, Ali A.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a wide range of applications for non-covalent DNA binding ligands, and optimization of such interactions requires detailed understanding of the binding mechanisms. One important class of these ligands is that of intercalators, which bind DNA by inserting aromatic moieties between adjacent DNA base pairs. Characterizing the dynamic and equilibrium aspects of DNA-intercalator complex assembly may allow optimization of DNA binding for specific functions. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies have recently revealed new details about the molecular mechanisms governing DNA intercalation. These studies can provide the binding kinetics and affinity as well as determining the magnitude of the double helix structural deformations during the dynamic assembly of DNA–ligand complexes. These results may in turn guide the rational design of intercalators synthesized for DNA-targeted drugs, optical probes, or integrated biological self-assembly processes. Herein, we survey the progress in experimental methods as well as the corresponding analysis framework for understanding single molecule DNA binding mechanisms. We discuss briefly minor and major groove binding ligands, and then focus on intercalators, which have been probed extensively with these methods. Conventional mono-intercalators and bis-intercalators are discussed, followed by unconventional DNA intercalation. We then consider the prospects for using these methods in optimizing conventional and unconventional DNA-intercalating small molecules. PMID:27085806

  15. Real-time observation of DNA repair: 2-aminopurine as a molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Rajagopal; Butcher, Christina E.; Oh, Dennis H.

    2008-02-01

    Triplex forming oligos (TFOs) that target psoralen photoadducts to specific DNA sequences have generated interest as a potential agent in gene therapy. TFOs also offer an opportunity to study the mechanism of DNA repair in detail. In an effort to understand the mechanism of DNA repair at a specific DNA sequence in real-time, we have designed a plasmid containing a psoralen reaction site adjacent to a TFO binding site corresponding to a sequence within the human interstitial collagenase gene. Two 2-aminopurine residues incorporated into the purine-rich strand of the TFO binding site and located within six nucleotides of the psoralen reaction site serve as molecular probes for excision repair events involving the psoralen photoadducts on that DNA strand. In duplex DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence is quenched. However, upon thermal or formamide-induced denaturation of duplex DNA to single stranded DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence increases by eight fold. These results suggest that monitoring 2-aminopurine fluorescence from plasmids damaged by psoralen TFOs may be a method for measuring excision of single-stranded damaged DNA from the plasmid in cells. A fluorescence-based molecular probe to the plasmid may significantly simplify the real-time observation of DNA repair in both populations of cells as well as single cells.

  16. Immobilization of human papillomavirus DNA probe for surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Ji, Yanhong; Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Li, Yao; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2009-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a kind of double-stranded DNA virus whose subspecies have diversity. Near 40 kinds of subspecies can invade reproductive organ and cause some high risk disease, such as cervical carcinoma. In order to detect the type of the subspecies of the HPV DNA, we used the parallel scan spectral surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique, which is a novel type of two- dimensional bio-sensing method based on surface plasmon resonance and is proposed in our previous work, to study the immobilization of the HPV DNA probes on the gold film. In the experiment, four kinds of the subspecies of the HPV DNA (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV58) probes are fixed on one gold film, and incubate in the constant temperature condition to get a HPV DNA probe microarray. We use the parallel scan spectral SPR imaging system to detect the reflective indices of the HPV DNA subspecies probes. The benefits of this new approach are high sensitive, label-free, strong specificity and high through-put.

  17. Site-Specific DNA Structural and Dynamic Features Revealed by Nucleotide-Independent Nitroxide Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Anna; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Qin, Peter Z.

    2009-09-15

    In site-directed spin labeling, a covalently attached nitroxide probe containing a chemically inert unpaired electron is utilized to obtain information on the local environment of the parent macromolecule. Studies presented here examine the feasibility of probing local DNA structural and dynamic features using a class of nitroxide probes that are linked to chemically substituted phosphorothioate positions at the DNA backbone. Two members of this family, designated as R5 and R5a, were attached to eight different sites of a dodecameric DNA duplex without severely perturbing the native B-form conformation. Measured X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, which report on nitroxide rotational motions, were found to vary depending on the location of the label (e.g., duplex center vs termini) and the surrounding DNA sequence. This indicates that R5 and R5a can provide information on the DNA local environment at the level of an individual nucleotide. As these probes can be attached to arbitrary nucleotides within a nucleic acid sequence, they may provide a means to “scan” a given DNA molecule in order to interrogate its local structural and dynamic features.

  18. Quantitative assay of PCR-amplified hepatitis B virus DNA using a peroxidase-labelled DNA probe and enhanced chemiluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Erhardt, A; Schaefer, S; Athanassiou, N; Kann, M; Gerlich, W H

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive and quantitative assay for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in serum or plasma in which PCR and then microtiter hybridization analysis are used. Assay of HBV DNA in serum or plasma is important for demonstrating viral replication, indicating and monitoring antiviral therapy, determining the infectivities of virus carriers, and ensuring the safety of blood products. Under optimum conditions PCR can amplify one HBV DNA molecule to 10(8) copies, but detection of this amount of DNA still requires hybridization with labelled probes or a nested PCR. We labelled one strand of the PCR product with a biotinylated primer. The double-stranded amplicon was incubated in streptavidin-coated microplate wells. The nonlabelled strand was removed after denaturation of the double-stranded DNA with alkali, and the bound strand was hybridized with a peroxidase-coupled single-stranded probe. The amount of bound peroxidase was measured in a luminometer. Four picograms of amplicon was detectable in this system, whereas conventional ethidium bromide staining requires a 1,000 times higher amplicon concentration. The performance of the new assay was compared with those of nested PCR and a PCR system that uses a digoxigenin label, hybridization to a solid-phase adsorbed probe, and colorimetric detection. The chemiluminescence assay was found to be almost as sensitive as nested PCR and approximately five times more sensitive than the colorimetric test. PMID:8818875

  19. Controlling microarray DNA hybridization efficiency by probe-surface distance and external surface electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qamhieh, K.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    DNA microarrays are analytical devices designed to determine the composition of multicomponent solutions of nucleic acids, DNA or RNA. These devices are promising technology for diverse applications, including sensing, diagnostics, and drug/gene delivery. Here, we modify a hybridization adsorption isotherm to study the effects of probe-surface distance and the external electrostatic fields, on the oligonucleotide hybridization in microarray and how these effects are varies depending on surface probe density and target concentration. This study helps in our understanding on-surface hybridization mechanisms, and from it we can observe a significant effect of the probe-surface distance, and the external electrostatic fields, on the hybridization yield. In addition we present a simple new criteria to control the oligonucleotide hybridization efficiency by providing a chart illustrating the effects of all factors on the DNA-hybridization efficiency.

  20. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, L. J.; Otto, O.; Skarstam, D. R.; Jahn, S.; Chimerel, C.; Gornall, J. L.; Keyser, U. F.

    2010-11-01

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of λ-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single λ-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  1. Validation of probe EFD52 (D17S26) for forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M S; Benzinger, E A; Budzynski, M J; Boodee, M T; Matthews, A; Buel, E; Schwartz, M B; von Beroldingen, C; Wampler, R L; Coons, T M

    1996-07-01

    Validation studies that meet TWGDAM (The Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods) and CAC (California Association of Criminalists) guidelines for RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis were performed with the DNA probe EFD52 (D17S26). These studies demonstrate that the probe EFD52 is suitable for forensic casework. No unexpected DNA banding patterns were obtained from controlled studies examining various tissues, sample consistency over many gels, mixtures of body fluids, various substrates, various contaminants and non-human DNA sources. Of all the animal DNAs tested, only one higher primate yielded a single band to EFD52 hybridization. The sensitivity of EFD52 was shown to be comparable to that of other forensic probes. Population frequency distribution tables were prepared from over 4000 alleles and two-locus studies were conducted on nine forensically useful probes. Black, White, Hispanic and Lumbee Indian populations were found to be in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. Comparisons between victim blood standards and epithelial fractions of mixed strains from sexual assault cases were used to demonstrate the robustness of the EFD52 probe in forensic casework. PMID:8754565

  2. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-10-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. PMID:8548693

  3. Development of a specific biotinylated DNA probe for the detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, H; Qian, B; Despres, B; Kibenge, F S; Heaney, S B; Rainnie, D J

    1995-01-01

    A specific DNA probe for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), was developed from one of 3 clones pRS47, pRS49, and pRS26 of 5.1 kb, 5.3 kb, and 11.3 kb, respectively. The biotinylated pRS47/BamHI insert probe was tested on 3 dilutions of DNA extracted from 3 strains of R. salmoninarum and from 1 strain each of Arthrobacter protophormiae, Aeromonas salmonicida, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Carnobacterium piscicola, Listonella anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio ordalii, and Yersinia ruckeri. In a dot blot assay, this probe hybridized only with the DNA from the R. salmoninarum strains. When used on kidney samples from fish challenged with R. salmoninarum, the dot blot hybridization assay with the probe was found to be as sensitive as culture. In a fluorescent antibody test, samples that were negative in culture and dot blot hybridization showed no more than one fluorescing cell in 50 microscopic fields examined. This DNA probe, therefore, has the potential for use in the diagnosis of BKD of fish. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:8548693

  4. Use of Ti Plasmid DNA Probes for Determining Tumorigenicity of Agrobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Thomas J.; Norelli, John L.; Katz, Barbara H.; Bishop, Andrew L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 106 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains. Images PMID:16348218

  5. TaqMan probe array for quantitative detection of DNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Heping; Wang, Hong; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Yang, Chaoyong; Silke, Spering; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Zuhong

    2006-01-01

    To date real-time quantitative PCR and gene expression microarrays are the methods of choice for quantification of nucleic acids. Herein, we described a unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based microarray platform for real-time quantification of nucleic acid targets that combines advantages of both and reduces their limitations. A set of 3′ amino-modified TaqMan probes were designed and immobilized on a glass slide composing a regular microarray pattern, and used as probes in the consecutive PCR carried out on the surface. During the extension step of the PCR, 5′ nuclease activity of DNA polymerase will cleave quencher dyes of the immobilized probe in the presence of nucleic acids targets. The increase of fluorescence intensities generated by the change in physical distance between reporter fluorophore and quencher moiety of the probes were collected by a confocal scanner. Using this new approach we successfully monitored five different pathogenic genomic DNAs and analyzed the dynamic characteristics of fluorescence intensity changes on the TaqMan probe array. The results indicate that the TaqMan probe array on a planar glass slide monitors DNA targets with excellent specificity as well as high sensitivity. This set-up offers the great advantage of real-time quantitative detection of DNA targets in a parallel array format.

  6. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two {sup 32}P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10{sup 6} CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains.

  7. Microarray long oligo probe designing for Escherichia coli: an in-silico DNA marker extraction

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Najafi, Ali; Behzadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infections are predominant diseases which may be caused by different pathogenic microorganisms, particularly Escherichia coli (E.coli). DNA microarray technology is an accurate, rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic tool which may lead to definite diagnosis and treatment of several infectious diseases. DNA microarray is a multi-process method in which probe designing plays an important. Therefore, the authors of the present study have tried to design a range of effective and proper long oligo microarray probes for detection and identification of different strains of pathogenic E.coli and in particular, uropathogenic E.coli (UPEC). Material and methods E.coli O26 H11 11368 uid41021 was selected as the standard strain for probe designing. This strain encompasses the largest nucleotide sequence and the most number of genes among other pathogenic strains of E.coli. For performing this in silico survey, NCBI database, GReview Server, PanSeq Server, Oligoanalyzer tool, and AlleleID 7.7 were used to design accurate, appropriate, effective, and flexible long oligo microarray probes. Moreover, the genome of E.coli and its closely related microorganisms were compared. Results In this study, 15 long oligo microarray probes were designed for detecting and identifying different strains of E.coli such as UPEC. These probes possessed the best physico-chemical characteristics. The functional and structural properties of the designed probes were recognized by practical tools and softwares. Conclusions The use of reliable advanced technologies and methodologies for probe designing guarentees the high quality of microarray probes and makes DNA microarray technology more flexible and an effective diagnostic technique. PMID:27123336

  8. Evaluation of a PCR/DNA Probe Colorimetric Membrane Assay for Identification of Campylobacter spp. in Human Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Evelyn; Glennon, Maura; Hanley, Shirley; Murray, Anne-Marie; Cormican, Martin; Smith, Terry; Maher, Majella

    2001-01-01

    DNA was extracted from 50 human stool specimens using the QIAamp DNA stool minikit. PCR amplification was followed by post-PCR hybridization to DNA probes specific for the Campylobacter genus, Campylobacter jejuni, and Campylobacter coli in a colorimetric membrane assay. Thirty-two of 38 culture-positive specimens were PCR/DNA probe positive for C. jejuni. The assay is rapid and simple and can be applied to stool specimens for the detection of Campylobacter. PMID:11682549

  9. Platinated DNA oligonucleotides: new probes forming ultrastable conjugates with graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2014-05-01

    Metal containing polymers have expanded the property of polymers by involving covalently associated metal complexes. DNA is a special block copolymer. While metal ions are known to influence DNA, little is explored on its polymer property when strong metal complexes are associated. In this work, we study cisplatin modified DNA as a new polymer and probe. Out of the complexes formed between cisplatin-A15, HAuCl4-A15, Hg2+-T15 and Ag+-C15, only the cisplatin adduct is stable under the denaturing gel electrophoresis condition. Each Pt-nucleobase bond gives a positive charge and thus makes DNA a zwitterionic polymer. This allows ultrafast adsorption of DNA by graphene oxide (GO) and the adsorbed complex is highly stable. Non-specific DNA, protein, surfactants and thiolated compounds cannot displace platinated DNA from GO, while non-modified DNA is easily displaced in most cases. The stable GO/DNA conjugate is further tested for surface hybridization. This is the first demonstration of using metallated DNA as a polymeric material for interfacing with nanoscale materials.Metal containing polymers have expanded the property of polymers by involving covalently associated metal complexes. DNA is a special block copolymer. While metal ions are known to influence DNA, little is explored on its polymer property when strong metal complexes are associated. In this work, we study cisplatin modified DNA as a new polymer and probe. Out of the complexes formed between cisplatin-A15, HAuCl4-A15, Hg2+-T15 and Ag+-C15, only the cisplatin adduct is stable under the denaturing gel electrophoresis condition. Each Pt-nucleobase bond gives a positive charge and thus makes DNA a zwitterionic polymer. This allows ultrafast adsorption of DNA by graphene oxide (GO) and the adsorbed complex is highly stable. Non-specific DNA, protein, surfactants and thiolated compounds cannot displace platinated DNA from GO, while non-modified DNA is easily displaced in most cases. The stable GO/DNA conjugate

  10. Fluorescent Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein as a Probe for Sensitive, Real-Time Assays of Helicase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dillingham, Mark S.; Tibbles, Katherine L.; Hunter, Jackie L.; Bell, Jason C.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Webb, Martin R.

    2008-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) are essential parts of many processes involving DNA. For example, strand separation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is catalyzed by helicases, and this exposure of the bases on the DNA allows further processing, such as replication, recombination, or repair. Assays of helicase activity and probes for their mechanism are essential for understanding related biological processes. Here we describe the development and use of a fluorescent probe to measure ssDNA formation specifically and in real time, with high sensitivity and time resolution. The reagentless biosensor is based on the ssDNA binding protein (SSB) from Escherichia coli, labeled at a specific site with a coumarin fluorophore. Its use in the study of DNA manipulations involving ssDNA intermediates is demonstrated in assays for DNA unwinding, catalyzed by DNA helicases. PMID:18599625

  11. A graphene field-effect transistor as a molecule-specific probe of DNA nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Dontschuk, Nikolai; Stacey, Alastair; Tadich, Anton; Rietwyk, Kevin J; Schenk, Alex; Edmonds, Mark T; Shimoni, Olga; Pakes, Chris I; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reliable DNA sequencing is a long-standing target in biomedical research. Recent advances in graphene-based electrical sensors have demonstrated their unprecedented sensitivity to adsorbed molecules, which holds great promise for label-free DNA sequencing technology. To date, the proposed sequencing approaches rely on the ability of graphene electric devices to probe molecular-specific interactions with a graphene surface. Here we experimentally demonstrate the use of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) as probes of the presence of a layer of individual DNA nucleobases adsorbed on the graphene surface. We show that GFETs are able to measure distinct coverage-dependent conductance signatures upon adsorption of the four different DNA nucleobases; a result that can be attributed to the formation of an interface dipole field. Comparison between experimental GFET results and synchrotron-based material analysis allowed prediction of the ultimate device sensitivity, and assessment of the feasibility of single nucleobase sensing with graphene. PMID:25800494

  12. Study of concentration of HPV DNA probe immobilization for cervical cancer detection based IDE biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshila, M. L.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper mainly illustrates regarding the detection process of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA probe. HPV is the most common virus that infected to human by a sexually transmitted virus. The most common high-risk HPV are 16 and 18. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) device used as based of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) acts as inorganic surface, where by using APTES as a linker between inorganic surface and organic surface. A strategy of rapid and sensitive for the HPV detection was proposed by integrating simple DNA extraction with a gene of DNA. The extraction of the gene of DNA will make an efficiency of the detection process. It will depend on the sequence of the capture probes and the way to support their attached. The fabrication, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization processes are characterized by current voltage (I-V) measurement by using KEITHLEY 6487. This strategy will perform a good sensitivity of HPV detection.

  13. A graphene field-effect transistor as a molecule-specific probe of DNA nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontschuk, Nikolai; Stacey, Alastair; Tadich, Anton; Rietwyk, Kevin J.; Schenk, Alex; Edmonds, Mark T.; Shimoni, Olga; Pakes, Chris I.; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable DNA sequencing is a long-standing target in biomedical research. Recent advances in graphene-based electrical sensors have demonstrated their unprecedented sensitivity to adsorbed molecules, which holds great promise for label-free DNA sequencing technology. To date, the proposed sequencing approaches rely on the ability of graphene electric devices to probe molecular-specific interactions with a graphene surface. Here we experimentally demonstrate the use of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) as probes of the presence of a layer of individual DNA nucleobases adsorbed on the graphene surface. We show that GFETs are able to measure distinct coverage-dependent conductance signatures upon adsorption of the four different DNA nucleobases; a result that can be attributed to the formation of an interface dipole field. Comparison between experimental GFET results and synchrotron-based material analysis allowed prediction of the ultimate device sensitivity, and assessment of the feasibility of single nucleobase sensing with graphene.

  14. Sensing Enzymatic Activity by Exposure and Selection of DNA-Encoded Probes.

    PubMed

    Jetson, Rachael R; Krusemark, Casey J

    2016-08-01

    A sensing approach is applied to encode quantitative enzymatic activity information into DNA sequence populations. The method utilizes DNA-linked peptide substrates as activity probes. Signal detection involves chemical manipulation of a probe population downstream of sample exposure and application of purifying, selective pressure for enzyme products. Selection-induced changes in DNA abundance indicate sample activity. The detection of protein kinase, protease, and farnesyltransferase activities is demonstrated. The assays were employed to measure enzyme inhibition by small molecules and activity in cell lysates using parallel DNA sequencing or quantitative PCR. This strategy will allow the extensive infrastructure for genetic analysis to be applied to proteomic assays, which has a number of advantages in throughput, sensitivity, and sample multiplexing. PMID:27355201

  15. Spectroscopic study one thiosemicarbazone derivative with ctDNA using ethidium bromide as a fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shaoguang; Wu, Qing; Shi, Lei; Cui, Fengling

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a thiosemicarbazone derivative (E)-2-((1,4-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone-2-yl)methylene)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)hydrazinecarbothioamide (DAFPT) was synthesized, and the interaction of DAFPT with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was explored using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe. The binding mode between DAFPT and ctDNA was investigated by UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of EB-ctDNA by DAFPT might be a combined quenching type. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the reaction was spontaneous. According to ionic strength, fluorescence polarization and melting temperature (T(m)) curve results, DAFPT-ctDNA interaction was groove binding. The molecular modeling results indicated that DAFPT could slide into the A-T rich region of ctDNA. PMID:23769721

  16. Effects of DNA probe and target flexibility on the performance of a "signal-on" electrochemical DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of the length and identity of a nontarget binding spacer in both the probe and target sequences on the overall performance of a folding-based electrochemical DNA sensor. Six near-identical DNA probes were used in this study; the main differences between these probes are the length (6, 10, or 14 bases) and identity (thymine (T) or adenine (A)) of the spacer connecting the two target binding domains. Despite the differences, the signaling mechanism of these sensors remains essentially the same. The methylene blue (MB)-modified probe assumes a linear unstructured conformation in the absence of the target; upon hybridization to the target, the probe adopts a "close" conformation, resulting in an increase in the MB current. Among the six sensors, the T14 and A14 sensors showed the largest signal increase upon target hybridization, highlighting the significance of probe flexibility on sensor performance. In addition to the target without a midsequence spacer, 12 other targets, each with a different oligo-T or oligo-A spacer, were used to elucidate the effect of target flexibility on the sensors' signaling capacity. For all six sensors, hybridization to targets with a 2- or 3-base spacer resulted in the largest signal increase. Higher signal enhancement was also observed with targets with an oligo-A spacer. For this sensor design, addition of a long nontarget binding spacer to the probe sequence is advantageous, as it provides flexibility for optimal target capture. The length of the spacer in the target sequence, however, should be adequately long to enable efficient hybridization yet does not introduce undesirable electrostatic and crowding effects. PMID:25110351

  17. DNA-Dye-Conjugates: Conformations and Spectra of Fluorescence Probes

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Frank R.; Paradas Palomo, Miguel; Sharapa, Dmitry I.; Zozulia, Oleksii; Mokhir, Andriy; Clark, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Extensive molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate DNA-dye and DNA-photosensitizer conjugates, which act as reactants in templated reactions leading to the generation of fluorescent products in the presence of specific desoxyribonucleic acid sequences (targets). Such reactions are potentially suitable for detecting target nucleic acids in live cells by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. The simulations show how the attached dyes/photosensitizers influence DNA structure and reveal the relative orientations of the chromophores with respect to each other. Our results will help to optimize the reactants for the templated reactions, especially length and structure of the spacers used to link reporter dyes or photosensitizers to the oligonucleotides responsible for target recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the structural ensembles obtained from the simulations can be used to calculate steady-state UV-vis absorption and emission spectra. We also show how important quantities describing the quenching of the reporter dye via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be calculated from the simulation data, and we compare these for different relative chromophore geometries. PMID:27467071

  18. Probing Evolutionary Patterns in Neotropical Birds through DNA Barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Kevin C. R.; Lijtmaer, Darío A.; Barreira, Ana S.; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Tubaro, Pablo L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Neotropical avifauna is more diverse than that of any other biogeographic region, but our understanding of patterns of regional divergence is limited. Critical examination of this issue is currently constrained by the limited genetic information available. This study begins to address this gap by assembling a library of mitochondrial COI sequences, or DNA barcodes, for Argentinian birds and comparing their patterns of genetic diversity to those of North American birds. Methodology and Principal Findings Five hundred Argentinian species were examined, making this the first major examination of DNA barcodes for South American birds. Our results indicate that most southern Neotropical bird species show deep sequence divergence from their nearest-neighbour, corroborating that the high diversity of this fauna is not based on an elevated incidence of young species radiations. Although species ages appear similar in temperate North and South American avifaunas, patterns of regional divergence are more complex in the Neotropics, suggesting that the high diversity of the Neotropical avifauna has been fueled by greater opportunities for regional divergence. Deep genetic splits were observed in at least 21 species, though distribution patterns of these lineages were variable. The lack of shared polymorphisms in species, even in species with less than 0.5M years of reproductive isolation, further suggests that selective sweeps could regularly excise ancestral mitochondrial polymorphisms. Conclusions These findings confirm the efficacy of species delimitation in birds via DNA barcodes, even when tested on a global scale. Further, they demonstrate how large libraries of a standardized gene region provide insight into evolutionary processes. PMID:19194495

  19. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotide probes for the reagentless, electrochemical detection of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Adriana; Caprio, Felice; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Moscone, Danila; Plaxco, Kevin W; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Ricci, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    We report a reagentless, electrochemical sensor for the detection of double-stranded DNA targets that employs triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as its recognition element. These sensors are based on redox-tagged TFO probes strongly chemisorbed onto an interrogating gold electrode. Upon the addition of the relevant double-stranded DNA target, the probe forms a rigid triplex structure via reverse Hoogsteen base pairing in the major groove. The formation of the triplex impedes contact between the probe's redox moiety and the interrogating electrode, thus signaling the presence of the target. We first demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach by using a well-characterized 22-base polypurine TFO sequence that readily detects a synthetic, double-stranded DNA target. We then confirmed the generalizability of our platform with a second probe, a 19-base polypyrimidine TFO sequence that targets a polypurine tract (PPT) sequence conserved in all HIV-1 strains. Both sensors rapidly and specifically detect their double-stranded DNA targets at concentrations as low as ~10 nM and are selective enough to be employed directly in complex sample matrices such as blood serum. Moreover, to demonstrate real-world applicability of this new sensor platform, we have successfully detected unpurified, double-stranded PCR amplicons containing the relevant conserved HIV-1 sequence. PMID:20936782

  20. The effects of multiple probes on the hybridization of target DNA on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Ryan C.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have disruptive potential in many fields including genetics and medicine, but the technology has yet to find widespread clinical use due to poor reliability. Microarrays work on the principle of hybridization and can only be as dependable as this process is reliable. As such, a significant amount of theoretical research has been done to understand hybridization on surfaces on the molecular level. Previous simulations of a target strand with a single, surface-tethered probe molecule have yielded valuable insights, but such is an ideal system and little is known about the effects of multiple probes—a situation that more closely approximates the real system. This work uses molecular simulation to determine the specific differences in duplex stability between one, three, six, and nine tethered probes on a surface. The results show that it is more difficult for a single target to hybridize to a probe as the number of probes on the surface increases due to crowding effects; however, once hybridized, the duplex is more stable than when fewer probes are present. The data also indicate that hybridization of a target to a probe on the face of a group of probes is more stable than hybridization to probes at the edge or center locations. Taken as a whole, the results offer new insights into the cause of the poor reproducibility exhibited by microarrays.

  1. Specific DNA probes for the identification of the fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    León, G; Martinez, M A; Etchegaray, J P; Vera, M I; Figueroa, J; Krauskopf, M

    1994-03-01

    To obtain specific DNA probes for the identification of the fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, a discriminatory recombinant DNA library was constructed using selective fragments of the bacterial genome. Three renibacterial clones, pMAM29, pMAM46 and pMAM77, containing 149, 73, and 154 bp respectively, were isolated and characterized. The specificity of the probes was confirmed by dot-blot and Southern hybridization analyses. Bacterial hybridization experiments revealed that pMAM29 discriminates the R. salmoninarum genome from that of other fish pathogens such as Aeromonas salmonicida, Yersinia ruckeri, Flexibacter columnaris, Lactobacillus piscicola, Vibrio ordalii, Vibrio anguillarum and Aeromonas hydrophila. Thus, this probe may provide a new means to diagnose bacterial kidney disease in asymptomatic fish and ova. PMID:24420936

  2. Probing DNA Helicase Kinetics with Temperature‐Controlled Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Gollnick, Benjamin; Carrasco, Carolina; Zuttion, Francesca; Gilhooly, Neville S.; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Motor protein functions like adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis or translocation along molecular substrates take place at nanometric scales and consequently depend on the amount of available thermal energy. The associated rates can hence be investigated by actively varying the temperature conditions. In this article, a thermally controlled magnetic tweezers (MT) system for single‐molecule experiments at up to 40 °C is presented. Its compact thermostat module yields a precision of 0.1 °C and can in principle be tailored to any other surface‐coupled microscopy technique, such as tethered particle motion (TPM), nanopore‐based sensing of biomolecules, or super‐resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument is used to examine the temperature dependence of translocation along double‐stranded (ds)DNA by individual copies of the protein complex AddAB, a helicase‐nuclease motor involved in dsDNA break repair. Despite moderately lower mean velocities measured at sub‐saturating ATP concentrations, almost identical estimates of the enzymatic reaction barrier (around 21–24 k B T) are obtained by comparing results from MT and stopped‐flow bulk assays. Single‐molecule rates approach ensemble values at optimized chemical energy conditions near the motor, which can withstand opposing loads of up to 14 piconewtons (pN). Having proven its reliability, the temperature‐controlled MT described herein will eventually represent a routinely applied method within the toolbox for nano‐biotechnology. PMID:25400244

  3. DNA-based digital tension probes reveal integrin forces during early cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Ge, Chenghao; Zhu, Cheng; Salaita, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli profoundly alter cell fate, yet the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction remain obscure due to a lack of methods for molecular force imaging. Here, to address this need, we develop a new class of molecular tension probes that function as a switch to generate a 20–30-fold increase in fluorescence upon experiencing a threshold piconewton force. The probes employ immobilized DNA-hairpins with tunable force response thresholds, ligands, and fluorescence reporters. Quantitative imaging reveals that integrin tension is highly dynamic and increases with an increasing integrin density during adhesion formation. Mixtures of fluorophore-encoded probes show integrin mechanical preference for cyclized-RGD over linear-RGD peptides. Multiplexed probes with variable guanine-cytosine content within their hairpins reveal integrin preference for the more stable probes at the leading tip of growing adhesions near the cell edge. DNA-based tension probes are among the most sensitive optical force reporters to date, overcoming the force and spatial-resolution limitations of traction force microscopy. PMID:25342432

  4. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfin, Najmul; Yadav, Avinash Chand; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ˜ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ˜ tβ/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  5. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    SciTech Connect

    Arfin, Najmul; Yadav, Avinash Chand; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-15

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement 〈R{sup 2}〉 exhibits a scaling with time as 〈R{sup 2}〉 ∼ t{sup α}, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ∼ t{sup β}/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  6. DNase-activatable fluorescence probes visualizing the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Shi, Bihua; Zhang, Pengfei; Hu, Dehong; Zheng, Mingbin; Zheng, Cuifang; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2012-03-01

    This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the occurrence of a red fluorescence signal due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). DNase in biological samples was detected using DFProbes and the fluorescence imaging in living cells was performed using DFprobe-modified Au nanoparticles. The results show that DFProbes have good responses to DNase, and can clearly visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in cells in real time. The well-designed probes might be useful in tracing the dynamic changes of exogenous DNA and nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo.This work presents a method to visualize the degradation of exogenous DNA in living cells using a novel type of activatable fluorescence imaging probe. Deoxyribonuclease (DNase)-activatable fluorescence probes (DFProbes) are composed of double strands deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) which is labeled with fluorophore (ROX or Cy3) and quencher on the end of one of its strands, and stained with SYBR Green I. In the absence of DNase, DFProbes produce the green fluorescence signal of SYBR Green I. In the presence of DNase, SYBR Green I is removed from the DFProbes and the labeled fluorophore is separated from the quencher owing to the degradation of DFProbes by DNase, resulting in the decrease of the green fluorescence signal and the

  7. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-07-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag+ ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection.DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the

  8. Derivation of DNA probes for enumeration of a specific strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus in piglet digestive tract samples.

    PubMed Central

    Rodtong, S; Dobbinson, S; Thode-Andersen, S; McConnell, M A; Tannock, G W

    1993-01-01

    Four DNA probes were derived that hybridized specifically to DNA from Lactobacillus acidophilus O. The probes were constructed by randomly cloning lactobacillus DNA in plasmid vector pBR322. Two of the probes (pSR1 and pSR2) were composed of vector and plasmid DNA inserts (3.6 and 1.6 kb, respectively); the others (pSR3 and pSR4) were composed of vector and chromosomally derived inserts (6.9 and 1.4 kb, respectively). The probes were used to enumerate, by colony hybridization, strain O in digestive tract samples collected from piglets inoculated 24 hours previously with a culture of the strain. The probes did not hybridize to DNA from lactobacilli inhabiting the digestive tract of uninoculated piglets. Strain O made up about 10% of the total lactobacillus population of the pars esophagea and about 20% of the population in other digestive tract samples. Images PMID:8285690

  9. 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue, is a probe of base flipping by DNA photolyase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kongsheng; Matsika, Spiridoula; Stanley, Robert J

    2007-09-01

    Cyclobutylpyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are formed between adjacent pyrimidines in DNA when it absorbs ultraviolet light. CPDs can be directly repaired by DNA photolyase (PL) in the presence of visible light. How PL recognizes and binds its substrate is still not well understood. Fluorescent nucleic acid base analogues are powerful probes of DNA structure. We have used the fluorescent adenine analogue 6MAP, a pteridone, to probe the local double helical structure of the CPD substrate when bound by photolyase. Duplex melting temperatures were obtained by both UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies to ascertain the effect of the probe and the CPD on DNA stability. Steady-state fluorescence measurements of 6MAP-containing single-stranded and doubled-stranded oligos with and without protein show that the local region around the CPD is significantly disrupted. 6MAP shows a different quenching pattern compared to 2-aminopurine, another important adenine analogue, although both probes show that the structure of the complementary strand opposing the 5'-side of the CPD lesion is more destacked than that opposing the 3'-side in substrate/protein complexes. We also show that 6MAP/CPD duplexes are substrates for PL. Vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moment directions for 6MAP were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. Using these results, the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency between the individual adenine analogues and the oxidized flavin cofactor was calculated to account for the observed intensity pattern. These calculations suggest that energy transfer is highly efficient for the 6MAP probe and less so for the 2Ap probe. However, no experimental evidence for this process was observed in the steady-state emission spectra. PMID:17696385

  10. Towards zirconium phosphonate-based microarrays for probing DNA-protein interactions: critical influence of the location of the probe anchoring groups.

    PubMed

    Monot, Julien; Petit, Marc; Lane, Sarah M; Guisle, Isabelle; Léger, Jean; Tellier, Charles; Talham, Daniel R; Bujoli, Bruno

    2008-05-14

    Terminal phosphate groups on double-stranded DNA probes bind strongly to glass substrates coated with a zirconium phosphonate monolayer, and probes immobilized in this way as microarrays can be used to detect protein targets. The sensitivity of the microarray was shown to be enhanced by the use of a polyguanine segment ((G)n , n > or = 5) as a spacer between the phosphate linker and the protein interaction domain. More importantly, the presence of phosphate linkers on both ends of the dsDNA probes leads to significant enhancement of target capture. The relevant characteristics of the different probes when bound to the surface were determined, by the original use of a combination of surface characterization techniques (XPS, AFM, and Sarfus). In this context, the location of the phosphate linkers in the duplex probes was found to result in different probe surface coverage and presentation on the surface, which affect subsequent interactions with the target protein. PMID:18407629

  11. Binding of the anti-cancer drug daunomycin to DNA probed by second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Rao, Yi; Kazer, Samuel W; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Turro, Nicholas J; Eisenthal, Kenneth B

    2013-12-12

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) was used to selectively probe DNA-drug interactions without the need for chemical labels or invasive detection methods. In particular, the binding constant of the anticancer drug daunomycin to a recognition triplet sequence in a 33-mer of double stranded DNA was determined. The SHG method, which is interface selective, probed the binding of daunomycin to DNA that was tethered to the surface of colloidal microparticles suspended in aqueous solution. Probing biomolecule coated colloids is expected to yield larger SH signals and provides experimental flexibility as compared to experiments performed at planar interfaces. The change in SHG intensity as daunomycin was added to the microparticle solution was fit to a Langmuir binding model, which yielded an equilibrium constant of 2.3 (±0.7) × 10(5) M(-1); the corresponding Gibbs free energy change at 20 °C is -7.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. Control experiments established that daunomycin preferentially binds to DNA at the recognition sequence. The equilibrium was found to be unaffected by the presence of free DNA in solution, and hyper-Rayleigh scattering from bulk molecules did not change with increasing daunomycin concentration. The extracted equilibrium constants are in agreement with the range of reported values found in the literature. PMID:23414337

  12. Quantum Dot-Bead-DNA Probe-Based Hybridization Fluorescence Assays on Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-10-01

    The development of chip-based, quantum dot (QD)-bead-DNA conjugate probes for hybridization detection is a prime research focus in the field of microfluidics. QD-Bead-DNA probe-based hybridization detection methods are often called "bead-based assays," and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capabilities of microfluidic technology. Met was identified as a prognostic marker in different cancers including lung, renal, liver, head and neck, stomach, and breast. In this report, the cancer causing Met gene was detected with QDs attached to polystyrene microbeads. We constructed a microfluidic platform using a flexible PDMS polymer. The chip consists of two channels, with two inlets and two outlets. The two channels were integrated with QD-bead-DNA probes for simultaneous detection of wild type target DNA and mutant DNA, containing three nucleotide changes compared to the wild type sequence. The fluorescence quenching ability of QDs within the channels of microfluidic chips were compared for both DNAs. PMID:26726440

  13. A universal design for a DNA probe providing ratiometric fluorescence detection by generation of silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Del Bonis-O'Donnell, Jackson Travis; Vong, Daniel; Pennathur, Sumita; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    2016-08-14

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (AgNCs), the fluorescence emission of which can rival that of typical organic fluorophores, have made possible a new class of label-free molecular beacons for the detection of single-stranded DNA. Like fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons (FQ-MBs) AgNC-based molecular beacons (AgNC-MBs) are based on a single-stranded DNA that undergoes a conformational change upon binding a target sequence. The new conformation exposes a stretch of single-stranded DNA capable of hosting a fluorescent AgNC upon reduction in the presence of Ag(+) ions. The utility of AgNC-MBs has been limited, however, because changing the target binding sequence unpredictably alters cluster fluorescence. Here we show that the original AgNC-MB design depends on bases in the target-binding (loop) domain to stabilize its AgNC. We then rationally alter the design to overcome this limitation. By separating and lengthening the AgNC-stabilizing domain, we create an AgNC-hairpin probe with consistent performance for arbitrary target sequence. This new design supports ratiometric fluorescence measurements of DNA target concentration, thereby providing a more sensitive, responsive and stable signal compared to turn-on AgNC probes. Using the new design, we demonstrate AgNC-MBs with nanomolar sensitivity and singe-nucleotide specificity, expanding the breadth of applicability of these cost-effective probes for biomolecular detection. PMID:27406901

  14. DNA with Damage in Both Strands as Affinity Probes and Nucleotide Excision Repair Substrates.

    PubMed

    Lukyanchikova, N V; Petruseva, I O; Evdokimov, A N; Silnikov, V N; Lavrik, O I

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multistep process of recognition and elimination of a wide spectrum of damages that cause significant distortions in DNA structure, such as UV-induced damage and bulky chemical adducts. A series of model DNAs containing new bulky fluoro-azidobenzoyl photoactive lesion dC(FAB) and well-recognized nonnucleoside lesions nFlu and nAnt have been designed and their interaction with repair proteins investigated. We demonstrate that modified DNA duplexes dC(FAB)/dG (probe I), dC(FAB)/nFlu+4 (probe II), and dC(FAB)/nFlu-3 (probe III) have increased (as compared to unmodified DNA, umDNA) structure-dependent affinity for XPC-HR23B (Kdum > KdI > KdII ≈ KdIII) and differentially crosslink to XPC and proteins of NER-competent extracts. The presence of dC(FAB) results in (i) decreased melting temperature (ΔTm = -3°C) and (ii) 12° DNA bending. The extended dC(FAB)/dG-DNA (137 bp) was demonstrated to be an effective NER substrate. Lack of correlation between the affinity to XPC-HR23B and substrate properties of the model DNA suggests a high impact of the verification stage on the overall NER process. In addition, DNAs containing closely positioned, well-recognized lesions in the complementary strands represent hardly repairable (dC(FAB)/nFlu+4, dC(FAB)/nFlu-3) or irreparable (nFlu/nFlu+4, nFlu/nFlu-3, nAnt/nFlu+4, nAnt/nFlu-3) structures. Our data provide evidence that the NER system of higher eukaryotes recognizes and eliminates damaged DNA fragments on a multi-criterion basis. PMID:27262196

  15. Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Two-Photon, Time-Resolved Emission Microscopy Probes for Cellular DNA**

    PubMed Central

    Baggaley, Elizabeth; Gill, Martin R; Green, Nicola H; Turton, David; Sazanovich, Igor V; Botchway, Stanley W; Smythe, Carl; Haycock, John W; Weinstein, Julia A; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-01-01

    The first transition-metal complex-based two-photon absorbing luminescence lifetime probes for cellular DNA are presented. This allows cell imaging of DNA free from endogenous fluorophores and potentially facilitates deep tissue imaging. In this initial study, ruthenium(II) luminophores are used as phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (PLIM) probes for nuclear DNA in both live and fixed cells. The DNA-bound probes display characteristic emission lifetimes of more than 160 ns, while shorter-lived cytoplasmic emission is also observed. These timescales are orders of magnitude longer than conventional FLIM, leading to previously unattainable levels of sensitivity, and autofluorescence-free imaging. PMID:24458590

  16. The isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA based on a double-stranded fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Shang, Fanjin; Pan, Mei; Liu, Sen; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-06-15

    Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) based on double-stranded fluorescence probe (ds-probe). Target dsDNA repeatedly generated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with polymerase and nicking enzyme. The ds-probe as a primer hybridized with ssDNA and extended to its 5'-end. The displaced ssDNA served as a new detection target to initiate above-described reaction. Meanwhile, the extended ds-probe could dynamically dissociate from ssDNA and self-hybridize, converting into a turn-back structure to initiate another amplification reaction. In particular, the ds-probe played a key role in the entire experimental process, which not only was as a primer but also produced the fluorescent signal by an extension and displacement reaction. Our method could detect the pBluescript II KS(+) plasmid with a detection limit of 2.3 amol, and it was also verified to exhibit a high specificity, even one-base mismatch. Overall, it was a true isothermal dsDNA detection strategy with a strongly anti-jamming capacity and one-pot, only requiring one ds-probe, which greatly reduced the cost and the probability of contamination. With its advantages, the approach of dsDNA detection will offer a promising tool in the field of point-of-care testing (POCT). PMID:26803414

  17. Demand for DNA probe testing in three genetic centres in Britain (August 1986 to July 1987).

    PubMed

    Rona, R J; Swan, A V; Beech, R; Prentice, L; Reynolds, A; Wilson, O; Mole, G; Vadera, P

    1989-04-01

    We report a preliminary analysis of the data collected during the first year of the evaluation of clinical genetics in the context of DNA probes in three genetic centres, to show the pattern of the demand for genetic services in the three centres and the services used in meeting that demand. The analysis includes information on 10,185 persons from 2852 families. The results are presented according to mode of inheritance and according to the most common disorders for which DNA probes have been used in the three centres. The results indicate that the use of DNA probes is now a major element of activity in genetic departments, and that as long as indirect DNA probe testing is the predominant manner of using recombinant technology, the clinical input will be an important element of the costs, probably more so than that of the DNA laboratories, as a large number of family members needs to be tested. In most cases centres have concentrated activity on DNA testing for common and severe genetic disorders. However, there are disorders, such as familial hypercholesterolaemia, which have not been part of the established pattern of services. Conversely, a relatively high number of families have been studied for some disorders of very low incidence. This suggests that the number of DNA laboratories should be limited. The precise arrangements will need to be established. With such services the distribution of DNA testing facilities for different disorders can be controlled to limit duplication. The model followed in Scotland based on collaboration between centres is worth considering. We have detected very large differences in take up rate of services within and between regions. Although many factors may contribute to these differences, ease of access and lay and professional awareness are probably the most important. This is supported by the fact that more patients from the same or neighbouring DHAs attend the genetic centre than from those further away. We also concluded that

  18. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1995-04-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans. Although the B. vulgatus probes detected high levels of their target DNA in most of the house pets, similarly high levels of target DNA were found only in a few individuals from other groups of nonhumans. Therefore, the results indicate that these probes can distinguish human from non human feces in many cases. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. DNA Photonics — Probing Light-Induced Dynamics in DNA on the Femtosecond Timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Fiebig, Torsten

    In Chap. 10, Wang and Fiebig discuss about a new field, DNA photonics that is important to understand the role of DNA as a functional building block in molecular nanoscale devices, and is also expected to shed light on the complex interactions between structural and electronic properties of DNA. The latter is important for biomedical applications such as DNA-targeted drug design. In this chapter, the authors present experimental data from several different classes of functionalized DNA systems and illustrate the relationship between the structural dynamics and charge injection/migration using state-of-the art femtosecond broadband spectroscopy. They also highlight the importance of the initial electronic excitation for modelling electron transfer rates and point out that ultrafast electronic energy migration, dissipation, and (de)localization must be included into the theoretical description of light-induced dynamics in DNA.

  20. Case-specific, breakpoint-spanning DNA probes for analysis of single interphase cells.

    PubMed

    Lersch, R A; Fung, J; Munné, S; Pedersen, R A; Weier, H U

    2000-01-01

    Balanced reciprocal translocations are known to interfere with homolog pairing in meiosis. Many individuals carrying such chromosomal abnormalities suffer from reduced fertility or spontaneous abortions and seek help in the form of assisted reproductive technology. Although most translocations are relatively easy to detect in metaphase cells, the majority of embryonic cells biopsied in the course of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures are in interphase. These nuclei are, thus, unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or painting using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Our assay, based on FISH detection of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, identifies translocations in interphase nuclei by microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are selected that span the breakpoint regions on normal homologs. The probes should hybridize to several hundred kilobases of DNA flanking the breakpoint. The two breakpoint-spanning DNA probes for the translocation chromosomes are labeled in separate colors (e.g., red and green). The translocation event producing two fused red/green hybridization domains can then be detected in interphase cell nuclei using a fluorescence microscope. We applied this scheme to analyze somatic and germ cells from 21 translocation patients, each with distinct breakpoints. Here, we summarize our experience and provide a description of strategies, cost estimates, as well as typical time frames. PMID:11142758

  1. Novel molecular beacon DNA probes for protein-nucleic acid interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei J.; Perlette, John; Fang, Xiaohong; Kelley, Shannon; Tan, Weihong

    2000-03-01

    We report a novel approach to study protein-nucleic acid interactions by using molecular beacons (MBs). Molecular beacons are hairpin-shaped DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher, and can report the presence of target DNA/RNA sequences. MBs can also report the existence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) through non-sequence specific binding. The interaction between SSB and MB has resulted in significant fluorescence restoration of the MB. The fluorescence enhancement brought by SSB and by complementary DNA is very comparable. The molar ratio of the binding between SSB and the molecular beacon is 1:1 with a binding constant of 2 X 107 M-1. Using the MB-SSB binding, we are able to determine SSB at 2 X 10-10 M with a conventional spectrometer. We have also applied MB DNA probes for the analysis of an enzyme lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and for the investigation of its binding properties with ssDNA. The biding process between MB and different isoenzymes of LDH has been studied. We also show that there are significant differences in MB binding affinity to different proteins, which will enable selective binding studies of a variety of proteins. This new approach is potentially useful for protein-DNA/RNA interaction studies that require high sensitivity, speed and convenience. The results also open the possibility of using easily obtainable, custom designed, modified DNA molecules for studies of drug interactions and targeting. Our results demonstrate that MB can be effectively used for sensitive protein quantitation and for efficient protein-DNA interaction studies. MB has the signal transduction mechanism built within the molecule, and can thus be used for quick protein assay development and for real-time measurements.

  2. Using Triplex-Forming Oligonucleotide Probes for the Reagentless, Electrochemical Detection of Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Adriana; Caprio, Felice; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Moscone, Danila; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Ricci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We report a reagentless, electrochemical sensor for the detection of double-stranded DNA targets that employs triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as its recognition element. These sensors are based on redox-tagged TFO probes strongly chemisorbed onto an interrogating gold electrode. Upon the addition of the relevant double-stranded DNA target, the probe forms a rigid triplex structure via reverse Hoogsteen base pairing in the major groove. The formation of the triplex impedes contact between the probe’s redox moiety and the interrogating electrode, thus signaling the presence of the target. We first demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach by using a well-characterized 22-base polypurine TFO sequence that readily detects a synthetic, double-stranded DNA target. We then confirmed the generalizability of our platform with a second probe, a 19-base polypyrimidine TFO sequence that targets a polypurine tract (PPT) sequence conserved in all HIV-1 strains. Both sensors rapidly and specifically detect their double-stranded DNA targets at concentrations as low as ~10 nM and are selective enough to be employed directly in complex sample matrices such as blood serum. Moreover, to demonstrate real-world applicability of this new sensor platform, we have successfully detected unpurified, double-stranded PCR amplicons containing the relevant conserved HIV-1 sequence. PMID:20936782

  3. Comparison of DNA probe and cytogenetic methods for identifying field collected Anopheles gambiae complex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Collins, F H; Petrarca, V; Mpofu, S; Brandling-Bennett, A D; Were, J B; Rasmussen, M O; Finnerty, V

    1988-12-01

    A recently developed DNA probe method was compared with the standard cytogenetic method for identifying the species of individual mosquitoes in the Anopheles gambiae complex. The complex consists of 6 morphologically indistinguishable sibling species that include the major African malaria vectors. Half-gravid, field collected mosquitoes were split into 2 portions: the abdomen was preserved for ovarian nurse cell cytotaxonomy and the head/thorax portion was desiccated for DNA extraction. Cytogenetic examination of the Kenya specimens showed 88 An. gambiae and 108 An. arabiensis. The Zimbabwe specimens consisted of 6 An. gambiae and 55 An. Quadriannulatus. All samples of the 3 species were polymorphic for the major chromosomal inversions previously recorded in field specimens from eastern and southern Africa, indicating that the collections reflected natural levels of intraspecific variation in the field populations sampled. Approximately 97% of the cytologically identified mosquitoes were also identified to species by the DNA probe method, and in every case the DNA probe and cytogenetic methods of species identification produced concordant results. PMID:3207175

  4. Light scattering from metal sol labels on high-density DNA probe arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trulson, Mark O.; Walton, Ian D.; Suseno, Audrey D.; Matsuzaki, Hajime; Stern, David

    1998-04-01

    We have been exploring the use of light scattering as a means to detect the binding of nucleic acids to high density DNA probe arrays. Initial work has concentrated on the use of 100 nanometer gold particles conjugated to monoclonal antibodies. A probe array scanner that utilizes an arc lamp source and a `photocopier grade' linear CCD detector has been developed. The optical configuration of the scanner maximizes dynamic range and minimizes optical backgrounds. Initial development of light scattering detection for the p53 cancer gene application shows that functional performance may be obtained that is essentially equivalent to existing fluorescence detection methodology.

  5. Bioinformatic Tools Identify Chromosome-Specific DNA Probes and Facilitate Risk Assessment by Detecting Aneusomies in Extra-embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J; Polyzos, Aris A; Baumgartner, Adolf; O’Brien, Benjamin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their non-diseased nature, healthy human tissues may show a surprisingly large fraction of aneusomic or aneuploid cells. We have shown previously that hybridization of three to six non-isotopically labeled, chromosome-specific DNA probes reveals different proportions of aneuploid cells in individual compartments of the human placenta and the uterine wall. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes. Chromosome losses in placental or uterine tissues, on the other hand, were detected infrequently. A more thorough numerical analysis of all possible aneusomies occurring in these tissues and the investigation of their spatial as well as temporal distribution would further our understanding of the underlying biology, but it is hampered by the high cost of and limited access to DNA probes. Furthermore, multiplexing assays are difficult to set up with commercially available probes due to limited choices of probe labels. Many laboratories therefore attempt to develop their own DNA probe sets, often duplicating cloning and screening efforts underway elsewhere. In this review, we discuss the conventional approaches to the preparation of chromosome-specific DNA probes followed by a description of our approach using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular biology tools for probe identification and manufacture. Novel probes that target gonosomes as well as two autosomes are presented as examples of rapid and inexpensive preparation of highly specific DNA probes for applications in placenta research and perinatal diagnostics. PMID:23450259

  6. Enzyme-Free Detection of Mutations in Cancer DNA Using Synthetic Oligonucleotide Probes and Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miotke, Laura; Maity, Arindam; Ji, Hanlee; Brewer, Jonathan; Astakhova, Kira

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapid reliable diagnostics of DNA mutations are highly desirable in research and clinical assays. Current development in this field goes simultaneously in two directions: 1) high-throughput methods, and 2) portable assays. Non-enzymatic approaches are attractive for both types of methods since they would allow rapid and relatively inexpensive detection of nucleic acids. Modern fluorescence microscopy is having a huge impact on detection of biomolecules at previously unachievable resolution. However, no straightforward methods to detect DNA in a non-enzymatic way using fluorescence microscopy and nucleic acid analogues have been proposed so far. Methods and Results Here we report a novel enzyme-free approach to efficiently detect cancer mutations. This assay includes gene-specific target enrichment followed by annealing to oligonucleotides containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) and finally, detection by fluorescence microscopy. The LNA containing probes display high binding affinity and specificity to DNA containing mutations, which allows for the detection of mutation abundance with an intercalating EvaGreen dye. We used a second probe, which increases the overall number of base pairs in order to produce a higher fluorescence signal by incorporating more dye molecules. Indeed we show here that using EvaGreen dye and LNA probes, genomic DNA containing BRAF V600E mutation could be detected by fluorescence microscopy at low femtomolar concentrations. Notably, this was at least 1000-fold above the potential detection limit. Conclusion Overall, the novel assay we describe could become a new approach to rapid, reliable and enzyme-free diagnostics of cancer or other associated DNA targets. Importantly, stoichiometry of wild type and mutant targets is conserved in our assay, which allows for an accurate estimation of mutant abundance when the detection limit requirement is met. Using fluorescence microscopy, this approach presents the opportunity to detect DNA

  7. Neocarzinostatin as a probe for DNA protection activity--molecular interaction with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Chin, Der-Hang; Li, Huang-Hsien; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Liu, Chia-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS), a potent mutagen and carcinogen, consists of an enediyne prodrug and a protein carrier. It has a unique double role in that it intercalates into DNA and imposes radical-mediated damage after thiol activation. Here we employed NCS as a probe to examine the DNA-protection capability of caffeine, one of common dietary phytochemicals with potential cancer-chemopreventive activity. NCS at the nanomolar concentration range could induce significant single- and double-strand lesions in DNA, but up to 75 ± 5% of such lesions were found to be efficiently inhibited by caffeine. The percentage of inhibition was caffeine-concentration dependent, but was not sensitive to the DNA-lesion types. The well-characterized activation reactions of NCS allowed us to explore the effect of caffeine on the enediyne-generated radicals. Postactivation analyses by chromatographic and mass spectroscopic methods identified a caffeine-quenched enediyne-radical adduct, but the yield was too small to fully account for the large inhibition effect on DNA lesions. The affinity between NCS chromophore and DNA was characterized by a fluorescence-based kinetic method. The drug-DNA intercalation was hampered by caffeine, and the caffeine-induced increases in DNA-drug dissociation constant was caffeine-concentration dependent, suggesting importance of binding affinity in the protection mechanism. Caffeine has been shown to be both an effective free radical scavenger and an intercalation inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that caffeine ingeniously protected DNA against the enediyne-induced damages mainly by inhibiting DNA intercalation beforehand. The direct scavenging of the DNA-bound NCS free radicals by caffeine played only a minor role. PMID:21538576

  8. Pathotypes in the Entomophaga grylli species complex of grasshopper pathogens differentiated with random amplification of polymorphic DNA and cloned-DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Bidochka, M J; Walsh, S R; Ramos, M E; Leger, R J; Silver, J C; Roberts, D W

    1995-01-01

    The zygomycetous fungus Entomophaga grylli is a pathogen that shows host-specific variance to grasshopper subfamilies. Three pathotypes of the E. grylli species complex were differentiated by three molecular techniques. In the first method, the three pathotypes showed different fragment patterns generated by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). There was little or no interisolate variability in RAPD fragment patterns within each pathotype. Passage of an isolate of pathotype 3, originally from an Australian grasshopper (Praxibulus sp.), through a North America grasshopper resulted in no differences in the resultant RAPD fragment patterns. In the second method, polymorphic RAPD fragments were used to probe the genomic DNA from the three pathotypes, and pathotype-specific fragments were found. In the third method, restriction fragments from genomic DNA of the three pathotypes were cloned and screened for pathotype specificity. A genomic probe specific for each pathotype was isolated. These probes did not hybridize to DNA from Entomophaga aulicae or from grasshoppers. To facilitate the use of RAPD analysis and other molecular tools to identify pathotypes, a method for extracting DNA from resting spores from infected grasshoppers was developed. The DNA from the fractured resting spores was of sufficient integrity to be blotted and probed with the pathotype-specific DNA probes, thus validating the use of these probes for pathotype identification in field-collected grasshoppers. PMID:7574596

  9. Recognition of DNA abasic site nanocavity by fluorophore-switched probe: Suitable for all sequence environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Yuehua; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Lihua; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Xiaoshun; Shao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Removal of a damaged base in DNA produces an abasic site (AP site) nanocavity. If left un-repaired in vivo by the specific enzyme, this nanocavity will result in nucleotide mutation in the following DNA replication. Therefore, selective recognition of AP site nanocavity by small molecules is important for identification of such DNA damage and development of genetic drugs. In this work, we investigate the fluorescence behavior of isoquinoline alkaloids including palmatine (PAL), berberine (BER), epiberberine (EPI), jatrorrhizine (JAT), coptisine (COP), coralyne (COR), worenine (WOR), berberrubine (BEU), sanguinarine (SAN), chelerythrine (CHE), and nitidine (NIT) upon binding with the AP nanocavity. PAL is screened out as the most efficient fluorophore-switched probe to recognize the AP nanocavity over the fully matched DNA. Its fluorescence enhancement occurs for all of the AP nanocavity sequence environments, which has not been achieved by the previously used probes. The bridged π conjugation effect should partially contribute to the AP nanocavity-specific fluorescence, as opposed to the solvent effect. Due to the strong binding with the AP nanocavity, PAL will find wide applications in the DNA damage recognition and sensor development.

  10. Rapid and early determination of sex using trophoblast biopsy specimens and Y chromosome specific DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Vergnaud, G; Kaplan, L; Weissenbach, J; Dumez, Y; Berger, R; Tiollais, P; Guellaen, G

    1984-07-14

    The feasibility of determining sex by analysing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with two probes specific for Y chromosomes was shown using DNA obtained from samples of blood from 30 non-related males and females of different ethnic origin. The DNA was spotted on nitrocellulose filters and hybridised with both a repetitive (P1) and a unique (49f) sequence specific for the human Y chromosome. A strong positive signal with both probes indicated the presence of male DNA. The sex of 12 fetuses was then similarly determined by molecular characterisation of DNA from trophoblast biopsy specimens. Chorionic samples were obtained in seven cases before termination of pregnancy in the first trimester and the aborted embryos subjected to karyotyping and sex chromatin analysis. In the five other cases samples were obtained from placentas obtained during caesarean section. Results of hybridisation were compared with those from cytogenic studies and actual sex at birth. The sex of all 12 fetuses was determined correctly by hybridisation. PMID:6428684

  11. Label-free colorimetric aptasensor for IgE using DNA pseudoknot probe.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Chen, Chen-Yu; Zhao, Xihong; Wu, Tzu-Heng; Wei, Shih-Chung; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2014-07-01

    The development of simple and low-cost approaches to the detection of immunoglobulin E (IgE) would provide a method for the early diagnosis and prevention of atopic diseases. The current methods of detection are generally tedious, multi-step processes and are limited by the high cost of the labeled proteins. We describe here a label-free structure-switching colorimetric method for the simple measurement of IgE using DNA pseudoknot probes and gold nanoparticles. In the absence of a target the IgE aptamer probe adopts a pseudoknot conformation that dissociates a capture probe from the unmodified gold nanoparticles. However, when IgE binds to the aptamer probe, the pseudoknot is resolved, leading to a favorable hybridization between the 3' terminal loop of the aptamer probe and the capture probe; this induces the aggregation of the gold nanoparticles. As a result, the colorimetric IgE sensor using this structure-switching mechanism is sensitive, specific and convenient, and the assay works even when challenged with complicated biological matrixes such as vaginal fluids. The proposed method is expected to be of great clinical value for IgE detection and could be used, after appropriate design, for sensing applications of other structured aptamers. PMID:24821053

  12. Identification of Brugia malayi in vectors with a species-specific DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Sim, B K; Mak, J W; Cheong, W H; Sutanto, I; Kurniawan, L; Marwoto, H A; Franke, E; Campell, J R; Wirth, D F; Piessens, W F

    1986-05-01

    We evaluated the potential value of a cloned sequence of genomic DNA of Brugia malayi as a species-specific probe. Clone pBm 15 reacted with all stages of 8 different geographic isolates of B. malayi and cross-hybridized with microfilariae of B. timori. It did not hybridize with Wuchereria bancrofti or with B. pahangi, W. kalimantani, Dirofilaria repens, Breinlia booliati or Cardiofilaria species, animal filariids that can be sympatric with B. malayi. P32-labeled clone pBm 15 correctly identified mosquitoes infected even with 1 infective larva of B. malayi. This specific DNA probe should be an invaluable tool to monitor control programs of Brugian filariasis. PMID:3518507

  13. Probe classification of on-off type DNA microarray images with a nonlinear matching measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Munho; Kim, Jong Dae; Min, Byoung Goo; Kim, Jongwon; Kim, Y. Y.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a nonlinear matching measure, called counting measure, as a signal detection measure that is defined as the number of on pixels in the spot area. It is applied to classify probes for an on-off type DNA microarray, where each probe spot is classified as hybridized or not. The counting measure also incorporates the maximum response search method, where the expected signal is obtained by taking the maximum among the measured responses of the various positions and sizes of the spot template. The counting measure was compared to existing signal detection measures such as the normalized covariance and the median for 2390 patient samples tested on the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA chip. The counting measure performed the best regardless of whether or not the maximum response search method was used. The experimental results showed that the counting measure combined with the positional search was the most preferable.

  14. Detection of bovine trichomoniasis with a specific DNA probe and PCR amplification system.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, M S; Conrad, P A; Conrad, P J; LeFebvre, R B; Perez, E; BonDurant, R H

    1994-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is a widespread, economically important venereal disease of cattle which causes infertility and abortion. Effective control of trichomoniasis has been impeded by the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic procedures, which require the isolation and cultivation of the parasite, Tritrichomonas foetus, from infected cattle. We developed a 0.85-kb T. foetus DNA probe by identifying conserved sequences in DNAs from T. foetus that were isolated from cattle in California, Idaho, Nevada, and Costa Rica. The probe hybridized specifically to DNAs of T. foetus isolates from different geographic areas but not to DNA preparations of Trichomonas vaginalis, bovine cells, or a variety of bacteria from cattle. The probe detected DNA from a minimum of 10(5) T. foetus organisms. To improve sensitivity, a partial sequence of the probe was used to identify oligonucleotide primers (TF1 and TF2) which could be used to amplify a 162-bp product from T. foetus DNAs by PCR. A chemiluminescent internal T. foetus sequence probe was hybridized to Southern blots of the amplification product. This system detected as few as one T. foetus organism in culture media or 10 parasites in samples containing bovine preputial smegma. Analysis of 52 clinical samples showed that 47 (90.4%) of the 52 samples were correctly identified, with no false-positive reactions. In comparison, the traditional cultivation method detected 44 (84.6%) of the 52 samples from T. foetus-infected and uninfected bulls. These results indicate that the PCR-based amplification system could be a useful alternative method for the diagnosis of bovine trichomoniasis. Images PMID:8126211

  15. Detection of bovine trichomoniasis with a specific DNA probe and PCR amplification system.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Conrad, P A; Conrad, P J; LeFebvre, R B; Perez, E; BonDurant, R H

    1994-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is a widespread, economically important venereal disease of cattle which causes infertility and abortion. Effective control of trichomoniasis has been impeded by the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic procedures, which require the isolation and cultivation of the parasite, Tritrichomonas foetus, from infected cattle. We developed a 0.85-kb T. foetus DNA probe by identifying conserved sequences in DNAs from T. foetus that were isolated from cattle in California, Idaho, Nevada, and Costa Rica. The probe hybridized specifically to DNAs of T. foetus isolates from different geographic areas but not to DNA preparations of Trichomonas vaginalis, bovine cells, or a variety of bacteria from cattle. The probe detected DNA from a minimum of 10(5) T. foetus organisms. To improve sensitivity, a partial sequence of the probe was used to identify oligonucleotide primers (TF1 and TF2) which could be used to amplify a 162-bp product from T. foetus DNAs by PCR. A chemiluminescent internal T. foetus sequence probe was hybridized to Southern blots of the amplification product. This system detected as few as one T. foetus organism in culture media or 10 parasites in samples containing bovine preputial smegma. Analysis of 52 clinical samples showed that 47 (90.4%) of the 52 samples were correctly identified, with no false-positive reactions. In comparison, the traditional cultivation method detected 44 (84.6%) of the 52 samples from T. foetus-infected and uninfected bulls. These results indicate that the PCR-based amplification system could be a useful alternative method for the diagnosis of bovine trichomoniasis. PMID:8126211

  16. Mitochondrial DNA deletions detected by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Lía; Laurito, Sergio R; Loos, Mariana A; Eiroa, Hernán D; de Pinho, Silvina; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Arroyo, Hugo A; Pereyra, Marcela F; Kauffman, Marcelo A; Roqué, María

    2016-07-01

    The genetic diagnosis algorithm for mitochondrial (mt) diseases starts looking for deletions and common mutations in mtDNA. MtDNA's special features, such as large and variable genome copies, heteroplasmy, polymorphisms, and its duplication in the nuclear genome as pseudogenes (NUMTs), make it vulnerable to diagnostic misleading interpretations. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) is used to detect copy number variations in nuclear genes and its application on mtDNA has not been widely spread. We report three Kearns Sayre Syndrome patients and one Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia adult, whose diagnostic mtDNA deletions were detected by MLPA using a very low amount of DNA. This managed to "dilute" the NUMT interference as well as enhance MLPA's efficiency. By this report, we conclude that when MLPA is performed upon a reduced amount of DNA, it can detect effectively mtDNA deletions. We propose MLPA as a possible first step method in the diagnosis of mt diseases. PMID:26114318

  17. Sequence of a DNA probe specific for Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Johnson, D W; Cockburn, A F; Seawright, J A

    1993-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for a portion of a 12-kb genomic DNA clone specific for Anopheles quadrimaculatus species A. Four short, internally repeated sequences were identified. Synthetic oligonucleotide probes were prepared based on these four repeats. The oligonucleotides are highly specific and can be reliably used to separate individuals of An. quadrimaculatus species A from members of other species of the complex. PMID:8254645

  18. Accuracy of the Clinical Diagnosis of Vaginitis Compared to a DNA Probe Laboratory Standard

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Nancy K.; Neal, Jeremy L.; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of the three most common causes of acute vulvovaginal symptoms (bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis vaginitis, and trichomoniasis vaginalis) using a traditional, standardized clinical diagnostic protocol compared to a DNA probe laboratory standard. Methods This prospective clinical comparative study had a sample of 535 active duty United States military women presenting with vulovaginal symptoms. Clinical diagnoses were made by research staff using a standardized protocol of history, physical examination including pelvic examination, determination of vaginal pH, vaginal fluid amines test, and wet-prep microscopy. Vaginal fluid samples were obtained for DNA analysis. The research clinicians were blinded to the DNA results. Results The participants described a presenting symptom of abnormal discharge (50%), itching/irritation (33%), malodor (10%), burning (4%), or others such as vulvar pain and vaginal discomfort. According to laboratory standard, there were 225 cases (42%) of bacterial vaginosis 76 cases (14%) of candidiasis vaginitis, 8 cases (1.5%) of trichomoniasis vaginalis, 87 cases of mixed infections (16%), and 139 negative cases (26%). For each single infection, the clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.8% and 70.0% for bacterial vaginosis; 83.8% and 84.8% for candidiasis vaginitis; and 84.6% and 99.6% for trichomoniasis vaginalis when compared to the DNA probe standard. Conclusion Compared to a DNA probe standard, clinical diagnosis is 81-85% sensitive and 70- 99% specific for bacterial vaginosis, candida vaginitis, and trichomoniasis. Even under research conditions that provided clinicians with sufficient time and materials to conduct a thorough and standardized clinical evaluation, the diagnosis and therefore, subsequent treatment of these common vaginal problems remains difficult. PMID:19104364

  19. BaitFisher: A Software Package for Multispecies Target DNA Enrichment Probe Design.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christoph; Sann, Manuela; Donath, Alexander; Meixner, Martin; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Peters, Ralph S; Petersen, Malte; Meusemann, Karen; Liere, Karsten; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang; Misof, Bernhard; Bleidorn, Christoph; Ohl, Michael; Niehuis, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Target DNA enrichment combined with high-throughput sequencing technologies is a powerful approach to probing a large number of loci in genomes of interest. However, software algorithms that explicitly consider nucleotide sequence information of target loci in multiple reference species for optimizing design of target enrichment baits to be applicable across a wide range of species have not been developed. Here we present an algorithm that infers target DNA enrichment baits from multiple nucleotide sequence alignments. By applying clustering methods and the combinatorial 1-center sequence optimization to bait design, we are able to minimize the total number of baits required to efficiently probe target loci in multiple species. Consequently, more loci can be probed across species with a given number of baits. Using transcript sequences of 24 apoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae, Sphecidae) from the 1KITE project and the gene models of Nasonia vitripennis, we inferred 57,650, 120-bp-long baits for capturing 378 coding sequence sections of 282 genes in apoid wasps. Illumina reduced-representation library sequencing confirmed successful enrichment of the target DNA when applying these baits to DNA of various apoid wasps. The designed baits furthermore enriched a major fraction of the target DNA in distantly related Hymenoptera, such as Formicidae and Chalcidoidea, highlighting the baits' broad taxonomic applicability. The availability of baits with broad taxonomic applicability is of major interest in numerous disciplines, ranging from phylogenetics to biodiversity monitoring. We implemented our new approach in a software package, called BaitFisher, which is open source and freely available at https://github.com/cmayer/BaitFisher-package.git. PMID:27009209

  20. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24929514

  1. Genomic DNA detection using cycling probe technology and capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Dickinson Laing, Terrina; Mah, David C W; Poirier, Robert T; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Lee, William E; Bader, Douglas E

    2004-10-01

    Cycling probe technology (CPT) is an isothermal DNA analysis method that has been shown to be useful for identifying genetic markers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in clinical settings. CPT assays have previously employed several assay methods that include polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and magnetic beads for separations and radioisotopic and colorimetric detection for detection. Capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CGE-LIF) is an alternative separation and detection method that offers attributes such as low sample consumption, short analysis times, no radiation hazards and potential for high throughput. We report on the development of a CGE-LIF CPT assay for genomic DNA from Erwinia herbicola and the comparison of this assay with a conventional 32p radioisotopic PAGE CPT assay. Separation and detection of intact and cleaved fluorescein-labeled CPT probe molecules by CGE-LIF was achieved in under 4 min through a gel-filled capillary (7 cm separation length to detector). Total time, from setup to detection, was about 1 h for the complete assay versus several hours (3-12 h) for the radioisotopic PAGE CPT assay. Similar detection limits of 10(5)-10(6) copies of genomic target DNA were observed with each assay method. This study demonstrated that CGE-LIF CPT is a suitable analysis method for the detection of genomic DNA sequences. PMID:15356906

  2. A caspase active site probe reveals high fractional inhibition needed to block DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Méthot, Nathalie; Vaillancourt, John P; Huang, JingQi; Colucci, John; Han, Yongxin; Ménard, Stéphane; Zamboni, Robert; Toulmond, Sylvie; Nicholson, Donald W; Roy, Sophie

    2004-07-01

    Apoptotic markers consist of either caspase substrate cleavage products or phenotypic changes that manifest themselves as a consequence of caspase-mediated substrate cleavage. We have shown recently that pharmacological inhibitors of caspase activity prevent the appearance of two such apoptotic manifestations, alphaII-spectrin cleavage and DNA fragmentation, but that blockade of the latter required a significantly higher concentration of inhibitor. We investigated this phenomenon through the use of a novel radiolabeled caspase inhibitor, [(125)I]M808, which acts as a caspase active site probe. [(125)I]M808 bound to active caspases irreversibly and with high sensitivity in apoptotic cell extracts, in tissue extracts from several commonly used animal models of cellular injury, and in living cells. Moreover, [(125)I]M808 detected active caspases in septic mice when injected intravenously. Using this caspase probe, an active site occupancy assay was developed and used to measure the fractional inhibition required to block apoptosis-induced DNA fragmentation. In thymocytes, occupancy of up to 40% of caspase active sites had no effect on DNA fragmentation, whereas inhibition of half of the DNA cleaving activity required between 65 and 75% of active site occupancy. These results suggest that a high and persistent fractional inhibition will be required for successful caspase inhibition-based therapies. PMID:15067000

  3. Monitoring triplex DNA formation with fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a fluorophore-labeled probe and intercalating dyes.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chiuan-Chian; Chen, Shiau-Wen; Luo, Ji-Dung; Chien, Yu-Tzu

    2011-09-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are sequence-dependent DNA binders that may be useful for DNA targeting and detection. A sensitive and convenient method to monitor triplex formation by a TFO and its target DNA duplex is required for the application of TFO probes. Here we describe a novel design by which triplex formation can be monitored homogeneously without prelabeling the target duplex. The design uses a TFO probe tagged with a fluorophore that undergoes fluorescence resonance energy transfer with fluorescent dyes that intercalate into the target duplex. Through color compensation analysis, the specific emission of the TFO probe reveals the status of the triple helices. We used this method to show that triple helix formation with TFOs is magnesium dependent. We also demonstrated that the TFO probe can be used for detection of sequence variation in melting analysis and for DNA quantitation in real-time polymerase chain reaction. PMID:21609711

  4. Simultaneous detection of DNA from 10 food allergens by ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Alexandra; Demmel, Anja; Hupfer, Christine; Busch, Ulrich; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-04-01

    The simultaneous detection of DNA from different allergenic food ingredients by a ligation-dependent probe amplification (LPA) system is described. The approach allows detection of several targets in a one-tube assay. Synthetic oligonucleotides were designed to detect DNA from peanuts, cashews, pecans, pistachios, hazelnuts, sesame seeds, macadamia nuts, almonds, walnuts and brazil nuts. The specificity of the system was tested with DNA from more than 50 plant and animal species. The sensitivity of the method was suitable to detect allergenic ingredients in the low mg kg(-1) range. The limit of detection (LOD) for single allergens in different food matrices was 5 mg kg(-1). The novel analytical strategy represents a useful tool for the surveillance of established legislation on food allergens within the European Union. PMID:19680915

  5. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy to probe lac repressor-DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Capitanio, Marco; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap capable to probe, under controlled force, bimolecular interactions with unprecedented temporal resolution. Here we present the technique in the framework of protein-DNA interactions, specifically on Lactose repressor protein (LacI). The high temporal resolution of the method reveals the kinetics of both short- and long-lived interactions of LacI along the DNA template (from ˜100 μs to tens of seconds), as well the dependence on force of such interaction kinetics. The two kinetically well-distinct populations of interactions observed clearly represent specific interactions with the operator sequences and a fast scanning of LacI along non-cognate DNA. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method to study the sequence-dependent affinity of DNA-binding proteins along the DNA and the effects of force on a wide range of interaction durations, including μs time scales not accessible to other single-molecule methods. This improvement in time resolution provides also important means of investigation on the long-puzzled mechanism of target search on DNA and possible protein conformational changes occurring upon target recognition.

  6. The Anopheles punctulatus complex: DNA probes for identifying the Australian species using isotopic, chromogenic, and chemiluminescence detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.; Cooper, R.D.; Burkot, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Isotopic and enzyme-labeled species-specific DNA probes were made for the three known members of the Anopheles punctulatus complex of mosquitoes in Australia (Anopheles farauti Nos. 1, 2, and 3). Species-specific probes were selected by screening total genomic libraries made from the DNA of individual species with 32P-labeled DNA of homologous and heterologous mosquito species. The 32P-labeled probes for A. farauti Nos. 1 and 2 can detect less than 0.2 ng of DNA while the 32P-labeled probe for A. farauti No. 3 has a sensitivity of 1.25 ng of DNA. Probes were then enzyme labeled for chromogenic and chemiluminescence detection and compared to isotopic detection using 32P-labeled probes. Sequences of the probe repeat regions are presented. Species identifications can be made from dot blots or squashes of freshly killed mosquitoes or mosquitoes stored frozen, dried, and held at room temperature or fixed in isopropanol or ethanol with isotopic, chromogenic, or chemiluminescence detection systems. The use of nonisotopic detection systems will enable laboratories with minimal facilities to identify important regional vectors.

  7. High-performance analysis of single interphase cells with custom DNA probes spanning translocation break points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Munne, S.; Lersch, Robert A.; Marquez, C.; Wu, J.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingly

    1999-06-01

    The chromatin organization of interphase cell nuclei, albeit an object of intense investigation, is only poorly understood. In the past, this has hampered the cytogenetic analysis of tissues derived from specimens where only few cells were actively proliferating or a significant number of metaphase cells could be obtained by induction of growth. Typical examples of such hard to analyze cell systems are solid tumors, germ cells and, to a certain extent, fetal cells such as amniocytes, blastomeres or cytotrophoblasts. Balanced reciprocal translocations that do not disrupt essential genes and thus do not led to disease symptoms exit in less than one percent of the general population. Since the presence of translocations interferes with homologue pairing in meiosis, many of these individuals experience problems in their reproduction, such as reduced fertility, infertility or a history of spontaneous abortions. The majority of translocation carriers enrolled in our in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs carry simple translocations involving only two autosomes. While most translocations are relatively easy to spot in metaphase cells, the majority of cells biopsied from embryos produced by IVF are in interphase and thus unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or FISH-painting. We therefore set out to analyze single interphase cells for presence or absence of specific translocations. Our assay, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, detects translocations in interphase by visual microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are prepared so that they span a breakpoint and cover several hundred kb of DNA adjacent to the breakpoint. On normal chromosomes, such probes label a contiguous stretch of DNA and produce a single hybridization domain per chromosome in interphase cells. The translocation disrupts the hybridization domain and the resulting two fragments appear as physically separated hybridization domains in

  8. An Engineered Kinetic Amplification Mechanism for Single Nucleotide Variant Discrimination by DNA Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sherry Xi; Seelig, Georg

    2016-04-20

    Even a single-nucleotide difference between the sequences of two otherwise identical biological nucleic acids can have dramatic functional consequences. Here, we use model-guided reaction pathway engineering to quantitatively improve the performance of selective hybridization probes in recognizing single nucleotide variants (SNVs). Specifically, we build a detection system that combines discrimination by competition with DNA strand displacement-based catalytic amplification. We show, both mathematically and experimentally, that the single nucleotide selectivity of such a system in binding to single-stranded DNA and RNA is quadratically better than discrimination due to competitive hybridization alone. As an additional benefit the integrated circuit inherits the property of amplification and provides at least 10-fold better sensitivity than standard hybridization probes. Moreover, we demonstrate how the detection mechanism can be tuned such that the detection reaction is agnostic to the position of the SNV within the target sequence. in contrast, prior strand displacement-based probes designed for kinetic discrimination are highly sensitive to position effects. We apply our system to reliably discriminate between different members of the let-7 microRNA family that differ in only a single base position. Our results demonstrate the power of systematic reaction network design to quantitatively improve biotechnology. PMID:27010123

  9. Rapid detection of chromosome 18 copy number in buccal smears using DNA probes and FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Nunez, M.; Giraldez, R.

    1994-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis of trisomy 18 in newborns is often critical to clinical management decisions that must be made in a minimum of time. DNA probes combined with FISH can be used to accurately to determine the copy number of chromosome 18 in interphase cells. We have used the D18Z1 alpha satellite DNA probe to determine signal frequency in normal, previously karyotyped subjects, 12 females and 6 males. We also present one clinical case of trisomy 18, confirmed by karyotype, for comparison to the results obtained from normal subjects. Buccal smears, unlike cytogenetic preparations from peripheral blood, are quite resistant to penetration of probes and detection reagents resulting in higher levels of false monosomy. We have studied 19 individuals and have obtained consistent FISH results, ranging from 64 to 90% disomy. False monosomy rates ranged from 10 to 36%, while false trisomy or tetrasomy was less than 1% in all samples. High rates of false monosomy make this test questionable for detection of low order mosaicism for monosomy, but the extremely low false hyperploidy rate suggests that this is a dependable procedure for detection of trisomy 18, enabling the use of buccal epithelium which can be collected easily from even premature and tiny infants.

  10. One-to-one quantum dot-labeled single long DNA probes.

    PubMed

    He, Shibin; Huang, Bi-Hai; Tan, Junjun; Luo, Qing-Ying; Lin, Yi; Li, Jun; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Yan, Shihan; Zhang, Qi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Li, Lijia

    2011-08-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been received most attention due to their unique properties. Constructing QDs conjugated with certain number of biomolecules is considered as one of the most important research goals in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we report polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of primer oligonucleotides bound to QDs, termed as QD-based PCR. Characterization of QD-based PCR products by gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy showed that QD-labeled long DNA strands were synthesized and only a single long DNA strand was conjugated with a QD. The QD-based PCR products still kept fluorescence properties. Moreover, the one-to-one QD-labeled long DNA conjugates as probes could detect a single-copy gene on maize chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Labeling a single QD to a single long DNA will make detection of small single-copy DNA fragments, quantitative detection and single molecule imaging come true by nanotechnology, and it will promote medical diagnosis and basic biological research as well as nano-material fabrication. PMID:21546079

  11. Interaction of the replication terminator protein of Bacillus subtilis with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Adam F.; Otting, Gottfried; Folmer, Rutger H.A.; Duggin, Iain G.; Wake, R. Gerry; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A. . E-mail: Jackie.Wilce@med.monash.edu.au

    2005-09-23

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the dimeric 29 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. We have used NMR spectroscopy to probe the changes in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlation spectra of a {sup 15}N-labelled RTP.C110S mutant upon the addition of a 21 base pair symmetrical DNA binding site. Assignment of the {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C,70% {sup 2}H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. Perturbations to {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectra revealed that the N-termini, {alpha}3-helices and several loops are affected by the binding interaction. An analysis of this data in light of the crystallographically determined apo- and DNA-bound forms of RTP.C110S revealed that the NMR spectral perturbations correlate more closely to protein structural changes upon complex formation rather than to interactions at the protein-DNA interface.

  12. Indole-3-acetic acid biosensor based on G-rich DNA labeled AuNPs as chemiluminescence probe coupling the DNA signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun, Xu; Mei, Zhenghua; Wang, Zhouping; He, Yunhua

    2012-09-01

    A highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for detection of phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was developed by using G-rich DNA labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as CL probe coupling the DNA signal amplification technology. The IAA antibody was immobilized on carboxyl terminated magnetic beads (MBs). In the presence of IAA, antibody labeled AuNPs were captured by antibody functionalized MBs. The DNA on AuNPs is released by a ligand exchange process induced by the addition of DTT. The released DNA is then acted as the linker and hybridized with the capture DNA on MBs and probe DNA on AuNPs CL probe. The CL signal is obtained via the instantaneous derivatization reaction between a specific CL reagent, 3,4,5-trimethoxyl-phenylglyoxal (TMPG), and the G-rich DNA on AuNPs CL probe. IAA can be detected in the concentration range from 0.02 ng/mL to 30 ng/mL, and the limit of detection is 0.01 ng/mL.

  13. Fluorescence detection of single-nucleotide polymorphism with single-strand triplex-forming DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinpeng; Wang, Yuan; Guo, Jiajie; Tang, Xinjing

    2011-12-16

    Triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are widespread in the genome and have been found in regulatory regions, especially in promoter zones and recombination hotspots of DNA. To specifically detect these polypurine sequences, we designed and synthesized two dual pyrene-labeled single-strand oligonucleotide probes (TFO-FPs) consisting of recognition, linker, and detection sequences. The hybridization processes of TFO-FPs with target polypurine oligonucleotides involve both Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base-pairings. Through double sensing of oligonucleotide sequences, single mutations of target oligonucleotides are detected by monitoring changes in pyrene fluorescence. The high specificities of the probes are maintained over a wide temperature range without sacrifice of hybridization kinetics. PMID:22095630

  14. DNA-encapsulated silver nanodots as ratiometric luminescent probes for hypochlorite detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soonyoung; Choi, Sungmoon; Yu, Junhua

    2014-03-01

    DNA-encapsulated silver nanodots are noteworthy candidates for bio-imaging probes, thanks to their excellent photophysical properties. The spectral shift of silver nanodot emitters from red to blue shows excellent correlations with the concentration of reactive oxygen species, which makes it possible to develop new types of probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl), given the outstanding stability of the blue in oxidizing environments. HOCl plays a role as a microbicide in immune systems but, on the other hand, is regarded as a disease contributor. Moreover, it is a common ingredient in household cleaners. There are still great demands to detect HOCl fluxes and their physiological pathways. We introduce a new ratiometric luminescence imaging method based on silver nanodots to sensitively detect hypochlorite. The factors that influence the accuracy of the detection are investigated. Its availability has also been demonstrated by detecting the active component in cleaners.

  15. Development of a diagnostic DNA probe for xanthomonads causing bacterial spot of peppers and tomatoes.

    PubMed Central

    Kuflu, K M; Cuppels, D A

    1997-01-01

    Xanthomonas vesicatoria and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, causal agents for bacterial spot of tomatoes and peppers, are difficult to distinguish from other xanthomonads found on field-grown plants. A genomic subtraction technique with subtracter DNA from nonpathogenic epiphytic xanthomonads was used to enrich for sequences that could serve as diagnostic probes for these pathogens. A 1.75-kb PstI-NotI fragment (KK1750) that preferentially hybridized to X. vesicatoria DNA and X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria DNA was identified and cloned into pBluescriptII KS+. It hybridized to 46 (89%) of the 52 geographically diverse bacterial spot-causing xanthomonad (bsx) strains included in this study. The six probe-negative strains were genotypically and pathologically distinct from the other bsx strains studied. Two of these strains, DC91-1 and DC91-2, resembled X. campestris pv. raphani in that they also infected radish plants. X. vesicatoria strains gave stronger hybridization signals than did most X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria strains. In a survey of 110 non-bsx plant-associated bacteria, including 44 nonvesicatoria phytopathogenic xanthomonads and 43 epiphytic xanthomonad strains, only 8 were probe positive, but the responses were weak. Further testing revealed that one of these strains was actually a tomato pathogen. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot analysis of 46 bsx strains indicated that KK1750 sequences could be either plasmid-borne (10.9%), chromosome-borne (43.4%), or present on both replicons (45.7%). KK1750, unique in its ability to hybridize to both X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and X. vesicatoria strains, should facilitate disease diagnosis for these important plant pathogens. PMID:9361433

  16. Cloning of a short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific cDNA probe: typing for DQw specificities.

    PubMed

    Sood, S K; McCusker, C T; Singal, D P

    1989-01-01

    A short HLA-DQ beta locus-specific (141 bp) probe was cloned from the full-length pII-beta-1 cDNA. Pst 1-digested genomic DNA from homozygous typing cell lines (HTC) was hybridized with this short DQ beta locus-specific, pDQ beta 141, probe. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns generated with this DQ beta locus-specific probe were compared with those obtained with the full-length (627 bp) DQ beta, pII-beta-1, probe. The results demonstrate that the RFLP patterns with the pDQ beta 141 probe were very simple, and no crossreacting DR beta and DX beta bands were observed. DQw1, 2, 3 and 4 specificities could each be identified by a single RFLP. PMID:2467193

  17. A highly specific and sensitive DNA probe derived from chromosomal DNA of Helicobacter pylori is useful for typing H. pylori isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Ferguson, D A; Ha, T; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1993-01-01

    HindIII-digested DNA fragments derived from an EcoRI-digested 6.5-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA prepared from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629 (type strain) were cloned into the pUC19 vector. A 0.86-kb insert was identified as a potential chromosomal DNA probe. The specificity of the probe was evaluated by testing 166 non-H. pylori bacterial strains representing 38 genera and 91 species which included aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic flora of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. None of the 166 non-H. pylori strains hybridized with this probe (100% specificity), and the sensitivity of this probe was also 100% when H. pylori isolates from 72 patients with gastritis and with the homologous ATCC type strain were tested by dot blot hybridization. The capability of this probe for differentiating between strains of H. pylori was evaluated by Southern blot hybridization of HaeIII-digested chromosomal DNA from 68 clinical isolates and the homologous ATCC type strain of H. pylori. Fifty-one unique hybridization patterns were seen among the 69 strains tested, demonstrating considerable genotypic variation among H. pylori clinical isolates. We propose that this probe would be of significant value for conducting epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:8370744

  18. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  19. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Kreader, C A

    1995-01-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7538270

  20. Detection of supercoiled hepatitis B virus DNA and related forms by means of molecular hybridization to an oligonucleotide probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.J.; Chung, H.T.; Lai, C.L.; Leong, S.; Tam, O.S. )

    1989-12-01

    A novel assay for supercoiled and other fully double-stranded forms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in blood is presented that utilizes molecular hybridisation to a radiophosphorous-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The probe (5'-d(ACGTGCAGAGGTGAAGCGA)) is complementary to the S(+)-strand sequence furthest downstream, at the end of the gap. We examined blood specimens from 137 healthy HBsAg-positive individuals, applying the probe to dots representing 2-3.5 ml serum or plasma. We found that supercoiled HBV is present in many HBV DNA-positive blood specimens albeit in small quantities. Of the 104 specimens that were positive for HBV DNA of any form, 53 annealed to the probe. Serial specimens from the same subject taken over a period of months showed that the proportion of supercoil to other HBV DNA forms was variable. The presence of supercoil HBV DNA was not closely correlated with the level of serum HBV DNA polymerase. The supercoil is an HBV DNA form that can persist in the liver in the presence or absence of other replicative intermediates. This assay may enable further characterization of the status of HBV infection.

  1. DNA-templated Ag nanoclusters as fluorescent probes for sensing and intracellular imaging of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Ru-Ping; Xiao, Sai-Jin; Bai, Jian-Mei; Zheng, Lin-Ling; Zhan, Lei; Zhao, Xi-Juan; Qiu, Jian-Ding; Huang, Cheng-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a simple, rapid and label-free sensor for the essential biological OH radicals based on the fluorescence quenching of DNA-templated Ag nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs). The OH radicals generated from the Fenton reagent attack and cleave the DNA template, which disturbs the microenvironments around Ag NCs, resulting in spontaneous aggregation due to the lack of stabilization and further the quenching of the Ag NCs fluorescence. These changes in fluorescence intensity allow sensing of OH radicals with good sensitivity and selectivity under optimal conditions. The sensor can be also applied for quantifying the radical scavenging action of antioxidants. Various characterizations including absorption spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, light scattering (LS) spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dark field light scattering imaging, and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry have been employed to illustrate the proposed sensing mechanism. Further investigations demonstrate that the fluorescent probe could penetrate into intact cell membranes to selectively detect intracellular OH radicals induced by the phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation. These advantageous characteristics make the fluorescent DNA-Ag NCs potentially useful as a new candidate to monitor OH in broad biosystems. PMID:24274306

  2. Analysis of the C4 genes in baleen whales using a human cDNA probe.

    PubMed

    Spilliaert, R; Palsdottir, A; Arnason, A

    1990-01-01

    We have used a human C4 cDNA probe to investigate the complement component C4 gene in four members of the family Balaenopteridae: fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), sei whale (B. borealis), minke whale (B. acutorostrata), and bryde's whale (B. edeni). Restriction mapping of genomic DNA from the first three species suggests the presence of only one locus in these species, and also shows that the C4 genes in the three species are very similar. We have used 14 restriction endonucleases to investigate the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of fin whales, 13 enzymes for sei whales, and 8 enzymes for the minke whale. No polymorphism was seen in DNA from the five minke whale samples, but Rsa I and Taq I restriction enzymes gave polymorphism in fin and sei whales whereas Hind III and Msp I restriction enzymes showed polymorphism in sei whales only. Only one bryde's whale sample was available for investigation. The study of DNA available from mother-fetus pairs from the two polymorphic species demonstrated a simple, two-allele transmission of RFLP alleles. PMID:1975799

  3. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  4. Kelvin probe force microscopy of DNA-capped nanoparticles for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung

    2016-07-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a chance to attenuate or augment the SP signal of DCNP without additional enhancement of instrumentation capabilities.Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a

  5. Homogeneous detection of unamplified genomic DNA sequences based on colorimetric scatter of gold nanoparticle probes

    PubMed Central

    Storhoff, James J; Lucas, Adam D; Garimella, Viswanadham; Bao, Y Paul; Müller, Uwe R

    2005-01-01

    Nucleic acid diagnostics is dominated by fluorescence-based assays that use complex and expensive enzyme-based target or signal-amplification procedures1–6. Many clinical diagnostic applications will require simpler, inexpensive assays that can be done in a screening mode. We have developed a ‘spot-and-read’ colorimetric detection method for identifying nucleic acid sequences based on the distance-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles. In this assay, nucleic acid targets are recognized by DNA-modified gold probes, which undergo a color change that is visually detectable when the solutions are spotted onto an illuminated glass waveguide. This scatter-based method enables detection of zeptomole quantities of nucleic acid targets without target or signal amplification when coupled to an improved hybridization method that facilitates probe-target binding in a homogeneous format. In comparison to a previously reported absorbance-based method7, this method increases detection sensitivity by over four orders of magnitude. We have applied this method to the rapid detection of mecA in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genomic DNA samples. PMID:15170215

  6. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded estuarine samples by hybridization with cDNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Estes, M.K.; Metcalf, T.G.; Melnick, J.L

    1986-10-01

    The development and trials of a nucleic acid hybridization test for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in estuarine samples within 48 h are described. Approximately 10/sup 4/ physical particlels of HAV per dot could be detected. Test sensitivity was optimized by the consideration of hydbridization stringency, /sup 32/P energy level, probe concentration, and nucleic acid binding to filters. Test specificity was shown by a lack of cross-hybridization with other enteroviruses and unrelated nucleic acids. Potential false-positive reactions between bacterial DNA in samples and residual vector DNA contamination of purified nucleotide sequences in probes were eliminated by DNase treatment of samples. Humic acid at concentrations of up to 100 mg/liter caused only insignificant decreases in test sensitivity. Interference with hybridization by organic components of virus-containing eluates was removed by proteinase K digestion followed by phenol extraction and ethanol precipitation. The test is suitable for detecting naturally occurring HAV in samples from polluted estuarine environments.

  7. Comparison of biotinylated DNA and RNA probes for rapid detection of varicella-zoster virus genome by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, B; Yu, G J; Hurst, J W

    1991-01-01

    We describe a general method for the production of nonisotopic DNA and RNA probes for the detection of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) genome by in situ hybridization. VZV DNA was extracted from purified viral nucleocapsids, cleaved with restriction enzyme (RE) BamHI, and cloned into plasmid pBR322 by the standard vector insert procedure. We cloned over 85% of the VZV genome and obtained 18 recombinants. Plasmids containing the B, F, G, H, and J fragments of VZV DNA were labeled by the nick translation method with biotin-11-dUTP as the dTTP analog. Additionally, the B fragment was cleaved with RE AvaI, subcloned into the plasmid pGEM-4 transcription vector, and subsequently linearized with REs PstI and EcoRI. RNA was transcribed with T7 or SP6 polymerase, with a substitution of allylamine-UTP as the UTP analog, and labeled with epsilon-caproylamidobiotin-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. The DNA and RNA probes were used under full-stringency conditions for in situ hybridization with alkaline phosphatase as the detector and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate-Nitro Blue Tetrazolium as the substrate. When tested under comparable conditions, the RNA probe was slightly more sensitive than was the DNA probe: both probes showed homology only with VZV-infected cells and clinical tissues and not with the other herpesviruses. Probes prepared from variable regions of the genome (fragments F and J) performed as well as did those from conserved regions (fragments B. G. and H). Biotinylated probes have distinct advantages over isotopic probes and retain their full potency for more than 2 years when stored properly. Images PMID:1645371

  8. DNA and RNA "traffic lights": synthetic wavelength-shifting fluorescent probes based on nucleic acid base substitutes for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, Carolin; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2013-08-01

    The DNA base substitute approach by the (S)-3-amino-1,2-propanediol linker allows placing two fluorophores in a precise way inside a given DNA framework. The double helical architecture around the fluorophores, especially the DNA-induced twist, is crucial for the desired photophysical interactions. Excitonic, excimer, and energy transfer interactions yield fluorescent DNA and RNA probes with dual emission color readout. Especially, our DNA and RNA "traffic light" that combines the green emission of TO with the red emission of TR represents an important tool for molecular imaging and can be applied as aptasensors and as probes to monitor the siRNA delivery into cells. The concept can be extended to the synthetically easier to access postsynthetic 2'-modifications and the NIR range. Thereby, the pool of tailor-made fluorescent nucleic acid conjugates can be extended. PMID:23796243

  9. A novel quantum dot nanocluster as versatile probe for electrochemiluminescence and electrochemical assays of DNA and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jie, Guifen; Zhang, Jian; Jie, Guixia; Wang, Lei

    2014-02-15

    A novel dendritic quantum dot (QD) nanocluster was constructed and used as versatile electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and electrochemical probe for the detection of DNA and cancer cells. Owing to the many functional groups present in the nanoclusters, a large number of QDs were assembled on the nanoclusters, which could greatly amplify both the ECL and electrochemical signals of QDs. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/gold nanoparticles' (NPs) hybrids were used as amplified platform for assembling large numbers of DNA on the electrode, which also improve the bioactivity and stability of the electrode. After the QD-DNA signal probe was recognized with target DNA (t-DNA), the amplified ECL signal for the detection of target DNA was obtained. Furthermore, magnetic nanoparticles were employed for cell aptamers immobilization, the same QD nanocluster-DNA probe was also extended for electrochemical detection of cancer cells using sensitive anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) method, which simplified the separation procedures and improved the sensitivity. It is anticipated that the assays could provide promising and cost effective approach for the early and accurate detection of DNA and cancer cells. PMID:24021658

  10. DNA methyltransferase activity detection based on fluorescent silver nanocluster hairpin-shaped DNA probe with 5'-C-rich/G-rich-3' tails.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenting; Lai, Han; Huang, Rong; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Yimo; Weng, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-06-15

    DNA methylation has received a large amount of attention due to its close relationship to a wide range of biological phenomena, such as gene activation, gene imprinting, and chromatin stability. Herein, we have designed a hairpin-shaped DNA probe with 5'-C-rich/G-rich-3' tails and developed a simple and reliable fluorescence turn-off assay for DNA adenine methylation (Dam) methyltransferase (MTase) detection combining site recognition and the fluorescence enhancement of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) by guanine-rich DNA sequences. A designed hairpin probe with 5' CCCTTACCCC and 3' GGGTGGGGTGGGGTGGGG displays a bright red emission after reacting with AgNO3 and NaBH4. In the presence of Dam MTase, the methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I which has the same recognition site with the Dam MTase can split the probe, freeing the G-rich sequence from the C-rich sequence, thus quenching the fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs. Compared to traditional fluorescent-based methods, this strategy is simple and inexpensive. A linear response to concentrations of Dam MTase which range from 1 U/mL to 100 U/mL and a detection limit of 1 U/mL are obtained without any amplification steps. In addition, we also demonstrate the method can be used for evaluation and screening of inhibitors for Dam MTase. PMID:25682501

  11. Mismatch discrimination of lipidated DNA and LNA-probes (LiNAs) in hybridization-controlled liposome assembly.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Vogel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Assays for mismatch discrimination and detection of single nucleotide variations by hybridization-controlled assembly of liposomes, which do not require tedious surface chemistry, are versatile for both DNA and RNA targets. We report herein a comprehensive study on different DNA and LNA (locked nucleic acids) probe designs, including membrane-anchoring requirements, studies on different probes and target lengths (including overhangs), DNA and RNA targets (including sequences associated with pathogens) for lipidated nucleic acids (LiNAs). Advantages and limitations of the liposome assembly based assay in the context of mismatch discrimination and SNP detection are presented. The advantages of membrane-anchored LiNA-probes compared to chemically attached probes on solid nanoparticles (e.g. gold nanoparticles) are described. Key functionalities such as non-covalent attachment of LiNA probes without the need for long spacers and the inherent mobility of membrane-anchored probes in lipid-bilayer membranes will be described for several different probe designs. PMID:27356098

  12. Kinetics of Oligonucleotide Hybridization to DNA Probe Arrays on High-Capacity Porous Silica Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Marc I.; Fidanza, Jacqueline A.; McGall, Glenn H.; Trulson, Mark O.; Forman, Jonathan E.; Frank, Curtis W.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of DNA hybridization to oligonucleotide arrays on high-capacity porous silica films that were deposited by two techniques. Films created by spin coating pure colloidal silica suspensions onto a substrate had pores of ∼23 nm, relatively low porosity (35%), and a surface area of 17 times flat glass (for a 0.3-μm film). In the second method, latex particles were codeposited with the silica by spin coating and then pyrolyzed, which resulted in larger pores (36 nm), higher porosity (65%), and higher surface area (26 times flat glass for a 0.3-μm film). As a result of these favorable properties, the templated silica hybridized more quickly and reached a higher adsorbed target density (11 vs. 8 times flat glass at 22°C) than the pure silica. Adsorption of DNA onto the high-capacity films is controlled by traditional adsorption and desorption coefficients, as well as by morphology factors and transient binding interactions between the target and the probes. To describe these effects, we have developed a model based on the analogy to diffusion of a reactant in a porous catalyst. Adsorption values (ka, kd, and K) measured on planar arrays for the same probe/target system provide the parameters for the model and also provide an internally consistent comparison for the stability of the transient complexes. The interpretation of the model takes into account factors not previously considered for hybridization in three-dimensional films, including the potential effects of heterogeneous probe populations, partial probe/target complexes during diffusion, and non-1:1 binding structures. The transient complexes are much less stable than full duplexes (binding constants for full duplexes higher by three orders of magnitude or more), which may be a result of the unique probe density and distribution that is characteristic of the photolithographically patterned arrays. The behavior at 22°C is described well by the predictive equations for

  13. Probing DNA in nanopores via tunneling: from sequencing to ``quantum'' analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-02-01

    Fast and low-cost DNA sequencing methods would revolutionize medicine: a person could have his/her full genome sequenced so that drugs could be tailored to his/her specific illnesses; doctors could know in advance patients' likelihood to develop a given ailment; cures to major diseases could be found faster [1]. However, this goal of ``personalized medicine'' is hampered today by the high cost and slow speed of DNA sequencing methods. In this talk, I will discuss the sequencing protocol we suggest which requires the measurement of the distributions of transverse currents during the translocation of single-stranded DNA into nanopores [2-5]. I will support our conclusions with a combination of molecular dynamics simulations coupled to quantum mechanical calculations of electrical current in experimentally realizable systems [2-5]. I will also discuss recent experiments that support these theoretical predictions. In addition, I will show how this relatively unexplored area of research at the interface between solids, liquids, and biomolecules at the nanometer length scale is a fertile ground to study quantum phenomena that have a classical counterpart, such as ionic quasi-particles, ionic ``quantized'' conductance [6,7] and Coulomb blockade [8]. Work supported in part by NIH. [4pt] [1] M. Zwolak, M. Di Ventra, Physical Approaches to DNA Sequencing and Detection, Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 141 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Zwolak and M. Di Ventra, Electronic signature of DNA nucleotides via transverse transport, Nano Lett. 5, 421 (2005).[0pt] [3] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Fast DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Nano Lett. 6, 779 (2006).[0pt] [4] J. Lagerqvist, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Influence of the environment and probes on rapid DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport, Biophys. J. 93, 2384 (2007).[0pt] [5] M. Krems, M. Zwolak, Y.V. Pershin, and M. Di Ventra, Effect of noise on DNA sequencing via transverse electronic transport

  14. A fluorescent aptasensor using double-stranded DNA/graphene oxide as the indicator probe.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiao-Jing; Xiao, Wan-Lu; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Ying; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-04-15

    We developed a fluorescent aptasensor based on the making use of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)/graphene oxide (GO) as the signal probe and the activities of exonuclease I (Exo I). This method takes advantage of the stronger affinity of the aptamer to its target rather than to its complementary sequence (competitor), and the different interaction intensity of dsDNA, mononucleotides with GO. Specifically, in the absence of target, the competitor hybridizes with the aptamer, preventing the digestion of the competitor by Exo I, and thus the formed dsDNA is adsorbed on GO surface, allowing fluorescence quenching. When the target is introduced, the aptamer preferentially binds with its target. Thereby, the corresponding nuclease reaction takes place, and slight fluorescence change is obtained after the introduction of GO due to the weak affinity of the generated mononucleotides to GO. Adenosine (AD) was chosen as a model system and tested in detail. Under the optimized conditions, smaller dissociation constant (Kd, 311.0 µM) and lower detection limit (LOD, 3.1 µM) were obtained in contrast with traditional dye-labeled aptamer/GO based platform (Kd=688.8 µM, LOD=21.2 µM). Satisfying results were still obtained in the evaluation of the specificity and the detection of AD in human serum, making it a promising tool for the diagnosis of AD-relevant diseases. Moreover, we demonstrated the effect of the competitor on the LOD, and the results reveal that the sensitivity could be enhanced by using the rational competitor. The present design not only constructs a label-free aptamer based platform but also extends the application of dsDNA/GO complex in biochemical and biomedical studies. PMID:26655184

  15. Usefulness of the secondary probe pTBN12 in DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, F; Yang, Z; el Hajj, H; Alonso, M; Burman, W J; Eisenach, K D; Dronda, F; Bates, J H; Cave, M D

    1996-01-01

    A comparison was made between DNA fingerprints of Mycobacterium tuberculosis produced with the insertion sequence IS6110 and those produced with the polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence contained in the plasmid pTBN12. A total of 302 M. tuberculosis isolates from the prison system in Madrid, Spain, and the Denver Public Health Department (Denver, Colo.) were analyzed with the two probes. Both probes identified the same isolates in the same clusters when the fingerprints had six or more copies of IS6110. Analysis of isolates with unique IS6110 fingerprints demonstrated that they were unique with pTBN12. The pTBN12 probe had greater discriminating power in isolates having five or fewer copies of IS6110. Forty-seven isolates from Denver having fewer than five copies of IS6110 which were grouped in 11 clusters with identical fingerprint patterns were subdivided into 35 different patterns by pTBN12. Isolates with IS6110 fingerprints with more than six copies of IS6110 that differed from one another by only one or two hybridizing bands were analyzed with pTBN12. Most of these sets of isolates demonstrated identical patterns with pTBN12. However, some exceptions were observed, suggesting that those having nearly identical IS6110 patterns should not necessarily be included in the same cluster. Since IS6110 provides more polymorphism in the fingerprint, it is most useful in identifying isolates with unique fingerprint patterns and those in clusters in which the isolates contain six or more copies of the insertion. However, it is necessary to employ a secondary probe, such as pTBN12, to discriminate isolates with five or fewer copies of IS6110 and those with similar but not identical IS6110 patterns. PMID:8727887

  16. A computer programme for estimation of genetic risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information.

    PubMed Central

    Sarfarazi, M; Williams, H

    1986-01-01

    A computer programme is presented for calculating the recurrence risk in X linked disorders, combining pedigree and DNA probe data with other conditional information such as carrier detection tests. The methods of computation are shown in the given examples. The programme can be used with either a single DNA probe or two 'flanking' DNA probes for both familial and isolated case pedigrees. For isolated case families the mutation rate at the disease locus can be taken into account in conjunction with the DNA probe data. PMID:3754009

  17. Padlock probe-mediated qRT-PCR for DNA computing answer determination

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fusheng; Frasch, Wayne D.

    2011-01-01

    Padlock probe-mediated quantitative real time PCR (PLP-qRT-PCR) was adapted to quantify the abundance of sequential 10mer DNA sequences for use in DNA computing to identify optimal answers of traveling salesman problems. The protocol involves: (i) hybridization of a linear PLP with a target DNA sequence; (ii) PLP circularization through enzymatic ligation; and (iii) qRT-PCR amplification of the circularized PLP after removal of non-circularized templates. The linear PLP was designed to consist of two 10-mer sequence-detection arms at the 5′ and 3′ ends separated by a core sequence composed of universal PCR primers, and a qRT-PCR reporter binding site. Circularization of each PLP molecule is dependent upon hybridization with target sequence and high-fidelity ligation. Thus, the number of PLP circularized is determined by the abundance of target in solution. The amplification efficiency of the PLP was 98.7% within a 0.2 pg–20 ng linear detection range between thermal cycle threshold (Ct value) and target content. The Ct values derived from multiplex qRT-PCR upon three targets did not differ significantly from those obtained with singleplex assays. The protocol provides a highly sensitive and efficient means for the simultaneous quantification of multiple short nucleic acid sequences that has a wide range of applications in biotechnology. PMID:21691417

  18. Novel Phenanthrene-Degrading Bacteria Identified by DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chunling; Zhang, Dayi; Zhang, Gan

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms responsible for the degradation of phenanthrene in a clean forest soil sample were identified by DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). The soil was artificially amended with either 12C- or 13C-labeled phenanthrene, and soil DNA was extracted on days 3, 6 and 9. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) results revealed that the fragments of 219- and 241-bp in HaeIII digests were distributed throughout the gradient profile at three different sampling time points, and both fragments were more dominant in the heavy fractions of the samples exposed to the 13C-labeled contaminant. 16S rRNA sequencing of the 13C-enriched fraction suggested that Acidobacterium spp. within the class Acidobacteria, and Collimonas spp. within the class Betaproteobacteria, were directly involved in the uptake and degradation of phenanthrene at different times. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the genus Collimonas has the ability to degrade PAHs. Two PAH-RHDα genes were identified in 13C-labeled DNA. However, isolation of pure cultures indicated that strains of Staphylococcus sp. PHE-3, Pseudomonas sp. PHE-1, and Pseudomonas sp. PHE-2 in the soil had high phenanthrene-degrading ability. This emphasizes the role of a culture-independent method in the functional understanding of microbial communities in situ. PMID:26098417

  19. Kelvin probe force microscopy of DNA-capped nanoparticles for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung

    2016-07-14

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a chance to attenuate or augment the SP signal of DCNP without additional enhancement of instrumentation capabilities. PMID:27127876

  20. Detection of circovirus infection in pigeons by in situ hybridization using cloned DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Smyth, J A; Weston, J; Moffett, D A; Todd, D

    2001-11-01

    Degenerate primers were designed based on known sequence information for the circoviruses psittacine beak and feather disease virus and porcine circovirus and applied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to known virus-infected bursa of Fabricius (BF) from a pigeon. A 548-bp DNA fragment was amplified and shown to be specific to a novel circovirus, named pigeon circovirus (PiCV), and was used to produce sensitive and specific probes for detection of circovirus DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH). Using ISH on BF from 107 pigeons submitted for necropsy, infection was detected in 89%, compared with a histologic detection rate of 66%. Using the ISH technique, infected cells were also found in liver, kidney, trachea, lung, brain, crop, intestine, spleen, bone marrow, and heart of some birds. Large quantities of DNA were present in some of these tissues, and in the absence of BF, liver in particular is identified as a potentially useful organ to examine for presence of PiCV. This high prevalence of infection in diseased birds is noteworthy, emphasizing the need for studies to determine the precise role of this virus as a disease-producing agent. PMID:11724137

  1. Rapid sex determination on buccal smears using DNA probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldez, R.A.; Harris, C.

    1994-09-01

    Hybridization of dual-labeled DNA probes for the repetitive sequences on the X and Y chromosomes allows a fast, non-invasive, more reliable method for sex determination that current cytogenetic Barr body and Y chromatin assays. Scrapes of squamous epithelial cells were collected from the oral cavity of 14 subjects (5{male}, 9{female}) and smeared onto silanized slides. The smears were allowed to air dry. Samples were blinded and then fixed in 50% methanol/50% glacial acetic acid for 10 minutes, and allowed to dry. The slides were incubated in a pretreatment solution containing 30% sodium bisulfite at 45{degrees}C for 10 minutes. They were rinsed in 2XSSC pH 7.0 and then dehydrated through a series of 70%, 85%, and 100% ethanols at room temperature and allowed to air dry. A probe mixture (30 {mu}L containing 10 ng/{mu}L biotin-labeled DXZ1 and digoxigenin-labeled DYZ1/DYZ3 in 70% Formamide/2XSSC) was aliquoted onto each slide, coverslipped, and sealed with rubber cement. Probe and target DNA were simultaneously denatured at 72{degrees}C on a slide warmer for 6 minutes. Probe was allowed to hybridize overnight in a humidified chamber at 37{degrees}C. Slides were postwashed at 72{degrees}C in 0.5xSSC pH 7.0 for 5 minutes, then soaked at room temperature 1XPBD for 2 minutes, and detected with rhodamine/anti-digoxigenin-FITC/avidin for 15 minutes at 37{degrees}C. Slides were soaked 3X in 1XPBD and then counterstained with 15 {mu}L 0.05 {mu}g/mL DAP1/Antifade. 200 nuclei were scored for the presence of one green (X), two green (XX), one green and one red (XY), or a single red (Y) signal, using a fluorescent microscope equipped with a triple band pass filter. Greater than 90% of the hybridized nuclei from each of the 14 cases studied conformed to the sex chromosome pattern. The modal number in 9 cases showed two green signals (XX), and a green and a red signal (XY) in the other 5 cases; this was in complete agreement with the cytogenetic results.

  2. Comparison of peroxidase-labeled DNA probes with radioactive RNA probes for detection of human papillomaviruses by in situ hybridization in paraffin sections

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Kurman, R.J.; Kessis, T.D.; Shah, K.V. )

    1991-01-01

    A study comparing in situ hybridization using nonradioactive DNA probes directly conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and {sup 35}S-labeled antisense RNA probes for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11, 16, and 18 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 34 lesions of the cervix and vulva. These lesions included exophytic condylomas and intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms. HPV 6/11 was detected in two of four condylomata acuminata by both in situ techniques. HPV 16 was detected in 13 of 30 cases of intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms by both methods. Discordance between the two methods occurred in two instances. The radiolabeled probe but not the HRP probe detected HPV 16 in one case of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3), whereas the converse occurred in one case of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3). HPV 18 was not detected in any of the specimens by either method. This study demonstrates that nonradioactive HRP-labeled probes for the detection of specific HPV types are as sensitive as the more laborious and potentially hazardous radioactive probes.

  3. Single-molecule and population probing of chromatin structure using DNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Jessica A.; Hoose, Scott A.; Gustafson, Tanya L.; Porter, Weston; Kladde, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Probing chromatin structure with DNA methyltransferases offers advantages over more commonly used nuclease-based and chromatin immunoprecipitation methods for detection of nucleosomes and non-histone protein-DNA interactions. Here we describe two related methods in which the readout of MTase accessibility is obtained by assaying 5-methylcytosine in DNA through the PCR-based technique of bisulfite genomic sequencing. The methyltransferase accessibility protocol (MAP) determines the relative frequency at which the enzyme accesses each of its target sites over an entire population of PCR amplified product. While MAP yields much quantitative information about relative accessibility of a region of chromatin, a complementary single-molecule view of methyltransferase accessibility, termed MAP for individual templates (MAP-IT), is provided by analysis of cloned PCR products. Absolute rather than relative methylation frequencies in a region are obtained by summing the methylation status at each site over a cohort of clones. Moreover, as the integrity of individual molecules is maintained in MAP-IT, unique information about the distribution of multiple footprints along continuous regions is gleaned. In principle, the population MAP and single-molecule MAP-IT strategies can be used to analyze chromatin structure in a variety of model systems. Here we describe the application of MAP in living S. cerevisiae cells and MAP-IT in the analysis of a mammalian tumor suppressor gene in nuclei. This application of MAP-IT provides the first means to simultaneously determine CpG methylation of mammalian genes and their overlying chromatin structure in the same single DNA molecule. PMID:17309843

  4. Potential use of buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of autosomal trisomy or chromosomal sex in newborn infants using DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Clark, K.; Lazarski, K.; Wilkerson, C.; Meisner, L. |

    1994-12-01

    Buccal smears from 3 women and 1 man were probed with alpha satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 8, 18, X, and Y. Buccal smears were also collected from an adolescent phenotypic female with uterine agenesis, as well as from newborn infants with suspected trisomy 18 and trisomy 21. The clinical cases were confirmed with conventional cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes. Overall probe efficiency at detecting expected chromosome number in interphase cells was found to be 71% {+-} 6.8%. Higher than expected n-1 signal numbers may be due to karyopyknotic intermediate epithelial cells present in all collected samples. Overall probe efficiency was found to be consistent using alpha satellite and cosmid probes, both of which accurately reflected the modal copy number of the target chromosomes. False trisomy was less than 1%. This study suggests DNA probes can be used in buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of trisomies and chromosomal sex in newborns, but because of high rates of false hydropoploid signals, probed buccal smear specimens may not be accurate at diagnosing mosaicism. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Cancer cell-targeted two-photon fluorescence probe for the real-time ratiometric imaging of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Kui; Xuan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Qingzhang; Nie, Yamin; Guo, Haiming

    2016-05-01

    Real-time imaging of DNA damage in cancer cells could provide valuable information on the formation and development of cancer. Herein, a two-photon fluorescence probe was discovered. Through sequential ICT processes, it allows successful in vivo visualization of DNA damage in cancer cells by one/two-photon microscopic imaging or by the unaided eye and a hand-held ultraviolet lamp. PMID:27087314

  6. Identification of active aerobic methanotrophs in plateau wetlands using DNA stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongcui; Cui, Xiaoyong; Dumont, Marc G

    2016-08-01

    Sedge-dominated wetlands on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are methane emission centers. Methanotrophs at these sites play a role in reducing methane emissions, but relatively little is known about the composition of active methanotrophs in these wetlands. Here, we used DNA stable isotope probing to identify the key active aerobic methanotrophs in three sedge-dominated wetlands on the plateau. We found that Methylocystis species were active in two peatlands, Hongyuan and Dangxiong. Methylobacter species were found to be active only in Dangxiong peat. Hongyuan peat had the highest methane oxidation rate, and cross-feeding of carbon from methanotrophs to methylotrophic Hyphomicrobium species was observed. Owing to a low methane oxidation rate during the incubation, the labeling of methanotrophs in Maduo wetland samples was not detected. Our results indicate that there are large differences in the activity of methanotrophs in the wetlands of this region. PMID:27369086

  7. Resolution of Discrepant Results for Candida Species Identification by Using DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Coignard, Catherine; Hurst, Steven F.; Benjamin, Lynette E.; Brandt, Mary E.; Warnock, David W.; Morrison, Christine J.

    2004-01-01

    Candida species bloodstream isolates were collected from institutions participating in an active, population-based surveillance for candidemia. Species identifications were performed locally and then confirmed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by phenotype-based methods. Discrepancies in species identification between the referring institution and the CDC were noted for 43 of 935 isolates (4.6%). A DNA probe-based species identification system (PCR-enzyme immunoassay [EIA]) was then used to resolve these discrepancies. The PCR-EIA result was identical to the CDC phenotypic identification method for 98% of the isolates tested. The most frequently misidentified species was Candida glabrata (37% of all discrepant identifications). Such misidentifications could lead to the administration of inappropriate therapy given the propensity of C. glabrata to develop resistance to azole antifungal drugs. PMID:14766873

  8. A graphene-based biosensing platform based on the release of DNA probes and rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Song, Jinping; Shuang, Shaomin; Dong, Chuan; Brennan, John D; Li, Yingfu

    2014-06-24

    We report a versatile biosensing platform capable of achieving ultrasensitive detection of both small-molecule and macromolecular targets. The system features three components: reduced graphene oxide for its ability to adsorb single-stranded DNA molecules nonspecifically, DNA aptamers for their ability to bind reduced graphene oxide but undergo target-induced conformational changes that facilitate their release from the reduced graphene oxide surface, and rolling circle amplification (RCA) for its ability to amplify a primer-template recognition event into repetitive sequence units that can be easily detected. The key to the design is the tagging of a short primer to an aptamer sequence, which results in a small DNA probe that allows for both effective probe adsorption onto the reduced graphene oxide surface to mask the primer domain in the absence of the target, as well as efficient probe release in the presence of the target to make the primer available for template binding and RCA. We also made an observation that the circular template, which on its own does not cause a detectable level of probe release from the reduced graphene oxide, augments target-induced probe release. The synergistic release of DNA probes is interpreted to be a contributing factor for the high detection sensitivity. The broad utility of the platform is illustrated though engineering three different sensors that are capable of achieving ultrasensitive detection of a protein target, a DNA sequence and a small-molecule analyte. We envision that the approach described herein will find useful applications in the biological, medical, and environmental fields. PMID:24857187

  9. DNA probe modified with 3-iron bis(dicarbollide) for electrochemical determination of DNA sequence of Avian Influenza Virus H5N1.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Iwona; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Olejniczak, Agnieszka B; Leśnikowski, Zbigniew J; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we report on oligonucleotide probes bearing metallacarborane [3-iron bis(dicarbollide)] redox label, deposited on gold electrode for electrochemical determination of DNA sequence derived from Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), type H5N1. The oligonucleotide probes containing 5'-terminal NH2 group were covalently attached to the electrode, via NHS/EDC coupling to 3-mercaptopropionic acid SAM, previously deposited on the surface of gold. The changes in redox activity of Fe(III) centre of the metallacarborane complex before and after hybridization process was used as analytical signal. The signals generated upon hybridization with targets such as complementary or non-complementary 20-mer ssDNA or various PCR products consisting of 180-190 bp (dsDNA) were recorded by Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). The developed system was very sensitive towards targets containing sequence complementary to the probe with the detection limit estimated as 0.03 fM (S/N=3.0) and 0.08 fM (S/N=3.0) for 20-mer ssDNA and for dsDNA (PCR product), respectively. The non-complementary targets generated very weak responses. Furthermore, the proposed genosensor was suitable for discrimination of PCR products with different location of the complementarity region. PMID:23958581

  10. A Rapid, Cost-Effective Method of Assembly and Purification of Synthetic DNA Probes >100 bp

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Michael A.; Jauregui, Lauren; Davis, Ronald W.

    2012-01-01

    Here we introduce a rapid, cost-effective method of generating molecular DNA probes in just under 15 minutes without the need for expensive, time-consuming gel-extraction steps. As an example, we enzymatically concatenated six variable strands (50 bp) with a common strand sequence (51 bp) in a single pool using Fast-Link DNA ligase to produce 101 bp targets (10 min). Unincorporated species were then filtered out by passing the crude reaction through a size-exclusion column (<5 min). We then compared full-length product yield of crude and purified samples using HPLC analysis; the results of which clearly show our method yields three-quarters that of the crude sample (50% higher than by gel-extraction). And while we substantially reduced the amount of unligated product with our filtration process, higher purity and yield, with an increase in number of stands per reaction (>12) could be achieved with further optimization. Moreover, for large-scale assays, we envision this method to be fully automated with the use of robotics such as the Biomek FX; here, potentially thousands of samples could be pooled, ligated and purified in either a 96, 384 or 1536-well platform in just minutes. PMID:22493688

  11. Generic affinities among crocodilians as revealed by DNA fingerprinting with a Bkm-derived probe.

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, R K; Majumdar, K C; Lang, J W; Singh, L

    1994-01-01

    Genetic fingerprint profiles have been successfully used for establishing biological relationships, in linkage analysis, and in studies of population structure but have not so far been used for ascertaining phylogenetic relationships among related groups of species and genera. This is largely because these profiles are thought to evolve too rapidly to be informative over large time intervals. However, we show here that among the Crocodilia, whose phylogeny is a debated issue, these profiles can provide phylogenetically useful information. By using the probe Bkm-2(8), DNA fingerprints with distinct bands distributed in the size range 0.5-23.0 kb were obtained for individuals of 18 species belonging to seven of the eight genera of crocodilians. These genetic profiles showed individual-, species-, and restriction enzyme-specific patterns. In addition, striking differences were observed in the copy number of Bkm-related sequences in genomes of different crocodilian species. The qualitative data from DNA fingerprint profiles, and quantitative data on copy number variation in Bkm-related sequences, suggest that these genera belong to two distinct groups, one of which includes Alligator, Paleosuchus, and Caiman; the other includes Crocodylus, Osteolaemus, Tomistoma, and Gavialis. A close relationship between Tomistoma and Gavialis is also suggested by these results. Images PMID:7937999

  12. Probing heterobivalent binding to the endocytic AP-2 adaptor complex by DNA-based spatial screening.

    PubMed

    Diezmann, F; von Kleist, L; Haucke, V; Seitz, O

    2015-08-01

    The double helical DNA scaffold offers a unique set of properties, which are particularly useful for studies of multivalency in biomolecular interactions: (i) multivalent ligand displays can be formed upon nucleic acid hybridization in a self-assembly process, which facilitates spatial screening (ii) valency and spatial arrangement of the ligand display can be precisely controlled and (iii) the flexibility of the ligand display can be adjusted by integrating nick sites and unpaired template regions. Herein we describe the use of DNA-based spatial screening for the characterization of the adaptor complex 2 (AP-2), a central interaction hub within the endocytic protein network in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2 is comprised of a core domain and two, so-called appendage domains, the α- and the β2-ear, which associate with cytoplasmatic proteins required for the formation or maturation of clathrin/AP-2 coated pits. Each appendage domain has two binding grooves which recognize distinct peptide motives with micromolar affinity. This provides opportunities for enhanced interactions with protein molecules that contain two (or more) different peptide motives. To determine whether a particular, spatial arrangement of binding motifs is required for high affinity binding we probed the distance-affinity relationships by means of DNA-programmed spatial screening with self-assembled peptide-DNA complexes. By using trimolecular and tetramolecular assemblies two different peptides were positioned in 2-22 nucleotide distance. The binding data obtained with both recombinant protein in well-defined buffer systems and native AP-2 in brain extract suggests that the two binding sites of the AP-2 α-appendage can cooperate to provide up to 40-fold enhancement of affinity compared to the monovalent interaction. The distance between the two recognized peptide motives was less important provided that the DNA duplex segments were connected by flexible, single strand segments. By

  13. FISH analysis of the arrangement of chromosomes in interphase nuclei using telomeric, centromeric, and DNA painting probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajembashi, Shamci; Schmitt, Eberhard; Dittmar, Heike; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used to study the arrangement of chromosomes in interphase nuclei of unsynchronized human lymphocytes. DNA probes specific for telomeric DNA, centromeric (alpha) -satellite DNA and whole chromosomes 2, 7, 9 and X are employed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the chromosome territories is variable in cycling cells, for example, close to the metaphase chromosome homologues are arranged pairwise. Furthermore, the relative arrangement of chromosome homologues to each other is not spatially defined. Also, the relative orientation of centromeres and telomeres within a chromosome domain is variable.

  14. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA (TYPHACEAE) AND THE IMPACT OF POLLUTANTS EXAMINED WITH TANDEM-REPETITIVE DNA PROBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic diversity at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci was examined in the common cattail, Typha latifolia (Typhaceae), using three synthetic DNA probes composed of tandemly repeated "core" sequences (GACA, GATA, and GCAC). The principal objectives of this investigation w...

  15. Triple functional DNA-protein conjugates: Signal probes for Pb(2+) using evanescent wave-induced emission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoyu; Zhou, Xiaohong; Shi, Hanchang

    2015-12-15

    We describe here a Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme-based evanescent wave-induced emission (EWIE) biosensing platform using triple functional DNA-protein conjugates as signal probes for Pb(2+) detection. Upon reaction with Pb(2+), the substrate strand is cleaved, releasing an invasion fragment, which is then hybridized with the complementary DNA strand immobilized on magnetic beads, while dissociating of the original hybridized signal probes. The signal probes, consisting of a streptavidin moiety and a Cy5.5 labeled DNA moiety, act simultaneously as signal conversion, signal recognition and signal report elements. Detection of the signal probes is accomplished by first adsorbing to the desthiobiotin-modified optical fiber, followed by fluorescence emission induced by an evanescent field. A linear calibration was obtained from 20 nM to 800 nM with a detection limit of 1 nM. The optical fiber system is robust enough for 250 sensing cycles and can be stored at room temperature over one month. These results demonstrate that application of DNA-streptavidin conjugates has been extended to DNAzyme-based biosensors, maintaining activity, specificity, regeneration and long-term storage ability. PMID:26120813

  16. Population variation of human mtDNA control region sequences detected by enzymatic amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, M; Hedgecock, D; Higuchi, R G; Vigilant, L; Erlich, H A

    1991-01-01

    A method for detecting sequence variation of hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region was developed. The technique uses hybridization of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes to DNA sequences that have been amplified by PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region from 52 individuals were determined; these sequences were then used to define nine regions suitable for SSO typing. A total of 23 SSO probes were used to detect sequence variants at these nine regions in 525 individuals from five ethnic groups (African, Asian, Caucasian, Japanese, and Mexican). The SSO typing revealed an enormous amount of variability, with 274 mtDNA types observed among these 525 individuals and with diversity values, for each population, exceeding .95. For each of the nine mtDNA regions significant differences in the frequencies of sequence variants were observed between these five populations. The mtDNA SSO-typing system was successfully applied to a case involving individual identification of skeletal remains; the probability of a random match was approximately 0.7%. The potential useful applications of this mtDNA SSO-typing system thus include the analysis of individual identity as well as population genetic studies. Images Figure 3 PMID:1990843

  17. Hg(2+) detection using a phosphorothioate RNA probe adsorbed on graphene oxide and a comparison with thymine-rich DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; van Ballegooie, Courtney; Liu, Juewen

    2016-06-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal and many DNA-based biosensors have been recently developed for Hg(2+) detection in water. Among them, thymine-rich DNA is the most commonly used for designing Hg(2+) sensors. However, the thymine-Hg(2+) interaction is strongly affected by the buffer conditions. We recently reported a molecular beacon containing phosphorothioate (PS)-modified RNA linkages that can be cleaved by Hg(2+). In this work, the fluorescence quenching and DNA adsorption properties of nano-sized graphene oxide (NGO) were used to develop a new sensor using the PS-RNA chemistry. Three DNA probes, containing one, three and five PS-RNA linkages, respectively, were tested. Finally, a fluorophore-labeled poly-A DNA with five PS-RNA linkages was selected and adsorbed by NGO. In the presence of Hg(2+), the fluorophore was released from NGO due to the cleavage reaction, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement. This sensor is highly selective for Hg(2+) with a detection limit of 8.5 nM Hg(2+). For comparison, a fluorophore-labeled poly-T DNA was also tested, which responded to Hg(2+) more slowly and was inhibited by high NaCl concentrations, while the PS-RNA probe was more tolerant to different buffer conditions. This work indicates a new method for interfacing DNA with NGO for Hg(2+) detection. PMID:26580137

  18. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate using a loop DNA probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chunshui; Cai, Zhixiong; Wang, Yiru; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James; Chen, Xi

    2014-07-15

    A simple, rapid, label-free, and ultrasensitive fluorescence strategy for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection was developed using a loop DNA probe with low background noise. In this strategy, a loop DNA probe, which is the substrate for both ligation and digestion enzyme reaction, was designed. SYBR green I (SG I), a double-stranded specific dye, was applied for the readout fluorescence signal. Exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease III (Exo III), sequence-independent nucleases, were selected to digest the loop DNA probe in order to minimize the background fluorescence signal. As a result, in the absence of ATP, the loop DNA was completely digested by Exo I and Exo III, leading to low background fluorescence owing to the weak electrostatic interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. On the other hand, ATP induced the ligation of the nicking site, and the sealed loop DNA resisted the digestion of Exo I and ExoIII, resulting in a remarkable increase of fluorescence response. Upon background noise reduction, the sensitivity of the ATP determination was improved significantly, and the detection limitation was found to be 1.2 pM, which is much lower than that in almost all the previously reported methods. This strategy has promise for wide application in the determination of ATP. PMID:24983417

  19. Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels with DNA capture-probes for potential use in microfluidic DNA analysis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Thredgold, Leigh D.; Lenehan, Claire E.; Andersson, Gunther A.; Kobus, Hilton; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2011-12-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is an elastomeric material used for microfluidic devices and is especially suited to medical and forensic applications. This is due to its relatively low cost, ease of fabrication, excellent optical transmission characteristics and its ability to support electroosmotic flow, required during electrophoretic separations. These aspects combined with its large range of surface modification chemistries, make PDMS an attractive substrate in microfluidic devices for, in particular, DNA separation. Here, we report the successful wet chemical surface modification of PDMS microchannels using a simple three step method to produce an isothiocyanate-terminated surface. Initially, PDMS was oxygen plasma treated to produce a silanol-terminated surface, this was then reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with subsequent reaction of the now amine-terminated surface with p-phenylenediisothiocyanate. Water contact angle measurements both before and after modification showed a reduction in hydrophobicity from 101o for native PDMS to 94o for the isothiocyante-terminated PDMS. The isothiocyanate-terminated surface was then coupled with an amineterminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide capture probe via a thiourea linkage. Confirmation of capture probe attachment was observed using fluorescent microscopy after hybridization of the capture probes with fluorescently labeled complimentary ssDNA oligonucleotides.

  20. Detection of human papillomavirus type 6/11 DNA in conjunctival papillomas by in situ hybridization with radioactive probes

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.J.; McDonnell, J.M.; Kessis, T.; Green, W.R.; Shah, K.V.

    1987-11-01

    Twenty-three conjunctival papillomas and 28 conjunctival dysplasias were examined for human papillomavirus (HPV)-DNA sequences by in situ hybridization with nick-translated /sup 35/S-labeled HPV probes. Adjacent paraffin sections were hybridized with HPV type 2, 6, 16, and 18 probes at Tm - 17 degrees C. Fifteen tissues, all papillomas, displayed positive hybridization with the HPV-6 probe. Infection with HPV-6 (or the closely related HPV-11) appeared to be responsible for most of the conjunctival papillomas of children and young adults. The presence of genital tract HPV-6 in these lesions suggests that some of the infections were acquired during passage through an infected birth canal. The lack of hybridization in adult conjunctival dysplasias indicates either that HPVs are not associated with this condition or that the probes and the technique utilized were not adequate for demonstration of this association.

  1. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between anthragallol and DNA using of ethidium bromide as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Li, Junsheng; Huang, Guoxia; Yan, Liujuan; Dong, Zhen

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of DNA with anthragallol (Ant) was investigated using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe, and the binding mechanism of Ant with DNA was researched via viscosity measurements. The results indicate that there is a complex of Ant and DNA, as confirmed by Ultraviolet visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fluorescent and Resonance Light Scattering spectrum (RLS) and viscosity measurements. Ant molecules could intercalate with the base pairs of DNA as evidenced by the hyperchromic effect of absorption spectra, the relative viscosity of DNA and significant increases in the melting temperature. The binding constants of Ant and DNA were obtained by the fluorescence quenching technique. Furthermore, the binding mechanisms of the reaction of Ant with DNA were also investigated. The RLS assay successfully evaluated the saturated value and measured the potential toxicity of Ant. Adriamycin, chrysophanol, rhein, and alizarin can be used as references to build a method based on the mechanism of interactions with DNA and the DNA-saturation binding value to rapidly evaluate the potential toxicity of Ant.

  2. Development of species-specific hybridization probes for marine luminous bacteria by using in vitro DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wimpee, C.F.; Nadeau, T.L.; Nealson, K.H. )

    1991-05-01

    By using two highly conserved regions of the luxA gene as primers, polymerase chain reaction amplification methods were used to prepare species-specific probes against the luciferase gene from four major groups of marine luminous bacteria. Laboratory studies with test strains indicated that three of the four probes cross-reacted with themselves and with one or more of the other species at low stringencies but were specific for members of their own species at high stringencies. The fourth probe, generated from Vibrio harveyi DNA, a cross-reacted with DNAs from two closely related species, V. orientalis and V. vulnificus. When nonluminous cultures were tested with the species-specific probes, no false-positive results were observed, even at low stringencies. Two field isolates were correctly identified as Photobacterium phosphoreum by using the species-specific hybridization probes at high stringency. A mixed probe (four different hybridization probes) used at low stringency gave positive results with all of the luminous bacteria tested, including the terrestrial species Xenorhabdus luminescens, and the taxonomically distinct marine bacterial species Shewanella hanedai; minimal cross-hybridization with these species was seen at higher stringencies.

  3. Sensitive and specific detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii with DNA primers and probes identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Manulis, S; Valinsky, L; Lichter, A; Gabriel, D W

    1994-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA method was used to distinguish strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii from 21 other Xanthomonas species and/or pathovars. Among the 42 arbitrarily chosen primers evaluated, 3 were found to reveal diagnostic polymorphisms when purified DNAs from compared strains were amplified by the PCR. The three primers revealed DNA amplification patterns which were conserved among all 53 strains tested of X. campestris pv. pelargonii isolated from various locations worldwide. The distinctive X. compestris pv. pelargonii patterns were clearly different from those obtained with any of 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. An amplified 1.2-kb DNA fragment, apparently unique to X. campestris pv. pelargonii by these random amplified polymorphic DNA tests, was cloned and evaluated as a diagnostic DNA probe. It hybridized with total DNA from all 53 X. campestris pv. pelargonii strains tested and not with any of the 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. The DNA sequence of the terminal ends of this 1.2-kb fragment was obtained and used to design a pair of 18-mer oligonucleotide primers specific for X. campestris pv. pelargonii. The custom-synthesized primers amplified the same 1.2-kb DNA fragment from all 53 X. campestris pv. pelargonii strains tested and failed to amplify DNA from any of the 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. DNA isolated from saprophytes associated with the geranium plant also did not produce amplified DNA with these primers. The sensitivity of the PCR assay using the custom-synthesized primers was between 10 and 50 cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7993095

  4. New Concepts of Fluorescent Probes for Specific Detection of DNA Sequences: Bis-Modified Oligonucleotides in Excimer and Exciplex Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gbaj, A; Bichenkova, EV; Walsh, L; Savage, HE; Sardarian, AR; Etchells, LL; Gulati, A; Hawisa, S; Douglas, KT

    2009-01-01

    The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5′-bispyrene and 3′-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5′-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5′-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing. PMID:21483539

  5. DNA-based stable isotope probing coupled with cultivation methods implicates Methylophaga in hydrocarbon degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mishamandani, Sara; Gutierrez, Tony; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the oxidation and ultimate removal of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. Those with an almost exclusive ability to utilize hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source have been found confined to just a few genera. Here we used stable isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in coastal North Carolina sea water (Beaufort Inlet, USA) with uniformly labeled [13C]n-hexadecane. The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from n-hexadecane enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Alcanivorax, with ≤98% sequence identity to the closest type strain—thus representing a putative novel phylogenetic taxon within this genus. Unexpectedly, we also identified 13C-enriched sequences in heavy DNA fractions that were affiliated to the genus Methylophaga. This is a contentious group since, though some of its members have been proposed to degrade hydrocarbons, substantive evidence has not previously confirmed this. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Alcanivorax and Methylophaga to determine their abundance in incubations amended with unlabeled n-hexadecane. Both showed substantial increases in gene copy number during the experiments. Subsequently, we isolated a strain representing the SIP-identified Methylophaga sequences (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) and used it to show, for the first time, direct evidence of hydrocarbon degradation by a cultured Methylophaga sp. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the marine environment. PMID:24578702

  6. High Performance DNA Probes for Perinatal Detection of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Kalistyn H; Weier, Jingly F; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Human reproduction is a tightly controlled process of stepwise evolution with multiple, mostly yet unknown milestones and checkpoints. Healthy halpoid gametes have to be produced by the parents, which will fuse to form the diploid zygote that implants in the female uterus and grows to become first an embryo, then a fetus and finally matures into a newborn. There are several known risk factors that interfere with normal production of gametes, spermatocytes or oocytes, and often cause embryonic mortality and fetal demise at an early stage. Yet some embryos with chomosomal abnormalities can develop beyond the critical first trimester of pregnancy and, while those with supernumary chromosomes in their hyperdiploid cells will be spontaneously aborted, a small fraction of fetuses with an extra chromosome continues to grow to term and will be delivered as a liveborn baby. While minor clinical symptoms displayed by children with trisomies are manageable for many parents, the burden of caring for a child with numerical chromosome abnormalities can be overwhelming to partners or individual families. It also poses a significant financial burden to the society and poses ethical dilemma. In this communication, we will review the progress that has been made in the development of molecular techniques to test individual fetal cells for chromosomal imbalances. We will focus our discussion on the direct visualization of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in live or fixed specimens using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and, more specifically, talk about the groundbreaking progress that in recent years has been achieved towards an improved diagnosis with novel, chromosome-specific DNA probes. PMID:26855976

  7. Detection of DNA hybridization and extension reactions by an extended-gate field-effect transistor: characterizations of immobilized DNA-probes and role of applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage onto a reference electrode.

    PubMed

    Kamahori, Masao; Ishige, Yu; Shimoda, Maki

    2008-02-28

    As we have already shown in a previous publication [Kamahori, M., Ihige, Y., Shimoda, M., 2007. Anal. Sci. 23, 75-79], an extended-gate field-effect transistor (FET) sensor with a gold electrode, on which both DNA probes and 6-hydroxyl-1-hexanethiol (6-HHT) molecules are immobilized, can detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to a reference electrode. However, kinetic parameters such as the dissociation constant (K(d)(s)) and the apparent DNA-probe concentration (C(probe)(s)) on a surface were not clarified. In addition, the role of applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage was not considered in detail. In this study, the values of K(d)(s) and C(probe)(s) were estimated using a method involving single-base extension reaction combined with bioluminescence detection. The value of K(d)(s) on the surface was 0.38 microM, which was about six times that in a liquid phase. The value of C(probe)(s), which expressed the upper detection limit for the solid phase reaction, was 0.079 microM at a DNA-probe density of 2.6 x 10(12)molecules/cm(2). We found that applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage accelerated the DNA molecules to reach the gold surface. Also, the distance between the DNA-probes immobilized on the gold surface was controlled to be over 6 nm by applying a method of competitive reaction with DNA probes and 6-HHT molecules. This space was sufficient to enable the immobilized DNA-probes to lie down on the 6-HHT monolayer in the space between them. Thus, the FET sensor could detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to the DNA-probes density-controlling gold surface. PMID:18054478

  8. Photophysical properties of hydroxyphenyl benzazoles and their applications as fluorescent probes to study local environment in DNA, protein and lipid.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Saba A J; Al-Rasbi, Ghalia S; Abou-Zied, Osama K

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence techniques have drawn increasing attention because they provide crucial information about molecular interactions in protein-ligand systems beyond that obtained by other methods. The advantage of fluorescence spectroscopy stems from the fact that the majority of molecules in biological systems do not exhibit fluorescence, making fluorescent probes useful with high sensitivity. Also, the fluorescence emission is highly sensitive to the local environment, providing a valuable tool to investigate the nature of binding sites in macromolecules. In this review, we discuss some of the important applications of a class of molecules that have been used as fluorescent probes in a variety of studies. Hydroxyphenyl benzazoles (HBXs) show distinct spectroscopic features that make them suitable probes for the study of certain biological mechanisms in DNA, protein and lipid. In particular, the complex photophysics of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and the distinguished fluorescence signatures of its different tautomeric forms make this molecule a useful probe in several applications. Among these are probing the DNA local environment, study of the flexibility and specificity of protein-binding sites, and detecting the heterogeneity and ionization ability of the head groups of different lipidic phases. The spectroscopy of HBX molecules and some of their chemically modified structures is also reviewed. PMID:26910188

  9. Multiple DNA Extractions Coupled with Stable-Isotope Probing of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Contaminated Soil▿†

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Singleton, David R.; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the 13C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-13C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from 13C-enriched DNA and were designated “anthracene group 1.” Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP. PMID:21398486

  10. Rapid and correct identification of intestinal Bacteroides spp. with chromosomal DNA probes by whole-cell dot blot hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi, M.; Ohno, T.; Mutai, M.

    1988-05-01

    A dot blot hybridization procedure with /sup 32/P-labeled whole chromosomal DNA of the type strains as probes was developed as a rapid and simple method for identification of intestinal Bacteroides species. Bacterial cells were fixed onto membrane filters by slight suction, treated with 0.5 N NaOH, and hybridized with these probes. Of 65 Bacteroides strains isolated from 19 human fecal specimens, which were identified as B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. caccae, B. uniformis, B. stercoris, B. vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. merdae by conventional phenotypic characterization, 62 (95%) were correctly identified with this hybridization procedure.

  11. Time-resolved probes based on guanine/thymine-rich DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium(III).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we have developed a novel strategy to highly sensitize the luminescence of terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) using a designed guanine/thymine-rich DNA (5'-[G3T]5-3') as an antenna ligand, in which [G3T]5 improved the luminescence of Tb(3+) by 3 orders of magnitude due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to Tb(3+) (i.e., antenna effect). Furthermore, label-free probes for the luminescent detection of biothiols, Ag(+), and sequence-specific DNA in an inexpensive, simple, and mix-and-read format are presented based on the [G3T]5-sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) (GTSLT). The long luminescence lifetime of the probes readily enables time-resolved luminescence (TRL) experiments. Hg(2+) can efficiently quench the luminescence of Tb(3+) sensitized by [G3T]5 (Tb(3+)/[G3T]5); however, biothiols are readily applicable to selectively grab Hg(2+) for restoration of the luminescence of Tb(3+)/[G3T]5 initially quenched by Hg(2+), which can be used for "turn on" detection of biothiols. With the use of cytosine (C)-rich oligonucleotide c[G3T]5 complementary to [G3T]5, the formed [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex cannot sensitize the luminescence of Tb(3+). However, in the presence of Ag(+), Ag(+) can combine the C base of c[G3T]5 to form C-Ag(+)-C complexes, leading to the split of the [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex and then release of [G3T]5. The released [G3T]5 acts as an antenna ligand for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+). Therefore, the Tb(3+)/[G3T]5/c[G3T]5 probe can be applied to detect Ag(+) in a "turn on" format. Moreover, recognition of target DNA via hybridization to a molecular beacon (MB)-like probe (MB-[G3T]5) can unfold the MB-[G3T]5 to release the [G3T]5 for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of target DNA of interest. This allows the development of a fascinating label-free MB probe for DNA sensing based on the luminescence of Tb(3+). Results and methods reported here suggest that a guanine/thymine-rich DNA

  12. A model of binding on DNA microarrays: understanding the combined effect of probe synthesis failure, cross-hybridization, DNA fragmentation and other experimental details of affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used both for research and for diagnostics. In research, Affymetrix arrays are commonly used for genome wide association studies, resequencing, and for gene expression analysis. These arrays provide large amounts of data. This data is analyzed using statistical methods that quite often discard a large portion of the information. Most of the information that is lost comes from probes that systematically fail across chips and from batch effects. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive model for hybridization that predicts probe intensities for Affymetrix arrays and that could provide a basis for improved microarray analysis and probe development. The first part of the model calculates probe binding affinities to all the possible targets in the hybridization solution using the Langmuir isotherm. In the second part of the model we integrate details that are specific to each experiment and contribute to the differences between hybridization in solution and on the microarray. These details include fragmentation, wash stringency, temperature, salt concentration, and scanner settings. Furthermore, the model fits probe synthesis efficiency and target concentration parameters directly to the data. All the parameters used in the model have a well-established physical origin. Results For the 302 chips that were analyzed the mean correlation between expected and observed probe intensities was 0.701 with a range of 0.88 to 0.55. All available chips were included in the analysis regardless of the data quality. Our results show that batch effects arise from differences in probe synthesis, scanner settings, wash strength, and target fragmentation. We also show that probe synthesis efficiencies for different nucleotides are not uniform. Conclusions To date this is the most complete model for binding on microarrays. This is the first model that includes both probe synthesis efficiency and hybridization kinetics/cross-hybridization. These

  13. Luminescent platinum(II) complexes with functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene or diphosphine selectively probe mismatched and abasic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Sin Ki; Zou, Taotao; Cao, Bei; Chen, Tianfeng; To, Wai-Pong; Yang, Chen; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The selective targeting of mismatched DNA overexpressed in cancer cells is an appealing strategy in designing cancer diagnosis and therapy protocols. Few luminescent probes that specifically detect intracellular mismatched DNA have been reported. Here we used Pt(II) complexes with luminescence sensitive to subtle changes in the local environment and report several Pt(II) complexes that selectively bind to and identify DNA mismatches. We evaluated the complexes' DNA-binding characteristics by ultraviolet/visible absorption titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. These Pt(II) complexes show up to 15-fold higher emission intensities upon binding to mismatched DNA over matched DNA and can be utilized for both detecting DNA abasic sites and identifying cancer cells and human tissue samples with different levels of mismatch repair. Our work highlights the potential of luminescent Pt(II) complexes to differentiate between normal cells and cancer cells which generally possess more aberrant DNA structures. PMID:26883164

  14. Cultivation-independent detection of autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C

    2011-07-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of (13)CO(2) was H(2) dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from (13)C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H(2) concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation. PMID:21622787

  15. Parity among the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA method, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and Southern blot hybridization with the moderately repetitive DNA probe Ca3 for fingerprinting Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, C; Joly, S; Lockhart, S R; Noel, S; Tibayrenc, M; Soll, D R

    1997-01-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and Southern blot hybridization with moderately repetitive DNA probes have emerged as effective fingerprinting methods for the infectious fungus Candida albicans. The three methods have been compared for their capacities to identify identical or highly related isolates, to cluster weakly related isolates, to discriminate between unrelated isolates, and to assess microevolution within a strain. By computing similarity coefficients between 29 isolates from three cities within the continental United States, strong concordance of the results is demonstrated for RAPD analysis, MLEE, and Southern blot hybridization with the moderately repetitive probe Ca3, and weaker concordance of the results is demonstrated for these three fingerprinting methods and Southern blot hybridization with the moderately repetitive probe CARE2. All methods were also demonstrated to be able to resolve microevolution within a strain, with the Ca3 probe exhibiting the greatest resolving power. The strong correlations demonstrated between polymorphic markers assessed by the four independent fingerprinting methods and the nonrandom association between loci demonstrated by RAPD analysis and MLEE provide evidence for strong linkage disequilibrium and a clonal population structure for C. albicans. In addition, a synapomorphic allele, Pep-3A, was found to be present in all members of one of the three clusters discriminated by RAPD analysis, MLEE, and Ca3 fingerprinting, supporting the concordance of the clustering capacities of the three methods, the robustness of the clusters, and the clonal nature of the clusters. PMID:9276415

  16. Development & evaluation of biotinylated DNA probe for clinical diagnosis of chikungunya infection in patients’ acute phase serum & CSF samples

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jyoti S.; Parida, Manmohan; Lakshmana Rao, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: The resurgence of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in the Indian Ocean Islands and India has drawn worldwide attention due to its explosive nature, high morbidity and complex clinico-pathological manifestations. The early confirmatory diagnosis of CHIKV is essential for management as well as control of unprecedented epidemics. The present study describes the development and evaluation of a highly sensitive and specific E1 structural gene specific biotinylated DNA probe for detection of chikungunya virus in clinical samples using a dot blot format. Methods: The complementary DNA (cDNA) of CHIKV was spotted on to nylon membrane. The membrane was subjected to prehybridization and hybridization and developed using a colour development solution containing DAB chromogen. Results: The CHIKV E1 specific DNA probe was highly sensitive detecting picogram levels of target nucleic acid. The comparative evaluation with SYBR Green I based real-time RT-PCR revealed 99 per cent accordance with a sensitivity and specificity of 99 and 98 per cent, respectively. The specificity of this assay was further confirmed through cross-reaction studies with confirmed dengue and Japanese encephalitis (JE) patient serum samples along with infected culture supernatant of Ross River and Saint Louis encephalitis and plasmid DNA of O’Nyong Nyong, Semlinki forest and Sindbis viruses. Interpretation & conclusion: The DNA probe reported in this study may be useful for specific, sensitive and confirmatory clinical diagnosis of chikungunya infection in acute phase human patient serum and CSF samples. This assay can also be used in the laboratory for quantification of viral antigen in cell culture supernatant for research purpose. PMID:24056565

  17. Fluorescence imaging of single-copy DNA sequences within the human genome using PNA-directed padlock probe assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yaroslavsky, Anastasia I.; Smolina, Irina V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a novel approach for fluorescent in situ detection of short, single-copy sequences within genomic DNA in human cells. The single copy sensitivity and single base specificity of our method is achieved due to the combination of three components. First, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe locally opens a chosen target site, which allows a padlock DNA probe to access the site and become ligated. Second, rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates thousands of single-stranded copies of the target sequence. Finally, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to visualize the amplified DNA. We validate this new technique by successfully detecting six unique target sites on human mitochondrial and autosomal DNA. We also demonstrate the high specificity of this method by detecting X- and Y- specific sequences on human sex chromosomes and by simultaneously detecting three unique target sites. Finally, we discriminate two target sites that differ by two nucleotides. The PNA-RCA-FISH approach is a unique in situ hybridization method capable of multi-target visualization within human chromosomes and nuclei that does not require DNA denaturation and is extremely sequence specific. PMID:23521801

  18. Genetic variation detected by use of the M13 "DNA fingerprint" probe in Malus, Prunus, and Rubus (Rosaceae).

    PubMed

    Nybom, H; Rogstad, S H; Schaal, B A

    1990-02-01

    Recently, "DNA fingerprints" have been reported in a wide array of organisms. We used the M13 repeat probe on several genera and species in the angiosperm family Rosaceae. Four apple cultivars could be differentiated when any one of five restriction enzymes was used to analyze minisatellite DNA. Similarly, four individual trees of Prunus serotina (black cherry) exhibited different "fingerprints" with each of four enyzmes. A total of 14 Rubus (blackberries and raspberries) plants representing four species were investigated with two enzymes. Extensive inter-and intraspecific variation was found. However, some closely growing plants had identical "fingerprints", probably due to their being derived through vegetative propagation. PMID:24226211

  19. Method to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification using an ionically labeled probe and measuring impedance change

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Belgrader, Phillip; Fuller, Christopher D.

    2007-01-02

    Impedance measurements are used to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification. A pair of spaced electrodes are located on a surface of a microfluidic channel and an AC or DC voltage is applied across the electrodes to produce an electric field. An ionically labeled probe will attach to a complementary DNA segment, and a polymerase enzyme will release the ionic label. This causes the conductivity of the solution in the area of the electrode to change. This change in conductivity is measured as a change in the impedance been the two electrodes.

  20. Homology probing: identification of cDNA clones encoding members of the protein-serine kinase family

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed /sup 32/P-labeled oligonucleotide probes were used to screen a HeLa cDNA library for clones encoding amino acid contiguities whose conservation is characteristic of the protein-serine kinase family. Eighty thousand clones were screened, from which 19 were identified as showing strong hybridization to two distinct probes. Four clones were chosen for characterization by partial DNA sequence analysis and 3 of these were found to encode amino acid sequences typical of protein-serine kinases. One deduced amino acid sequence shares 72% identify with rabbit skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase ..gamma..-subunit, while another is closely related to the yeast protein-serine kinases CDC2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and CDC28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This screening approach should have applications in the identification of clones encoding previously unknown or poorly characterized members of other protein families.

  1. A comparative cytogenetic study of Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) using DNA-binding fluorochromes and FISH with 45S rDNA probe.

    PubMed

    Gokhman, Vladimir E; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Govind, Shubha; Muravenko, Olga V

    2016-06-01

    Karyotypes of Leptopilina boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979) (n = 9), L. heterotoma (Thomson, 1862) (n = 10), L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 (n = 10) and Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896) (n = 9) (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) were studied using DNA-binding ligands with different base specificity [propidium iodide (PI), chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)], and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S rDNA probe. Fluorochrome staining was similar between the different fluorochromes, except for a single CMA3- and PI-positive and DAPI-negative band per haploid karyotype of each species. FISH with 45S rDNA probe detected a single rDNA site in place of the bright CMA3-positive band, thus identifying the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). Chromosomal locations of NORs were similar for both L. heterotoma and L. victoriae, but strongly differed in L. boulardi as well as in G. xanthopoda. Phylogenetic aspects of NOR localization in all studied species are briefly discussed. PMID:27150102

  2. Clinical utility of a DNA probe to 17p11.2 in screening of patients with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancato, J.; Precht, K.; Meck, J.

    1994-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of in situ hybridization with a DNA probe to the area of chromosome 17 at p11.2 as a diagnostic tool for screening for Charcot Marte Tooth 1A (CMT 1A). In situ hybridization with a probe to 17p11.2 was performed on fixed lymphocytes from the following groups of individuals: (1) normal controls; (2) patients evoking a strong clinical suspicion of CMT 1A; and (3) 3 families with an apparent autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy of unknown diagnoses. Group 2 patients had evidence of demyelination as defined by nerve conduction of less that 50% of the normal mean or terminal latency greater than 50% of the normal mean in conduction studies. Analysis of interphase cells hybridized with a cosmid DNA probe to 17p11.2 requires inclusion of a normal control with each trial and masked observer. Due to the size of the target DNA and the nature of the centromeric heterochromatin, the scoring of this probe is more subjective than centromere probes. For example, if the two 17 chromosomes are decondensed as in interphase, two tandem signals may be visualized as one. Results from duplication positive patients demonstrate a large proportion of cells with two closely aligned, but separate, signals with an additional single signal. Normal results demonstrate a majority of cells with two separate signals representing both normal homologues. None of the 3 families with questionable diagnosis revealed a duplication at the region, reinforcing our belief that a clinical diagnosis is the most discriminating tool available for diagnosis of CMT 1A. We concur with Boylan that molecular analysis for CMT 1A is useful for establishing a diagnosis of CMT 1A, but is not a primary differential diagnostic test. The yield in screening patients without physiologic evidence of demyelination is likely to be low. We further find that the use of in situ hybridization is a simple method of performing the duplication analysis.

  3. A label-free DNA-templated silver nanocluster probe for fluorescence on-off detection of endonuclease activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yunxia; Zhang, Yaodong; Lu, Lu; Cai, Yanan

    2014-01-15

    Endonuclease cleavage of DNA plays an important role in biological and medicinal chemistry. This study aimed to develop a reliable and sensitive method for nuclease activity assay by combining the high specificity of DNA cleavage reactions with ultrahigh fluorescence turn-on abilities of guanine-rich (G-rich) DNA sequences in proximity to silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs). The DNA-templated Ag NC (DNA-Ag NC) probe with endonuclease recognition sequence consists of NC and a G-rich probe. The NC probe was designed by adding Ag NC nucleation sequence at the 5'-end. The G-rich probe is the complementary DNA sequence modified by adding a G-rich overhang sequence at the 3'-end. Thus, the fluorescence of DNA-Ag NC probe was activated because of DNA hybridization. When these DNA-Ag NC probes were exposed to the targeted endonucleases, specific DNA cleavages occurred, and pieces of G-rich DNA fragments separated from Ag NCs, resulting in fluorescence turn-off. The endonuclease activity was quantified by monitoring the change in the fluorescence intensity. Detection was demonstrated by assaying EcoRI activity. Under optimized conditions, the fluorescence reduction efficiency was linear with the EcoRI concentration in the range of 5.0×10(-4) U μL(-1) to 3.0×10(-3) U μL(-1), with a detection limit of 3.5×10(-4) U μL(-1), which is much better than or at least comparable with that in previous reports. The potential application of the proposed method for screening endonuclease inhibitors was also demonstrated. The presented assay protocol proved to be convenient, effective, sensitive, and easy in preparing the fluorescent probe. PMID:24001584

  4. Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) with YAC/BAC-based probes and region-specific microdissection DNA libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Liehr, T.; Weise, A.; Heller, A.; Starke, H.; Mrasek, K.; Kuechler, A.; Weier, H.-U.G.; Claussen, U.

    2003-06-23

    Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) allows the delineation of chromosomal regions with a resolution of a few mega base pairs, i.e., slightly below the size of most visible chromosome bands. Based on the hybridization of over lapping region-specific probe libraries, chromosomal subregions are hybridized with probes that fluoresce in distinct wave length intervals, so they can be assigned predefined pseudo-colors during the digital imaging and visualization process. The present study demonstrates how MCB patterns can be produced by region-specific micro dissection derived (mcd) libraries as well as collections of yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes (YACs and BACs, respectively). We compared the efficiency of an mcd library based approach with the hybridization of collections of locus-specific probes (LSP) for fluorescent banding of three rather differently sized human chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes 2, 13, and 22. The LSP sets were comprised of 107 probes specific for chromosome 2, 82 probes for chromosome 13, and 31 probes for chromosome 22. The results demonstrated a more homogeneous coverage of chromosomes and thus, more desirable banding patterns using the microdissection library-based MCB. This may be related to the observation that chromosomes are difficult to cover completely with YAC and/or BAC clones as single-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments showed. Mcd libraries, on the other hand, provide high complexity probes that work well as region specific paints, but do not readily allow positioning of break points on genetic or physical maps as required for the positional cloning of genes. Thus, combinations of mcd libraries and locus-specific large insert DNA probes appear to be the most efficient tools for high-resolution cytogenetic analyses.

  5. Fluorescence determination of DNA with 1-pyrenebutyric acid nanoparticles coated with β-cyclodextrin as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Bian, Guirong; Wang, Leyu; Dong, Ling; Chen, Hongqi; Xia, Tingting

    2005-04-01

    A novel ultrasonication method has been successfully developed for the preparation of 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBAC)/β-cyclodextrin(β-CD) complex nanoparticles. The as-prepared nanoparticles are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy. Complex nanoparticles prepared with ultrasonication are smaller and better dispersed than single PBAC nanoparticles. At pH 3.0, the relative fluorescence intensity of complex nanoparticles of PBAC/β-CD can be quenched by the concentration of DNA. Based on this, a novel fluorimetric method has been developed for rapid determination of DNA. In comparison with single organic fluorophores, these nanoparticle probes are better water-solubility, more stable and do not suffer from blinking. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range 0.2-15 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.3-12 μg mL -1 for fish sperm DNA (fs-DNA). The corresponding detection limit is 0.01 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.02 μg mL -1 for fs-DNA. The relative standard deviation of seven replicate measurements is 1.2% for 2.0 μg mL -1 ct-DNA and 1.4% for 2.0 μg mL -1 fs-DNA, respectively. The method is simple and sensitive. The recovery and relative standard deviation are very satisfactory. A mechanism proposed to explain the process also has been studied.

  6. Covalent linking DNA to graphene oxide and its comparison with physisorbed probes for Hg²⁺ detection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chang; Jimmy Huang, Po-Jung; Ying, Yibin; Liu, Juewen

    2016-05-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) has attracted extensive research interest as a platform for DNA adsorption and biosensor development. While most researchers use simple physisorption of fluorescently labeled DNA, covalent sensors are less susceptible to non-specific probe displacement and minimize false positive results. In this work, three thymine-rich DNA probes of different lengths are modified on their 3'-end with an amino group for covalent conjugation to GO. They also each contain an internally labeled fluorophore so that Hg(2+) binding can lead to a large distance increase between the fluorophore and the GO surface for fluorescence signaling. Hg(2+)-dependent fluorescence signaling from the covalent sensors are compared with that from the non-covalent sensors in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, signaling kinetics, and continuous monitoring. The covalent sensors are much more stable and resistant to non-specific probe displacement, while still retaining high sensitivity and similar selectivity. The detection limits are 16.3 and 20.6 nM Hg(2+), respectively, for the covalent and non-covalent sensors, and detection of spiked Hg(2+) in Lake Ontario water is demonstrated. PMID:26710342

  7. Poly(dG) spacers lead to increased surface coverage of DNA probes: an XPS study of oligonucleotide binding to zirconium phosphonate modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lane, Sarah M; Monot, Julien; Petit, Marc; Tellier, Charles; Bujoli, Bruno; Talham, Daniel R

    2008-07-15

    A spacer is often employed between the surface linking group and the probe sequence to improve the performance of DNA microarrays. Previous work demonstrated that a consecutive stretch of guanines as a spacer increased target capture during hybridization relative to probes with either no spacer or a similar stretch of one of the other nucleotides. Using zirconium phosphonate modified surfaces with 5'-phosphorylated ssDNA probes, the present study compares the surface coverage of ssDNA probes containing either a poly(dG) spacer or a poly(dA) spacer. Surface coverages are quantified by XPS using a modified overlayer model. The results show that after treatment to mimic conditions of the passivation and hybridization steps the probe with the poly(dG) spacer has about twice the surface coverage as the probe with the poly(dA) spacer, indicating that increased target capture is due to higher probe coverage. When monitoring the surface coverage after each rinsing step, it is observed that the probe with the poly(dA) spacer is more susceptible to rinsing, suggesting the interaction with the surface is different for the two probes. It is suggested that the formation of G quadruplexes causes an increased avidity of the probe for the zirconium phosphonate surface. PMID:18547070

  8. Transcription-Factor-Mediated DNA Looping Probed by High-Resolution, Single-Molecule Imaging in Live E. coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Zach; Xiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The “genetic switch” of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences OR and OL (separated by 2.3 kb), mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034), play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms. PMID:23853547

  9. Use of a multi-thermal washer for DNA microarrays simplifies probe design and gives robust genotyping assays

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Jesper; Poulsen, Lena; Petronis, Sarunas; Birgens, Henrik; Dufva, Martin

    2008-01-01

    DNA microarrays are generally operated at a single condition, which severely limits the freedom of designing probes for allele-specific hybridization assays. Here, we demonstrate a fluidic device for multi-stringency posthybridization washing of microarrays on microscope slides. This device is called a multi-thermal array washer (MTAW), and it has eight individually controlled heating zones, each of which corresponds to the location of a subarray on a slide. Allele-specific oligonucleotide probes for nine mutations in the beta-globin gene were spotted in eight identical subarrays at positions corresponding to the temperature zones of the MTAW. After hybridization with amplified patient material, the slides were mounted in the MTAW, and each subarray was exposed to different temperatures ranging from 22 to 40°C. When processed in the MTAW, probes selected without considering melting temperature resulted in improved genotyping compared with probes selected according to theoretical melting temperature and run under one condition. In conclusion, the MTAW is a versatile tool that can facilitate screening of a large number of probes for genotyping assays and can also enhance the performance of diagnostic arrays. PMID:18063568

  10. Use of a multiplexed CMOS microarray to optimize and compare oligonucleotide binding to DNA probes synthesized or immobilized on individual electrodes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Karl; Yazvenko, Nina; Wilmoth, Jodi; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda; Danley, David

    2010-01-01

    The CombiMatrix microarray with 12,544 electrodes supports in situ electrochemical synthesis of user-defined DNA probes. As an alternative, we immobilized commercially synthesized DNA probes on individual electrodes coated with electropolymerized polypyrrole (Ppy). Hybridization was measured using a biotinylated target oligonucleotide and either Cy5-streptavidin and fluorescence detection or horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and enzyme-enhanced electrochemical detection. Detection efficiencies were optimized by varying the deposition of the Ppy, the terminal groups on the DNA probes, and other factors that impacted fluorescence quenching and electrical conductivity. Optimized results were compared against those obtained using a microarray with the same DNA sequences synthesized in situ. Immobilized probes produced higher fluorescence signals, possibly by providing a greater stand off between the Cy5 on the target oligonucleotide and the quenching effects of the Ppy and the platinum electrode. PMID:22163607

  11. Use of a Multiplexed CMOS Microarray to Optimize and Compare Oligonucleotide Binding to DNA Probes Synthesized or Immobilized on Individual Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Karl; Yazvenko, Nina; Wilmoth, Jodi; Cooper, John; Lyon, Wanda; Danley, David

    2010-01-01

    The CombiMatrix microarray with 12,544 electrodes supports in situ electrochemical synthesis of user-defined DNA probes. As an alternative, we immobilized commercially synthesized DNA probes on individual electrodes coated with electropolymerized polypyrrole (Ppy). Hybridization was measured using a biotinylated target oligonucleotide and either Cy5-streptavidin and fluorescence detection or horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin and enzyme-enhanced electrochemical detection. Detection efficiencies were optimized by varying the deposition of the Ppy, the terminal groups on the DNA probes, and other factors that impacted fluorescence quenching and electrical conductivity. Optimized results were compared against those obtained using a microarray with the same DNA sequences synthesized in situ. Immobilized probes produced higher fluorescence signals, possibly by providing a greater stand off between the Cy5 on the target oligonucleotide and the quenching effects of the Ppy and the platinum electrode. PMID:22163607

  12. Electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for determining the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Meixing; Fan, Mengxing; Gu, Jinxing; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2014-03-18

    We report a new strategy for detection of the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene based on the electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for improving selectivity. PMID:24501739

  13. A simple and cost-effective molecular diagnostic system and DNA probes synthesized by light emitting diode photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksandrov, Sergiy; Kwon, Jung Ho; Lee, Ki-chang; Sujin-Ku; Paek, Mun Cheol

    2014-09-01

    This work introduces a novel chip to be used in the future as a simple and cost-effective method for creating DNA arrays using light emission diode (LED) photolithography. The DNA chip platform contains 24 independent reaction sites, which allows for the testing of a corresponding amount of patients' samples in hospital. An array of commercial UV LEDs and lens systems was combined with a microfluidic flow system to provide patterning of 24 individual reaction sites, each with 64 independent probes. Using the LED array instead of conventional laser exposure systems or micro-mirror systems significantly reduces the cost of equipment. The microfluidic system together with microfluidic flow cells drastically reduces the amount of used reagents, which is important due to the high cost of commercial reagents. The DNA synthesis efficiency was verified by fluorescence labeling and conventional hybridization.

  14. New luminescent probe based on a terbium(III) complex for studying DNA affinity of aminoalkoxy fluorenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorova, A. V.; Leonenko, I. I.; Scrypynets, Yu. V.; Antonovich, V. P.; Malzev, G. V.; Ukrainets, I. V.; Aleksandrova, D. I.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied the spectral luminescent properties of complexes of Tb(III) ions with a series of new derivatives of 2-oxo-4-hydroxyquinoline-3-carboxylic acid amides (L1-L4). We have established that DNA significantly enhances the 4f luminescence of terbium(III) in these complex compounds. We show satisfactory agreement between the logarithms of the DNA binding constants for a series of aminoalkoxy fluorenones (R1-R6), obtained using ethidium bromide and the complex Tb(III)-L1, which we propose using as a new luminescent probe for studying the affinity of drugs (prodrugs) for DNA molecules in a series of structurally similar biologically active substances.

  15. Direct Probing of Solvent Accessibility and Mobility at the Binding Interface of Polymerase (Dpo4)-DNA Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangzhong; Zhong, Dongping

    2014-03-01

    Water plays essential structural and dynamical roles in protein-DNA recognition through contributing to enthalpic or entropic stabilization of binding complex and by mediating intermolecular interactions and fluctuations for biological function. These interfacial water molecules are confined in nanospace but mostly highly mobile. Here, we report our studies of interfacial water dynamics in the binary and ternary complexes of a polymerase (Dpo4) with DNA and an incoming nucleotide using a site-specific tryptophan probe with femtosecond resolution. By systematic comparison of the interfacial water motions and local sidechain fluctuations in the apo, binary and ternary states of Dpo4, we observed that the DNA binding interface and active site is dynamically solvent accessible and the interfacial water dynamics are slightly slow but similar to the surface hydration water fluctuations on picosecond time scales. Our MD simulations also show the binding interface full of water molecules and nonspecific weak interactions with protein and DNA. Such a fluid binding interface facilitates the polymerase sliding on DNA for fast translocation while the spacious and mobile hydrated active site contributes to the low fidelity of the lesion-bypass Y-family DNA polymerase.

  16. Physical mapping of new DNA probes near the fragile X mutation (FRAXA) by using a panel of cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, G. K.; Hyland, V. J.; Callen, D. F.; Oberle, I.; Rocchi, M.; Thomas, N. S.; Morris, C. P.; Schwartz, C. E.; Schmidt, M.; Ropers, H. H.; Baker, E.; Oostra, B. A.; Dahl, N.; Wilson, P. J.; Hopwood, J. J.; Sutherland, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is a very common disorder, but there has been little progress toward isolating the fragile X mutation (FRAXA). We describe a panel of 14 somatic cell hybrid lines, lymphoblastoid cell lines, and peripheral lymphocytes with X-chromosome translocation or deletion breakpoints near FRAXA. The locations of the breakpoints were defined with 16 established probes between pX45d (DXS100) and St14–1 (DXS52). Seven of the cell lines had breakpoints between the probes RN1 (DXS369) and U6.2 (DXS304), which flank FRAXA at distances of 3–5 centimorgans. The panel of cell lines was used to localize 16 new DNA probes in this region. Six of the probes–VK16, VK18, VK23, VK24, VK37, and VK47–detected loci near FRAXA, and it was possible to order both the X-chromosome breakpoints and the probes in relation to FRAXA. The order of probes and loci near FRAXA is cen–RN1,VK24–VK47–VK23–VK16,FRAXA–VK21A–VK18–IDS–VK37–U6.2-qter. The breakpoints near FRAXA are sufficiently close together that probes localized with this panel can be linked on a large-scale restriction map by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This panel of cell lines will be valuable in rapidly localizing other probes near FRAXA. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:2378346

  17. A Rotational BODIPY Nucleotide: An Environment-Sensitive Fluorescence-Lifetime Probe for DNA Interactions and Applications in Live-Cell Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dziuba, Dmytro; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cebecauer, Marek; Hof, Martin; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent probes for detecting the physical properties of cellular structures have become valuable tools in life sciences. The fluorescence lifetime of molecular rotors can be used to report on variations in local molecular packing or viscosity. We used a nucleoside linked to a meso-substituted BODIPY fluorescent molecular rotor (dC(bdp)) to sense changes in DNA microenvironment both in vitro and in living cells. DNA incorporating dC(bdp) can respond to interactions with DNA-binding proteins and lipids by changes in the fluorescence lifetimes in the range 0.5-2.2 ns. We can directly visualize changes in the local environment of exogenous DNA during transfection of living cells. Relatively long fluorescence lifetimes and extensive contrast for detecting changes in the microenvironment together with good photostability and versatility for DNA synthesis make this probe suitable for analysis of DNA-associated processes, cellular structures, and also DNA-based nanomaterials. PMID:26768820

  18. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  19. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  20. Direct Probing of Solvent Accessibility and Mobility at the Binding Interface of Polymerase (Dpo4)-DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yangzhong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Luyuan; Fowler, Jason D.; Qiu, Weihong; Wang, Lijuan; Suo, Zucai; Zhong, Dongping

    2014-01-01

    Water plays essential structural and dynamical roles in protein-DNA recognition through contributing to enthalpic or entropic stabilization of binding complex and by mediating intermolecular interactions and fluctuations for biological function. These interfacial water molecules are confined by the binding partners in nanospace but in many cases they are highly mobile and exchange with outside bulk solution. Here, we report our studies of the interfacial water dynamics in the binary and ternary complexes of a polymerase (Dpo4) with DNA and an incoming nucleotide using a site-specific tryptophan probe with femtosecond resolution. By systematic comparison of the interfacial water motions and local sidechain fluctuations in the apo, binary and ternary states of Dpo4, we observed that the DNA binding interface and active site is dynamically solvent accessible and the interfacial water dynamics are similar to the surface hydration water fluctuations on picosecond time scales. Our molecular dynamics simulations also show the binding interface full of water molecules and nonspecific weak interactions. Such a fluid binding interface facilitates the polymerase sliding on DNA for fast translocation while the spacious and mobile hydrated active site contributes to the low fidelity of the lesion-bypass Y-family DNA polymerase. PMID:24308461

  1. Detection of Neospora from tissues of experimentally infected rhesus macaques by PCR and specific DNA probe hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Tarantal, A F; Lai, L T; Hendrickx, A G; Marsh, A E; Sverlow, K W; Packham, A E; Conrad, P A

    1997-07-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized Toxoplasma-like cyst-forming coccidian parasite that causes abortion or congenital infections in naturally or experimentally infected animals. In this study, pregnant rhesus macaques were inoculated with culture-derived tachyzoites of a bovine Neospora isolate, and tissue samples from various major organs were collected from dams and fetuses for the detection of parasite DNA by using oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 for PCR amplification of a conserved coccidial nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene sequence, and amplification products were confirmed by hybridization with a Neospora-specific DNA probe. PCR products were amplified from DNAs of different fetal monkey tissues, including brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, skin, and placenta. In addition, Neospora DNA was amplified from the brain, heart, and lung tissues of infected rhesus macaque dams. The PCR and probe hybridization system may provide an effective method for the detection of Neospora infection in fetuses and dams from nonhuman primates and may be useful in determining the zoonotic potential of Neospora. PMID:9196184

  2. Exclusion of alcohols from spermidine-DNA assemblies: probing the physical basis of preferential hydration.

    PubMed

    Hultgren, Anne; Rau, Donald C

    2004-06-29

    The interaction of the alcohols 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) and 2-propanol and of glycerol with condensed spermidine(3+)-DNA arrays are investigated with direct force measurements using osmotic stress coupled with X-ray scattering. Thermodynamic forces between DNA helices are measured from the dependence of helical interaxial spacings on the osmotic pressure applied by poly(ethylene glycol) solutions in equilibrium with the DNA phase. The sensitivity of these forces to solute concentration can be transformed into a change in the number of excess or deficit solutes or waters in the DNA phase by applying the Gibbs-Duhem equation. The alcohols examined are excluded from the condensed DNA array and strongly affect the osmotic stress force curves. DNA is preferentially hydrated. MPD is significantly more excluded than 2-propanol. The exclusion of these alcohols, however, is not due to a steric repulsion since glycerol that is intermediate in size between MPD and 2-propanol does not observably affect DNA force curves. As the distance between DNA helices varies, the change in the number of excess waters is independent of alcohol concentration for each alcohol. These solutes are acting osmotically on the condensed array. The distance dependence of exclusion indicates that repulsive water structuring forces dominate the interaction of alcohols with the DNA surface. The exclusion measured for these condensed arrays can quantitatively account for the effect of these alcohols on the precipitation of DNA from dilute solution by spermidine(3+). PMID:15209524

  3. Chromosome painting in plants: in situ hybridization with a DNA probe from a specific microdissected chromosome arm of common wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Vega, M; Abbo, S; Feldman, M; Levy, A A

    1994-01-01

    We report here on the successful painting of a specific plant chromosome within its own genome. Isochromosomes for the long arm of chromosome 5 of the wheat B genome (5BL) were microdissected from first meiotic metaphase spreads of a monoisosomic 5BL line of the common wheat Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring. The dissected isochromosomes were amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR in a single tube reaction. The amplified DNA was used as a complex probe mixture for fluorescent in situ hybridization on first meiotic metaphase spreads of lines carrying 5BL as a distinctive marker. Hybridization signals were observed, specifically, along the entire 5BL. In some of the cells, labeling was also detected in two bivalents, presumably those of the 5B "homoeologues" (partial homologues) found in common wheat (5A and 5D). The probe also revealed discrete domains in tapetal nuclei at interphase, further supporting the probe's high specificity. These data suggest that chromosome and homoeologous group-specific sequences are more abundant in 5BL than genome-specific sequences. Chromosome-painting probes, such as the one described here for 5BL, can facilitate the study of chromosome evolution in polyploid wheat. Images PMID:7991581

  4. Kinetic Adsorption Profile and Conformation Evolution at the DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Interface Probed by Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA–AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly. PMID:25222203

  5. Development of a DNA-Templated Peptide Probe for Photoaffinity Labeling and Enrichment of the Histone Modification Reader Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Lu, Congcong; Jin, Jin; Tian, Shanshan; Guo, Zhenchang; Chen, Pu; Zhai, Guijin; Zheng, Shuzhen; He, Xiwen; Fan, Enguo; Zhang, Yukui; Zhang, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (HPTMs) provide signal platforms to recruit proteins or protein complexes to regulate gene expression. Therefore, the identification of these recruited partners (readers) is essential to understand the underlying regulatory mechanisms. However, it is still a major challenge to profile these partners because their interactions with HPTMs are rather weak and highly dynamic. Herein we report the development of a HPTM dual probe based on DNA-templated technology and a photo-crosslinking method for the identification of HPTM readers. By using the trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4, we demonstrated that this HPTM dual probe can be successfully utilized for labeling and enrichment of HPTM readers, as well as for the discovery of potential HPTM partners. This study describes the development of a new chemical proteomics tool for profiling HPTM readers and can be adapted for broad biomedical applications. PMID:27169517

  6. In vitro DNA binding studies of antiretroviral drug nelfinavir using ethidium bromide as fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Ramana, M M V; Betkar, Rahul; Nimkar, Amey; Ranade, Prasanna; Mundhe, Balaji; Pardeshi, Sachin

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of small molecules with DNA has become an active research area at the interface between biology and chemistry. In the present work, we investigated the mode of interaction of nelfinavir (NFV) with herring sperm DNA (hs DNA) under physiological conditions using various biophysical techniques. Analysis of UV-absorption and fluorescence spectra indicates the formation of complex between NFV and hs DNA. According to the fluorescence results, the binding constant (K) between NFV and hs DNA was found to be 3.30 × 10(4)LM(-1). The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔH° and ΔS°) suggested that hydrogen bonding plays a major role in binding between them. Phosphate group binding studies revealed that there was no electrostatic interactions occurred between NFV and hs DNA. Circular dichroism (CD) and DNA melting curve were employed to measure the conformational change of hs DNA in the presence of NFV, which verified the minor groove binding mode. These results were further supported by viscosity measurements and competitive displacement assay study using Hoechst 33258. According to the sequence specificity experiments, NFV binds to A-T rich region of hs DNA. PMID:26310356

  7. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  8. Rabies RNA synthesis, detected with cDNA probes, as a marker for virus transport in the rat nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ermine, A; Ceccaldi, P E; Masson, G; Tsiang, H

    1993-02-01

    The kinetics of viral RNA synthesis in different parts of the rat brain, infected with fixed or street rabies virus strains, is correlated with their anatomical neuronal connections with the masseter muscles, using hybridization with rabies cDNA probes. Viral RNA synthesis is first detected in the brain-stem and in the pons where the direct anatomical projection of the masseter muscle nervous arborization into the sensory and motor nuclei is located, through the trigeminus nerve. Rabies RNA detection is delayed in the other regions of the rat brain depending on the time course of virus transport from the trigeminal nuclei through multiple nervous connections. PMID:7681151

  9. A H+/Ag+ dual-target responsive label-free light-up probe based on a DNA triplex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Guo, Yahui; Wang, Jine; Zhou, Lu; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Hong, Shanni; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Jianye; Pei, Renjun

    2015-05-01

    We developed a dual-target responsive sensor for label-free light-up fluorescent detection of protons (H(+)) and silver ions (Ag(+)) using an "OR'' logic gate. Berberine, a cost-effective and non-toxic indicator, partially intercalates the formed triplex DNA in the presence of H(+) or Ag(+), generating enhanced fluorescence. The designed Ag(+) probe has high selectivity and desirable sensitivity, which is necessary for practical use. The robust "OR" logic gate is capable of a rapid and reversible response to the H(+) and/or Ag(+) inputs. PMID:25663002

  10. Evaluation of culture methods and a DNA probe-based PCR assay for detection of Campylobacter species in clinical specimens of feces.

    PubMed

    Maher, Majella; Finnegan, Cathriona; Collins, Evelyn; Ward, Brid; Carroll, Cyril; Cormican, Martin

    2003-07-01

    Campylobacter species are the leading agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in developed countries. In this study 320 specimens of feces from patients with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis were cultured for Campylobacter species by direct plating on modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar and by enrichment in modified Preston broth, with or without blood added, for 48 h at 37 degrees C prior to plating. A 16S/23S PCR/DNA probe membrane-based colorimetric detection assay was evaluated on a subset of the feces (n = 127), including 18 culture-positive and 109 culture-negative specimens. DNA was extracted directly from the fecal specimens by using the QIAamp DNA stool Minikit for the DNA probe-based PCR assay (PCR/DNA probe assay). A second PCR/DNA probe assay based on the 16S rRNA gene in Campylobacter spp. was applied to all specimens that were culture negative, PCR/DNA positive on initial analysis. Campylobacter species were cultured in 20 of the 320 specimens. The 16S/23S PCR/DNA probe assay detected campylobacter DNA in 17 of 18 (94% sensitivity) culture-positive specimens and in 41 (38%) culture-negative specimens. The presence of campylobacter DNA in 35 of 41 culture-negative specimens was confirmed by the 16S PCR/DNA probe assay. DNA sequence analysis of seven 16S/23S PCR products and five 16S PCR products amplified from a selection of these specimens confirmed the presence of campylobacter DNA and more specifically Campylobacter jejuni, C. concisus, C. curvus, and C. gracilis DNA in these specimens. The molecular assays described in this study are rapid methods for the detection and identification of Campylobacter species in fecal specimens. The finding of Campylobacter spp. DNA in a large number of specimens of feces from patients with no other identified cause of diarrhea may suggest that Campylobacter spp. other than C. jejuni and C. coli may account for a proportion of cases of acute gastroenteritis in which no etiological agent is currently

  11. Evaluation of Culture Methods and a DNA Probe-Based PCR Assay for Detection of Campylobacter Species in Clinical Specimens of Feces

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Majella; Finnegan, Cathriona; Collins, Evelyn; Ward, Brid; Carroll, Cyril; Cormican, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Campylobacter species are the leading agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in developed countries. In this study 320 specimens of feces from patients with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis were cultured for Campylobacter species by direct plating on modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar and by enrichment in modified Preston broth, with or without blood added, for 48 h at 37°C prior to plating. A 16S/23S PCR/DNA probe membrane-based colorimetric detection assay was evaluated on a subset of the feces (n = 127), including 18 culture-positive and 109 culture-negative specimens. DNA was extracted directly from the fecal specimens by using the QIAamp DNA stool Minikit for the DNA probe-based PCR assay (PCR/DNA probe assay). A second PCR/DNA probe assay based on the 16S rRNA gene in Campylobacter spp. was applied to all specimens that were culture negative, PCR/DNA positive on initial analysis. Campylobacter species were cultured in 20 of the 320 specimens. The 16S/23S PCR/DNA probe assay detected campylobacter DNA in 17 of 18 (94% sensitivity) culture-positive specimens and in 41 (38%) culture-negative specimens. The presence of campylobacter DNA in 35 of 41 culture-negative specimens was confirmed by the 16S PCR/DNA probe assay. DNA sequence analysis of seven 16S/23S PCR products and five 16S PCR products amplified from a selection of these specimens confirmed the presence of campylobacter DNA and more specifically Campylobacter jejuni, C. concisus, C. curvus, and C. gracilis DNA in these specimens. The molecular assays described in this study are rapid methods for the detection and identification of Campylobacter species in fecal specimens. The finding of Campylobacter spp. DNA in a large number of specimens of feces from patients with no other identified cause of diarrhea may suggest that Campylobacter spp. other than C. jejuni and C. coli may account for a proportion of cases of acute gastroenteritis in which no etiological agent is currently identified

  12. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplex. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. (2011) Journal of Organic Chemistry 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γMPPNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that γMPPNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ∼ 0.030 ± 0.01 sec-1 for γMPPNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs. 0.375 ± 0.18 sec-1 for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γMPPNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γMPPNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  13. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  14. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  15. Preclinical detection of porcine circovirus type 2 infection using an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xiujuan; Du, Qian; Wang, Fengyu; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wenlong; Tong, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) has emerged as one of the most important pathogens affecting swine production globally. Preclinical identification of PCV2 is very important for effective prophylaxis of PCV2-associated diseases. In this study, we developed an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (UNDP-PCR) for PCV2 detection. Magnetic microparticles coated with PCV2 specific DNA probes were used to enrich PCV2 DNA from samples, then gold nanoparticles coated with PCV2 specific oligonucleotides were added to form a sandwich nucleic acid-complex. After the complex was formed, the oligonucleotides were released and characterized by PCR. This assay exhibited about 500-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR, with a detection limit of 2 copies of purified PCV2 genomic DNA and 10 viral copies of PCV2 in serum. The assay has a wide detection range for all of PCV2 genotypes with reliable reproducibility. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other related viruses including porcine circovirus type 1, porcine parvovirus, porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and classical swine fever virus. The positive detection rate of PCV2 specific UNDP-PCR in 40 preclinical field samples was 27.5%, which appeared greater than that by conventional and real-time PCR and appeared application potency in evaluation of the viral loads levels of preclinical infection samples. The UNDP-PCR assay reported here can reliably rule out false negative results from antibody-based assays, provide a nucleic acid extraction free, specific, ultrasensitive, economic and rapid diagnosis method for preclinical PCV2 infection in field, which may help prevent large-scale outbreaks. PMID:24842840

  16. Detecting variants with Metabolic Design, a new software tool to design probes for explorative functional DNA microarray development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microorganisms display vast diversity, and each one has its own set of genes, cell components and metabolic reactions. To assess their huge unexploited metabolic potential in different ecosystems, we need high throughput tools, such as functional microarrays, that allow the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes. However, most classical functional microarrays use specific probes that monitor only known sequences, and so fail to cover the full microbial gene diversity present in complex environments. We have thus developed an algorithm, implemented in the user-friendly program Metabolic Design, to design efficient explorative probes. Results First we have validated our approach by studying eight enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the model strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. EPA505 using a designed microarray of 8,048 probes. As expected, microarray assays identified the targeted set of genes induced during biodegradation kinetics experiments with various pollutants. We have then confirmed the identity of these new genes by sequencing, and corroborated the quantitative discrimination of our microarray by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we have assessed metabolic capacities of microbial communities in soil contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. Results show that our probe design (sensitivity and explorative quality) can be used to study a complex environment efficiently. Conclusions We successfully use our microarray to detect gene expression encoding enzymes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation for the model strain. In addition, DNA microarray experiments performed on soil polluted by organic pollutants without prior sequence assumptions demonstrate high specificity and sensitivity for gene detection. Metabolic Design is thus a powerful, efficient tool that can be used to design explorative probes and monitor metabolic pathways in complex environments, and it may also be used to

  17. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    PubMed

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions. PMID:24310436

  18. Comparative study of antipneumocystis agents in rats by using a Pneumocystis carinii-specific DNA probe to quantitate infection.

    PubMed Central

    Liberator, P A; Anderson, J W; Powles, M; Pittarelli, L A; Worley, M; Becker-Hapak, M; Graves, D C; Schmatz, D M

    1992-01-01

    A repetitive genomic DNA clone (B12-2) that specifically hybridizes to Pneumocystis carinii DNA has been identified. No cross-hybridization to genomic DNA prepared from bacteria, other fungi, protozoa, or mammals was observed. Clone B12-2 is multiply represented in the P. carinii genome. By direct hybridization to DNA prepared from the lungs of immunosuppressed rats, the probe can detect the equivalent of fewer than 1,000 P. carinii organisms. A hybridization assay employing clone B12-2 has been developed to quantitate organism load in the rat model for P. carinii. Application of the assay to track the accumulation of organisms during the immunosuppression regimen as well as to monitor the efficacy of two drug therapies used clinically for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia is described here. The clone B12-2 hybridization assay for the determination of P. carinii organism load possesses several advantageous features and thus should serve to complement conventional staining and immunohistochemical methods. Images PMID:1452667

  19. 16S rDNA-based probes for two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading soil Mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaswami, M.; Feldhake, D.J.; Loper, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    PAHs are a class of widespread pollutants, some of which have been shown to be genotoxic, hence the fate of these compounds in the environment is of considerable interest. Research on the biodegradation of 4 and 5 ring PAHs has been limited by the general lack of microbial isolates or consortia which can completely degrade these toxicants. Heitkamp and Cerniglia have described an oxidative soil Mycobacterium-strain PYR-1 that metabolizes pyrene and fluoranthene more rapidly than the 2 and 3 ring naphthalene and phenanthrene; although some metabolites of benzo-(a)-pyrene (BaP) were detected, no mineralization of BaP was observed. In 1991 Grosser et al. reported the isolation of a Mycobacterium sp. which mineralizes pyrene and also causing some mineralization of BaP. Their study describes a comparative analysis of these two strains, which show very similar colony morphology, growth rate and yellow-orange pigmentation. Genetic differences were shown by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) using two arbitrary GC-rich octanucleotide primers, and by sequence comparison of PCR amplified 16S rDNA, although both strains show similarity closest to that of the genus Mycobacteria. These 16S rDNA sequences are in use for the construction of strain-specific DNA probes to monitor the presence, survival and growth of these isolates in PAH-contaminated soils in studies of biodegradation.

  20. Application of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) to study DNA drug complexes and probing helical propensity of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Marek; Cieplak, Piotr

    2005-05-01

    We present the preliminary results of two computer experiments involving the application of an external force to molecular systems. In the first experiment we simulated the process of pulling out a simple intercalator, the 9-aminoacridine molecule, from its complex with a short DNA oligonucleotide in aqueous solution. Removing a drug from the DNA is assumed to be an opposite process to the complex formation. The force and energy profiles suggest that formation of the DNA-9-aminoacridine complex is preferred when the acridine approaches the DNA from the minor groove rather than the major groove side. For a given mode of pulling the intercalation process is also shown to be nucleotide sequence dependent. In another computer experiment we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations for stretching short, containing 15 amino acids, helical polypeptides in aqueous solution using an external force. The purpose of these simulations is to check whether this type of approach is sensitive enough to probe the sequence dependent helical propensity of short polypeptides.

  1. Synthesis and Assessment of DNA/Silver Nanoclusters Probes for Optimal and Selective Detection of Tristeza Virus Mild Strains.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Ehsan; Hosseini, Morteza; Faridbod, Farnoush; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2016-09-01

    Citrus Tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most destructive pathogens worldwide that exist as a mixture of malicious (Sever) and tolerable (Mild) strains. Mild strains of CTV can be used to immunize healthy plants from more Severe strains damage. Recently, innovative methods based on the fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters have been developed for molecular detection purposes. In this study, a simple procedure was followed to create more active DNA/AgNCs probe for accurate and selective detection of Tristeza Mild-RNA. To this end, four distinct DNA emitter scaffolds (C12, Red, Green, Yellow) were tethered to the Mild capture sequence and investigated in various buffers in order to find highly emissive combinations. Then, to achieve specific and reliable results, several chemical additives, including organic solvents, PEG and organo-soluble salts were used to enhance control fluorescence signals and optimize the hybridization solution. The data showed that, under adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity is enhanced by a factor of five and the high discrimination between Mild and Severe RNAs were obtained. The emission ratio of the DNA/AgNCs was dropped in the presence of target RNAs and I0/I intensity linearly ranged from 1.5 × 10(-8) M to 1.8 × 10(-6) M with the detection limit of 4.3 × 10(-9) M. PMID:27349801

  2. Contact-dependent regulation of vinculin expression in cultured fibroblasts: a study with vinculin-specific cDNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Bendori, R; Salomon, D; Geiger, B

    1987-01-01

    Vinculin specific cDNA clones were isolated from chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cDNA library in lambda gt11. The clones, ranging in size from 2.8 to 5.0 kb, were initially selected by rabbit antibodies to vinculin. Their identity was further confirmed by their specific reactivities with a battery of different vinculin-specific monoclonal antibodies. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme digested chicken spleen DNA suggested that all the isolated cDNA clones correspond to the same gene(s). Northern blot hybridization revealed that the vinculin-specific cDNA clones react with a single 6.5 kb mRNA in total cellular RNA preparations of CEF, whole chicken embryos and chicken gizzard smooth muscle. Moreover, fractionation of CEF poly(A)+ RNA by sucrose gradient centrifugation followed by translation in cell free system indicated that the mRNA coding for vinculin has a size of about 6.0-7.0 kb. The identity of these clones was finally confirmed by selection hybridization assay. The isolated vinculin-specific cDNA probes were subsequently used in order to study the effect of substrate adhesiveness on the expression of vinculin. We show here that cells cultured on highly adhesive substrate, such as endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM), form large vinculin-rich focal contacts, while cells grown on poorly adhesive substrate poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [poly(HEMA)] contain only small distorted vinculin spots. These morphological differences were accompanied by over 5-fold reduction in vinculin synthesis in cells growing on poly(HEMA), compared to those cultured on the ECM and over 7.5-fold decrease in the levels of vinculin-specific mRNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3121302

  3. An in vitro selection scheme for oligonucleotide probes to discriminate between closely related DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Ivan; El-Ramahi, Razan; Gorska-Flipot, Izabella; Krajinovic, Maja; Labuda, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Using an in vitro selection, we have obtained oligonucleotide probes with high discriminatory power against multiple, similar nucleic acid sequences, which is often required in diagnostic applications for simultaneous testing of such sequences. We have tested this approach, referred to as iterative hybridizations, by selecting probes against six 22-nt-long sequence variants representing human papillomavirus, (HPV). We have obtained probes that efficiently discriminate between HPV types that differ by 3–7 nt. The probes were found effective to recognize HPV sequences of the type 6, 11, 16, 18 and a pair of type 31 and 33, either when immobilized on a solid support or in a reverse configuration, as well to discriminate HPV types from the clinical samples. This methodology can be extended to generate diagnostic kits that rely on nucleic acid hybridization between closely related sequences. In this approach, instead of adjusting hybridization conditions to the intended set of probe–target pairs, we ‘adjust’, through in vitro selection, the probes to the conditions we have chosen. Importantly, these conditions have to be ‘relaxed’, allowing the formation of a variety of not fully complementary complexes from which those that efficiently recognize and discriminate intended from non-intended targets can be readily selected. PMID:17426126

  4. Rapid Identification of Candida Species with Species-Specific DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Cheryl M.; Lott, Timothy J.; Reiss, Errol; Morrison, Christine J.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid identification of Candida species has become more important because of an increase in infections caused by species other than Candida albicans, including species innately resistant to azole antifungal drugs. We previously developed a PCR assay with an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) format to detect amplicons from the five most common Candida species by using universal fungal primers and species-specific probes directed to the ITS2 region of the gene for rRNA. We designed probes to detect seven additional Candida species (C. guilliermondii, C. kefyr, C. lambica, C. lusitaniae, C. pelliculosa, C. rugosa, and C. zeylanoides) included in the API 20C sugar assimilation panel, five probes for species not identified by API 20C (C. haemulonii, C. norvegica, C. norvegensis, C. utilis, and C. viswanathii), and a probe for the newly described species C. dubliniensis, creating a panel of 18 Candida species probes. The PCR-EIA correctly identified multiple strains of each species tested, including five identified as C. albicans by the currently available API 20C database but determined to be C. dubliniensis by genotypic and nonroutine phenotypic characteristics. Species identification time was reduced from a mean of 3.5 days by conventional identification methods to 7 h by the PCR-EIA. This method is simple, rapid, and feasible for identifying Candida species in clinical laboratories that utilize molecular identification techniques and provides a novel method to differentiate the new species, C. dubliniensis, from C. albicans. PMID:9774576

  5. A reagentless DNA-based electrochemical silver(I) sensor for real time detection of Ag(I) - the effect of probe sequence and orientation on sensor response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2016-06-01

    Ag(I) is known to interact with cytosine (C) via the formation C-Ag(I)-C complexes. The authors have utilized this concept to design six electrochemical Ag(I) sensors using C-rich DNA probes. Alternating current voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry were used to analyze the sensors. The results show that the dual-probe sensors that require the use of both 5'- and 3'-thiolated DNA probes are not suitable for this application, the differences in probe orientation impedes formation of C-Ag(I)-C complexes. Sensors fabricated with DNA probes containing both thymine (T) and C, independent of the location of the alkanethiol linker, do not response to Ag(I) either; T-T mismatches destabilize the duplex even in the presence of Ag(I). However, sensors fabricated with DNA probes containing both adenine (A) and C are ideal for this application, owing to the formation of C-Ag(I)-C complexes, as well as other lesser known interactions between A and Ag(I). Both sensors are sensitive, specific and selective enough to be used in 50% human saliva. They can also be used to detect silver sulfadiazine, a commonly prescribed antimicrobial drug. With further optimization, this sensing strategy may offer a promising approach for detection of Ag(I) in environmental and clinical samples. PMID:26901685

  6. Detection and interrogation of biomolecules via nanoscale probes: From fundamental physics to DNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A rapid and low-cost method to sequence DNA would revolutionize personalized medicine, where genetic information is used to diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases. There is a longstanding interest in nanopores as a platform for rapid interrogation of single DNA molecules. I will discuss a sequencing protocol based on the measurement of transverse electronic currents during the translocation of single-stranded DNA through nanopores. Using molecular dynamics simulations coupled to quantum mechanical calculations of the tunneling current, I will show that the DNA nucleotides are predicted to have distinguishable electronic signatures in experimentally realizable systems. Several recent experiments support our theoretical predictions. In addition to their possible impact in medicine and biology, the above methods offer ideal test beds to study open scientific issues in the relatively unexplored area at the interface between solids, liquids, and biomolecules at the nanometer length scale. http://mike.zwolak.org

  7. Nucleosomal structure at hyperacetylated loci probed in nuclei by DNA-histone crosslinking.

    PubMed Central

    Ebralidse, K K; Hebbes, T R; Clayton, A L; Thorne, A W; Crane-Robinson, C

    1993-01-01

    Chemically induced histone-DNA crosslinking in nuclei is used to monitor structural changes in chromosomal domains containing hyperacetylated histones. Core particles harbouring the crosslinks are immunofractionated with antibodies specific for acetylated histones. Crosslinking is revealed by gel separation of tryptic peptides from core histones that carry 32P-labelled residual nucleotide. The large number of DNA-histone crosslinks retained indicates that acetylated core histone tails are not totally displaced from the DNA. Changes in the patterns of crosslinked peptides imply a restructuring of hyperacetylated histone-DNA interactions at several points within the nucleosome. This demonstrates that a distinct conformational state is adopted in acetylated nucleosomes, known to be concentrated at transcriptionally active loci. Images PMID:8233821

  8. DNA-Linked Enzyme-Coupled Assay for Probing Glucosyltransferase Specificity.

    PubMed

    Sukovich, David J; Modavi, Cyrus; de Raad, Markus; Prince, Robin N; Anderson, J Christopher

    2015-07-17

    Traditional enzyme characterization methods are low-throughput and therefore limit engineering efforts in synthetic biology and biotechnology. Here, we propose a DNA-linked enzyme-coupled assay (DLEnCA) to monitor enzyme reactions in a high-throughput manner. Throughput is improved by removing the need for protein purification and by limiting the need for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) product detection by linking enzymatic function to DNA modification. We demonstrate the DLEnCA methodology using glucosyltransferases as an illustration. The assay utilizes cell free transcription/translation systems to produce enzymes of interest, while UDP-glucose and T4-β-glucosyltransferase are used to modify DNA, which is detected postreaction using qPCR or a similar means of DNA analysis. OleD and two glucosyltransferases from Arabidopsis were used to verify the assay's generality toward glucosyltransferases. We further show DLEnCA's utility by mapping out the substrate specificity for these enzymes. PMID:25621860

  9. Development and evaluation of probe based real time loop mediated isothermal amplification for Salmonella: A new tool for DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Mashooq, Mohmad; Kumar, Deepak; Niranjan, Ankush Kiran; Agarwal, Rajesh Kumar; Rathore, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    A one step, single tube, accelerated probe based real time loop mediated isothermal amplification (RT LAMP) assay was developed for detecting the invasion gene (InvA) of Salmonella. The probe based RT LAMP is a novel method of gene amplification that amplifies nucleic acid with high specificity and rapidity under isothermal conditions with a set of six primers. The whole procedure is very simple and rapid, and amplification can be obtained in 20min. Detection of gene amplification was accomplished by amplification curve, turbidity and addition of DNA binding dye at the end of the reaction results in colour difference and can be visualized under normal day light and in UV. The sensitivity of developed assay was found 10 fold higher than taqman based qPCR. The specificity of the RT LAMP assay was validated by the absence of any cross reaction with other members of enterobacteriaceae family and other gram negative bacteria. These results indicate that the probe based RT LAMP assay is extremely rapid, cost effective, highly specific and sensitivity and has potential usefulness for rapid Salmonella surveillance. PMID:27130353

  10. Intercalation between antitumor anthracyclines and DNA as probed by resonance and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulevich, G.; Mantini, A. R.; Casu, M.; Marzocchi, M. P.

    1991-05-01

    The antiturnor anthracyclincs, idarubicin (IDA ), adrianiycin (ADM), epirubicin (EPI), carminomycin (CAR) and 1 1-deoxycarminornycin (DCM), whose siructural formula includes a substituted hydroxyanthraquirionc chrornophore and a sugar residue, form intercalation complexes with DNA. The stacking interaction between the chromophore and the base-pairs of DNA gives rise to noticeable ciTects on resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) scattering as well as on the absorption (ABS), its second derivative (D2) and fluorescence emission (FEM) spectra.

  11. DNA mechanics as a tool to probe helicase and translocase activity.

    PubMed

    Lionnet, Timothée; Dawid, Alexandre; Bigot, Sarah; Barre, François-Xavier; Saleh, Omar A; Heslot, François; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Helicases and translocases are proteins that use the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move along or pump nucleic acid substrates. Single molecule manipulation has proved to be a powerful tool to investigate the mechanochemistry of these motors. Here we first describe the basic mechanical properties of DNA unraveled by single molecule manipulation techniques. Then we demonstrate how the knowledge of these properties has been used to design single molecule assays to address the enzymatic mechanisms of different translocases. We report on four single molecule manipulation systems addressing the mechanism of different helicases using specifically designed DNA substrates: UvrD enzyme activity detection on a stretched nicked DNA molecule, HCV NS3 helicase unwinding of a RNA hairpin under tension, the observation of RecBCD helicase/nuclease forward and backward motion, and T7 gp4 helicase mediated opening of a synthetic DNA replication fork. We then discuss experiments on two dsDNA translocases: the RuvAB motor studied on its natural substrate, the Holliday junction, and the chromosome-segregation motor FtsK, showing its unusual coupling to DNA supercoiling. PMID:16935884

  12. DNA interaction probed by evanescent wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy via functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi-Ju; Lin, King-Chuen

    2014-04-11

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) is employed to study interaction and binding kinetics of DNA strands by using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as sensitive reporters. These Au NPs are connected to target DNA of study that hybridizes with the complementary DNA fixed on the silica surface. By the absorbance of Au NPs, the interaction between two DNA strands may be examined to yield an adsorption equilibrium constant of 2.2×10(10) M(-1) using Langmuir fit. The binding efficiency that is affected by ion concentration, buffer pH and temperature is also examined. This approach is then applied to the label-free detection of the DNA mutation diseases using the sandwich hybridization assay. For monitoring a gene associated with sickle-cell anemia, the detection limit and the adsorption equilibrium constant is determined to be 1.2 pM and (3.7±0.8)×10(10) M(-1), distinct difference from the perfectly matched DNA sequence that yields the corresponding 0.5 pM and (1.1±0.2)×10(11) M(-1). The EW-CRDS method appears to have great potential for the investigation of the kinetics of a wide range of biological reactions. PMID:24745732

  13. Time-Resolved Sequence Analysis on High Density Fiberoptic DNA Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walt, D. R.; Lee, K-H

    2002-11-19

    A universal array format has been developed in which all possible n-mers of a particular oligonucleotide sequence can be represented. The ability to determine the sequence of the probes at every position in the array should enable unbiased gene expression as well as arrays for de novo sequencing.

  14. Highly sensitive detection of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA using time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and long lifetime probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue F.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Wodnicki, Pawel; Siadat-Pajouh, M.; Herman, Brian

    1995-04-01

    We have been interested in the role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer and its diagnosis; to that end we have been developing microscopic imaging and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques to genotype and quantitate the amount of HPV present at a single cell level in cervical PAP smears. However, we have found that low levels of HPV DNA are difficult to detect accurately because theoretically obtainable sensitivity is never achieved due to nonspecific autofluorescence, fixative induced fluorescence of cells and tissues, and autofluorescence of the optical components in the microscopic system. In addition, the absorption stains used for PAP smears are intensely autofluorescent. Autofluorescence is a rapidly decaying process with lifetimes in the range of 1-100 nsec, whereas phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence have lifetimes in the range of 1 microsecond(s) ec-10 msec. The ability to discriminate between specific fluorescence and autofluorescence in the time-domain has improved the sensitivity of diagnostic test such that they perform comparably to, or even more sensitive than radioisotopic assays. We have developed a novel time-resolved fluorescence microscope to improve the sensitivity of detection of specific molecules of interest in slide based specimens. This time-resolved fluorescence microscope is based on our recently developed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FILM) in conjunction with the use of long lifetime fluorescent labels. By using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the long lifetime probe (europium), we have demonstrated the utility of this technique for detection of HPV DNA in cervicovaginal cells. Our results indicate that the use of time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and long lifetime probes increases the sensitivity of detection by removing autofluorescence and will thus lead to improved early diagnosis of cervical cancer. Since the highly sensitive detection of DNA in clinical samples using

  15. Probing the Run-On Oligomer of Activated SgrAI Bound to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Santosh; Sanchez, Jonathan; Stewart, Andrew; Piperakis, Michael M.; Cosstick, Richard; Nichols, Claire; Park, Chad K.; Ma, Xin; Wysocki, Vicki; Bitinaite, Jurate; Horton, Nancy C.

    2015-01-01

    SgrAI is a type II restriction endonuclease with an unusual mechanism of activation involving run-on oligomerization. The run-on oligomer is formed from complexes of SgrAI bound to DNA containing its 8 bp primary recognition sequence (uncleaved or cleaved), and also binds (and thereby activates for DNA cleavage) complexes of SgrAI bound to secondary site DNA sequences which contain a single base substitution in either the 1st/8th or the 2nd/7th position of the primary recognition sequence. This modulation of enzyme activity via run-on oligomerization is a newly appreciated phenomenon that has been shown for a small but increasing number of enzymes. One outstanding question regarding the mechanistic model for SgrAI is whether or not the activating primary site DNA must be cleaved by SgrAI prior to inducing activation. Herein we show that an uncleavable primary site DNA containing a 3’-S-phosphorothiolate is in fact able to induce activation. In addition, we now show that cleavage of secondary site DNA can be activated to nearly the same degree as primary, provided a sufficient number of flanking base pairs are present. We also show differences in activation and cleavage of the two types of secondary site, and that effects of selected single site substitutions in SgrAI, as well as measured collisional cross-sections from previous work, are consistent with the cryo-electron microscopy model for the run-on activated oligomer of SgrAI bound to DNA. PMID:25880668

  16. Probing DNA-stabilized fluorescent silver nanocluster spectral heterogeneity by time-correlated single photon counting.

    PubMed

    Carro Temboury, Miguel R; Paolucci, Valentina; Hooley, Emma N; Latterini, Loredana; Vosch, Tom

    2016-01-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) are promising fluorophores whose photophysical properties and synthesis procedures have received increased attention in the literature. However, depending on the preparation conditions and the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNC samples can host a range of different emitters, which can influence the reproducibility of the optical response and the evolution over time of the populations of these emitters. We have developed a simple method to characterize the spectral heterogeneity and time evolution of these emissive species at any given point in time after preparation, by plotting the average decay time as a function of emission wavelength. These so-called average decay time spectra were acquired for different excitation wavelengths of AgNCs stabilized by an oligonucleotide containing 24 cytosines (C24-AgNCs). The average decay time spectra allowed the comparison of sample preparation and the judgment of reproducibility. Therefore, we propose the use of the average decay time spectra as a robust and easy tool to characterize and compare different as-synthesized DNA-AgNC samples. The average decay time spectra can in general also be used to characterize the spectral heterogeneity of other fluorophores, such as luminescent colloidal nanoparticles, and to assess the reproducibility of a synthetic procedure containing an unknown distribution of emissive species. PMID:26509191

  17. G-quadruplex formation in double strand DNA probed by NMM and CV fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kreig, Alex; Calvert, Jacob; Sanoica, Janet; Cullum, Emily; Tipanna, Ramreddy; Myong, Sua

    2015-09-18

    G-quadruplexes (GQs) are alternative DNA secondary structures that can form throughout the human genome and control the replication and transcription of important regulatory genes. Here, we established an ensemble fluorescence assay by employing two GQ-interacting compounds, N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) and Crystal Violet (CV). This enables quantitative measurement of the GQ folding propensity and conformation specificity in both single strand (ss) and double strand (ds) DNA. Our GQ mapping indicates that the likelihood of GQ formation is substantially diminished in dsDNA, likely due to the competition from the Watson-Crick base pairing. Unlike GQ folding sequence in ssDNA which forms both parallel and antiparallel GQs, dsDNA displays only parallel folding. Additionally, we employed single molecule FRET to obtain a direct quantitation of stably formed-, weakly folded and unfolded GQ conformations. The findings of this study and the method developed here will enable identifying and classifying potential GQ-forming sequences in human genome. PMID:26202971

  18. Influence of the oxazole ring connection on the fluorescence of oxazoyl-triphenylamine biphotonic DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Dumat, Blaise; Faurel-Paul, Elodie; Fornarelli, Pauline; Saettel, Nicolas; Metgé, Germain; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Céline; Charra, Fabrice; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of our previous work on DNA fluorophores derived from vinylpyridinium-triphenylamine, we explored the structure space around the electron-rich triphenylamine (TP) core by changing the vinyl bond to an oxazole ring. As 2,5-diaryloxazoles are known to be highly fluorescent and efficient two photon absorbers, we synthesized analogues with two different connections of the oxazole to the triphenylamine core: TP-Ox2Py and TP-Ox5Py sets. Since the benzimidazolium group was proven to be more effective in the TP series than the pyridinium, we also synthesized a TP-Ox5Bzim set. The TP-Ox5Py series retains the TP-Py properties: on/off behavior on DNA, good two-photon cross-section and bright staining of nuclear DNA by microscopy under both one or two-photon excitation. On the other hand, the TP-Ox2Py series does not display fluorescence upon binding to DNA. The TP-Ox5Bzim set is fluorescent even in the absence of DNA and displays lower affinity than the corresponding TP-Ox5Py. CD experiments and docking were performed to understand these different behaviors. PMID:26599863

  19. G-quadruplex formation in double strand DNA probed by NMM and CV fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Kreig, Alex; Calvert, Jacob; Sanoica, Janet; Cullum, Emily; Tipanna, Ramreddy; Myong, Sua

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (GQs) are alternative DNA secondary structures that can form throughout the human genome and control the replication and transcription of important regulatory genes. Here, we established an ensemble fluorescence assay by employing two GQ-interacting compounds, N-methyl mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) and Crystal Violet (CV). This enables quantitative measurement of the GQ folding propensity and conformation specificity in both single strand (ss) and double strand (ds) DNA. Our GQ mapping indicates that the likelihood of GQ formation is substantially diminished in dsDNA, likely due to the competition from the Watson–Crick base pairing. Unlike GQ folding sequence in ssDNA which forms both parallel and antiparallel GQs, dsDNA displays only parallel folding. Additionally, we employed single molecule FRET to obtain a direct quantitation of stably formed-, weakly folded and unfolded GQ conformations. The findings of this study and the method developed here will enable identifying and classifying potential GQ-forming sequences in human genome. PMID:26202971

  20. Identification of Benzo[a]pyrene-Metabolizing Bacteria in Forest Soils by Using DNA-Based Stable-Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mengke; Jiang, Longfei; Zhang, Dayi; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Gan

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used in this study to investigate the uncultivated bacteria with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) metabolism capacities in two Chinese forest soils (Mt. Maoer in Heilongjiang Province and Mt. Baicaowa in Hubei Province). We characterized three different phylotypes with responsibility for BaP degradation, none of which were previously reported as BaP-degrading microorganisms by SIP. In Mt. Maoer soil microcosms, the putative BaP degraders were classified as belonging to the genus Terrimonas (family Chitinophagaceae, order Sphingobacteriales), whereas Burkholderia spp. were the key BaP degraders in Mt. Baicaowa soils. The addition of metabolic salicylate significantly increased BaP degradation efficiency in Mt. Maoer soils, and the BaP-metabolizing bacteria shifted to the microorganisms in the family Oxalobacteraceae (genus unclassified). Meanwhile, salicylate addition did not change either BaP degradation or putative BaP degraders in Mt. Baicaowa. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHD) genes were amplified, sequenced, and quantified in the DNA-SIP 13C heavy fraction to further confirm the BaP metabolism. By illuminating the microbial diversity and salicylate additive effects on BaP degradation across different soils, the results increased our understanding of BaP natural attenuation and provided a possible approach to enhance the bioremediation of BaP-contaminated soils. PMID:26253666

  1. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA minor groove by an NIR-fluorescence switch-on probe and its potential applications

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Das, Shubhajit; Samanta, Pralok K.; Banu, Khadija; Sharma, Guru Prasad; Mondal, Neelima; Dhar, Suman K.; Pati, Swapan K.; Govindaraju, T.

    2015-01-01

    In molecular biology, understanding the functional and structural aspects of DNA requires sequence-specific DNA binding probes. Especially, sequence-specific fluorescence probes offer the advantage of real-time monitoring of the conformational and structural reorganization of DNA in living cells. Herein, we designed a new class of D2A (one-donor-two-acceptor) near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence switch-on probe named quinone cyanine–dithiazole (QCy–DT) based on the distinctive internal charge transfer (ICT) process for minor groove recognition of AT-rich DNA. Interestingly, QCy–DT exhibited strong NIR-fluorescence enhancement in the presence of AT-rich DNA compared to GC-rich and single-stranded DNAs. We show sequence-specific minor groove recognition of QCy–DT for DNA containing 5′-AATT-3′ sequence over other variable (A/T)4 sequences and local nucleobase variation study around the 5′-X(AATT)Y-3′ recognition sequence revealed that X = A and Y = T are the most preferable nucleobases. The live cell imaging studies confirmed mammalian cell permeability, low-toxicity and selective staining capacity of nuclear DNA without requiring RNase treatment. Further, Plasmodium falciparum with an AT-rich genome showed specific uptake with a reasonably low IC50 value (<4 µM). The ease of synthesis, large Stokes shift, sequence-specific DNA minor groove recognition with switch-on NIR-fluorescence, photostability and parasite staining with low IC50 make QCy–DT a potential and commercially viable DNA probe. PMID:26350219

  2. Probing the charge-transfer dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Matsutani, Eri; Maruyama, Atsushi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2011-10-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer fluorescence quenching of a fluorescent dye produces the nonemissive charge-separated state, and subsequent charge recombination makes the reaction reversible. While the information available from the photoinduced charge-transfer process provides the basis for monitoring the microenvironment around the fluorescent dyes and such monitoring is particularly important in live-cell imaging and DNA diagnosis, the information obtainable from the charge recombination process is usually overlooked. When looking at fluorescence emitted from each single fluorescent dye, photoinduced charge-transfer, charge-migration, and charge recombination cause a "blinking" of the fluorescence, in which the charge-recombination rate or the lifetime of the charge-separated state (τ) is supposed to be reflected in the duration of the off time during the single-molecule-level fluorescence measurement. Herein, based on our recently developed method for the direct observation of charge migration in DNA, we utilized DNA as a platform for spectroscopic investigations of charge-recombination dynamics for several fluorescent dyes: TAMRA, ATTO 655, and Alexa 532, which are used in single-molecule fluorescence measurements. Charge recombination dynamics were observed by transient absorption measurements, demonstrating that these fluorescent dyes can be used to monitor the charge-separation and charge-recombination events. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of ATTO 655 modified DNA allowed the successful measurement of the charge-recombination dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level. Utilizing the injected charge just like a pulse of sound, such as a "ping" in active sonar systems, information about the DNA sequence surrounding the fluorescent dye was read out by measuring the time it takes for the charge to return. PMID:21875061

  3. A label-free fluorescent probe based on DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and exonuclease III-assisted recycling amplification detection of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Tian, Jianniao; Ma, Yefei; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yanchun; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-11-01

    A number of specific nucleic acids are closely related with many serious diseases, in the current research, a platform taking advantage of exonuclease III (Exo III) to realize double recycling amplification and label-free fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) for detecting of nucleic acid had been developed. In this method, a molecular beacon (MB) with 3'-protruding termini and a single-stranded cytosine-rich (C-rich) probe were designed that coexist stably with Exo III. Once the target DNA appeared, portion of the MB could hybridize with target DNA and was digested by Exo III, which allowed the release of target DNA and a residual sequence. Subsequently, the residual sequence could trigger the Exo III to digest C-rich probe, and the DNA-AgNCs was not able to be synthesized because of the C-rich probe was destroyed; finally the fluorescent of solution was quenched. This assay enables to monitor human hemochromatosis gene (as a model) with high sensitivity, the detection limit is as low as 120 pM compared with other fluorescence DNA-AgNCs methods, this assay also exhibits superior specificity even against single base mismatch. The strategy is applied to detect human hemochromatosis gene in real human serum samples successfully. PMID:26572843

  4. Toehold enabling stem-loop inspired hemiduplex probe with enhanced sensitivity and sequence-specific detection of tumor DNA in serum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Siqi; Zhang, Yulin; Tang, Lina; Jin, Dan; Ning, Yong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-15

    The sensitivity of structure-switchable electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors is generally limited by the irremovable redox labels that are close to or distant from the sensing interface. To address this issue, we design a semiduplex probe inspired by the stem-loop structure, in which the "nicked loop" domain can serve as toehold to mediate a target-responsive strand-displacement reaction. Such a reaction can fundamentally eliminate the post-responsive background current that arises from the irremovable probe, and thus improve the sensitivity. This novel toehold E-DNA (tE-DNA) sensor is able to achieve a detection limit as low as 0.2pM, which is lower than that of the classic stem-loop structured sensor by two orders of magnitude. Moreover, the toehold domain endows the sensor an excellent selectivity against a single-base mismatched sequence and high binding kinetics. By combining this heterogeneous surface-based dynamic self-assembly design with a homogeneous enzyme amplification strategy, the sensitivity can be further improved by three orders of magnitude to sub-femtomolar level. Additionally, this unique biosensor presents reliable reusability, and is capable of probing low abundance of target DNA directly in complex matrices, such as human serum, with minimal interference. These advantages make our tE-DNA sensor a promising contender in the E-DNA sensor family for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27040528

  5. Detection and quantification of schistosome DNA in freshwater snails using either fluorescent probes in real-time PCR or oligochromatographic dipstick assays targeting the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed

    Kane, Richard A; Stothard, J Russell; Rollinson, David; Leclipteux, Thierry; Evraerts, Jonathan; Standley, Claire J; Allan, Fiona; Betson, Martha; Kaba, Rehana; Mertens, Pascal; Laurent, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    Several DNA probes were designed for use in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to target sequence variation within the ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) of schistosomes. A sub-section of the IGS (∼300bp) was amplified, with cross-specific primers, after which group-specific fluorescent, locked nucleic acid probes were assessed for their ability to differentiate and quantify DNA from Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni group parasites. A number of fluorescent probe candidates were screened and validated against genomic DNA from adult schistosome worms and laboratory infected freshwater snails. Two fluorescent, locked nucleic acid probes ShaemLNA5 and SmanLNA2, of 20-26bp in length, were identified and found to be effective in providing evidence of infection in field-collected snails. To adapt these real-time PCR assays for more resource-poor laboratory settings, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay was developed and primer/probe combinations were modified for use in oligochromatography, a DNA 'dipstick' technology. An appropriate dipstick was developed, inclusive of internal amplification and amplicon migration controls that could be of particular importance for assessing schistosome transmission dynamics. These assays and tools also have future potential for use in detection of schistosome infections in humans and livestock. PMID:22100540

  6. A Multiplexed, Probe-Based Quantitative PCR Assay for DNA of Phytophthora sojae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora sojae (Kaufm. & Gerd.) causes seed rot, pre- and post-emergence damping off, and sometimes foliar blight in soybean (Glycine max). Crop loss may approach 100% with susceptible cultivars. We report here the development of a unique quantitative PCR assay specific to DNA of P. sojae, and a...

  7. Recent advances in self-assembled fluorescent DNA structures and probes.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, Anna I; Brylev, Vladimir A; Nozhevnikova, Elena V; Korshun, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    The combined efforts of chemistry, nanotechnology, and spectroscopy led to the development of self-assembled fluorescent DNA nanostructures, an inexhaustible source of refined and bizarre tools and powerful techniques for research and diagnostic applications. This multidisciplinary area has tremendous prospects for science and technology. PMID:25858134

  8. A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines withX-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, ChristoperJ.; Chang, Polly Y.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2007-01-19

    In this study, we investigated {gamma}H2AX{sup ser139} and 53BP1{sup ser25}, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infinite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a finite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50 cGy X-rays, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37 C, and processed through immunofluorescence. Cells were visualized with a fluorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. We will expand the dose and time course in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is 'normal' and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  9. A COMPARISON OF DNA DAMAGE PROBES IN TWO HMEC LINES WITH X-IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wisnewski, C.L.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Rosen, C.J.; Chang, P.Y.; Blakely, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated γH2AXser139 and 53BP1ser25, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infi nite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a fi nite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50cGy X-rays, fi xed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37°C, and processed through immunofl uorescence. Cells were visualized with a fl uorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. The dose and time course will be expanded in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is “normal” and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  10. Differential furanose selection in the active sites of archaeal DNA polymerases probed by fixed-conformation nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-11-13

    DNA polymerases select for the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) using amino acid side-chains that act as a "steric-gate" to bar improper incorporation of rNTPs. An additional factor in the selection of nucleotide substrates resides in the preferred geometry for the furanose moiety of the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. We have probed the role of sugar geometry during nucleotide selection by model DNA polymerases from Sulfolobus solfataricus using fixed conformation nucleotide analogues. North-methanocarba-dATP (N-MC-dATP) locks the central ring into a RNA-type (C2'-exo, North) conformation near a C3'-endo pucker, and South-methanocarba-dATP (S-MC-dATP) locks the central ring system into a (C3'-exo, South) conformation near a C2'-endo pucker. Dpo4 preferentially inserts N-MC-dATP and in the crystal structure of Dpo4 in complex with N-MC-dAMP, the nucleotide analogue superimposes almost perfectly with Dpo4 bound to unmodified dATP. Biochemical assays indicate that the S. solfataricus B-family DNA polymerase Dpo1 can insert and extend from both N-MC-dATP and S-MC-dATP. In this respect, Dpo1 is unexpectedly more tolerant of substrate conformation than Dpo4. The crystal structure of Dpo4 bound to S-MC-dADP shows that poor incorporation of the Southern pucker by the Y-family polymerase results from a hydrogen bond between the 3'-OH group of the nucleotide analogue and the OH group of the steric gate residue, Tyr12, shifting the S-MC-dADP molecule away from the dNTP binding pocket and distorting the base pair at the primer-template junction. These results provide insights into substrate specificity of DNA polymerases, as well as molecular mechanisms that act as a barrier against insertion of rNTPs. PMID:23050956

  11. Using DNA-Stable Isotope Probing to Identify MTBE- and TBA-Degrading Microorganisms in Contaminated Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Key, Katherine C.; Sublette, Kerry L.; Duncan, Kathleen; Mackay, Douglas M.; Scow, Kate M.; Ogles, Dora

    2014-01-01

    Although the anaerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) has been documented in the laboratory and the field, knowledge of the microorganisms and mechanisms involved is still lacking. In this study, DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify microorganisms involved in anaerobic fuel oxygenate biodegradation in a sulfate-reducing MTBE and TBA plume. Microorganisms were collected in the field using Bio-Sep® beads amended with 13C5-MTBE, 13C1-MTBE (only methoxy carbon labeled), or13C4-TBA. 13C-DNA and 12C-DNA extracted from the Bio-Sep beads were cloned and 16S rRNA gene sequences were used to identify the indigenous microorganisms involved in degrading the methoxy group of MTBE and the tert-butyl group of MTBE and TBA. Results indicated that microorganisms were actively degrading 13C-labeled MTBE and TBA in situ and the 13C was incorporated into their DNA. Several sequences related to known MTBE- and TBA-degraders in the Burkholderiales and the Sphingomonadales orders were detected in all three13C clone libraries and were likely to be primary degraders at the site. Sequences related to sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron-reducers, such as Geobacter and Geothrix, were only detected in the clone libraries where MTBE and TBA were fully labeled with 13C, suggesting that they were involved in processing carbon from the tert-butyl group. Sequences similar to the Pseudomonas genus predominated in the clone library where only the methoxy carbon of MTBE was labeled with 13C. It is likely that members of this genus were secondary degraders cross-feeding on 13C-labeled metabolites such as acetate. PMID:25525320

  12. Use of complementary DNA oligomers to probe trp leader transcript secondary structures involved in transcription pausing and termination.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, R; Yanofsky, C

    1984-01-01

    DNA oligomers were synthesized that are perfectly complementary to different segments of the tryptophan (trp) operon leader transcript. These 15 nucleotide long oligomers were used as probes of the involvement of transcript secondary structures in two processes: transcription pausing at the pause site located near base pair 90 in the leader region, and transcription termination at the attenuator. The 15-mers were complementary to the four segments of the trp leader transcript which have been shown to form the alternative secondary structures that are believed to be responsible for pausing, termination, and antitermination. Oligomers complementary to RNA segments 1 and 3 relieved termination while the 15-mer complementary to RNA segment 1 relieved pausing. 15-mers complementary to segment 2 had no effect on pausing and the oligomer complementary to segment 4 had virtually no effect on termination. PMID:6201827

  13. A DNA-templated silver nanocluster probe for label-free, turn-on fluorescence-based screening of homo-adenine binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-02-15

    A novel, label-free, turn-on fluorescence strategy to detect molecules that bind to adenine-rich DNA sequences has been developed. The probe employs DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) as the key detection component. The new strategy relies on the formation of non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex, triggered by strong interactions with homo-adenine binding molecules, which brings a guanine-rich sequence in one strand close to DNA-AgNCs located on the opposite strand. This phenomenon transforms weakly fluorescent AgNCs into highly emissive species that display bright red fluorescence. Finally, we have shown that the new fluorescence turn-on strategy can be employed to detect coralyne, the most representative homo-adenine binding molecule that triggers formation of a non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex. PMID:25441410

  14. Identification of human DNA in forensic evidence by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a colorimetric gold nanoparticle hybridization probe.

    PubMed

    Watthanapanpituck, Khanistha; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Chu, Eric; Panvisavas, Nathinee

    2014-11-01

    A DNA test based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric gold nanoparticle (AuNP) hybridization probe to detect the presence of human DNA in forensic evidence was developed. The LAMP primer set targeted eight regions of the human cytochrome b, and its specificity was verified against the DNA of 11 animal species, which included animals closely related to humans, such as chimpanzee and orangutan. By using the AuNP probe, sequence-specific LAMP product could be detected and the test result could be visualized through the change in color. The limit of detection was demonstrated with reproducibility to be as low as 718 fg of genomic DNA, which is equivalent to approximately 100 plasmid DNA copies containing the cytochrome b DNA target region. A simple DNA extraction method for the commonly found forensic biological samples was also devised to streamline the test process. This LAMP-AuNP human DNA test showed to be a robust, specific, and cost-effective tool for the forensic identification of human specimens without requiring sophisticated laboratory instruments. PMID:24827529

  15. TaqMan probe real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the quantification of canine DNA in chicken nugget.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Bhassu, Subha; Rashid, Nur Raifana Abdul; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Mohd Desa, Mohd Nasir; Ali, Md Eaqub

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a short-amplicon-based TaqMan probe quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the quantitative detection of canine meat in chicken nuggets, which are very popular across the world, including Malaysia. The assay targeted a 100-bp fragment of canine cytb gene using a canine-specific primer and TaqMan probe. Specificity against 10 different animals and plants species demonstrated threshold cycles (Ct) of 16.13 ± 0.12 to 16.25 ± 0.23 for canine DNA and negative results for the others in a 40-cycle reaction. The assay was tested for the quantification of up to 0.01% canine meat in deliberately spiked chicken nuggets with 99.7% PCR efficiency and 0.995 correlation coefficient. The analysis of the actual and qPCR predicted values showed a high recovery rate (from 87% ± 28% to 112% ± 19%) with a linear regression close to unity (R(2) = 0.999). Finally, samples of three halal-branded commercial chicken nuggets collected from different Malaysian outlets were screened for canine meat, but no contamination was demonstrated. PMID:26458055

  16. Probing the structure and dynamics of a DNA hairpin by ultrafast quenching and fluorescence depolarization.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, O F; van Stokkum, I H; Gobets, B; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    2001-01-01

    DNA hairpins have been investigated in which individual adenines were replaced by their fluorescent analog 2-aminopurine (2AP). The temperature dependence of the time evolution of polarized emission spectra was monitored with picosecond time resolution. Four isotropic decay components for each oligonucleotide indicated the coexistence of at least four conformations. The fluorescence for three of these was significantly quenched, which is explained by hole transfer from 2AP to guanine(s). An approximately 8-ps component is ascribed to direct hole transfer, the approximately 50-ps and approximately 500-ps components are ascribed to structural reorganization, preceding hole transfer. At room temperature, a fraction remains unquenched on a 10-ns timescale, in contrast to higher temperatures, where the flexibility increases. Besides quenching due to base stacking, a second quenching process was needed to describe the data. Evidence for both intrastrand and interstrand hole transfer was found. The extracted probability for stacking between neighboring bases in double-stranded regions was estimated to be approximately 75% at room temperature and approximately 25% at 80 degrees C, demonstrating structural disorder of the DNA. Fluorescence depolarization revealed both local dynamics of the DNA and overall dynamics of the entire oligonucleotide. Upon raising the temperature, the C-N terminus of the hairpin appears to melt first; the rest of the hairpin denatures above the average melting temperature. PMID:11463652

  17. Use of a plasmid DNA probe to monitor populations of Bacillus pumilus inoculant strains in hay

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, C.A.; Smiley, B.K.; Shelley, T.H.; Tomes, N.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors are evaluating naturally occurring isolates of Bacillus pumilus for use as microbial hay preservatives. Seven isolates of B, pumilus from hay contained a 42-kb cryptic plasmid (pMGD296). They wished to determine whether pMGD296 could be used as a molecular marker to follow populations of these isolates in hay over time. Southern blots and colony blots of 69 isolates of B. pumilus and other Bacillus spp. were probed with {sup 32}P-labeled pMGD296. Twenty-nine probe-positive isolates were identified; of these, 28 contained a plasmid with a restriction profile identical to that of pMGD296. One isolate from untreated hay contained a 40-kb plasmid (pMGD150) that was homologous to pMGD296 but had a different restriction fragment pattern. Regions of homology between the two plasmids were identified by Southern blotting, and a 1.9-kb HindIII-PstI fragment of pMGD296 lacking strong homology to pMGD150 was cloned in pUC18. The cloned fragment hybridized only with isolates containing pMGD296 and was used to estimate populations of these isolates in treated and untreated hay.

  18. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  19. Hemin/G-quadruplexes as DNAzymes for the fluorescent detection of DNA, aptamer-thrombin complexes, and probing the activity of glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Golub, Eyal; Freeman, Ronit; Niazov, Angelica; Willner, Itamar

    2011-11-01

    Hemin/G-quadruplex catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of Amplex Red to the fluorescent product resorufin. This process is implemented to develop hairpin nucleic acid structures for the detection of DNA, to probe the catalytic activity of glucose oxidase, to use the thrombin-aptamer complex as a catalytic readout structure, and to quantitatively analyze telomere chain composition. PMID:21881641

  20. GENETIC VARIATION IN RED RASPBERRIES (RUBUS IDAEUS L.; ROSACEAE) FROM SITES DIFFERING IN ORGANIC POLLUTANTS COMPARED WITH SYNTHETIC TANDEM REPEAT DNA PROBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two synthetic tandem repetitive DNA probes were used to compare genetic variation at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci among Rubus idaeus L. var. strigosus (Michx.) Maxim. (Rosaceae) individuals sampled at eight sites contaminated by pollutants (N = 39) and eight adjacent...

  1. Synthesis of Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms and their use as DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthetic route to prepare Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms consists of the facile addition of Na(2) S to a solution of triangular Ag nanoprisms. The resulting Ag(2) S-Ag nanoparticles are more stable in solution than the original Ag nanoprisms, and two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the original Ag nanoprisms still remain. In addition, the SPR bands of the Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms are tunable over a wide range. The Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms can be directly bioconjugated via well-established stable Ag(2) S surface chemistry with readily available sulfur coupling agents. The nanoprisms are used in the hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides, and show promise as probes for future biosensing applications. PMID:21538868

  2. Characterization of serovars of the genus Leptospira by DNA hybridization with hardjobovis and icterohaemorrhagiae recombinant probes with special attention to serogroup sejroe.

    PubMed Central

    Van Eys, G J; Gerritsen, M J; Korver, H; Schoone, G J; Kroon, C C; Terpstra, W J

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant DNA probes derived from genomic libraries of serovars hardjobovis and icterohaemorrhagiae were applied for the characterization of leptospires. Differences in hybridization signals in combination with the banding pattern appear to provide good characteristics for strain typing. The banding patterns were easy to distinguish, since the recombinant DNA probes hybridized with a limited number of fragments. They were also indicative of genomic relationships between serovars. The probes suggested the existence of four subgroups with extensive genomic homology within the serogroup Sejroe. A number of serovars outside the serogroup Sejroe showed genomic homology with these subgroups. Amplification with the polymerase chain reaction showed a correlation with the genomic homologies demonstrated by Southern analysis. Knowledge about genomic relationships between leptospiral strains, as revealed by Southern analysis, may lead to a more rational approach for primer selection for polymerase chain reaction or cloning of particular genes. Images PMID:2056039

  3. Tuning the cellular uptake properties of luminescent heterobimetallic iridium(III)-ruthenium(II) DNA imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; Turton, David; Adams, Harry; Roseveare, Thomas M; Smythe, Carl; Su, Xiaodi; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-10-20

    The synthesis of two new luminescent dinuclear Ir(III)-Ru(II) complexes containing tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-h:2''',3'''-j]phenazine (tpphz) as the bridging ligand is reported. Unlike many other complexes incorporating cyclometalated Ir(III) moieties, these complexes display good water solubility, allowing the first cell-based study on Ir(III)-Ru(II) bioprobes to be carried out. Photophysical studies indicate that emission from each complex is from a Ru(II) excited state and both complexes display significant in vitro DNA-binding affinities. Cellular studies show that each complex is rapidly internalised by HeLa cells, in which they function as luminescent nuclear DNA-imaging agents for confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the uptake and nuclear targeting properties of the complex incorporating cyclometalating 2-(4-fluorophenyl)pyridine ligands around its Ir(III) centre is enhanced in comparison to the non-fluorinated analogue, indicating that fluorination may provide a route to promote cell uptake of transition-metal bioprobes. PMID:25208528

  4. Screening and development of DNA aptamers as capture probes for colorimetric detection of patulin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Zhang, Weixiao; Zhao, Sen; Wang, Zhouping

    2016-09-01

    Patulin (PAT) is a kind of mycotoxin that has serious harmful impacts on both food quality and human health. A high-affinity ssDNA aptamer that specifically binds to patulin was generated using systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) assisted by graphene oxide (GO). After 15 rounds of positive and negative selection, a highly enriched ssDNA pool was sequenced and the representative sequences were subjected to binding assays to evaluate their affinity and specificity. Of the eight aptamer candidates tested, the sequence PAT-11 bound to patulin with high affinity and excellent selectivity with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 21.83 ± 5.022 nM. The selected aptamer, PAT-11, was subsequently used as a recognition element to develop a detection method for patulin based on an enzyme-chromogenic substrate system. The colorimetric aptasensor exhibited a linear range from 50 to 2500 pg mL(-1), and the limit of detection was found to be 48 pg mL(-1). The results indicated that GO-SELEX technology was appropriate for the screening of aptamers against small-molecule toxins, offering a promising application for aptamer-based biosensors. PMID:27318239

  5. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the crucian carp, Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae), using chromosome staining and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with rDNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Spoz, Aneta; Boron, Alicja; Porycka, Katarzyna; Karolewska, Monika; Ito, Daisuke; Abe, Syuiti; Kirtiklis, Lech; Juchno, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The crucian carp Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) is a species with restricted and decreasing distribution in Europe. Six males and six females of the species from the Baltic Sea basin in Poland were examined to show sequentially CMA3/AgNO3 staining pattern, DAPI staining, and, for the first time in literature, molecular cytogenetic analysis using double-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with 28S and 5S rDNA probes. The karyotype consisted of 20 m, 36 sm and 44 sta chromosomes, NF=156. The AgNO3 stained NORs were most frequently located terminally in the short arms of two sm and two sta elements, and CMA3-positive sites were also observed suggesting abundant GC-rich repetitive DNA in the regions. Other CMA3-positive sites in the short arms of six to ten sm and sta chromosomes were detected. The results based on 28S rDNA FISH confirmed the location of rDNA sites. DAPI-negative staining of NORs suggested the scarcity of AT-rich DNA in the regions. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed 8–14 loci (ten and 12 in respectively 49 and 29% of metaphases). They were located in two sm and eight to ten sta chromosomes and six of them were larger than others. Simultaneously, mapping of the two rDNA families on the chromosomes of C. carassius revealed that both 28S and 5S rDNA probes were located in different chromosomes. Molecular cytogenetic data of C. carassius presented here for the first time give an important insight into the structure of chromosomes of this polyploid and declining species and may be useful in its systematics. PMID:25349674

  6. Fluorescent DNA probes at liquid/liquid interfaces studied by surface second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Licari, Giuseppe; Brevet, Pierre-François; Vauthey, Eric

    2016-01-28

    The properties of a series of oxazole yellow dyes, including the dicationic YOPRO-1 and its homodimeric parent YOYO-1 and two monocationic dyes (YOSAC-1 and YOSAC-3), have been investigated at the dodecane/water interface using stationary and time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (SSHG) combined with quantum chemical calculations. Whereas YOYO-1 exists predominantly as a H-dimer in aqueous solution, the stationary SSHG spectra reveal that such dimers are not formed at the interface. No significant H-aggregation was observed with YOPRO-1, neither in solution nor at the interface. In the case of the monocationic YOSAC dyes, a distinct SSHG band due to H-aggregates was measured at the interface, whereas only weak aggregation was found in solution. These distinct aggregation behaviors can be explained by the different orientations of the dyes at the interface, as revealed from the analysis of polarization-resolved experiments, the doubly-charged dyes lying more flat on the interface than the singly charged ones. Although YOYO-1 and YOPRO-1 do not form H-dimer/aggregates at the interface, time-resolved SSHG measurements point to the occurrence of intra- and intermolecular interactions, respectively, which inhibit the ultrafast non-radiative decay of the excited dyes via large amplitude motion, and lead to a nanosecond excited-state lifetime. The distinct behavior evidenced here for YOYO-1 and YOSAC dyes points to their potential use as fluorescent or SHG interfacial probes. PMID:26740332

  7. High-resolution analysis of 16q22.1 in breast carcinoma using DNA amplifiable probes (multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization technique) and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Emad A; Armour, John A L; Pinder, Sarah E; Paish, Claire E; Ellis, Ian O

    2005-05-01

    Loss of the chromosomal material at 16q22.1 is one of the most frequent genetic aberrations found in both lobular and low-grade nonlobular invasive carcinoma of the breast, indicating the presence of a tumour suppressor gene (TSG) at this region in these tumours. However, the TSG (s) at the 16q22.1 in the more frequent nonlobular carcinomas is still unknown. Multiplex Amplifiable Probe Hybridisation (MAPH) is a simple, accurate and a high-resolution technique that provides an alternative approach to DNA copy-number measurement. The aim of our study was to examine the most likely candidate genes at 16q22.1 using MAPH assay combined with protein expression analysis by immunohistochemistry. We identified deletion at 16q22.1 that involves some or all of these genes. We also noticed that the smallest region of deletion at 16q22.1 could be delineated to a 3 Mb region centromeric to the P-cadherin gene. Apart from the correlation between E-cadherin protein expression and its gene copy number, no correlation was detected between the expression of E2F-4, CTCF, TRF2 or P-cadherin with their gene's copy number. In the malignant tissues, no significant loss or decrease of protein expression of any gene other than E-cadherin was seen in association with any specific tumour type. No expression of VE-cadherin or Ksp-cadherin was detected in the normal and/or malignant tissues of the breast in these cases. However, there was a correlation between increased nuclear expression of E2F-4 and tumours with higher histological grade (p = 0.04) and positive lymph node disease (p = 0.02), suggesting that it may have an oncogenic rather than a tumour suppressor role. The malignant breast tissues also showed abnormal cytoplasmic cellular localisation of CTCF, compared to its expression in the normal parenchymal cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that MAPH is a potential technique for assessment of genomic imbalances in malignant tissues. Although our results support E-cadherin as the

  8. (+)-CC-1065 as a structural probe of Mu transposase-induced bending of DNA: overcoming limitations of hydroxyl-radical footprinting.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z M; Harshey, R M; Hurley, L H

    1993-09-11

    Phage Mu transposase (A-protein) is primarily responsible for transposition of the Mu genome. The protein binds to six att sites, three at each end of Mu DNA. At most att sites interaction of a protein monomer with DNA is seen to occur over three minor and two consecutive major grooves and to result in bending up to about 90 degrees. To probe the directionality and locus of these A-protein-induced bends, we have used the antitumor antibiotic (+)-CC-1065 as a structural probe. As a consequence of binding within the minor groove, (+)-CC-1065 is able to alkylate N3 of adenine in a sequence selective manner. This selectivity is partially determined by conformational flexibility of the DNA sequence, and the covalent adduct has a bent DNA structure in which narrowing of the minor groove has occurred. Using this drug in experiments in which either gel retardation or DNA strand breakage are used to monitor the stability of the A-protein--DNA complex or the (+)-CC-1065 alkylation sites on DNA (att site L3), we have demonstrated that of the three minor grooves implicated in the interaction with A-protein, the peripheral two are 'open' or accessible to drug bonding following protein binding. These drug-bonding sites very likely represent binding at at least two A-protein-induced bending sites. Significantly, the locus of bending at these sites is spaced approximately two helical turns apart, and the bending is proposed to occur by narrowing of the minor groove of DNA. The intervening minor groove between these two peripheral sites is protected from (+)-CC-1065 alkylation. The results are discussed in reference to a proposed model for overall DNA bending in the A-protein att L3 site complex. This study illustrates the utility of (+)-CC-1065 as a probe for protein-induced bending of DNA, as well as for interactions of minor groove DNA bending proteins with DNA which may be masked in hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments. PMID:8414983

  9. Use of cadA-Specific Primers and DNA Probes as Tools to Select Cadmium Biosorbents with Potential in Remediation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Icgen, Bulent; Yilmaz, Fadime

    2016-05-01

    Biosorption, using cadmium-resistant bacterial isolates, is often regarded as a relatively inexpensive and efficient way of cleaning up wastes, sediments, or soils polluted with cadmium. Therefore, many efforts have been devoted to the isolation of cadmium-resistant isolates for the efficient management of cadmium remediation processes. However, isolation, identification and in situ screening of efficient cadmium-resistant isolates are primary challenges. To overcome these challanges, in this study, cadA, cadmium resistance coding gene, specific primers and DNA probes were used to identify and screen cadmium-resistant bacteria in the cadmium-polluted river waters through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescein in situ hybridization (FISH). PCR amplification of the cadA amplicon coupled with 16S rRNA sequencing revealed various gram-positive and -negative bacterial isolates harboring cadA. Accordingly, a cadA-mediated DNA probe was prepared and used for in situ screening of cadmium-resistant isolates from water samples collected from cadmium-polluted river waters. The FISH analyses of cadA probe showed highly specific and efficient hybridization with cadA harboring isolates. The use of primers and DNA probes specific for cadA gene seems to be very helpful tools for the selection and screening of cadmium biosorbents with potential to be used in the remediation of cadmium-polluted sites. PMID:26969609

  10. The use of EGFR exon 19 and 21 unlabeled DNA probes to screen for activating mutations in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Willmore-Payne, Carlynn; Holden, Joseph A; Wittwer, Carl T; Layfield, Lester J

    2008-07-01

    Activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor-1 (EGFR) are found in 10-15% of Caucasian patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Approximately 90% of the mutations are deletions of several amino acids in exon 19 or point mutations in exon 21. Some studies suggest that these mutations identify patients that might benefit from targeted EGFR inhibitor therapy. DNA melting analysis of polymerase chain reaction products can screen for these mutations to identify this patient population. However, amplicon DNA melting analysis, although easily capable of detecting heterozygous mutations by heterodimer formation, becomes more difficult if mutations are homozygous or if the mutant allele is selectively amplified over wild type. Amplification of EGFR is common in NSCLC and this could compromise mutation detection by amplicon melting analysis. To overcome this potential limitation, we developed unlabeled, single-stranded DNA probes, complimentary to EGFR exon 19 and exon 21 where the common activating mutations occur. The unlabeled probes are incorporated into a standard polymerase chain reaction during the amplification of EGFR exons 19 and 21. The probe melting peak is easily distinguished from the amplicon melting peak, and probe melting is altered if mutations are present. This allows for easy identification of activating mutations even in homozygous or amplified states and is useful in the screening of NSCLC for the common EGFR activating mutations. PMID:19137110

  11. Development of propidium iodide as a fluorescence probe for the on-line screening of non-specific DNA-intercalators in Fufang Banbianlian Injection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yanyan; Li, Sensen; Lin, Zongtao; Liu, Meixian; Wang, Daidong; Wang, Hong; Chen, Shizhong

    2016-09-01

    Fufang Banbianlian Injection (FBI) has been widely used as an anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor prescription. To understand the relationships between its bioactive ingredients and pharmacological efficacies, our previous study has been successfully identified some DNA-binding compounds in FBI using an established on-line screening system, in which 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) was developed as a probe. However, DAPI can be only used to screen ATT-specific DNA minor groove binders, leaving the potential active intercalators unknown in FBI. As a continuation of our studies on FBI, here we present a sensitive analytical method for rapid identification and evaluation of DNA-intercalators using propidium iodide (PI) as a fluorescent probe. We have firstly established the technique of high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detector-multistage mass spectrometry-deoxyribonucleic acid-propidium iodide-fluorescence detector (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)-DNA-PI-FLD) system. As a result, 38 of 58 previously identified compounds in FBI were DNA-intercalation active. Interestingly, all previously reported DNA-binders also showed intercalative activities, suggesting they are dual-mode DNA-binders. Quantitative study showed that flavonoid glycosides and chlorogenic acids were the main active compounds in FBI, and displayed similar DNA-binding ability using either DAPI or PI. In addition, 13 active compounds were used to establish the structure-activity relationships. In this study, PI was developed into an on-line method for identifying DNA-intercalators for the first time, and thus it will be a useful high-throughput screening technique for other related samples. PMID:27522151

  12. Fluorescent Quantification of DNA Based on Core-Shell Fe3O4@SiO2@Au Nanocomposites and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Yang, Haowen; Liu, Ming; Wu, Dan; Jiang, Hongrong; Zeng, Xin; Elingarami, Sauli; Ll, Zhiyang; Li, Song; Liu, Hongna; He, Nongyue

    2015-02-01

    In this research, a novel method for relative fluorescent quantification of DNA based on Fe3O4@SiO2@Au gold-coated magnetic nanocomposites (GMNPs) and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been developed. With the help of self-assembly, seed-mediated growth and chemical reduction method, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2@Au GMNPs were synthesized. Through modified streptavidin on the GMNPs surface, we obtained a bead chip which can capture the biotinylated probes. Then we designed MLPA probes which were tagged with biotin or Cy3 and target DNA on the basis of human APP gene sequence. The products from the thermostable DNA ligase induced ligation reactions and PCR amplifications were incubated with SA-GMNPs. After washing, magnetic separation, spotting, the fluorescent scanning results showed our method can be used for the relative quantitative analysis of the target DNA in the concentration range of 03004~0.5 µM. PMID:26353621

  13. Integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre for DNA probe immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutowska, Monika S.; Garcia Gunning, Fatima C.; Kivlehan, Francine; Moore, Eric; Brennan, Des; Galvin, Paul; Ellis, Andrew D.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF). In addition, we also show the fluorescence of Cy5-labelled DNA molecules immobilized within the hydrogel formed in two different types of HC-PCF. The 3D hydrogel matrix is designed to bind with the amino groups of biomolecules using an appropriate cross-linker, providing higher sensitivity and selectivity than the standard 2D coverage, enabling a greater number of probe molecules to be available per unit area. The HC-PCFs, on the other hand, can be designed to maximize the capture of fluorescence to improve sensitivity and provide longer interaction lengths. This could enable the development of fibre-based point-of-care and remote systems, where the enhanced sensitivity would relax the constraints placed on sources and detectors. In this paper, we will discuss the formation of such polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels within a HC-PCF, including their optical properties such as light propagation and auto-fluorescence.

  14. Analysis of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles in Graves' disease by oligonucleotide probing of enzymatically amplified DNA.

    PubMed

    Weetman, A P; Zhang, L; Webb, S; Shine, B

    1990-07-01

    We have tested the possible association of HLA-DQB and HLA-DPB alleles with Graves' thyrotoxicosis, with or without severe ophthalmopathy, by polymerase chain amplification of genomic DNA and allele-specific oligonucleotide probing. There was no significantly abnormal distribution of DQB alleles compared to 50 control subjects except for a reduced prevalence of DQw 3.1 in the Graves' patients with severe ophthalmopathy (X2 = 6.23, P less than 0.02). HLA-DPB 2.1/8 was found in only 1 of 40 of these patients compared with 15 of the controls (X2 = 11.49, P less than 0.001). Ten of 48 patients with Graves' disease but without clinically significant eye involvement were HLA-DPB 2.1/8 positive, not significantly different from controls, but significantly different from the ophthalmopathy group (X2 = 6.70, P less than 0.01). The other DPB alleles in both groups of Graves' disease patients were the same as controls. These results suggest that HLA-DPB 2.1/8 may confer a protective effect in Graves' disease with respect to ophthalmopathy. PMID:2401099

  15. Cultivation-Independent Detection of Autotrophic Hydrogen-Oxidizing Bacteria by DNA Stable-Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Pumphrey, Graham M.; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of 13CO2 was H2 dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from 13C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H2 concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation. PMID:21622787

  16. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment.

  17. Spectroscopic investigation on interaction and sonodynamic damage of Riboflavin to DNA under ultrasonic irradiation by using Methylene Blue as fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Fan, Ping; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the Riboflavin (RF) as a sonosensitizer and Methylene Blue (MB) as a fluorescent probe were used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to DNA in aqueous solution and exchange with the MB through competing reaction. And then, under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the DNA. In addition, the influencing factors such as ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration on the sonodynamic damage to DNA were also considered. The experimental results showed that the sonodynamic damage degree increase with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and RF concentration. Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for broadening the application of RF in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) technologies for tumor treatment. PMID:24094993

  18. Probing the recognition surface of a DNA triplex: Binding studies with intercalator-neomycin conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Liang; Xi, Hongjuan; Kumar, Sunil; Gray, David; Davis, Erik; Hamilton, Paris; Skirba, Michael; Arya, Dev P.

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic studies on the interactions between intercalator-neomycin conjugates and a DNA polynucleotide triplex [poly(dA)•2poly(dT)] were conducted. To draw a complete picture of such interactions, naphthalenedimide-neomycin (3) and anthraquinone-neomycin (4) were synthesized and used together with two other analogues, previously synthesized pyrene-neomycin (1) and BQQ-neomycin (2), in our investigations. A combination of experiments including UV denaturation, circular dichroism (CD) titration, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) revealed that all four conjugates (1–4) stabilized poly(dA)•2poly(dT) much greater than its parent compound, neomycin. UV melting experiments clearly showed that the temperature (Tm3→2) at which poly(dA)•2poly(dT) dissociated into poly(dA)•poly(dT) and poly(dT) increased dramatically (> 12 °C) in the presence of intercalator-neomycin (1–4) even at a very low concentration (2 µM). In contrast to intercalator-neomycin conjugates, the increment of Tm3→2 of poly(dA)•2poly(dT) induced by neomycin was negligible under the same conditions. The binding preference of intercalator-neomycin (1–4) to poly(dA)•2poly(dT) was also confirmed by competition dialysis and fluorescent intercalator displacement assay. Circular dichroism titration studies revealed that compound 1–4 had slightly larger binding site size (~7–7.5) with poly(dA)•2poly(dT) as compared to neomycin (~6.5). The thermodynamic parameters of these intercalator-neomycin conjugates with poly(dA)•2poly(dT) were derived from an integrated van’t Hoff equation using the Tm3→2 values, the binding site size numbers, and other parameters obtained from DSC and ITC. The binding affinity of all tested ligands with poly(dA)•2poly(dT) increased in the order neomycin < 1 < 3 < 4 < 2. Amongst them, the binding constant [(2.7 ± 0.3) × 108 M−1] of 2 with poly(dA)•2poly(dT) was the highest, almost 1000 fold more

  19. Paramagnetic cobalt as a probe of the orientation of an accessory DNA-binding region of the yeast ADR1 zinc-finger protein.

    PubMed

    Schmiedeskamp, M; Klevit, R E

    1997-11-18

    The minimal DNA-binding domain of the yeast ADR1 transcription factor consists of two Cys2-His2 zinc fingers and an additional 20 residues N-terminal and proximal to the fingers. The accessory sequence likely plays a role in contacting DNA. Paramagnetic cobalt was incorporated into the fingers of an ADR1 DNA-binding construct (ADR1z) to serve as a probe of the proximity of the accessory sequence to the zinc fingers. NMR signals from the accessory region are not perturbed by cobalt incorporation. Previous studies showed that this region is random coil in the ADR1z construct in the absence of DNA; it does not adopt a fixed orientation with respect to the cobalt sites. In contrast, many residues of the accessory region are perturbed by cobalt in the DNA-bound form of the protein, suggesting this region becomes constrained. This observation agrees with previous results showing a disorder-to-order transition for the accessory region upon DNA binding. Furthermore, these results indicate that the accessory region lies close to the fingers in the protein-DNA complex. This region thus does not extend along the DNA away from the zinc fingers; it more likely binds the same stretch of DNA contacted by the zinc fingers. Comparison to the behavior of other zinc-finger proteins that utilize an accessory DNA-binding sequence suggested that the region of ADR1 proximal to the zinc fingers might form an alpha-helix. Analysis of sequential NOEs in the accessory region of DNA-bound ADR1z reveals no helical structure. PMID:9369471

  20. Development of an on-site rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction system and the characterization of suitable DNA polymerases for TaqMan probe technology.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Naruishi, Nahoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nagai, Hidenori

    2016-08-01

    On-site quantitative analyses of microorganisms (including viruses) by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system are significantly influencing medical and biological research. We have developed a remarkably rapid and portable real-time PCR system that is based on microfluidic approaches. Real-time PCR using TaqMan probes consists of a complex reaction. Therefore, in a rapid real-time PCR, the optimum DNA polymerase must be estimated by using actual real-time PCR conditions. In this study, we compared the performance of three DNA polymerases in actual PCR conditions using our rapid real-time PCR system. Although KAPA2G Fast HS DNA Polymerase has the highest enzymatic activity among them, SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase exhibited better performance to rapidly increase the fluorescence signal in an actual real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. Furthermore, we achieved rapid detection of Escherichia coli in 7 min by using SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase with the same sensitivity as that of a conventional thermal cycler. PMID:27271319

  1. Solution Structures of 2 : 1 And 1 : 1 DNA Polymerase - DNA Complexes Probed By Ultracentrifugation And Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.H.; Niebuhr, M.; Aulabaugh, A.; Tsai, M.D.; /Ohio State U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    We report small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and sedimentation velocity (SV) studies on the enzyme-DNA complexes of rat DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) and African swine fever virus DNA polymerase X (ASFV Pol X) with one-nucleotide gapped DNA. The results indicated formation of a 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex, whereas only 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complex was observed. Three-dimensional structural models for the 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA and 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complexes were generated from the SAXS experimental data to correlate with the functions of the DNA polymerases. The former indicates interactions of the 8 kDa 5{prime}-dRP lyase domain of the second Pol {beta} molecule with the active site of the 1 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex, while the latter demonstrates how ASFV Pol X binds DNA in the absence of DNA-binding motif(s). As ASFV Pol X has no 5{prime}-dRP lyase domain, it is reasonable not to form a 2 : 1 complex. Based on the enhanced activities of the 2 : 1 complex and the observation that the 8 kDa domain is not in an optimal configuration for the 5{prime}-dRP lyase reaction in the crystal structures of the closed ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes, we propose that the asymmetric 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex enhances the function of Pol {beta}.

  2. Solution structures of 2 : 1 and 1 : 1 DNA polymerase-DNA complexes probed by ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Niebuhr, Marc; Aulabaugh, Ann; Tsai, Ming-Daw

    2008-03-25

    We report small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and sedimentation velocity (SV) studies on the enzyme-DNA complexes of rat DNA polymerase β (Pol β) and African swine fever virus DNA polymerase X (ASFV Pol X) with one-nucleotide gapped DNA. The results indicated formation of a 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex, whereas only 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complex was observed. Three-dimensional structural models for the 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA and 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complexes were generated from the SAXS experimental data to correlate with the functions of the DNA polymerases. The former indicates interactions of the 8 kDa 5'-dRP lyase domain of the second Pol β molecule with the active site of the 1 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex, while the latter demonstrates how ASFV Pol X binds DNA in the absence of DNA-binding motif(s). As ASFV Pol X has no 5'-dRP lyase domain, it is reasonable not to form a 2 : 1 complex. Based on the enhanced activities of the 2 : 1 complex and the observation that the 8 kDa domain is not in an optimal configuration for the 5'-dRP lyase reaction in the crystal structures of the closed ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes, we propose that the asymmetric 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex enhances the function of Pol β.

  3. New Degenerate Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides-Specific 16S Ribosomal DNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes Reveal High Bacterial Diversity in River Taff Epilithon

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Louise A.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Fry, John C.

    2002-01-01

    River microbial communities play an important role in global nutrient cycles, and aggregated bacteria such as those in epilithic biofilms may be major contributors. In this study the bacterial diversity of River Taff epilithon in South Wales was investigated. A 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone library was constructed and analyzed by partial sequencing of 76 of 347 clones and hybridization with taxon-specific probes. The epilithon was found to be very diverse, with an estimated 59.6% of the bacterial populations not accounted for by these clones. Members of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides division (CFBs) were most abundant in the library, representing 25% of clones, followed by members of the α subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (α-Proteobacteria), γ-Proteobacteria, gram-positive bacteria, Cyanobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, δ-Proteobacteria, and the Prosthecobacter group. This study concentrated on the epilithic CFB populations, and a new set of degenerate 16S rDNA probes was developed to enhance their detection, namely, CFB560, CFB562, and CFB376. The commonly used probe CF319a/b may frequently lead to the underestimation of CFB populations in environmental studies, because it does not fully detect members of the division. CFB560 had exact matches to 95.6% of CFBs listed in the Ribosomal Database Project (release 8.0) small-subunit phylogenetic trees, compared to 60% for CF319a/b. The CFB probes detected 66 of 347 epilithon TAF clones, and 60 of these were partially sequenced. They affiliated with the RDP-designated groups Cytophaga, Sphingobacterium, Lewinella, and Cytophaga aurantiaca. CFB560 and CF319a/b detected 94% (62 of 66) and 48.5% (32 of 66) of clones, respectively, and therefore CFB560 is recommended for future use. Probe design in this study illustrated that multiple degenerate positions can greatly increase target range without adversely effecting specificity or experimental performance. PMID:11772628

  4. Vasopressin mRNA in situ hybridization: localization and regulation studied with oligonucleotide cDNA probes in normal and Brattleboro rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.R.; Zingg, H.H.; Habener, J.F.

    1985-08-01

    Hybridizable vasopressin mRNA may be quantitatively localized in situ in sections from rat hypothalamus. Radiolabeled oligonucleotide cDNA probes, synthesized by chemical and enzymatic means, provide strong hybridization in zones known to contain vasopressin cell bodies. Multiple single-stranded /sup 32/P-, /sup 35/S-, or /sup 3/H-labeled oligonucleotides demonstrate localized hybridization that increases as probes are lengthened from 8 to 75 bases. Competition studies, RNase experiments, anatomic localization, and use of multiple probes all support hybridization specificity. An approximate doubling of hybridizable mRNA in both supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei can be detected with dehydration of the animals. Hybridizable mRNA densities are virtually normal in hypothalamic nuclei of Brattleboro rats given free access to water. These methods can provide insight into regional mRNA dynamics and may reflect functional activity of peptidergic neurons.

  5. Facile construction of a highly sensitive DNA biosensor by in-situ assembly of electro-active tags on hairpin-structured probe fragment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Ni, Jiancong; Liao, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xuan; Lin, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive DNA biosensor has been developed through in-situ labeling of electroactive melamine-Cu2+ complex (Mel-Cu2+) on the end of hairpin-like probe using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal amplification platform. The 3′-thiolated hairpin-like probe was first immobilized to the gold electrode surface by the Au-S bond. The AuNPs were then tethered on the free 5′-end of the immobilized probe via the special affinity between Au and the modified -NH2. Followed by, the Mel and Cu2+ were assembled on the AuNPs surface through Au-N bond and Cu2+-N bond, respectively. Due to the surface area and electrocatalytic effects of the AuNPs, the loading amount and electron transfer kinetic of the Mel-Cu2+ were enhanced greatly, resulting in significantly enhanced electrochemical response of the developed biosensor. Compared with the synthesis process of conventional electroactive probe DNA accomplished by homogeneous method, the method presented in this work is more reagent- and time-saving. The proposed biosensor showed high selectivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. This novel strategy could also be extended to the other bioanalysis platforms such as immunosensors and aptasensors. PMID:26931160

  6. Facile construction of a highly sensitive DNA biosensor by in-situ assembly of electro-active tags on hairpin-structured probe fragment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingxiang; Gao, Feng; Ni, Jiancong; Liao, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xuan; Lin, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive DNA biosensor has been developed through in-situ labeling of electroactive melamine-Cu(2+) complex (Mel-Cu(2+)) on the end of hairpin-like probe using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal amplification platform. The 3'-thiolated hairpin-like probe was first immobilized to the gold electrode surface by the Au-S bond. The AuNPs were then tethered on the free 5'-end of the immobilized probe via the special affinity between Au and the modified -NH2. Followed by, the Mel and Cu(2+) were assembled on the AuNPs surface through Au-N bond and Cu(2+)-N bond, respectively. Due to the surface area and electrocatalytic effects of the AuNPs, the loading amount and electron transfer kinetic of the Mel-Cu(2+) were enhanced greatly, resulting in significantly enhanced electrochemical response of the developed biosensor. Compared with the synthesis process of conventional electroactive probe DNA accomplished by homogeneous method, the method presented in this work is more reagent- and time-saving. The proposed biosensor showed high selectivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. This novel strategy could also be extended to the other bioanalysis platforms such as immunosensors and aptasensors. PMID:26931160

  7. Conformation-sensitive nucleoside analogues as topology-specific fluorescence turn-on probes for DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Tanpure, Arun A.; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2015-01-01

    Development of probes that can discriminate G-quadruplex (GQ) structures and indentify efficient GQ binders on the basis of topology and nucleic acid type is highly desired to advance GQ-directed therapeutic strategies. In this context, we describe the development of minimally perturbing and environment-sensitive pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, based on a 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)uracil core, as topology-specific fluorescence turn-on probes for human telomeric DNA and RNA GQs. The pyrimidine residues of one of the loop regions (TTA) of telomeric DNA and RNA GQ oligonucleotide (ON) sequences were replaced with 5-benzofuran-modified 2′-deoxyuridine and uridine analogues. Depending on the position of modification the fluorescent nucleoside analogues distinguish antiparallel, mixed parallel-antiparallel and parallel stranded DNA and RNA GQ topologies from corresponding duplexes with significant enhancement in fluorescence intensity and quantum yield. Further, these GQ sensors enabled the development of a simple fluorescence binding assay to quantify topology- and nucleic acid-specific binding of small molecule ligands to GQ structures. Together, our results demonstrate that these nucleoside analogues are useful GQ probes, which are anticipated to provide new opportunities to study and discover efficient G-quadruplex binders of therapeutic potential. PMID:26202965

  8. Mercury-induced DNA polymorphism: Probing the conformation of Hg(II)-DNA via Staphylococcal nuclease digestion and circular dichroism measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwedel, D.W.; Cruikshank, M.K. )

    1990-02-27

    Exposing native calf thymus DNA to increasing concentrations of Hg(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} not only produces dramatic changes in its circular dichroism (CD) but results also in the decrease, and ultimate cessation, of endonucleolytic DNA cleavage by staphylococcal nuclease. DNA cleavage proceeds at or near the rates exhibited by untreated DNA. At Hg(II) levels of 0.08 < r < 0.5, the rate of DNA hydrolysis decreases monotonically with increasing Hg(II) concentrations, and at r > 0.4, DNA cleavage ceases. Both the CD changes and the changes in the rate of DNA digestion are totally reversible upon the removal of Hg(II). For comparison purposes, native calf thymus DNA was also treated with methylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg(II)), an agent known to disrupt the secondary structure of DNA. The treatment yielded single-stranded methylmercurated DNA with preserved right-handed helix screwness. The authors interpret the Hg(II)-induced alterations in the CD of native calf thymus DNA, and the hydrolysis rate changes observed with staphylococcal nuclease, to indicate that Hg(II) either produces in DNA reversible B {leftrightarrow} Z transitions, passing transiently through C-like conformations, or generates non-B-conformational structures of presumably left-handed geometry.

  9. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-05-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX. PMID:26819406

  10. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX. PMID:26819406

  11. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish Squalius lucumonis and three other Italian leuciscines using chromosome banding and FISH with rDNA probes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anna Rita; Milana, Valentina; Hett, Anne Kathrin; Tancioni, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Karyotype and other chromosomal characteristics of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish, Toscana stream chub Squalius lucumonis, were analysed using conventional banding and FISH with 45S and 5S rDNA probes. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) and karyotype characteristics including pericentromeric heterochromatic blocks and GC-rich CMA(3)-positive sites corresponding to both positive Ag-NORs and 45S rDNA loci on the short arms of a single medium-sized submetacentric chromosome pair were consistent with those found in most European leuciscine cyprinids. On other hand, 5S rDNA FISH in the Toscana stream chub and three other Italian leuciscines, S. squalus, Rutilus rubilio and Telestes muticellus, revealed a species-specific hybridization pattern, i.e. signals on four (S. lucumonis), three (S. squalus and R. rubilio) and two (T. muticellus) chromosome pairs. Whereas all the species shared the 5S rDNA loci on the largest subtelocentric chromosome pair, a "leuciscine" cytotaxonomic marker, S. lucumonis showed both classes of rDNA loci tandem aligned on the short arms of chromosome pair No. 12. The present findings suggest that the observed high variability of 5S rDNA loci provides a powerful tool for investigation of karyotype differentiation in karyologically conservative leuciscine fishes. PMID:23238894

  12. A new label-free and turn-on strategy for endonuclease detection using a DNA-silver nanocluster probe.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue; Kong, Xiang-Juan; Zhu, Zi-Mao; Chen, Ting-Ting; Chu, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Endonuclease plays a vital role in a variety of biological processes and the assay of endonuclease activity and inhibitors is of high importance in the fields ranging from biotechnology to pharmacology. Howerer, traditional techniques usually suffer from time intensive, laborious, and cost-expensive. This work aims to develop a facile and sensitive method for endonuclease activity assay by making use of the fluorescence enhancement effect when DNA-silver nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) are in proximity to guanine-rich DNA sequences. The system mainly consists of block DNA (B-DNA), G-DNA and Ag-DNA. B-DNA serves as the substrate of the endonuclease (S1 nuclease as the model enzyme). G-DNA, which is predesigned entirely complementary to B strand, contains a guanine-rich overhang sequence and hybridization part at the 5'-end. Ag-DNA involves a sequence for Ag NCs synthesis and a sequence complementary to the hybridization part of the G-DNA. In the "off" state, B-DNA plays the role as a blocker that inhibit the proximity between Ag NCs and guanine-rich DNA sequences, resulting in a low fluorescence readout. However, if S1 nuclease is introduced into the system, B-DNA was cleaved into mono- or short-oligonucleotides fragments, which could not hybridize with G-DNA. As a result, the subsequent addition of DNA-Ag NCs could bring guanine-rich DNA sequences close to the Ag NCs, accompanied by a significant fluorescence enhancement. Therefore, endonuclease activity could be successfully quantified by monitoring the variation in fluorescence intensity. In addition, this approach can also be applied for inhibitor screening of endonuclease. This label-free and turn-on fluorescent assays employing the mechanism proposed here for the detection of nuclease and inhibitors turn out to be sensitive, selective, and convenient. PMID:25281081

  13. Evaluation of LNA, MGB and non-modified DNA probes to improve the detection limit of TaqMan real-time PCR assay for Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to compare the sensitivity and amplification efficiency of the TaqMan assay using locked nucleic acid (LNA), minor groove binder (MGB) ligands and non-modified DNA probes. In monoplex or single target TaqMan assays for P. stewartii subsp. stewartii, LNA and MGB probes impr...

  14. Reverse Sample Genome Probing, a New Technique for Identification of Bacteria in Environmental Samples by DNA Hybridization, and Its Application to the Identification of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Oil Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Voordouw, Johanna K.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, Roxann R.; Fedorak, Phillip M.; Westlake, Donald W. S.

    1991-01-01

    A novel method for the identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization is presented. It is based on the fact that, even within a genus, the genomes of different bacteria may have little overall sequence homology. This allows the use of the labeled genomic DNA of a given bacterium (referred to as a “standard”) to probe for its presence and that of bacteria with highly homologous genomes in total DNA obtained from an environmental sample. Alternatively, total DNA extracted from the sample can be labeled and used to probe filters on which denatured chromosomal DNA from relevant bacterial standards has been spotted. The latter technique is referred to as reverse sample genome probing, since it is the reverse of the usual practice of deriving probes from reference bacteria for analyzing a DNA sample. Reverse sample genome probing allows identification of bacteria in a sample in a single step once a master filter with suitable standards has been developed. Application of reverse sample genome probing to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in 31 samples obtained primarily from oil fields in the province of Alberta has indicated that there are at least 20 genotypically different sulfate-reducing bacteria in these samples. Images PMID:16348574

  15. DNA Interactions Probed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange (HDX) Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry Confirm External Binding Sites on the Minichromosomal Maintenance (MCM) Helicase.

    PubMed

    Graham, Brian W; Tao, Yeqing; Dodge, Katie L; Thaxton, Carly T; Olaso, Danae; Young, Nicolas L; Marshall, Alan G; Trakselis, Michael A

    2016-06-10

    The archaeal minichromosomal maintenance (MCM) helicase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsoMCM) is a model for understanding structural and mechanistic aspects of DNA unwinding. Although interactions of the encircled DNA strand within the central channel provide an accepted mode for translocation, interactions with the excluded strand on the exterior surface have mostly been ignored with regard to DNA unwinding. We have previously proposed an extension of the traditional steric exclusion model of unwinding to also include significant contributions with the excluded strand during unwinding, termed steric exclusion and wrapping (SEW). The SEW model hypothesizes that the displaced single strand tracks along paths on the exterior surface of hexameric helicases to protect single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and stabilize the complex in a forward unwinding mode. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS, we have probed the binding sites for ssDNA, using multiple substrates targeting both the encircled and excluded strand interactions. In each experiment, we have obtained >98.7% sequence coverage of SsoMCM from >650 peptides (5-30 residues in length) and are able to identify interacting residues on both the interior and exterior of SsoMCM. Based on identified contacts, positively charged residues within the external waist region were mutated and shown to generally lower DNA unwinding without negatively affecting the ATP hydrolysis. The combined data globally identify binding sites for ssDNA during SsoMCM unwinding as well as validating the importance of the SEW model for hexameric helicase unwinding. PMID:27044751

  16. Cascade DNA logic device programmed ratiometric DNA analysis and logic devices based on a fluorescent dual-signal probe of a G-quadruplex DNAzyme.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Jinbo; Zhai, Qingfeng; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-03-01

    Herein, two fluorescence sensitive substrates of G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme with inverse responses (Scopoletin and Amplex Red) were simultaneously used in one homogeneous system to construct a cascade advanced DNA logic device for the first time (a functional logic device (a three input based DNA calliper) cascade with an advanced non-arithmetic logic gate (1 to 2 decoder)). This cascade logic device was applied to label-free ratiometric target DNA detection and length measurement. PMID:26882417

  17. Platforms Formed from a Three-Dimensional Cu-Based Zwitterionic Metal-Organic Framework and Probe ss-DNA: Selective Fluorescent Biosensors for Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 ds-DNA and Sudan Virus RNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shui-Ping; Chen, Shao-Rui; Liu, Shu-Wen; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Qin, Liang; Qiu, Gui-Hua; Chen, Jin-Xiang; Chen, Wen-Hua

    2015-12-15

    We herein report a water-stable three-dimensional Cu-based metal-organic framework (MOF) 1 supported by a tritopic quaternized carboxylate and 4,4'-dipyridyl sulfide as an ancillary ligand. This MOF exhibits unique pore shapes with aromatic rings, positively charged pyridinium and unsaturated Cu(II) cation centers, free carboxylates, tessellating H2O, and coordinating SO4(2-) on the pore surface. Compound 1 can interact with two carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled single-stranded DNA sequences (probe ss-DNA, delineated as P-DNA) through electrostatic, π-stacking, and/or hydrogen-bonding interactions to form two P-DNA@1 systems, and thus quench the fluorescence of FAM via a photoinduced electron-transfer process. These P-DNA@1 systems can be used as effective fluorescent sensors for human immunodeficiency virus 1 double-stranded DNA and Sudan virus RNA sequences, respectively, with detection limits of 196 and 73 pM, respectively. PMID:26619043

  18. Biofunction-assisted DNA detection through RNase H-enhanced 3' processing of a premature tRNA probe in a wheat germ extract.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Tabuchi, Junichiro; Doi, Yasunori; Takamatsu, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a novel type of biofunction-assisted, signal-turn-on sensor for simply and homogenously detecting DNA. This sensor system is composed of two types of in vitro-transcribed label-free RNAs (a 3' premature amber suppressor tRNA probe and an amber-mutated mRNA encoding a reporter protein), RNase H, and a wheat germ extract (WGE). A target DNA induces the 3' end maturation of the tRNA probe, which is enhanced by RNase H and leads to the expression of a full-length reporter protein through amber suppression in WGE, while there is almost no expression without the target due to the inactivity of the premature probe. Therefore, the target can be readily detected with the activity of the translated reporter. The catalytic reuse of the target with the help of RNase H in addition to various bioprocesses in WGE enables this sensor system to exhibit relatively high selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:27289318

  19. Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay and GenoType MTBDRplus DNA Probes for Detection of Mutations Associated with Rifampicin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Arfatur; Sahrin, Mahfuza; Afrin, Sadia; Earley, Keith; Ahmed, Shahriar; Rahman, S. M. Mazidur; Banu, Sayera

    2016-01-01

    Background GeneXpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) and Genotype MTBDRplus (DRplus) are two World Health Organization (WHO) endorsed probe based molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) methods for rapid diagnosis of drug resistant tuberculosis. Both methods target the same 81 bp Rifampicin Resistance Determining Region (RRDR) of bacterial RNA polymerase β subunit (rpoB) for detection of Rifampicin (RIF) resistance associated mutations using DNA probes. So there is a correspondence of the probes of each other and expected similarity of probe binding. Methods We analyzed 92 sputum specimens by Xpert, DRplus and LJ proportion method (LJ-DST). We compared molecular DSTs with gold standard LJ-DST. We wanted to see the agreement level of two molecular methods for detection of RIF resistance associated mutations. The 81bp RRDR region of rpoB gene of discrepant cases between the two molecular methods was sequenced by Sanger sequencing. Results The agreement of Xpert and DRplus with LJ-DST for detection of RIF susceptibility was found to be 93.5% and 92.4%, respectively. We also found 92.4% overall agreement of two molecular methods for the detection of RIF susceptibility. A total of 84 out of 92 samples (91.3%) had agreement on the molecular locus of RRDR mutation by DRplus and Xpert. Sanger sequencing of 81bp RRDR revealed that Xpert probes detected seven of eight discrepant cases correctly and DRplus was erroneous in all the eight cases. Conclusion Although the overall concordance with LJ-DST was similar for both Xpert and DRplus assay, Xpert demonstrated more accuracy in the detection of RIF susceptibility for discrepant isolates compared with DRplus. This observation would be helpful for the improvement of probe based detection of drug resistance associated mutations especially rpoB mutation in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27054344

  20. Sensitivity of in situ detection with biotinylated probes of human papilloma virus type 16 DNA in frozen tissue sections of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Walboomers, J M; Melchers, W J; Mullink, H; Meijer, C J; Struyk, A; Quint, W G; van der Noordaa, J; ter Schegget, J

    1988-06-01

    The sensitivity of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA detection by DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated probes (bio-DISH) was estimated by performing this technique on snap-frozen tissue sections of 10 cervical squamous cell carcinomas containing increasing amounts of HPV-16 as determined by Southern blot hybridization. A protocol using serial sections for bio-DISH and DNA extraction was used. The number of positively stained cells and the detection limit were strongly dependent on the treatment of the sections with proteinase K prior to hybridization. At low proteinase K concentration (0.1 micrograms/ml), the detection limit appeared to be 30-40 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell, whereas morphology was preserved. A high proteinase K concentration (1-5 micrograms/ml) often resulted in an increase in the number of positively stained cells but also in a poor morphology. The detection limit was improved to at least 20 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell. PMID:2837906

  1. Developing new chemical tools for DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT 1): a small-molecule activity-based probe and novel tetrazole-containing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Biwei; Ge, Jingyan; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-06-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Abnormal expression of endogenous DNMTs in human causes alterations in the genome methylation patterns which subsequently lead to the development of cancers. Thus detection of endogenous DNMT activities and efficient inhibition of DNMTs have important therapeutic significance. In this work, a small molecule activity-based probe (ABP) of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), T1, was developed. The probe was a clickable analog of tryptophan and was able to covalently label endogenous DNMT1 and inhibit its enzymatic activity more effectively than previously known DNMT1 inhibitors (RG108 and its maleimide analog 1149). In addition, we also discovered a new type of small molecule DNMT inhibitors based on tetrazole-containing compounds which were analogs of 1149. Among these compounds, which we called Gn, one of them (G6) possessed reasonable inhibitory activity against DNMT1 in both in vitro enzymatic assays and cell growth proliferation experiments. Both T1 and G6 showed effective labeling of endogenous DNMT1 from mammalian cells by using in vitro competitive pull-down and live-cell bioimaging experiments. PMID:25801160

  2. Quantification of microRNA by DNA-Peptide Probe and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Quasi-Targeted Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Chen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The distorted and unique expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer makes them an attractive source of biomarkers. However, one of prerequisites for the application of miRNAs in clinical practice is to accurately profile their expression. Currently available assays normally require pre-enrichment, amplification, and labeling steps, and most of them are semiquantitative. In this study, we converted the signal of target miR-21 into reporter peptide by a DNA-peptide probe and the reporter peptide was ultimately quantified using LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics. Specifically, substrate peptide GDKAVLGVDPFR containing reporter peptide AVLGVDPFR and tryptic cleavage site (lysine at position 3) was first designed, followed by the conjugation with DNA sequence that was complementary to miR-21. The newly formed DNA-peptide probe was then hybridized with miR-21, which was biotinylated and attached to streptavidin agarose in advance. After trypsin digestion, the reporter peptide was released and monitored by a targeted proteomics assay. The obtained limit of quantification (LOQ) was 1 pM, and the detection dynamic range spanned ∼5 orders of magnitude. Using this assay, the developed quasi-targeted proteomics approach was applied to determine miR-21 level in breast cells and tissue samples. Finally, qRT-PCR was also performed for a comparison. This report grafted the strategy of targeted proteomics into miRNA quantification. PMID:26641144

  3. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H.; Dryden, David T.F.

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Successful fusion of GFP to M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase. {yields} GFP located at C-terminal of sequence specificity subunit does not later enzyme activity. {yields} FRET confirms structural model of M.EcoKI bound to DNA. -- Abstract: We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Foerster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI.

  4. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyoyeon; Lee, Hansol; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. PMID:26449454

  5. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  6. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-01-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:3037104

  7. Methylation at the PW71 locus on chromosome 15 in DNA derived from CVS and from amniocytes; implications for the use of the PW71 probe in prenatal diagnosis of the Prader-Willi and Angleman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Telleria, P.; Yu, C.C.; Brown, S.

    1994-09-01

    The probe PW71 spans a HpaII site in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Syndrome critical region on chromosome 15. A single Southern blot with this probe can be used to detect deletion and uniparental disomy. We attempted to determine the methylation state of the PW71 locus in DNA derived from prenatal sources. Southern blots of HindIII and HindIII/HpaII double digests of DNA from cultured amniocytes and CVS specimens were prepared and probed with the PW71 probe. The results from 6 cultured CVS specimens indicate that several HPAII sites recognized by the PW71 probe are not methylated in trophoblast. Four amniotic fluid cultures gave results which were not different from lymphocyte-derived DNA; however, in several cases, amniotic fluid cultures resulted in Southern blots identical to those from CVS. Since we did not have verified prenatal cases of chromosome 15 uniparental disomy, we were unable to determine whether the parent-of-origin specific methylation present in lymphocyte DNA is also present in amniocyte DNA. We conclude that prenatal determination of chromosome 15 uniparental disomy with this probe will be unreliable.

  8. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes as a new approach to distinguish chromosome breakage from aneuploidy in interphase cells and micronuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Rupa, D.S.; Chen, H.W.; Hasegawa, L.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosomal abnormalities are believed to contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, carcinogenesis and other pathophysiological conditions. For example, approximately 15% of recognized pregnancies terminate in spontaneous abortion, and of these approximately 30% have been shown to be chromosomally abnormal. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to early embryonic and fetal death appears to decrease with gestational age, suggesting that as many as 67% of the aborted embryos in early embryonic deaths are chromosomally abnormal. Furthermore, clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities can also be found to be present in approximately 0.58 to 0.67% of live births. These figures indicate that within a given year, hundreds of thousands of chromosomally abnormal babies will be born throughout the world and additional millions of chromosomally abnormal embryos will have been spontaneously aborted. For the past several years, our research has focused on utilizing new molecular cytogenetic techniques to develop assays for detecting aneuploidy-inducing agents in mammalian cells. One approach that we have sucessfully employed involves the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes to determine the number of copies of a representative chromosome present within the nucleus following chemical exposure. DNA sequences (probes) which hybridize to blocks of repetitive centromeric DNA on specific chromosomes have been developed for most of the human chromosomes. In situ hybridization with these probes results in the staining of a compact chromosomal region which can be easily detected in interphase nuclei. The presence of 3 (or more) hybridization domains in an interphase nucleus indicates the presence of three centromeric regions and has been presumed to indicate that three copies of the entire chromosome were present in the nucleus.

  9. Probing radiation damage by alternated current conductivity as a method to characterize electron hopping conduction in DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Paulo J.; Coelho, Margarida; Antonio Ribeiro, Paulo; Raposo, Maria; Dionisio, Madalena

    2012-09-17

    Analysis of AC electrical conductivity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) thin films, irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light, revealed that electrical conduction arises from DNA chain electron hopping between base-pairs and phosphate groups. The hopping distance calculated from correlated barrier hopping model equals the distance between DNA base-pairs, which is consistent with the loss of conductivity with irradiation time arising from a decrease in phosphates groups. In the high frequency regime, at a given frequency, real part of conductivity strongly depends on irradiation time particularly for low dose levels suggesting the use of DNA based films for UV radiation sensors.

  10. An ultrasensitive DNA biosensor based on covalent immobilization of probe DNA on fern leaf-like α-Fe2O3 and chitosan Hybrid film using terephthalaldehyde as arm-linker.

    PubMed

    Xu, Biyan; Zheng, Delun; Qiu, Weiwei; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Shaoxiong; Wang, Qingxiang

    2015-10-15

    In this work, a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor has been developed based on the hybrid film of fern leaf-like α-Fe2O3 microparticles and chitosan (CS). The fern leaf-like α-Fe2O3 microparticles were synthesized via a facile template-free hydrothermal method, and their morphologies were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Electrochemical characterization assays revealed that the hybrid film modified electrode had remarkable synergistic effects of the large accessible surface area and high electrical conductivity of semiconductive Fe2O3, and the good film stability of CS. Based on the rich amino groups on CS, the CS-Fe2O3 hybrid film was employed as a functional matrix for probe DNA immobilization using terephthalaldehyde (TPA) as a bifunctional arm-linker. The hybridization capacity of the developed biosensor was evaluated with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) as the indicating probe. A wide dynamic detection range from 1.0 × 10(-14) to 1.0 × 10(-10)M with ultralow detection limit of 5.6 × 10(-15)M was achieved for the target DNA. The hybridization selectivity experiments further revealed that the biosensor could discriminate fully complementary sequences from one-base mismatched, three-base mismatched, and non-complementary sequences. Moreover, the biosensor showed the advantage of good regeneration ability and reproducibility. PMID:25982725

  11. Genotyping of velvet antlers for identification of country of origin using mitochondrial DNA and fluorescence melting curve analysis with locked nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong Jin; Kim, Youngjoo; Hong, Ji Young; Kim, Gi Won; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2016-07-01

    Velvet antlers are used medicinally in Asia and possess various therapeutic effects. Prices are set according to the country of origin, which is unidentifiable to the naked eye, and therefore counterfeiting is prevalent. Additionally, antlers of the Canadian elk, which can generate chronic wasting disease, are prevalently smuggled and distributed in the market. Thus, a method for identifying the country of origin of velvet antlers was developed, using polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA, fluorescence melting curve analysis and analysis of locked nucleic acids (LNA). This combined method is capable of identifying five genotypes of velvet antlers in a single experiment using two probes. It also has advantages in multiplexing, simplicity and efficiency in genotyping, when compared to real-time PCR or microarrays. The developed method can be used to improve identification rates in the velvet antler market and, by extension, research based on polymorphisms in DNA sequences. PMID:26094991

  12. Terminal protection of a small molecule-linked loop DNA probe for turn-on label-free fluorescence detection of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Luo, Feng; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-09-15

    A novel label-free turn-on fluorescence biosensor for the determination of streptavidin (SA) was proposed. Using terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA chimeras, which can protect DNA from degradation by various exonucleases when the small molecule moieties are bound to their protein target, we designed a loop probe, where the 3'-end was modified with biotin to resist digestion by exonucleases in the presence of target SA. Coupled with an intercalating dye, SYBR Green I, strong enhancement of the fluorescence signals was obtained compared with that in the absence of SA. A linear correlation equation was obtained for SA from 0 to 200nM with a limit detection of 0.4nM. This strategy holds great promise for practical applications with good specificity and sensitivity. PMID:27107146

  13. Probing Ligand Binding to Duplex DNA using KMnO4 Reactions and Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    An ESI-MS/MS strategy employing the thymine-selective KMnO4 oxidation reaction to detect conformational changes and ligand binding sites in non-covalent DNA/drug complexes is reported. ESI-MS/MS is used to detect specific mass shifts of the DNA ions that are associated with the oxidation of thymines. This KMnO4 oxidation/ESI-MS/MS approach is an alternative to conventional gel-based oxidation methods and affords excellent sensitivity while eliminating the reliance on radiolabelled DNA. Comparison of single strand versus duplex DNA indicates that the duplexes exhibit a significant resistance to the reaction, thus confirming that the oxidation process is favored for unwound or single strand regions of DNA. DNA complexes containing different drugs including echinomycin, actinomycin-D, ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342 and cis-C1 were subjected to the oxidation reaction. Echinomycin, a ligand with a bisintercalative binding mode, was found to induce the greatest KMnO4 reactivity, while Hoechst 33342, a minor groove binder, caused no increase in the oxidation of DNA. The oxidation of echinomycin/DNA containing duplexes with different sequences and lengths was also assessed. Duplexes with thymines closer to the terminal ends of the duplex demonstrated a greater increase in the degree of oxidation than those with thymines in the middle of the sequence. CAD and IRMPD experiments were used to determine the site of oxidation based on oligonucleotide fragmentation patterns. PMID:17508717

  14. Two glycosylase families diffusively scan DNA using a wedge residue to probe for and identify oxidatively damaged bases

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Dunn, Andrew R.; Kathe, Scott D.; Warshaw, David M.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    DNA glycosylases are enzymes that perform the initial steps of base excision repair, the principal repair mechanism that identifies and removes endogenous damages that occur in an organism’s DNA. We characterized the motion of single molecules of three bacterial glycosylases that recognize oxidized bases, Fpg, Nei, and Nth, as they scan for damages on tightropes of λ DNA. We find that all three enzymes use a key “wedge residue” to scan for damage because mutation of this residue to an alanine results in faster diffusion. Moreover, all three enzymes bind longer and diffuse more slowly on DNA that contains the damages they recognize and remove. Using a sliding window approach to measure diffusion constants and a simple chemomechanical simulation, we demonstrate that these enzymes diffuse along DNA, pausing momentarily to interrogate random bases, and when a damaged base is recognized, they stop to evert and excise it. PMID:24799677

  15. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids. PMID:24668321

  16. Time-resolved luminescence biosensor for continuous activity detection of protein acetylation-related enzymes based on DNA-sensitized terbium(III) probes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yitao; Li, Hao; Hu, Yufang; Li, Pei; Wang, Huixia; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-09-15

    Protein acetylation of histone is an essential post-translational modification (PTM) mechanism in epigenetic gene regulation, and its status is reversibly controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Herein, we have developed a sensitive and label-free time-resolved luminescence (TRL) biosensor for continuous detection of enzymatic activity of HATs and HDACs, respectively, based on acetylation-mediated peptide/DNA interaction and Tb(3+)/DNA luminescent probes. Using guanine (G)-rich DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence as the output signal, the polycationic substrate peptides interact with DNA with high affinity and subsequently replace Tb(3+), eliminating the luminescent signal. HAT-catalyzed acetylation remarkably reduces the positive charge of the peptides and diminishes the peptide/DNA interaction, resulting in the signal on detection via recovery of DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence. With this TRL sensor, HAT (p300) can be sensitively detected with a wide linear range from 0.2 to 100 nM and a low detection limit of 0.05 nM. The proposed sensor was further used to continuously monitor the HAT activity in real time. Additionally, the TRL biosensor was successfully applied to evaluating HAT inhibition by two specific inhibitors, anacardic acid and C464, and satisfactory Z'-factors above 0.73 were obtained. Moreover, this sensor is feasible to continuously monitor the HDAC (Sirt1)-catalyzed deacetylation with a linear range from 0.5 to 500 nM and a detection limit of 0.5 nM. The proposed sensor is a convenient, sensitive, and mix-and-read assay, presenting a promising platform for protein acetylation-targeted epigenetic research and drug discovery. PMID:26307596

  17. An on-chip thin film photodetector for the quantification of DNA probes and targets in microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Fixe, F.; Chu, V.; Prazeres, D. M. F.; Conde, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    A flat microdevice which incorporates a thin-film amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photodetector with an upper layer of functionalized SiO2 is used to quantify the density of both immobilized and hybridized DNA oligonucleotides labeled with a fluorophore. The device is based on the photoconductivity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon in a coplanar electrode configuration. Excitation, with near UV/blue light, of a single-stranded DNA molecule tagged with the fluorophore 1-(3-(succinimidyloxycarbonyl)benzyl)-4-(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-2-yl) pyridinium bromide (PyMPO), results in the emission of visible light. The emitted light is then converted into an electrical signal in the photodetector, thus allowing the optoelectronic detection of the DNA molecules. The detection limit of the present device is of the order of 1 × 1012 molecules/cm2 and is limited by the efficiency of the filtering of the excitation light. A surface density of 33.5 ± 4.0 pmol/cm2 was measured for DNA covalently immobilized to the functionalized SiO2 thin film and a surface density of 3.7 ± 1.5 pmol/cm2 was measured for the complementary DNA hybridized to the bound DNA. The detection concept explored can enable on-chip electronic data acquisition, improving both the speed and the reliability of DNA microarrays. PMID:15148343

  18. Use of dystrophin genomic and cDNA probes for solving difficulties in carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shomrat, R; Driks, N; Legum, C; Shiloh, Y

    1992-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) results from mutations in the X-linked gene coding for the muscular protein dystrophin. The isolation of genomic and cDNA probes for this gene has greatly facilitated the detection of DMD carriers, which previously relied mainly on measurements of serum creatine kinase (CK), and has enabled prenatal diagnosis of this disease. However, the relatively large size of the gene and the high frequency of recombination and mutation events within the dystrophin locus continue to pose difficulties in the genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis of DMD, and render the conclusions of molecular analysis less clear cut. This communication presents examples of two such difficulties: the distinction between sporadic and inherited cases in families with a single patient and normal CK levels in all females, and the distinction between mutant and normal dystrophin alleles in families in which the patients have died. The combined use of genomic and cDNA probes allows one to make these distinctions. An additional complicating factor, gonadal mosaicism, is demonstrated. PMID:1536162

  19. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika; Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Best, Gerrit; Mohana, Giriram K; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Roignant, Jean-Yves; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei. PMID:27054149

  20. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe

    PubMed Central

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika; Szczurek, Aleksander T.; Prakash, Kirti; Best, Gerrit; Mohana, Giriram K.; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Roignant, Jean-Yves; Dobrucki, Jurek W.; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei. PMID:27054149

  1. Mechanical unfolding of human telomere G-quadruplex DNA probed by integrated fluorescence and magnetic tweezers spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Long, Xi; Parks, Joseph W; Bagshaw, Clive R; Stone, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule techniques facilitate analysis of mechanical transitions within nucleic acids and proteins. Here, we describe an integrated fluorescence and magnetic tweezers instrument that permits detection of nanometer-scale DNA structural rearrangements together with the application of a wide range of stretching forces to individual DNA molecules. We have analyzed the force-dependent equilibrium and rate constants for telomere DNA G-quadruplex (GQ) folding and unfolding, and have determined the location of the transition state barrier along the well-defined DNA-stretching reaction coordinate. Our results reveal the mechanical unfolding pathway of the telomere DNA GQ is characterized by a short distance (<1 nm) to the transition state for the unfolding reaction. This mechanical unfolding response reflects a critical contribution of long-range interactions to the global stability of the GQ fold, and suggests that telomere-associated proteins need only disrupt a few base pairs to destabilize GQ structures. Comparison of the GQ unfolded state with a single-stranded polyT DNA revealed the unfolded GQ exhibits a compacted non-native conformation reminiscent of the protein molten globule. We expect the capacity to interrogate macromolecular structural transitions with high spatial resolution under conditions of low forces will have broad application in analyses of nucleic acid and protein folding. PMID:23303789

  2. The detection of multiple DNA targets with a single probe using a conformation-sensitive acoustic sensor.

    PubMed

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Grammoustianou, Aristea; Lymbouridou, Rena; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-07-21

    By using an acoustic wave methodology that allows direct sensing of biomolecular conformations, we achieved the detection of multiple target DNAs using a single probe, exploiting the fact that each bound target results in a hybridized product of a different shape. PMID:26097916

  3. Validation of 4-nitrophenol as an in vitro substrate probe for human liver CYP2E1 using cDNA expression and microsomal kinetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Tassaneeyakul, W; Veronese, M E; Birkett, D J; Gonzalez, F J; Miners, J O

    1993-12-01

    The involvement of human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 in the hydroxylation of 4-nitrophenol (4NP) to 4-nitrocatechol (4NC) has been investigated using cDNA expression and liver microsomal kinetic and inhibitor techniques. 4NP hydroxylation by human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed human CYP2E1 exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the respective apparent Km values were 30 +/- 7 and 21 microM. Mutual competitive inhibition was observed for 4NP and chlorzoxazone (CZ) (an alternative human CYP2E1 substrate) in liver microsomes, with close similarities between the calculated apparent Km and Ki values for each individual compound. 4NP and CZ hydroxylase activities in microsomes from 18 liver donors varied to a similar extent (3.3- and 3.0-fold, respectively) and 4NP hydroxylase activity correlated significantly (rs > or = 0.75, P < 0.005) with both CZ hydroxylation and immunoreactive CYP2E1 content. The prototypic CYP2E1 inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate, was a potent inhibitor of 4NC formation and decreased 4NP hydroxylation by cDNA-expressed CYP2E1 and human liver microsomes in parallel. Probes for other human CYP isoforms namely (alpha-naphthoflavone, coumarin, sulphaphenazole, quinidine, troleandomycin and mephenytoin) caused < 15% inhibition of liver microsomal 4NP hydroxylation. These data confirm that, as in animal species, 4NP hydroxylation is catalysed largely by CYP2E1 in human liver and 4NP may therefore be used as an in vitro substrate probe for the human enzyme. PMID:8267647

  4. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  5. Probing molecular pathways for DNA orientational trapping, unzipping and translocation in nanopores by using a tunable overhang sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Tian, Kai; Hunter, Lehr L.; Ritzo, Brandon; Gu, Li-Qun

    2014-09-01

    Nanopores provide a unique single-molecule platform for genetic and epigenetic detection. The target nucleic acids can be accurately analyzed by characterizing their specific electric fingerprints or signatures in the nanopore. Here we report a series of novel nanopore signatures generated by target nucleic acids that are hybridized with a probe. A length-tunable overhang appended to the probe functions as a sensor to specifically modulate the nanopore current profile. The resulting signatures can reveal multiple mechanisms for the orientational trapping, unzipping, escaping and translocation of nucleic acids in the nanopore. This universal approach can be used to program various molecular movement pathways, elucidate their kinetics, and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the nanopore sensor for nucleic acid detection.Nanopores provide a unique single-molecule platform for genetic and epigenetic detection. The target nucleic acids can be accurately analyzed by characterizing their specific electric fingerprints or signatures in the nanopore. Here we report a series of novel nanopore signatures generated by target nucleic acids that are hybridized with a probe. A length-tunable overhang appended to the probe functions as a sensor to specifically modulate the nanopore current profile. The resulting signatures can reveal multiple mechanisms for the orientational trapping, unzipping, escaping and translocation of nucleic acids in the nanopore. This universal approach can be used to program various molecular movement pathways, elucidate their kinetics, and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the nanopore sensor for nucleic acid detection. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03195d

  6. Connector Inversion Probe Technology: A Powerful One-Primer Multiplex DNA Amplification System for Numerous Scientific Applications

    PubMed Central

    Akhras, Michael S.; Unemo, Magnus; Thiyagarajan, Sreedevi; Nyrén, Pål; Davis, Ronald W.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Pourmand, Nader

    2007-01-01

    We combined components of a previous assay referred to as Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) with a complete gap filling strategy, creating a versatile powerful one-primer multiplex amplification system. As a proof-of-concept, this novel method, which employs a Connector Inversion Probe (CIPer), was tested as a genetic tool for pathogen diagnosis, typing, and antibiotic resistance screening with two distinct systems: i) a conserved sequence primer system for genotyping Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a cancer-associated viral agent and ii) screening for antibiotic resistance mutations in the bacterial pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We also discuss future applications and advances of the CIPer technology such as integration with digital amplification and next-generation sequencing methods. Furthermore, we introduce the concept of two-dimension informational barcodes, i.e. “multiplex multiplexing padlocks” (MMPs). For the readers' convenience, we also provide an on-line tutorial with user-interface software application CIP creator 1.0.1, for custom probe generation from virtually any new or established primer-pairs. PMID:17878950

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence of 2-aminopurine as a probe of base flipping in M.HhaI–DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Robert K.; Daujotyte, Dalia; Grazulis, Saulius; Magennis, Steven W.; Dryden, David T. F.; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Jones, Anita C.

    2005-01-01

    DNA base flipping is an important mechanism in molecular enzymology, but its study is limited by the lack of an accessible and reliable diagnostic technique. A series of crystalline complexes of a DNA methyltransferase, M.HhaI, and its cognate DNA, in which a fluorescent nucleobase analogue, 2-aminopurine (AP), occupies defined positions with respect the target flipped base, have been prepared and their structures determined at higher than 2 Å resolution. From time-resolved fluorescence measurements of these single crystals, we have established that the fluorescence decay function of AP shows a pronounced, characteristic response to base flipping: the loss of the very short (∼100 ps) decay component and the large increase in the amplitude of the long (∼10 ns) component. When AP is positioned at sites other than the target site, this response is not seen. Most significantly, we have shown that the same clear response is apparent when M.HhaI complexes with DNA in solution, giving an unambiguous signal of base flipping. Analysis of the AP fluorescence decay function reveals conformational heterogeneity in the DNA–enzyme complexes that cannot be discerned from the present X-ray structures. PMID:16340006

  8. Single Qdot-labeled glycosylase molecules use a wedge amino acid to probe for lesions while scanning along DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Andrew R.; Kad, Neil M.; Nelson, Shane R.; Warshaw, David M.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Within the base excision repair (BER) pathway, the DNA N-glycosylases are responsible for locating and removing the majority of oxidative base damages. Endonuclease III (Nth), formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) are members of two glycosylase families: the helix–hairpin–helix (HhH) superfamily and the Fpg/Nei family. The search mechanisms employed by these two families of glycosylases were examined using a single molecule assay to image quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled glycosylases interacting with YOYO-1 stained λ-DNA molecules suspended between 5 µm silica beads. The HhH and Fpg/Nei families were found to have a similar diffusive search mechanism described as a continuum of motion, in keeping with rotational diffusion along the DNA molecule ranging from slow, sub-diffusive to faster, unrestricted diffusion. The search mechanism for an Fpg variant, F111A, lacking a phenylalanine wedge residue no longer displayed slow, sub-diffusive motion compared to wild type, suggesting that Fpg base interrogation may be accomplished by Phe111 insertion. PMID:21666255

  9. DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy neon and iron ions in human fibroblasts. II. Probing individual notI fragments by hybridization.

    PubMed

    Löbrich, M; Rydberg, B; Cooper, P K

    1994-08-01

    The initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks induced by energetic heavy ions (425 MeV/u neon and 250, 400 and 600 MeV/u iron) in comparison to X rays were measured in normal human diploid fibroblast cells within three small areas of the genome, defined by NotI fragments of 3.2, 2.0 and 1.2 Mbp. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated cells, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with probes recognizing single-copy sequences within the three NotI fragments. The gradual disappearance of the full-size NotI fragment with dose and the appearance of a smear of broken DNA molecules are quantified. Assuming Poisson statistics for the number of double-strand breaks induced per NotI fragment of known size, absolute yields of DNA double-strand breaks were calculated and determined to be linear with dose in all cases, with the neon ion (LET 32 keV/microns) producing 4.4 x 10(-3) breaks/Mbp/Gy and all three iron-ion beams (LETs from 190 to 350 keV/microns) producing 2.8 x 10(-3) breaks/Mbp/Gy, giving RBE values for production of double-strand breaks of 0.76 for neon and 0.48 for iron in comparison to our previously determined X-ray induction rate of 5.8 x 10(-3) breaks/Mbp/Gy. These RBE values are in good agreement with results of measurements over the whole genome as reported in the accompanying paper (B. Rydberg, M. Löbrich and P. Cooper, Radiat. Res. 139, 133-141, 1994). The distribution of broken DNA molecules was similar for the various radiations, supporting a random distribution of double-strand breaks induced by the heavy ions over Mbp distances; however, correlated breaks (clusters) over much smaller distances are not ruled out. Reconstitution of the 3.2 Mbp NotI fragment was studied during postirradiation incubation of the cells as a measure of rejoining of correct DNA ends. The proportion of breaks repaired decreased with increasing LET. PMID:8052689

  10. cDNA probes for detection of specific dsRNAs from the fungal pathogen, Monosporascus cannonballus.

    PubMed

    Batten, J S; Scholthof, K B; Miller, M E; Martyn, R D

    2000-02-01

    Monosporascus cannonballus is an ascomycete fungus that is the causative agent of Monosporascus root rot/vine decline, a serious disease of muskmelon and watermelon. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was identified in approximately 60% of M. cannonballus isolates recovered from infected muskmelon plants in 1993. After repeated laboratory transfer on culture media, the majority of the isolates harboring dsRNAs developed degenerate culture phenotypes and showed reduced virulence (hypovirulence) to muskmelon. Initially, dsRNA purification and cDNA synthesis were attempted in three M. cannonballus isolates harboring dsRNAs. However, numerous difficulties were encountered due to the stable, double-stranded nature of the dsRNAs and contamination of the preparations by fungal rRNA. Several purification and cDNA protocols were evaluated and eventually modified into methods that were ultimately highly effective for cloning dsRNAs from M. cannonballus. The cDNAs derived from purified dsRNA preparations were cloned into a pUC119 plasmid vector and amplified in Escherichia coli. Nine cDNA clones were identified that are specific for medium-sized (ca. 3 kbp) dsRNAs associated with M. cannonballus isolate Ca91-17(96+). The methods used to make the cDNA clones of the dsRNAs in M. cannonballus may be useful for those working on fungal dsRNAs. In addition, these cDNAs may be useful for identifying dsRNAs associated with the hypovirulence phenotype. PMID:10680971

  11. In Situ Detection of Bacteria within Paraffin-embedded Tissues Using a Digoxin-labeled DNA Probe Targeting 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yong Cheol; Baek, Keum Jin; Choi, Youngnim

    2015-01-01

    The presence of bacteria within the pocket epithelium and underlying connective tissue in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis has been reported using various methods, including electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence using bacteria-specific antibodies, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe. Nevertheless, these methods are not widely used due to technical limitation or difficulties. Here a method to localize bacteria within paraffin-embedded tissues using DIG-labeled DNA probes has been introduced. The paraffin-embedded tissues are the most common form of biopsy tissues available from pathology banks. Bacteria can be detected either in a species-specific or universal manner. Bacterial signals are detected as either discrete forms (coccus, rod, fusiform, and hairy form) of bacteria or dispersed forms. The technique allows other histological information to be obtained: the epithelia, connective tissue, inflammatory infiltrates, and blood vessels are well distinguished. This method can be used to study the role of bacteria in various diseases, such as periodontitis, cancers, and inflammatory immune diseases. PMID:26066790

  12. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi Sublineage in Human Samples from a North-East Argentina Area by Hybridization with DNA Probes and Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Cristina; Lorenz, Virginia; Ortiz, Silvia; Gonzalez, Verónica; Racca, Andrea; Bontempi, Iván; Manattini, Silvia; Solari, Aldo; Marcipar, Iván

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated blood samples of chronic and congenital Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients from the city of Reconquista located in the northeast of Argentina where no information was previously obtained about the genotype of infecting parasites. Fourteen samples of congenital and 19 chronical patients were analyzed by hybridization with DNA probes of minicircle hypervariable regions (mHVR). In congenital patients, 50% had single infections with TcIId, 7% single infections with TcIIe, 29% mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 7% had mixed infections with TcIId/b and 7% TcIId/b, respectively. In Chronical patients, 52% had single infections with TcIId, 11% single infections with TcIIe, 26% had mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 11% had non-identified genotypes. With these samples, we evaluated the minicircle lineage-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (MLS-PCR), which involves a nested PCR to HVR minicircle sequences and we found a correlation with hybridization probes of 96.4% for TcIId and 54.8% for TcIIe. PMID:20064998

  13. A novel cell permeant and far red-fluorescing DNA probe, DRAQ5, for blood cell discrimination by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Wiltshire, M; Davies, S; Patterson, L H; Hoy, T

    1999-10-29

    The deep red fluorescing agent (DRAQ5) is a synthetic anthraquinone with a high affinity for DNA and a high capacity to rapidly enter living cells or stain fixed cells. DRAQ5 is optimally excited by red-light emitting sources and yields a deep red emission spectrum which extends into the low infra-red. DRAQ5 shows excitation at sub-optimal wavelengths including the 488 nm line and the multi-line UV wavelengths emitted by argon-ion lasers. Single beam (488 nm) flow cytometry has been used to demonstrate the utility of DRAQ5-nuclear DNA fluorescence as a discriminating parameter for human leucocytes and lymphoma cells, in combination with fluorochrome-labelled antibodies for the detection of surface antigens and subpopulation recognition. DRAQ5 fluorescence was found to reflect cellular DNA content as evidenced by cell cycle distribution profiles for asynchronous and cell cycle-perturbed populations. Importantly, DRAQ5 can be used in combination with FITC and RPE-labelled antibodies, without the need for fluorescence compensation. PMID:10556697

  14. Probe Intracellular Trafficking of a Polymeric DNA Delivery Vehicle by Functionalization with an Aggregation-Induced Emissive Tetraphenylethene Derivative.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiongqi; Chen, Qixian; Lu, Hongguang; Ma, Jianbiao; Gao, Hui

    2015-12-30

    Characteristic aggregation-induced quenching of π-fluorophores imposed substantial hindrance to their utilization in nanomedicine for insight into microscopic intracellular trafficking of therapeutic payload. To address this obstacle, we attempted to introduce a novel aggregation-induced emission (AIE) fluorophore into the cationic polymer, which was further used for formulation of a gene delivery carrier. Note that the selective restriction of the intramolecular rotation of the AIE fluorophore through its covalent bond to the polymer conduced to immense AIE. Furthermore, DNA payload labeled with the appropriate fluorophore as the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor verified a facile strategy to trace intracellular DNA releasing activity relying on the distance limitation requested by FRET (AIE fluorophore as FRET donor). Moreover, the hydrophobic nature of the AIE fluorophore appeared to promote colloidal stability of the constructed formulation. Together with other chemistry functionalization strategies (including endosome escape), the ultimate formulation exerted dramatic gene transfection efficiency. Hence, this report manifested a first nanomedicine platform combining AIE and FRET for microscopic insight into DNA intracellular trafficking activity. PMID:26634294

  15. A unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease IV activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yushu; Yan, Ping; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and endonuclease IV (Endo IV) play cooperative roles in uracil base-excision repair (UBER) and inactivity of either will interrupt the UBER to cause disease. Detection of UDG and Endo IV activities is crucial to evaluate the UBER process in fundamental research and diagnostic application. Here, a unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method was developed for sensitively and selectively detecting UDG and Endo IV activities. For detecting UDG activity, the uracil base in the probe was excised by the target enzyme to generate an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site, achieving the UDG recognition. Then, the AP site was cleaved by a tool enzyme Endo IV, releasing a primer to trigger rolling circle amplification (RCA) reaction. Finally, the RCA reaction produced numerous repeated G-quadruplex sequences, which interacted with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX to generate an enhanced fluorescence signal. Alternatively, for detecting Endo IV activity, the uracil base in the probe was first converted into an AP site by a tool enzyme UDG. Next, the AP site was cleaved by the target enzyme, achieving the Endo IV recognition. The signal was then generated and amplified in the same way as those in the UDG activity assay. The detection limits were as low as 0.00017 U mL(-1) for UDG and 0.11 U mL(-1) for Endo IV, respectively. Moreover, UDG and Endo IV can be well distinguished from their analogs. This method is beneficial for properly evaluating the UBER process in function studies and disease prognoses. PMID:26899234

  16. Bacteria capable of degrading anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene as revealed by DNA based stable-isotope probing in a forest soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Mengke; Jiang, Longfei; Zhang, Dayi; Luo, Chunling; Wang, Yan; Yu, Zhiqiang; Yin, Hua; Zhang, Gan

    2016-05-01

    Information on microorganisms possessing the ability to metabolize different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in complex environments helps in understanding PAHs behavior in natural environment and developing bioremediation strategies. In the present study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied to investigate degraders of PAHs in a forest soil with the addition of individually (13)C-labeled phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene. Three distinct phylotypes were identified as the active phenanthrene-, anthracene- and fluoranthene-degrading bacteria. The putative phenanthrene degraders were classified as belonging to the genus Sphingomona. For anthracene, bacteria of the genus Rhodanobacter were the putative degraders, and in the microcosm amended with fluoranthene, the putative degraders were identified as belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria. Our results from DNA-SIP are the first to directly link Rhodanobacter- and Acidobacteria-related bacteria with anthracene and fluoranthene degradation, respectively. The results also illustrate the specificity and diversity of three- and four-ring PAHs degraders in forest soil, contributes to our understanding on natural PAHs biodegradation processes, and also proves the feasibility and practicality of DNA-based SIP for linking functions with identity especially uncultured microorganisms in complex microbial biota. PMID:26808242

  17. Locking-to-unlocking system is an efficient strategy to design DNA/silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) probe for human miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pratik; Choi, Suk Won; Kim, Ho-jin; Cho, Seok Keun; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ryu, Moon Young; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; Yang, Seong Wook

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA molecules, are important biomarkers for research and medical purposes. Here, we describe the development of a fast and simple method using highly fluorescent oligonucleotide-silver nanocluster probes (DNA/AgNCs) to efficiently detect specific miRNAs. Due to the great sequence diversity of miRNAs in humans and other organisms, a uniform strategy for miRNA detection is attractive. The concept presented is an oligonucleotide-based locking-to-unlocking system that can be endowed with miRNA complementarity while maintaining the same secondary structure. The locking-to-unlocking system is based on fold-back anchored DNA templates that consist of a cytosine-rich loop for AgNCs stabilization, an miRNA recognition site and an overlap region for hairpin stabilization. When an miRNA is recognized, fluorescence in the visible region is specifically extinguished in a concentration-dependent manner. Here, the exact composition of the fold-back anchor for the locking-to-unlocking system has been systematically optimized, balancing propensity for loop-structure formation, encapsulation of emissive AgNCs and target sensitivity. It is demonstrated that the applied strategy successfully can detect a number of cancer related miRNAs in RNA extracts from human cancer cell lines. PMID:26681688

  18. Locking-to-unlocking system is an efficient strategy to design DNA/silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) probe for human miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pratik; Choi, Suk Won; Kim, Ho-Jin; Cho, Seok Keun; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ryu, Moon Young; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; Yang, Seong Wook

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNA molecules, are important biomarkers for research and medical purposes. Here, we describe the development of a fast and simple method using highly fluorescent oligonucleotide-silver nanocluster probes (DNA/AgNCs) to efficiently detect specific miRNAs. Due to the great sequence diversity of miRNAs in humans and other organisms, a uniform strategy for miRNA detection is attractive. The concept presented is an oligonucleotide-based locking-to-unlocking system that can be endowed with miRNA complementarity while maintaining the same secondary structure. The locking-to-unlocking system is based on fold-back anchored DNA templates that consist of a cytosine-rich loop for AgNCs stabilization, an miRNA recognition site and an overlap region for hairpin stabilization. When an miRNA is recognized, fluorescence in the visible region is specifically extinguished in a concentration-dependent manner. Here, the exact composition of the fold-back anchor for the locking-to-unlocking system has been systematically optimized, balancing propensity for loop-structure formation, encapsulation of emissive AgNCs and target sensitivity. It is demonstrated that the applied strategy successfully can detect a number of cancer related miRNAs in RNA extracts from human cancer cell lines. PMID:26681688

  19. Time-Resolved DNA Stable Isotope Probing Links Desulfobacterales- and Coriobacteriaceae-Related Bacteria to Anaerobic Degradation of Benzene under Methanogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Mana; Kurisu, Futoshi; Kasuga, Ikuro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    To identify the microorganisms involved in benzene degradation, DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP) with 13C-benzene was applied to a methanogenic benzene-degrading enrichment culture. Pyrosequencing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences revealed that the community structure was highly complex in spite of a 3-year incubation only with benzene. The culture degraded 98% of approximately 1 mM 13C-benzene and mineralized 72% of that within 63 d. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles of the buoyant density fractions revealed the incorporation of 13C into two phylotypes after 64 d. These two phylotypes were determined to be Desulfobacterales- and Coriobacteriaceae-related bacteria by cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the 13C-labeled DNA abundant fraction. Comparative pyrosequencing analysis of the buoyant density fractions of 12C- and 13C-labeled samples indicated the incorporation of 13C into three bacterial and one archaeal OTUs related to Desulfobacterales, Coriobacteriales, Rhodocyclaceae, and Methanosarcinales. The first two OTUs included the bacteria detected by T-RFLP-cloning-sequencing analysis. Furthermore, time-resolved SIP analysis confirmed that the activity of all these microbes appeared at the earliest stage of degradation. In this methanogenic culture, Desulfobacterales- and Coriobacteriaceae-related bacteria were most likely to be the major benzene degraders. PMID:24909708

  20. Development of a Single Stranded DNA Aptamer as a Molecular Probe for LNCap Cells Using Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Almasi, Faezeh; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif; Bitaraf, Fatemeh; Rasoulinejad, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, highly specific aptamers generated by cell SELEX technology (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) are being applied for early detection of cancer cells. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA), over expressed in prostate cancer, is a highly specific marker and therefore can be used for diagnosis of the prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to select single-stranded DNA aptamers against LNCap cells highly expressing PSMA, using cell–SELEX method which can be used as a diagnostic tool for the detection of prostate cancer cells. Methods: After 10 rounds of cell-SELEX, DNA aptamers were isolated against PSMA using LNCaP cells as a target and PC-3 cell lines for counter SELEX. Five DNA aptamers with more than 70% affinity were selected up on flow cytometry analysis of positive clones. Results: Dissociation constants of two selected sequences (A12-B1) were estimated in the range of 33.78±3.77 and 57.49±2.214 pmol, respectively. Conserved secondary structures of A12 and B1 sequences suggest the necessity of these structures for binding with high affinity to native PSMA. Comparison of the secondary structures of our isolated aptamers and aptamer A10 obtained by protein SELEX showed similar stem-loop structures which could be responsible for the recognition of PSMA on LNCap cell surface. Conclusion: Our results indicated that selected aptamers may turn out to be ideal candidates for the development of a detection tool and also can be used in targeted drug delivery for future smart drugs. PMID:27563422

  1. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA, USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore, we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  2. Identification of Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Gut of the Generalist Spodoptera littoralis via DNA Stable Isotope Probing Using 13C-Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Guts of most insects are inhabited by complex communities of symbiotic nonpathogenic bacteria. Within such microbial communities it is possible to identify commensal or mutualistic bacteria species. The latter ones, have been observed to serve multiple functions to the insect, i.e. helping in insect reproduction1, boosting the immune response2, pheromone production3, as well as nutrition, including the synthesis of essential amino acids4, among others.     Due to the importance of these associations, many efforts have been made to characterize the communities down to the individual members. However, most of these efforts were either based on cultivation methods or relied on the generation of 16S rRNA gene fragments which were sequenced for final identification. Unfortunately, these approaches only identified the bacterial species present in the gut and provided no information on the metabolic activity of the microorganisms. To characterize the metabolically active bacterial species in the gut of an insect, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) in vivo employing 13C-glucose as a universal substrate. This is a promising culture-free technique that allows the linkage of microbial phylogenies to their particular metabolic activity. This is possible by tracking stable, isotope labeled atoms from substrates into microbial biomarkers, such as DNA and RNA5. The incorporation of 13C isotopes into DNA increases the density of the labeled DNA compared to the unlabeled (12C) one. In the end, the 13C-labeled DNA or RNA is separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation from the 12C-unlabeled similar one6. Subsequent molecular analysis of the separated nucleic acid isotopomers provides the connection between metabolic activity and identity of the species. Here, we present the protocol used to characterize the metabolically active bacteria in the gut of a generalist insect (our model system), Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). The phylogenetic analysis of the DNA

  3. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A.; Sosik, Heidi M.; Olson, Robert J.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA USA), and from a rare A. fundyense ‘red tide’ that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase (‘2C’) A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells’ nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may

  4. Complexities of bloom dynamics in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense revealed through DNA measurements by imaging flow cytometry coupled with species-specific rRNA probes.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Michael L; Farzan, Shahla; Keafer, Bruce A; Sosik, Heidi M; Olson, Robert J; Anderson, Donald M

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the DNA content of different protist populations can shed light on a variety of processes, including cell division, sex, prey ingestion, and parasite invasion. Here, we modified an Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), a custom-built flow cytometer that records images of microplankton, to measure the DNA content of large dinoflagellates and other high-DNA content species. The IFCB was also configured to measure fluorescence from Cy3-labeled rRNA probes, aiding the identification of Alexandrium fundyense (syn. A. tamarense Group I), a photosynthetic dinoflagellate that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The modified IFCB was used to analyze samples from the development, peak and termination phases of an inshore A. fundyense bloom (Salt Pond, Eastham, MA USA), and from a rare A. fundyense 'red tide' that occurred in the western Gulf of Maine, offshore of Portsmouth, NH (USA). Diploid or G2 phase ('2C') A. fundyense cells were frequently enriched at the near-surface, suggesting an important role for aggregation at the air-sea interface during sexual events. Also, our analysis showed that large proportions of A. fundyense cells in both the Salt Pond and red tide blooms were planozygotes during bloom decline, highlighting the importance of sexual fusion to bloom termination. At Salt Pond, bloom decline also coincided with a dramatic rise in infections by the parasite genus Amoebophrya. The samples that were most heavily infected contained many large cells with higher DNA-associated fluorescence than 2C vegetative cells, but these cells' nuclei were also frequently consumed by Amoebophrya trophonts. Neither large cell size nor increased DNA-associated fluorescence could be replicated by infecting an A. fundyense culture of vegetative cells. Therefore we attribute these characteristics of the large Salt Pond cells to planozygote maturation rather than Amoebophrya infection, though an interaction between infection and planozygote maturation may also have

  5. Contribution to the diagnosis of Johne's disease in cattle. Comparative studies on the validity of Ziehl-Neelsen staining, faecal culture and a commercially available DNA-Probe test in detecting Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in faeces from cattle.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, K; Dräger, K G; Klawonn, W; Hess, R G

    1999-03-01

    In the present study, 132 selected faecal samples from clinically affected and subclinically infected cattle from dairy herds known to be affected by Johne's disease were investigated for the presence of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis using Ziehl-Neelsen staining, faecal culture and a commercially available DNA-Probe test. The sensitivity was 36.4% for Ziehl-Neelsen staining, 85.6% for faecal culture and 47.7% for the DNA-Probe test. Proving the presence of acid-fast bacteria in 49.3% of the samples from clinically affected cattle and 19.3% of those from subclinically infected cattle, Ziehl-Neelsen staining had the lowest detection rate of the three tests under investigation. Faecal culture showed the highest detection rate of M. paratuberculosis in samples from both clinically affected (84.0%) and subclinically infected (87.7%) animals. The DNA-Probe test showed a positive result in 68.0% of the samples from clinically affected cattle and 21.1% of those from subclinically infected cattle. Ziehl-Neelsen staining proved unreliable in diagnosing Johne's disease. Faecal culture was the most sensitive method for detecting M. paratuberculosis both in clinically affected and subclinically infected cattle. The sensitivity of a commercially available DNA-Probe test has to be enhanced to enable a quick and reliable diagnosis of Johne's disease. PMID:10216457

  6. Mapping immunoglobulin gene-related DNA probes to the central region of normal and pericentrically inverted human chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lautner-Rieske, A.; Zachau, H.G.; Hameister, H.; Barbi, G.

    1993-05-01

    Several immunoglobulin {kappa}-related sequences were transposed in evolution from the short arm to the long arm of chromosome 2. The common pericentric inversion of this chromosome found in present-day populations results in an apparent reinversion of those sequences to the short arm and the transposition of the {kappa} and CD8{alpha} loci to the long arm. This is shown by in situ hybridization and PFGE experiments with hybridization probes from both arms of chromosome 2, i.e., from 2cen-p12 and 2cen-q13. The inversion breakpoints lie outside of all hybridization sites, and the inversion is described as inv(2)(p12q14). The possibility of common breakpoints in ancient and present-day pericentric inversions is discussed. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Sensitive Visual Detection of AHPND Bacteria Using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles as Probes

    PubMed Central

    Arunrut, Narong; Kampeera, Jantana; Sirithammajak, Sarawut; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Proespraiwong, Porranee; Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a component cause of early mortality syndrome (EMS) of shrimp. In 2013, the causative agent was found to be unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND) that contained a 69 kbp plasmid (pAP1) carrying binary Pir-like toxin genes PirvpA and PirvpB. In Thailand, AHPND was first recognized in 2012, prior to knowledge of the causative agent, and it subsequently led to a precipitous drop in shrimp production. After VPAHPND was characterized, a major focus of the AHPND control strategy was to monitor broodstock shrimp and post larvae for freedom from VPAHPND by nucleic acid amplification methods, most of which required use of expensive and sophisticated equipment not readily available in a shrimp farm setting. Here, we describe a simpler but equally sensitive approach for detection of VPAHPND based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) combined with unaided visual reading of positive amplification products using a DNA-functionalized, ssDNA-labled nanogold probe (AuNP). The target for the special set of six LAMP primers used was the VPAHPND PirvpA gene. The LAMP reaction was carried out at 65°C for 45 min followed by addition of the red AuNP solution and further incubation at 65°C for 5 min, allowing any PirvpA gene amplicons present to hybridize with the probe. Hybridization protected the AuNP against aggregation, so that the solution color remained red upon subsequent salt addition (positive test result) while unprotected AuNP aggregated and underwent a color change from red to blue and eventually precipitated (negative result). The total assay time was approximately 50 min. The detection limit (100 CFU) was comparable to that of other commonly-used methods for nested PCR detection of VPAHPND and 100-times more sensitive than 1-step PCR detection methods (104 CFU) that used amplicon detection by electrophoresis or spectrophotometry. There was no cross reaction with DNA templates derived from non

  8. Detection of {open_quotes}cryptic{close_quotes}karyotypic rearrangements in closely related primate species by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using human subtelomeric DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblom, J.J.; Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Specific human subtelomeric DNA probes were used to reveal cryptic chromosomal rearrangements that cannot be detected by conventional high resolution cytogenetic techniques, or by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization using whole chromosome paint analysis. Two cosmids containing different subtelomeric DNA sequences were derived from human chromosome 19 and designated as 7501 and 16432. Cosmid 7501 was hybridized to chromosomes from humans, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. In humans, 7501 consistently labeled chromosomes 3q, 15q, and 19p. Additional chromosomes were labeled in different individuals, indicating a polymorphic distribution of this sequence in the human genome. In contrast, 7501 consistently and strongly labeled only the q arm terminus of chromosome 3 in both chimp and gorilla. The identification of the chromosome was made by two-color FISH analysis using human chromosome 4-specific paint and homologous to human chromosome 4. None of the human subjects showed labeling of chromosome 4 with 7501. This finding suggests that in the course of human evolution, subsequent to the divergence of humans and African apes, a cryptic translocation occurred between the ancestral human chromosome 4 and one or more of the other human chromosomes that now contain this DNA segment. In orangutan, 7501 labeled a single acrocentric chromosome pair, a distinctly different chromosome than that labeled in chimp and gorilla. Comparison of chromosome sites labeled with cosmid 16432 showed the distribution of signals on chromosome 1q arm is the same for humans and chimp, but different in the gorilla. Humans and chimps show distinct labeling on sites 1q terminus and 1q41-42. In gorilla, there is instead a large cluster of intense signal near the terminus of 1q that clearly does not extend all the way to the terminus. A paracentric inversion or an unequal cross-over event may account for the observed difference between these species.

  9. Probing the target search of DNA-binding proteins in mammalian cells using TetR as model searcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normanno, Davide; Boudarène, Lydia; Dugast-Darzacq, Claire; Chen, Jiji; Richter, Christian; Proux, Florence; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Darzacq, Xavier; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-07-01

    Many cellular functions rely on DNA-binding proteins finding and associating to specific sites in the genome. Yet the mechanisms underlying the target search remain poorly understood, especially in the case of the highly organized mammalian cell nucleus. Using as a model Tet repressors (TetRs) searching for a multi-array locus, we quantitatively analyse the search process in human cells with single-molecule tracking and single-cell protein-DNA association measurements. We find that TetRs explore the nucleus and reach their target by 3D diffusion interspersed with transient interactions with non-cognate sites, consistent with the facilitated diffusion model. Remarkably, nonspecific binding times are broadly distributed, underlining a lack of clear delimitation between specific and nonspecific interactions. However, the search kinetics is not determined by diffusive transport but by the low association rate to nonspecific sites. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view of the recruitment dynamics of proteins at specific loci in mammalian cells.

  10. A Novel Sandwich Electrochemical Immunosensor Based on the DNA-Derived Magnetic Nanochain Probes for Alpha-Fetoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Jia, Liyong; Zheng, Lei

    2011-01-01

    One novel electrochemical immunosensor was constructed by immobilizing capture antibody of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP Ab1) on a nafion/nanogold-particle modified glassy carbon electrode. With a sandwich immunoassay, one DNA-derived magnetic nanoprobe, simplified as DNA/(ZMPs—HRP-AFP Ab2)n, was employed for the detection of AFP. The fabricated procedure of the proposed biosensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The performance and factors influencing the performance of the biosensor were also evaluated. Under optimal conditions, the developed biosensor exhibited a well-defined electrochemical behavior toward the reduction of AFP ranging from 0.01 to 200 ng/mL with a detection limit of 4 pg/mL (S/N = 3). The biosensor was applied to the determination of AFP in serum with satisfactory results. It is important to note that the sandwich nanochainmodified electro-immunosensor provided an alternative substrate for the immobilization of other tumor markers. PMID:22013390

  11. Probing the Ion Binding Site in a DNA Holliday Junction Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)

    PubMed Central

    Litke, Jacob L.; Li, Yan; Nocka, Laura M.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2016-01-01

    Holliday Junctions are critical DNA intermediates central to double strand break repair and homologous recombination. The junctions can adopt two general forms: open and stacked-X, which are induced by protein or ion binding. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy, metal ion luminescence and thermodynamic measurements are used to elucidate the ion binding site and the mechanism of junction conformational change. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements of end-labeled junctions monitored junction conformation and ion binding affinity, and reported higher affinities for multi-valent ions. Thermodynamic measurements provided evidence for two classes of binding sites. The higher affinity ion-binding interaction is an enthalpy driven process with an apparent stoichiometry of 2.1 ± 0.2. As revealed by Eu3+ luminescence, this binding class is homogeneous, and results in slight dehydration of the ion with one direct coordination site to the junction. Luminescence resonance energy transfer experiments confirmed the presence of two ions and indicated they are 6–7 Å apart. These findings are in good agreement with previous molecular dynamics simulations, which identified two symmetrical regions of high ion density in the center of stacked junctions. These results support a model in which site-specific binding of two ions in close proximity is required for folding of DNA Holliday junctions into the stacked-X conformation. PMID:26978349

  12. Probing the target search of DNA-binding proteins in mammalian cells using TetR as model searcher.

    PubMed

    Normanno, Davide; Boudarène, Lydia; Dugast-Darzacq, Claire; Chen, Jiji; Richter, Christian; Proux, Florence; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Darzacq, Xavier; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular functions rely on DNA-binding proteins finding and associating to specific sites in the genome. Yet the mechanisms underlying the target search remain poorly understood, especially in the case of the highly organized mammalian cell nucleus. Using as a model Tet repressors (TetRs) searching for a multi-array locus, we quantitatively analyse the search process in human cells with single-molecule tracking and single-cell protein-DNA association measurements. We find that TetRs explore the nucleus and reach their target by 3D diffusion interspersed with transient interactions with non-cognate sites, consistent with the facilitated diffusion model. Remarkably, nonspecific binding times are broadly distributed, underlining a lack of clear delimitation between specific and nonspecific interactions. However, the search kinetics is not determined by diffusive transport but by the low association rate to nonspecific sites. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view of the recruitment dynamics of proteins at specific loci in mammalian cells. PMID:26151127

  13. Probing the target search of DNA-binding proteins in mammalian cells using TetR as model searcher

    PubMed Central

    Normanno, Davide; Boudarène, Lydia; Dugast-Darzacq, Claire; Chen, Jiji; Richter, Christian; Proux, Florence; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Darzacq, Xavier; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular functions rely on DNA-binding proteins finding and associating to specific sites in the genome. Yet the mechanisms underlying the target search remain poorly understood, especially in the case of the highly organized mammalian cell nucleus. Using as a model Tet repressors (TetRs) searching for a multi-array locus, we quantitatively analyse the search process in human cells with single-molecule tracking and single-cell protein–DNA association measurements. We find that TetRs explore the nucleus and reach their target by 3D diffusion interspersed with transient interactions with non-cognate sites, consistent with the facilitated diffusion model. Remarkably, nonspecific binding times are broadly distributed, underlining a lack of clear delimitation between specific and nonspecific interactions. However, the search kinetics is not determined by diffusive transport but by the low association rate to nonspecific sites. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view of the recruitment dynamics of proteins at specific loci in mammalian cells. PMID:26151127

  14. Novel method for high throughput DNA methylation marker evaluation using PNA-probe library hybridization and MALDI-TOF detection.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Philipp; Distler, Jürgen; Berlin, Kurt; Schuster, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The methylation of CpG dinucleotides has become a topic of great interest in cancer research, and the methylation of promoter regions of several tumor suppressor genes has been identified as a marker of tumorigenesis. Evaluation of DNA methylation markers in tumor tissue requires hundreds of samples, which must be analyzed quantitatively due to the heterogeneous composition of biological material. Therefore novel, fast and inexpensive methods for high throughput analysis are needed. Here we introduce a new assay based on peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-library hybridization and subsequent MALDI-TOF analysis. This method is multiplexable, allows the use of standard 384 well automated pipetting, and is more specific and flexible than established methods, such as microarrays and MS-SNuPE. The approach was used to evaluate three candidate colon cancer methylation markers previously identified in a microarray study. The methylation of the genes Ade-nomatous polyposis coli (APC), glycogen synthase kinase-beta-3 (GSK3beta) and eyes absent 4 (EYA4) was analyzed in 12 colon cancer and 12 normal tissues. APC and EYA4 were confirmed as being differentially methylated in colon cancer patients whereas GSK3beta did not show differential methylation. PMID:16670426

  15. Novel method for high throughput DNA methylation marker evaluation using PNA-probe library hybridization and MALDI-TOF detection

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Philipp; Distler, Jürgen; Berlin, Kurt; Schuster, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The methylation of CpG dinucleotides has become a topic of great interest in cancer research, and the methylation of promoter regions of several tumor suppressor genes has been identified as a marker of tumorigenesis. Evaluation of DNA methylation markers in tumor tissue requires hundreds of samples, which must be analyzed quantitatively due to the heterogeneous composition of biological material. Therefore novel, fast and inexpensive methods for high throughput analysis are needed. Here we introduce a new assay based on peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-library hybridization and subsequent MALDI-TOF analysis. This method is multiplexable, allows the use of standard 384 well automated pipetting, and is more specific and flexible than established methods, such as microarrays and MS-SNuPE. The approach was used to evaluate three candidate colon cancer methylation markers previously identified in a microarray study. The methylation of the genes Ade-nomatous polyposis coli (APC), glycogen synthase kinase-β-3 (GSK3β) and eyes absent 4 (EYA4) was analyzed in 12 colon cancer and 12 normal tissues. APC and EYA4 were confirmed as being differentially methylated in colon cancer patients whereas GSK3β did not show differential methylation. PMID:16670426

  16. Measurement of mRNA by solution hybridization with /sup 32/P-labelled single stranded cRNA probe (SP6 test). Comparison with a /sup 32/P-labelled single stranded cDNA as hybridization probe (S1 test) for measurement of AVP mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, G.; Haenze, J.L.; Lehmann, E.; Lang, R.E.; Burbach, J.H.; Ganten, D.

    1988-01-01

    Radioactively labelled cRNA for the rat AVP gene exon C was synthetized from a pSP64-vector and used for solution hybridization measurement of AVP mRNA (SP6 test). For comparison hybridization was carried out with a gel-purified radioactively labelled cDNA probe synthetized by primer extension of AVP gene exon C cloned into an M13mp9 phage vector DNA (S1 test). Both tests had a comparable sensitivity of up to 0.2 pg AVP mRNA. Under optimal hybridization conditions kinetics were similar in both tests. The fast and easy preparation of large amounts of labelled cDNA probe and simple determination of absolute amounts of mRNA by saturation kinetics without need of a mRNA standard makes the SP6 test an attractive alternative to the known S1 test. The SP6 test should be applicable for a wide variety of genes.

  17. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus in infected CEM cells using fluorescent DNA probes and a laser-based computerized image cytofluorometry system.

    PubMed

    Hart, L; Donovan, R M; Goldstein, E; Brady, F P

    1990-04-01

    Quantitative nonradioactive methods to measure the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in individually infected cells are needed for the direct assessment of HIV infection, for the evaluation of antiviral chemotherapy and for testing the efficacy of vaccines. As a first step in accomplishing this goal, we built an argon ion laser-based computerized image cytofluorometry (ALCIC) system and determined this instrument's ability to quantitatively measure HIV nucleotides in infected lymphocytes. ALCIC consisted of a 43-mW argon ion laser connected to a Zeiss Universal microscope via a fiberoptic cable, a charged coupled-device video camera, a video frame grabber and array processor and a Micro Vax II computer using computer programs written in FORTRAN. HIV RNA and DNA were detected in infected CEM lymphocytes in culture by in situ hybridization using acetylaminofluorene (AAF)-labeled HIV-DNA probes, a rabbit anti-AAF antibody and a fluorescein-labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody. ALCIC measurements showed that 61% of the CEM cells were infected and that quantitative differences were distinguishable within this group. The levels of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence were sixfold or more greater than that observed with the same system using a 100-W mercury lamp for illumination; the improved intensity of the laser-based system is due to greater excitation intensity of the laser and the matching of the excitation spectrum to the peak wavelength of FITC. ALCIC has potential clinical value for determining the effect of antiviral agents on HIV infection and for assessing the susceptibility of different cell types to infection. PMID:2112391

  18. Identification of Nitrogen-Incorporating Bacteria in Petroleum-Contaminated Arctic Soils by Using [15N]DNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing and Pyrosequencing ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Terrence H.; Yergeau, Etienne; Martineau, Christine; Juck, David; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Arctic soils are increasingly susceptible to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, as exploration and exploitation of the Arctic increase. Bioremediation in these soils is challenging due to logistical constraints and because soil temperatures only rise above 0°C for ∼2 months each year. Nitrogen is often added to contaminated soil in situ to stimulate the existing microbial community, but little is known about how the added nutrients are used by these microorganisms. Microbes vary widely in their ability to metabolize petroleum hydrocarbons, so the question becomes: which hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms most effectively use this added nitrogen for growth? Using [15N]DNA-based stable isotope probing, we determined which taxonomic groups most readily incorporated nitrogen from the monoammonium phosphate added to contaminated and uncontaminated soil in Canadian Forces Station-Alert, Nunavut, Canada. Fractions from each sample were amplified with bacterial 16S rRNA and alkane monooxygenase B (alkB) gene-specific primers and then sequenced using lage-scale parallel-pyrosequencing. Sequence data was combined with 16S rRNA and alkB gene C quantitative PCR data to measure the presence of various phylogenetic groups in fractions at different buoyant densities. Several families of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria that are directly involved in petroleum degradation incorporated the added nitrogen in contaminated soils, but it was the DNA of Sphingomonadaceae that was most enriched in 15N. Bacterial growth in uncontaminated soils was not stimulated by nutrient amendment. Our results suggest that nitrogen uptake efficiency differs between bacterial groups in contaminated soils. A better understanding of how groups of hydrocarbon-degraders contribute to the catabolism of petroleum will facilitate the design of more targeted bioremediation treatments. PMID:21498745

  19. Isolation of a Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific DNA probe by subtraction hybridization and construction of species-specific oligonucleotide primers for sensitive detection by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, S E; Jackson, L A; Daniels, M J

    1992-01-01

    A subtraction hybridization technique was employed to make a library enriched for Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific sequences. One cloned fragment, PS2096, hybridized under stringent conditions to DNA of 82 P. solanacearum strains representing all subgroups of the species. Other plant-associated bacteria, including closely related species such as Pseudomonas capacia, Pseudomonas picketti, or Pseudomonas syzygii, did not hybridize to PS2096. A minimum number of between 4 x 10(5) and 4 x 10(6) P. solanacearum cells could routinely be detected with PS2096 labelled either with [32P]dCTP or with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. To improve the sensitivity of detection, PS2096 was sequenced to allow the construction of specific oligonucleotide primers to be used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After 50 cycles of amplification, 5 to 116 cells, depending on the strain, could reproducibly be detected by visualization of a 148-bp PCR product on an agarose gel. A preliminary field trial in Burundi with the probe and PCR primers has confirmed that they are sensitive tools for specifically detecting low-level infections of P. solanacearum in potato tubers. Images PMID:1482193

  20. Use of an antikinetochore antibody and DNA probes to measure aneuploidy induction in interphase human lymphocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Tucker, J.D.; Pinkel, D.

    1988-12-05

    Aneuploidy in germ cells is associated with birth defects, spontaneous abortions, and infertility, whereas in somatic cells aneuploidy may lead to cell death and carcinogenesis. The nonrandom numerical chromosomal changes that are often observed in tumors or transformed cells suggest that aneuploidy induction by chemicals may be involved in carcinogenesis. The identification of aneuploidy inducing agents (aneuploidogens) and studies into the mechanisms by which aneuploidy may be involved in carcinogenesis are currently limited in that standard cytogenetic techniques are time consuming, require highly skilled personnel and are prone to technical artifacts. Recent developments in immunology and molecular biology have resulted in new techniques which may allow simple and rapid identification of aneuploidogens. We report the development of two new approaches to determine the aneuploidy-inducing potential of chemicals. The first approach involves the induction of micronuclei in human lymphocytes and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and the use of an antikinetochore antibody to determine whether micronuclei contain centromeres---a condition indicating potential aneuploidy. The second approach involves the use of in situ hybridization with fluorescently labeled chromosome-specific DNA probes and the subsequent counting of the number of copies of that chromosome in the interphase nuclei of human lymphocytes. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. DNA stable-isotope probing of oil sands tailings pond enrichment cultures reveals different key players for toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laban, Nidal Abu; Dao, Anh; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    Oil sands tailings ponds are anaerobic repositories of fluid wastes produced by extraction of bitumen from oil sands ores. Diverse indigenous microbiota biodegrade hydrocarbons (including toluene) in situ, producing methane, carbon dioxide and/or hydrogen sulfide, depending on electron acceptor availability. Stable-isotope probing of cultures enriched from tailings associated specific taxa and functional genes to (13)C6- and (12)C7-toluene degradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions. Total DNA was subjected to isopycnic ultracentrifugation followed by gradient fraction analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and construction of 16S rRNA, benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) gene clone libraries. T-RFLP analysis plus sequencing and in silico digestion of cloned taxonomic and functional genes revealed that Clostridiales, particularly Desulfosporosinus (136 bp T-RF) contained bssA genes and were key toluene degraders during methanogenesis dominated by Methanosaeta. Deltaproteobacterial Desulfobulbaceae (157 bp T-RF) became dominant under sulfidogenic conditions, likely because the Desulfosporosinus T-RF 136 apparently lacks dsrB and therefore, unlike its close relatives, is presumed incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. We infer incomplete oxidation of toluene by Desulfosporosinus in syntrophic association with Methanosaeta under methanogenic conditions, and complete toluene oxidation by Desulfobulbaceae during sulfate reduction. PMID:25873466

  2. A novel real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay with partially double-stranded linear DNA probe for sensitive detection of hepatitis C viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianfu; Wan, Zhenzhou; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Lingyi; Zhou, Yanheng; Lan, Ke; Hu, Yihong; Zhang, Chiyu

    2016-10-01

    The detection and quantification of HCV RNA is very helpful for the management and treatment of HCV related diseases. Detection of low HCV viral load is a great challenge in HCV RNA detection. Here, we developed a novel real-time RT-PCR assay with partially double-stranded linear DNA probe which can detect all HCV genotypes and improve the detection performance. The novel assay has a wide linear dynamic range of HCV RNA quantification (1×10(2)-1×10(11)IU/ml) and a limit of detection of 78IU/ml. The assay exhibits an excellent reproducibility with 2.52% and 1.33% coefficients of variations, for inter- and intra-assays, respectively. To evaluate the viability of the assay, a comparison with a commercial HCV RNA detection kit was performed using 106 serum samples. The lineared correlation coefficient between the novel assay and the commercial HCV RNA detection kit was 0.940. Meanwhile, the deviation between the two methods was tolerable. Therefore, the novel real-time RT-PCR assay was applicable for laboratory diagnosis and monitoring of HCV infection. PMID:27451264

  3. A modular approach to the synthesis of new reagents useful in the chemical synthesis of modified DNA probes: derivatives of 3-(tert-butyldimethylsiloxy)glutaric anhydride as versatile building blocks in the synthesis of new phosphoramidites and modified solid supports.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczynski, Zbigniew; Wayland, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    We present a flexible and cost-efficient synthetic strategy for the preparation of a new family of phosphoramidite and solid-support reagents that can introduce a broad range of modifications into DNA probes. The key intermediate material 3 is synthesized using the inexpensive and commercially available 3-(tert-butyldimethylsiloxy)glutaric anhydride 1 and can be used as common starting material for the preparation of new labeling reagents. PMID:15149187

  4. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  5. Use of urea and glycine betaine to quantify coupled folding and probe the burial of DNA phosphates in lac repressor-lac operator binding.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiang; Capp, Mike W; Saecker, Ruth M; Record, M Thomas

    2005-12-27

    Thermodynamic analysis of urea-biopolymer interactions and effects of urea on folding of proteins and alpha-helical peptides shows that urea interacts primarily with polar amide surface. Urea is therefore predicted to be a quantitative probe of coupled folding, remodeling, and other large-scale changes in the amount of water-accessible polar amide surface in protein processes. A parallel analysis indicates that glycine betaine [N,N,N-trimethylglycine (GB)] can be used to detect burial or exposure of anionic (carboxylate, phosphate) biopolymer surface. To test these predictions, we have investigated the effects of these solutes (0-3 m) on the formation of 1:1 complexes between lac repressor (LacI) and its symmetric operator site (SymL) at a constant KCl molality. Urea reduces the binding constant K(TO) [initial slope dlnK(TO)/dm(urea) = -1.7 +/- 0.2], and GB increases K(TO) [initial slope dlnK(TO)/dm(GB) = 2.1 +/- 0.2]. For both solutes, this derivative decreases with an increase in solute concentration. Analysis of these initial slopes predicts that (1.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) A2 of polar amide surface and (4.5 +/- 1.0) x 10(2) A2 of anionic surface are buried in the association process. Analysis of published structural data, together with modeling of unfolded regions of free LacI as extended chains, indicates that 1.5 x 10(3) A2 of polar amide surface and 6.3 x 10(2) A2 of anionic surface are buried in complexation. Quantitative agreement between structural and thermodynamic results is obtained for amide surface (urea); for anionic surface (GB), the experimental value is approximately 70% of the structural value. For LacI-SymL binding, two-thirds of the structurally predicted change in amide surface (1.0 x 10(3) A2) occurs outside the protein-DNA interface in protein-protein interfaces formed by folding of the hinge helices and interactions of the DNA binding domain (DBD) with the core of the repressor. Since urea interacts principally with amide surface, it is

  6. Characterization of Growing Soil Bacterial Communities across a pH gradient Using H218O DNA-Stable Isotope Probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty-Bernard, A. T.; Schwartz, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have established consistent relationships between pH and bacterial diversity and community structure in soils from site-specific to landscape scales. However, these studies rely on DNA or PLFA extraction techniques from bulk soils that encompass metabolically active and inactive, or dormant, communities, and loose DNA. Dormant cells may comprise up to 80% of total live cells. If dormant cells dominate a particular environment, it is possible that previous interpretations of the soil variables assumed to drive communities could be profoundly affected. We used H218O stable isotope probing and bar-coded illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes to monitor the response of actively growing communities to changes in soil pH in a soil microcosm over 14 days. This substrate-independent approach has several advantages over 13C or 15N-labelled molecules in that all growing bacteria should be able to make use of water, allowing characterization of whole communities. We hypothesized that Acidobacteria would increasingly dominate the growing community and that Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes would decline, given previously established responses by these taxa to soil pH. Instead, we observed the reverse. Actinobacteria abundance increased three-fold from 26 to 76% of the overall community as soil pH fell from pH 5.6 to pH 4.6. Shifts in community structure and decreases in diversity with declining soil pH were essentially driven by two families, Streptomyceaca and Microbacteracea, which collectively increased from 2 to 40% of the entire community. In contrast, Acidobacteria as a whole declined although numbers of subdivision 1 remained stable across all soil pH levels. We suggest that the brief incubation period in this SIP study selected for growth of acid-tolerant Actinobacteria over Acidobacteria. Taxa within Actinomycetales have been readily cultured over short time frames, suggesting rapid growth patterns. Conversely, taxa within Acidobacteria have been

  7. High Resolution DNA Stable Isotope Probing Reveals that Root Exudate Addition to Soil Changes the Identity of the Microbes that Degrade Cellulose but not the Rate of Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A.; Pepe-Ranney, C. P.; Nguyen, A. V. T.; Buckley, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Plant roots release compounds, such as root exudates, which can alter soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and have large impacts on soil carbon (C) retention. The changes in SOM turnover resulting from the addition of organic and/or inorganic substrates are termed 'priming effects'. In this study we examine the effects of root exudates on the priming of cellulose added as particulate organic matter. We amended soil microcosms with 13C-cellulose in the presence or absence of artificial root exudate additions and incubated over time for 45 days. Soils receiving the root exudate (RE) were given either one large dose or multiple, small doses of RE. In each treatment we tracked operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assimilating 13C from cellulose (herein, known as a 'responder') over time using DNA stable isotope probing coupled with next generation sequencing. In all treatments the same amount of cellulose-13C was respired indicating the addition of RE did not result in the priming of cellulose decomposition. However, cellulose responders were different depending on treatment and time of sampling (days 14, 28 and 45). We identified a total of 10,361 OTUs, of which there were 369 cellulose responders in the cellulose only treatment, 273 in the repeated, small dose RE treatment, and 358 in the RE single, large dose treatment. Most of the cellulose responders found in all treatments belonged to phyla Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Chloroflexi. The response time of phyla varies; for instance, more OTUs in Bacteroidetes were observed on day 14 and diminish with each subsequent sampling time. On the other hand, OTUs in Verrucomicrobia increased in response over time. Our study shows no priming effect resulting from the addition of root exudates, although the identity of the microbial mediators of cellulose decomposition varies in each treatment.

  8. Thiazole orange as a fluorescent probe: Label-free and selective detection of silver ions based on the structural change of i-motif DNA at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bei Hua; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Na; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-08-15

    Silver ions have been widely applied to many fields and have harmful effects on environments and human health. Herein, a label-free optical sensor for Ag(+) detection is constructed based on thiazole orange (TO) as a fluorescent probe for the recognition of i-motif DNA structure change at neutral pH. Ag(+) can fold a C-rich single stranded DNA sequence into i-motif DNA structure at neutral pH and that folding is reversible by chelation with cysteine (Cys). The DNA folding process can be indicated by the fluorescence change of TO, which is non-fluorescent in free molecule state and emits strong fluorescence after the incorporation with i-motif DNA. Thus, a rapid, sensitive, and selective method for the detection of Ag(+) and Cys is developed with a detection limit of 17 and 280nM, respectively. It is worth noting that the mechanism underlying the increase of the fluorescence of thiazole orange in the presence of i-motif structure is explained. Moreover, a fluorescent DNA logic gate is successfully designed based on the Ag(+)/Cys-mediated reversible fluorescence changes. The proposed detection strategy is label-free and economical. In addition, this system shows a great promise for i-motif/TO complex to analyze Ag(+) in the real samples. PMID:27260446

  9. Long-Term Prognostic Effects of Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus DNA by Minor Groove Binder-Probe Real-Time Quantitative PCR on Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.-C. . E-mail: jclin@vghtc.gov.tw; Wang, W.-Y.; Liang, W.-M.; Chou, H.-Y.; Jan, J.-S.; Jiang, R.-S.; Wang, J.-Y.; Twu, C.-W.; Liang, K.-L.; Chao, Jeffrey; Shen, W.-C.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term prognostic impact of plasma Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA concentration measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Epstein-Barr virus DNA was retrospectively measured from stock plasma of 152 biopsy-proven NPC patients with Stage II-IV (M0) disease with a RTQ-PCR using the minor groove binder-probe. All patients received CCRT with a median follow-up of 78 months. We divided patients into three subgroups: (1) low pretreatment EBV DNA (<1,500 copies/mL) and undetectable posttreatment EBV DNA (pre-L/post-U) (2) high pretreatment EBV DNA ({>=}1,500 copies/mL) and undetectable posttreatment EBV DNA (pre-H/post-U), and (3) low or high pretreatment EBV DNA and detectable posttreatment EBV DNA (pre-L or H/post-D) for prognostic analyses. Results: Epstein-Barr virus DNA (median concentration, 573 copies/mL; interquartile range, 197-3,074) was detected in the pretreatment plasma of 94.1% (143/152) of patients. After treatment, plasma EBV DNA decreased or remained 0 for all patients and was detectable in 31 patients (20.4%) with a median concentration 0 copy/mL (interquartile range, 0-0). The 5-year overall survival rates of the pre-L/post-U, pre-H/post-U, and pre-L or H/post-D subgroups were 87.2%, 71.0%, and 38.7%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The relapse-free survival showed similar results with corresponding rates of 85.6%, 75.9%, and 26.9%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Multivariate Cox analysis confirmed the superior effects of plasma EBV DNA compared to other clinical parameters in prognosis prediction. Conclusion: Plasma EBV DNA is the most valuable prognostic factor for NPC. More chemotherapy should be considered for patients with persistently detectable EBV DNA after CCRT.

  10. A novel DNA biosensor integrated with Polypyrrole/streptavidin and Au-PAMAM-CP bionanocomposite probes to detect the rs4839469 locus of the vangl1 gene for dysontogenesis prediction.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingying; Yu, Chao; Gao, Rufei; Xia, Chunyong; Yuan, Guolin; Li, Yuliang; Zhao, Yilin; Chen, Qiutong; He, Junlin

    2016-06-15

    The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the vangl1 gene is highly correlated with Neural Tube Defects (NTDs), a group of severe congenital malformations. It is hindered by the lack of a quantitative detection method. We first propose the use of a DNA biosensor to detect the missense single nucleotide polymorphism (rs4839469 c.346G>A p.Ala116Thr) of the vangl1 gene in this work. Polypyrrole (PPy) and streptavidin were integrated to modify a gold electrode. We took advantage of the PPy's good biocompatibility and excellent conductivity. To further accelerate the electron transfer process at the electrode surface, polyamidoamine dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (Au-PAMAM) were used, because Au-PAMAM possess a large number of amino groups to load capture probes (CP). Using the biotin-streptavidin system, the Au-PAMAM-CP bionanocomposite probe, which can detect the target DNA, was conjugated to the electrode surface. Under optimal conditions, the DNA biosensor exhibited a wide linear range of 0.1-100nM with a low detection limit of 0.033nM (S/N=3). The results suggest that this approach has the potential to be used in clinical research. PMID:26914375

  11. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  12. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  13. Two-color spectroscopy of UV excited ssDNA complex with a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) probe: Fast nucleobase autoionization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.; Ignatova, Tetyana; Balaeff, Alexander; Zheng, Ming; Blades, Michael; Stoeckl, Peter

    DNA autoionization is a fundamental process wherein UV-photoexcited nucleobases dissipate energy to the environment without undergoing chemical damage. SWNT is shown to serve as a photoluminescent reporter for studying the mechanism and rates of DNA autoionization. Two-color photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy revealed a strong SWNT PL quenching when the UV pump is resonant with the DNA absorption [Nano Research, 2015]. Semiempirical calculations of the DNA-SWNT electronic structure, combined with a Green's function theory for charge transfer, show a 20 fs autoionization rate, dominated by the hole transfer. Rate-equation analysis of the spectroscopy data confirms that the quenching rate is limited by the thermalization of the free charge carriers transferred to the nanotube reservoir. The developed approach has a great potential for monitoring DNA excitation, autoionization, and chemical damage both in vivo and in vitro. NSF ECCS-1509786 (S.V.R.,T.I.) and PHY-1359195 (P.S.), NIST and UCF facilities.

  14. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  15. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  16. Comparative evaluation of PCR and commercial DNA probes for detection and identification to species level of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Devallois, A; Picardeau, M; Goh, K S; Sola, C; Vincent, V; Rastogi, N

    1996-01-01

    Selective amplification of a 187-bp fragment within the DT6 sequence using the AV6 and AV7 primers for Mycobacterium avium and of a 666-bp fragment within the DT1 sequence of Mycobacterium intracellulare using the IN38 and IN41 primers was performed for 69 clinical isolates identified as M. avium complex by conventional methods. The results were compared in parallel with results with commercial M. avium and M. intracellulare probes. A positive response to either of the two PCRs or M. avium-M. intracellulare AccuProbes constituted positive detection as M. avium complex; this cumulative detection limit was 94.2% for PCR, compared with 90% for AccuProbe. Concordance, on the other hand, was considered an identical species identification using either DT1 PCR and the M. intracellulare probe or DT6 and DT1 PCRs are inexpensive and at least equally sensitive, in-house options to the AccuProbe system for species identification of M. avium and M. intracellulare. PMID:8897178

  17. Localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant(®) DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe: A new approach to study nuclear nanostructure at single molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika; Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Mohana, Giriram K; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Roignant, Jean-Yves; Birk, Udo J; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Higher order chromatin structure is not only required to compact and spatially arrange long chromatids within a nucleus, but have also important functional roles, including control of gene expression and DNA processing. However, studies of chromatin nanostructures cannot be performed using conventional widefield and confocal microscopy because of the limited optical resolution. Various methods of superresolution microscopy have been described to overcome this difficulty, like structured illumination and single molecule localization microscopy. We report here that the standard DNA dye Vybrant(®) DyeCycle™ Violet can be used to provide single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) images of DNA in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells. This SMLM method enabled optical isolation and localization of large numbers of DNA-bound molecules, usually in excess of 10(6) signals in one cell nucleus. The technique yielded high-quality images of nuclear DNA density, revealing subdiffraction chromatin structures of the size in the order of 100nm; the interchromatin compartment was visualized at unprecedented optical resolution. The approach offers several advantages over previously described high resolution DNA imaging methods, including high specificity, an ability to record images using a single wavelength excitation, and a higher density of single molecule signals than reported in previous SMLM studies. The method is compatible with DNA/multicolor SMLM imaging which employs simple staining methods suited also for conventional optical microscopy. PMID:26341267

  18. Synthesis of a novel 4H-pyran analog as minor groove binder to DNA using ethidium bromide as fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Ramana, M M V; Betkar, Rahul; Nimkar, Amey; Ranade, Prasanna; Mundhe, Balaji; Pardeshi, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, isopropyl-6-amino-4-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-5-cyano-2-methyl-4H-pyran-3-carboxylate (4H-pyran analog) has been synthesized by a three component reaction catalyzed by CsOH/γ-Al2O3 and characterized. The interaction of 4H-pyran analog with herring sperm DNA (hs DNA) under physiological conditions (phosphate buffer of pH 7.2) was investigated by UV absorption, FT-IR, fluorescence, (31)P NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Fluorescence quenching results reveal that static quenching mechanism is involved in binding between 4H-pyran analog and hs DNA. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔH° and ΔS°) indicate that hydrogen bonding plays a major role in binding between them. UV absorption and fluorescence shows the binding mode of 4H-pyran analog with hs DNA as non-intercalative. According to the IR spectroscopy, 4H-pyran analog binds to guanine, thymine, adenine bases of hs DNA but not to phosphate backbone of hs DNA which is also in good agreement with (31)P NMR results. CD and competitive binding experiment results confirms the minor groove binding of 4H-pyran analog to hs DNA. PMID:26208271

  19. Synthesis of a novel 4H-pyran analog as minor groove binder to DNA using ethidium bromide as fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, M. M. V.; Betkar, Rahul; Nimkar, Amey; Ranade, Prasanna; Mundhe, Balaji; Pardeshi, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, isopropyl-6-amino-4-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-5-cyano-2-methyl-4H-pyran-3-carboxylate (4H-pyran analog) has been synthesized by a three component reaction catalyzed by CsOH/γ-Al2O3 and characterized. The interaction of 4H-pyran analog with herring sperm DNA (hs DNA) under physiological conditions (phosphate buffer of pH 7.2) was investigated by UV absorption, FT-IR, fluorescence, 31P NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Fluorescence quenching results reveal that static quenching mechanism is involved in binding between 4H-pyran analog and hs DNA. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔH° and ΔS°) indicate that hydrogen bonding plays a major role in binding between them. UV absorption and fluorescence shows the binding mode of 4H-pyran analog with hs DNA as non-intercalative. According to the IR spectroscopy, 4H-pyran analog binds to guanine, thymine, adenine bases of hs DNA but not to phosphate backbone of hs DNA which is also in good agreement with 31P NMR results. CD and competitive binding experiment results confirms the minor groove binding of 4H-pyran analog to hs DNA.

  20. Identification of tuna species in commercial cans by minor groove binder probe real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Terio, Valentina; Di Pinto, Pietro; Decaro, Nicola; Parisi, Antonio; Desario, Costantina; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio; Tantillo, Marilia Giuseppina

    2010-12-01

    Three different minor groove binder (MGB) probe assays have been developed for rapid and accurate identification of the species commonly used for production of canned tuna, i.e. yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bluefin (Thunnus thynnus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga) tunas. The assays targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were able to discriminate efficiently between the three species contained in fresh or canned tunas and did not react with other Scombroidei that were tested. A correct species prediction was obtained even from artificial mixtures prepared with different amounts of the reference tuna species and subjected to the sterilisation treatment. Testing of 27 commercial canned tunas by PCR-RFLP, MGB probe assays and sequence analysis showed a concordance of 100% between the last two techniques, whereas by using PCR-RFLP several samples were uncharacterised or mischaracterised. These results make the established MGB probe assays an attractive tool for direct and rapid species identification in canned tuna. PMID:20691254

  1. Construction of genome-wide physical BAC contigs using mapped cDNA as probes: Toward an integrated BAC library resource for genome sequencing and analysis. Annual report, July 1995--January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.C.; Bocskai, D.; Cao, Y.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of human genome project is to characterize and sequence entire genomes of human and several model organisms, thus providing complete sets of information on the entire structure of transcribed, regulatory and other functional regions for these organisms. In the past years, a number of useful genetic and physical markers on human and mouse genomes have been made available along with the advent of BAC library resources for these organisms. The advances in technology and resource development made it feasible to efficiently construct genome-wide physical BAC contigs for human and other genomes. Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes are available for human genome mapping. ESTs and cDNAs are excellent resources for building contig maps for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms--as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDoreen genomic libraries efficiently for large number of DNA probes by combining over 100 cDNA probes in each hybridization. Second, the linkage and order of genes are rather conserved among human, mouse and other model organisms. Therefore, gene markers have advantages over random anonymous STSs in building maps for comparative genomic studies.

  2. Comparison of the benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide (BANA) test, DNA probes, and immunological reagents for ability to detect anaerobic periodontal infections due to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Bacteroides forsythus.

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, W J; Lopatin, D E; Giordano, J; Alcoforado, G; Hujoel, P

    1992-01-01

    Most forms of periodontal disease are associated with the presence or overgrowth of anaerobic species that could include Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bacteroides forsythus among others. These three organisms are among the few cultivable plaque species that can hydrolyze the synthetic trypsin substrate benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide (BANA). In turn, BANA hydrolysis by the plaque can be associated with periodontal morbidity and with the presence of these three BANA-positive organisms in the plaque. In this investigation, the results of the BANA test, which simultaneously detects one or more of these organisms, were compared with the detection of these organisms by (i) highly specific antibodies to P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and B. forsythus; (ii) whole genomic DNA probes to P. gingivalis and T. denticola; and (iii) culturing or microscopic procedures. The BANA test, the DNA probes, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or an indirect immunofluorescence assay procedure exhibited high sensitivities, i.e., 90 ot 96%, and high accuracies, i.e., 83 to 92%, in their ability to detect combinations of these organisms in over 200 subgingival plaque samples taken from the most periodontally diseased sites in 67 patients. This indicated that if P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and B. forsythus are appropriate marker organisms for an anaerobic periodontal infection, then the three detection methods are equally accurate in their ability to diagnose this infection. The same statement could not be made for the culturing approach, where accuracies of 50 to 62% were observed. PMID:1311335

  3. Temperature mediated variation of DNA secondary structure in (A.T) clusters; evidence by use of the oligopeptide netropsin as a structural probe.

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, K E; Geller, D; Stutter, E

    1981-01-01

    The titration viscometric investigation of the multi-mode interaction of netropsin (Nt) with (A.T) clusters of NaDNA12 and NH4DNA10 has been extended to different temperatures. The position of two boundaries on the r-scale (r= [Nt]bound/[DNA-P]) with increasing temperature steadily (rI/II) or more abruptly (rO/I) shifts to lower values. For the most (A.T) rich Nt-binding sites of modes (O), (I) and (II) this observation suggests the existence of an equilibrium between different DNA secondary structures with a different translation per base pair. The mode specific changes delta L1Nt of DNA contour length as induced by one Nt molecule proved to be almost independent of temperature. Concomitant stiffening effects increase with decreasing temperature, contrary to initial expectation. Conformational variability of (A.T) clusters may represent an essential feature in specific or selective DNA-protein interaction. PMID:6265870

  4. HYBRIDIZATION OF DNA PROBES WITH WHOLE-COMMUNITY GENOMES FOR DETECTION OF GENES THAT ENCODE MICROBIAL RESPONSES TO POLLUTANTS: MER GENES AND HG2+ RESISTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nucleic acids extracted from microbial biomass were hybridized with probes representing four mer operons, to detect genes encoding adaptation to Hg2+. An enrichment in sequences similar to the mer genes of transposon 501 occurred during adaptation in a freshwater community. In an...

  5. ESTIMATION OF BACTERIAL CELL NUMBERS IN HUMIC ACID-RICH SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS WITH PROBES DIRECTED TO 16S RIBOSOMAL DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using probes directed towards ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) as a quantitative approach to estimating cell numbers was examined and applied to study the structure of a bacterial community in humic acid-rich salt marsh sediments. Hybridizations were performed with membr...

  6. Differential Incorporation of Carbon Substrates among Microbial Populations Identified by Field-Based, DNA Stable-Isotope Probing in South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiabing; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    To determine the adapted microbial populations to variant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) sources in the marine environment and improve the understanding of the interaction between microorganisms and marine DOC pool, field-based incubation experiments were carried out using supplemental 13C-labeled typical substrates D-glucose and D-glucosamine (D-Glc and D-GlcN, respectively), which are two important components in marine DOC pool in the South China Sea. 13C- and 12C-DNA were then fractionated by ultracentrifugation and the microbial community was analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene. 12C-DNA-based communities showed relatively high similarities with their corresponding in situ communities, and their bacterial diversities were generally higher than 13C-DNA-based counterparts. Distinct differences in community composition were found between 13C- and 12C-DNA-based communities and between two substrate-supplemented 13C-DNA-based communities; these differences distinctly varied with depth and site. In most cases, there were more genera with relative abundances of >0.1% in D-Glc-incorporating communities than in D-GlcN-incorporating communities. The Roseobacter clade was one of the prominent actively substrate-incorporating bacterial populations in all 13C-DNA-based communities. Vibrio was another prominent actively D-GlcN-incorporating bacterial population in most incubations. However notably, different OTUs dominated this clade or genus in different treatments at different depths. Altogether, these results suggested that there were taxa-specific differences in DOC assimilations and, moreover, their differences varied among the typical water masses, which could have been caused by the variant compositions of original bacterial communities from different hydrological environments. This implies that ecologically, the levels of labile or recalcitrance of DOC can be maintained only in a specific environmental

  7. Determination of cell metabolite VEGF₁₆₅ and dynamic analysis of protein-DNA interactions by combination of microfluidic technique and luminescent switch-on probe.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xuexia; Leung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Ling; Lin, Luyao; Lin, Sheng; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, we rationally design a novel G-quadruplex-selective luminescent iridium (III) complex for rapid detection of oligonucleotide and VEGF165 in microfluidics. This new probe is applied as a convenient biosensor for label-free quantitative analysis of VEGF165 protein from cell metabolism, as well as for studying the kinetics of the aptamer-protein interaction combination with a microfluidic platform. As a result, we have successfully established a quantitative analysis of VEGF165 from cell metabolism. Furthermore, based on the principles of hydrodynamic focusing and diffusive mixing, different transient states during kinetics process were monitored and recorded. Thus, the combination of microfluidic technique and G-quadruplex luminescent probe will be potentially applied in the studies of intramolecular interactions and molecule recognition in the future. PMID:26686922

  8. Fluctuational opening-closing reactions in DNA and mononucleosome cores of chromatin probed by H-exchange and ligand binding reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, C.; Englander, S.W.; Young, P.R.; Kallenbach, N.R.

    1980-10-01

    The DNA double helix represents a dynamic structure in solution that undergoes a spectrum of conformational opening and closing reactions under conditions remote from onset of denaturation. Two kinds of opening reactions of the double helix are manifested by: (a) the ability of base and solvent protons to exchange; and (b) the access of the duplex interior to intercalating agents such as ethidium bromide.

  9. An electrochemiluminescence biosensor for 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine quantification and DNA repair enzyme activity analysis using a novel bifunctional probe.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiping; Yang, Xiqiang; Zhang, Bintian; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2015-07-15

    A new electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor was developed for 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) quantification and Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG) activity assay. The sensor employed a novel spermine conjugated ruthenium tris-(bipyridine) derivative (spermine-Ru) which binds specifically with 8-oxodGuo through a one-step reaction and also acts as an ECL signal reporter. In the sensor, an 8-oxodGuo-containing ds-DNA film was first immobilized on a gold electrode by self-assembly. The DNA film was then incubated with spermine-Ru under oxidative condition for 8-oxodGuo labeling. The ECL intensity was found to correlate with the amount of 8-oxodGuo on the surface and the detection limit was estimated to be about 1 lesion in 500 DNA bases. Addition of FPG resulted in some loss of the signal due to the excision of 8-oxodGuo by the enzyme. An inverse relationship between ECL intensity and FPG concentration was observed in a range from 0 to 4.0U/µL, demonstrating that this sensor could be used for FPG activity assay. A number of metal ions were screened by the sensor for their inhibition effect on FPG activity. Among them, Hg(2+) and methyl Hg(II) shown very potent inhibition, with IC50 values of 4.04µM and 4.34nM respectively. The result may suggest that interference on the DNA repair system could be another mechanism for the high toxicity of MeHg. PMID:25747509

  10. Structure-based design of platinum(II) complexes as c-myc oncogene down-regulators and luminescent probes for G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Yan, Siu-Cheong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-18

    A series of platinum(II) complexes with tridentate ligands was synthesized and their interactions with G-quadruplex DNA within the c-myc gene promoter were evaluated. Complex 1, which has a flat planar 2,6-bis(benzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine (bzimpy) scaffold, was found to stabilize the c-myc G-quadruplex structure in a cell-free system. An in silico G-quadruplex DNA model has been constructed for structure-based virtual screening to develop new Pt(II)-based complexes with superior inhibitory activities. By using complex 1 as the initial structure for hit-to-lead optimization, bzimpy and related 2,6-bis(pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine (dPzPy) scaffolds containing amine side-chains emerge as the top candidates. Six of the top-scoring complexes were synthesized and their interactions with c-myc G-quadruplex DNA have been investigated. The results revealed that all of the complexes have the ability to stabilize the c-myc G-quadruplex. Complex 3 a ([Pt(II)L2R](+); L2=2,6-bis[1-(3-piperidinepropyl)-1H-enzo[d]imidazol-2-yl]pyridine, R=Cl) displayed the strongest inhibition in a cell-free system (IC(50)=2.2 microM) and was 3.3-fold more potent than that of 1. Complexes 3 a and 4 a ([Pt(II)L3R](+); L3=2,6-bis[1-(3-morpholinopropyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]pyridine, R=Cl) were found to effectively inhibit c-myc gene expression in human hepatocarcinoma cells with IC(50) values of approximately 17 microM, whereas initial hit 1 displayed no significant effect on gene expression at concentrations up to 50 microM. Complexes 3 a and 4 a have a strong preference for G-quadruplex DNA over duplex DNA, as revealed by competition dialysis experiments and absorption titration; 3 a and 4 a bind G-quadruplex DNA with binding constants (K) of approximately 10(6)-10(7) dm(3) mol(-1), which are at least an order of magnitude higher than the K values for duplex DNA. NMR spectroscopic titration experiments and molecular modeling showed that 4 a binds c-myc G-quadruplex DNA through an external end-stacking mode at

  11. Green synthesis of anticancerous honeycomb PtNPs clusters: Their alteration effect on BSA and HsDNA using fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Pansare, Amol V; Kulal, Dnyaneshwar K; Shedge, Amol A; Patil, Vishwanath R

    2016-09-01

    The screening and characterization of cancer cells has been challenging due to sample insufficiency and extravagant. In this article, we highlighted easy green synthesis of Platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) in the honeycomb like clusters, and their optical properties (by HRTEM, XRD, DLS, Zeta potential, EDAX, and UV-Visible techniques). PtNPs were responsive of binding mechanisms with the bovine serum albumin (BSA), herring sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (HsDNA) and cytotoxicity of human carcinomas cell. We are able to elucidate the responses of various concentrations of PtNPs for the control of MDA-MB-468 cell and binding conformation of BSA and HsDNA by using multi-spectroscopic techniques under the physiological conditions. The extent of quenching was in agreement of PtNPs-BSA binding reaction was mainly a static. The Ksv, K, the number of binding sites at different temperatures and the thermodynamic parameters between BSA and PtNPs were calculated. The positive ΔS(0) and negative ΔH(0), ΔG(0) values indicated that the binding pattern was determined by spontaneous hydrogen bond electrostatic interaction of BSA with esterage like activity. The binding properties of the PtNPs with HsDNA have been investigated by thermal denaturation, competitive DNA-binding studies with ethidium bromide (EB), Hochest-33258 and relative viscosity. The negative ΔH(0), ΔS(0) and ΔG(0) values indicated that the hydrophilic interaction were main force in spontaneity in binding mechanism of PtNPs to HsDNA. GI50 value of PtNPs demonstrated that these nanoparticles showed cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer cell line. Our results also clarified that PtNPs bind to BSA and can be effectively transported in the body and eliminated. PtNPs showed minor groove binding with HsDNA, which could be a useful guideline for further versatile approach to develop biomedical coatings with different functions of drug design. PMID:27450301

  12. Salt Dependence of the Radius of Gyration and Flexibility of Single-stranded DNA in Solution probed by Small-angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Lipfert, Jan; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2012-07-06

    Short single-stranded nucleic acids are ubiquitous in biological processes and understanding their physical properties provides insights to nucleic acid folding and dynamics. We used small angle x-ray scattering to study 8-100 residue homopolymeric single-stranded DNAs in solution, without external forces or labeling probes. Poly-T's structural ensemble changes with increasing ionic strength in a manner consistent with a polyelectrolyte persistence length theory that accounts for molecular flexibility. For any number of residues, poly-A is consistently more elongated than poly-T, likely due to the tendency of A residues to form stronger base-stacking interactions than T residues.

  13. Isolation of isoprene degrading bacteria from soils, development of isoA gene probes and identification of the active isoprene-degrading soil community using DNA-stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    El Khawand, Myriam; Crombie, Andrew T; Johnston, Antonia; Vavlline, Dmitrii V; McAuliffe, Joseph C; Latone, Jacob A; Primak, Yuliya A; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2016-09-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), are an important element in the global carbon cycle, accounting for a significant proportion of fixed carbon. They contribute directly and indirectly to global warming and climate change and have a major effect on atmospheric chemistry. Plants emit isoprene to the atmosphere in similar quantities to emissions of methane from all sources and each accounts for approximately one third of total VOCs. Although methanotrophs, capable of growth on methane, have been intensively studied, we know little of isoprene biodegradation. Here, we report the isolation of two isoprene-degrading strains from the terrestrial environment and describe the design and testing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers targeting isoA, the gene encoding the active-site component of the conserved isoprene monooxygenase, which are capable of retrieving isoA sequences from isoprene-enriched environmental samples. Stable isotope probing experiments, using biosynthesized (13) C-labelled isoprene, identified the active isoprene-degrading bacteria in soil. This study identifies novel isoprene-degrading strains using both culture-dependent and, for the first time, culture-independent methods and provides the tools and foundations for continued investigation of the biogeography and molecular ecology of isoprene-degrading bacteria. PMID:27102583

  14. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  15. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Strand-invading linear probe combined with unmodified PNA.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Hiroyuki; Niwa, Rie; Akahane, Mariko; Murayama, Keiji; Kashida, Hiromu; Kamiya, Yukiko

    2016-09-15

    Efficient strand invasion by a linear probe to fluorescently label double-stranded DNA has been implemented by employing a probe and unmodified PNA. As a fluorophore, we utilized ethynylperylene. Multiple ethynylperylene residues were incorporated into the DNA probe via a d-threoninol scaffold. The ethynylperylene did not significantly disrupt hybridization with complementary DNA. The linear probe self-quenched in the absence of target DNA and did not hybridize with PNA. A gel-shift assay revealed that linear probe and PNA combination invaded the central region of double-stranded DNA upon heat-shock treatment to form a double duplex. To further suppress the background emission and increase the stability of the probe/DNA duplex, a probe containing anthraquinones as well as ethynylperylene was synthesized. This probe and PNA invader pair detected an internal sequence in a double-stranded DNA with high sensitivity when heat shock treatment was used. The probe and PNA pair was able to invade at the terminus of a long double-stranded DNA at 40°C at 100mM NaCl concentration. PMID:27394693

  17. Visualizing genomes with Oligopaint FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Brian J.; Apostolopoulos, Nicholas; Wu, Chao-ting

    2014-01-01

    Oligopaint probes are fluorescently-labeled, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that can be used to visualize genomic regions ranging in size from tens of kilobases to many megabases. This unit details how Oligopaint probes can be synthesized using basic molecular biological techniques as well as provides protocols for FISH, 3D-FISH, and sample preparation. PMID:24510436

  18. Solvation of deoxynucleosides in aqueous mixtures of organic solvents probed through their intrinsic fluorescence: Implications for open base pair states in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Anas Mohammad

    Because of the importance of solvation in the function of DNA, there is considerable interest in understanding the solvation network of its constituent components. This is of particular importance in connection with the closing of base pairs that have been disrupted as a result of structural fluctuations. Following the opening of a base pair, the open base is exposed to a heterogeneous environment which involves polar as well as nonpolar interactions. Toward the goal of understanding how the open bases interact with such a heterogeneous environment, we have studied the intrinsic fluorescence properties of the purine and pyrimidine nucleosides (dG, dA, dT, and dC) in organic solvents in the presence of small amounts of water. Exposure of the nucleoside to water was done by preparing solutions in three different ways: (i) "premixed" solution in which the nucleoside is dissolved in a water-organic solvent mixture, (ii) "carry its own water" solution in which the nucleoside is first dissolved in water and then diluted in the organic solvent, and (iii) "injected" solution in which water is added to a solution of the nucleoside in the organic solvent. The organic solvents used in the present study were: n-butanol, acetonitrile, methanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, and isobutanol. We find that for n-butanol and acetonitrile, which have a high degree of amphiphilicity and weak hydrogen bonding ability, respectively, the fluorescence spectral properties of the purines are found to depend on the sequence of the steps in which the aqueous mixture was formed. By contrast, no such dependence was observed in the other organic solvents. On the other hand, no such dependence was observed for the pyrimidines in any of the organic solvents used in the present study. These findings suggest that the final solvation network around the purines is dependent on the nature of the environment to which they were initially exposed. This would tend to present an impediment to the closing of

  19. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Protein mutagenesis with monodispersity-based quality probing: selective inactivation of p53 degradation and DNA-binding properties of HPV E6 oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ristriani, Tutik; Nominé, Yves; Laurent, Cécile; Weiss, Etienne; Travé, Gilles

    2002-12-01

    Interpretation of protein mutagenesis experiments requires the ability to distinguish functionally relevant mutations from mutations affecting the structure. When a protein is expressed soluble in bacteria, properly folded mutants are expected to remain soluble whereas misfolded mutants should form insoluble aggregates. However, this rule may fail for proteins fused to highly soluble carrier proteins. In a previous study, we analysed the biophysical status of HPV oncoprotein E6 fused to the C-terminus of maltose-binding protein (MBP) and found that misfolded E6 moieties fused to MBP formed soluble aggregates of high molecular weight. By contrast, preparations of properly folded E6 fused to MBP were monodisperse. Here, we have used this finding to evaluate the quality of 19 MBP-fused E6 site-directed mutants by using a light scattering assay performed in a fluorimeter. This assay guided us to rule out structurally defective mutants and to obtain functionally relevant E6 mutants selectively altered for two molecular activities: degradation of tumour suppressor p53 and DNA recognition. PMID:12460759

  1. Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis DNA by use of self-obtained vaginal swabs with the BD ProbeTec Qx assay on the BD Viper system.

    PubMed

    Van Der Pol, Barbara; Williams, James A; Taylor, Stephanie N; Cammarata, Catherine L; Rivers, Charles A; Body, Barbara A; Nye, Melinda; Fuller, Deanna; Schwebke, Jane R; Barnes, Mathilda; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2014-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection worldwide, and improved diagnostic methods are critical for controlling this pathogen. Diagnostic assays that can be used in conjunction with routine chlamydia/gonorrhea nucleic acid-based screening are likely to have the most impact on disease control. Here we describe the performance of the new BD T. vaginalis Qx (TVQ) amplified DNA assay, which can be performed on the automated BD Viper system. We focus on data from vaginal swab samples, since this is the specimen type routinely used for traditional trichomonas testing and the recommended specimen type for chlamydia/gonorrhea screening. Vaginal swabs were obtained from women attending sexually transmitted disease or family planning clinics at 7 sites. Patient-collected vaginal swabs were tested by the TVQ assay, and the Aptima T. vaginalis (ATV) assay was performed using clinician-collected vaginal swabs. Additional clinician-collected vaginal swabs were used for the wet mount and culture methods. Analyses included comparisons versus the patient infection status (PIS) defined by positive results with the wet mount method or culture, direct comparisons assessed with κ scores, and latent class analysis (LCA) as an unbiased estimator of test accuracy. Data from 838 women, 116 of whom were infected with T. vaginalis, were analyzed. The TVQ assay sensitivity and specificity estimates based on the PIS were 98.3% and 99.0%, respectively. The TVQ assay was similar to the ATV assay (κ=0.938) in direct analysis. LCA estimated the TVQ sensitivity and specificity as 98.3 and 99.6%, respectively. The TVQ assay performed well using self-collected vaginal swabs, the optimal sample type, as recommended by the CDC for chlamydia/gonorrhea screening among women. PMID:24391200

  2. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  3. PCR and probe-PCR assays to monitor broodstock Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) ovarian fluid and kidney tissue for presence of DNA of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed Central

    Miriam, A; Griffiths, S G; Lovely, J E; Lynch, W H

    1997-01-01

    A simple, rapid PCR assay for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) tissues detected DNA extracted from between 4 and 40 bacterial cells. PCR was at least as sensitive as culture when it was used to identify subclinically infected fish experimentally challenged with R. salmoninarum. However, PCR identified much higher numbers of kidney tissue and ovarian fluid samples from commercially reared broodstock fish to be positive for R. salmoninarum than did culture. This difference may be due to the antibiotic chemotherapy of broodstock fish used by the industry in 1994 to control the vertical transmission of R. salmoninarum. A much closer relationship between PCR and culture results was observed for ovarian fluid samples collected from broodstock fish in 1993. Also, PCR scored a much higher percentage of kidney tissue samples than ovarian fluid samples from 1994 broodstock fish positive for R. salmoninarum, which may reflect the uneven distribution of the pathogen in different fish tissues. Inclusion of a nested probe to identify the PCR-positive 1994 ovarian fluid samples increased the sensitivity of detection to between one and four cells and the number of samples that scored positive by almost threefold. These data indicate that many infected ovarian fluid samples contained very low numbers of R. salmoninarum cells and, because almost all these samples were culture negative, that PCR may have detected dead or otherwise unculturable bacterial cells. PMID:9163437

  4. PCR and probe-PCR assays to monitor broodstock Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) ovarian fluid and kidney tissue for presence of DNA of the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    PubMed

    Miriam, A; Griffiths, S G; Lovely, J E; Lynch, W H

    1997-06-01

    A simple, rapid PCR assay for the identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) tissues detected DNA extracted from between 4 and 40 bacterial cells. PCR was at least as sensitive as culture when it was used to identify subclinically infected fish experimentally challenged with R. salmoninarum. However, PCR identified much higher numbers of kidney tissue and ovarian fluid samples from commercially reared broodstock fish to be positive for R. salmoninarum than did culture. This difference may be due to the antibiotic chemotherapy of broodstock fish used by the industry in 1994 to control the vertical transmission of R. salmoninarum. A much closer relationship between PCR and culture results was observed for ovarian fluid samples collected from broodstock fish in 1993. Also, PCR scored a much higher percentage of kidney tissue samples than ovarian fluid samples from 1994 broodstock fish positive for R. salmoninarum, which may reflect the uneven distribution of the pathogen in different fish tissues. Inclusion of a nested probe to identify the PCR-positive 1994 ovarian fluid samples increased the sensitivity of detection to between one and four cells and the number of samples that scored positive by almost threefold. These data indicate that many infected ovarian fluid samples contained very low numbers of R. salmoninarum cells and, because almost all these samples were culture negative, that PCR may have detected dead or otherwise unculturable bacterial cells. PMID:9163437

  5. A DNA machine for sensitive and homogeneous DNA detection via lambda exonuclease assisted amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Lei, Jianping; Gao, Fenglei; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-10-15

    This work designs a DNA machine with three assistant DNAs and lambda exonuclease (Exo-λ) for sensitive and homogeneous fluorescent detection of DNA. The selective digestion of Exo-λ to blunt or recessed 5'-phosphorylated strand of probe 1-probe 2 duplex results in the release of target DNA and probe 2 to produce the fluorescence restoring of fluorophore labeled to probe 1. The released target DNA could hybridize with another probe 1-probe 2 duplex to trigger the target recycling for signal amplification, while the released probe 2 hybridized with molecular beacon to restore its fluorescence for signal enhancement. This DNA machine showed a fast response to target DNA with a linear concentration range from 0.4 pM to 4 nM. The limit of detection was 68 fM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The high selectivity of the method may result from the Exo-λ's specific recognition-site of double-stranded DNA and the specific hybridization of target DNA with probe 1-probe 2 duplex. This DNA machine with the homogenous detection, rapid response as well as simplicity provides a new approach for sensitive detection of DNA. PMID:24054668

  6. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  7. A reliable method to concentrate circulating DNA.

    PubMed

    Bryzgunova, Olga; Bondar, Anna; Morozkin, Evgeniy; Mileyko, Vladislav; Vlassov, Valentin; Laktionov, Pavel

    2011-01-15

    Concentration of circulating DNA probes is required to increase the amount of DNA involved in subsequent study (by polymerase chain reaction, sequencing, and microarray). This work was dedicated to the comparison of five different methods used for concentration of DNA circulating in blood. Precipitation of circulating DNA with acetone in the presence of triethylamine provides minimal DNA loss, high reproducibility, and at least three times higher DNA yield in comparison with the standard ethanol protocol. PMID:20828533

  8. Ultrasensitive FRET-based DNA sensor using PNA/DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lan-Hee; Ahn, Dong June; Koo, Eunhae

    2016-12-01

    In the diagnosis of genetic diseases, rapid and highly sensitive DNA detection is crucial. Therefore, many strategies for detecting target DNA have been developed, including electrical, optical, and mechanical methods. Herein, a highly sensitive FRET based sensor was developed by using PNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) probe and QD, in which red color QDs are hybridized with capture probes, reporter probes and target DNAs by EDC-NHS coupling. The hybridized probe with target DNA gives off fluorescent signal due to the energy transfer from QD to Cy5 dye in the reporter probe. Compared to the conventional DNA sensor using DNA probes, the DNA sensor using PNA probes shows higher FRET factor and efficiency due to the higher reactivity between PNA and target DNA. In addition, to elicit the effect of the distance between the donor and the acceptor, we have investigated two types of the reporter probes having Cy5 dyes attached at the different positions of the reporter probes. Results show that the shorter the distance between QDs and Cy5s, the stronger the signal intensity. Furthermore, based on the fluorescence microscopy images using microcapillary chips, the FRET signal is enhanced to be up to 276% times stronger than the signal obtained using the cuvette by the fluorescence spectrometer. These results suggest that the PNA probe system conjugated with QDs can be used as ultrasensitive DNA nanosensors. PMID:27612755

  9. Fluorescent probes for G-quadruplex structures.

    PubMed

    Vummidi, Balayeshwanth R; Alzeer, Jawad; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2013-03-18

    Mounting evidence supports the presence of biologically relevant G-quadruplexes in single-cell organisms, but the existence of endogenous G-quadruplex structures in mammalian cells remains highly controversial. This is due, in part, to the common misconception that DNA and RNA molecules are passive information carriers with relatively little structural or functional complexity. For those working in the field, however, the lack of available tools for characterizing DNA structures in vivo remains a major limitation to addressing fundamental questions about structure-function relationships of nucleic acids. In this review, we present progress towards the direct detection of G-quadruplex structures by using small molecules and modified oligonucleotides as fluorescent probes. While most development has focused on cell-permeable probes that selectively bind to G-quadruplex structures with high affinity, these same probes can induce G-quadruplex folding, thereby making the native conformation of the DNA or RNA molecule (i.e., in the absence of probe) uncertain. For this reason, modified oligonucleotides and fluorescent base analogues that serve as "internal" fluorescent probes are presented as an orthogonal means for detecting conformational changes, without necessarily perturbing the equilibria between G-quadruplex, single-stranded, and duplex DNA. The major challenges and motivation for the development of fluorescent probes for G-quadruplex structures are presented, along with a summary of the key photophysical, biophysical, and biological properties of reported examples. PMID:23440895

  10. ECTOMYCORRHIZAL DNA: ISOLATION, RFLPS, AND PROBE HYBRIDIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are in a new era for research in terrestrial ecology. s with diagnostics and research in medicine and forensics, molecular biology is transforming the way we pose hypotheses, conceptualize experiments, and conduct research in rhizosphere ecology. any soil-borne organisms are m...

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis using different colored dye dimer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmé, Nicole; Friedrich, Achim; Denapaite, Dalia; Hakenbeck, Regine; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2006-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching by dye dimer formation has been utilized to develop hairpin-structured DNA probes for the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the penicillin target gene pbp2x, which is implicated in the penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We designed two specific DNA probes for the identification of the pbp2x genes from a penicillin susceptible strain R6 and a resistant strain Streptococcus mitis 661 using green-fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) and red-fluorescent DY-636, respectively. Hybridization of each of the probes to its respective target DNA sequence opened the DNA hairpin probes, consequently breaking the nonfluorescent dye dimers into fluorescent species. This hybridization of the target with the hairpin probe achieved single nucleotide specific detection at nanomolar concentrations via increased fluorescence.

  12. Microarrays/DNA Chips for the Detection of Waterborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vale, Filipa F

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarrays are useful for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms in water samples. Specific probes targeting waterborne pathogens are selected with bioinformatics tools, synthesized and spotted onto a DNA array. Here, the construction of a DNA chip for waterborne pathogen detection is described, including the processes of probe in silico selection, synthesis, validation, and data analysis. PMID:27460375

  13. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  14. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  15. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    PubMed

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust. PMID:21883207

  16. Amplification of target-specific, ligation-dependent circular probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D Y; Brandwein, M; Hsuih, T C; Li, H

    1998-05-12

    We describe a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based gene amplification method utilizing a circularizable oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe (C-probe). The C-probe contains two target complementary regions located at each terminus and an interposed generic PCR primer binding region. The hybridization of C-probe to a target brings two termini in direct apposition as the complementary regions of C-probe wind around the target to form a double helix. Subsequent ligation of the two termini results in a covalently linked C-probe that becomes 'locked on to' the target. The circular nature of the C-probe allows for the generation of a multimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) via extension of the antisense primer by Taq DNA polymerase along the C-probe and displacement of downstream strand, analogous to 'rolling circle' replication of bacteriophage in vivo. This multimeric ssDNA then serves as a template for multiple sense primers to hybridize, extend, and displace downstream DNA, generating a large ramified (branching) DNA complex. Subsequent thermocycling denatures the dsDNA and initiates the next round of primer extension and ramification. This model results in significantly improved amplification kinetics (super-exponential) as compared to conventional PCR. Our results show that the C-probe was 1000 times more sensitive than the corresponding linear hemiprobes for detecting Epstein-Barr virus early RNA. The C-probe not only increases the power of amplification but also offers a means for decontaminating carryover amplicons. As the ligated C-probes possess no free termini, they are resistant to exonuclease digestion, whereas contaminated linear amplicons are susceptible to digestion. Treatment of the ligation reaction mixture with exonuclease prior to amplification eliminated the amplicon contaminant, which could also have been co-amplified with the same PCR primers; only the ligated C-probes were amplified. The combined advantages of the C-probe and thermocycling have a

  17. Improved Process for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Cassell, A.; Delzeit, L.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    An improved process has been developed for the efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube probes for use in atomic-force microscopes (AFMs) and nanomanipulators. Relative to prior nanotube tip production processes, this process offers advantages in alignment of the nanotube on the cantilever and stability of the nanotube's attachment. A procedure has also been developed at Ames that effectively sharpens the multiwalled nanotube, which improves the resolution of the multiwalled nanotube probes and, combined with the greater stability of multiwalled nanotube probes, increases the effective resolution of these probes, making them comparable in resolution to single-walled carbon nanotube probes. The robust attachment derived from this improved fabrication method and the natural strength and resiliency of the nanotube itself produces an AFM probe with an extremely long imaging lifetime. In a longevity test, a nanotube tip imaged a silicon nitride surface for 15 hours without measurable loss of resolution. In contrast, the resolution of conventional silicon probes noticeably begins to degrade within minutes. These carbon nanotube probes have many possible applications in the semiconductor industry, particularly as devices are approaching the nanometer scale and new atomic layer deposition techniques necessitate a higher resolution characterization technique. Previously at Ames, the use of nanotube probes has been demonstrated for imaging photoresist patterns with high aspect ratio. In addition, these tips have been used to analyze Mars simulant dust grains, extremophile protein crystals, and DNA structure.

  18. Theory and Application of DNA Histogram Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagwell, Charles Bruce

    The underlying principles and assumptions associated with DNA histograms are discussed along with the characteristics of fluorescent probes. Information theory was described and used to calculate the information content of a DNA histogram. Two major types of DNA histogram analyses are proposed: parametric and nonparametric analysis. Three levels…

  19. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  20. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  1. Electrochemical DNA sensor-based strategy for sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and DNA demethylase activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingming; Fan, Mengxing; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-31

    DNA demethylation and demethylase activity play important roles in DNA self-repair, and their detection is key to early diagnosis of fatal diseases. Herein, a facile electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor was developed for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and demethylase activity based on an enzyme cleavage strategy. The thiol modified hemi-methylated hairpin probe DNA (pDNA) was self-assembled on a Au electrode surface through the formation of AuS bonds. The hemi-methylated pDNA served as the substrate of DNA demethylase (using methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) as an example). Following demethylation, the hairpin stem was then recognized and cleaved by BstUI endonuclease. The ferrocene carboxylic acid (FcA)-tagged pDNA strands were released into the buffer solution from the electrode surface, resulting in a significant decrease of electrochemical signal and providing a means to observe DNA demethylation. The activity of DNA demethylase was analyzed in the concentration ranging from 0.5 to 500 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection as low as 0.17 ng mL(-1). With high specificity and sensitivity, rapid response, and low cost, this simple E-DNA sensor provides a unique platform for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation, DNA demethylase activity, and related molecular diagnostics and drug screening. PMID:27506345

  2. Immobilization of DNA in polyacrylamide gel for the manufacture of DNA and DNA-oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Timofeev, E.; Mirzabekov, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    1998-05-15