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Sample records for dna repair-deficient strains

  1. COMPARISON OF UV INACTIVATION OF SPORES OF THREE ENCEPHALITOZOON SPECIES WITH THAT OF SPORES OF TWO DNA REPAIR-DEFICIENT BACILLUS SUBTILIS BIODOSIMETRY STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of three Encephalitozoon spp. to ultraviolet (UV) inactivation was determined. Encephalitozoon intestinalis is a contaminant listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Also, use of DNA repair deficient strains of Bacillus subtilis were evaluat...

  2. Hereditary cancer syndromes: utilizing DNA repair deficiency as therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Fan, Tiffany; Silberstein, Peter Todd

    2016-07-01

    Human cells have numerous repair mechanisms to counteract various insults incurred on the DNA. Any mutation in these repair mechanisms can lead to accumulation of DNA errors and carcinogenesis. This review aims to discuss the therapeutic options in the two most common DNA repair deficient cancer syndromes, namely Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) and breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) associated ovarian and breast cancer. Deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms renders these tumors with increased sensitivity to platinum agents. There has been increasing amount of information on the utility of the defects in DNA repair as targets for cancer therapy in these syndromes. Novel therapies like poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are one of such example where the induction of double stranded breaks in DNA leads to tumoricidal effect in patients with homologous DNA repair deficiency. Interestingly, patients with DNA repair deficiencies tend to have a more favorable prognosis than sporadic malignancies. In microsatellite high colorectal cancer patients, this has been attributed to increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes in tumor microenvironment. However, these tumors are able to limit the host immune response by activation of immune checkpoints that seem like attractive targets of therapy in the future. PMID:26873719

  3. Measurement of DNA repair deficiency in workers exposed to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.M.; Au, W.W.; El Zein, R.; Grossman, L.

    1996-05-01

    We hypothesize that chronic exposure to environmental toxicants can induce genetic damage causing DNA repair deficiencies and leading to the postulated mutator phenotype of carcinogenesis. To test our hypothesis, a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was used in which pCMVcat plasmids were damaged with UV light (175, 350 J/m{sup 2} UV light), inactivating the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and then transfected into lymphocytes. Transfected lymphocytes were therefore challenged to repair the damaged plasmids, reactivating the reporter gene. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Gaucher cell lines were used as positive and negative controls for the HCR assay. The Gaucher cell line repaired normally but XP cell lines demonstrated lower repair activity. Additionally, the repair activity of the XP heterozygous cell line showed intermediate repair compared to the homozygous XP and Gaucher cells. We used HCR to measure the effects of benzene exposure on 12 exposed and 8 nonexposed workers from a local benzene plant. Plasmids 175 J/m{sup 2} and 350 J/m{sup 2} were repaired with a mean frequency of 66% and 58%, respectively, in control workers compared to 71% and 62% in exposed workers. Conversely, more of the exposed workers were grouped into the reduced repair category than controls. These differences in repair capacity between exposed and control workers were, however, not statistically significant. The lack of significant differences between the exposed and control groups may be due to extremely low exposure to benzene (<0.3 ppm), small population size, or a lack of benzene genotoxicity at these concentrations. These results are consistent with a parallel hprt gene mutation assay. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Measurement of DNA repair deficiency in workers exposed to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, L M; el Zein, R; Grossman, L; Au, W W

    1996-01-01

    We hypothesize that chronic exposure to environmental toxicants can induce genetic damage causing DNA repair deficiencies and leading to the postulated mutator phenotype of carcinogenesis. To test our hypothesis, a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay was used in which pCMVcat plasmids were damaged with UV light (175, 350 J/m2 UV light), inactivating the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and then transfected into lymphocytes. Transfected lymphocytes were therefore challenged to repair the damaged plasmids, reactivating the reporter gene. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Gaucher cell lines were used as positive and negative controls for the HCR assay. The Gaucher cell line repaired normally but XP cell lines demonstrated lower repair activity. Additionally, the repair activity of the XP heterozygous cell line showed intermediate repair compared to the homozygous XP and Gaucher cells. We used HCR to measure the effects of benzene exposure on 12 exposed and 8 nonexposed workers from a local benzene plant. Plasmids 175 J/m2 and 350 J/m2 were repaired with a mean frequency of 66% and 58%, respectively, in control workers compared to 71% and 62% in exposed workers. Conversely, more of the exposed workers were grouped into the reduced repair category than controls. These differences in repair capacity between exposed and control workers were, however, not statistically significant. The lack of significant differences between the exposed and control groups may be due to extremely low exposure to benzene (< 0.3 ppm), small population size, or a lack of benzene genotoxicity at these concentrations. These results are consistent with a parallel hprt gene mutation assay. PMID:8781377

  5. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  6. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  7. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  8. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  9. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information should be... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.”...

  10. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  11. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. ); Libertin, C.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  12. BRCA Mutations, DNA Repair Deficiency, and Ovarian Aging1

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Kutluk; Turan, Volkan; Titus, Shiny; Stobezki, Robert; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte aging has a significant impact on reproductive outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the age-related decline in reproductive success have not been fully addressed. BRCA is known to be involved in homologous DNA recombination and plays an essential role in double-strand DNA break repair. Given the growing body of laboratory and clinical evidence, we performed a systematic review on the current understanding of the role of DNA repair in human reproduction. We find that BRCA mutations negatively affect ovarian reserve based on convincing evidence from in vitro and in vivo results and prospective studies. Because decline in the function of the intact gene occurs at an earlier age, women with BRCA1 mutations exhibit accelerated ovarian aging, unlike those with BRCA2 mutations. However, because of the still robust function of the intact allele in younger women and because of the masking of most severe cases by prophylactic oophorectomy or cancer, it is less likely one would see an effect of BRCA mutations on fertility until later in reproductive age. The impact of BRCA2 mutations on reproductive function may be less visible because of the delayed decline in the function of normal BRCA2 allele. BRCA1 function and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-mediated DNA repair may also be important in the pathogenesis of age-induced increase in aneuploidy. BRCA1 is required for meiotic spindle assembly, and cohesion function between sister chromatids is also regulated by ATM family member proteins. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest the implication of BRCA and DNA repair malfunction in ovarian aging. PMID:26224004

  13. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  14. C. elegans whole-genome sequencing reveals mutational signatures related to carcinogens and DNA repair deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Cooke, Susanna L.; Weiss, Joerg; Bailly, Aymeric P.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Maddison, Mark; Anderson, Elizabeth; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is associated with developmental and hereditary disorders, aging, and cancer. While we understand some mutational processes operative in human disease, most remain mysterious. We used Caenorhabditis elegans whole-genome sequencing to model mutational signatures, analyzing 183 worm populations across 17 DNA repair-deficient backgrounds propagated for 20 generations or exposed to carcinogens. The baseline mutation rate in C. elegans was approximately one per genome per generation, not overtly altered across several DNA repair deficiencies over 20 generations. Telomere erosion led to complex chromosomal rearrangements initiated by breakage–fusion–bridge cycles and completed by simultaneously acquired, localized clusters of breakpoints. Aflatoxin B1 induced substitutions of guanines in a GpC context, as observed in aflatoxin-induced liver cancers. Mutational burden increased with impaired nucleotide excision repair. Cisplatin and mechlorethamine, DNA crosslinking agents, caused dose- and genotype-dependent signatures among indels, substitutions, and rearrangements. Strikingly, both agents induced clustered rearrangements resembling “chromoanasynthesis,” a replication-based mutational signature seen in constitutional genomic disorders, suggesting that interstrand crosslinks may play a pathogenic role in such events. Cisplatin mutagenicity was most pronounced in xpf-1 mutants, suggesting that this gene critically protects cells against platinum chemotherapy. Thus, experimental model systems combined with genome sequencing can recapture and mechanistically explain mutational signatures associated with human disease. PMID:25030888

  15. Clues to epidermal cancer proneness revealed by reconstruction of DNA repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum skin in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bernerd, Françoise; Asselineau, Daniel; Vioux, Corinne; Chevallier-Lagente, Odile; Bouadjar, Bakar; Sarasin, Alain; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Sun exposure has been clearly implicated in premature skin aging and neoplastic development. These features are exacerbated in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a hereditary disease, the biochemical hallmark of which is a severe deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions. To develop an organotypic model of DNA repair deficiency, we have cultured several strains of primary XP keratinocytes and XP fibroblasts from skin biopsies of XP patients. XP skin comprising both a full-thickness epidermis and a dermal equivalent was succesfully reconstructed in vitro. Satisfactory features of stratification were obtained, but the expression of epidermal differentiation products, such as keratin K10 and loricrin, was delayed and reduced. In addition, the proliferation of XP keratinocytes was more rapid than that of normal keratinocytes. Moreover, increased deposition of cell attachment proteins, α-6 and β-1 integrins, was observed in the basement membrane zone, and β-1 integrin subunit, the expression of which is normally confined to basal keratinocytes, extended into several suprabasal cell layers. Most strikingly, the in vitro reconstructed XP skin displayed numerous proliferative epidermal invasions within dermal equivalents. Epidermal invasion and higher proliferation rate are reminiscent of early steps of neoplasia. Compared with normal skin, the DNA repair deficiency of in vitro reconstructed XP skin was documented by long-lasting persistence of UVB-induced DNA damage in all epidermal layers, including the basal layer from which carcinoma develops. The availability of in vitro reconstructed XP skin provides opportunities for research in the fields of photoaging, photocarcinogenesis, and tissue therapy. PMID:11438733

  16. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N.; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P.; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the U.S. Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in 7 isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis. PMID:21538559

  17. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients. PMID:26255934

  18. Aberrant DNA Methylation in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer without Mismatch Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ajay; Xicola, Rosa M.; Nguyen, Thuy-Phuong; Doyle, Brian J; Sohn, Vanessa R.; Bandipalliam, Prathap; Reyes, Josep; Cordero, Carmen; Balaguer, Francesc; Castells, Antoni; Jover, Rodrigo; Andreu, Montserrat; Syngal, Sapna; Boland, C. Richard; Llor, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Approximately half of the families that fulfill Amsterdam criteria for Lynch syndrome or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) do not have evidence of the germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations that define this syndrome and result in microsatellite instability. The carcinogenic pathways and the best diagnostic approaches to detect microsatellite stable (MSS) HNPCC tumors are unclear. We investigated the contribution of epigenetic alterations to development of MSS HNPCC tumors. Methods Colorectal cancers were divided in four groups: 1. Microsatellite stable, Amsterdam positive (MSS HNPCC) (N=22); 2. Lynch syndrome cancers (identified mismatch repair mutations) (N=21); 3. Sporadic MSS (N=92); 4. Sporadic MSI (N=46). Methylation status was evaluated for CACNAG1, SOCS1, RUNX3, NEUROG1, MLH1, and LINE-1. KRAS and BRAF mutations status was analyzed. Results MSS HNPCC tumors displayed a significantly lower degree of LINE-1 methylation, marker for global methylation, than any other group. Whereas most MSS HNPCC tumors had some degree of CpG island methylation, none presented a high index of methylation. MSS HNPCC tumors had KRAS mutations exclusively in codon 12, but none harbored V600E BRAF mutations. Conclusions Tumors from Amsterdam-positive patients without mismatch repair deficiency (MSS HNPCC) have certain molecular features, including global hypomethylation that distinguish them from all other colorectal cancers. These characteristics could have an important impact on tumor behavior or treatment response. Studies are underway to further assess the cause and effects of these features. PMID:20102720

  19. Base excision repair deficient mice lacking the Aag alkyladenine DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Engelward, Bevin P.; Weeda, Geert; Wyatt, Michael D.; Broekhof, José L. M.; de Wit, Jan; Donker, Ingrid; Allan, James M.; Gold, Barry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Samson, Leona D.

    1997-01-01

    3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylases remove 3MeAs from alkylated DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Here we report the generation of mice deficient in the 3MeA DNA glycosylase encoded by the Aag (Mpg) gene. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase turns out to be the major DNA glycosylase not only for the cytotoxic 3MeA DNA lesion, but also for the mutagenic 1,N6-ethenoadenine (ɛA) and hypoxanthine lesions. Aag appears to be the only 3MeA and hypoxanthine DNA glycosylase in liver, testes, kidney, and lung, and the only ɛA DNA glycosylase in liver, testes, and kidney; another ɛA DNA glycosylase may be expressed in lung. Although alkyladenine DNA glycosylase has the capacity to remove 8-oxoguanine DNA lesions, it does not appear to be the major glycosylase for 8-oxoguanine repair. Fibroblasts derived from Aag −/− mice are alkylation sensitive, indicating that Aag −/− mice may be similarly sensitive. PMID:9371804

  20. Enhanced Genotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in DNA Repair Deficient Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Asharani, P. V.; Hande, M. Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) have been used in medicine and commercially due to their anti-microbial properties. Therapeutic potentials of these nanoparticles are being explored extensively despite the lack of information on their mechanism of action at molecular and cellular level. Here, we have investigated the DNA damage response and repair following Ag-np treatment in mammalian cells. Studies have shown that Ag-np exerts genotoxicity through double-strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs, the catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase, is an important caretaker of the genome which is known to be the main player mediating Non-homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs is responsible for the repair of Ag-np induced DNA damage. In vitro studies have been carried out to investigate both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by Ag-np in normal human cells, DNA-PKcs proficient, and deficient mammalian cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity with NU7026, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, has been performed to further validate the role of DNA-PKcs in this model. Our results suggest that Ag-np induced more prominent dose-dependent decrease in cell viability in DNA-PKcs deficient or inhibited cells. The deficiency or inhibition of DNA-PKcs renders the cells with higher susceptibility to DNA damage and genome instability which in turn contributed to greater cell cycle arrest/cell death. These findings support the fact that DNA-PKcs is involved in the repair of Ag-np induced genotoxicity and NHEJ repair pathway and DNA-PKcs particularly is activated to safeguard the genome upon Ag-np exposure. PMID:22707954

  1. Rapid and Progressive Pulmonary Fibrosis in 2 Families with DNA Repair Deficiencies of Undetermined Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Vece, Timothy J.; Schecter, Marc G.; Gatti, Richard A.; Tunuguntla, Rashmi; Garcia, Christine Kim; Langston, Claire; Dishop, Megan K.; Moore, Robert H.; Fan, Leland L.

    2016-01-01

    Known genetic causes of pediatric interstitial lung disease include disorders of surfactant metabolism, telomerase, and DNA repair. We report 4 children from 2 families with rapidly progressive and fatal pulmonary fibrosis. A novel DNA repair defect unrelated to the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene was found in 1 child from each family. PMID:22240110

  2. Differential suppression of DNA repair deficiencies of Yeast rad50, mre11 and xrs2 mutants by EXO1 and TLC1 (the RNA component of telomerase).

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, L Kevin; Karthikeyan, G; Westmoreland, James W; Resnick, Michael A

    2002-01-01

    Rad50, Mre11, and Xrs2 form a nuclease complex that functions in both nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A search for highly expressed cDNAs that suppress the DNA repair deficiency of rad50 mutants yielded multiple isolates of two genes: EXO1 and TLC1. Overexpression of EXO1 or TLC1 increased the resistance of rad50, mre11, and xrs2 mutants to ionizing radiation and MMS, but did not increase resistance in strains defective in recombination (rad51, rad52, rad54, rad59) or NHEJ only (yku70, sir4). Increased Exo1 or TLC1 RNA did not alter checkpoint responses or restore NHEJ proficiency, but DNA repair defects of yku70 and rad27 (fen) mutants were differentially suppressed by the two genes. Overexpression of Exo1, but not mutant proteins containing substitutions in the conserved nuclease domain, increased recombination and suppressed HO and EcoRI endonuclease-induced killing of rad50 strains. exo1 rad50 mutants lacking both nuclease activities exhibited a high proportion of enlarged, G2-arrested cells and displayed a synergistic decrease in DSB-induced plasmid:chromosome recombination. These results support a model in which the nuclease activity of the Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 complex is required for recombinational repair, but not NHEJ. We suggest that the 5'-3' exo activity of Exo1 is able to substitute for Rad50/Mre11/Xrs2 in rescission of specific classes of DSB end structures. Gene-specific suppression by TLC1, which encodes the RNA subunit of the yeast telomerase complex, demonstrates that components of telomerase can also impact on DSB repair pathways. PMID:11805044

  3. Potentiation of cytotoxicity by 3-aminobenzamide in DNA repair-deficient human tumor cell lines following exposure to methylating agents or anti-neoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Babich, M A; Day, R S

    1988-04-01

    We studied the potentiation by 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) of killing of nine human cell lines exposed to alkylating agents. Cell lines included normal, transformed and DNA repair-proficient and -deficient phenotypes. 3AB potentiated cell killing by the methylating agents methylmethanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in all lines tested. The degree of potentiation ranged from 1.7- to 3.8-fold, based on the LD99. The average potentiation observed with MMS (2.7-fold) was greater than with MNNG (2.2-fold). On average the potentiation of MMS and MNNG killing of repair-deficient Mer- lines (2.4-fold) was similar to that of repair-proficient Mer+ lines. The degree of 3AB potentiation of MNNG killing (2.0-fold) was similar in Mer+ Rem- lines and in Mer+ Rem+ lines. Mer+ Rem+, Mer+ Rem-, Mer- Rem+, and Mer- Rem- strains all appeared proficient in a 3AB-sensitive DNA repair pathway. Within experimental error, 20 mM 3AB did not inhibit the removal of the MNNG-induced methylpurines 7-methylguanine, O6-methylguanine and 3-methyladenine from the DNA of repair-proficient Mer+ Rem+ HT29 cells, consistent with evidence that 3AB inhibits the ligation step of excision repair. 3AB potentiated cell killing by the bifunctional alkylating agents 1-(2-chlorethyl)-1-nitrosourea or busulfan, two anti-neoplastic drugs, by only 0.9- to 1.5-fold. These drugs therefore produce DNA damage which is not efficiently repaired by the pathways that repair methylated bases. PMID:3356063

  4. Evolving approach and clinical significance of detecting DNA mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen significant advancement in our understanding of colorectal tumors with DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency. The ever-emerging revelations of new molecular and genetic alterations in various clinical conditions have necessitated constant refinement of disease terminology and classification. Thus, a case with the clinical condition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer as defined by the Amsterdam criteria may be one of Lynch syndrome characterized by a germline defect in one of the several MMR genes, one of the yet-to-be-defined “Lynch-like syndrome” if there is evidence of MMR deficiency in the tumor but no detectable germline MMR defect or tumor MLH1 promoter methylation, or “familial colorectal cancer type X” if there is no evidence of MMR deficiency. The detection of these conditions carries significant clinical implications. The detection tools and strategies are constantly evolving. The Bethesda guidelines symbolize a selective approach that uses clinical information and tumor histology as the basis to select high-risk individuals. Such a selective approach has subsequently been found to have limited sensitivity, and is thus gradually giving way to the alternative universal approach that tests all newly diagnosed colorectal cancers. Notably, the universal approach also has its own limitations; its cost-effectiveness in real practice, in particular, remains to be determined. Meanwhile, technological advances such as the next-generation sequencing are offering the promise of direct genetic testing for MMR deficiency at an affordable cost probably in the near future. This article reviews the up-to-date molecular definitions of the various conditions related to MMR deficiency, and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolving nature and the clinical importance of the disease definitions and the detection strategies. PMID:25716099

  5. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  6. Distinctive features of single nucleotide alterations in induced pluripotent stem cells with different types of DNA repair deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Kohji; Sakaguchi, Hironari; Sakamoto-Abutani, Rie; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nishimura, Ken; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Ohtaka, Manami; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Higuchi, Akon; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Hata, Kenichiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used as a model to analyze pathogenesis of disease. In this study, we generated iPSCs derived from a fibroblastic cell line of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A (XPA-iPSCs), a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease in which patients develop skin cancer in the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. XPA-iPSCs exhibited hypersensitivity to ultraviolet exposure and accumulation of single-nucleotide substitutions when compared with ataxia telangiectasia-derived iPSCs that were established in a previous study. However, XPA-iPSCs did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro, i.e. intact chromosomes were maintained. The results were mutually compensating for examining two major sources of mutations, nucleotide excision repair deficiency and double-strand break repair deficiency. Like XP patients, XPA-iPSCs accumulated single-nucleotide substitutions that are associated with malignant melanoma, a manifestation of XP. These results indicate that XPA-iPSCs may serve a monitoring tool (analogous to the Ames test but using mammalian cells) to measure single-nucleotide alterations, and may be a good model to clarify pathogenesis of XP. In addition, XPA-iPSCs may allow us to facilitate development of drugs that delay genetic alteration and decrease hypersensitivity to ultraviolet for therapeutic applications. PMID:27197874

  7. Immunohistochemistry for hMLH1 and hMSH2: a practical test for DNA mismatch repair-deficient tumors.

    PubMed

    Marcus, V A; Madlensky, L; Gryfe, R; Kim, H; So, K; Millar, A; Temple, L K; Hsieh, E; Hiruki, T; Narod, S; Bapat, B V; Gallinger, S; Redston, M

    1999-10-01

    Inactivation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair genes, most commonly human mutL homologue 1 (hMLH1) or human mutS homologue 2 (hMSH2), is a recently described alternate pathway in cancer development and progression. The resulting genetic instability is characterized by widespread somatic mutations in tumor DNA, and is termed high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Although described in a variety of tumors, mismatch repair deficiency has been studied predominantly in colorectal carcinoma. Most MSI-H colorectal carcinomas are sporadic, but some occur in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), and are associated with germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. Until now, the identification of MSI-H cancers has required molecular testing. To evaluate the role of immunohistochemistry as a new screening tool for mismatch repair-deficient neoplasms, the authors studied the expression of hMLH1 and hMSH2, using commercially available monoclonal antibodies, in 72 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors that had been tested previously for microsatellite instability. They compared immunohistochemical patterns of 38 MSI-H neoplasms, including 16 cases from HNPCC patients with known germline mutations in hMLH1 or hMSH2, with 34 neoplasms that did not show microsatellite instability. Thirty-seven of 38 MSI-H neoplasms were predicted to have a mismatch repair gene defect, as demonstrated by the absence of hMLH1 and/or hMSH2 expression. This included correspondence with all 16 cases with germline mutations. All 34 microsatellite-stable cancers had intact staining with both antibodies. These findings clearly demonstrate that immunohistochemistry can discriminate accurately between MSI-H and microsatellite-stable tumors, providing a practical new technique with important clinical and research applications. PMID:10524526

  8. Repair-deficient 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase homozygous mutant mouse cells have increased sensitivity to alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cell killing.

    PubMed Central

    Engelward, B P; Dreslin, A; Christensen, J; Huszar, D; Kurahara, C; Samson, L

    1996-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the repair of 3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA lesions prevents alkylation-induced cell death because unrepaired 3MeA blocks DNA replication. Whether this lesion is cytotoxic to mammalian cells has been difficult to establish in the absence of 3MeA repair-deficient cell lines. We previously isolated and characterized a mouse 3MeA DNA glycosylase cDNA (Aag) that provides resistance to killing by alkylating agents in E. coli. To determine the in vivo role of Aag, we cloned a large fragment of the Aag gene and used it to create Aag-deficient mouse cells by targeted homologous recombination. Aag null cells have no detectable Aag transcripts or 3MeA DNA glycosylase activity. The loss of Aag renders cells significantly more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate-induced chromosome damage, and to cell killing induced by two methylating agents, one of which produces almost exclusively 3MeAs. Aag null embryonic stem cells become sensitive to two cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents, namely 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and mitomycin C, indicating that Aag status is an important determinant of cellular resistance to these agents. We conclude that this mammalian 3MeA DNA glycosylase plays a pivotal role in preventing alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cytotoxicity. Images PMID:8631315

  9. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis in DNA repair deficient CHO cells expressing human CYP1A1 and rapid or slow acetylator NAT2

    PubMed Central

    Bendaly, Jean; Zhao, Shuang; Neale, Jason R.; Metry, Kristin J.; Doll, Mark A.; States, J. Christopher; Pierce, William M.; Hein, David W.

    2007-01-01

    2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is one of the most potent and abundant mutagens in the western diet. Bioactivation includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P450s followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). Nucleotide excision repair-deficient chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were constructed by stable transfection of human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles. CYP1A1 and NAT2 catalytic activities were undetectable in untransfected CHO cell lines. CYP1A1 activity did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) among the CYP1A1-transfected cell lines. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had significantly higher levels of sulfamethazine N-acetyltransferase (p = 0.0001) and N-hydroxy-MeIQx O-acetyltransferase (p = 0.0093) catalytic activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Only cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutagenesis following MeIQx treatment. dG-C8-MeIQx was the primary DNA adduct formed and levels were dose-dependent in each cell line and in the order: untransfected < transfected with CYP1A1 < transfected with CYP1A1 & NAT2*5B < transfected with CYP1A1 & NAT2*4. MeIQx DNA adduct levels were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in CYP1A1/NAT2*4 than CYP1A1/NAT2*5B cells at all concentrations of MeIQx tested. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r2 = 0.88) with MeIQx-induced mutants. These results strongly support extrahepatic activation of MeIQx by CYP1A1 and a robust effect of human NAT2 genetic polymorphism on MeIQx –induced DNA adducts and mutagenesis. The results provide laboratory-based support for epidemiological studies reporting higher frequency of heterocyclic amine-related cancers in rapid NAT2 acetylators. PMID:17627018

  10. UV-induced histone H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage related proteins accumulate and persist in nucleotide excision repair-deficient XP-B cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyu-Seon; Bustin, Michael; Mazur, Sharlyn J; Appella, Ettore; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) may be caused by ionizing radiation. In contrast, UV exposure forms dipyrimidine photoproducts and is not considered an inducer of DSB. We found that uniform or localized UV treatment induced phosphorylation of the DNA damage related (DDR) proteins H2AX, ATM and NBS1 and co-localization of γ-H2AX with the DDR proteins p-ATM, p-NBS1, Rad51 and FANCD2 that persisted for about 6h in normal human fibroblasts. This post-UV phosphorylation was observed in the absence of nucleotide excision repair (NER), since NER deficient XP-B cells (lacking functional XPB DNA repair helicase) and global genome repair-deficient rodent cells also showed phosphorylation and localization of these DDR proteins. Resolution of the DDR proteins was dependent on NER, since they persisted for 24h in the XP-B cells. In the normal and XP-B cells p53 and p21 was detected at 6h and 24h but Mdm2 was not induced in the XP-B cells. Post-UV induction of Wip1 phosphatase was detected in the normal cells but not in the XP-B cells. DNA DSB were detected with a neutral comet assay at 6h and 24h post-UV in the normal and XP-B cells. These results indicate that UV damage can activate the DDR pathway in the absence of NER. However, a later step in DNA damage processing involving induction of Wip1 and resolution of DDR proteins was not observed in the absence of NER. PMID:20947453

  11. RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Peter

    2009-05-15

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

  12. Mismatch repair deficiency endows tumors with a unique mutation signature and sensitivity to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Thienpont, Bernard; Yesilyurt, Betül Tuba; Moisse, Matthieu; Reumers, Joke; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Sagaert, Xavier; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Smeets, Dominiek; Matthijs, Gert; Aerts, Stein; Cools, Jan; Metcalf, Alex; Spurdle, Amanda; Amant, Frederic; Lambrechts, Diether

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication errors that persist as mismatch mutations make up the molecular fingerprint of mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient tumors and convey them with resistance to standard therapy. Using whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing, we here confirm an MMR-deficient mutation signature that is distinct from other tumor genomes, but surprisingly similar to germ-line DNA, indicating that a substantial fraction of human genetic variation arises through mutations escaping MMR. Moreover, we identify a large set of recurrent indels that may serve to detect microsatellite instability (MSI). Indeed, using endometrial tumors with immunohistochemically proven MMR deficiency, we optimize a novel marker set capable of detecting MSI and show it to have greater specificity and selectivity than standard MSI tests. Additionally, we show that recurrent indels are enriched for the ‘DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination’ pathway. Consequently, DSB repair is reduced in MMR-deficient tumors, triggering a dose-dependent sensitivity of MMR-deficient tumor cultures to DSB inducers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02725.001 PMID:25085081

  13. Subnormal albumin gene expression is associated with weight loss in immunodeficient/DNA-repair-deficient wasted mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Woloschak, G.E. |; Mobarhan, S.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wst express a disease syndrome of immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction, and increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation. The mice were originally characterized as ``wasted`` because of their dramatic weight loss that begins at 21 days of age and progresses until death at 28-32 days of age. Because of the reported association between abnormal liver status and weight loss, we examined expression of a variety of liver-specific genes in wst/wst 10 mice relative to littermate (wst/{center_dot}) and parental strain (BCF{sub 1}) controls. Interestingly, the results revealed a greater than 67% reduction in albumin mRNA expression in livers derived from wst/wst mice relative to both controls. Expression of alpha-fetoprotein as well as a variety of other liver-specific genes (secretory component, metallothionein, cytochrome P{sub 1}450, transferrin receptor, tumor necrosis factor, and Ia antigen) was unaffected. These results suggest a relationship between low albumin expression and wasting syndromes in mice. In addition, we believe that our data suggest the wasted mouse as a unique model for subnormal albumin expression in humans.

  14. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors

    PubMed Central

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysed ex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20–67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation. PMID:25678531

  15. XPD DNA nucleotide excision repair gene polymorphisms associated with DNA repair deficiency predict better treatment outcomes in secondary acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kuptsova-Clarkson, Nataliya; Ambrosone, Christine B; Weiss, Joli; Baer, Maria R; Sucheston, Lara E; Zirpoli, Gary; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Ford, Laurie; Blanco, Javier; Wetzler, Meir; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic studies in DNA repair pathway have consistently demonstrated correlations between the XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and XPD Asp312Gln genotypes, previously associated with suboptimal DNA repair, and differential cancer treatment outcomes. We evaluated these polymorphisms and XPD haplotypes in adult de novo (n=214) and secondary (n=79) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients treated with cytarabine and anthracycline chemotherapy. Genotyping was performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Logistic and proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate relationships. Differential responses were observed in secondary, but not de novo, AML. Among secondary AML patients, the odds of achieving complete remission (CR) were higher for the XPD 312Asn/Asn (OR= 11.23; 95% CI, 2.23-56.63) and XPD 751Gln/Gln (OR= 7.07; 95% CI, 1.42-35.18) genotypes. The XPD diplotypes were coded as the combination of two of the following haplotypes: haplotype A=(Lys)751A/(Asp) 312G; B=(Gln)751C/(Asn)312A; C=(Lys)751A/(Asn)312A; and D=(Gln)751C/(Asp)312G. The BB diplotype was associated with CR attainment [OR=18.31; 95% CI: 2.08-283.57] and longer survival [HR=0.31; 95% CI: 0.14-0.73] compared to the referent AA diplotype. The XPD 751 CC, 312GA, 312AA genotypes and the XPD DC diplotype were also associated with longer overall survival (OS).Thus, XPD codon 312 and 751 variant genotypes and haplotypes containing at least one variant allele may predict better treatment responses. If validated, these findings could support stratification of chemotherapy in secondary AML. PMID:21394217

  16. Cytotoxic and genotoxic profiles of benzo[a]pyrene and N-nitrosodimethylamine demonstrated using DNA repair deficient DT40 cells with metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Masato; Takazawa, Hironori; Takeda, Shunichi; Hirota, Kouji

    2016-02-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene and N-nitrosodimethylamine are major genotoxic compounds present in cigarette smoke, food and oil. To examine the type(s) of DNA damage induced by these compounds, we used a panel of DNA-repair-pathway-deficient mutants generated from chicken DT40 cells and achieved metabolic activation of the test compounds by including rat liver S9 mix. Consistent with expections, benzo[a]pyrene and N-nitrosodimethylamine require metabolicactivation to become genotoxic. The REV3(-/-) mutant cell line exhibited the highest sensitivity, in terms of increased cytotoxicity, to the both compounds after metabolic activation consistent with the known ability of these two compounds to induce DNA adducts. Strikingly, we found that the RAD54(-/-)/KU70(-/-) cell line, a mutant defective in the repair of double-strand breaks, is sensitive to benzo[a]pyrene, suggesting that this compound also induces strand breaks in these cells. In this study we combined a previously employed method, metabolic activation by S9 mix, with the use of a DNA-repair mutant panel, thereby broadening the range of compounds that can be screened for potential genotoxicity. PMID:26547024

  17. Mechanism of action studies of lomaiviticin A and the monomeric lomaiviticin aglycon. Selective and potent activity toward DNA double-strand break repair-deficient cell lines.

    PubMed

    Colis, Laureen C; Hegan, Denise C; Kaneko, Miho; Glazer, Peter M; Herzon, Seth B

    2015-05-01

    (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) and the monomeric lomaiviticin aglycon [aka: (-)-MK7-206, (3)] are cytotoxic agents that induce double-strand breaks (DSBs) in DNA. Here we elucidate the cellular responses to these agents and identify synthetic lethal interactions with specific DNA repair factors. Toward this end, we first characterized the kinetics of DNA damage by 1 and 3 in human chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) cells. DSBs are rapidly induced by 3, reaching a maximum at 15 min post addition and are resolved within 4 h. By comparison, DSB production by 1 requires 2-4 h to achieve maximal values and >8 h to achieve resolution. As evidenced by an alkaline comet unwinding assay, 3 induces extensive DNA damage, suggesting that the observed DSBs arise from closely spaced single-strand breaks (SSBs). Both 1 and 3 induce ataxia telangiectasia mutated- (ATM-) and DNA-dependent protein kinase- (DNA-PK-) dependent production of phospho-SER139-histone H2AX (γH2AX) and generation of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) foci in K562 cells within 1 h of exposure, which is indicative of activation of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) repair. Both compounds also lead to ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related- (ATR-) dependent production of γH2AX at later time points (6 h post addition), which is indicative of replication stress. 3 is also shown to induce apoptosis. In accord with these data, 1 and 3 were found to be synthetic lethal with certain mutations in DNA DSB repair. 1 potently inhibits the growth of breast cancer type 2, early onset- (BRCA2-) deficient V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line derivative (VC8), and phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten- (PTEN-) deficient human glioblastoma (U251) cell lines, with LC50 values of 1.5 ± 0.5 and 2.0 ± 0.6 pM, respectively, and selectivities of >11.6 versus the isogenic cell lines transfected with and expressing functional BRCA2 and PTEN genes. 3 inhibits the growth of the same

  18. Effects of side-stream tobacco smoke and smoke extract on glutathione- and oxidative DNA damage repair-deficient mice and blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Chapman, Aaron M.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoke causes direct oxidative DNA damage as well as indirect damage through inflammation. Epidemiological studies show a strong relationship between secondhand smoke and cancer; however, the mechanisms of secondhand smoke-induced cancer are not well understood. Animal models with either i) deficient oxidative DNA damage repair, or ii) a decreased capacity to combat oxidative stress may help determine the pathways important in mitigating damage caused by smoke. In this study, we used mice lacking Ogg1 and Myh, both of which are involved in base excision repair by removing oxidatively damaged DNA bases. Gclm-deficient mice, which have decreased levels of glutathione (GSH), were used to look at the role of smoke-induced oxidative damage. Ex vivo experiments show significantly elevated levels of DNA single-strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes from Ogg1−/−Myh−/− double knockout mice compared to wild type (WT) mice after 24 hours of exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The average γH2AX foci per cell was significantly elevated 3 hours after exposure to CSE in cells from Ogg1 −/−Myh −/− double knockout mice compared to wildtype mice. In vivo we found that all mice had increased markers of DNA damage after exposure to side-stream tobacco smoke (SSTS). Ogg1−/− Myh−/− and Gclm−/− mice had altered levels of peripheral blood glutathione after SSTS exposure whereas wild type mice did not. This may be due to differential regulation of glutathione synthesis in the lung. We also found that Ogg1−/−Myh−/− mice had a decreased lifespan after oral gavage with benzo[a]pyrene compared to wildtype mice and sham-exposed Ogg1−/−Myh−/− mice. Our results are important in investigating the roles of oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage repair in cigarette smoke-induced cancers and characterizing the role of genetic polymorphisms in smoke-related disease susceptibility. PMID:23748015

  19. E7449: A dual inhibitor of PARP1/2 and tankyrase1/2 inhibits growth of DNA repair deficient tumors and antagonizes Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiayi; Chang, Paul; Kolber-Simonds, Donna; Ackermann, Karen; Twine, Natalie C.; Shie, Jue-Lon; Miu, Jingzang Tao; Huang, Kuan-Chun; Moniz, George A.; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase1 (PARP1) impairs DNA damage repair, and early generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (olaparib, niraparib, etc.) have demonstrated clinical proof of concept for cancer treatment. Here, we describe the development of the novel PARP inhibitor E7449, a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor that also inhibits PARP5a/5b, otherwise known as tankyrase1 and 2 (TNKS1 and 2), important regulators of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. E7449 inhibits PARP enzymatic activity and additionally traps PARP1 onto damaged DNA; a mechanism previously shown to augment cytotoxicity. Cells deficient in DNA repair pathways beyond homologous recombination were sensitive to E7449 treatment. Chemotherapy was potentiated by E7449 and single agent had significant antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient xenografts. Additionally, E7449 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon cancer cell lines, likely through TNKS inhibition. Consistent with this possibility, E7449 stabilized axin and TNKS proteins resulting in β-catenin de-stabilization and significantly altered expression of Wnt target genes. Notably, hair growth mediated by Wnt signaling was inhibited by E7449. A pharmacodynamic effect of E7449 on Wnt target genes was observed in tumors, although E7449 lacked single agent antitumor activity in vivo, a finding typical for selective TNKS inhibitors. E7449 antitumor activity was increased through combination with MEK inhibition. Particularly noteworthy was the lack of toxicity, most significantly the lack of intestinal toxicity reported for other TNKS inhibitors. E7449 represents a novel dual PARP1/2 and TNKS1/2 inhibitor which has the advantage of targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling addicted tumors. E7449 is currently in early clinical development. PMID:26513298

  20. E7449: A dual inhibitor of PARP1/2 and tankyrase1/2 inhibits growth of DNA repair deficient tumors and antagonizes Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Sharon; Chen, Zhihong; Wu, Jiayi; Chang, Paul; Kolber-Simonds, Donna; Ackermann, Karen; Twine, Natalie C; Shie, Jue-Lon; Miu, Jingzang Tao; Huang, Kuan-Chun; Moniz, George A; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase1 (PARP1) impairs DNA damage repair, and early generation PARP1/2 inhibitors (olaparib, niraparib, etc.) have demonstrated clinical proof of concept for cancer treatment. Here, we describe the development of the novel PARP inhibitor E7449, a potent PARP1/2 inhibitor that also inhibits PARP5a/5b, otherwise known as tankyrase1 and 2 (TNKS1 and 2), important regulators of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. E7449 inhibits PARP enzymatic activity and additionally traps PARP1 onto damaged DNA; a mechanism previously shown to augment cytotoxicity. Cells deficient in DNA repair pathways beyond homologous recombination were sensitive to E7449 treatment. Chemotherapy was potentiated by E7449 and single agent had significant antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient xenografts. Additionally, E7449 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colon cancer cell lines, likely through TNKS inhibition. Consistent with this possibility, E7449 stabilized axin and TNKS proteins resulting in β-catenin de-stabilization and significantly altered expression of Wnt target genes. Notably, hair growth mediated by Wnt signaling was inhibited by E7449. A pharmacodynamic effect of E7449 on Wnt target genes was observed in tumors, although E7449 lacked single agent antitumor activity in vivo, a finding typical for selective TNKS inhibitors. E7449 antitumor activity was increased through combination with MEK inhibition. Particularly noteworthy was the lack of toxicity, most significantly the lack of intestinal toxicity reported for other TNKS inhibitors. E7449 represents a novel dual PARP1/2 and TNKS1/2 inhibitor which has the advantage of targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling addicted tumors. E7449 is currently in early clinical development. PMID:26513298

  1. Nucleotide excision repair deficiency increases levels of acrolein-derived cyclic DNA adduct and sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by docosahexaenoic acid and acrolein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jishen; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Xuan, Zhuoli; Dyba, Marcin; Fu, Ying; Sen, Supti; Berry, Deborah; Creswell, Karen; Hu, Jiaxi; Roy, Rabindra; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2016-07-01

    The acrolein derived cyclic 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine adduct (Acr-dG), formed primarily from ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) under oxidative conditions, while proven to be mutagenic, is potentially involved in DHA-induced apoptosis. The latter may contribute to the chemopreventive effects of DHA. Previous studies have shown that the levels of Acr-dG are correlated with apoptosis induction in HT29 cells treated with DHA. Because Acr-dG is shown to be repaired by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, to further investigate the role of Acr-dG in apoptosis, in this study, NER-deficient XPA and its isogenic NER-proficient XAN1 cells were treated with DHA. The Acr-dG levels and apoptosis were sharply increased in XPA cells, but not in XAN1 cells when treated with 125μM of DHA. Because DHA can induce formation of various DNA damage, to specifically investigate the role of Acr-dG in apoptosis induction, we treated XPA knockdown HCT116+ch3 cells with acrolein. The levels of both Acr-dG and apoptosis induction increased significantly in the XPA knockdown cells. These results clearly demonstrate that NER deficiency induces higher levels of Acr-dG in cells treated with DHA or acrolein and sensitizes cells to undergo apoptosis in a correlative manner. Collectively, these results support that Acr-dG, a ubiquitously formed mutagenic oxidative DNA adduct, plays a role in DHA-induced apoptosis and suggest that it could serve as a biomarker for the cancer preventive effects of DHA. PMID:27036235

  2. 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline-induced DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis in DNA repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human cytochrome P4501A1 and rapid or slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Bendaly, Jean; Zhao, Shuang; Neale, Jason R; Metry, Kristin J; Doll, Mark A; States, J Christopher; Pierce, William M; Hein, David W

    2007-07-01

    2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) is one of the most potent and abundant mutagens in the western diet. Bioactivation includes N-hydroxylation catalyzed by cytochrome P450s followed by O-acetylation catalyzed by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). In humans, NAT2*4 allele is associated with rapid acetylator phenotype, whereas NAT2*5B allele is associated with slow acetylator phenotype. We hypothesized that rapid acetylator phenotype predisposes humans to DNA damage and mutagenesis from MeIQx. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells were constructed by stable transfection of human cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) and a single copy of either NAT2*4 (rapid acetylator) or NAT2*5B (slow acetylator) alleles. CYP1A1 and NAT2 catalytic activities were undetectable in untransfected Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. CYP1A1 activity did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) among the CYP1A1-transfected cell lines. Cells transfected with NAT2*4 had 20-fold significantly higher levels of sulfamethazine N-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0001) and 6-fold higher levels of N-hydroxy-MeIQx O-acetyltransferase (P = 0.0093) catalytic activity than cells transfected with NAT2*5B. Only cells transfected with both CYP1A1 and NAT2*4 showed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase mutagenesis following MeIQx treatment. Deoxyguanosine-C8-MeIQx was the primary DNA adduct formed and levels were dose dependent in each cell line and in the following order: untransfected < transfected with CYP1A1 < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*5B < transfected with CYP1A1 and NAT2*4. MeIQx DNA adduct levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in CYP1A1/NAT2*4 than CYP1A1/NAT2*5B cells at all concentrations of MeIQx tested. MeIQx-induced DNA adduct levels correlated very highly (r2 = 0.88) with MeIQx-induced mutants. These results strongly support extrahepatic activation of MeIQx by CYP1A1 and a robust effect of human NAT2 genetic polymorphism

  3. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed. PMID:26895074

  4. Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome: Do we know it?

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, C.; Challa, Vasu Reddy; Shetty, Rachan

    2014-01-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome caused by homozygous mutations in mismatch repair genes. This is characterized by the childhood onset of brain tumors, colorectal cancers, cutaneous manifestations of neurofibromatosis-1 like café au lait spots, hematological malignancies, and occasionally other rare malignancies. Here, we would like to present a family in which the sibling had glioblastoma, and the present case had acute lymphoblastic lymphoma and colorectal cancer. We would like to present this case because of its rarity and would add to literature. PMID:25400351

  5. Rapid screening of potential human bladder carcinogens: genotoxicity in meiosis repair deficient Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lamm, L M; Reichert, D F; Lamm, D L

    1989-11-01

    To find a quick screen of potential bladder carcinogens, a genotoxicity test in Drosophila melanogaster stocks containing DNA repair mutations was evaluated. Meiosis repair deficient male Drosophila melanogaster mei-9, mei-41, and the double mutant mei-9-41 were allowed to mate with attached -x females on media containing the test agent. Genotoxic agents produce DNA damage which accumulates and can be lethal in mei males, whereas the attached -x females are able to repair the damage and survive. Thus, the sex ratio of the progeny is a measure of genotoxicity which can be correlated with mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. In this study, tea, coffee, and saccharin were not genotoxic (p greater than 0.3). Dose dependent toxicity was observed in bracken fern (p less than 0.001). The known mutagen and bladder carcinogen, cyclophosphamide, was highly genotoxic (p less than .001). Drosophila genotoxicity not only permits rapid screening of mutagens, but may also have advantages over other systems in the screening of potential bladder carcinogens. PMID:2509735

  6. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma in the context of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Tim; Schlegelberger, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome is one of the rare diseases associated with a high risk of cancer. Causative mutations are found in DNA mismatch repair genes PMS2, MSH6, MSH2 or MLH1 that are well known in the context of Lynch syndrome. CMMRD follows an autosomal recessive inheritance trait and is characterized by childhood brain tumors and hematological malignancies as well as gastrointestinal cancer in the second and third decades of life. There is a high risk of multiple cancers, occurring synchronously and metachronously. In general, the prognosis is poor. About one third of CMMRD patients develop hematological malignancies as primary (sometimes the only) malignancy or as secondary neoplasm. T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, mainly of mediastinal origin, are the most frequent hematological malignancies. Besides malignant diseases, non-neoplastic features are frequently observed, e.g. café-au-lait spots sometimes resembling neurofibromatosis type I, hypopigmented skin lesions, numerous adenomatous polyps, multiple pilomatricomas, or impaired immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Within the present review, we summarize previously published CMMRD patients with at least one hematological malignancy, provide an overview of steps necessary to substantiate the diagnosis of CMMRD, and refer to the recent most relevant literature. PMID:26743104

  7. Generalized time-dependent model of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in normal and repair-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Artem L; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a model that can simulate the yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair-deficient cells. The model predicts the kinetics of chromosomal aberration formation after exposure in the G₀/G₁ phase of the cell cycle to either low- or high-LET radiation. A previously formulated model based on a stochastic Monte Carlo approach was updated to consider the time dependence of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair (proper or improper), and different cell types were assigned different kinetics of DSB repair. The distribution of the DSB free ends was derived from a mechanistic model that takes into account the structure of chromatin and DSB clustering from high-LET radiation. The kinetics of chromosomal aberration formation were derived from experimental data on DSB repair kinetics in normal and repair-deficient cell lines. We assessed different types of chromosomal aberrations with the focus on simple and complex exchanges, and predicted the DSB rejoining kinetics and misrepair probabilities for different cell types. The results identify major cell-dependent factors, such as a greater yield of chromosome misrepair in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells and slower rejoining in Nijmegen (NBS) cells relative to the wild-type. The model's predictions suggest that two mechanisms could exist for the inefficiency of DSB repair in AT and NBS cells, one that depends on the overall speed of joining (either proper or improper) of DNA broken ends, and another that depends on geometric factors, such as the Euclidian distance between DNA broken ends, which influences the relative frequency of misrepair. PMID:24611656

  8. Nucleotide excision repair deficient mouse models and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Niedernhofer, Laura J

    2008-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved mechanism to remove helix-distorting DNA base damage. A major substrate for NER is DNA damage caused by environmental genotoxins, most notably ultraviolet radiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy are three human diseases caused by inherited defects in NER. The symptoms and severity of these diseases vary dramatically, ranging from profound developmental delay to cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. All three syndromes include neurological disease, indicating an important role for NER in protecting against spontaneous DNA damage as well. To study the pathophysiology caused by DNA damage, numerous mouse models of NER-deficiency were generated by knocking-out genes required for NER or knocking-in disease-causing human mutations. This review explores the utility of these mouse models to study neurological disease caused by NER-deficiency. PMID:18272436

  9. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors. PMID:25711864

  10. APC mutations in colorectal tumors with mismatch repair deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Papadopoulos, N; McKinley, A J; Farrington, S M; Curtis, L J; Wyllie, A H; Zheng, S; Willson, J K; Markowitz, S D; Morin, P; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B; Dunlop, M G

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of genetic instability [replication error (RER) phenotype] on APC (adenomatous polyposis coli), a gene thought to initiate colorectal tumorigenesis. The prevalence of APC mutations was similar in RER and non-RER tumors, indicating that both tumor types share this step in neoplastic transformation. However, in a total of 101 sequenced mutations, we noted a substantial excess of APC frameshift mutations in the RER cases (70% in RER tumors versus 47% in non-RER tumors, P < 0.04). These frameshifts were characteristic of mutations arising in cells deficient in DNA mismatch repair, with a predilection for mononucleotide repeats in the RER tumors (P < 0.0002), particularly (A)n tracts (P < 0.00007). These findings suggest that the genetic instability that is reflected by the RER phenotype precedes, and is responsible for, APC mutation in RER large bowel tumors and have important implications for understanding the very earliest stages of neoplasia in patients with tumors deficient in mismatch repair. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8799152

  11. Tight-binding approach to strain-dependent DNA electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Sadeq; Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Small mechanical strain perturbations are considered in calculations of the poly(G)-poly(C) DNA molecular electronic structure, using a tight-binding framework in conjunction with the theories of Slater-Koster and linear elasticity. Results reveal a strain-induced band gap for DNA which is linearly dependent on the induced strain. Local density of states calculations expose that the contribution of the guanine-cytosine base pairs in the charge transport mechanism is significantly enhanced relative to the backbones when DNA is compressed. Transport investigations also disclose a strain-induced metal-semiconductor transition for the DNA molecule, which suggests possible potential uses for sensing applications.

  12. Identification of Lactobacillus UFV H2B20 (probiotic strain) using DNA-DNA hybridization

    PubMed Central

    de Magalhães, J.T.; Uetanabaro, A.P. T.; de Moraes, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization tests were performed for identification of the species of the probiotic Lactobacillus UFV H2b20 strain. Using these two tests, we concluded that this strain, originally considered Lact. acidophilus, should be classified as Lact. delbrueckii. PMID:24031263

  13. The inheritance of mtDNA in lager brewing strains.

    PubMed

    Rainieri, Sandra; Kodama, Yukiko; Nakao, Yoshihiro; Pulvirenti, Andrea; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    In this work, we compared the mtDNA of a number of interspecific Saccharomyces hybrids (Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum and S. cerevisiae x Saccharomyces bayanus) to the mtDNA of 22 lager brewing strains that are thought to be the result of a natural hybridization between S. cerevisiae and another Saccharomyces yeast, possibly belonging to the species S. bayanus. We detected that in hybrids constructed in vitro, the mtDNA could be inherited from either parental strain. Conversely, in the lager strains tested, the mtDNA was never of the S. cerevisiae type. Moreover, the nucleotide sequence of lager brewing strains COXII gene was identical to S. bayanus strain NBRC 1948 COXII gene. MtDNA restriction analysis carried out with three enzymes confirmed this finding. However, restriction analysis with a fourth enzyme (AvaI) provided restriction patterns for lager strains that differed from those of S. bayanus strain NBRC 1948. Our results raise the hypothesis that the human-driven selection carried out on existing lager yeasts has favored only those bearing optimal fermentation characteristics at low temperatures, which harbor the mtDNA of S. bayanus. PMID:18318709

  14. Differential nonsense mediated decay of mutated mRNAs in mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    El-Bchiri, Jamila; Buhard, Olivier; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Thomas, Gilles; Hamelin, Richard; Duval, Alex

    2005-08-15

    The nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) system normally targets mRNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) for rapid degradation. We investigated for a putative role of NMD in cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI-H cancers), because numerous mutant mRNAs containing PTC are generated in these tumors as a consequence of their mismatch repair deficiency. Using a quantitative RT-PCR approach in a large series of colorectal cancer cell lines, we demonstrate a significantly increased rate of degradation of mutant mRNAs containing a PTC compared with wild-type. A specific siRNA strategy was used to inhibit RENT-1 and/or RENT-2 activity, two major genes in the NMD system. This allowed us to show that increased degradation of PTC-containing mRNAs in MSI-H tumors was partly dependent upon NMD activity. The efficiency of NMD for the degradation of mutant mRNAs from target genes was highly variable in these cancers. NMD degraded some of them (TGFssRII, MSH3, GRK4), although allowing the persistent expression of others (BAX, TCF-4). This is of particular interest within the context of a proposed conservation of biological activity for the corresponding mutated proteins. We thus propose that NMD might play an important role in the selection of target gene mutations with a functional role in MSI-H carcinogenesis. PMID:16000315

  15. Mutation rates, spectra, and genome-wide distribution of spontaneous mutations in mismatch repair deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gregory I; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E

    2013-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  16. High frequency of mismatch repair deficiency among pediatric high grade gliomas in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Amayiri, Nisreen; Tabori, Uri; Campbell, Brittany; Bakry, Doua; Aronson, Melyssa; Durno, Carol; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Malkin, David; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Musharbash, Awni; Swaidan, Maisa; Bouffet, Eric; Hawkins, Cynthia; Al-Hussaini, Maysa

    2016-01-15

    Biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) is a cancer predisposition syndrome affecting primarily individuals from consanguinous families resulting in multiple childhood cancers including high grade gliomas (HGG). This is the first study to assess the prevalence of bMMRD among patients with HGG in countries where consanguinity is high. We collected molecular and clinical information on all children diagnosed with HGG and supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) between 2003 and 2013 at King Hussein Cancer Center, Jordan. Comparison was made to a similar cohort from Toronto. Clinical data regarding presence of café au lait macules(CAL), family history of cancer, consanguinity, pathology and treatment were collected. Tumors were centrally reviewed and tested for MMRD by immunohistochemistry of the corresponding proteins. Forty-two patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, including 36 with HGG. MMRD was observed in 39% of HGG of whom 79% also lost MMR staining in the corresponding normal cells suggestive of bMMRD. P53 dysfunction was highly enriched in MMR deficient tumors (p = 0.0003).The frequency of MMRD was significantly lower in Toronto cohort (23%, p = 0.03). Both evidence of CAL and consanguinity correlated with bMMRD (p = 0.005 and 0.05,respectively) but family history of cancer didn't. HGG with all three bMMRD risk factors had evidence of MMRD and all children affected by multiple bMMRD related cancers had identical gene loss by immunohistochemical staining. In Jordan, the frequency of clinical and immunohistochemical alterations suggestive of bMMRD in pediatric HGG is high. Genetic testing will enable appropriate counseling and cancer screening to improve survival of these patients. PMID:26293621

  17. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amie L; Joyce, Kellie; Xie, Hong; Falank, Carolyne; Hinz, John M; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation. PMID:24561002

  18. Metachronous T-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma in a Child With Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Thomas B; McGee, Rose B; Kaye, Erica C; McCarville, Mary Beth; Choi, John K; Cavender, Cary P; Nichols, Kim E; Sandlund, John T

    2016-08-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD) is a cancer predisposition syndrome associated with a high risk of developing early-onset malignancies of the blood, brain, and intestinal tract. We present the case of a patient with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma at the age of 3 years, followed by Burkitt lymphoma 10 years later. This patient also exhibited numerous nonmalignant findings including café au lait spots, lipomas, bilateral renal nodules, a nonossifying fibroma, multiple colonic adenomas, and a rapidly enlarging pilomatrixoma. The spectrum of malignant and nonmalignant neoplasms in this patient highlights the remarkable diversity, and early onset, of lesions seen in children with CMMRD. PMID:27037742

  19. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  20. Isolation of a Variant Strain of Pleurotus eryngii and the Development of Specific DNA Markers to Identify the Variant Strain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ryu, Jae-San; Lee, Chang-Yun

    2014-01-01

    A degenerated strain of Pleurotus eryngii KNR2312 was isolated from a commercial farm. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis performed on the genomic DNA of the normal and degenerated strains of this species revealed differences in the DNA banding pattern. A unique DNA fragment (1.7 kbp), which appeared only in the degenerated strain, was isolated and sequenced. Comparing this sequence with the KNR2312 genomic sequence showed that the sequence of the degenerated strain comprised three DNA regions that originated from nine distinct scaffolds of the genomic sequence, suggesting that chromosome-level changes had occurred in the degenerated strain. Using the unique sequence, three sets of PCR primers were designed that targeted the full length, the 5' half, and the 3' half of the DNA. The primer sets P2-1 and P2-2 yielded 1.76 and 0.97 kbp PCR products, respectively, only in the case of the degenerated strain, whereas P2-3 generated a 0.8 kbp product in both the normal and the degenerated strains because its target region was intact in the normal strain as well. In the case of the P2-1 and P2-2 sets, the priming regions of the forward and reverse primers were located at distinct genomic scaffolds in the normal strain. These two primer sets specifically detected the degenerate strain of KNR2312 isolated from various mushrooms including 10 different strains of P. eryngii, four strains of P. ostreatus, and 11 other wild mushrooms. PMID:24808734

  1. Isolation of a Variant Strain of Pleurotus eryngii and the Development of Specific DNA Markers to Identify the Variant Strain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ryu, Jae-San; Lee, Chang-Yun; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2014-03-01

    A degenerated strain of Pleurotus eryngii KNR2312 was isolated from a commercial farm. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis performed on the genomic DNA of the normal and degenerated strains of this species revealed differences in the DNA banding pattern. A unique DNA fragment (1.7 kbp), which appeared only in the degenerated strain, was isolated and sequenced. Comparing this sequence with the KNR2312 genomic sequence showed that the sequence of the degenerated strain comprised three DNA regions that originated from nine distinct scaffolds of the genomic sequence, suggesting that chromosome-level changes had occurred in the degenerated strain. Using the unique sequence, three sets of PCR primers were designed that targeted the full length, the 5' half, and the 3' half of the DNA. The primer sets P2-1 and P2-2 yielded 1.76 and 0.97 kbp PCR products, respectively, only in the case of the degenerated strain, whereas P2-3 generated a 0.8 kbp product in both the normal and the degenerated strains because its target region was intact in the normal strain as well. In the case of the P2-1 and P2-2 sets, the priming regions of the forward and reverse primers were located at distinct genomic scaffolds in the normal strain. These two primer sets specifically detected the degenerate strain of KNR2312 isolated from various mushrooms including 10 different strains of P. eryngii, four strains of P. ostreatus, and 11 other wild mushrooms. PMID:24808734

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  3. Rapid discrimination of Mycobacterium avium strains from AIDS patients by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsiota-Bernard, P; Waser, S; Tassios, P T; Kyriakopoulos, A; Legakis, N J

    1997-01-01

    A randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed for the molecular typing of Mycobacterium avium strains. This method was applied to epidemiologically unrelated M. avium strains isolated from the blood of 10 different AIDS patients and to strains that were considered epidemiologically related, as they had been isolated from the same patient but from different body locations (4 patients, 10 strains). Three oligonucleotide primers among the six tested were found to generate RAPD profiles with DNA from all M. avium strains and to successfully type them. This method for the typing of M. avium strains is rapid and easy to perform. PMID:9163488

  4. Identification and DNA fingerprinting of Legionella strains by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, N S; McDonell, F

    1997-01-01

    The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used in the development of a fingerprinting (typing) and identification protocol for Legionella strains. Twenty decamer random oligonucleotide primers were screened for their discriminatory abilities. Two candidate primers were selected. By using a combination of these primers, RAPD analysis allowed for the differentiation between all different species, between the serogroups, and further differentiation between subtypes of the same serogroup. The usefulness of RAPD analysis was also evaluated with outbreak-related clinical and environmental isolates previously typed by the restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. RAPD analysis proved to be as accurate as other genotypic methods, reproducible, and highly discriminatory and is a valuable new alternative to traditional fingerprinting and identification of Legionella species and strains. PMID:9276408

  5. Somatic cell mutations caused by 365 nm LED-UVA due to DNA double-strand breaks through oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xing; Ide, Naohiro; Higashi, Sho-Ichi; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Ibuki, Yuko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Kasai, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Negishi, Tomoe

    2014-09-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating that UVA (320-400 nm ultraviolet light) plays an important role in photo-carcinogenesis. UVA is thought to produce reactive oxygen species in irradiated cells through photo-activation of inherent photosensitizers, and was recently reported to cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in exposed cells. We have investigated the involvement of UVA in mutations and DNA damage in somatic cells using Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Using the Okazaki Large Spectrograph, we previously observed that longer wavelength UVA (>330 nm) was more mutagenic in post-replication repair-deficient D. melanogaster (mei-41) than in the nucleotide excision repair-deficient strain (mei-9). LED-light has recently been developed as a high-dose-rate UVA source. LED-UVA light (365 nm) was also more mutagenic in mei-41 than in mei-9. The mei-41 gene was shown to be an orthologue of the human ATR gene, which is involved in the repair of DSBs through phosphorylation of histone H2AX. In order to estimate the extent to which oxidative damage contributes to mutation, we established a new D. melanogaster strain (urate-null mutant) that is sensitive to oxidative damage and has a marker to detect somatic cell mutations. When somatic cell mutations were examined using this strain, LED-UVA was mutagenic in the urate-null strain at doses that were non-mutagenic in the urate-positive strain. In an effort to investigate the generation of DSBs, we examined the presence of phosphorylated histone H2AvD (H2AX D. melanogaster homologue). At high doses of LED-UVA (>800 kJ m(-2)), levels of phosphorylated H2AvD (γ-H2AvD) increased significantly in the urate-null strain. Moreover, the level of γ-H2AvD increased in the excision repair-deficient strain but not in the ATR-deficient strain following UVA-irradiation. These results supported the notion that the generation of γ-H2AvD was mediated by the function of the mei-41 gene. It was reported that ATR functions on DSB repair in D

  6. The endoperoxide ascaridol shows strong differential cytotoxicity in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Rashda; Efferth, Thomas; Kuhmann, Christine; Opatz, Till; Hao, Xiaojiang; Popanda, Odilia; Schmezer, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Targeting synthetic lethality in DNA repair pathways has become a promising anti-cancer strategy. However little is known about such interactions with regard to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Therefore, cell lines with a defect in the NER genes ERCC6 or XPC and their normal counterparts were screened with 53 chemically defined phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine for differential cytotoxic effects. The screening revealed 12 drugs that killed NER-deficient cells more efficiently than proficient cells. Five drugs were further analyzed for IC{sub 50} values, effects on cell cycle distribution, and induction of DNA damage. Ascaridol was the most effective compound with a difference of > 1000-fold in resistance between normal and NER-deficient cells (IC{sub 50} values for cells with deficiency in ERCC6: 0.15 μM, XPC: 0.18 μM, and normal cells: > 180 μM). NER-deficiency combined with ascaridol treatment led to G2/M-phase arrest, an increased percentage of subG1 cells, and a substantially higher DNA damage induction. These results were confirmed in a second set of NER-deficient and -proficient cell lines with isogenic background. Finally, ascaridol was characterized for its ability to generate oxidative DNA damage. The drug led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species at cytotoxic concentrations, but only NER-deficient cells showed a strongly induced amount of 8-oxodG sites. In summary, ascaridol is a cytotoxic and DNA-damaging compound which generates intracellular reactive oxidative intermediates and which selectively affects NER-deficient cells. This could provide a new therapeutic option to treat cancer cells with mutations in NER genes. -- Highlights: ► Thousand-fold higher Ascaridol activity in NER-deficient versus proficient cells. ► Impaired repair of Ascaridol-induced oxidative DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. ► Selective activity of Ascaridol opens new therapy

  7. Mutagenesis in Oocytes of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER. I. Scheduled Synthesis of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA and Unscheduled DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R.; Lee, William R.

    1983-01-01

    As a model system for studying mutagenesis, the oocyte of Drosophila melanogaster has exhibited considerable complexity. Very few experiments have been conducted on the effect of exposing oocytes to chemical mutagens, presumably due to their lower mutational response relative to sperm and spermatids. This lower response may be due either to a change in probability of mutation induction per adduct due to a change in the type of DNA repair or to a lower dose of the mutagen to the female germ line. To study molecular dosimetry and DNA repair in the oocyte, the large number of intracellular constituents (mtDNA, RNA, nucleic acid precursors and large quantities of proteins and lipids) must be separated from nuclear DNA. In this paper we present results showing reliable separation of such molecules enabling us to detect scheduled nuclear and mitochondrial DNA synthesis. We also, by understanding the precise timing of such events, can detect unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) as a measure of DNA repair. Furthermore, by comparing the UDS results in a repair competent (Ore-R) vs. a repair deficient (mei-9L1 ) strain, we have shown the oocyte capable of DNA repair after treatment with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). We conclude that the important determinant of mutation induction in oocytes after treatment with EMS is the time interval between DNA alkylation and DNA synthesis after fertilization, i.e., the interruption of continuous DNA repair. PMID:17246137

  8. Germline variants in POLE are associated with early onset mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Fadwa A; Kets, C Marleen; Ruano, Dina; van den Akker, Brendy; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Schrumpf, Melanie; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Vasen, Hans FA; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Germline variants affecting the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 predispose to multiple colorectal adenomas and/or colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of previously described heterozygous germline variants POLE c.1270C>G, p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 c.1433G>A, p.(Ser478Asn) in a Dutch series of unexplained familial, early onset CRC and polyposis index cases. We examined 1188 familial CRC and polyposis index patients for POLE p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variants using competitive allele-specific PCR. In addition, protein expression of the POLE and DNA mismatch repair genes was studied by immunohistochemistry in tumours from POLE carriers. Somatic mutations were screened using semiconductor sequencing. We detected three index patients (0.25%) with a POLE p.(Leu424Val) variant. In one patient, the variant was found to be de-novo. Tumours from three patients from two families were microsatellite instable, and immunohistochemistry showed MSH6/MSH2 deficiency suggestive of Lynch syndrome. Somatic mutations but no germline MSH6 and MSH2 variants were subsequently found, and one tumour displayed a hypermutator phenotype. None of the 1188 patients carried the POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variant. POLE germline variant carriers are also associated with a microsatellite instable CRC. POLE DNA analysis now seems warranted in microsatellite instable CRC, especially in the absence of a causative DNA mismatch repair gene germline variant. PMID:25370038

  9. Mismatch Repair Deficiency Does Not Mediate Clinical Resistance to Temozolomide in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jill A.; Johnson, Stewart P.; McLendon, Roger E.; Lister, David W.; Horne, Krystle S.; Rasheed, Ahmed; Quinn, Jennifer A.; Ali-Osman, Francis; Friedman, Allan H.; Modrich, Paul L.; Bigner, Darell D.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A major mechanism of resistance to methylating agents, including temozolomide, is the DNA repair protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT). Preclinical data indicates that defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) results in tolerance to temozolomide regardless of AGT activity. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of MMR deficiency in mediating resistance in samples from patients with both newly diagnosed malignant gliomas and those who have failed temozolomide therapy. Experimental Design The roles of AGT and MMR deficiency in mediating resistance in glioblastoma multiforme were assessed by immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability (MSI), respectively. The mutation status of the MSH6 gene, a proposed correlate of temozolomide resistance, was determined by direct sequencing and compared with data from immunofluorescent detection of MSH6 protein and reverse transcription-PCR amplification of MSH6 RNA. Results Seventy percent of newly diagnosed and 78 % of failed-therapy glioblastoma multiforme samples expressed nuclear AGT protein in ≥20% of cells analyzed, suggesting alternate means of resistance in 20% to 30% of cases. Single loci MSI was observed in 3% of patient samples; no sample showed the presence of high MSI. MSI was not shown to correlate with MSH6 mutation or loss of MSH6 protein expression. Conclusions Although high AGT levels may mediate resistance in a portion of these samples, MMR deficiency does not seem to be responsible for mediating temozolomide resistance in adult malignant glioma. Accordingly, the presence of a fraction of samples exhibiting both lowAGT expression and MMR proficiency suggests that additional mechanisms of temozolomide resistance are operational in the clinic. PMID:18676759

  10. Involvement of MBD4 inactivation in mismatch repair-deficient tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Rossella; Cortellino, Salvatore; Riccio, Antonio; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie; van der Klift, Heleen; Wijnen, Juul; Turner, David; Ventura, Andrea; Rovella, Valentina; Percesepe, Antonio; Lucci-Cordisco, Emanuela; Radice, Paolo; Bertario, Lucio; Pedroni, Monica; de Leon, Maurizio Ponz; Mancuso, Pietro; Devarajan, Karthik; Cai, Kathy Q.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Neri, Giovanni; Møller, Pål; Viel, Alessandra; Genuardi, Maurizio; Fodde, Riccardo; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The DNA glycosylase gene MBD4 safeguards genomic stability at CpG sites and is frequently mutated at coding poly-A tracks in mismatch repair (MMR)-defective colorectal tumors (CRC). Mbd4 biallelic inactivation in mice provided conflicting results as to its role in tumorigenesis. Thus, it is unclear whether MBD4 alterations are only secondary to MMR defects without functional consequences or can contribute to the mutator phenotype. We investigated MBD4 variants in a large series of hereditary/familial and sporadic CRC cases. Whereas MBD4 frameshifts were only detected in tumors, missense variants were found in both normal and tumor DNA. In CRC with double-MBD4/MMR and single-MBD4 variants, transition mutation frequency was increased, indicating that MBD4 defects may affect the mutational landscape independently of MMR defect. Mbd4-deficient mice showed reduced survival when combined with Mlh1−/− genotype. Taken together, these data suggest that MBD4 inactivation may contribute to tumorigenesis, acting as a modifier of MMR-deficient cancer phenotype. PMID:26503472

  11. Agenesis of the corpus callosum and gray matter heterotopia in three patients with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baas, Annette F; Gabbett, Michael; Rimac, Milan; Kansikas, Minttu; Raphael, Martine; Nievelstein, Rutger AJ; Nicholls, Wayne; Offerhaus, Johan; Bodmer, Danielle; Wernstedt, Annekatrin; Krabichler, Birgit; Strasser, Ulrich; Nyström, Minna; Zschocke, Johannes; Robertson, Stephen P; van Haelst, Mieke M; Wimmer, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome is a rare inherited childhood cancer predisposition caused by biallelic germline mutations in one of the four mismatch repair (MMR)-genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Owing to a wide tumor spectrum, the lack of specific clinical features and the overlap with other cancer predisposing syndromes, diagnosis of CMMR-D is often delayed in pediatric cancer patients. Here, we report of three new CMMR-D patients all of whom developed more than one malignancy. The common finding in these three patients is agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Gray matter heterotopia is present in two patients. One of the 57 previously reported CMMR-D patients with brain tumors (therefore all likely had cerebral imaging) also had ACC. With the present report the prevalence of cerebral malformations is at least 4/60 (6.6%). This number is well above the population birth prevalence of 0.09–0.36 live births with these cerebral malformations, suggesting that ACC and heterotopia are features of CMMR-D. Therefore, the presence of cerebral malformations in pediatric cancer patients should alert to the possible diagnosis of CMMR-D. ACC and gray matter heterotopia are the first congenital malformations described to occur at higher frequency in CMMR-D patients than in the general population. Further systematic evaluations of CMMR-D patients are needed to identify possible other malformations associated with this syndrome. PMID:22692065

  12. Colon and Endometrial Cancers with Mismatch Repair Deficiency can Arise from Somatic, Rather Than Germline, Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Tomsic, Jerneja; Frankel, Wendy L.; Pearlman, Rachel; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with Lynch syndrome carry germline mutations in single alleles of genes encoding the MMR proteins MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2; when the second allele becomes mutated, cancer can develop. Increased screening for Lynch syndrome has identified patients with tumors that have deficiency in MMR, but no germline mutations in genes encoding MMR proteins. We investigated whether tumors with deficient MMR had acquired somatic mutations in patients without germline mutations in MMR genes using next-generation sequencing. Methods We analyzed blood and tumor samples from 32 patients with colorectal or endometrial cancer who participated in Lynch syndrome screening studies in Ohio and were found to have tumors with MMR deficiency (based on microsatellite instability and/or absence of MMR proteins in immunohistochemical analysis, without hypermethylation of MLH1), but no germline mutations in MMR genes. Tumor DNA was sequenced for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM, POLE and POLD1 with ColoSeq and mutation frequencies were established. Results Twenty-two of 32 patients (69%) were found to have two somatic (tumor) mutations in MMR genes encoding proteins that were lost from tumor samples, based on immunohistochemistry. Of the 10 tumors without somatic mutations in MMR genes, 3 had somatic mutations with possible loss of heterozygosity that could lead to MMR deficiency, 6 were found to be false-positive results (19%), and 1 had no mutations known to be associated with MMR deficiency. All of the tumors found to have somatic MMR mutations were of the hypermutated phenotype (>12 mutations/Mb); 6 had mutation frequencies >200 per Mb, and 5 of these had somatic mutations in POLE, which encodes a DNA polymerase. Conclusions Some patients are found to have tumors with MMR deficiency during screening for Lynch syndrome, yet have no identifiable germline mutations in MMR genes. We found that almost 70% of these patients acquire somatic mutations in MMR genes, leading to

  13. Improvement of ENU Mutagenesis Efficiency Using Serial Injection and Mismatch Repair Deficiency Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pitstick, Rose; Peters, Janet; Carlson, George A.

    2016-01-01

    ENU mutagenesis is a powerful method for generating novel lines of mice that are informative with respect to both fundamental biological processes and human disease. Rapid developments in genomic technology have made the task of identifying causal mutations by positional cloning remarkably efficient. One limitation of this approach remains the mutation frequency achievable using standard treatment protocols, which currently generate approximately 1–2 sequence changes per megabase when optimized. In this study we used two strategies to attempt to increase the number of mutations induced by ENU treatment. One approach employed mice carrying a mutation in the DNA repair enzyme Msh6. The second strategy involved injection of ENU to successive generations of mice. To evaluate the number of ENU-induced mutations, single mice or pooled samples were analyzed using whole exome sequencing. The results showed that there is considerable variability in the induced mutation frequency using these approaches, but an overall increase in ENU-induced variants from one generation to another was observed. The analysis of the mice deficient for Msh6 also showed an increase in the ENU-induced variants compared to the wild-type ENU-treated mice. However, in both cases the increase in ENU-induced mutation frequency was modest. PMID:27441645

  14. Relationship between DNA double-strand break rejoining and cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation in human fibroblast strains with differing ATM/p53 status: Implications for evaluation of clinical radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Severin, Diane; Murray, David . E-mail: davem@cancerboard.ab.ca

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To better understand the impact of defects in the DNA damage-surveillance network on the various cell-based assays used for the prediction of patient radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We examined noncancerous human fibroblast strains from individuals with ataxia telangiectasia (ataxia telangiectasia mutated [ATM] deficient) or Li-Fraumeni syndrome (p53 deficient) using the neutral comet, H2AX phosphorylation, and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Using the comet assay, we found that, compared with normal fibroblasts, cells lacking either ATM or p53 function exhibited a reduced rate of double-strand break (DSB) rejoining early ({<=}4 h) after exposure to 8 Gy of {gamma}-radiation and also exhibited high levels of unrejoined DSBs later after irradiation. ATM-deficient and p53-deficient fibroblasts also exhibited abnormally increased levels of phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) at later intervals after irradiation. In the clonogenic assay, ATM-deficient cells exhibited marked radiosensitivity and p53-deficient cells had varying degrees of radioresistance compared with normal fibroblasts. Conclusion: Regardless of whether ataxia telangiectasia and Li-Fraumeni syndrome fibroblasts are DSB-repair deficient per se, it is apparent that p53 and ATM defects greatly influence the cellular phenotype as evidenced by the neutral comet and {gamma}-H2AX assays. Our data suggest that the {gamma}-H2AX levels observed at later intervals after irradiation may represent a reliable measure of the overall DSB rejoining capabilities of human fibroblasts. However, it appears that using this parameter as a predictor of radiosensitivity without knowledge of the cells' p53 status could lead to incorrect conclusions.

  15. Implications of mismatch repair-deficient status on management of early stage colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Hisato; Zaanan, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    For primary colorectal cancers (CRCs), tumor stage has been the best predictor of survival after resection and the key determinant of patient management. However, considerable stage-independent variability in clinical outcome is observed that is likely due to molecular heterogeneity. This is particularly important in early stage CRCs where patients can be cured by surgery alone and only a proportion derives benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Thus, the identification of molecular prognostic markers to supplement conventional pathologic staging systems has the potential to guide patient management and influence outcomes. CRC is a heterogeneous disease with molecular phenotypes reflecting distinct forms of genetic instability. The chromosomal instability pathway (CIN) is the most common phenotype, accounting for 85% of all sporadic CRCs. Alternatively, the microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype represents ~15% of all CRCs and is caused by deficient DNA mismatch repair (MMR) as a consequence of germline mutations in MMR genes or, more commonly, epigenetic silencing of the MLH1 gene with frequent mutations in the BRAF oncogene. MSI tumors have distinct phenotypic features and are consistently associated with a better stage-adjusted prognosis compared with microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. Among non-metastatic CRCs, the difference in prognosis between MSI and MSS tumors is larger for stage II than stage III patients. On the other hand, the predictive impact of MMR status for adjuvant chemotherapy remains a contentious issue in that most studies demonstrate a lack of benefit for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II MSI-H CRCs, whereas it remains unclear in MSI-H stage III tumors. Here, we describe the molecular aspects of the MMR system and discuss the implications of MMR-deficient/MSI-H status in the clinical management of patients with early stage CRC. PMID:26697201

  16. Use of Ti Plasmid DNA Probes for Determining Tumorigenicity of Agrobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Thomas J.; Norelli, John L.; Katz, Barbara H.; Bishop, Andrew L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 106 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains. Images PMID:16348218

  17. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two {sup 32}P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10{sup 6} CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains.

  18. Relationship between biological behaviour and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles of Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Díaz, R A; Escario, J A; Nogal-Ruiz, J J; Gómez-Barrio, A

    2001-02-01

    Once known some biological characteristics of six Trypanosoma cruzi strains, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was made. Cluster analysis by UPGMA (unweighted pair group method analysis) was then applied both to biological parameters and RAPD profiles. Inspection of the UPGMA phenograms indicates identical clusters, so supporting that usefulness of biological parameters to characterization of T. cruzi strains still remains. PMID:11285506

  19. Mitochondrial DNA and Functional Investigations into the Radiosensitivity of Four Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Steven B.; Maguire, David; Zhang, Mei; Tian, Yeping; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Amy; Casey-Sawicki, Katherine; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Yin, Liangjie; Guo, Yongson; Wang, Xiaohui; Chen, Chun; Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Swarts, Steven; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Zhang, Lurong; Okunieff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether genetic radiosensitivity-related changes in mtDNA/nDNA ratios are significant to mitochondrial function and if a material effect on mtDNA content and function exists. BALB/c (radiosensitive), C57BL/6 (radioresistant), and F1 hybrid mouse strains were exposed to total body irradiation. Hepatic genomic DNA was extracted, and mitochondria were isolated. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ROS, and calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling were measured. Radiation influenced strain-specific survival in vivo. F1 hybrid survival was influenced by maternal input. Changes in mitochondrial content corresponded to survival in vivo among the 4 strains. Calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling was strain dependent. Isolated mitochondria from BALB/c mice were significantly more sensitive to calcium overload than mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice. Maternal input partially influenced the recovery effect of radiation on calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling in F1 hybrids; the hybrid with a radiosensitive maternal lineage exhibited a lower rate of recovery. Hybrids had a survival rate that was biased toward maternal input. mtDNA content and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTP) measured in these strains before irradiation reflected a dominant input from the parent. After irradiation, the MPTP opened sooner in radiosensitive and hybrid strains, likely triggering intrinsic apoptotic pathways. These findings have important implications for translation into predictors of radiation sensitivity/resistance. PMID:24688546

  20. Characterization of unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi by using ribosomal DNA fingerprinting, DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Grattard, F; Etienne, J; Pozzetto, B; Tardy, F; Gaudin, O G; Fleurette, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of 31 unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi isolated from 13 hospitals between 1973 and 1991 were determined by ribosomal DNA fingerprinting by using a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe, genomic DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles. Only six strains harbored one or two plasmids. DNA restriction analysis, which was carried out with five endonucleases (EcoRI, HindIII, PstI, PvuII, and ClaI), did not allow us to discriminate between isolates. Ribotyping with HindIII, ClaI, or EcoRI enzymes generated six, seven, and nine distinct patterns, respectively. With the combination ClaI-EcoRI, 13 ribotypes were obtained among the 31 strains, suggesting a relative heterogeneity within the species. Moreover, all strains shared two or three common bands, according to the endonuclease used, which were relatively specific for S. schleiferi in comparison with the ribosomal banding patterns described for other coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results illustrate that ribotyping can be used for the epidemiological investigation of S. schleiferi isolates and possibly for taxonomic analysis in this species. Images PMID:8385149

  1. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis.

    We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  2. Sex and strain differences in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, C.A.; Way, B.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The hepatocyte primary culture (HPC)/DNA repair test was developed using hepatocytes isolated from male F-344 rats. A number of genetic polymorphisms have been shown to occur in inbred strains of rats, which may lead to variation in biotransformation of xenobiotics resulting in differences in susceptibility to genotoxins. The effect of the strain utilized as a source of hepatocytes was investigated with female Lewis, F-344, and DA rats. Variation was observed when hepatocytes from the three strains were exposed to aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). No clearcut strain differences were seen when cells were exposed to diethylnitrosamine (DEN) or 2-acetylaminofluorene. These results demonstrate that both the strain and the sex of the animal used as a source of hepatocytes can affect the HPC/DNA repair test.

  3. Geographic Discrimination of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Strains by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Ana María; Niño-Vega, Gustavo; San-Blas, Felipe; San-Blas, Gioconda

    1998-01-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis of 33 Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strains from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela produced reproducible amplification products which were sufficiently polymorphic to allow differentiation of the strains. Types generated with five primers (OPG 03, OPG 05, OPG 14, OPG 16, and OPG 18) resulted in a high discriminatory index (0.956). The discriminatory index was slightly reduced (0.940) when only two primers (OPG 3 and OPG 14) were used. A dendrogram based on these results showed a high degree of similarity among the strains, and genetic differences were expressed in clusters related to geographical regions but not to pathological features of the disease. With a few exceptions, strains were sorted into five groups by geographical origin as follows: group I, Venezuelan strains; group II, Brazilian strains; group III, Peruvian strains; group IV, Colombian strains; and group V, Argentinian strains. The group containing the most disparate strains was group V (discriminatory index, 0.633); the discriminatory index for the other four groups was 0.824. The use of primer OPG 18 by itself was sufficient to discriminate species specificity, and the use of primer OPG 14 by itself was sufficient to discriminate among the geographical locations of the strains in the sample. This method may be helpful for epidemiological studies of P. brasiliensis. PMID:9620409

  4. Identification of upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain and characterization of novel DNA vaccine candidates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (EST's) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC formerly RD-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  5. Strain differentiation of Onchocerca volvulus from Uganda using DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, P; Bamuhiiga, J; Kilian, A H; Büttner, D W

    1996-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with non-radioactive DNA hybridization was applied for the detection and characterization of a 150 bp tandem repeat of Onchocerca volvulus. DNA of worms from western Uganda was amplified and then probed with a digoxygenin-labelled oligonucleotide, specific for the forest form of O. volvulus and compared to samples from various African countries. Hybridization was only observed with PCR products from the forest in Liberia, south-eastern Ghana, Benin and southern Cameroon, but not with worms from Uganda or the savannah in Burkina Faso and northern Ghana. A nested PCR using primers derived form the forest form-specific DNA sequence confirmed these results. Morphometric studies revealed length differences between the microfilariae of Ugandan O. volvulus to those of West Africa, especially to those of the savannah in Burkina Faso. It is concluded that the forest/savannah classification of O. volvulus from West Africa is not suitable for Simulium neavei-transmitted O. volvulus from Uganda. PMID:8935951

  6. Rapid discrimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Linton, C J; Jalal, H; Leeming, J P; Millar, M R

    1994-01-01

    Investigations of the epidemiology of tuberculosis have been hampered by the lack of strain-specific markers that can be used to differentiate isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report the development of a rapid protocol for random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis which included the use of a commercially available DNA extraction kit (GeneReleaser). This was applied to 14 strains of M. tuberculosis, including strains associated with temporal and geographical clusters of tuberculosis in the United Kingdom and those from India, Africa, and Saudi Arabia. Strains of M. tuberculosis could be discriminated in about 8 h by this method, which is therefore a rapid and simple alternative to restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Images PMID:7814542

  7. Diversities in virulence, antifungal activity, pigmentation and DNA fingerprint among strains of Burkholderia glumae.

    PubMed

    Karki, Hari S; Shrestha, Bishnu K; Han, Jae Woo; Groth, Donald E; Barphagha, Inderjit K; Rush, Milton C; Melanson, Rebecca A; Kim, Beom Seok; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the primary causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice. In this study, 11 naturally avirulent and nine virulent strains of B. glumae native to the southern United States were characterized in terms of virulence in rice and onion, toxofalvin production, antifungal activity, pigmentation and genomic structure. Virulence of B. glumae strains on rice panicles was highly correlated to virulence on onion bulb scales, suggesting that onion bulb can be a convenient alternative host system to efficiently determine the virulence of B. glumae strains. Production of toxoflavin, the phytotoxin that functions as a major virulence factor, was closely associated with the virulence phenotypes of B. glumae strains in rice. Some strains of B. glumae showed various levels of antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of sheath blight, and pigmentation phenotypes on casamino acid-peptone-glucose (CPG) agar plates regardless of their virulence traits. Purple and yellow-green pigments were partially purified from a pigmenting strain of B. glumae, 411gr-6, and the purple pigment fraction showed a strong antifungal activity against Collectotrichum orbiculare. Genetic variations were detected among the B. glumae strains from DNA fingerprinting analyses by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) for BOX-A1R-based repetitive extragenic palindromic (BOX) or enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences of bacteria; and close genetic relatedness among virulent but pigment-deficient strains were revealed by clustering analyses of DNA fingerprints from BOX-and ERIC-PCR. PMID:23028972

  8. Circadian expression of the dnaK gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, S; Kondo, T; Ishiura, M

    1995-01-01

    The expression of the dnaK gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was continuously monitored as bioluminescence by an automated monitoring system, using the bacterial luciferase genes (luxAB) of Vibrio harveyi as a reporter of promoter activity. A dnaK-reporting bioluminescent Synechocystis strain was constructed by fusing a promoterless segment of the luxAB gene set downstream of the promoter region of the Synechocystis dnaK gene and introduction of this gene fusion into a BglII site downstream of the ndhB gene in the Synechocystis chromosome. Bioluminescence from this strain was continuously monitored and oscillated with a period of about 22 h for at least 5 days in continuous light. The phase of the rhythm was reset by the timing of the 12-h dark period administered prior to the continuous light. The period of the rhythm was temperature compensated between 25 and 35 degrees C. Thus, the bioluminescence rhythm satisfied the three criteria of circadian rhythms. Furthermore, the abundance of dnaK mRNA also oscillated with a period of about 1 day for at least 2 days in continuous light conditions, indicating circadian control of dnaK gene expression in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. PMID:7559349

  9. Strain-specific determinants of beet curly top geminivirus DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Choi, I R; Stenger, D C

    1995-02-01

    The Logan and CFH strains of the geminivirus beet curly top virus (BCTV) possess cis- and trans-DNA replication factors which exhibit specificity and are not functionally interchangeable. We demonstrate that the cis-acting replication specificity element is entirely contained within a 82- to 97-bp fragment which includes most of the viral DNA origin of replication. We also demonstrate that the strain-specific trans-acting replication determinant is located within amino acid residues 3-89 of the BCTV C1 replication protein. Transient replication assays indicated that chimeric BCTV genomes containing reciprocally exchanged regions of the CFH and Logan genomes were replication competent when the cis- and trans-replication specificity elements were derived from the same strain. Two reciprocal chimeric viral genomes with heterologous cis- and trans-replication elements were incapable of self-replication, yet could trans-replicate one another in a coinoculation experiment. Only chimeric genomes possessing the Logan trans-replication element were capable of mobilizing and amplifying a transgenic Logan derived DI-DNA. DI-DNA mobilization and amplification occurred in transient replication assays even when the helper virus genome was incapable of self-replication, providing that the trans-replication element was derived from the Logan strain. These results genetically define specific regions of the BCTV C1 replication protein determining viral DNA replication origin recognition and provide clear evidence that strains of BCTV have evolved specific cis- and trans-replication factors which functionally define the Logan and CFH strains as distinct viral agents. PMID:7856103

  10. Unique modification of adenine in genomic DNA of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067.

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, J P; Ohki, K; Fujita, Y; Landry, D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic DNA of the marine nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. strain NIBB 1067 was found to be highly resistant to DNA restriction endonucleases. The DNA was digested extensively by the restriction enzyme DpnI, which requires adenine methylation for activity. The DNA composition, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), was found to be 69% AT. Surprisingly, it was found that a modified adenine which was not methylated at the usual N6 position was present and made up 4.7 mol% of the nucleosides in Trichodesmium DNA (15 mol% of deoxyadenosine). In order for adenine residues to be modified at this many positions, there must be many modifying enzymes or at least one of the modifying enzymes must have a degenerate recognition site. The reason(s) for this extensive methylation has not yet been determined but may have implications for the ecological success of this microorganism in nature. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1657876

  11. Molecular characterization of Leishmania infantum strains by kinetoplast DNA RFLP-PCR.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Daniela; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Poglayen, Giovanni; Rugna, Gianluca; Santi, Annalisa; Morandi, Benedetto; Baldelli, Raffaella

    2016-03-31

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis is the tool most frequently used to classify Leishmania spp., although it is time consuming and, sometimes, a not enough discriminative method. In the present study a kinetoplast DNA polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to characterize 16 zymodeme MON-1 Leishmania infantum strains: 15 were from dogs housed in public kennels of 7 geographical areas in the Emilia-Romagna region, Northern Italy, 1 was the L. infantum reference strain MHOM/TN/1980/IPT1. Six enzymatic patterns were observed. Kinetoplast DNA RFLP-PCR con rmed to have a good discriminatory power within the same zymodeme and proved to be useful for comparing few strains or discriminating between relapse and reinfection in the same host. We therefore recommend it use for discriminating between relapse and reinfection in the same host rather than supporting large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:27033533

  12. A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zaisheng; Chang, Dingran; Zhang, Wenqing; Tram, Kha; Lee, Christine; Kim, Peter; Salena, Bruno J; Li, Yingfu

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenic strains of bacteria are known to cause various infectious diseases and there is a growing demand for molecular probes that can selectively recognize them. Here we report a special DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD-CD1, that shows exquisite specificity for a pathogenic strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). RFD-CD1 was derived by an in vitro selection approach where a random-sequence DNA library was allowed to react with an unpurified molecular mixture derived from this strain of C. difficle, coupled with a subtractive selection strategy to eliminate cross-reactivities to unintended C. difficile strains and other bacteria species. RFD-CD1 is activated by a truncated version of TcdC, a transcription factor, that is unique to the targeted strain of C. difficle. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in vitro selection offers an effective approach for deriving functional nucleic acid probes that are capable of achieving strain-specific recognition of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26676768

  13. Random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting as a marker for Paramecium jenningsi strains.

    PubMed

    Skotarczak, Bogumiła; Przyboś, Ewa; Wodecka, Beata; Maciejewska, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to establish a common RAPD marker for P. jenningsi using a series of Ro primers and to investigate if strains originating from distant and isolated localities (Japan, China, India, Saudi Arabia) have isolated gene pools and represent distinct species. An analysis of dendrograms constructed on the basis of RAPD-PCR fingerprints with four primers (Ro 460-04, 460-06, 460-07, and 460-10) from the first part of this project (SKOTARCZAK et al. 2004), assigns the strains to two groups consisting of the continental strains (India, Saudi Arabia, China) and Japanese strains that have been considered as a separate sibling species within P. jenningsi. The genetic similarity of the Indian and Arabian strains was ascertained, whereas the Chinese strain formed an independent branch in this sibling species. The primers Ro (460-01,460-02, 460-03, 460-05, 460-08) also distinguish between two groups of strains, although they divide the Japanese strains into two subgroups that are not reproductively isolated. This probably indicates genetic variation within this sibling species. However, it comprises one common gene pool (successful inter-strain crosses) and is reproductively isolated from the other sibling species. The results presented in these papers confirm that the construction of ten band patterns having marker attributes is possible on the basis of DNA amplification from 9 strains of P. jenningsi with the RAPD-PCR fingerprinting method using five primers from the Ro series. The patterns can be assigned to three marker-groups: a general species group, a group differentiating between sibling species, and accessory strain markers. PMID:15521659

  14. Holliday Triangle Hunter (HolT Hunter): Efficient Software for Identifying Low Strain DNA Triangular Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, W.B.

    2012-04-16

    Synthetic DNA nanostructures are typically held together primarily by Holliday junctions. One of the most basic types of structures possible to assemble with only DNA and Holliday junctions is the triangle. To date, however, only equilateral triangles have been assembled in this manner - primarily because it is difficult to figure out what configurations of Holliday triangles have low strain. Early attempts at identifying such configurations relied upon calculations that followed the strained helical paths of DNA. Those methods, however, were computationally expensive, and failed to find many of the possible solutions. I have developed a new approach to identifying Holliday triangles that is computationally faster, and finds well over 95% of the possible solutions. The new approach is based on splitting the problem into two parts. The first part involves figuring out all the different ways that three featureless rods of the appropriate length and diameter can weave over and under one another to form a triangle. The second part of the computation entails seeing whether double helical DNA backbones can fit into the shape dictated by the rods in such a manner that the strands can cross over from one domain to the other at the appropriate spots. Structures with low strain (that is, good fit between the rods and the helices) on all three edges are recorded as promising for assembly.

  15. Rapid generation of pandemic influenza virus vaccine candidate strains using synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Verity, Erin E.; Camuglia, Sarina; Agius, Catherine T.; Ong, Chi; Shaw, Robert; Barr, Ian; Middleton, Deborah; Rockman, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Verity et al. (2011) Rapid generation of pandemic influenza virus vaccine candidate strains using synthetic DNA. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI:10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00273.x. Background  Vaccination is considered the most effective means of reducing influenza burden. The emergence of H5N1 and pandemic spread of novel H1N1/2009 viruses reinforces the need to have strategies in place to rapidly develop seed viruses for vaccine manufacture. Methods  Candidate pandemic vaccine strains consisting of the circulating strain haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) in an A/PR/8/34 backbone were generated using alternative synthetic DNA approaches, including site‐directed mutagenesis of DNA encoding related virus strains, and rapid generation of virus using synthetic DNA cloned into plasmid vectors. Results  Firstly, synthetic A/Bar Headed Goose/Qinghai/1A/2005 (H5N1) virus was generated from an A/Vietnam/1194/2004 template using site‐directed mutagenesis. Secondly, A/Whooper Swan/Mongolia/244/2005 (H5N1) and A/California/04/09 (H1N1) viruses were generated using synthetic DNA encoding the viral HA and NA genes. Replication and antigenicity of the synthetic viruses were comparable to that of the corresponding non‐synthetic viruses. Conclusions  In the event of an influenza pandemic, the use of these approaches may significantly reduce the time required to generate and distribute the vaccine seed virus and vaccine manufacture. These approaches also offer the advantage of not needing to handle wild‐type virus, potentially diminishing biocontainment requirements. PMID:21771285

  16. Deficiency in DNA repair in mouse lymphoma strain L5178Y-S.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, H H; Ricanati, M; Horng, M F

    1987-01-01

    The production and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage were measured by filter elution in strains of mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells differing in their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The induction of radiation-induced damage, as measured by filter elution at pH 12.1, 9.6, and 7.2, was similar in the resistant strain LY-R and the sensitive strain LY-S. The repair of single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as measured by filter elution at pH 12.1 at various times after irradiation, was somewhat slower in strain LY-S than in strain LY-R, although after a 20-min repair period the extent of repair was equal in the two strains. However, when filter elution was performed at either pH 9.6 or pH 7.2, the repair of x-radiation-induced damage was much less extensive in strain LY-S than in strain LY-R. We have assumed that the extent of filter elution at pH 9.6 is a measure of the occurrence of frank double-strand breaks as well as closely opposing single-strand breaks and pH 9.6-labile sites (and combinations thereof), and that the extent of elution at pH 7.2 is a measure of the occurrence of frank double-strand breaks alone. If these assumptions are correct, the results suggest that the sensitivity of strain LY-S to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation is caused by a deficiency in the ability of this strain to repair frank double-strand breaks and pH 9.6-labile lesions. The repair of pH 9.6-labile lesions was temperature sensitive in strain LY-S, as previously found for cellular recovery processes in this strain. Two independent radiation-resistant variants of strain LY-S, isolated after protracted exposure of LY-S cells to low-dose-rate radiation, showed a deficiency in the repair of pH 9.6-labile lesions similar to that observed in strain LY-S. However, the repair of frank double-strand breaks was more extensive in the radiation-resistant variants than in strain LY-S and was similar in extent to that occurring in strain LY-R after a 60-min postirradiation

  17. Comparison of Mycoplasma arthritidis strains by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, and DNA restriction analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Voelker, L L; Ehle, L J; Hirsch, S; Dutenhofer, C; Olson, K; Beck, B

    1995-01-01

    Twenty Mycoplasma arthritidis strains or isolates were compared by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by an antiserum adsorption technique, Western immunoblotting, and restriction analysis of chromosomal DNA. Antigenic markers that defined strains related to strains 158p10p9, PG6, and H606 were identified. In addition, restriction analysis allowed all 20 strains to be divided into six groups. Results of restriction analysis corresponded generally with antigenic similarities, although the former did not allow grouping with as fine a precision as the latter. However, intrastrain antigenic variability, which is common among many Mycoplasma species, including M. arthritidis, introduced a complicating factor into our attempts at antigenic analysis. While serologic and antigenic analyses remain useful, we recommend that they be used with caution and in combination with other techniques for identifying and characterizing new isolates and newly acquired strains. Combinations of these techniques have proven to be useful in our laboratory for quality control and for uncovering interesting relationships among strains subjected to animal passage and their less virulent antecedents and among strains originally classified as the same but obtained from different sources and maintained, sometimes for decades, in different laboratories. PMID:7494014

  18. A simplified procedure for the analysis of DNA polymerase III levels in Bacillus subtilis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Ciarrocchi, G; Fortunato, A; Attolini, C; Falaschi, A

    1976-01-01

    A simple and reproducible procedure is described which allows the fast and almost quantitative removal of DNA polymerases I and II from DNA polymerase III, in crude extracts of polA+ strains of Bacillus subtilis. The procedure entails streptomycin sulfate and ammonium sulfate fractionations; subsequent analysis of the partially purified preparation by G-200 chromatography, DEAE cellulose chromatography and density gradient sedimentation, shows that the ammonium sulfate fraction contains less than 5% of the total activity as DNA polymerase I and less than 2% as DNA polymerase II. The purification procedure, up to the ammonium sulfate step, was utilized for the analysis of the level of DNA polymerase III in several B. subtilis mutants, with results comparable to those obtained from the corresponding polA- strains following more cumbersome purification procedures. The M.W. of the purified form is of 227.000, somewhat greater than the published values. The early fractions of the purification have revealed the existence of a form with a M.W. of 426.000; the nature of this form, which has been observed in several instances and which is very unstable and short-lived, is under investigation. PMID:826885

  19. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    PubMed Central

    Frazão-Teixeira, E.; Sundar, N.; Dubey, J. P.; Grigg, M. E.; de Oliveira, F. C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1–5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus PCR-DNA sequencing showed that each strain possessed a unique combination of archetypal and novel alleles not previously described in South America. The data suggest that different strains circulate in pigs destined for human consumption from those previously isolated from cats and chickens in Brazil. Further, multi-locus PCR-RFLP analyses failed to accurately genotype the Brazilian isolates due to the high presence of atypical alleles. This is the first report of multi-locus DNA sequencing of T. gondii isolates in pigs from Brazil. PMID:21051148

  20. A novel means to develop strain-specific DNA probes for detecting bacteria in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, V G; Munakata-Marr, J; Hopkins, G D; McCarty, P L; Tiedje, J M; Forney, L J

    1997-01-01

    A simple means to develop strain-specific DNA probes for use in monitoring the movement and survival of bacteria in natural and laboratory ecosystems was developed. The method employed amplification of genomic DNA via repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) using primers specific for repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements, followed by cloning of the amplified fragments. The cloned fragments were screened to identify those which were strain specific, and these were used as probes for total genomic DNA isolated from microbial communities and subjected to rep-PCR. To evaluate the utility of the approach, we developed probes specific for Burkholderia cepacia G4 and used them to determine the persistence of the strain in aquifer sediment microcosms following bioaugmentation. Two of four probes tested were found to specifically hybridize to DNA fragments of the expected sizes in the rep-PCR fingerprint of B. cepacia G4 but not to 64 genetically distinct bacteria previously isolated from the aquifer. One of these probes, a 650-bp fragment, produced a hybridization signal when as few as 10 CFU of B. cepacia G4 were present in a mixture with 10(6) CFU nontarget strains, indicating that the sensitivity of these probes was comparable to those of other PCR-based detection methods. The probes were used to discriminate groundwater and microcosm samples that contained B. cepacia G4 from those which did not. False-positive results were obtained with a few samples, but these were readily identified by using hybridization to the second probe as a confirmation step. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated by constructing probes specific to three other environmental isolates. PMID:9212434

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel DNA marker associated with epidemic Burkholderia cepacia strains recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mahenthiralingam, E; Simpson, D A; Speert, D P

    1997-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a problematic pathogen that may spread among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). One highly infectious CF strain that causes epidemics in both the United Kingdom and eastern Canada has been shown to possess both the cable pilin subunit gene (cblA) and a unique combination of insertion sequences. However, no genetic markers linking this strain type with other types epidemic at various centers have been identified. Using a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing scheme, we identified an apparently conserved 1.4-kb fragment in the DNA fingerprint of epidemic B. cepacia strains. Conservation of the DNA marker among epidemic strains was demonstrated by Southern hybridization, and its prevalence was assessed in a collection of chromosomal DNAs extracted from 627 isolates representative of 132 RAPD-defined B. cepacia strain types. The marker was specifically associated with seven epidemic CF strains, was absent among nonepidemic strains infecting individual patients with CF, and rare among strains recovered from the natural environment. Only one of the seven epidemic CF strain types possessed DNA homologous to cblA. The RAPD marker was designated the "B. cepacia epidemic strain marker" (BCESM). Sequence analysis of chromosomal DNA corresponding to the 1.4-kb RAPD marker revealed the presence of a putative open reading frame (ORF) with significant homology to several negative transcriptional regulators; the ORF was designated the "epidemic strain marker regulator," or esmR. The BCESM DNA is the first genetic marker that has been identified to be specifically associated with and conserved among several epidemic B. cepacia strains which infect multiple patients with CF. PMID:9157133

  2. DNA fingerprinting differentiation between β-carotene hyperproducer strains of Dunaliella from around the world

    PubMed Central

    Olmos, Jorge; Ochoa, Leonel; Paniagua-Michel, Jesus; Contreras, Rosalía

    2009-01-01

    Background Dunaliella salina is the most important species of the genus for β-carotene production. Several investigations have demonstrated that D. salina produces more than 10% dry weight of pigment and that the species grows in salt saturated lagoons. High plasticity in the green stage and the almost indistinguishable differences in the red phase make identification and differentiation of species and ecotypes very difficult and time consuming. Results In this work, we applied our intron-sizing method to compare the 18S rDNA fingerprint between D. salina (CCAP 19/18), D. salina/bardawil (UTEX LB2538) and β-carotene hyperproducing strains of Dunaliella isolated from salt saturated lagoons in Baja, Mexico. All hyperproducer strains reached β-carotene levels of about 10 pg/cell. Optical microscopy did not allow to differentiate between these Dunaliella strains; however, 18S rDNA fingerprinting methodology allowed us to differentiate D. salina from D. salina/bardawil. Conclusion In Baja Mexico we found D. salina and D. salina/bardawil species by using intron-sizing-method. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Dunaliella 18S rDNA gene sequences were analyzed with our methodology and extraordinary correlation was found with experimental results. PMID:19563682

  3. Divergent genes in potential inoculant Sinorhizobium strains are related to DNA replication, recombination, and repair.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Petri; Greco, Dario; Muntyan, Victoria; Terefework, Zewdu; De Lajudie, Philippe; Roumiantseva, Marina; Becker, Anke; Auvinen, Petri; Lindström, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    To serve as inoculants of legumes, nitrogen-fixing rhizobium strains should be competitive and tolerant of diverse environments. We hybridized the genomes of symbiotically efficient and salt tolerant Sinorhizobium inoculant strains onto the Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 microarray. The number of variable genes, that is, divergent or putatively multiplied genes, ranged from 503 to 1556 for S. meliloti AK23, S. meliloti STM 1064 and S. arboris HAMBI 1552. The numbers of divergent genes affiliated with the symbiosis plasmid pSymA and related to DNA replication, recombination and repair were significantly higher than expected. The variation was mainly in the accessory genome, implying that it was important in shaping the adaptability of the strains. PMID:26879331

  4. Differentiation of field isolates and vaccine strains of infectious laryngotracheitis virus by DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Jorge Luis; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2009-11-12

    Two different regions of the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) gene of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) were amplified and sequenced for characterization of field isolates and tissue culture-origin (TCO) and chicken embryo-origin (CEO) vaccine strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the two regions showed differences in nucleotide and amino acid sequences between field isolates and attenuated vaccines. The PCR-RFLP results were identical to those obtained by DNA sequencing and validated their use to differentiate ILTV strains. The approach using the sequencing of the two fragments of the ICP4 gene showed to be an efficient and practical procedure to differentiate between field isolates and vaccine strains of ILTV. PMID:19747995

  5. Mismatch repair deficiency: a temozolomide resistance factor in medulloblastoma cell lines that is uncommon in primary medulloblastoma tumours

    PubMed Central

    von Bueren, A O; Bacolod, M D; Hagel, C; Heinimann, K; Fedier, A; Kordes, U; Pietsch, T; Koster, J; Grotzer, M A; Friedman, H S; Marra, G; Kool, M; Rutkowski, S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tumours are responsive to temozolomide (TMZ) if they are deficient in O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and mismatch repair (MMR) proficient. Methods: The effect of TMZ on medulloblastoma (MB) cell killing was analysed with clonogenic survival assays. Expression of DNA repair genes and enzymes was investigated using microarrays, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. DNA sequencing and promoter methylation analysis were employed to investigate the cause of loss of the expression of MMR gene MLH1. Results: Temozolomide exhibited potent cytotoxic activity in D425Med (MGMT deficient, MLH1 proficient; IC50=1.7 μℳ), moderate activity against D341Med (MGMT proficient, MLH1 deficient), and DAOY MB cells (MGMT proficient, MLH1 proficient). MGMT inhibitor O6-benzylguanine sensitised DAOY, but not D341Med cells to TMZ. Of 12 MB cell lines, D341Med, D283Med, and 1580WÜ cells exhibited MMR deficiency due to MLH1 promoter hypermethylation. DNA sequencing of these cells provided no evidence for somatic genetic alterations in MLH1. Expression analyses of MMR and MGMT in MB revealed that all patient specimens (n=74; expression array, n=61; immunostaining, n=13) are most likely MMR proficient, whereas some tumours had low MGMT expression levels (according to expression array) or were totally MGMT deficient (3 out of 13 according to immunohistochemistry). Conclusion: A subset of MB may respond to TMZ as some patient specimens are MGMT deficient, and tumours appear to be MMR proficient. PMID:22976800

  6. Properties of Thermus ruber Strains Isolated from Icelandic Hot Springs and DNA:DNA Homology of Thermus ruber and Thermus aquaticus

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Richard J.; Williams, Ralph A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Seventeen pink-pigmented strains of the genus Thermus were isolated from samples collected from thermal areas of Iceland. The strains were examined by using phenotypic characterization and DNA:DNA homology and were compared with recognized strains. Visually, the strains could be divided into three groups based on their pigmentation; however, spectroscopic studies of the pigments indicated little difference among them. Most strains required a vitamin supplement for growth and used fructose, maltose, mannose, or sucrose as the sole carbon source. In the presence of nitrate, two strains were able to grow under anaerobic conditions. The optimum growth temperature was 60°C; growth did not occur at 30 or 70°C. PMID:16347714

  7. Strain-specific mobilization and amplification of a transgenic defective-interfering DNA of the geminivirus beet curly top virus.

    PubMed

    Stenger, D C

    1994-09-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants have been constructed which bear integrated, tandemly repeated copies of a beet curly top virus (BCTV) defective-interfering (DI) DNA derived from the Logan strain. Transgenic DI-DNA plant lines challenge-inoculated with BCTV-Logan exhibited delayed and attenuated symptoms compared to nontransgenic plants. Infection of transgenic plants with the Logan strain resulted in the mobilization of the integrated DI-DNA sequence, which was subsequently amplified as an episome. The accumulation of Logan helper virus DNA forms was reduced in transgenic plants, relative to nontransgenic plants. In contrast, no delay or attenuation of symptoms was observed for transgenic plants challenge-inoculated with the BCTV strains CFH and Worland. Infection by the CFH and Worland strains did not result in mobilization or amplification of the integrated Logan DI-DNA sequence, and no consistent differences in the accumulation of CFH or Worland genomic viral DNA forms were observed among transgenic and nontransgenic plants. These results, and a comparison of putative DNA replication origin sequences, suggest that BCTV strains display specificity with respect to recognition of heterologous DNA replication origin cis-elements. PMID:8053165

  8. Strain variability in the DNA immigration control region (ICR) of Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Picchi, Simone Cristina; Vilas-Boas, Laurival Antonio; Ceresini, Paulo César; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco

    2006-04-01

    The genome of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa contains four ORFs (XF2721, XF2725, XF2739 and XF0295) related to the restriction modification type I system, ordinarily named R-M. This system belongs to the DNA immigration control region (ICR). Each ORF is related to different operon structures, which are homologues among themselves and with subunit Hsd R from the endonuclease coding genes. In addition, these ORFs are highly homologous to genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methylococcus capsulatus str. Bath, Legionella pneumophila, Helicobacter pylori, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae and Silicibacter pomeroyi, as well as to genes from X. fastidiosa strains that infect grapevine, almond and oleander plants. This study was carried out on R-M ORFs from forty-three X. fastidiosa strains isolated from citrus, coffee, grapevine, periwinkle, almond and plum trees, in order to assess the genetic diversity of these loci through PCR-RFLP. PCR-RFLP analysis of the four ORFs related to the R-M system from these strains enabled the detection of haplotypes for these loci. When the haplotypes were defined, wide genetic diversity and a large range of similar strains originating from different hosts were observed. This analysis also provided information indicating differences in population genetic structures, which led to detection of different levels of gene transfer among the groups of strains. PMID:16125907

  9. Derivation of DNA probes for enumeration of a specific strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus in piglet digestive tract samples.

    PubMed Central

    Rodtong, S; Dobbinson, S; Thode-Andersen, S; McConnell, M A; Tannock, G W

    1993-01-01

    Four DNA probes were derived that hybridized specifically to DNA from Lactobacillus acidophilus O. The probes were constructed by randomly cloning lactobacillus DNA in plasmid vector pBR322. Two of the probes (pSR1 and pSR2) were composed of vector and plasmid DNA inserts (3.6 and 1.6 kb, respectively); the others (pSR3 and pSR4) were composed of vector and chromosomally derived inserts (6.9 and 1.4 kb, respectively). The probes were used to enumerate, by colony hybridization, strain O in digestive tract samples collected from piglets inoculated 24 hours previously with a culture of the strain. The probes did not hybridize to DNA from lactobacilli inhabiting the digestive tract of uninoculated piglets. Strain O made up about 10% of the total lactobacillus population of the pars esophagea and about 20% of the population in other digestive tract samples. Images PMID:8285690

  10. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Prados, Julien; Stenz, Ludwig; Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  11. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Affects Spermatogenesis and Sperm DNA Methylation in a Strain-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Somm, Emmanuel; Stouder, Christelle; Dayer, Alexandre; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phtalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer with endocrine disrupting properties found ubiquitously in the environment and altering reproduction in rodents. Here we investigated the impact of prenatal exposure to DEHP on spermatogenesis and DNA sperm methylation in two distinct, selected, and sequenced mice strains. FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice were orally exposed to 300 mg/kg/day of DEHP from gestation day 9 to 19. Prenatal DEHP exposure significantly decreased spermatogenesis in C57BL/6J (fold-change = 0.6, p-value = 8.7*10-4), but not in FVB/N (fold-change = 1, p-value = 0.9). The number of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) by DEHP-exposure across the entire genome showed increased hyper- and decreased hypo-methylation in C57BL/6J compared to FVB/N. At the promoter level, three important subsets of genes were massively affected. Promoters of vomeronasal and olfactory receptors coding genes globally followed the same trend, more pronounced in the C57BL/6J strain, of being hyper-methylated in DEHP related conditions. In contrast, a large set of micro-RNAs were hypo-methylated, with a trend more pronounced in the FVB/N strain. We additionally analyze both the presence of functional genetic variations within genes that were associated with the detected DMRs and that could be involved in spermatogenesis, and DMRs related with the DEHP exposure that affected both strains in an opposite manner. The major finding in this study indicates that prenatal exposure to DEHP can decrease spermatogenesis in a strain-dependent manner and affects sperm DNA methylation in promoters of large sets of genes putatively involved in both sperm chemotaxis and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26244509

  12. Simple Sequence Repeats Together with Mismatch Repair Deficiency Can Bias Mutagenic Pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Chronic Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Alejandro J.; Feliziani, Sofía; Di Rienzo, Julio A.; Smania, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and undergoes a process of genetic adaptation based on mutagenesis. We evaluated the role of mononucleotide G:C and A:T simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in this adaptive process. An in silico survey of the genome sequences of 7 P. aeruginosa strains showed that mononucleotide G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were greatly under-represented in coding regions, suggesting a strong counterselection process for G:C SSRs with lengths >5 bp but not for A:T SSRs. A meta-analysis of published whole genome sequence data for a P. aeruginosa strain from a CF patient with chronic airway infection showed that G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were frequently mutated during the infection process through the insertion or deletion of one or more SSR subunits. The mutation tendency of G:C SSRs was length-dependent and increased exponentially as a function of SSR length. When this strain naturally became a stable Mismatch Repair System (MRS)-deficient mutator, the degree of increase of G:C SSRs mutations (5-fold) was much higher than that of other types of mutation (2.2-fold or less). Sequence analysis of several mutated genes reported for two different collections, both containing mutator and non-mutator strains of P. aeruginosa from CF chronic infections, showed that the proportion of G:C SSR mutations was significantly higher in mutators than in non-mutators, whereas no such difference was observed for A:T SSR mutations. Our findings, taken together, provide genome-scale evidences that under a MRS-deficient background, long G:C SSRs are able to stochastically bias mutagenic pathways by making the genes in which they are harbored more prone to mutation. The combination of MRS deficiency and virulence-related genes that contain long G:C SSRs is therefore a matter of concern in P. aeruginosa CF chronic infection. PMID:24278287

  13. Simple sequence repeats together with mismatch repair deficiency can bias mutagenic pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Alejandro J; Feliziani, Sofía; Di Rienzo, Julio A; Smania, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and undergoes a process of genetic adaptation based on mutagenesis. We evaluated the role of mononucleotide G:C and A:T simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in this adaptive process. An in silico survey of the genome sequences of 7 P. aeruginosa strains showed that mononucleotide G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were greatly under-represented in coding regions, suggesting a strong counterselection process for G:C SSRs with lengths >5 bp but not for A:T SSRs. A meta-analysis of published whole genome sequence data for a P. aeruginosa strain from a CF patient with chronic airway infection showed that G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were frequently mutated during the infection process through the insertion or deletion of one or more SSR subunits. The mutation tendency of G:C SSRs was length-dependent and increased exponentially as a function of SSR length. When this strain naturally became a stable Mismatch Repair System (MRS)-deficient mutator, the degree of increase of G:C SSRs mutations (5-fold) was much higher than that of other types of mutation (2.2-fold or less). Sequence analysis of several mutated genes reported for two different collections, both containing mutator and non-mutator strains of P. aeruginosa from CF chronic infections, showed that the proportion of G:C SSR mutations was significantly higher in mutators than in non-mutators, whereas no such difference was observed for A:T SSR mutations. Our findings, taken together, provide genome-scale evidences that under a MRS-deficient background, long G:C SSRs are able to stochastically bias mutagenic pathways by making the genes in which they are harbored more prone to mutation. The combination of MRS deficiency and virulence-related genes that contain long G:C SSRs is therefore a matter of concern in P. aeruginosa CF chronic infection. PMID:24278287

  14. Strain-Specific Identification of Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus with Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA-Derived PCR Primers

    PubMed Central

    Tilsala-Timisjärvi, Anu; Alatossava, Tapani

    1998-01-01

    In the present work, strain-specific PCR primers for Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lc 1/3 are described. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to produce potential strain-specific markers. They were screened for specificity by hybridization with DNA from 11 L. rhamnosus strains. A 613-bp RAPD marker found to be strain-specific was sequenced, and a primer pair specific to L. rhamnosus Lc 1/3 was constructed based on the sequence. The primer pair was tested with 11 Lactobacillus species and 11 L. rhamnosus strains and was found to be strain specific. The nucleotide sequence of the specific RAPD marker was found to contain part of a protein encoding region which showed significant similarity to several transposases for insertion sequence elements of various bacteria, including other lactic acid bacterium species. PMID:9835567

  15. Ribosomal DNA analysis of tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted Ethiopian Trypanosoma vivax strains in view of improved molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fikru, Regassa; Matetovici, Irina; Rogé, Stijn; Merga, Bekana; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Büscher, Philippe; Van Reet, Nick

    2016-04-15

    Animal trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma vivax (T. vivax) is a devastating disease causing serious economic losses. Most molecular diagnostics for T. vivax infection target the ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA) but are challenged by the heterogeneity among T. vivax strains. In this study, we investigated the rDNA heterogeneity of Ethiopian T. vivax strains in relation to their presence in tsetse-infested and tsetse-free areas and its effect on molecular diagnosis. We sequenced the rDNA loci of six Ethiopian (three from tsetse-infested and three from tsetse-free areas) and one Nigerian T. vivax strain. We analysed the obtained sequences in silico for primer-mismatches of some commonly used diagnostic PCR assays and for GC content. With these data, we selected some rDNA diagnostic PCR assays for evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore we constructed two phylogenetic networks based on sequences within the smaller subunit (SSU) of 18S and within the 5.8S and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) to assess the relatedness of Ethiopian T. vivax strains to strains from other African countries and from South America. In silico analysis of the rDNA sequence showed important mismatches of some published diagnostic PCR primers and high GC content of T. vivax rDNA. The evaluation of selected diagnostic PCR assays with specimens from cattle under natural T. vivax challenge showed that this high GC content interferes with the diagnostic accuracy of PCR, especially in cases of mixed infections with T. congolense. Adding betain to the PCR reaction mixture can enhance the amplification of T. vivax rDNA but decreases the sensitivity for T. congolense and Trypanozoon. The networks illustrated that Ethiopian T. vivax strains are considerably heterogeneous and two strains (one from tsetse-infested and one from tsetse-free area) are more related to the West African and South American strains than to the East African strains. The rDNA locus sequence of six Ethiopian T. vivax

  16. Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum Correlates With 23S rDNA Mutations in Recently Isolated Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Molini, Barbara J.; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Sahi, Sharon K.; Rodriguez, Veronica I.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Fernandez, Mark C.; Godornes, Charmie B.; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of 23S rDNA mutations implicated in macrolide resistance have been identified in Treponema pallidum samples from syphilis patients in many countries. Nonetheless, some clinicians have been reluctant to abandon azithromycin as a treatment for syphilis, citing the lack of a causal association between these mutations and clinical evidence of drug resistance. Although azithromycin resistance has been demonstrated in vivo for the historical Street 14 strain, no recent T. pallidum isolates have been tested. We used the well-established rabbit model of syphilis to determine the in vivo efficacy of azithromycin against 23S rDNA mutant strains collected in 2004 to 2005 from patients with syphilis in Seattle, Wash. Methods Groups of 9 rabbits were each infected with a strain containing 23S rDNA mutation A2058G (strains UW074B, UW189B, UW391B) or A2059G (strains UW228B, UW254B, and UW330B), or with 1 wild type strain (Chicago, Bal 3, and Mexico A). After documentation of infection, 3 animals per strain were treated with azithromycin, 3 were treated with benzathine penicillin G, and 3 served as untreated control groups. Treatment efficacy was documented by darkfield microscopic evidence of T. pallidum, serological response, and rabbit infectivity test. Results Azithromycin uniformly failed to cure rabbits infected with strains harboring either 23S rDNA mutation, although benzathine penicillin G was effective. Infections caused by wild type strains were successfully treated by either azithromycin or benzathine penicillin G. Conclusions A macrolide resistant phenotype was demonstrated for all strains harboring a 23S rDNA mutation, demonstrating that either A2058G or A2059G mutation confers in vivo drug resistance. PMID:27513385

  17. Simple sequence repeats and mucoid conversion: biased mucA mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Alejandro J; Smania, Andrea M

    2009-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, conversion to the mucoid phenotype marks the onset of an irreversible state of the infection in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The main pathway for mucoid conversion is mutagenesis of the mucA gene, frequently due to -1 bp deletions in a simple sequence repeat (SSR) of 5 Gs (G(5)-SSR(426)). We have recently observed that this mucA mutation is particularly accentuated in Mismatch Repair System (MRS)-deficient cells grown in vitro. Interestingly, previous reports have shown a high prevalence of hypermutable MRS-deficient strains occurring naturally in CF chronic lung infections. Here, we used mucA as a forward mutation model to systematically evaluate the role of G(5)-SSR(426) in conversion to mucoidy in a MRS-deficient background, with this being the first analysis combining SSR-dependent localized hypermutability and the acquisition of a particular virulence/persistence trait in P. aeruginosa. In this study, mucA alleles were engineered with different contents of G:C SSRs, and tested for their effect on the mucoid conversion frequency and mucA mutational spectra in a mutS-deficient strain of P. aeruginosa. Importantly, deletion of G(5)-SSR(426) severely reduced the emergence frequency of mucoid variants, with no preferential site of mutagenesis within mucA. Moreover, although mutagenesis in mucA was not totally removed, this was no longer the main pathway for mucoid conversion, suggesting that G(5)-SSR(426) biased mutations towards mucA. Mutagenesis in mucA was restored by the addition of a new SSR (C(6)-SSR(431)), and even synergistically increased when G(5)-SSR(426) and C(6)-SSR(431) were present simultaneously, with the mucA mutations being restricted to -1 bp deletions within any of both G:C SSRs. These results confirm a critical role for G(5)-SSR(426) enhancing the mutagenic process of mucA in MRS-deficient cells, and shed light on another mechanism, the SSR- localized hypermutability, contributing to mucoid conversion in P

  18. Genotyping by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alli, John Adeolu; Iwalokun, Bamidele A; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Okonko, Iheanyi Omezuruike

    2015-01-01

    Yogurt and starter culture producers are still searching strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus to produce healthier yogurt with a longer shelf life and better texture, taste, and quality. This study determined the genotyping of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains recovered from Nigerian yogurts. Yogurt samples were collected from four different states of South West regions of Nigeria. Isolates were obtained from MRS Medium and biochemically characterized. This was further confirmed by API50CH. The bacteriocin positivity and activity was determined. Genomic characterization of our Lactobacillus acidophilus strains was done with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR. All yogurt samples containing Lactobacillus acidophilus strains meet the probiotic requirement of ≥10(6) cfu/mL. The gel picture revealed 6 RAPD clonal types of Lactobacillus acidophilus strains with RAPD type C observed to be more common. Significant differences existed in the mean growth inhibition zone (t = -7.32, P < 0.05 for E. coli ATCC; t = -6.19, P < 0.05 for E. coli clinical isolates; t = -6.16, P < 0.05 for Enterobacter sp; t = -11.92, P < 0.05 for Salmonella typhi, t = -1.10, P > 0.05 Staphylococcus aureus). No correlation between the bacteriocin production, activity, and their RAPD clonal division (X(2) = 7.49, P = 0.1610, df = 5). In conclusion, L. acidophilus isolated in Nigeria samples met the probiotic requirements of ≥10(6) cfu/mL and produce bacteriocins with good spectrum of activity. PMID:25153762

  19. Biological effects of stevioside on the survival of Escherichia coli strains and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Nunes, A P M; De Mattos, J C P; Ferreira-Machado, S C; Nunes, R M; Asad, N R; Dantas, F J S; Bezerra, R J A C; Caldeira-de-Araujo, A

    2006-12-01

    Stevioside is widely used daily in many countries as a non-caloric sugar substitute. Its sweetening power is higher than that of sucrose by approximately 250-300 times, being extensively employed as a household sweetener, or added to beverages and food products. The purpose of this study was to ascertain stevioside genotoxic and cytotoxic potentiality in different biological systems, as its use continues to increase. Agarose gel electrophoresis and bacterial transformation were employed to observe the occurrence of DNA lesions. In addition to these assays, Escherichia coli strains were incubated with stevioside so that their survival fractions could be obtained. Results show absence of genotoxic activity through electrophoresis and bacterial transformation assays and drop of survival fraction of E. coli strains deficient in rec A and nth genes, suggesting that stevioside (i) is cytotoxic; (ii) could need metabolization to present deleterious effects on cells; (iii) is capable of generating lesions in DNA and pathways as base excision repair, recombination and SOS system would be important to recover these lesions. PMID:16804638

  20. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  1. [The development of reagents set in the format of DNA-chip for genetic typing of strains of Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Pudova, E A; Markelov, M L; Dedkov, V G; Tchekanova, T A; Sadjin, A I; Kirdiyashkina, N P; Bekova, M V; Deviyatkin, A A

    2014-05-01

    The necessity of development of methods of genic diagnostic of cholera is conditioned by continuation of the Seventh pandemic of cholera, taxonomic variability of strains of Vibrio cholerae involved into pandemic and also permanent danger of delivery of disease to the territory of the Russian Federation. The methods of genic diagnostic of cholera make it possible in a comparatively short time to maximally minutely characterize strains isolated from patients or their environment. The article presents information about working out reagents set for genetic typing of agents of cholera using DNA-chip. The makeup of DNA-chip included oligonucleotide probes making possible to differentiate strains of V. cholerae on serogroups and biovars and to determine their pathogenicity. The single DNA-chip makes it possible to genetically type up to 12 samples concurrently. At that, duration of analysis without accounting stage of DNA separation makes up to 5 hours. In the progress of work, 23 cholera and non-cholera strains were analyzed. The full compliance of DNA-chip typing results to previously known characteristics of strains. Hence, there is a reason to consider availability of further development of reagents set and possibility of its further application in laboratories of regional level and reference centers. PMID:25338464

  2. Genetic relatedness analysis of nocardia strains by random amplification polymorphic Dna: validation and applications.

    PubMed

    Laurent, F; Provost, F; Couble, A; Casoli, E; Boiron, P

    2000-05-01

    Until now, no simple and rapid technique existed for epidemiological study of strains belonging to the Nocardia genus. The application of the arbitrarily primed PCR procedure to generate randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprints for such analysis of Nocardia isolates was investigated. Fifty-one unrelated clinical isolates of N. asteroides were tested. Two conditions of RAPD using two different primers generated RAPD fingerprints that allowed the differentiation of all strains. The patterns were reproducible and discriminating. The results highlight the diversity of N. asteroides species and confirm that RAPD analysis is a highly valuable tool for studying the epidemiology of the Nocardia genus. Several examples describe the advantage of RAPD analysis for establishing the relationship between isolates from a given patient (long-term infections, coinfections) and from different patients (i.e. during an outbreak). In the future, this technique will help us to investigate the source of infection in cases of nosocomial transmission, to understand the outcome of nocardiosis, and to follow the evolution and acquisition of resistance to Nocardia strains. PMID:10875283

  3. DNAaseI-hypersensitive minichromosomes of SV40 possess an elastic torsional strain in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Luchnik, A N; Bakayev, V V; Yugai, A A; Zbarsky, I B; Georgiev, G P

    1985-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that DNA in a small fraction (2-5%) of SV40 minichromosomes was torsionally strained and could be relaxed by treating minichromosomes with topoisomerase I. This fraction was enriched with endogeneous RNA polymerase II (Luchnik et al., 1982, EMBO J., 1, 1353). Here we show that one and the same fraction of SV40 minichromosomes is hypersensitive to DNAase I and is relaxable by topoisomerase I. Moreover, this fraction completely loses its hypersensitivity to DNAase I upon relaxation. The possibility that this fraction of minichromosomes can be represented by naked DNA is ruled out by the results of studying the kinetics of minichromosome digestion by DNAase I in comparison to digestion of pure SV40 DNA and by measuring the buoyant density of SV40 chromatin in equilibrium CsCl gradient. Our data obtained with SV40 minichromosomes may be relevant to the mechanism responsible for DNAase I hypersensitivity in the loops or domains of cellular chromatin. Images PMID:2987817

  4. Replication Fidelity of Escherichia Coli DNA Polymerase III Holoenzyme in Vitro and Repair of Heteroduplex DNA with Multibase Loops in Vivo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraway, Margaretha Bernardina Maria

    The genetic integrity of an organism is maintained by accurate replication and correction of asymmetry in the DNA. To study replication fidelity, single-stranded plasmid DNA containing the mnt gene, was replicated in vitro with DNA polymerase III holoenzyme by extension of a complimentary annealed primer. On this plasmid the mnt region is fused to a promoterless tet gene. Accurate replication of mnt generates a tetracycline sensitive phenotype, errors in replication are identified by mutation to tetracycline resistance. Mismatch repair deficient mutH cells were transformed to ampicillin-resistance by replicated circles. The mutations in mnt were identified by replica plating and selecting for tetracycline resistant cells. The mutation rate was 1 in 100,000. DNA sequence analysis of 65 isolates identified 33 single base changes, 20 deletions and 12 concurrent deletions and insertions. Except for the deletions and substitutions, identical mutations were isolated in vivo in mismatch repair deficient cells. Therefore, in vitro replication errors resemble those isolated in vivo. Heteroduplexes with loops occur as a result of replication or recombination. To examine if E. coli converts these molecules to a homoduplex via DNA repair, plasmid heteroduplexes with loops of 5, 7, 9, 192, 410 or 514 bases in mnt were constructed. Conversion was examined by tranforming the plasmid heteroduplexes into E. coli lysogens which had a non-functional mnt gene fused to a promoterless lac gene. Repair of the heteroduplex to wild type yields white/tetracycline sensitive colonies; repair to the mutant yields red/tetracycline resistant colonies and no repair results in red-white (mixed)/tetracycline resistant colonies. No significant change in colony color distribution was observed when the heteroduplexes were transformed into wild type and the following mutant strains: pcnB, mutS, recA, recD, recBC sbcBC, recF, recJ, recR, recN, recO, recG ruvC, ruvB, lexA3, lexA51, uvrA, recBC sbcBC rec

  5. Mitotic stability and nuclear inheritance of integrated viral cDNA in engineered hypovirulent strains of the chestnut blight fungus.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Choi, G H; Nuss, D L

    1993-01-01

    Transmissible hypovirulence is a novel form of biological control in which virulence of a fungal pathogen is attenuated by an endogenous RNA virus. The feasibility of engineering hypovirulence was recently demonstrated by transformation of the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, with a full-length cDNA copy of a hypovirulence-associated viral RNA. Engineered hypovirulent transformants were found to contain both a chromsomally integrated cDNA copy of the viral genome and a resurrected cytoplasmically replicating double-stranded RNA form. We now report stable maintenance of integrated viral cDNA through repeated rounds of asexual sporulation and passages on host plant tissue. We also demonstrate stable nuclear inheritance of the integrated viral cDNA and resurrection of the cytoplasmic viral double-stranded RNA form in progeny resulting from the mating of an engineered hypovirulent C. parasitica strain and a vegetatively incompatible virulent strain. Mitotic stability of the viral cDNA ensures highly efficient transmission of the hypovirulence phenotype through conidia. Meiotic transmission, a mode not observed for natural hypovirulent strains, introduces virus into ascospore progeny representing a spectrum of vegetative compatibility groups, thereby circumventing barriers to anastomosis-mediated transmission imposed by the fungal vegetative incompatibility system. These transmission properties significantly enhance the potential of engineered hypovirulent C. parasitica strains as effective biocontrol agents. Images PMID:8344241

  6. Strained DNA is kinked by low concentrations of Zn2+

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenhai; Dlakic, Mensur; Zhu, Yinwen Judy; Lindsay, S. M.; Harrington, Rodney E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel atomic force microscope with a magnetically oscillated tip has provided unprecedented resolution of small DNA fragments spontaneously adsorbed to mica and imaged in situ in the presence of divalent ions. Kinks (localized bends of average angle 78°) were observed in axially strained minicircles consisting of tandemly repeated d(A)5 and d(GGGCC[C]) sequences. The frequency of kinks in identical minicircles increased 4-fold in the presence of 1 mM Zn2+ compared with 1 mM Mg2+. Kinking persisted in mixed Mg2+/Zn2+ electrolytes until the Zn2+ concentration dropped below 100 μM, indicating that this type of kinking may occur under physiological conditions. Kinking appears to replace intrinsic bending, and statistical analysis shows that kinks are not localized within any single sequence element. A surprisingly small free energy is associated with kink formation. PMID:9380675

  7. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. PMID:27151293

  8. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range.

    PubMed

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  9. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  10. Characterization of strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides by analysis of soluble whole-cell protein pattern, DNA fingerprinting and restriction of ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Coppola, S

    1997-05-01

    Of 215 leuconostocs isolated from field grass, natural whey cultures and water-buffalo milk, 178 were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides while 37 strains could not be identified. Biochemical characterization allowed seven groups to be defined. Representative strains of each group and different habitat and nine reference strains were selected for further analyses. Protein profiles appeared suitable for species discrimination, but did not differentiate between the three subspecies of Leuc. mesenteroides. The technique also showed some differences among equivocal strains. DNA fingerprinting for most strains of Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides examined showed a different restriction pattern from that of the type strain. Ribotyping was not useful for discriminating species and subspecies of the genus Leuconostoc: Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides and ssp. dextranicum showed the same ribopattern as Leuc. lactis while Leuc. mesenteroides ssp. cremoris exhibited a pattern distinct from all the other species examined. On the basis of ARDRA-PCR, two main groups could be distinguished: the larger group included Leuc. mesenteroides, Leuc. lactis, Leuc. pseudomesenteroides and some unidentifiable strains; the second one included Leuc. citreum, Leuc. fallax, Weissella paramesenteroides and some unidentified strains. PMID:9172399

  11. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa activated TLR pathway and enhanced HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2012-01-01

    The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has been shown to trigger naïve immune responses through the activation of monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells (NK cells) and antigen presenting cells (APCs). Based on the hypothesis that PA-MSHA activates natural immunity through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, we scanned several critical TLR pathway molecules in mouse splenocytes using high-throughput real-time QRT-PCR and co-stimulatory molecule in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) following in vitro stimulation by PA-MSHA. PA-MSHA enabled activation of the TLR pathway mediated by NF-κB and JNK signaling in splenocytes, and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 was up-regulated in BMDCs. We then assessed the adjuvant effect of PA-MSHA for HIV-1 DNA vaccines. In comparison to DNA inoculation alone, co-inoculation with low dosage of PA-MSHA enhanced specific immunoreactivity against HIV-1 Env in both cellular and humoral responses, and promoted antibody avidity maturation. However, high doses of adjuvant resulted in an immunosuppressive effect; a two- or three-inoculation regimen yielded low antibody responses and the two-inoculation regimen exhibited only a slight cellular immunity response. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the utility of PA-MSHA as an adjuvant to a DNA vaccine. Further research is needed to investigate the exact mechanisms through which PA-MSHA achieves its adjuvant effects on innate immune responses, especially on dendritic cells. PMID:23077664

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Rheinheimera sp. F8, a Biofilm-Forming Strain Which Produces Large Amounts of Extracellular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Rheinheimera sp. strain F8 is a biofilm-forming gammaproteobacterium that has been found to produce large amounts of filamentous extracellular DNA. Here, we announce the de novo assembly of its genome. It is estimated to be 4,464,511 bp in length, with 3,970 protein-coding sequences and 92 RNA-coding sequences. PMID:26966195

  13. 28s rDNA group-I introns: a powerful tool for identifying strains of Beauveria brongniartii.

    PubMed

    Neuvéglise, C; Brygoo, Y; Riba, G

    1997-04-01

    The nuclear ribosomal DNA of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria brongniartii is polymorphic in terms of both restriction site and length. Insertions of 350-450 bp long, identified as group-I introns, were detected in the 28s rDNA. A panel of 47 strains of B. brongniartii, two B. bassiana and one Metarhizium anisopliae of various geographical and biological origins were found to contain 14 variant forms of intron differing in size and restriction pattern, at four different positions. Twelve types of ribosomal large subunit were defined on the basis of variant distribution and compared with strain clustering based on internal transcribed spacers analysis. There was a correlation between the characteristic introns and isolates collected from the sugar cane pest Hoplochelus marginalis. Primers for polymerase chain reaction amplification were chosen from these variants, and used to develop a specific method for detecting strains pathogenic towards Hoplochelus. PMID:9131812

  14. Identification of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains based on restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, K; Wakai, S; Sugio, T

    2001-01-01

    The 16S rDNA sequences from ten strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were amplified by PCR. The products were compared by performing restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with restriction endonucleases Alu I, Hap II, Hha I, and Hae III. The RFLP patterns revealed that T. ferrooxidans could be distinguished from other iron- or sulphur-oxidizing bacteria such as T. thiooxidans NB1-3, T. caldus GO-1, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and the marine iron-oxidizing bacterium strain KU2-11. The RFLP patterns obtained with Alu I, Hap II, and Hae III were the same for nine strains of T. ferrooxidans except for strain ATCC 13661. The RFLP patterns for strains NASF-1 and ATCC 13661 with Hha I were distinct from those for other T. ferrooxidans strains. The 16S rDNA sequence of T. ferrooxidans NASF-1 possessed an additional restriction site for Hha I. These results show that iron-oxidizing bacteria isolated from natural environments were rapidly identified as T. ferrooxidans by the method combining RFLP analysis with physiological analysis. PMID:11414499

  15. Transcription-coupled Hypernegative Supercoiling of Plasmid DNA by T7 RNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli Topoisomerase I Deficient Strains

    PubMed Central

    Samul, Rebecca; Leng, Fenfei

    2007-01-01

    Summary Transcription by RNA polymerase can stimulate negative DNA supercoiling in Escherichia coli topA strains. This phenomenon has been explained by a “twin-supercoiled-domain” model of transcription in which positive DNA supercoils are generated in front of a translocating RNA polymerase and negative supercoils behind it. However, since a specific system is lacking to study the factors governing this biologically important process, the parameters regulating transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS) in Escherichia coli still remain elusive. In this paper, we describe our efforts to study TCDS in Escherichia coli using a newly developed system. This system consists of a topA strain, VS111(DE3) or DM800(DE3), in which a λDE3 prophage containing a T7 RNA polymerase gene under control of the lacUV5 promoter has been integrated into the cell chromosome, along with a set of plasmids producing RNA transcripts of various lengths by T7 RNA polymerase. Using this system, we found that transcription by T7 RNA polymerase strikingly induced formation of hypernegatively supercoiled plasmid DNA. We also discovered, for the first time, that TCDS was dependent on the length of RNA transcripts in vivo, precisely predicted by the “twin-supercoiled-domain” model of transcription. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that hypernegative supercoiling of plasmid DNA by T7 RNA polymerase did not require anchoring of DNA to the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicate that a transcribing RNA polymerase alone is sufficient to cause change of local DNA superhelicity, which can have a powerful impact on the conformation and function of critical DNA sequence elements, such as promoters and DNA replication origins. PMID:17980389

  16. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, August 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. More specifically, mutant strains will be selected which are deficient in various DNA repair pathways. These strains will be studied with regard to (1) the nature of the defect in repair, and (2) the mutability and transformability of the defective cells by various agents as compared to the wild type parental cells. The results to date include progress in the following areas: (1) determination of optimum conditions for growth and maintenance of cells and for quantitative measurement of various cellular parameters; (2) investigation of the effect of holding mutagenized cells for various periods in a density inhibited state on survival and on mutation and transformation frequencies; (3) examination of the repair capabilities of BHK cells, as compared to repair-proficient and repair-deficient human cells and excision-deficient mouse cells, as measured by the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) treated with radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS); (4) initiation of host cell reactivation viral sucide enrichment and screening of survivors of the enrichment for sensitivity to ionizing radiation; and (5) investigation of the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of various metabolites of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). (ERB)

  17. Induction of chromosomal damage in CHO-K1 cells and their repair-deficient mutant XRS5 by x-ray and particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasonova, E.; Ritter, S.; Fomenkova, T.; Kraft, G.

    The cytogenetic effects of X-rays and Au ions were investigated in repair-proficient CHO-K1 cells and their radiosensitive mutant strain xrs5, which shows a defect in the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. Both cell lines were synchronized by mitotic shake off, irradiated in G_1-phase with either 250 kV X-rays or 780 MeV/u Au ions (LET: 1150 keV/mum) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed in first post-irradiation metaphases. Isoeffective doses of X-rays for the induction of aberrant cells and aberrations per cell were about 14 times lower for xrs5 than for CHO-K1 cells. After high LET radiation the difference in the cytogenetic response of both cell lines was drastically diminished. Furthermore, the analysis of the aberration types induced by sparsely and densely ionizing radiation showed for both cell lines specific changes in the spectrum of aberration types as LET increases. The experimental results are discussed with respect to the different types of lesions induced by sparsely and densely ionizing radiation.

  18. Synthesis and Assessment of DNA/Silver Nanoclusters Probes for Optimal and Selective Detection of Tristeza Virus Mild Strains.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Ehsan; Hosseini, Morteza; Faridbod, Farnoush; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2016-09-01

    Citrus Tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most destructive pathogens worldwide that exist as a mixture of malicious (Sever) and tolerable (Mild) strains. Mild strains of CTV can be used to immunize healthy plants from more Severe strains damage. Recently, innovative methods based on the fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters have been developed for molecular detection purposes. In this study, a simple procedure was followed to create more active DNA/AgNCs probe for accurate and selective detection of Tristeza Mild-RNA. To this end, four distinct DNA emitter scaffolds (C12, Red, Green, Yellow) were tethered to the Mild capture sequence and investigated in various buffers in order to find highly emissive combinations. Then, to achieve specific and reliable results, several chemical additives, including organic solvents, PEG and organo-soluble salts were used to enhance control fluorescence signals and optimize the hybridization solution. The data showed that, under adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity is enhanced by a factor of five and the high discrimination between Mild and Severe RNAs were obtained. The emission ratio of the DNA/AgNCs was dropped in the presence of target RNAs and I0/I intensity linearly ranged from 1.5 × 10(-8) M to 1.8 × 10(-6) M with the detection limit of 4.3 × 10(-9) M. PMID:27349801

  19. Impediment of E. coli UvrD by DNA-destabilizing force reveals a strained-inchworm mechanism of DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Wei, Kong-Ji; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing-Hua; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Li, Ming; Xi, Xu Guang

    2008-12-17

    Escherichia coli UvrD is a non-ring-shaped model helicase, displaying a 3'-5' polarity in DNA unwinding. Using a transverse magnetic tweezer and DNA hairpins, we measured the unwinding kinetics of UvrD at various DNA-destabilizing forces. The multiform patterns of unwinding bursts and the distributions of the off-times favour the mechanism that UvrD unwinds DNA as a dimer. The two subunits of the dimer coordinate to unwind DNA processively. They can jointly switch strands and translocate backwards on the other strand to allow slow (approximately 40 bp/s) rewinding, or unbind simultaneously to allow quick rehybridization. Partial dissociation of the dimer results in pauses in the middle of the unwinding or increases the translocation rate from approximately 40 to approximately 150 nt/s in the middle of the rewinding. Moreover, the unwinding rate was surprisingly found to decrease from approximately 45 to approximately 10 bp/s when the force is increased from 2 to 12 pN. The results lead to a strained-inchworm mechanism in which a conformational change that bends and tenses the ssDNA is required to activate the dimer. PMID:19008855

  20. Protective effect of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) against oxidative DNA damage and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Berić, Tanja; Nikolić, Biljana; Stanojević, Jasna; Vuković-Gacić, Branka; Knezević-Vukcević, Jelena

    2008-02-01

    Mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of essential oil (EO) of basil and its major constituent Linalool, reported to possess antioxidative properties, were examined in microbial tests. In Salmonella/microsome and Escherichia. coli WP2 reversion assays both derivatives (0.25-2.0 microl/plate) showed no mutagenic effect. Salmonella. typhimurium TA98, TA100 and TA102 strains displayed similar sensitivity to both basil derivatives as non-permeable E. coli WP2 strains IC185 and IC202 oxyR. Moreover, the toxicity of basil derivatives to WP2 strains did not depend on OxyR function. The reduction of t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis by EO and Linalool (30-60%) was obtained in repair proficient strains of the E. coli K12 assay (Nikolić, B., Stanojević, J., Mitić, D., Vuković-Gacić, B., Knezević-Vukcević, J., Simić, D., 2004. Comparative study of the antimutagenic potential of vitamin E in different E. coli strains. Mutat. Res. 564, 31-38), as well as in E. coli WP2 IC202 strain. EO and Linalool reduced spontaneous mutagenesis in mismatch repair deficient E. coli K12 strains (27-44%). In all tests, antimutagenic effect of basil derivatives was comparable with that obtained with model antioxidant vitamin E. Linalool and vitamin E induced DNA strand breaks in Comet assay on S. cerevisiae 3A cells, but at non-genotoxic concentrations (0.075 and 0.025 microg/ml, respectively) they reduced the number of H(2)O(2)-induced comets (45-70% Linalool and 80-93% vitamin E). Obtained results indicate that antigenotoxic potential of basil derivatives could be attributed to their antioxidative properties. PMID:17980946

  1. Excision of ultraviolet damage and the effect of irradiation on DNA synthesis in a strain of Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, P.; Selsky, C.A.; Little, J.B.

    1981-03-01

    Researchers have studied repair of ultraviolet light-induced damage in a strain of Bloom's syndrome cells which we have shown to be defective in host cell reactivation of uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus. Excision repair was monitored by following loss of sensitivity of DNA in permeabilized cells to digestion by the Micrococcus luteus uv endonuclease preparation. The Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts apparently removed endonuclease-sensitive sites from the DNA slightly less efficiently than did normal strains. After 24 h, 38% of the sites remained in the Bloom's syndrome cells in comparison with 16% in normal fibroblasts. DNA newly synthesized in uv-irradiated Bloom's syndrome cells sedimented less far into alkaline sucrose gradients than did DNA from similarly treated normal cells. In other respects, including the effect of caffeine exposure, DNA synthesis in Bloom's syndrome cells was indistinguishable from that in normal cells. We were therefore able to detect only minor defects in the repair of uv-induced damage in Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts. This is consistent with the normal survival exhibited by these cells. The defect in excision repair may, however, be sufficient to allow the cellular repair capacity to become saturated at high infecting multiplicities of uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus.

  2. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  3. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  4. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of ER2796, a DNA Methyltransferase-Deficient Strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Anton, Brian P; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Agrawal, Sonia; Fomenkov, Alexey; Byrd, Devon R; Roberts, Richard J; Raleigh, Elisabeth A

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially co-linear relationship with no major rearrangements despite many generations of laboratory manipulation. The comparison revealed a total of 41 insertions and deletions, and 228 single base pair substitutions. In addition, the long-read approach facilitated the surprising discovery of four gene conversion events, three involving rRNA operons and one between two cryptic prophages. Such events thus contribute both to genomic homogenization and to bacteriophage diversification. As one of relatively few laboratory strains of E. coli to be sequenced, the genome also reveals the sequence changes underlying a number of classical mutant alleles including those affecting the various native DNA methylation systems. PMID:26010885

  6. Evolution and replacement of Candida albicans strains during recurrent vaginitis demonstrated by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Schröppel, K; Rotman, M; Galask, R; Mac, K; Soll, D R

    1994-01-01

    Southern blot hybridization with the Ca3 probe and the C fragment of the Ca3 probe was used to assess the genetic relatedness of Candida albicans strains from one patient with recurrent C. albicans infection in whom the same strain was maintained, one patient in whom the infecting strain was replaced, and their male sexual partners. In the patient in whom the infecting strain was maintained, the infecting strain exhibited a minor genetic change in each successive episode of Candida vaginitis. These genetic changes occurred in the C-fragment bands of the Ca3 hybridization pattern. In the patient in whom the infecting strain was replaced by another infecting strain, a transition infection involved a genetically mixed infecting population, and the replacement strain appeared to have originated from the oral cavity of the male partner. The results demonstrate that the infecting strains of recurrent Candida vaginitis are not genetically stable, that drug treatment can result in the selection of variants of the previously infecting strain or replacement by a genetically unrelated strain, and that the male partner can be the source of a replacement strain. Images PMID:7852550

  7. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Typing of Clinical and Environmental Aeromonas hydrophila Strains from Limpopo Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ramalivhana, J.N.; Obi, C.L.; Labuschagne, C.; Weldhagen, G.F.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the genetic relatedness of strains isolated from diarrhoeal stool and water specimens collected from water-storage containers from different geographical areas in the Limpopo province. In total, 32 Aeromonas strains isolated from stool specimens collected from HIV/AIDS patients suffering from gastroenteritis and their household drinking-water stored in 20-L and 25-L containers were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD). The RAPD fingerprints obtained proved reproducible when repeated on three different occasions using whole-cell DNA isolated from the Aeromonas strains. In total, 12 unique RAPD fingerprints were found. The results revealed a tendency of the isolates to cluster according to their origin of isolation (best-cut test 0.80 and bootstrap values >50%). However, a certain degree of similarity was also observed between isolates of water sources and clinical sources which indicated genetic relatedness. There were also genetic similarities between the clinical and the environmental strains of Aeromonas spp. isolated from different geographical areas. This study has demonstrated the genetic relatedness of Aeromonas hydrophila isolates from household drinking-water and clinical sources in South Africa, which may be due to cross-contamination from water to patients or vice-versa. This observation is of public-health significance, particularly in the era of HIV/AIDS. This study points to the importance of monitoring and evaluating infection-control measures for improved hygiene and to prevent cross-contaminations. PMID:20214080

  8. Factors affecting the transformation of Escherichia coli strain chi1776 by pBR322 plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Norgard, M V; Keem, K; Monahan, J J

    1978-07-01

    The susceptibility of E. coli strain chi1776 to transformation by pBR322 plasmid DNA was examined and optimized. Maximum transformation to tetracycline (Tc) resistance was achieved when cells were harvested from L broth at 5.0--6.0 . 10(7) cfu/ml, followed by washing twice in cold 0.1 M NaCl + 5 mM MgCl2 + 5 mM Tris, pH 7.6. Cells grown in the presence of D-cycloserine (Cyc) rather than nalidixic acid (Nx) transformed markedly better. The presence of 5 mM Mg2+ ions in washing and CaCl2 solutions stimulated transformation about 2-fold. Optimal conditions for transformation included a pH range of 7.25-7.75 and a cell-to-DNA ratio of about 1.6 . 10(8) cfu/ng plasmid DNA. The frequency of transformation was highest when cells were exposed to 100 mM CaCl2 in 250 mM KCl + 5 mM MgCl2 + 5 mM Tris, pH 7.6, before mixing with DNA. A 60 min incubation period for cell + DNA mixtures held on ice produced the maximum number of Tcr transformants. In our hands, heat shocks at 37 degrees C or 42 degrees C for various times all decreased transformation to about one-half of optimal levels. Furthermore, the recovery of transformants was best when cell + DNA mixtures were plated on precooled (4 degrees C) Tc agar plates. The efficiency of plating was optimum when only 5 microliter of cell + DNA mixture was spread per plate, suggesting that non-viable background chi1776 cells on selective medium inhibited the recovery of transformants. It was also found that the presence of linear DNA molecules in cell + DNA mixtures markedly inhibited the transformation of chi1776 by pBR322 plasmid DNA. On the basis of these findings, a new procedure for the plasmid-specific transformation of E. coli chi1776 by pBR322 plasmid DNA is proposed. The use of this technique has allowed us to attain transformation frequencies in excess of 10(7) transformants/microgram pBR322 plasmid DNA. PMID:365684

  9. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  10. Paths of Heritable Mitochondrial DNA Mutation and Heteroplasmy in Reference and gas-1 Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wernick, Riana I.; Estes, Suzanne; Howe, Dana K.; Denver, Dee R.

    2016-01-01

    Heteroplasmy—the presence of more than one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence type in a cell, tissue, or individual—impacts human mitochondrial disease and numerous aging-related syndromes. Understanding the trans-generational dynamics of mtDNA is critical to understanding the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial disease and evolution. We investigated mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmy using a set of wild-type (N2 strain) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) mutant (gas-1) mutant Caenorhabditis elegans mutation-accumulation (MA) lines. The N2 MA lines, derived from a previous experiment, were bottlenecked for 250 generations. The gas-1 MA lines were created for this study, and bottlenecked in the laboratory for up to 50 generations. We applied Illumina-MiSeq DNA sequencing to L1 larvae from five gas-1 MA lines and five N2 MA lines to detect and characterize mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmic inheritance patterns evolving under extreme drift. mtDNA copy number increased in both sets of MA lines: three-fold on average among the gas-1 MA lines and five-fold on average among N2 MA lines. Eight heteroplasmic single base substitution polymorphisms were detected in the gas-1 MA lines; only one was observed in the N2 MA lines. Heteroplasmy frequencies ranged broadly in the gas-1 MA lines, from as low as 2.3% to complete fixation (homoplasmy). An initially low-frequency (<5%) heteroplasmy discovered in the gas-1 progenitor was observed to fix in one gas-1 MA line, achieve higher frequency (37.4%) in another, and be lost in the other three lines. A similar low-frequency heteroplasmy was detected in the N2 progenitor, but was lost in all five N2 MA lines. We identified three insertion-deletion (indel) heteroplasmies in gas-1 MA lines and six indel variants in the N2 MA lines, most occurring at homopolymeric nucleotide runs. The observed bias toward accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gas-1 MA lines is consistent with the idea that impaired

  11. Paths of Heritable Mitochondrial DNA Mutation and Heteroplasmy in Reference and gas-1 Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wernick, Riana I; Estes, Suzanne; Howe, Dana K; Denver, Dee R

    2016-01-01

    Heteroplasmy-the presence of more than one mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence type in a cell, tissue, or individual-impacts human mitochondrial disease and numerous aging-related syndromes. Understanding the trans-generational dynamics of mtDNA is critical to understanding the underlying mechanisms of mitochondrial disease and evolution. We investigated mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmy using a set of wild-type (N2 strain) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) mutant (gas-1) mutant Caenorhabditis elegans mutation-accumulation (MA) lines. The N2 MA lines, derived from a previous experiment, were bottlenecked for 250 generations. The gas-1 MA lines were created for this study, and bottlenecked in the laboratory for up to 50 generations. We applied Illumina-MiSeq DNA sequencing to L1 larvae from five gas-1 MA lines and five N2 MA lines to detect and characterize mtDNA mutation and heteroplasmic inheritance patterns evolving under extreme drift. mtDNA copy number increased in both sets of MA lines: three-fold on average among the gas-1 MA lines and five-fold on average among N2 MA lines. Eight heteroplasmic single base substitution polymorphisms were detected in the gas-1 MA lines; only one was observed in the N2 MA lines. Heteroplasmy frequencies ranged broadly in the gas-1 MA lines, from as low as 2.3% to complete fixation (homoplasmy). An initially low-frequency (<5%) heteroplasmy discovered in the gas-1 progenitor was observed to fix in one gas-1 MA line, achieve higher frequency (37.4%) in another, and be lost in the other three lines. A similar low-frequency heteroplasmy was detected in the N2 progenitor, but was lost in all five N2 MA lines. We identified three insertion-deletion (indel) heteroplasmies in gas-1 MA lines and six indel variants in the N2 MA lines, most occurring at homopolymeric nucleotide runs. The observed bias toward accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in gas-1 MA lines is consistent with the idea that impaired

  12. DNA-damaging activity in ethanol-soluble fractions of feces from New Zealand groups at varying risks of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Alley, P G; Gribben, B M

    1985-01-01

    Using repair-proficient and repair-deficient strains of E. coli, we investigated the application of a liquid incubation assay to measure the DNA-damaging activity of ethanol-soluble fecal extracts. This method appears to be suitable for the study of a wide range of sample types. It was used to measure the DNA-modifying activity of ethanol-soluble fecal extracts from a group of European colorectal cancer patients. Data were compared with those from Europeans of similar age and sex distribution who did not have bowel cancer. We also studied groups of Maoris, Samoans, and European Seventh-Day Adventists who followed an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet. There are significant levels of DNA-modifying materials in the feces of many Europeans on a mixed diet, regardless of whether or not they have cancer. The number of positive samples was less in the Polynesian groups, and there were no samples that could be unequivocally scored as positive in the Seventh-Day Adventist groups. We conclude that diet can significantly reduce the level of ethanol-soluble mutagens, at least in New Zealand Europeans. The data may provide an explanation for the reduced incidence of bowel cancer in Seventh-Day Adventist groups. PMID:3906579

  13. Construction and use of an ipb DNA module to generate Pseudomonas strains with constitutive trichloroethene and isopropylbenzene oxidation activity.

    PubMed

    Berendes, F; Sabarth, N; Averhoff, B; Gottschalk, G

    1998-07-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JR1 exhibits trichloroethene (TCE) oxidation activity with isopropylbenzene (IPB) as the inducer substrate. We previously reported the genes encoding the first three enzymes of the IPB-degradative pathway (ipbA1, ipbA2, ipbA3, ipbA4, ipbB, and ipbC) and identified the initial IPB dioxygenase (IpbA1 A2A3A4) as responsible for TCE cooxidation (U. Pflugmacher, B. Averhoff, and G. Gottschalk, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:3967-3977, 1996). Primer extension analyses revealed multiple transcriptional start points located upstream of the translational initiation codon of ipbA1. The transcription from these start sites was found to be IPB dependent. Thirty-one base pairs upstream of the first transcriptional start point tandemly repeated DNA sequences overlapping the -35 region of a putative sigma 70 promoter were found. These repeats exhibit significant sequence similarity to the operator-promoter region of the xyl meta operon in Pseudomonas putida, which is required for the binding of XylS, a regulatory protein of the XylS (also called AraC) family. These similarities suggest that the transcription of the IPB dioxygenase genes is modulated by a regulatory protein of the XylS/AraC family. The construction of an ipb DNA module devoid of this ipb operator-promoter region and the stable insertion of this DNA module into the genomes of different Pseudomonas strains resulted in pseudomonads with constitutive IPB and TCE oxidation activities. Constitutive TCE oxidation of two such Pseudomonas hybrid strains, JR1A::ipb and CBS-3::ipb, was found to be stable for more than 120 generations in antibiotic-free medium. Evaluation of constitutive TCE degradation rates revealed that continuous cultivation of strain JR1A::ipb resulted in a significant increase in rates of TCE degradation. PMID:9647815

  14. Construction and use of an ipb DNA module to generate Pseudomonas strains with constitutive trichloroethene and isopropylbenzene oxidation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Berendes, F.; Sabarth, N.; Averhoff, B.; Gottschalk, G.

    1998-07-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JR1 exhibits trichloroethene (TCE) oxidation activity with isopropylbenzene (IPB) as the inducer substrate. The authors previously reported the genes encoding the first three enzymes of the IPB-deg-radiative pathway (ipbAl, ipbA2, ipbA3, ipbA4, ipbB, and ipbC) an identified the initial IPB dioxygenase (IpbAlA2A3A4) as responsible for TCE cooxidation. Primer extension analyses revealed multiple transcriptional start points located upstream of the translational initiation codon of ipbA1. The transcription from these start sites was found to be IPB dependent. Thirty-one base pairs upstream of the first transcriptional start point tandemly repeated DNA sequences overlapping the {minus}35 region of a putative {sigma}{sup 70} promoter were found. These repeats exhibit significant sequence3 similarity to the operator-promoter region of the xyl meta operon in Pseudomonas putida, which is required for the binding of XylS, a regulatory protein of the XylS (also called AraC) family. These similarities suggest that the transcription of the IPB dioxygenase genes is modulated by a regulatory protein of the XylS/AraC family. The construction of an ipb DNA module devoid of this ipb operator-promoter region and the stable insertion of this DNA module into the genomes of different Pseudomonas strains resulted in pseudomonads with constitutive IPB and TCE oxidation activities. Constitutive TCE oxidation of two such Pseudomonas hybrid strains, JR1A::ipb and CBS-3::ipb, was found to be stable for more than 120 generations in antibiotic-free medium. Evaluation of constitutive TCE degradation rates revealed that continuous cultivation of strain JR1A::ipb resulted in a significant increase in rates of TCE degradation.

  15. Discriminant analysis of DNA polymorphisms in herpes simplex virus type 1 strains involved in primary compared to recurrent infections.

    PubMed

    Umene, Kenichi; Koga, Chihiro; Kameyama, Tadamitsu

    2007-02-01

    The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was analyzed using a set of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strains isolated from oro-facial lesions (oro-facial site collection), which was composed of two subsets: one subset consisted of 57 strains from primary oro-facial lesions, and the other of 47 strains from recurrent oro-facial lesions of patients complicated by factors possibly triggering the recurrence (e.g. malignancy, operation, and treatment of dental caries). RFLP analysis was carried out previously on two other sets of HSV-1 strains: one set was from genital lesions (genital site collection), and the other was from non-genital lesions (non-genital site collection). Discriminant analysis was carried out on the three sets of HSV-1 strains: the criterion variable had two values of primary infection or recurrence, and the predictor variables were 20 RFLPs. The degrees of separation between primary infection and recurrence increased in the order oro-facial site collection, genital site collection, and non-genital site collection. The results of discriminant analysis in this study confirmed that reactivation of HSV-1 infection is influenced by triggering factors and the site of infection, thereby suggesting the capabilities of multivariate analysis (including discriminant analysis) with DNA polymorphisms for molecular epidemiological studies. PMID:17070937

  16. Effectiveness of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting for Helicobacter pylori strain differentiation.

    PubMed

    Finger, S Alison; Velapatiño, Billie; Kosek, Margaret; Santivañez, Livia; Dailidiene, Daiva; Quino, Willi; Balqui, Jacqueline; Herrera, Phabiola; Berg, Douglas E; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-07-01

    We compared the robustness and discriminatory power of the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting methods for detecting cases of mixed Helicobacter pylori infection in Peruvian shantytown residents. H. pylori isolates from 63 participants were cultured, and five single colonies and a pool of additional colonies from each participant were analyzed by ERIC-PCR and by RAPD tests with four 10-nucleotide primers (one primer per reaction). There was 94% agreement between the ERIC and RAPD profiles in classifying sets of isolates as uniform versus closely related but not identical versus probably unrelated, indicating a high kappa statistic of 0.8942. Subtle differences in related ERIC or RAPD patterns likely reflect gene transfer between strains, recombination, and/or mutation, whereas markedly different patterns reflect infection by unrelated strains. At least half of infected shantytown residents seemed to carry more than one H. pylori strain, although in 19 of 31 persons, the strains were closely related. Three RAPD tests, each with a different primer, were needed to achieve the sensitivity of one ERIC test. ERIC-PCR constitutes a resource- and time-efficient method for H. pylori strain differentiation. PMID:16820463

  17. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. ); Chen, D.S. . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  18. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  19. A rapid, comprehensive system for assaying DNA repair activity and cytotoxic effects of DNA-damaging reagents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Nan; Nakazawa, Yuka; Guo, Chaowan; Shimada, Mayuko; Sethi, Mieran; Takahashi, Yoshito; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Yuji; Ogi, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair systems protect cells from genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Therefore, assays for measuring DNA repair activity are valuable, not only for clinical diagnoses of DNA repair deficiency disorders but also for basic research and anticancer drug development. Two commonly used assays are UDS (unscheduled DNA synthesis, requiring a precise measurement of an extremely small amount of repair DNA synthesis) and RRS (recovery of RNA synthesis after DNA damage). Both UDS and RRS are major endpoints for assessing the activity of nucleotide excision repair (NER), the most versatile DNA repair process. Conventional UDS and RRS assays are laborious and time-consuming, as they measure the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides associated with NER. Here we describe a comprehensive protocol for monitoring nonradioactive UDS and RRS by studying the incorporation of alkyne-conjugated nucleoside analogs followed by a fluorescent azide-coupling click-chemistry reaction. The system is also suitable for quick measurement of cell sensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and for lentivirus-based complementation assays, which can be used to systematically determine the pathogenic genes associated with DNA repair deficiency disorders. A typical UDS or RRS assay using primary fibroblasts, including a virus complementation test, takes 1 week to complete. PMID:25474029

  20. Specific Detection of Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium Strains Colonizing Rice (Oryza sativa) Roots by 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer-Targeted PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhiyuan; Hurek, Thomas; Vinuesa, Pablo; Müller, Peter; Ladha, Jagdish K.; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In addition to forming symbiotic nodules on legumes, rhizobial strains are members of soil or rhizosphere communities or occur as endophytes, e.g., in rice. Two rhizobial strains which have been isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legumes Aeschynomene fluminensis (IRBG271) and Sesbania aculeata (IRBG74) were previously found to promote rice growth. In addition to analyzing their phylogenetic positions, we assessed the suitability of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences for the differentiation of closely related rhizobial taxa and for the development of PCR protocols allowing the specific detection of strains in the environment. 16S rDNA sequence analysis (sequence identity, 99%) and phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that strain IRBG271 was related to but distinct from Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Rhizobium sp. (Sesbania) strain IRBG74 was located in the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium cluster as a novel lineage according to phylogenetic 16S rDNA analysis (96.8 to 98.9% sequence identity with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; emended name, Rhizobium radiobacter). Strain IRBG74 harbored four copies of rRNA operons whose IGS sequences varied only slightly (2 to 9 nucleotides). The IGS sequence analyses allowed intraspecies differentiation, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, as illustrated here for strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, B. elkanii, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Chamaecytisus) strain BTA-1. It also clearly differentiated fast-growing rhizobial species and strains, albeit with lower statistical significance. Moreover, the high sequence variability allowed the development of highly specific IGS-targeted nested-PCR assays. Strains IRBG74 and IRBG271 were specifically detected in complex DNA mixtures of numerous related bacteria and in the DNA of roots of gnotobiotically cultured or even of soil-grown rice plants after inoculation. Thus, IGS sequence analysis is an attractive technique for both microbial

  1. Characterization of Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) feed and larvae: safety, DNA fingerprinting, and bacteriocinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carlos; Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M

    2016-05-01

    The use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics constitutes an alternative or complementary strategy to chemotherapy and vaccination for disease control in aquaculture. The objectives of this work were (1) the in vitro safety assessment of 8 Pediococcus acidilactici strains isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) feed and larvae; (2) the evaluation of their genetic relatedness; (3) the study of their antimicrobial/bacteriocin activity against fish pathogens; and (4) the biochemical and genetic characterization of the bacteriocin produced by the strain displaying the greatest antimicrobial activity. Concerning the safety assessment, none of the pediococci showed antibiotic resistance nor produced hemolysin or gelatinase, degraded gastric mucin, or deconjugated bile salts. Four strains (50%) produced tyramine or putrescine, but the corresponding genes were not amplified by PCR. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR) fingerprinting allowed clustering of the pediococci into 2 well-defined groups (68% similarity). From the 8 pediococci displaying direct antimicrobial activity against at least 3 out of 9 fish pathogens, 6 strains (75%) were identified as bacteriocin producers. The bacteriocin produced by P. acidilactici L-14 was purified, and mass spectrometry and DNA sequencing revealed its identity to pediocin PA-1 (PedPA-1). Altogether, our results allowed the identification of 4 (50%) putatively safe pediococci, including 2 bacteriocinogenic strains. ERIC-PCR fingerprinting was a valuable tool for genetic profiling of P. acidilactici strains. This work reports for the first time the characterization of a PedPA-1-producing P. acidilactici strain isolated from an aquatic environment (rainbow trout larvae), which shows interesting properties related to its potential use as a probiotic in aquaculture. PMID:27137071

  2. Differential replication of two porcine parvovirus strains in bovine cell lines ensues from initial DNA processing and NS1 expression.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sandra; Boisvert, Maude; Szelei, Jozsef; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) is a small DNA virus with restricted coding capacity. The 5 kb genome expresses three major non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2 and SAT), and two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2). These few viral proteins are pleiotropic and interact with cellular components throughout viral replication. In this regard, very few cell lines have been shown to replicate the virus efficiently. Cell lines were established from a primary culture of bovine cells that allowed allotropic variants of PPV to be distinguished. Three cell lines were differentially sensitive to infection by two prototype PPV strains, NADL-2 and Kresse. In the first cell line (D10), infection was restricted early in the infectious cycle and was not productive. Infection of the second cell line (G11) was 1000 times less efficient with the NADL-2 strain compared with porcine cells, while production of infectious virus of the Kresse strain was barely detectable. Restriction points in these cells were the initial generation of DNA replication intermediates and NS1 production. Infection with chimeras between NADL-2 and Kresse showed that residues outside the previously described allotropic determinant were also partially responsible for the restriction to Kresse replication in G11 cells. F4 cells were permissive to both strains, although genome replication and infectious virus production were lower than in the porcine cells used for comparison. These results highlight the dependent nature of parvovirus tropism on host factors and suggest that cells from a non-host origin can fully support a productive infection by both strains. PMID:24347493

  3. Genotoxicity of dichlorvos in strains of Drosophila melanogaster defective in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Manish; Sharma, A; Shukla, A K; Kumar, R; Dwivedi, U N; Kar Chowdhuri, D

    2014-05-15

    Dichlorvos (DDVP), an organophosphate pesticide, is reported to be genotoxic at high concentrations. However, the roles of DNA damage repair pathways in DDVP genotoxicity are not well characterized. To test whether pre- and post-replication pathways are involved, we measured changes in DNA migration (Comet assay) in the midgut cells of Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R+ larvae and in some mutants of pre- (mei-9, mus201, and mus207) and post- (mei-41 and mus209)replication DNA repair pathways. Insects were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of DDVP (up to 15ng/ml) for 48h. After insect exposure to 0.15ng/ml DDVP, we observed greater DNA damage in pre-replication repair mutants; effects on Oregon R+ and post-replication repair mutants were insignificant. In contrast, significant DNA damage was observed in the post-replication repair mutants after their exposure to 1.5 and 15ng/ml DDVP. The pre-replication repair mutant mus207 showed maximum sensitivity to DDVP, suggestive of alkylation damage to DNA. We also examined mutants (SOD- and urate-null) that are sensitive to oxidative stress and the results indicate that significant oxidative DNA damage occurs in DDVP-exposed mutants. This study suggests involvement of both pre- and post-replication repair pathways against DDVP-induced DNA damage in Drosophila, with oxidative DNA damage leading to genotoxicity. PMID:24614193

  4. DNA fingerprinting of Lactobacillus crispatus strain CTV-05 by repetitive element sequence-based PCR analysis in a pilot study of vaginal colonization.

    PubMed

    Antonio, May A D; Hillier, Sharon L

    2003-05-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the predominant hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-producing species found in the vagina and is under development as a probiotic for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. In this study, we assessed whether DNA fingerprinting by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) can be used to distinguish the capsule strain of L. crispatus (CTV-05) from other endogenous strains as well as other species of vaginal lactobacilli. Vaginal and rectal lactobacilli were identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probe DNA hybridization. The DNAs from L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. gasseri, and an as-yet-unnamed H(2)O(2)-negative Lactobacillus species designated 1086V were subjected to rep-PCR. The results of gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining of the DNA fingerprints obtained were compared. L. crispatus CTV-05 had a unique DNA fingerprint compared to all other lactobacilli. DNA fingerprints for 27 production lots of L. crispatus sampled from 1994 through 2001 were identical to that of the original strain isolated in 1993, suggesting strain stability. In a pilot study of nine women, this DNA fingerprinting method distinguished CTV-05 from other endogenous vaginal lactobacilli prior to and after vaginal capsule use. rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting is useful for strain typing and for evaluating longitudinal loss or acquisition of vaginal lactobacilli used as probiotics. PMID:12734221

  5. DNA Fingerprinting of Lactobacillus crispatus Strain CTV-05 by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR Analysis in a Pilot Study of Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, May A. D.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2003-01-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the predominant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing species found in the vagina and is under development as a probiotic for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. In this study, we assessed whether DNA fingerprinting by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) can be used to distinguish the capsule strain of L. crispatus (CTV-05) from other endogenous strains as well as other species of vaginal lactobacilli. Vaginal and rectal lactobacilli were identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probe DNA hybridization. The DNAs from L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. gasseri, and an as-yet-unnamed H2O2-negative Lactobacillus species designated 1086V were subjected to rep-PCR. The results of gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining of the DNA fingerprints obtained were compared. L. crispatus CTV-05 had a unique DNA fingerprint compared to all other lactobacilli. DNA fingerprints for 27 production lots of L. crispatus sampled from 1994 through 2001 were identical to that of the original strain isolated in 1993, suggesting strain stability. In a pilot study of nine women, this DNA fingerprinting method distinguished CTV-05 from other endogenous vaginal lactobacilli prior to and after vaginal capsule use. rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting is useful for strain typing and for evaluating longitudinal loss or acquisition of vaginal lactobacilli used as probiotics. PMID:12734221

  6. INDUCTION OF DNA ADDUCTS, TUMORS, AND KI-RAS ONCOGENE MUTATIONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG BY IP. ADMINISTRATION OF DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of DNA adducts, tumors, and Ki-ras oncogene mutations in strain AlJ mouse lung by ip. administration of dibenz[a,h]anthracene

    Previous studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) induced lung tumors in the strain NJ mouse model system have demonstrated qua...

  7. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal

  8. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  9. Differentiation of four strains of Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) based on high-resolution melting analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism sites in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Q; Zhang, C; Xu, X J; Zhu, J J; He, Z Y; Shao, J Z

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) has been one of the most economically important aquatic animals in China for thousands of years, and several breeding strains have been formed. Since the morphological characteristics of some strains are similar, a rapid and accurate molecular method to differentiate between strains is required. In this study, partial sequences of mitochondrial DNA from four turtle strains, Taihu Lake Strain, Taiwan Strain, Japanese Strain, and Yellow River Strain, were amplified and sequenced based on selected strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. The corresponding primers were designed and a high-resolution melting (HRM) technique was employed for genotyping these SNPs. The results indicated that a total of seven SNPs can be detected by HRM. Among these SNPs, one can be used for identifying the Taihu Lake Strain, one for the Japanese Strain, two for the Taiwan Strain, and three for the Yellow River Strain. This method is rapid and convenient, which offers technical support for strain identification and selective breeding in Chinese soft-shelled turtles. PMID:26535627

  10. Approach to molecular characterization of different strains of Fasciola hepatica using random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Scarcella, S; Miranda-Miranda, E; Solana, M V; Solana, H

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically characterize Fasciola hepatica strains from diverse ecogeographical regions (America and Europe), susceptible and resistant to Triclabendazole, using the random amplified polymorphic DNA fragments (RAPDs-PCR) technique to elucidate genetic variability between the different isolates. Ten different oligonucleotide primers of 10 bases with GC content varying from 50-70% were used. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out in 25 μl of total volume. Duplicate PCR reactions on each individual template DNA were performed to test the reproducibility of the individual DNA bands. The size of the RAPD-PCR fragments was determined by the reciprocal plot between the delay factors (Rf) versus the logarithm of molecular weight ladder. The phenogram obtained showed three main clusters, the major of which contained European Strains (Cullompton and Sligo) showing a genetic distance of 27.2 between them. The American strains (Cedive and Cajamarca) on the other hand formed each their distinctive group but clearly maintaining a closer genetic relationship among them than that to their European counterparts, with which showed a distance of 33.8 and 37.8, respectively. This polymorphism would give this species enhanced adaptability against the host, as well as the environment. The existence of genetically different populations of F. hepatica could allow, against any selection pressure, natural or artificial (for use fasciolicides products and/or control measures), one or more populations of F. hepatica to be able to survive and create resistance or adaptability to such selective pressure. PMID:25595655

  11. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22.

    PubMed

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-10-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2'-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H](+) > [M + H - 116](+) transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  12. Application of DNA adductomics to soil bacterium Sphingobium sp. strain KK22

    PubMed Central

    Kanaly, Robert A; Micheletto, Ruggero; Matsuda, Tomonari; Utsuno, Youko; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Toward the development of ecotoxicology methods to investigate microbial markers of impacts of hydrocarbon processing activities, DNA adductomic analyses were conducted on a sphingomonad soil bacterium. From growing cells that were exposed or unexposed to acrolein, a commonly used biocide in hydraulic fracturing processes, DNA was extracted, digested to 2′-deoxynucleosides and analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive ionization electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode transmitting the [M + H]+ > [M + H − 116]+ transition over 100 transitions. Overall data shown as DNA adductome maps revealed numerous putative DNA adducts under both conditions with some occurring specifically for each condition. Adductomic analyses of triplicate samples indicated that elevated levels of some targeted putative adducts occurred in exposed cells. Two exposure-specific adducts were identified in exposed cells as 3-(2′-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-(and 8-hydroxy-)pyrimido[1,2-a]- purine-(3H)-one (6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG) following synthesis of authentic standards of these compounds and subsequent analyses. A time course experiment showed that 6- and 8-hydroxy-PdG were detected in bacterial DNA within 30 min of acrolein exposure but were not detected in unexposed cells. This work demonstrated the first application of DNA adductomics to examine DNA damage in a bacterium and sets a foundation for future work. PMID:26305056

  13. Nonrandom Wolbachia Infection Status of Drosophila melanogaster Strains with Different mtDNA Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria D. S.; Nolte, Viola

    2008-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited bacteria, which typically spread in the host population by inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia is quite common but CI is variable, with most of the studies reporting low levels of CI. Surveying mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation and infection status in a worldwide D. melanogaster collection, we found that the Wolbachia infection was not randomly distributed among flies with different mtDNA haplotypes. This preferential infection of some mtDNA haplotypes could be caused by a recent spread of mtDNA haplotypes associated with the infection. The comparison of contemporary D. melanogaster samples with lines collected more than 50 years ago shows that indeed one haplotype with a high incidence of Wolbachia infection has increased in frequency. Consistent with this observation, we found that the acquisition of a Wolbachia infection in a population from Crete was accompanied with an almost complete mtDNA replacement, with the Wolbachia-associated haplotype becoming abundant. Although it is difficult to identify the evolutionary forces causing the global increase of wMel, the parallel sweep of Wolbachia and an mtDNA haplotype suggests a fitness advantage of the Wolbachia infection. PMID:18780877

  14. Random amplified polymorphic DNA assay is less discriminant than pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Saulnier, P; Bourneix, C; Prévost, G; Andremont, A

    1993-04-01

    Twenty-six strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprints were tested by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay with three primers, resulting in 15 to 20 different random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints. By summing the results for the three primers, the number of different fingerprints increased to 25, but two strains could not be differentiated. We conclude that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis remains the best method of typing methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. PMID:8463406

  15. Random amplified polymorphic DNA assay is less discriminant than pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Saulnier, P; Bourneix, C; Prévost, G; Andremont, A

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-six strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprints were tested by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay with three primers, resulting in 15 to 20 different random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints. By summing the results for the three primers, the number of different fingerprints increased to 25, but two strains could not be differentiated. We conclude that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis remains the best method of typing methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. Images PMID:8463406

  16. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  17. Dme-miR-314-3p modulation in Cr(VI) exposed Drosophila affects DNA damage repair by targeting mus309.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Swati; Khatoon, Rehana; Pandey, Ashutosh; Saini, Sanjay; Vimal, Divya; Singh, Pallavi; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2016-03-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) as one of the major epigenetic modulators negatively regulate mRNAs at post transcriptional level. It was therefore hypothesized that modulation of miRNAs by hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)], a priority environmental chemical, can affect DNA damage. In a genetically tractable model, Drosophila melanogaster, role of maximally up-regulated miRNA, dme-miR-314-3p, on DNA damage was examined by exposing the third instar larvae to 5.0-20.0 μg/ml Cr(VI) for 24 and 48 h. mus309, a Drosophila homologue of human Bloom's syndrome and predicted as one of the potential targets of this miRNA, was confirmed as its target by 5'RLM-RACE assay. A significant down-regulation of mus309 was observed in dme-miR-314-3p overexpression strain (myo-gal4>UAS-miR-314-3p) as compared with that in parental strains (myo-gal4 and UAS-miR-314-3p) and in w(1118). A significant increase in DNA damage including double strand breaks generation was observed in exposed myo-gal4>UAS-miR-314 and mus309 mutants as compared with that in parental strain and in unexposed control. A significant down-regulation of cell cycle regulation genes (CycA, CycB and cdc2) was observed in these exposed genotypes. Collectively, the study demonstrates that dme-miR-314-3p can mediate the downregulation of repair deficient gene mus309 leading to increased DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in exposed organism which may affect Cr(VI) mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:26590872

  18. DNA-Damage Foci to Detect and Characterize DNA Repair Alterations in Children Treated for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mareike; Betten, Dominik; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Rübe, Christian; Graf, Norbert; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA) suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. Methods and Materials In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. Results Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. Conclusions Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies. PMID:24637877

  19. Complete DNA sequences of two oka strain varicella-zoster virus genomes.

    PubMed

    Tillieux, Sueli L; Halsey, Wendy S; Thomas, Elizabeth S; Voycik, John J; Sathe, Ganesh M; Vassilev, Ventzislav

    2008-11-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a herpesvirus and is the causative agent of chicken pox (varicella) and shingles (herpes zoster). Active immunization against varicella became possible with the development of live attenuated varicella vaccine. The Oka vaccine strain was isolated in Japan from a child who had typical varicella, and it was then attenuated by serial passages in cell culture. Several manufacturers have obtained this attenuated Oka strain and, following additional passages, have developed their own vaccine strains. Notably, the vaccines Varilrix and Varivax are produced by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals and Merck & Co., Inc., respectively. Both vaccines have been well studied in terms of safety and immunogenicity. In this study, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the Varilrix (Oka-V(GSK)) and Varivax (Oka-V(Merck)) vaccine strain genomes. Their genomes are composed of 124,821 and 124,815 bp, respectively. Full genome annotations covering the features of Oka-derived vaccine genomes have been established for the first time. Sequence analysis indicates 36 nucleotide differences between the two vaccine strains throughout the entire genome, among which only 14 are involved in unique amino acid substitutions. These results demonstrate that, although Oka-V(GSK) and Oka-V(Merck) vaccine strains are not identical, they are very similar, which supports the clinical data showing that both vaccines are well tolerated and elicit strong immune responses against varicella. PMID:18787000

  20. Detection and identification of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas strains by amplification of DNA sequences related to the hrp genes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed Central

    Leite, R P; Minsavage, G V; Bonas, U; Stall, R E

    1994-01-01

    Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers specific for different regions of the hrp gene (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) cluster of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria were designed and tested for amplification of DNA isolated from a large number of different bacteria. DNA sequences related to the hrp genes were successfully amplified from X. fragariae and from 28 pathovars of X. campestris. No DNA amplification occurred with genomic DNA from phytopathogenic strains of X. campestris pv. secalis, X. campestris pv. translucens, and X. albilineans or from nonpathogenic opportunistic xanthomonads and phytopathogenic strains of the genera Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Clavibacter, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, and Xylella. The DNA from those bacteria also failed to hybridize to hrp-specific fragments in Southern blot analysis. DNA fragments amplified with a particular primer pair were of identical size from each of the different phytopathogenic xanthomonads. However, restriction analysis of these fragments by using frequently cutting endonucleases revealed variation in the pattern for these hrp-related fragments amplified from the different Xanthomonas strains. The restriction patterns generated for the different fragments allowed distinction of the strains representing a pathovar or species of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. We believe that DNA amplification with hrp-specific oligonucleotide primers is a highly sensitive and specific method that can be applied for detection and identification of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. Images PMID:8017904

  1. Quantification of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains F113, CHA0 and Pf153 in the rhizosphere of maize by strain-specific real-time PCR unaffected by the variability of DNA extraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Von Felten, Andreas; Défago, Geneviève; Maurhofer, Monika

    2010-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains F113 and CHA0 are well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) often used as model strains in biocontrol experiments. To monitor their persistence in large scale field experiments, culture-independent methods are needed. In this study, a strain-specific real-time PCR quantification tool was developed based on sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCAR) for P. fluorescens strains F113, CHA0 and Pf153. Differences in DNA extraction efficiencies from rhizosphere samples were circumvented using plasmid APA9 as internal standard to normalize C(T) values after real-time amplification. The detection limits of the real-time PCR assays for all three strains were approximately 10 cells for genomic DNA and 10(4)cells/g rhizosphere for maize samples grown in different natural soils. Population sizes of the three strains in the rhizosphere of maize measured by the new real-time PCR approaches were similar to those measured by most probable number (MPN)-PCR. A persistence study of the three strains indicated that the strains persisted differently over a period of 5weeks. In conclusion the newly developed real-time PCR approach is a fast and resource efficient method for monitoring individual biocontrol strains in natural soil, which makes it an apt quantification tool for future large-scale field experiments. PMID:20153383

  2. Post-UV survival and mutagenesis in DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Escherichia coli K-12 grown in 5-azacytidine to inhibit DNA cytosine methylation: evidence for mutagenic excision repair.

    PubMed

    Radnedge, L; Pinney, R J

    1993-03-01

    Inhibition of cytosine methylation by growth in 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), did not affect the sensitivities to DNA damage induced by exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) of Escherichia coli K-12 strains AB1157 dcm+, which is fully DNA repair-proficient, LR68 (a dcm derivative of AB1157), JC3890 dcm+ uvrB, deficient in error-free excision repair, TK702 dcm+ umuC, deficient in error-prone repair, or TK501 dcm+ uvrB umuC, which lacks both excision repair and error-prone repair. However, growth in 5-azaC increased the post-UV survival of strains AB2463 recA(Def), AB2470 recB and AB2494 lexA(Ind-), which are deficient in the induction or expression of recombination repair or error-prone repair of DNA. Spontaneous mutation frequencies were increased in strains LR68, AB2463, AB2470 and AB2494 by growth in 5-azaC, but remained unaltered in strains AB1157, JC3890, TK702 or TK501. Growth in 5-azaC significantly increased UV-induced mutation frequencies in strains AB2463 and AB2470, significantly reduced UV-induced mutation in strain JC3890, but had little effect on UV-induced mutation in the other strains. The results suggest that 5-azaC may induce a normally error-free DNA repair pathway to become error-prone and therefore genotoxic. PMID:7683337

  3. 2-Aminofluorene metabolism and DNA adduct formation by mononuclear leukocytes from rapid and slow acetylator mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Levy, G N; Chung, J G; Weber, W W

    1994-02-01

    Following exposure of mice to the arylamine carcinogen 2-aminofluorene, DNA-carcinogen adducts can be found in the target tissues liver and bladder, and also in circulating leukocytes. Evidence is presented here that mouse mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) are capable of metabolizing 2-aminofluorene to DNA-binding metabolites which give rise to the adducts found in the MNL. Both lymphocytes and monocytes were able to acetylate arylamines during 18 h of culture. The degree of acetylation was determined by the N-acetyltransferase genotype of the mice as shown through use of acetylator congenic strains which differ only in the Nat-2 gene. Cultured MNL from rapid acetylator mice (C57BL/6J and A.B6-Natr) produced about twice as much N-acetylaminofluorene from 2-aminofluorene and 6- to 8-fold as much N-acetyl-p-aminobenzoic acid from p-aminobenzoic acid as cells from slow acetylator mice (B6.A-Nat(s) and A/J). Other differences in arylamine metabolism by MNL in culture were observed and shown to be due to genetic factors, currently unidentified, other than N-acetyltransferase. DNA adduct formation following incubation of MNL with the arylamine carcinogen 2-aminofluorene was related to both acetylation capacity and to other genetic metabolic factors in the mouse genome. MNL from rapid acetylator mice with the C57BL/6J background (B6) had 3-fold the DNA adduct levels of cells from the corresponding slow acetylator congenic (B6.A-Nat(s)). Similarly, MNL from rapid acetylator mice with the A/J background (A.B6-Natr) had twice the DNA adduct levels of those from their corresponding slow congenic (A). Adduct levels in MNL from C57BL/6J were nearly the same as those of MNL from A/J, again indicating the involvement of loci other than acetylation in DNA adduct formation. The finding of genetically dependent arylamine carcinogen metabolism and DNA adduct formation in cultured MNL suggests the possibility of using cultured MNL for assessing individual susceptibility to arylamine

  4. Identification and quantification of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota in human feces with strain-specific primers derived from randomly amplified polymorphic DNA.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Junji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Sasamoto, Masae; Tomii, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Koichi

    2008-08-15

    Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) has been used in the production of fermented milk products for many years and is one of the most intensively studied probiotics. To evaluate the ability of LcS to proliferate in human intestines after it has been ingested, we developed a PCR-based method to identify and quantify LcS using an LcS-specific primer set (pLcS) derived from a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. We confirmed the high specificity of the pLcS primer set in 167 bacterial strains (57 strains of L. casei and 110 other strains of bacteria commonly isolated from human feces). The method's ability to identify LcS matched that of an ELISA using a monoclonal antibody and a RAPD analysis in a representative sample of colonies cultured from human feces. The detection limit of quantitative PCR (qPCR) using pLcS was 10(4.6) per gram of feces. The number of LcS in feces detected with qPCR was highly and significantly correlated with the number of LcS added to fecal samples within the range of 10(4.6) to 10(9.6) per gram feces (r(2)=0.999, P<0.001). After 14 healthy subjects ingested 10(11.0) CFU of LcS daily for 7 days, 10(9.1+/-0.5) LcS g(-1) (mean+/-S.D.) was detected in the fecal samples of all subjects by qPCR, and 10(8.0+/-0.9) CFU g(-1) was detected by culture; these values were significantly different (P<0.001, paired t-test). After the subjects stopped ingesting LcS, fecal LcS counts obtained with both methods decreased daily. The values produced by the 2 methods might have differed because of an overestimation in the PCR analysis due to the presence of dead LcS cells or an underestimation in the culture system due to the use of selective culture media; however, dead LcS cells can also be beneficial as immunomodulators. We confirmed that qPCR with an LcS-specific primer set was a rapid and accurate method for determining the total amount of LcS in feces including dead or less active cells which could not be detected by culture method. PMID

  5. Local elasticity of strained DNA studied by all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2011-08-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly subjected to various mechanical stresses arising from its biological functions and cell packaging. If the local mechanical properties of DNA change under torsional and tensional stress, the activity of DNA-modifying proteins and transcription factors can be affected and regulated allosterically. To check this possibility, appropriate steady forces and torques were applied in the course of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with AT- and GC-alternating sequences. It is found that the stretching rigidity grows with tension as well as twisting. The torsional rigidity is not affected by stretching, but it varies with twisting very strongly, and differently for the two sequences. Surprisingly, for AT-alternating DNA it passes through a minimum with the average twist close to the experimental value in solution. For this fragment, but not for the GC-alternating sequence, the bending rigidity noticeably changes with both twisting and stretching. The results have important biological implications and shed light on earlier experimental observations.

  6. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology.

    PubMed

    Derkx, Patrick M F; Janzen, Thomas; Sørensen, Kim I; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Johansen, Eric

    2014-08-29

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes. PMID:25186244

  7. The art of strain improvement of industrial lactic acid bacteria without the use of recombinant DNA technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The food industry is constantly striving to develop new products to fulfil the ever changing demands of consumers and the strict requirements of regulatory agencies. For foods based on microbial fermentation, this pushes the boundaries of microbial performance and requires the constant development of new starter cultures with novel properties. Since the use of ingredients in the food industry is tightly regulated and under close scrutiny by consumers, the use of recombinant DNA technology to improve microbial performance is currently not an option. As a result, the focus for improving strains for microbial fermentation is on classical strain improvement methods. Here we review the use of these techniques to improve the functionality of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for application in industrial-scale food production. Methods will be described for improving the bacteriophage resistance of specific strains, improving their texture forming ability, increasing their tolerance to stress and modulating both the amount and identity of acids produced during fermentation. In addition, approaches to eliminating undesirable properties will be described. Techniques include random mutagenesis, directed evolution and dominant selection schemes. PMID:25186244

  8. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1-5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus DNA sequenci...

  9. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  10. The aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin damages DNA bases in Escherichia coli: caffeine potentiates the DNA-damaging effects of kanamycin while suppressing cell killing by ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tina Manzhu; Yuan, Jessica; Nguyen, Angelyn; Becket, Elinne; Yang, Hanjing; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2012-06-01

    The distribution of mutants in the Keio collection of Escherichia coli gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and neomycin indicates that damaged bases resulting from antibiotic action can lead to cell death. Strains lacking one of a number of glycosylases (e.g., AlkA, YzaB, Ogt, KsgA) or other specific repair proteins (AlkB, PhrB, SmbC) are more sensitive to these antibiotics. Mutants lacking AlkB display the strongest sensitivity among the glycosylase- or direct lesion removal-deficient strains. This perhaps suggests the involvement of ethenoadenine adducts, resulting from reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, since AlkB removes this lesion. Other sensitivities displayed by mutants lacking UvrA, polymerase V (Pol V), or components of double-strand break repair indicate that kanamycin results in damaged base pairs that need to be removed or replicated past in order to avoid double-strand breaks that saturate the cellular repair capacity. Caffeine enhances the sensitivities of these repair-deficient strains to kanamycin and neomycin. The gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to caffeine (dnaQ, holC, holD, and priA knockout mutants) indicate that caffeine blocks DNA replication, ultimately leading to double-strand breaks that require recombinational repair by functions encoded by recA, recB, and recC, among others. Additionally, caffeine partially protects cells of both Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis from killing by the widely used fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. PMID:22391551

  11. The Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Kanamycin Damages DNA Bases in Escherichia coli: Caffeine Potentiates the DNA-Damaging Effects of Kanamycin while Suppressing Cell Killing by Ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tina Manzhu; Yuan, Jessica; Nguyen, Angelyn; Becket, Elinne; Yang, Hanjing

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of mutants in the Keio collection of Escherichia coli gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and neomycin indicates that damaged bases resulting from antibiotic action can lead to cell death. Strains lacking one of a number of glycosylases (e.g., AlkA, YzaB, Ogt, KsgA) or other specific repair proteins (AlkB, PhrB, SmbC) are more sensitive to these antibiotics. Mutants lacking AlkB display the strongest sensitivity among the glycosylase- or direct lesion removal-deficient strains. This perhaps suggests the involvement of ethenoadenine adducts, resulting from reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, since AlkB removes this lesion. Other sensitivities displayed by mutants lacking UvrA, polymerase V (Pol V), or components of double-strand break repair indicate that kanamycin results in damaged base pairs that need to be removed or replicated past in order to avoid double-strand breaks that saturate the cellular repair capacity. Caffeine enhances the sensitivities of these repair-deficient strains to kanamycin and neomycin. The gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to caffeine (dnaQ, holC, holD, and priA knockout mutants) indicate that caffeine blocks DNA replication, ultimately leading to double-strand breaks that require recombinational repair by functions encoded by recA, recB, and recC, among others. Additionally, caffeine partially protects cells of both Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis from killing by the widely used fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. PMID:22391551

  12. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting. PMID:25099886

  13. Deficient DNA repair capacity, a predisposing factor in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Parshad, R.; Price, F. M.; Bohr, V. A.; Cowans, K. H.; Zujewski, J. A.; Sanford, K. K.

    1996-01-01

    Women with breast cancer and a family history of breast cancer and some with sporadic breast cancer are deficient in the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage compared with normal donors with no family history of breast cancer. DNA repair was measured indirectly by quantifying chromatid breaks in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blood lymphocytes after either X-irradiation or UV-C exposure, with or without post treatment with the DNA repair inhibitor, 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). We have correlated chromatid breaks with unrepaired DNA strand breaks using responses to X-irradiation of cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients with well-characterised DNA repair defects or responses of repair-deficient mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with or without transfected human DNA repair genes. Deficient DNA repair appears to be a predisposing factor in familial breast cancer and in some sporadic breast cancers. PMID:8679441

  14. DNA stress and strain, in silico, in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, David; Benham, Craig J.

    2011-06-01

    A vast literature has explored the genetic interactions among the cellular components regulating gene expression in many organisms. Early on, in the absence of any biochemical definition, regulatory modules were conceived using the strict formalism of genetics to designate the modifiers of phenotype as either cis- or trans-acting depending on whether the relevant genes were embedded in the same or separate DNA molecules. This formalism distilled gene regulation down to its essence in much the same way that consideration of an ideal gas reveals essential thermodynamic and kinetic principles. Yet just as the anomalous behavior of materials may thwart an engineer who ignores their non-ideal properties, schemes to control and manipulate the genetic and epigenetic programs of cells may falter without a fuller and more quantitative elucidation of the physical and chemical characteristics of DNA and chromatin in vivo.

  15. Comparative Sequence Analysis of the Non-Protein-Coding Mitochondrial DNA of Inbred Rat Strains

    PubMed Central

    Abhyankar, Avinash; Park, Hee-Bok; Tonolo, Giancarlo; Luthman, Holger

    2009-01-01

    The proper function of mammalian mitochondria necessitates a coordinated expression of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, most likely due to the co-evolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The non-protein coding regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) including the D-loop, tRNA and rRNA genes form a major component of this regulated expression unit. Here we present comparative analyses of the non-protein-coding regions from 27 Rattus norvegicus mtDNA sequences. There were two variable positions in 12S rRNA, 20 in 16S rRNA, eight within the tRNA genes and 13 in the D-loop. Only one of the three neutrality tests used demonstrated statistically significant evidence for selection in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys. Based on our analyses of conserved sequences, we propose that some of the variable nucleotide positions identified in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys, and the D-loop might be important for mitochondrial function and its regulation. PMID:19997590

  16. Recent progress with the DNA repair mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Salazar, E.P.; Brookman, K.W.; Collins, C.C.; Stewart, S.A.; Busch, D.B.; Weber, C.A.

    1986-04-02

    Repair deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are being used to identify human genes that correct the repair defects and to study mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Five independent tertiary DNA transformants were obtained from the EM9 mutant. In these clones a human DNA sequence was identified that correlated with the resistance of the cells to CldUrd. After Eco RI digestion, Southern transfer, and hybridization of transformant DNAs with the BLUR-8 Alu family sequence, a common fragment of 25 to 30 kb was present. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Molecular Pathways: Targeting DNA Repair Pathway Defects Enriched in Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Niall M; Clarkson, Michael J; Stuchbery, Ryan; Hovens, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of a pristine genome, free from errors, is necessary to prevent cellular transformation and degeneration. When errors in DNA are detected, DNA damage repair (DDR) genes and their regulators are activated to effect repair. When these DDR pathways are themselves mutated or aberrantly downregulated, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders can ensue. Multiple lines of evidence now indicate, however, that defects in key regulators of DNA repair pathways are highly enriched in human metastasis specimens and hence may be a key step in the acquisition of metastasis and the ability of localized disease to disseminate. Some of the key regulators of checkpoints in the DNA damage response are the TP53 protein and the PARP enzyme family. Targeting of these pathways, especially through PARP inhibition, is now being exploited therapeutically to effect significant clinical responses in subsets of individuals, particularly in patients with ovarian cancer or prostate cancer, including cancers with a marked metastatic burden. Targeting DNA repair-deficient tumors with drugs that take advantage of the fundamental differences between normal repair-proficient cells and repair-deficient tumors offers new avenues for treating advanced disease in the future. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3132-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27169997

  18. Spontaneous and UV-induced mutations in Escherichia coli K-12 strains with altered or absent DNA polymerase I

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, H.; Randall, S.K.; Rayssiguier, C.; Bridges, B.A.; Goodman, M.F.; Radman, M.

    1989-05-01

    The induction of mutations to valine resistance and to rifampin resistance occurs after UV irradiation in bacteria carrying a deletion through the polA gene (delta polA), showing that DNA polymerase I (PolI) is not an essential enzyme for this process. The PolI deletion strain showed a 7- to 10-fold-higher spontaneous mutation frequency than the wild type. The presence in the deletion strain of the 5'----3' exonuclease fragment on an F' episome caused an additional 10-fold increase in spontaneous mutation frequency, resulting in mutation frequencies on the order of 50- to 100-fold greater than wild type. The mutator effect associated with the 5'----3' exonuclease gene fragment together with much of the effect attributable to the polA deletion was blocked in bacteria carrying a umuC mutation. The mutator activity therefore appears to reflect constitutive SOS induction. Excision-proficient polA deletion strains exhibited increased sensitivity to the lethal effect of UV light which was only partially ameliorated by the presence of polA+ on an F' episome. The UV-induced mutation rate to rifampin resistance was marginally lower in delta polA bacteria than in bacteria carrying the polA+ allele. This effect is unlikely to be caused by the existence of a PolI-dependent mutagenic pathway and is probably an indirect effect caused by an alteration in the pattern of excision repair, since it did not occur in excision-deficient (uvrA) bacteria.

  19. Abnormal pattern of post-gamma-ray DNA replication in radioresistant fibroblast strains from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, R.; Aubin, R. A.; Bosnich, W.; Blattner, W. A.; Paterson, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    Non-malignant dermal fibroblast strains, cultured from affected members of a Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) family with diverse neoplasms associated with radiation exposure, display a unique increased resistance to the lethal effects of gamma-radiation. In the studies reported here, this radioresistance (RR) trait has been found to correlate strongly with an abnormal pattern of post-gamma-ray DNA replicative synthesis, as monitored by radiolabelled thymidine incorporation and S-phase cell autoradiography. In particular, the time interval between the gamma-ray-induced shutdown of DNA synthesis and its subsequent recovery was greater in all four RR strains examined and the post-recovery replication rate was much higher and was maintained longer than in normal and spousal controls. Alkaline sucrose sedimentation profiles of pulse-labelled cellular DNA indicated that the unusual pattern of DNA replication in irradiated RR strains may be ascribed to anomalies in both replicon initiation and DNA chain elongation processes. Moreover, the RR strain which had previously displayed the highest post-gamma-ray clonogenic survival was found to harbour a somatic (codon 234) mutation (presumably acquired during culture in vitro) in the same conserved region of the p53 tumour-suppressor gene as the germline (codon 245) mutation in the remaining three RR strains from other family members, thus coupling the RR phenotype and abnormal post-gamma-ray DNA synthesis pattern with faulty p53 expression. Significantly, these two aberrant radioresponse end points, along with documented anomalies in c-myc and c-raf-1 proto-oncogenes, are unprecedented among other LFS families carrying p53 germline mutations. We thus speculate that this peculiar cancer-prone family may possess in its germ line a second, as yet unidentified, genetic defect in addition to the p53 mutation. Images Figure 8 PMID:7779715

  20. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting {gamma}H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  1. In vitro phenotype of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) fibroblast strains: clues to the nature of the ''AT DNA lesion'' and the molecular defect in AT

    SciTech Connect

    Shiloh, Y.; Tabor, E.; Becker, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the in vitro phenotype of a series of AT strains established in Israel revealed the following features: premature senescence and increased demands for growth factors, normal sensitivity to the cytotoxic effect of alkylating agents, hypersensitivity to agents that damage the deoxyribose moiety of DNA via a ''targeted'' free radical attack (this hypersensitivity is coupled with reduced inhibition of DNA synthesis compared to normal cells), varying degrees of intermediate hypersensitivity to the same agents in AT heterozygous cells, lack of potentially lethal damage repair and sublethal damage repair in AT homozygous cells following treatment with free radical-producing agents. We conclude that AT involves a DNA repair defect and that the AT DNA lesion is probably a gap with the 3'-phosphate or 3'-phosphoglycolate end left in the DNA following sugar destruction.

  2. Comparison of ribotyping, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in typing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. casei strains.

    PubMed

    Tynkkynen, S; Satokari, R; Saarela, M; Mattila-Sandholm, T; Saxelin, M

    1999-09-01

    A total of 24 strains, biochemically identified as members of the Lactobacillus casei group, were identified by PCR with species-specific primers. The same set of strains was typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in order to compare the discriminatory power of the methods. Species-specific primers for L. rhamnosus and L. casei identified the type strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and the neotype strain L. casei ATCC 334, respectively, but did not give any signal with the recently revived species L. zeae, which contains the type strain ATCC 15820 and the strain ATCC 393, which was previously classified as L. casei. Our results are in accordance with the suggested new classification of the L. casei group. Altogether, 21 of the 24 strains studied were identified with the species-specific primers. In strain typing, PFGE was the most discriminatory method, revealing 17 genotypes for the 24 strains studied. Ribotyping and RAPD analysis yielded 15 and 12 genotypes, respectively. PMID:10473394

  3. Comparison of Ribotyping, Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis in Typing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. casei Strains

    PubMed Central

    Tynkkynen, Soile; Satokari, Reetta; Saarela, Maria; Mattila-Sandholm, Tiina; Saxelin, Maija

    1999-01-01

    A total of 24 strains, biochemically identified as members of the Lactobacillus casei group, were identified by PCR with species-specific primers. The same set of strains was typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in order to compare the discriminatory power of the methods. Species-specific primers for L. rhamnosus and L. casei identified the type strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and the neotype strain L. casei ATCC 334, respectively, but did not give any signal with the recently revived species L. zeae, which contains the type strain ATCC 15820 and the strain ATCC 393, which was previously classified as L. casei. Our results are in accordance with the suggested new classification of the L. casei group. Altogether, 21 of the 24 strains studied were identified with the species-specific primers. In strain typing, PFGE was the most discriminatory method, revealing 17 genotypes for the 24 strains studied. Ribotyping and RAPD analysis yielded 15 and 12 genotypes, respectively. PMID:10473394

  4. Unscheduled DNA Synthesis: The Clinical and Functional Assay for Global Genomic DNA Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Jean J.; Kelly, Crystal M.

    2016-01-01

    The unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay measures the ability of a cell to perform global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER). This chapter provides instructions for the application of this technique by creating 6-4 photoproducts and pyrimidine dimers using UV-C irradiation. This procedure is designed specifically for quantification of the 6-4 photoproducts. Repair is quantified by the amount of radioactive thymidine incorporated during repair synthesis after this insult, and radioactivity is evaluated by grain counting after autoradiography. The results are used to clinically diagnose human DNA repair deficiency disorders and provide a basis for investigation of repair deficiency in human tissues or tumors. No other functional assay is available that directly measures the capacity to perform NER on the entire genome without the use of specific antibodies. Since live cells are required for this assay, explant culture techniques must be previously established. Host cell reactivation (HCR), as discussed in Chapter 37, is not an equivalent technique, as it measures only transcription-coupled repair (TCR) at active genes, a small subset of total NER. PMID:24623250

  5. Hyperresistance to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide cytotoxicity and reduced DNA damage formation in dermal fibroblast strains derived from five members of a cancer-prone family.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, R.; Sabour, M.; Rauth, A. M.; Paterson, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts cultured from members of a family presenting multiple polyps and sarcomas were compared with fibroblast strains from unrelated healthy donors for sensitivity to killing by four genotoxic agents. Cells from the sister of the male proband (strain 3437T), mother (strain 3703T), two of his paternal aunts (3701T and 3704T) and one paternal uncle (3702T) displayed marked resistance (1.8 to 4.3 times greater than the normal mean) to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), a procarcinogen whose DNA-damaging properties encompass those of both far (254 nm) ultraviolet (UV) light and ionising radiation. These same 4NQO-resistant cells, however, responded normally to reproductive inactivation by UV light, 60Co gamma radiation or the alkylating agent methylnitrosourea, signifying that the abnormal resistance of these cells to 4NQO is not associated with aberrant DNA metabolism. In keeping with this conclusion, exposure to a given dose of 4NQO produced decreased amounts of DNA damage and stimulated lower levels of repair DNA synthesis in all five 4NQO-resistant strains than in normal controls. Moreover, exogenous radiolabelled 4NQO accumulated to a lesser extent in the 4NQO-resistant than in the normal fibroblasts. Cell sonicates of strains 3437T, 3701T and 3702T exhibited reduced capacities (40-60% of normal) to catalise the conversion of 4NQO to the proximate carcinogen 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide. However, the 4NQO-resistant strains 3703T and 3704T carried out 4NQO bioreduction at normal rates. Our data therefore indicate that enhanced resistance to 4NQO cytotoxicity in 3437T, 3701T and 3702T is a consequence of anomalies in both intracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of 4NQO, whereas 4NQO resistance in 3703T and 3704T appears to result solely from reduced intracellular drug accumulation. PMID:8217598

  6. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  7. Factors affecting production of transgenic rats by ICSI-mediated DNA transfer: effects of sonication and freeze-thawing of spermatozoa, rat strains for sperm and oocyte donors, and different constructs of exogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Masumi; Kato, Megumi; Ishikawa, Ayako; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Yagi, Takeshi; Hochi, Shinichi

    2005-04-01

    Factors affecting the efficiency of producing transgenic rats by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-mediated DNA transfer were investigated. Epididymal spermatozoa from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were sonicated and/or frozen-thawed for cutting the tail and membrane disruption. The sperm heads were exposed for 1 min to different concentrations (0.02-2.5 microg/ml) of 3.0 kb enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) DNA solution, and then microinjected into the denuded F1 hybrid (Donryu x LEW) rat oocytes. The optimal concentration of EGFP DNA solution was 0.1 microg/ml, as determined by the in vitro developmental competence into morulae/blastocysts of the ICSI oocytes and the EGFP expression of the resultant embryos. The efficiency of producing transgenic rat offspring (per transferred zygote) was 2.8%, 1.6%, and 3.3% in the oocytes injected with sonicated, frozen-thawed, and sonicated + frozen-thawed sperm heads, respectively. The founder transgenic rats carrying the EGFP gene transmitted their transgenes to their progeny according to the Mendelian fashion, suggesting the stable incorporation of the transgenes into the rat genomes. Four rat strains (F344, LEW, Donryu, and SD) were compared for their suitability as sperm/oocyte donors for the production of transgenic rats by ICSI with sonicated, frozen-thawed and solution of EGFP DNA-exposed sperm heads. The efficiency of producing transgenic rats in the SD strain (8.2%) was higher than that in the LEW strain (0.9%), while those in the F344 and Donryu strains (4.3%-4.4%) were intermediate. One plasmid DNA (Fyn, 5.0 kb) and two BAC DNA (BAC/Fyn, 208 kb; Svet1/IRES-Cre, 186 kb) were successfully introduced into the SD rat genomes via ICSI, with the producing efficiencies of 2.8%, 0.9%, and 2.4%, respectively. PMID:15685640

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF STEREOCHEMICAL CONFIGURATIONS OF CYCLOPENTA[CD]PYRENE-DNA ADDUCTS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG AND C3H10T1/2CL8 CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of Sterochemical Configurations of Cyclopent A[cd]Pyrene DNA Adducts in Strain A/J Mouse Lung and C3H10T1/2CL8 Cells.

    Four major and several minor DNA adducts were resolved by 32P-postlabeling analysis of DNA from strain A/J mouse lung and C3H10T1/2CL8 (C3H...

  9. Mutagenicity in Escherichia coli of the major DNA adduct derived from the endogenous mutagen malondialdehyde

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Stephen P.; Reddy, G. Ramachandra; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    1997-01-01

    The spectrum of mutations induced by the naturally occurring DNA adduct pyrimido[1,2-α]purin-10(3H)-one (M1G) was determined by site-specific approaches using M13 vectors replicated in Escherichia coli. M1G was placed at position 6256 in the (−)-strand of M13MB102 by ligating the oligodeoxynucleotide 5′-GGT(M1G)TCCG-3′ into a gapped-duplex derivative of the vector. Unmodified and M1G-modified genomes containing either a cytosine or thymine at position 6256 of the (+)-strand were transformed into repair-proficient and repair-deficient E. coli strains, and base pair substitutions were quantitated by hybridization analysis. Modified genomes containing a cytosine opposite M1G resulted in roughly equal numbers of M1G→A and M1G→T mutations with few M1G→C mutations. The total mutation frequency was ≈1%, which represents a 500-fold increase in mutations compared with unmodified M13MB102. Transformation of modified genomes containing a thymine opposite M1G allowed an estimate to be made of the ability of M1G to block replication. The (−)-strand was replicated >80% of the time in the unadducted genome but only 20% of the time when M1G was present. Correction of the mutation frequency for the strand bias of replication indicated that the actual frequency of mutations induced by M1G was 18%. Experiments using E. coli with different genetic backgrounds indicated that the SOS response enhances the mutagenicity of M1G and that M1G is a substrate for repair by the nucleotide excision repair complex. These studies indicate that M1G, which is present endogenously in DNA of healthy human beings, is a strong block to replication and an efficient premutagenic lesion. PMID:9238032

  10. Analysis of a genomic DNA region from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942 involved in carboxysome assembly and function.

    PubMed Central

    Price, G D; Howitt, S M; Harrison, K; Badger, M R

    1993-01-01

    We report on the sequencing and analysis of a 3,557-bp genomic DNA clone that is located between 4.8 and 1.2 kilobase pairs (kb) upstream of the rbcL gene and is capable of complementing a class of cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942 mutants requiring a high level of CO2. The upstream 2,704 bp of this sequence is novel, the remaining 852 bp having been reported by other workers. Four new open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified along with putative promoter elements. These ORFs, which could code for proteins of 7, 10.9, 11, and 58 kDa in size, have been named ORF 64, ccmK, ccmL, and ccmM, respectively. The last three have been named ccm genes on the basis that insertional mutagenesis of each produces a phenotype requiring a high level of CO2 (i.e., each produces a lesion in the CO2 concentrating mechanism). The putative gene product for the large ccmM ORF has three internally repeated regions and also has two possible DNA binding motifs. Two defined mutants in the 3,557-bp region, mutants PVU and P-N, have been more fully characterized. The PVU mutant has a drug marker inserted into the ccmL gene, and it possesses abnormal rod-shaped carboxysomes. The P-N mutant is a 2.64-kb deletion of DNA from the same position in ccmL to a region closer to rbcL. This mutant, which has previously been shown to lack carboxysomes and have soluble ribulosebiphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity, has now been shown to have a predominantly soluble carboxysomal carbonic anhydrase activity. Both mutants were found to possess carboxysomal carbonic anhydrase activities which are below wild-type levels, and in the P-N mutant this activity appears to be unstable. The results are discussed in terms of the possible interactions of putative ccm gene products in the process of carboxysome assembly and function. Images PMID:8491708

  11. Development of a Custom-Designed, Pan Genomic DNA Microarray to Characterize Strain-Level Diversity among Cronobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Ben Davies; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Gopinath, Gopal R.; Yan, Qiongqiong; Chase, Hannah R.; Lee, Boram; Hwang, Seongeun; Trach, Larisa; Park, Eunbi; Yoo, YeonJoo; Chung, TaeJung; Jackson, Scott A.; Patel, Isha R.; Sathyamoorthy, Venugopal; Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Kotewicz, Michael L.; Carter, Laurenda; Iversen, Carol; Pagotto, Franco; Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika; Fanning, Séamus; Grim, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Cronobacter species cause infections in all age groups; however neonates are at highest risk and remain the most susceptible age group for life-threatening invasive disease. The genus contains seven species:Cronobacter sakazakii, Cronobacter malonaticus, Cronobacter turicensis, Cronobacter muytjensii, Cronobacter dublinensis, Cronobacter universalis, and Cronobacter condimenti. Despite an abundance of published genomes of these species, genomics-based epidemiology of the genus is not well established. The gene content of a diverse group of 126 unique Cronobacter and taxonomically related isolates was determined using a pan genomic-based DNA microarray as a genotyping tool and as a means to identify outbreak isolates for food safety, environmental, and clinical surveillance purposes. The microarray constitutes 19,287 independent genes representing 15 Cronobacter genomes and 18 plasmids and 2,371 virulence factor genes of phylogenetically related Gram-negative bacteria. The Cronobacter microarray was able to distinguish the seven Cronobacter species from one another and from non-Cronobacter species; and within each species, strains grouped into distinct clusters based on their genomic diversity. These results also support the phylogenic divergence of the genus and clearly highlight the genomic diversity among each member of the genus. The current study establishes a powerful platform for further genomics research of this diverse genus, an important prerequisite toward the development of future countermeasures against this foodborne pathogen in the food safety and clinical arenas. PMID:25984509

  12. Extremophilic Acinetobacter Strains from High-Altitude Lakes in Argentinean Puna: Remarkable UV-B Resistance and Efficient DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P.; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli.

  13. Extremophilic Acinetobacter strains from high-altitude lakes in Argentinean Puna: remarkable UV-B resistance and efficient DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Pathak, Gopal P; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean; Borsarelli, Claudio Darío; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Farias, María Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    High-Altitude Andean Lakes (HAAL) of the South American Andes are almost unexplored ecosystems of shallow lakes. The HAAL are recognized by a remarkably high UV exposure, strong changes in temperature and salinity, and a high content of toxic elements, especially arsenic. Being exposed to remarkably extreme conditions, they have been classified as model systems for the study of life on other planets. Particularly, Acinetobacter strains isolated from the HAAL were studied for their survival competence under strong UV-B irradiation. Clinical isolates, Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter johnsonii, served as reference material. Whereas the reference strains rapidly lost viability under UV-B irradiation, most HAAL-derived strains readily survived this exposure and showed less change in cell number after the treatment. Controls for DNA repair activity, comparing dark repair (DR) or photo repair (PR), gave evidence for the involvement of photolyases in the DNA repair. Comparative measurements by HPLC-mass spectrometry detected the number of photoproducts: bipyrimidine dimers under both PR and DR treatments were more efficiently repaired in the HAAL strains (up to 85 % PR and 38 % DR) than in the controls (31 % PR and zero DR ability). Analysis of cosmid-cloned total genomic DNA from the most effective DNA-photorepair strain (Ver3) yielded a gene (HQ443199) encoding a protein with clear photolyase signatures belonging to class I CPD-photolyases. Despite the relatively low sequence similarity of 41 % between the enzymes from Ver3 and from E. coli (PDB 1DNPA), a model-building approach revealed a high structural homology to the CPD-photolyase of E. coli. PMID:22644565

  14. Alterations of nuclear DNA synthesis after irradiation of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum: studies performed in a mutant strain displaying enhanced thymidine uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The auxotrophic Dictyostelium discoideum strain HPS 401 was studied. Thymidine at 8 ..mu..g/ml or thymidylate at 50 ..mu..g/ml supported growth to maximal cell densities. Thin layer chromatography of cell extracts showed rapid intracellular accumulation of thymidine in HPS 401 vs slightly detectable accumulation in wild-type cells. Measurements showed that methionine and thymidylate were taken into all strains at a low rate, but HPS 401 had enhanced uptake of thymidine and uridine compared to wild-type. The HPS 401 phenotype is due to the efficient utilization of thymidine as a result of increased nucleoside uptake. Rapid nuclear purification removed mitochondrial DNA without decreasing the single-strand molecular weight of the nuclear DNA. The nuclear DNA peaks on alkaline sucrose gradients were identified using filter hybridization to cloned probes. As measured by pulse-chase labelling, production of full-sized main band DNA required 45-50 minutes. Pulse labelling of the cells immediately after ultraviolet irradiation caused the single-strand molecular weight of the DNA synthesized to decrease from 8 x 10/sup 6/ daltons at O J/m/sup 2/ to 3.9 x 10/sup 6/ daltons at 50 J/m/sup 2/ to 2.6 x 10/sup 6/ daltons at 200 J/m/sup 2/. The time required for maturation into full-sized DNA increased from 1 hour at O J/m/sup 2/ to 4 hours at 20 J/m/sup 2/ and to 21 hours at 200 J/m/sup 2/. Measured amounts of DNA synthesis at times after ultraviolet irradiation showed a period of reduced incorporation, followed by the resumption of control levels. The lag period ended at the same time as the production of full-sized DNA resumed.

  15. Differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua by 16S rRNA genes and intraspecies discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes strains by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, J; Bsat, N; Piani, M; Russ, W; Sultana, K; Wiedmann, M; Whitaker, R; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    Differences in the 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA) which can be used to discriminate Listeria monocytogenes from Listeria innocua have been detected. The 16S rDNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with a set of oligonucleotide primers which flank a 1.5-kb fragment. Sequence differences were observed in the V2 region of the 16S rDNA both between L. monocytogenes Scott A and L. innocua and between different L. monocytogenes serotypes. Although L. monocytogenes SLCC2371 had the same V2 region sequence as L. innocua, the two species were different within the V9 region at nucleotides 1259 and 1292, in agreement with previous studies (R.-F. Wang, W.-W. Cao, and M.G. Johnson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:3666-3670, 1991). Intraspecies discrimination of L. monocytogenes strains was achieved by using the patterns generated by random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. Although some distinction can be made within the L. monocytogenes species by their 16S rDNA sequence, a far greater discrimination within species could be made by generating random amplified polymorphic DNA patterns from chromosomal DNA. By using a number of 10-bp primers, unique patterns for each isolate which in all cases examined differentiate between various L. monocytogenes serotypes, even though they may have the same 16S rRNA sequences, could be generated. Images PMID:8439157

  16. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  17. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  18. VNTR fingerprinting of Kluyveromyces marxianus strains WT, 7-1, and 8-1 by using different primer types to give best results in PCR and on electrophorese gel in order to find differentiation of the DNA of the yeast strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (WT, 7-1, 8-1) we wish to find out the variable numbered tandem repeats (VNTR) of each of the DNA strains from the different mutagenized K. marxianus strains. To do this we used Phusion HF Buffer Pack to try and give a clear picture of the VNTR by u...

  19. DNA variation and brain region-specific expression profiles exhibit different relationships between inbred mouse strains: implications for eQTL mapping studies

    PubMed Central

    Hovatta, Iiris; Zapala, Matthew A; Broide, Ron S; Schadt, Eric E; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2007-01-01

    Background Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping is used to find loci that are responsible for the transcriptional activity of a particular gene. In recent eQTL studies, expression profiles were derived from either homogenized whole brain or collections of large brain regions. However, the brain is a very heterogeneous organ, and expression profiles of different brain regions vary significantly. Because of the importance and potential power of eQTL studies in identifying regulatory networks, we analyzed gene expression patterns in different brain regions from multiple inbred mouse strains and investigated the implications for the design and analysis of eQTL studies. Results Gene expression profiles of five brain regions in six inbred mouse strains were studied. Few genes exhibited a significant strain-specific expression pattern, whereas a large number of genes exhibited brain region-specific patterns. We constructed phylogenetic trees based on the expression relationships between the strains and compared them with a DNA-level relationship tree. The trees based on the expression of strain-specific genes were constant across brain regions and mirrored DNA-level variation. However, the trees based on region-specific genes exhibited a different set of strain relationships, depending on the brain region. An eQTL analysis showed enrichment of cis-acting regulators among strain-specific genes, whereas brain region-specific genes appear to be mainly regulated by trans-acting elements. Conclusion Our results suggest that many regulatory networks are highly brain region specific and indicate the importance of conducting eQTL mapping studies using data from brain regions or tissues that are physiologically and phenotypically relevant to the trait of interest. PMID:17324278

  20. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  1. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates. PMID:24484478

  2. Novel Infectious cDNA Clones of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3a (Strain S52) and 4a (Strain ED43): Genetic Analyses and In Vivo Pathogenesis Studies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gottwein, Judith M.; Scheel, Troels K. H.; Callendret, Benoit; Li, Yi-Ping; Eccleston, Heather B.; Engle, Ronald E.; Govindarajan, Sugantha; Satterfield, William; Purcell, Robert H.; Walker, Christopher M.; Bukh, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Previously, RNA transcripts of cDNA clones of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1a (strains H77, HCV-1, and HC-TN), 1b (HC-J4, Con1, and HCV-N), and 2a (HC-J6 and JFH1) were found to be infectious in chimpanzees. However, only JFH1 was infectious in human hepatoma Huh7 cells. We performed genetic analysis of HCV genotype 3a (strain S52) and 4a (strain ED43) prototype strains and generated full-length consensus cDNA clones (pS52 and pED43). Transfection of Huh7.5 cells with RNA transcripts of these clones did not yield cells expressing HCV Core. However, intrahepatic transfection of chimpanzees resulted in robust infection with peak HCV RNA titers of ∼5.5 log10 international units (IU)/ml. Genomic consensus sequences recovered from serum at the times of peak viral titers were identical to the sequences of the parental plasmids. Both chimpanzees developed acute hepatitis with elevated liver enzymes and significant necroinflammatory liver changes coinciding with detection of gamma interferon-secreting, intrahepatic T cells. However, the onset and broadness of intrahepatic T-cell responses varied greatly in the two animals, with an early (week 4) multispecific response in the ED43-infected animal (3 weeks before the first evidence of viral control) and a late (week 11) response with limited breadth in the S52-infected animal (without evidence of viral control). Autologous serum neutralizing antibodies were not detected during the acute infection in either animal. Both animals became persistently infected. In conclusion, we generated fully functional infectious cDNA clones of HCV genotypes 3a and 4a. Proof of functionality of all genes might further the development of recombinant cell culture systems for these important genotypes. PMID:20200247

  3. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  4. Isolation of extremely AT-rich genomic DNA and analysis of genes encoding carbohydrate-degrading enzymes from Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huizhong; Hopper, Sherryll L; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2006-11-01

    An effective method for extraction of intact genomic DNA from the extremely AT-rich polycentric anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 has been developed. This procedure involves removal of glycogen-like storage polysaccharides using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and high salt washes. The DNA was digested with various restriction enzymes and was suitable for use as a PCR template, for Southern blotting, and for genomic library construction. Genomic DNA analysis of three representative genes (celE, bgl1, and xynA) encoding (hemi-) cellulolytic enzymes of the fungus revealed multiplicity of family 5 endocellulase genes (celE-like), and family 1 beta-glucosidase genes (bgl1-like), but only a single copy of family 11 xylanase gene (xynA). PMID:17019643

  5. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regionsmore » of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.« less

  6. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26426354

  7. A TaqMan-Based Multiplex qPCR Assay and DNA Extraction Method for Phylotype IIB Sequevars 1&2 (Select Agent) Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Furthermore, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum. PMID:26426354

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Pythium insidiosum Thai strains using cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) DNA coding sequences and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS).

    PubMed

    Kammarnjesadakul, Patcharee; Palaga, Tanapat; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Mendoza, Leonel; Krajaejun, Theerapong; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Tongchusak, Songsak; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the phylogenetic relationship among Pythium insidiosum isolates in Thailand, we investigated the genomic DNA of 31 P. insidiosum strains isolated from humans and environmental sources from Thailand, and two from North and Central America. We used PCR to amplify the partial COX II DNA coding sequences and the ITS regions of these isolates. The nucleotide sequences of both amplicons were analyzed by the Bioedit program. Phylogenetic analysis using genetic distance method with Neighbor Joining (NJ) approach was performed using the MEGA4 software. Additional sequences of three other Pythium species, Phytophthora sojae and Lagenidium giganteum were employed as outgroups. The sizes of the COX II amplicons varied from 558-564 bp, whereas the ITS products varied from approximately 871-898 bp. Corrected sequence divergences with Kimura 2-parameter model calculated for the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences ranged between 0.0000-0.0608 and 0.0000-0.2832, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using both the COX II and the ITS DNA sequences showed similar trees, where we found three sister groups (A(TH), B(TH), and C(TH)) among P. insidiosum strains. All Thai isolates from clinical cases and environmental sources were placed in two separated sister groups (B(TH) and C(TH)), whereas the Americas isolates were grouped into A(TH.) Although the phylogenetic tree based on both regions showed similar distribution, the COX II phylogenetic tree showed higher resolution than the one using the ITS sequences. Our study indicates that COX II gene is the better of the two alternatives to study the phylogenetic relationships among P. insidiosum strains. PMID:20818919

  9. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Heteroplasmy in a Mouse Model with Mitochondrial DNA of C57BL/6 and NZB/BINJ Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sangalli, Juliano Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Thiago Bittencourt; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are widely employed to study mitochondrial inheritance, which have implications to several human diseases caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). These mouse models take advantage of polymorphisms between the mtDNA of the NZB/BINJ and the mtDNA of common inbred laboratory (i.e., C57BL/6) strains to generate mice with two mtDNA haplotypes (heteroplasmy). Based on PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), these studies determine the level of heteroplasmy across generations and in different cell types aiming to understand the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial inheritance. However, PCR-RFLP is a time-consuming method of low sensitivity and accuracy that dependents on the use of restriction enzyme digestions. A more robust method to measure heteroplasmy has been provided by the use of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on allelic refractory mutation detection system (ARMS-qPCR). Herein, we report an ARMS-qPCR assay for quantification of heteroplasmy using heteroplasmic mice with mtDNA of NZB/BINJ and C57BL/6 origin. Heteroplasmy and mtDNA copy number were estimated in germline and somatic tissues, providing evidence of the reliability of the approach. Furthermore, it enabled single-step quantification of heteroplasmy, with sensitivity to detect as low as 0.1% of either NZB/BINJ or C57BL/6 mtDNA. These findings are relevant as the ARMS-qPCR assay reported here is fully compatible with similar heteroplasmic mouse models used to study mitochondrial inheritance in mammals. PMID:26274500

  10. Regenerative capacity of old muscle stem cells declines without significant accumulation of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Wendy; Ho, Michelle Liane; Desai, Rajiv; Tham, Andrea; Chen, Robert Yuzen; Kung, Sunny; Elabd, Christian; Conboy, Irina M

    2013-01-01

    The performance of adult stem cells is crucial for tissue homeostasis but their regenerative capacity declines with age, leading to failure of multiple organs. In skeletal muscle this failure is manifested by the loss of functional tissue, the accumulation of fibrosis, and reduced satellite cell-mediated myogenesis in response to injury. While recent studies have shown that changes in the composition of the satellite cell niche are at least in part responsible for the impaired function observed with aging, little is known about the effects of aging on the intrinsic properties of satellite cells. For instance, their ability to repair DNA damage and the effects of a potential accumulation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) on their regenerative performance remain unclear. This work demonstrates that old muscle stem cells display no significant accumulation of DNA DSBs when compared to those of young, as assayed after cell isolation and in tissue sections, either in uninjured muscle or at multiple time points after injury. Additionally, there is no significant difference in the expression of DNA DSB repair proteins or globally assayed DNA damage response genes, suggesting that not only DNA DSBs, but also other types of DNA damage, do not significantly mark aged muscle stem cells. Satellite cells from DNA DSB-repair-deficient SCID mice do have an unsurprisingly higher level of innate DNA DSBs and a weakened recovery from gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage. Interestingly, they are as myogenic in vitro and in vivo as satellite cells from young wild type mice, suggesting that the inefficiency in DNA DSB repair does not directly correlate with the ability to regenerate muscle after injury. Overall, our findings suggest that a DNA DSB-repair deficiency is unlikely to be a key factor in the decline in muscle regeneration observed upon aging. PMID:23704914

  11. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) from the Sava River basin: New insights into strain formation, mtDNA-like sequences and dynamics of infection.

    PubMed

    Vardić Smrzlić, Irena; Valić, Damir; Kapetanović, Damir; Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Gjurčević, Emil; Teskeredžić, Emin

    2015-10-01

    Here we report the genetic variability and presence of mtDNA-like sequences of Pomphorhynchus laevis from the chub, Squalius cephalus, caught at the sampling sites along the Sava River and its tributary the Sutla River in Croatia. Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene of the recovered P. laevis specimens were used for haplotype network construction and phylogenetic analysis. These analyses showed that some specimens contained mitochondrial-like sequences, and they uncovered the existence of a Sava River basin strain different from known strains of P. laevis. This is the first time that P. laevis has been shown to contain mtDNA-like sequences, suggesting the need to exercise caution during COI analyses of P. laevis using universal primers. Highly conserved sequences of two nuclear markers, the ITS region and 18S rRNA, were not helpful for understanding genetic variability or differentiating strains. Furthermore, analysis of the dynamics of P. laevis infections in S. cephalus from the Sava and Sutla Rivers showed decreased prevalence and abundance at sites with inferior water quality, positive association of parasite abundance with fish size, and no clear association of parasite abundance with fish condition index or sex. PMID:25728305

  12. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF STEROCHEMICAL CONFIGERATION OF CYCLOPENTA[CD]PYRENE-DNA ADDUCTS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG AND C3H10T1/2CL8

    EPA Science Inventory

    The definitive identification of stereochemical configurations of DNA adducts detected by 32P-postlabeling requires co-chromatography of adducts with synthetic chromatographic standards. Four major and several minor DNA adducts are formed by cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) in strain A...

  14. The strain-specific cis-acting element of beet curly top geminivirus DNA replication maps to the directly repeated motif of the ori.

    PubMed

    Choi, I R; Stenger, D C

    1996-12-01

    Strains of beet curly top geminivirus (BCTV) possess distinct cis- and trans-acting replication specificity elements which are not separately interchangeable among strains. Analysis of the replication competency of chimeric BCTV genomes, in which portions of the origin of DNA replication (ori) were derived from heterologous BCTV strains, have permitted identification of an essential cis-acting element governing strain-specific replication in a subgroup II geminivirus. Our studies indicate that the cis-acting element responsible for strain-specific replication properties resides within the directly repeated motif of the BCTV ori. Transient replication assays conducted in leaf disks and complementation experiments conducted in whole plants indicated that the trans-acting replication specificity element, residing within the amino-terminal region of the C1 Rep protein, may recognize and replicate a chimeric BCTV genome containing a heterologous ori so long as all or portions of the core element of the directly repeated motif are derived from the same strain as the Rep protein. As Rep protein binding to the core element of the directly repeated motif has been demonstrated by others to be essential for replication of subgroup III geminiviruses, our results support the hypothesis that replication specificity of subgroup II viruses is governed by processes similar to that of subgroup III viruses. However, a second cis-acting element of the ori, which appears to contribute to subgroup III virus replication specificity, does not seem to be required for replication specificity among the subgroup II viruses examined. Nonetheless, a potential role for a second cis-acting element in the BCTV ori contributing to maximal replication cannot be excluded. PMID:8941329

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of hctB encoding a strain-variant chlamydial histone-like protein with DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, T J; Barry, C E; Hackstadt, T

    1993-01-01

    Two DNA-binding proteins with similarity to eukaryotic histone H1 have been described in Chlamydia trachomatis. In addition to the 18-kDa histone H1 homolog Hc1, elementary bodies of C. trachomatis possess an antigenically related histone H1 homolog, which we have termed Hc2, that varies in apparent molecular mass among strains. We report the molecular cloning, expression, and nucleotide sequence of the hctB gene encoding Hc2 and present evidence for in vivo DNA-binding activity of the expressed product. Expression of Hc2 in Escherichia coli induces a compaction of bacterial chromatin that is distinct from that observed upon Hc1 expression. Moreover, isolated nucleoids from Hc2-expressing E. coli exhibit markedly reduced sensitivity to DNase I. These properties of Hc2 are consistent with a postulated role in establishing the nucleoid structure of elementary bodies. Images PMID:7687246

  16. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  17. Evaluation of four DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus detection by PCR in tissues from experimentally infected cows with the 2308 strain.

    PubMed

    Vejarano, M P; Matrone, M; Keid, L B; Rocha, V C M; Ikuta, C Y; Rodriguez, C A R; Salgado, V R; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Telles, E O; Ferreira Neto, J S

    2013-04-01

    This study compared 4 protocols for DNA extraction from homogenates of 6 different organs of cows infected with the Brucella abortus 2308 strain. The extraction protocols compared were as follows: GT (guanidine isothiocyanate lysis), Boom (GT lysis with the carrying suspension diatomaceous earth), PK (proteinase K lysis), and Santos (lysis by boiling and freezing with liquid nitrogen). Positive and negative gold standard reference groups were generated by classical bacteriological methods. All samples were processed with the 4 DNA extraction protocols and amplified with the B4 and B5 primers. The number of positive samples in the placental cotyledons was higher than that in the other organs. The cumulated results showed that the Santos protocol was more sensitive than the Boom (p=0.003) and GT (p=0.0506) methods and was similar to the PK method (p=0.2969). All of the DNA extraction protocols resulted in false-negative results for PCR. In conclusion, despite the disadvantages of classical bacteriological methods, the best approach for direct diagnosis of B. abortus in organs of infected cows includes the isolation associated with PCR of DNA extracted from the cotyledon by the Santos or PK methods. PMID:23421881

  18. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  19. Genome-wide Transcriptome Profiling of Homologous Recombination DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Curtis Chun-Jen; Mo, Wei; Dai, Hui; Park, Yun-Yong; Kim, Soo-Mi; Peng, Yang; Mo, Qianxing; Siwko, Stefan; Hu, Ruozhen; Lee, Ju-Seog; Hennessy, Bryan; Hanash, Samir; Mills, Gordon B.; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair deficiency predisposes to cancer development, but also sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damage-inducing therapeutics. Here we identify an HR-defect (HRD) gene signature, which can be used to functionally assess HR repair status without interrogating individual genetic alterations in cells. By using this HRD gene signature as a functional network analysis tool, we discover that simultaneous loss of two major tumor suppressors BRCA1 and PTEN extensively rewire the HR repair-deficient phenotype, which is found in cells with defects in either BRCA1 or PTEN alone. Moreover, the HRD gene signature serves as an effective drug discovery platform to identify agents targeting HR repair as potential chemo/radio-sensitizers. More importantly, this HRD gene signature is able to predict clinical outcomes across multiple cancer lineages. Our findings, therefore, provide a molecular profile of HR repair to assess its status at a functional network level, which can provide both biological insights and have clinical implications in cancer. PMID:24553445

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Assembled Using Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Brown; Sagar M. Utturkar; Timothy S. Magnuson; Allison E. Ray; Farris L. Poole; W. Andrew Lancaster; Michael P. Thorgersen; Michael W. W. Adams; Dwayne A. Elias

    2014-09-01

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  1. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterizedmore » as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).« less

  2. Selective alleviation of Mitomycin C sensitivity in lexA3 strains of Escherichia coli demands allele specificity of rif-nal mutations: a pivotal role for rpoB87-gyrA87 mutations.

    PubMed

    Shanmughapriya, Vinod; Meenakshi, Shanmugaraja; Munavar, M Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Very recently, we have reported about an unconventional mode of elicitation of Mitomycin C (MMC) specific resistance in lexA3 (SOS repair deficient) mutants due to a combination of Rif-Nal mutations (rpoB87-gyrA87). We have clearly shown that UvrB is mandatory for this unconventional MMC resistance in rpoB87-gyrA87-lexA3 strains and uvrB is expressed more even without DNA damage induction from its LexA dependent promoter despite the uncleavable LexA3 repressor. The rpoB87 allele is same as the rpoB3595 which is known to give rise to a fast moving RNA Polymerase and gyrA87 is a hitherto unreported Nal(R) allele. Thus, it is proposed that the RNA Polymerase with higher elongation rate with the mutant DNA Gyrase is able to overcome the repressional hurdle posed by LexA3 to express uvrB. In this study we have systematically analysed the effect of three other rpoB (rif) mutations-two known to give rise to fast moving RNAP (rpoB2 and rpoB111) and one to a slow moving RNAP (rpoB8) and four different alleles of gyrA Nal(R) mutations (gyrA199, gyrA247, gyrA250, gyrA259) isolated spontaneously, on elicitation of MMC resistance in lexA3 strains. Our results indicate that in order to acquire resistance to 0.5 µg/ml MMC cells require both rpoB87 and gyrA87 but resistance to 0.25 µg/ml of MMC can be brought about by either rpoB87, gyrA87, fast moving rpoB mutations or other nal mutations also. We have also depicted increased constitutive uvrB expression in strains carrying fast moving RNAP (rpoB2 and rpoB111) with gyrA87 and another nal mutation with rpoB87 and expression level in these strains is lesser than rpoB87-gyrA87 strain. These results evidently suggest an allele specific role for the rif-nal mutations to acquire MMC resistance in lexA3 strains via increased constitutive uvrB expression and a pivotal role for rpoB87-gyrA87 combination to elicit higher levels of resistance. PMID:24498357

  3. Protective immunity induced with 23 kDa membrane protein dna vaccine of Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain in infected C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingchang; Ren, Jiangong; Harn, D A; Si, Jin; Yu, Chuanxin; Ming, Xu; Liang, Yousheng

    2003-12-01

    A 23 kDa membrane protein DNA vaccine for Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain was developed and tested for its protective efficacy and immune responses in infected C57BL/6 mice. The cDNA encoding SjC23 amplified from pUC19-SjC23 were subcloned into an eukaryotic expression vector (pcDNA3.1). Forty-eight female C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups. Each mouse of group A (control group) was immunized intramuscularly (i.m.) with 100 microg of pcDNA3.1; of group B (SjC23 group) was immunized (i.m.) with 100 microg of pcDNA3.1-SjC23; of group C (SjC23+IL-12) was immunized (i.m.) with a mixture of 100 microg of pcDNA3.1-SjC23, 100 microg of pcDNA3.1-p35 and 100 microg of pcDNA-p40. These were followed by two boosts of the same DNA once every two weeks. All mice were challenged with 45 cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain at week 8, and were killed and perfused at week 14. The numbers of recovered worms and hepatic eggs were counted. The expression of SjC23 and p35, p40 in muscle tissue was determined by immunohistochemical method. By culture of spleen cells, the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-gamma with the stimulation of specific antigen of the recombinant hydrophilic domain of SjC23 (rSjC23-HD) was determined after the last immunization (before challenge). Sera were collected from each group before immunization and two weeks before and after challenge. Anti-SjC23 antibodies were tested by Western blot. The results showed that SjC23 and p35, p40 of mouse IL-12 were expressed on the membrane and in the plasma of the muscle cells of immunized C57BL/6 mice. A rise of IL-2 and IFN-gamma in the SjC23 group and SjC23+IL-12 group was observed; No changes were found in IL-4 and IL-10. Detection of anti-SjC23 antibody with Western blot showed that after the third immunization (before challenge) all the serum samples from the control group were negative; 8 of 10 sera from the SjC23 group and 9 of 10 sera from the SjC23+IL-12 group were positive. The

  4. DNA Repair Dependence of Somatic Mutagenesis of Transposon-Caused WHITE Alleles in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER after Treatment with Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Sohei

    1986-01-01

    DNA repair-defective alleles of the mei-9, mei-41, mus-104 and mus-101 loci of Drosophila melanogaster were introduced into stocks bearing the UZ and SZ marker sets. Males with the UZ marker set, z1 (zeste allele) and w+(TE) (genetically unstable white allele presumably caused by a transposable element), or the SZ marker set, z1 and w+R (semistable white allele caused by partial duplication of the w+ locus plus transposon insert), were exposed to EMS at the first instar. After emergence, adult males bearing red spots on lemon-yellow eyes were scored as flies with somatic reversions of w+(TE) or w +R. The relative mutabilities (relative values of reversion frequency at an equal EMS dose) of either w+(TE) or w+R in a repair-proficient strain and in mei-9, mei-41, mus-104 and mus-101 strains were 1:∼1.2:0.3:0.3:0.7, despite the fact that w+(TE) reverted two to three times as frequently as w+R under both the repair-proficient and repair-deficient genetic conditions. Similarly, after treatment with MMS, MNNG and ENNG, w+(TE) was somatically more mutable in the mei-9 strain and less mutable in the mei-41 and mus-104 strains than in the repair-proficient strain. From these results, we propose that mutagenic lesions produced in DNA by treatment with these chemicals are converted to mutant DNA sequences via the error-prone repair mechanisms dependent on the products of the genes mei-41+ (mei-41 and mus-104 being alleles of the same locus) and mus-101+, whereas they are eliminated by mei-9+-dependent excision repair. In contrast to the approximately linear responses of induced reversions of w+( TE) with ENNG in the repair-proficient, mei-9, and mei-41 strains, seemingly there were dosage insensitive ranges for induced reversion with MNNG in the repair-proficient and mei-41 strains, but not for reversion in the mei-9 strain; w+( TE) in the mus-104 strain was virtually nonmutable with MNNG and ENNG. These results suggest that O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) produced in DNA with

  5. The consequences of growth of a mutator strain of Escherichia coli as measured by loss of function among multiple gene targets and loss of fitness.

    PubMed Central

    Funchain, P; Yeung, A; Stewart, J L; Lin, R; Slupska, M M; Miller, J H

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the composition of members of mutator populations of Escherichia coli by employing an extensive set of phenotypic screens that allow us to monitor the function of >700 genes, constituting approximately 15% of the genome. We looked at mismatch repair deficient cells after repeated cycles of single colony isolation on rich medium to generate lineages that are forced through severe bottlenecks, and compared the results to those for wild-type strains. The mutator lineages continued to accumulate mutations rapidly with each increasing cycle of colony isolation. By the end of the 40th cycle, after approximately 1000 generations, most of the lineages had reduced colony size, 4% had died out, 55% had auxotrophic requirements (increasing to 80% after 60 cycles), and 70% had defects in at least one sugar or catabolic pathway. In addition, 33% had a defect in cell motility, and 26% were either temperature-sensitive or cold-sensitive lethals. On the other hand, only 3% of the wild-type lineages had detectable mutations of any type after 40 cycles. By the 60th cycle, the typical mutator cell carried 4-5 inactive genes among the 15% of the genome being monitored, indicating that the average cell carried at least 24-30 inactivated genes distributed throughout the genome. Remarkably, 30% of the lineages had lost the ability to utilize xylose as a carbon source. DNA sequencing revealed that most of the Xyl(-) mutants had a frameshift in a run of eight G's (GGGGGGGG) in the xylB gene, either adding or deleting one -G-. Further analysis indicated that rendering E. coli deficient in mismatch repair unmasks hypermutable sites in certain genes or intergenic regions. Growth curves and competition tests on lineages that passed through 90 cycles of single colony isolation showed that all lineages suffered reduced fitness. We discuss these results in terms of the value of mutators in cellular evolution. PMID:10757746

  6. Restriction site detection in repetitive nuclear DNA sequences of Trypanosoma evansi for strain differentiation among different isolates.

    PubMed

    Shyma, K P; Gupta, S K; Gupta, J P; Singh, Ajit; Chaudhari, S S; Singh, Veer

    2016-09-01

    The differences or similarities among different isolates of Trypanosoma evansi through endonuclease profile was identified in the present study. The repetitive nuclear DNA of T. evansi isolated from infected cattle, buffalo and equine blood was initially amplified by PCR using specific primers. A panel of restriction enzymes, EcoRI, Eco91l, HindIII and PstI were for complete digestion of PCR products. Agarose gel electrophoresis of digested product did not show cleavage fragments and only single DNA band of the original size was visible in the ethidium bromide stained agarose gel. This indicated that the 227 bp PCR product from repetitive sequence had no site-specific cleavage sites for the REs used in this study. No heterogeneity in the repetitive nuclear DNA restriction endonuclease profile among the different isolates was recorded. PMID:27605842

  7. The induction of lysis in lysogenic strains of Escherichia coli by a new antitumor transplatin derivative and its DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Viktor; Pracharova, Jitka; Novakova, Olga; Gibson, Dan; Kasparkova, Jana

    2015-02-28

    The toxicity of the new derivative of transplatin, namely trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] (DEA = diethylamine), in which only one NH3 group was replaced by a small, non-bulky DEA ligand, in the cisplatin sensitive and resistant tumor cell lines was examined. The results indicate that this very small modification of the transplatin molecule results in a considerable enhancement of toxicity in the cancer cells. Thus, this finding is consistent with the thesis that the trans geometry in Pt(II)-dichlorido compounds can also be effectively activated by the replacement of only one NH3 ligand in transplatin by the non-bulky ligand, such as the short aliphatic amine, (C2H5)2NH. We also demonstrate that trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)], in contrast to transplatin, can be grouped with the coordination compounds exhibiting antitumor activity and capable of inducing lysis in lysogenic bacteria. Thus, these results afford, for the first time, experimental support for the view that DNA is the potential cellular target also for antitumor derivatives of transplatin. DNA binding mode of trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] in cell-free media was examined as well. The results show that the small aliphatic DEA ligand has significant consequences for the DNA conformational changes. Unlike 'classical' transplatin, modification of DNA with trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] leads to mainly bifunctional cross-links. The extent and destabilization of the double-helical structure of DNA by this new trans-platinum complex are similar to those induced by cisplatin. As a consequence the lesions effectively inhibit transcription of template DNA similarly to the lesions of cisplatin, but markedly more than the lesions of transplatin. The stronger inhibition of DNA transcription by the adducts of trans-[PtCl2(DEA)(NH3)] in comparison with the adducts of transplatin adds a new dimension to the impact of the activated trans geometry in platinum compounds on biological processes, possibly including DNA transcription. PMID:25406573

  8. Comparison of Haemophilus parasuis reference strains and field isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and protein profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease and is a pathogen of swine in high-health status herds. Reports on serotyping of field strains from outbreaks describe that approximately 30% of them are nontypable and therefore cannot be traced. Molecular typing methods have been use...

  9. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  10. Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus pcr detection in aborted fetuses or calves born from cows experimentally infected with strain 2308

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, M.; Keid, L.B.; Rocha, V.C.M.; Vejarano, M.P.; Ikuta, C.Y.; Rodriguez, C.A.R.; Ferreira, F.; Dias, R.A.; Ferreira Neto, J.S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the detection of B. abortus by PCR in organs of aborted fetuses from infected cows, an important mechanism to find infected herds on the eradication phase of the program. So, different DNA extraction protocols were compared, focusing the PCR detection of B. abortus in clinical samples collected from aborted fetuses or calves born from cows challenged with the 2308 B. abortus strain. Therefore, two gold standard groups were built based on classical bacteriology, formed from: 32 lungs (17 positives), 26 spleens (11 positives), 23 livers (8 positives) and 22 bronchial lymph nodes (7 positives). All samples were submitted to three DNA extraction protocols, followed by the same amplification process with the primers B4 and B5. From the accumulated results for organ, the proportion of positives for the lungs was higher than the livers (p=0.04) or bronchial lymph nodes (p=0.004) and equal to the spleens (p=0.18). From the accumulated results for DNA extraction protocol, the proportion of positives for the Boom protocol was bigger than the PK (p< 0.0001) and GT (p=0.0004). There was no difference between the PK and GT protocols (p=0.5). Some positive samples from the classical bacteriology were negative to the PCR and vice-versa. Therefore, the best strategy for B. abortus detection in the organs of aborted fetuses or calves born from infected cows is the use, in parallel, of isolation by classical bacteriology and the PCR, with the DNA extraction performed by the Boom protocol. PMID:24031391

  11. Enhanced unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated human skin explants treated with T4N5 liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yarosh, D.B.; Kibitel, J.T.; Green, L.A.; Spinowitz, A. )

    1991-07-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes cultured from explants of skin cancer patients, including biopsies from xeroderma pigmentosum patients, were ultraviolet light-irradiated and DNA repair synthesis was measured. Repair capacity was much lower in xeroderma pigmentosum patients than in normal patients. The extent of DNA repair replication did not decline with the age of the normal patient. Treatment with T4N5 liposomes containing a DNA repair enzyme enhanced repair synthesis in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum keratinocytes in an irradiation- and liposome-dose dependent manner. These results provide no evidence that aging people or skin cancer patients are predisposed to cutaneous malignancy by a DNA repair deficiency, but do demonstrate that T4N5 liposomes enhance DNA repair in the keratinocytes of the susceptible xeroderma pigmentosum and skin cancer population.

  12. Polymorphisms in the ITS rDNA regions for differentiating strains of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex in Sfax-Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Drira, I; Neji, S; Hadrich, I; Trabelsi, H; Sellami, H; Cheikhrouhou, F; Guidara, R; Makni, F; Ayadi, A

    2014-08-01

    The Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex is the main cause of superficial mycoses in humans and animals. Molecular research has provided useful insights into the taxonomy of this complex to overcome the challenges with conventional diagnostics. The aim of this study was to identify, type and differentiate anthropophilic and zoophilic species of the T. mentagrophytes complex. Sixty clinical samples identified as T. mentagrophytes by morphological characteristics were isolated using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The identification of our strains by conventional methods was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing in 93.34% of the cases. The strains under investigation were recategorised as T. rubrum (Tr2711). In addition, PCR products were independently digested with the restriction endonucleases, MvaI and HinfI, to produce a single dominant profile for T. interdigitale. ITS sequence analysis revealed a polymorphism in the ITS1 and 5.8S regions. Analysis of the consensus sequences distinguished four types of genotypes among our T. interdigitale species. Moreover, ITS type I was the dominant genotype characterising the anthropophilic variant of T. interdigitale. The phylogenetic study showed that only 5% of our strains were zoophilic. PCR sequencing was useful for distinguishing anthropophilic and zoophilic species of T. interdigitale, in which the differentiation is relevant because it helps to prescribe the correct treatment and to identify the surrounding source of infection. PMID:24621449

  13. DNA sequence and genetic characterization of plasmid pFQ11 from Frankia alni strain CpI1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xudong; Kong, Renqiu; de Bruijn, Frans J; He, Sheng Yang; Murry, Marcia A; Newman, Thomas; Wolk, C Peter

    2002-01-22

    An 8551-bp plasmid, pFQ11, from Frankia alni strain CpI1 was sequenced. Its sequence was found to be very similar to that presented for pFQ31 from strain ArI3. Six potential protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, and transcriptional activity was shown within four of those regions of the plasmid by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. An earlier study reported that ORF E(F) of pFQ31, which is nearly identical to the 3' 45% of ORF1 of pFQ11, is significantly similar to RepF. We found no such similarity. ORF2 and ORF3 predict products that are similar to a repressor protein and a partition protein, respectively. We found inverted repeats within and covering the start codon of ORF3; palindromic sequences and direct repeats between ORF3 and ORF4; and 3' from ORF3, an AT-rich sequence that extensively overlaps the promoter region of a uvrB homolog in strain ArI3. PMID:11886759

  14. DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

  15. DNA damage induced by the anticodon nuclease from a Pichia acaciae killer strain is linked to ribonucleotide reductase depletion.

    PubMed

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2016-02-01

    Virus like element (VLE) encoded killer toxins of Pichia acaciae and Kluyveromyces lactis kill target cells through anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activity directed against tRNA(Gln) and tRNA(Glu) respectively. Not only does tRNA cleavage disable translation, it also affects DNA integrity as well. Consistent with DNA damage, which is involved in toxicity, target cells' mutation frequencies are elevated upon ACNase exposure, suggesting a link between translational integrity and genome surveillance. Here, we analysed whether ACNase action impedes the periodically and highly expressed S-phase specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and proved that RNR expression is severely affected by PaT. Because RNR catalyses the rate-limiting step in dNTP synthesis, mutants affected in dNTP synthesis were scrutinized with respect to ACNase action. Mutations elevating cellular dNTPs antagonized the action of both the above ACNases, whereas mutations lowering dNTPs aggravated toxicity. Consistently, prevention of tRNA cleavage in elp3 or trm9 mutants, which both affect the wobble uridine modification of the target tRNA, suppressed the toxin hypersensitivity of a dNTP synthesis mutant. Moreover, dNTP synthesis defects exacerbated the PaT ACNase sensitivity of cells defective in homologous recombination, proving that dNTP depletion is responsible for subsequent DNA damage. PMID:26247322

  16. Further evidence from SSCP and ITS DNA sequencing support Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum as subspecies or even strains of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan-Zi; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Hide, Geoff; Lai, De-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The subgenus Trypanozoon includes three species Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma equiperdum, which are morphologically identical and indistinguishable even using some molecular methods. In this study, PCR-based single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to analyze the ribosomal DNA of the Trypanozoon species. Data indicate different patterns of ITS2 fragments between T. brucei, T. evansi and T. equiperdum by SSCP. Furthermore, analysis of total ITS sequences within these three members of the subgenus Trypanozoon showed a high degree of homology using phylogenetic analysis but were polyphyletic in haplotype networks. These data provide novel nuclear evidence to further support the notion that T. evansi and T. equiperdum should be subspecies or even strains of T. brucei. PMID:27016375

  17. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed Central

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP. PMID:7574582

  18. Infectious Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (Strain NADL) RNA from Stable cDNA Clones: a Cellular Insert Determines NS3 Production and Viral Cytopathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ernesto; Ruggli, Nicolas; Collett, Marc S.; Rice, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), strain NADL, was originally isolated from an animal with fatal mucosal disease. This isolate is cytopathic in cell culture and produces two forms of NS3-containing proteins: uncleaved NS2-3 and mature NS3. For BVDV NADL, the production of NS3, a characteristic of cytopathic BVDV strains, is believed to be a consequence of an in-frame insertion of a 270-nucleotide cellular mRNA sequence (called cIns) in the NS2 coding region. In this study, we constructed a stable full-length cDNA copy of BVDV NADL in a low-copy-number plasmid vector. As assayed by transfection of MDBK cells, uncapped RNAs transcribed from this template were highly infectious (>105 PFU/μg). The recovered virus was similar in plaque morphology, growth properties, polyprotein processing, and cytopathogenicity to the BVDV NADL parent. Deletion of cIns abolished processing at the NS2/NS3 site and produced a virus that was no longer cytopathic for MDBK cells. This deletion did not affect the efficiency of infectious virus production or viral protein production, but it reduced the level of virus-specific RNA synthesis and accumulation. Thus, cIns not only modulates NS3 production but also upregulates RNA replication relative to an isogenic noncytopathic derivative lacking the insert. These results raise the possibility of a linkage between enhanced BVDV NADL RNA replication and virus-induced cytopathogenicity. PMID:9573238

  19. Development and characterization of a synthetic infectious cDNA clone of the virulent Bucyrus strain of equine arteritis virus expressing mCherry (red fluorescent protein).

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shankar P; Cook, R Frank; Chelvarajan, R Lakshman; Henney, Pamela J; Timoney, Peter J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Strains of equine arteritis virus (EAV) differ in their virulence phenotypes, causing anywhere from subclinical infections to severe disease in horses. Here, we describe the in silico design and de novo synthesis of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of the horse-adapted virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS) of EAV encoding mCherry along with in vitro characterization of the progeny virions (EAV sVBSmCherry) in terms of host-cell tropism, replicative capacity and stability of the mCherry coding sequences following sequential passage in cell culture. The relative stability of the mCherry sequence during sequential cell culture passage coupled with a comparable host-cell range phenotype (equine endothelial cells, CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) monocytes) to parental EAV VBS suggest that EAV-sVBSmCherry-derived virus could become a valuable research tool for identification of host-cell tropism determinants and for characterization of the viral proteins involved in virus attachment and entry into different subpopulations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that advances in nucleic acid synthesis technology permit synthesis of complex viral genomes with overlapping genes like those of arteriviruses, thereby circumventing the need for complicated molecular cloning techniques. In summary, de novo nucleic acid synthesis technology facilitates innovative viral vector design without the tedium and risks posed by more-conventional laboratory techniques. PMID:26711457

  20. [Expression of cDNA of the Gene for the Capsid Protein VP2 of German Cockroach Densovirus in the Transgenic Strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, E N; Martynova, E U; Roshina, N V; Karakozova, M V; Mukha, D V

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster capable of expressing a cDNA fragment corresponding to open reading frame (ORF) of the gene for the German cockroach densonucleosis virus capsid protein VP2 (ORF VP2) in specific tissues and at a certain stage of development depending on the type of chosen driver strains (GAL-UAS system) were obtained. The ORF VP2 transcription was examined at the imago stage after crossing the obtained transgenic Drosophila with the driver line expressing the inducer protein (GAL4) under control of actin promoter (the ORF VP2 expression is induced in all tissues of the first-generation Drosophila). It was demonstrated that the greater part of transcribed foreign RNA was represented by three spliced variants in which RNA fragments either between nucleotides 137 and 353 or between nucleotides 609 and 1925 were excised; the third spliced variant was represented by RNA lacking both introns. Using the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique, the proportion of unspliced form relative to spliced variants of the analyzed RNA was assessed. It was shown that the ratio of unspliced form to the identified spliced variants of the analyzed RNA was approximately 1:6. It is suggested that splicing of viral RNA foreign to Drosophila can be a sort of defense mechanism preventing the large-scale production of the capsid protein, potentially hazardous to the host organism. PMID:27529987

  1. Isolation and characterization of a single-stranded DNA virus infecting the marine diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11 isolated from western Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kei; Tomaru, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are significant organisms for primary production in the earth's aquatic environment. Hence, their dynamics are an important focus area in current studies. Viruses are a great concern as potential factors of diatom mortality, along with other physical, chemical, and biological factors. We isolated and characterized a new diatom virus (Csp07DNAV) that lyses the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11. This paper examines the physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics of Csp07DNAV. The virus was isolated from a surface water sample that was collected at Hiroshima Bay, Japan. It was icosahedral, had a diameter of 34 nm, and accumulated in the nuclei of host cells. Rod-shaped virus particles also coexisted in the host nuclei. The latent period and burst size were estimated to be <12 h and 29 infectious units per host cell, respectively. Csp07DNAV had a closed circular single-stranded DNA genome (5,552 nucleotides), which included a double-stranded region and 3 open reading frames. The monophyly of Csp07DNAV and other Bacilladnavirus group single-stranded DNA viruses was supported by phylogenetic analysis that was based on the amino acid sequence of each virus protein. On the basis of these results, we considered Csp07DNAV to be a new member of the genus Bacilladnavirus. PMID:24358139

  2. PhyloFlu, a DNA Microarray for Determining the Phylogenetic Origin of Influenza A Virus Gene Segments and the Genomic Fingerprint of Viral Strains

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Luis F.; Soto-Del Río, María de los D.; Sánchez, Iván; Hernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa M.; López-Martínez, Irma; Wong-Chew, Rosa M.; Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Isa, P.; López, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that most influenza A virus gene segments can contribute to the pathogenicity of the virus. In this regard, the hemagglutinin (HA) subtype of the circulating strains has been closely surveyed, but the reassortment of internal gene segments is usually not monitored as a potential source of an increased pathogenicity. In this work, an oligonucleotide DNA microarray (PhyloFlu) designed to determine the phylogenetic origins of the eight segments of the influenza virus genome was constructed and validated. Clades were defined for each segment and also for the 16 HA and 9 neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. Viral genetic material was amplified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with primers specific to the conserved 5′ and 3′ ends of the influenza A virus genes, followed by PCR amplification with random primers and Cy3 labeling. The microarray unambiguously determined the clades for all eight influenza virus genes in 74% (28/38) of the samples. The microarray was validated with reference strains from different animal origins, as well as from human, swine, and avian viruses from field or clinical samples. In most cases, the phylogenetic clade of each segment defined its animal host of origin. The genomic fingerprint deduced by the combined information of the individual clades allowed for the determination of the time and place that strains with the same genomic pattern were previously reported. PhyloFlu is useful for characterizing and surveying the genetic diversity and variation of animal viruses circulating in different environmental niches and for obtaining a more detailed surveillance and follow up of reassortant events that can potentially modify virus pathogenicity. PMID:24353006

  3. The RdgC protein of Escherichia coli binds DNA and counters a toxic effect of RecFOR in strains lacking the replication restart protein PriA

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Timothy; McGlynn, Peter; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Sharples, Gary J.; Lloyd, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    PriA protein provides a means to load the DnaB replicative helicase at DNA replication fork and D loop structures, and is therefore a key factor in the rescue of stalled or broken forks and subsequent replication restart. We show that the nucleoid-associated RdgC protein binds non-specifically to single-stranded (ss) DNA and double-stranded DNA. It is also essential for growth of a strain lacking PriA, indicating that it might affect replication fork progression or fork rescue. dnaC suppressors of priA overcome this inviability, especially when RecF, RecO or RecR is inactivated, indicating that RdgC avoids or counters a toxic effect of these proteins. Mutations modifying ssDNA-binding (SSB) protein also negate this toxic effect, suggesting that the toxicity reflects inappropriate loading of RecA on SSB-coated ssDNA, leading to excessive or untimely RecA activity. We suggest that binding of RdgC to DNA limits RecA loading, avoiding problems at replication forks that would otherwise require PriA to promote replication restart. Mutations in RNA polymerase also reduce the toxic effect of RecFOR, providing a further link between DNA replication, transcription and repair. PMID:12554673

  4. Assessment of the Genetic Diversity among Strains of Xanthomonas cynarae by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis and Development of Specific Characterized Amplified Regions for the Rapid Identification of X. cynarae

    PubMed Central

    Trébaol, Gaëlle; Manceau, Charles; Tirilly, Yves; Boury, Stéphane

    2001-01-01

    The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was used to investigate the genetic diversity in Xanthomonas cynarae, which causes bacterial bract spot disease of artichoke. This RAPD analysis was also intended to identify molecular markers characteristic of this species, in order to develop PCR-based markers which can be used to detect this pathogenic bacterium in artichoke fields. Among the 340 RAPD primers tested, 40 were selected on their ability to produce reproducible and reliable fingerprints in our genetic background. These 40 primers produced almost similar patterns for the 37 X. cynarae strains studied, different from the fingerprints obtained for other Xanthomonas species and other xanthomonad-like bacteria isolated from artichoke leaves. Therefore, X. cynarae strains form a homogeneous genetic group. However, a little DNA polymorphism within this species was observed and the collection of X. cynarae isolates was divided into two groups (one containing three strains, the second one including all other strains). Out of seven RAPD markers characteristic of X. cynarae that were cloned, four did not hybridize to the genomic DNA of strains belonging to other Xanthomonas species. These four RAPD markers were converted into PCR markers (specific characterized amplified regions [SCARs]); they were sequenced, and a PCR primer pair was designed for each of them. Three derived SCARs are good candidates to develop PCR-based tests to detect X. cynarae in artichoke fields. PMID:11472907

  5. Systemically administered DNA and fowlpox recombinants expressing four vaccinia virus genes although immunogenic do not protect mice against the highly pathogenic IHD-J vaccinia strain.

    PubMed

    Bissa, Massimiliano; Pacchioni, Sole Maria; Zanotto, Carlo; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Illiano, Elena; Granucci, Francesca; Zanoni, Ivan; Broggi, Achille; Radaelli, Antonia

    2013-12-26

    The first-generation smallpox vaccine was based on live vaccinia virus (VV) and it successfully eradicated the disease worldwide. Therefore, it was not administered any more after 1980, as smallpox no longer existed as a natural infection. However, emerging threats by terrorist organisations has prompted new programmes for second-generation vaccine development based on attenuated VV strains, which have been shown to cause rare but serious adverse events in immunocompromised patients. Considering the closely related animal poxviruses that might also be used as bioweapons, and the increasing number of unvaccinated young people and AIDS-affected immunocompromised subjects, a safer and more effective smallpox vaccine is still required. New avipoxvirus-based vectors should improve the safety of conventional vaccines, and protect from newly emerging zoonotic orthopoxvirus diseases and from the threat of deliberate release of variola or monkeypox virus in a bioterrorist attack. In this study, DNA and fowlpox recombinants expressing the L1R, A27L, A33R and B5R genes were constructed and evaluated in a pre-clinical trial in mouse, following six prime/boost immunisation regimens, to compare their immunogenicity and protective efficacy against a challenge with the lethal VV IHD-J strain. Although higher numbers of VV-specific IFNγ-producing T lymphocytes were observed in the protected mice, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and the presence of neutralising antibodies did not always correlate with protection. In spite of previous successful results in mice, rabbits and monkeys, where SIV/HIV transgenes were expressed by the fowlpox vector, the immune response elicited by these recombinants was low, and most of the mice were not protected. PMID:24050999

  6. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene from strain PAO1 and quinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kureishi, A; Diver, J M; Beckthold, B; Schollaardt, T; Bryan, L E

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase gyrA gene was cloned and sequenced from strain PAO1. An open reading frame of 2,769 bp was found; it coded for a protein of 923 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 103 kDa. The derived amino acid sequence shared 67% identity with Escherichia coli GyrA and 54% identity with Bacillus subtilis GyrA, although conserved regions were present throughout the sequences, particularly toward the N terminus. Complementation of an E. coli mutant with a temperature-sensitive gyrA gene with the PAO1 gyrA gene showed that the gene is expressed in E. coli and is able to functionally complement the E. coli DNA gyrase B subunit. Expression of PAO1 gyrA in E. coli or P. aeruginosa with mutationally altered gyrA genes caused a reversion to wild-type quinolone susceptibility, indicating that the intrinsic susceptibility of the PAO1 GyrA to quinolones is comparable to that of the E. coli enzyme. PCR was used to amplify 360 bp of P. aeruginosa gyrA encompassing the so-called quinolone resistance-determining region from ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis. Mutations were found in three of nine isolates tested; these mutations caused the following alterations in the sequence of GyrA: Asp at position 87 (Asp-87) to Asn, Asp-87 to Tyr, and Thr-83 to Ile. The resistance mechanisms in the other six isolates are unknown. The results of the study suggested that mechanisms other than a mutational alteration in gyrA are the most common mechanism of ciprofloxacin resistance in P. aeruginosa from the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7811002

  7. Isolation and characterization of the gene encoding single-stranded-DNA-binding protein (SSB) from four marine Shewanella strains that differ in their temperature and pressure optima for growth.

    PubMed

    Chilukuri, L N; Bartlett, D H

    1997-04-01

    The ssb gene, coding for single-stranded-DNA-binding protein (SSB), was cloned from four marine Shewanella strains that differed in their temperature and pressure optima and ranges of growth. All four Shewanella ssb genes complemented Escherichia coli ssb point and deletion mutants, with efficiencies that varied with temperature and ssb gene source. The Shewanella SSBs are the largest bacterial SSBs identified to date (24.9-26.3 kDa) and may be divided into conserved amino- and carboy-terminal regions and a highly variable central region. Greater amino acid sequence homology was observed between the Shewanella SSBs as a group (72-87%) than with other bacterial SSBs (52-69%). Analysis of the amino acid composition of the Shewanella SSBs revealed several features that could correlate with pressure or temperature adaptation. SSBs from the three low-temperature-adapted Shewanella strains were an order of magnitude more hydrophilic than that from the mesophilic strain, and differences in the distribution of eight amino acids were identified which could contribute to either the temperature or pressure adaptation of the proteins. The SSBs from all four Shewanella strains were overproduced and partially purified based upon their ability to bind single-stranded DNA. The differences found among the Shewanella SSBs suggest that these proteins will provide a useful system for exploring the adaptation of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions at low temperature and high pressure. PMID:9141679

  8. Cloning and DNA sequencing of bgaA, a gene encoding an endo-beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase, from an alkalophilic Bacillus strain (N137).

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, C; Coll, P M; Fernández-Abalos, J M; Pérez, P; Santamaría, R I

    1994-01-01

    The gene bgaA encoding an alkaline endo-beta-1,3-1,4-glucanase (lichenase) from an alkalophilic Bacillus sp. strain N137, isolated in our laboratory, was cloned and expressed from its own promoter in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of a 1,416-bp DNA fragment containing bgaA was determined and revealed an open reading frame of 828 nucleotides. The deduced protein sequence consists of 276 amino acids and has a 31-amino-acid putative signal peptide which is functional in E. coli, in which the BgaA protein is located mainly in the periplasmic space. The lichenase activity of BgaA is stable between pH 6 and 12, it shows optimal activity at a temperature between 60 and 70 degrees C, and it retains 65% of its activity after incubation at 70 degrees C for 1 h. This protein is similar to some other lichenases from Bacillus species such as B. amyloliquefaciens, B. brevis, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. polymyxa, and B. subtilis. However, it has a lysine-rich region at the carboxy terminus which is not found in any other published lichenase sequence and might be implicated in the unusual biochemical properties of this enzyme. The location of the mRNA 5' end was determined by primer extension and corresponds to nucleotide 235. A typical Bacillus sigma A promoter precedes the transcription start site. Images PMID:7517127

  9. Development and validation of DNA markers linked to Sdvy-1, a common bean gene conferring resistance to the yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Takeuchi, Toru; Okuyama, Masataka; Sasaki, Jun; Onodera, Kakumasa; Sato, Mikako; Souma, Chihiro; Ebe, Shigehiko

    2014-12-01

    The yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV-YS) causes yellowing and yield loss in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). The most effective control is achieved through breeding for resistance. An indeterminate climbing cultivar with a white seed coat, 'Oofuku', is resistant to SbDV-YS in inoculation tests. We crossed 'Oofuku' with an elite cultivar, 'Taisho-Kintoki', which is SbDV-YS-susceptible, determinate dwarf with a red-purple seed coat, and performed amplified-fragment-length polymorphism analysis of F3 lines. From nucleotide sequences of the resistant-specific fragments and their flanking regions, we developed five DNA markers, of which DV86, DV386, and DV398 were closely linked to Sdvy-1, a resistance gene. Using the markers, we developed 'Toiku-B79' and 'Toiku-B80', the near-isogenic lines (NILs) incorporating Sdvy-1 in the background of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs had similar growth habit, maturity date and seed shape to those of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The quality of boiled beans was also similar, except that the NILs had more seed coat cracking than 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs showed no SbDV-YS infection in inoculation tests. We suggest that Sdvy-1 is a useful source of SbDV-YS resistance in common bean. PMID:25914596

  10. BamI, KpnI, and SalI restriction enzyme maps of the DNAs of herpes simplex virus strains Justin and F: occurrence of heterogeneities in defined regions of the viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Locker, H; Frenkel, N

    1979-01-01

    We present the locations of the cleavage sites for the BamI, KpnI, and SalI restriction endonucleases within the DNA molecules of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strains Justin and F. These restriction enzymes cleave the HSV-1 DNA at many sites, producing relatively small fragments which should prove useful in future studies of HSV-1 gene structure and function. The mapping data revealed the occurrence of heterogeneity within three regions of the viral genome including (i) the region spanning map coordinates 0.74--0.76, (ii) the ends of the large (L) DNA component, and (iii) the junction between the large (L) and the small (S) components. The heterogeneity in the ends of L and the S-L junctions of HSV-1 (Justin) and HSV-1 (F) DNAs was grossly similar to that previously reported to occur in the ends of L and the S-L junctions of the HSV-1 (KOS) DNA (M. J. Wagner and W. C. Summers, J. Virol. 27:374--387, 1978). Thus, cleavage of these regions with restriction endonucleases yielded sets of minor fragments differing in size by constant increments. However, the various strains of HSV-1 differed with respect to the numbers, size increments, and relative molarities of the various minor fragments, suggesting that the parameters of the heterogeneity are inherited in the structural makeup of the HSV-1 genome. The strain dependence of the pattern of heterogeneity can be most easily explained in terms of variable sizes of the terminally reiterated a sequence, contained in the DNA molecules of these three strains of HSV-1. Images PMID:228068

  11. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  12. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein. PMID:26317160

  13. Structural basis for DNA cleavage by the potent antiproliferative agent (-)-lomaiviticin A.

    PubMed

    Woo, Christina M; Li, Zhenwu; Paulson, Eric K; Herzon, Seth B

    2016-03-15

    (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) is a complex antiproliferative metabolite that inhibits the growth of many cultured cancer cell lines at low nanomolar-picomolar concentrations. (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) possesses a C2-symmetric structure that contains two unusual diazotetrahydrobenzo[b]fluorene (diazofluorene) functional groups. Nucleophilic activation of each diazofluorene within 1 produces vinyl radical intermediates that affect hydrogen atom abstraction from DNA, leading to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Certain DNA DSB repair-deficient cell lines are sensitized toward 1, and 1 is under evaluation in preclinical models of these tumor types. However, the mode of binding of 1 to DNA had not been determined. Here we elucidate the structure of a 1:1 complex between 1 and the duplex d(GCTATAGC)2 by NMR spectroscopy and computational modeling. Unexpectedly, we show that both diazofluorene residues of 1 penetrate the duplex. This binding disrupts base pairing leading to ejection of the central AT bases, while placing the proreactive centers of 1 in close proximity to each strand. DNA binding may also enhance the reactivity of 1 toward nucleophilic activation through steric compression and conformational restriction (an example of shape-dependent catalysis). This study provides a structural basis for the DNA cleavage activity of 1, will guide the design of synthetic DNA-activated DNA cleavage agents, and underscores the utility of natural products to reveal novel modes of small molecule-DNA association. PMID:26929332

  14. Rescue of infective virus from a genome-length cDNA clone of the FMDV serotype O (IND-R2/75) vaccine strain and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Rajasekhar, R; Hosamani, Madhusudan; Basagoudanavar, Suresh H; Sreenivasa, B P; Tamil Selvan, R P; Saravanan, Paramasivam; Venkataramanan, Ramamurthy

    2013-08-01

    We report here the construction and characterization of an infectious cDNA clone of the Indian vaccine strain of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O, IND-R2/75. Viral genome was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in five fragments and subsequently assembled sequentially in a plasmid vector to generate a complete cDNA clone, flanked by the T7 RNA polymerase promoter and poly (A) tail at 5' and 3' ends, respectively. Transfection of BHK-21 cells with the RNA transcribed from this genome-length cDNA construct allowed the recovery of infectious recombinant FMDV particles as evidenced by cytopathic effect in BHK-21 cells. Characterization of the recombinant virus revealed its similarity to the parental strain. Recombinant virus could be distinguished from the parental virus based on the presence of a unique marker sequence in the former, which was incorporated in the cDNA using a silent mutation. The virus showed no significant amino acid changes in the capsid-coding region when serially passaged up to ten times in BHK-21 cells, while retaining the marker sequence. PMID:23465777

  15. A critical re-assessment of DNA repair gene promoter methylation in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Do, Hongdo; Wong, Nicholas C.; Murone, Carmel; John, Thomas; Solomon, Benjamin; Mitchell, Paul L.; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair genes that have been inactivated by promoter methylation offer potential therapeutic targets either by targeting the specific repair deficiency, or by synthetic lethal approaches. This study evaluated promoter methylation status for eight selected DNA repair genes (ATM, BRCA1, ERCC1, MGMT, MLH1, NEIL1, RAD23B and XPC) in 56 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumours and 11 lung cell lines using the methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) methodology. Frequent methylation in NEIL1 (42%) and infrequent methylation in ERCC1 (2%) and RAD23B (2%) are reported for the first time in NSCLC. MGMT methylation was detected in 13% of the NSCLCs. Contrary to previous studies, methylation was not detected in ATM, BRCA1, MLH1 and XPC. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) was consistent with these findings. The study emphasises the importance of using appropriate methodology for accurate assessment of promoter methylation. PMID:24569633

  16. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    SciTech Connect

    Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB, sequevars 1 and 2 (IIB-1&2) cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates, and are quarantined pathogens in Canada and Europe. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of their potential risk to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated geraniums are also a host and have the potential to spread the pathogen through trade, and its extracts strongly inhibits DNA-based detection methods. We designed four primer and probe sets for an improved qPCR method that targets stable regions of DNA. RsSA1 and RsSA2 recognize IIB-1&2 strains, RsII recognizes the current phylotype II (the newly proposed R. solanacearum species) strains (and a non-plant associated R. mannitolilytica), and Cox1 recognizes eight plant species including major hosts of R. solanacearum such as potato, tomato and cultivated geranium as an internal plant control. We multiplexed the RsSA2 with the RsII and Cox1 sets to provide two layers of detection of a positive IIB-1&2 sample, and to validate plant extracts and qPCR reactions. The TaqMan-based uniplex and multiplex qPCR assays correctly identified 34 IIB-1&2 and 52 phylotype II strains out of 90 R. solanacearum species complex strains. Additionally, the multiplex qPCR assay was validated successfully using 169 artificially inoculated symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples from multiple plant hosts including geranium. Moreover, we developed an extraction buffer that allowed for a quick and easy DNA extraction from infected plants including geranium for detection of R. solanacearum by qPCR. Our multiplex qPCR assay, especially when coupled with the quick extraction buffer method, allows for quick, easy and reliable detection and differentiation of the IIB-1&2 strains of R. solanacearum.

  17. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  18. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids in wild-type and a mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks the mitochondrial HMG box protein Abf2p.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S M; Zelenaya-Troitskaya, O; Perlman, P S; Butow, R A

    1996-01-01

    DNA-protein complexes (nucleoids) are believed to be the segregating unit of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A mitochondrial HMG box protein, Abf2p, is needed for maintenance of mtDNA in cells grown on rich dextrose medium, but is dispensible in glycerol grown cells. As visualized by 4',6'-diamino-2-phenylindole staining, mtDNA nucleoids in mutant cells lacking Abf2p ( delta abf2) are diffuse compared with those in wild-type cells. We have isolated mtDNA nucleoids and characterized two mtDNA-protein complexes, termed NCLDp-2 and NCLDs-2, containing distinct but overlapping sets of polypeptides. This protocol yields similar nucleoid complexes from the delta abf2 mutant, although several proteins appear lacking from NCLDs-2. Segments of mtDNA detected with probes to COXII, VAR1 and ori5 sequences are equally sensitive to DNase I digestion in NCLDs-2 and NCLDp-2 from wild-type cells and from the delta abf2 mutant. However, COXII and VAR1 sequences are 4-to 5-fold more sensitive to DNase I digestion of mtDNA in toluene-permeabilized mitochondria from the delta abf2 mutant than from wild-type cells, but no difference in DNase I sensitivity was detected with the ori5 probe. These results provide a first indication that Abf2p influences differential organization of mtDNA sequences. PMID:8628667

  19. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. )

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  20. DNA repair and the evolution of transformation in Bacillus subtilis. II. Role of inducible repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wojciechowski, M.F.; Hoelzer, M.A.; Michod, R.E.

    1989-03-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, DNA repair and recombination are intimately associated with competence, the physiological state in which the bacterium can bind, take up and recombine exogenous DNA. Previously, we have shown that the homologous DNA transformation rate (ratio of transformants to total cells) increases with increasing UV dosage if cells are transformed after exposure to UV radiation (UV-DNA), whereas the transformation rate decreases if cells are transformed before exposure to UV (DNA-UV). In this report, by using different DNA repair-deficient mutants, we show that the greater increase in transformation rate in UV-DNA experiments than in DNA-UV experiments does not depend upon excision repair or inducible SOS-like repair, although certain quantitative aspects of the response do depend upon these repair systems. We also show that there is no increase in the transformation rate in a UV-DNA experiment when repair and recombination proficient cells are transformed with nonhomologous plasmid DNA, although the results in a DNA-UV experiment are essentially unchanged by using plasmid DNA. We have used din operon fusions as a sensitive means of assaying for the expression of genes under the control of the SOS-like regulon in both competent and noncompetent cell subpopulations as a consequence of competence development and our subsequent experimental treatments. Results indicate that the SOS-like system is induced in both competent and noncompetent subpopulations in our treatments and so should not be a major factor in the differential response in transformation rate observed in UV-DNA and DNA-UV treatments. These results provide further support to the hypothesis that the evolutionary function of competence is to bring DNA into the cell for use as template in the repair of DNA damage.

  1. Genetic study on the effects of the repair deficient mutants mei-9/sup a/, mei-41/sup D5/, mus101/sup D1/, mus104/sup D1/, and mus302/sup D1/ of Drosophila melanogaster on x-ray induced chromosome loss and translocations in the paternal genome

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.F.

    1981-01-01

    Each mutant was incorporated singly into ring-x males each provided with V/sup s/Yy/sup +/. From matings of males carrying mus101/sup D1/, mus302/sup D1/, or mei-41/sup D5/, mutants identifying a caffeine sensitive (CAS) postreplication repair pathway, with corresponding mutant females, overall frequencies of spontaneous partial loss and spontaneous complete loss were significantly increased over nonmutant controls. Similar findings were noted when males carrying the excision repair mutant mei-9/sup a/ were mated with mei-9/sup a/ females. Males carrying the mutant mus104/sup D1/, identifying a caffeine insensitive (CIS) postreplication repair pathway, tested with mus104/sup D1/ females, produced results that were not significantly different from non-mutant controls. When males were given 3000 rads x-irradiation, frequencies of induced partial loss were significantly higher with mus101/sup D1/, mus302/sup D1/, mei-41/sup D5/, and mei-9/sup a/ and not significantly different from controls with mus104/sup D1/. It was suggested that the functional CAS postreplication repair pathway primarily promotes repair, while an alternative pathway(s), not defined by mus104/sup D1/, promotes misrepair. Therefore, the significant increases in both spontaneous and induced partial loss with the excision repair deficient mutant mei-9/sup a/ suggest the possibility that (a) the excision repair pathway may not function in misrepair and (b) the undefined misrepair pathway may be the dominant pathway for postreplication repair in Drosophila since mei-9/sup a/ females presumably have functional repair and misrepair capacity.

  2. Biological cost of hypermutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Sara; Oliver, Antonio; Salerno, Paola; Mena, Ana; Bertoni, Giovanni; Tümmler, Burkhard; Cariani, Lisa; Conese, Massimo; Döring, Gerd; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2007-05-01

    The high prevalence of hypermutable (mismatch repair-deficient) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is thought to be driven by their co-selection with adaptive mutations required for long-term persistence. Whether the increased mutation rate of naturally hypermutable strains is associated with a biological benefit or cost for the colonization of secondary environments is not known. Thirty-nine P. aeruginosa strains were collected from ten patients with CF during their course of chronic lung infections and screened for hypermutability. Seven hypermutable P. aeruginosa strains (18 %) isolated from six patients with CF (60 %) were identified and assigned to five different genotypes. Complementation and sequence analysis in the mutS, mutL and uvrD genes of these hypermutable P. aeruginosa strains revealed novel mutations. To understand the consequences of hypermutation for the fitness of the organisms, five pairs of clinical wild-type/hypermutable, clonally related P. aeruginosa strains and the laboratory strains PAO1/PAO1DeltamutS were subjected to competition in vitro and in the agar-beads mouse model of chronic airway infection. When tested in competition assay in vitro, the wild-type outcompeted four clinical hypermutable strains and the PAO1DeltamutS strain. In vivo, all of the hypermutable strains were less efficient at establishing lung infection than their wild-type clones. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa hypermutation is associated with a biological cost, reducing the potential for colonization of new environments and therefore strain transmissibility. PMID:17464058

  3. A TaqMan-based multiplex qPCR assay and DNA extraction method for phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2 (select agent) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strains have the ability to cause brown rot of potato in temperate climates. Since these strains are not established in the U.S. and because of the potential risk they pose to the potato industry, the U.S. government has listed them as select agents. Cultivated...

  4. Characterization by automated DNA sequencing of mutations in the gene (rpoB) encoding the RNA polymerase beta subunit in rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from New York City and Texas.

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, V; Li, L L; Iordanescu, S; Hamrick, M R; Wanger, A; Kreiswirth, B N; Musser, J M

    1994-01-01

    Automated DNA sequencing was used to characterize mutations associated with rifampin resistance in a 69-bp region of the gene, rpoB, encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The data confirmed that greater than 90% of rifampin-resistant strains have sequence alterations in this region and showed that most are missense mutations. The analysis also identified several mutant rpoB alleles not previously associated with resistant organisms and one short region of rpoB that had an unusually high frequency of insertions and deletions. Although many strains with an identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern have the same variant rpoB allele, some do not, a result that suggests the occurrence of evolutionary divergence at the clone level. PMID:8027320

  5. Suppression of capsule expression in Δlon strains of Escherichia coli by two novel rpoB mutations in concert with HNS: possible role for DNA bending at rcsA promoter

    PubMed Central

    Meenakshi, Shanmugaraja; Munavar, M Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of mutations in genes coding for subunits of RNA polymerase always throw more light on the intricate events that regulate the expression of gene(s). Lon protease of Escherichia coli is implicated in the turnover of RcsA (positive regulator of genes involved in capsular polysaccharide synthesis) and SulA (cell division inhibitor induced upon DNA damage). Failure to degrade RcsA and SulA makes lon mutant cells to overproduce capsular polysaccharides and to become sensitive to DNA damaging agents. Earlier reports on suppressors for these characteristic lon phenotypes related the role of cochaperon DnaJ and tmRNA. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two novel mutations in rpoB gene capable of modulating the expression of cps genes in Δlon strains of E. coli in concert with HNS. clpA, clpB, clpY, and clpQ mutations do not affect this capsule expression suppressor (Ces) phenotype. These mutant RNA polymerases affect rcsA transcription, but per se are not defective either at rcsA or at cps promoters. The results combined with bioinformatics analyses indicate that the weaker interaction between the enzyme and DNA::RNA hybrid during transcription might play a vital role in the lower level expression of rcsA. These results might have relevance to pathogenesis in related bacteria. PMID:26403574

  6. In situ detection of acetylaminofluorene-DNA adducts in human cells using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Taka-aki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Imoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Aya; Nakamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Yukika; Okumura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Akiko; Hanaoka, Fumio; Shibutani, Shinya; Miyagawa, Sachiko; Mori, Toshio

    2004-11-01

    The present study was performed to generate monoclonal antibodies capable of detecting N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF)-derived DNA adducts in human cells in situ. As an immunogen, we employed NA-AAF-modified single-stranded DNA coupled electrostatically to methylated protein and we produced five different monoclonal antibodies. All of them showed strong binding to NA-AAF-modified DNA, but had undetectable or minimal binding to undamaged DNA. Competitive inhibition experiments revealed that the epitope recognized by these antibodies is N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene (dG-C8-AAF) in DNA, although deacetylated N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene in DNA is also recognized with slightly less efficiency. In contrast, these antibodies did not bind to 3-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene in DNA or to UV-induced lesions in DNA. Interestingly, they showed only minimal binding to small AAF-nucleoside adducts (dG-C8-AAF), indicating that DNA regions flanking a DNA-bound adduct, in addition to the adduct itself, are essential for the stable binding of the antibodies. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the most promising antibody (AAF-1), we detected the concentration-dependent induction of NA-AAF-modified adducts in DNA from repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells treated with physiological concentrations of NA-AAF. Moreover, the assay enabled to confirm that normal human cells efficiently repaired NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts but not XP-A cells. Most importantly, the formation of NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts in individual nuclei of XP cells could be clearly visualized using indirect immunofluorescence. Thus, we succeeded in establishing novel monoclonal antibodies capable of the in situ detection of NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts in human cells. PMID:15380103

  7. Complete genome sequence of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 assembled using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.; Ray, Allison E.; Poole, Farris L.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-09-04

    Pelosinus fermentans strain R7 was isolated from Russian kaolin clays as the type strain and it can reduce Fe(III) during fermentative growth (1). Draft genome sequences for P. fermentans R7 and four strains from Hanford, Washington, USA, have been published (2–4). The P. fermentans 16S rRNA sequence dominated the lactate-based enrichment cultures from three geochemically contrasting soils from the Melton Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA (5) and also at another stimulated, uraniumcontaminated field site near Oak Ridge (6). For the current work, strain UFO1 was isolated from pristine sediments at a background field site in Oak Ridge and characterized as facilitating U(VI) reduction and precipitation with phosphate (7).

  8. Structural defect linked to nonrandom mutations in the matrix gene of Biden strain subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus defined by cDNA cloning and expression of chimeric genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayata, M.; Hirano, A.; Wong, T.C.

    1989-03-01

    Biken strain, a nonproductive measles viruslike agent isolated from a subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patient, contains a posttranscriptional defect affecting matrix (M) protein. A putative M protein was translated in vitro with RNA from Biken strain-infected cells. A similar protein was detected in vivo by an antiserum against a peptide synthesized from the cloned M gene of Edmonston strain measles virus. By using a novel method, full-length cDNAs of the Biken M gene were selectively cloned. The cloned Biken M gene contained an open reading frame which encoded 8 extra carboxy-terminal amino acid residues and 20 amino acid substitutions predicted to affect both the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of the gene product. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and in vivo into a 37,500 M/sub r/ protein electrophoretically and antigenically distinct from the M protein of Edmonston strain but identical to the M protein in Biken strain-infected cells. Chimeric M proteins synthesized in vitro and in vivo showed that the mutations in the carboxy-proximal region altered the local antigenicity and those in the amino region affected the overall protein conformation. The protein expressed from the Biken M gene was unstable in vivo. Instability was attributed to multiple mutations. These results offer insights into the basis of the defect in Biken strain and pose intriguing questions about the evolutionary origins of SSPE viruses in general.

  9. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  10. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing. PMID:24607713

  11. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri 2a strains mucosally deliver DNA vaccines encoding measles virus hemagglutinin, inducing specific immune responses and protection in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Losonsky, Genevieve; Singh, Mahender; Medina-Moreno, Sandra M; Polo, John M; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Robinson, Harriet; Sztein, Marcelo B; Levine, Myron M

    2003-05-01

    Measles remains a leading cause of child mortality in developing countries. Residual maternal measles antibodies and immunologic immaturity dampen immunogenicity of the current vaccine in young infants. Because cotton rat respiratory tract is susceptible to measles virus (MV) replication after intranasal (i.n.) challenge, this model can be used to assess the efficacy of MV vaccines. Pursuing a new measles vaccine strategy that might be effective in young infants, we used attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CVD 908-htrA and Shigella flexneri 2a CVD 1208 vaccines to deliver mucosally to cotton rats eukaryotic expression plasmid pGA3-mH and Sindbis virus-based DNA replicon pMSIN-H encoding MV hemagglutinin (H). The initial i.n. dose-response with bacterial vectors alone identified a well-tolerated dosage (1 x 10(9) to 7 x 10(9) CFU) and a volume (20 micro l) that elicited strong antivector immune responses. Animals immunized i.n. on days 0, 28, and 76 with bacterial vectors carrying DNA plasmids encoding MV H or immunized parenterally with these naked DNA vaccine plasmids developed MV plaque reduction neutralizing antibodies and proliferative responses against MV antigens. In a subsequent experiment of identical design, cotton rats were challenged with wild-type MV 1 month after the third dose of vaccine or placebo. MV titers were significantly reduced in lung tissue of animals immunized with MV DNA vaccines delivered either via bacterial live vectors or parenterally. Since attenuated serovar Typhi and S. flexneri can deliver measles DNA vaccines mucosally in cotton rats, inducing measles immune responses (including neutralizing antibodies) and protection, boosting strategies can now be evaluated in animals primed with MV DNA vaccines. PMID:12692223

  12. A Single Electroporation Delivery of a DNA Vaccine Containing the Hemagglutinin Gene of Asian H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Generated a Protective Antibody Response in Chickens against a North American Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pasick, John; Kobinger, Gary P.; Hannaman, Drew; Berhane, Yohannes; Clavijo, Alfonso; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Protection against the avian influenza (AI) H5N1 virus is suspected to be mainly conferred by the presence of antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the virus. A single electroporation delivery of 100 or 250 μg of a DNA vaccine construct, pCAG-HA, carrying the HA gene of strain A/Hanoi/30408/2005 (H5N1), in chickens led to the development of anti-HA antibody response in 16 of 17 immunized birds, as measured by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), and an indirect ELISA. Birds vaccinated by electroporation (n = 11) were protected from experimental AI challenge with strain A/chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/1/1983 (H5N2) as judged by low viral load, absence of clinical symptoms, and absence of mortality (n = 11). In contrast, only two out of 10 birds vaccinated with the same vaccine dose (100 or 250 μg) but without electroporation developed antibodies. These birds showed high viral loads and significant morbidity and mortality after the challenge. Seroconversion was reduced in birds electroporated with a low vaccine dose (10 μg), but the antibody-positive birds were protected against virus challenge. Nonelectroporation delivery of a low-dose vaccine did not result in seroconversion, and the birds were as susceptible as those in the control groups that received the control pCAG vector. Electroporation delivery of the DNA vaccine led to enhanced antibody responses and to protection against the AI virus challenge. The HI test, cELISA, or indirect ELISA for anti-H5 antibodies might serve as a good predictor of the potency and efficacy of a DNA immunization strategy against AI in chickens. PMID:23365205

  13. Genotypic characterization of two bacterial artificial chromosome clones derived from a single DNA source of the very virulent gallid herpesvirus-2 strain C12/130

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gallid herpesvirus type 2 (GaHV-2) is the causative agent of Marek’s disease, a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens. GaHV-2 strains vary greatly in pathogenicity. Identification of specific genetic changes associated with differences in pathogenicity has been a formidable task due to the large n...

  14. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep) and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR) led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in the non-coding region of

  15. Activities of DNA base excision repair enzymes in liver and brain correlate with body mass, but not lifespan.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2012-10-01

    Accumulation of DNA lesions compromises replication and transcription and is thus toxic to cells. DNA repair deficiencies are generally associated with cellular replicative senescence and premature aging syndromes, suggesting that efficient DNA repair is required for normal longevity. It follows that the evolution of increasing lifespan amongst animal species should be associated with enhanced DNA repair capacities. Although UV damage repair has been shown to correlate positively with mammalian species lifespan, we lack similar insight into many other DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair (BER). DNA is continuously exposed to reactive oxygen species produced during aerobic metabolism, resulting in the occurrence of oxidative damage within DNA. Short-patch BER plays an important role in repairing the resultant oxidative lesions. We therefore tested whether an enhancement of BER enzyme activities has occurred concomitantly with the evolution of increased maximum lifespan (MLSP). We collected brain and liver tissue from 15 vertebrate endotherm species ranging in MLSP over an order of magnitude. We measured apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity, as well as the rates of nucleotide incorporation into an oligonucleotide containing a single nucleotide gap (catalyzed by BER polymerase β) and subsequent ligation of the oligonucleotide. None of these activities correlated positively with species MLSP. Rather, nucleotide incorporation and oligonucleotide ligation activities appeared to be primarily (and negatively) correlated with species body mass. PMID:21853261

  16. Emerging Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains?

    PubMed Central

    Irino, Kinue; Girão, Dennys M.; Girão, Valéria B.C.; Guth, Beatriz E.C.; Vaz, Tânia M.I.; Moreira, Fabiana C.; Chinarelli, Silvia H.; Vieira, Mônica A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains of nonenteropathogenic serogroups carrying eae but lacking the enteropathogenic E. coli adherence factor plasmid and Shiga toxin DNA probe sequences were isolated from patients (children, adults, and AIDS patients) with and without diarrhea in Brazil. Although diverse in phenotype and genotype, some strains are potentially diarrheagenic. PMID:15504277

  17. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression.

    PubMed

    Horton, Julie K; Gassman, Natalie R; Dunigan, Brittany D; Stefanick, Donna F; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-02-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1(+/+) and Xrcc1(-/-) mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  18. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Dunigan, Brittany B.; Stefanick, Donna F.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1+/+ and Xrcc1−/− mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β- dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  19. Translesion synthesis mechanisms depend on the nature of DNA damage in UV-irradiated human cells

    PubMed Central

    Quinet, Annabel; Martins, Davi Jardim; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Stary, Anne; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet-induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) can be tolerated by translesion DNA polymerases (TLS Pols) at stalled replication forks or by gap-filling. Here, we investigated the involvement of Polη, Rev1 and Rev3L (Polζ catalytic subunit) in the specific bypass of 6-4PP and CPD in repair-deficient XP-C human cells. We combined DNA fiber assay and novel methodologies for detection and quantification of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gaps on ongoing replication forks and postreplication repair (PRR) tracts in the human genome. We demonstrated that Rev3L, but not Rev1, is required for postreplicative gap-filling, while Polη and Rev1 are responsible for TLS at stalled replication forks. Moreover, specific photolyases were employed to show that in XP-C cells, CPD arrest replication forks, while 6-4PP are responsible for the generation of ssDNA gaps and PRR tracts. On the other hand, in the absence of Polη or Rev1, both types of lesion block replication forks progression. Altogether, the data directly show that, in the human genome, Polη and Rev1 bypass CPD and 6-4PP at replication forks, while only 6-4PP are also tolerated by a Polζ-dependent gap-filling mechanism, independent of S phase. PMID:27095204

  20. Translesion synthesis mechanisms depend on the nature of DNA damage in UV-irradiated human cells.

    PubMed

    Quinet, Annabel; Martins, Davi Jardim; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Stary, Anne; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2016-07-01

    Ultraviolet-induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) can be tolerated by translesion DNA polymerases (TLS Pols) at stalled replication forks or by gap-filling. Here, we investigated the involvement of Polη, Rev1 and Rev3L (Polζ catalytic subunit) in the specific bypass of 6-4PP and CPD in repair-deficient XP-C human cells. We combined DNA fiber assay and novel methodologies for detection and quantification of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gaps on ongoing replication forks and postreplication repair (PRR) tracts in the human genome. We demonstrated that Rev3L, but not Rev1, is required for postreplicative gap-filling, while Polη and Rev1 are responsible for TLS at stalled replication forks. Moreover, specific photolyases were employed to show that in XP-C cells, CPD arrest replication forks, while 6-4PP are responsible for the generation of ssDNA gaps and PRR tracts. On the other hand, in the absence of Polη or Rev1, both types of lesion block replication forks progression. Altogether, the data directly show that, in the human genome, Polη and Rev1 bypass CPD and 6-4PP at replication forks, while only 6-4PP are also tolerated by a Polζ-dependent gap-filling mechanism, independent of S phase. PMID:27095204

  1. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing. PMID:27221660

  2. Genealogies of mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Beck, J A; Lloyd, S; Hafezparast, M; Lennon-Pierce, M; Eppig, J T; Festing, M F; Fisher, E M

    2000-01-01

    The mouse is a prime organism of choice for modelling human disease. Over 450 inbred strains of mice have been described, providing a wealth of different genotypes and phenotypes for genetic and other studies. As new strains are generated and others become extinct, it is useful to review periodically what strains are available and how they are related to each other, particularly in the light of available DNA polymorphism data from microsatellite and other markers. We describe the origins and relationships of inbred mouse strains, 90 years after the generation of the first inbred strain. Given the large collection of inbred strains available, and that published information on these strains is incomplete, we propose that all genealogical and genetic data on inbred strains be submitted to a common electronic database to ensure this valuable information resource is preserved and used efficiently. PMID:10615122

  3. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  4. A double-stranded RNA element from a hypovirulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani occurs in DNA form and is genetically related to the pentafunctional AROM protein of the shikimate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, Dilip K.; Jian, Jianhua; Tavantzis, Stellos M.

    1998-01-01

    M2 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) element occurring in the hypovirulent isolate Rhs 1A1 of the plant pathogenic basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani. Rhs 1A1 originated as a sector of the virulent field isolate Rhs 1AP, which contains no detectable amount of the M2 dsRNA. The complete sequence (3,570 bp) of the M2 dsRNA has been determined. A 6.9-kbp segment of total DNA from either Rhs 1A1 or Rhs 1AP hybridizes with an M2-specific cDNA probe. The sequences of M2 dsRNA and of PCR products generated from Rhs 1A1 total DNA were found to be identical. Thus this report describes a fungal host containing full-length DNA copies of a dsRNA element. A major portion of the M2 dsRNA is located in the cytoplasm, whereas a smaller amount is found in mitochondria. Based on either the universal or the mitochondrial genetic code of filamentous fungi, one strand of M2 encodes a putative protein of 754 amino acids. The resulting polypeptide has all four motifs of a dsRNA viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) and is phylogenetically related to the RDRP of a mitochondrial dsRNA associated with hypovirulence in strain NB631 of Cryphonectria parasitica, incitant of chestnut blight. This polypeptide also has significant sequence similarity with two domains of a pentafunctional polypeptide, which catalyzes the five central steps of the shikimate pathway in yeast and filamentous fungi. PMID:9600982

  5. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  6. Diversity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from the Aquatic Environment as Determined by Serotyping and Amplification of the Ribosomal DNA Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baudart, Julia; Lemarchand, Karine; Brisabois, Anne; Lebaron, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186–194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates. PMID:10742240

  7. An easy, rapid, and cost-effective method for DNA extraction from various lichen taxa and specimens suitable for analysis of fungal and algal strains.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook-Young; Jang, Seol-Hwa; Oh, Soon-Ok; Kim, Jung A; Hur, Jae-Seoun

    2014-12-01

    Lichen studies, including biodiversity, phylogenetic relationships, and conservation concerns require definitive species identification, however many lichens can be challenging to identify at the species level. Molecular techniques have shown efficacy in discriminating among lichen taxa, however, obtaining genomic DNA from herbarium and fresh lichen thalli by conventional methods has been difficult, because lichens contain high proteins, polysaccharides, and other complex compounds in their cell walls. Here we report a rapid, easy, and inexpensive protocol for extracting PCR-quality DNA from various lichen species. This method involves the following two steps: first, cell breakage using a beadbeater; and second, extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The procedure requires approximately 10 mg of lichen thalli and can be completed within 20 min. The obtained DNAs were of sufficient quality and quantity to amplify the internal transcribed spacer region from the fungal and algal lichen components, as well as to sequence the amplified products. In addition, 26 different lichen taxa were tested, resulting in successful PCR products. The results of this study validated the experimental protocols, and clearly demonstrated the efficacy and value of our KCl extraction method applied in the fungal and algal samples. PMID:25606001

  8. An Easy, Rapid, and Cost-Effective Method for DNA Extraction from Various Lichen Taxa and Specimens Suitable for Analysis of Fungal and Algal Strains

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sook-Young; Jang, Seol-Hwa; Oh, Soon-Ok; Kim, Jung A

    2014-01-01

    Lichen studies, including biodiversity, phylogenetic relationships, and conservation concerns require definitive species identification, however many lichens can be challenging to identify at the species level. Molecular techniques have shown efficacy in discriminating among lichen taxa, however, obtaining genomic DNA from herbarium and fresh lichen thalli by conventional methods has been difficult, because lichens contain high proteins, polysaccharides, and other complex compounds in their cell walls. Here we report a rapid, easy, and inexpensive protocol for extracting PCR-quality DNA from various lichen species. This method involves the following two steps: first, cell breakage using a beadbeater; and second, extraction, isolation, and precipitation of genomic DNA. The procedure requires approximately 10 mg of lichen thalli and can be completed within 20 min. The obtained DNAs were of sufficient quality and quantity to amplify the internal transcribed spacer region from the fungal and algal lichen components, as well as to sequence the amplified products. In addition, 26 different lichen taxa were tested, resulting in successful PCR products. The results of this study validated the experimental protocols, and clearly demonstrated the efficacy and value of our KCl extraction method applied in the fungal and algal samples. PMID:25606001

  9. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  10. A modified host-cell reactivation assay to quantify DNA repair capacity in cryopreserved peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Pedro; Taron, Miquel; Moran, Teresa; Fernandez, Marco A; Requena, Gerard; Rosell, Rafael

    2011-06-10

    The host-cell reactivation assay (HCRA) is a functional assay that allows the identification of the genes responsible for DNA repair-deficient syndromes, such as Xeroderma pigmentosum, by cross-complementation experiments. It has also been used in molecular epidemiology studies to correlate the low nucleotide excision repair pathway function in peripheral blood lymphocytes with an increased risk of bladder, head and neck, skin and lung cancers. Herein, we present the technical validation of a newly modified HCRA, where nucleofection is used for the transfection of the pmaxGFP plasmid into cryopreserved peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) or lymphoblastoid cell lines. In each sample, 20-24h after transfection, the relative DNA repair capacity (DRC) was quantified by flow cytometry, comparing the transfection efficiency of nucleoporated cells with undamaged plasmid to those transfected with UV-light damaged plasmid in the seven cell lines that were characterized by different DNA repair phenotypes. Dead cells were excluded from the analysis. We observed a high reproducibility of the relative DRC, transfection efficiency and cell viability. The inter-experimental normalization of the flow cytometry resulted in an increased data accuracy and reproducibility. The amount of cells required for each transfection reaction was reduced fourfold, without affecting the final relative DRC. Furthermore, our HCRA demonstrated strong discrimination power in the UV-light dose-response, both in lymphoblastoid cell lines and cryopreserved PBLs. We also observed a strong correlation of the relative DRC data, when samples were measured against two independent batches of both damaged and undamaged plasmid DNA. The relative DRC variable shows a normal distribution when analyzed in the cryopreserved PBLs from a cohort of 35 lung cancer patients and a 5.59-fold variation in the relative DRC is identified among our patients. The mitotic dynamic was discarded as a confounding factor for the

  11. DNA damage is a late event in resveratrol-mediated inhibition of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Mahesh; Soundar, Swetha; Mangoli, Suhas

    2016-07-01

    Resveratrol is an important phytoalexin notable for a wide variety of beneficial activities. Resveratrol has been reported to be active against various pathogenic bacteria. However, it is not clear at the molecular level how this important activity is manifested. Resveratrol has been reported to bind to cupric ions and reduce it. In the process, it generates copper-peroxide complex and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to this ability, resveratrol has been shown to cleave plasmid DNA in several studies. To this end, we envisaged DNA damage to play a role in resveratrol mediated inhibition in Escherichia coli. We employed DNA damage repair deficient mutants from keio collection to demonstrate the hypersensitive phenotype upon resveratrol treatment. Analysis of integrity and PCR efficiency of plasmid DNA from resveratrol-treated cells revealed significant DNA damage after 6 h or more compared to DNA from vehicle-treated cells. RAPD-PCR was performed to demonstrate the damage in genomic DNA from resveratrol-treated cells. In addition, in situ DNA damage was observed under fluorescence microscopy after resveratrol treatment. Further resveratrol treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest of significant fraction of population revealed by flow cytometry. However, a robust induction was not observed in phage induction assay and induction of DNA damage response genes quantified by promoter fused fluorescent tracker protein. These observations along with our previous observation that resveratrol induces membrane damage in E. coli at early time point reveal, DNA damage is a late event, occurring after a few hours of treatment. PMID:27021971

  12. Taxonomic identity of type E botulinum toxin-producing Clostridium butyricum strains by sequencing of a short 16S rDNA region.

    PubMed

    Pourshaban, Manoocheher; Franciosa, Giovanna; Fenicia, Lucia; Aureli, Paolo

    2002-08-27

    Several micro-organisms capable of producing botulinum neurotoxin type E, though phenotypically similar to Clostridium butyricum (a normally non-neurotoxigenic organism), have recently been isolated in Italy and China. Some of these micro-organisms had been implicated in food-borne botulism, a serious neuroparalytic disease. The taxonomic identity of the type E botulinum toxin-producing strains is confirmed here, through sequencing of a genus- and species-specific segment of the 16S rRNA gene. Confirmation leads to the conclusion that neurotoxigenic C. butyricum must be regarded as an emergent food-borne pathogen. PMID:12204382

  13. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  14. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M

    2015-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand breaks by heat and piperidine was analyzed. Results showed that DNA lesions in plasmid DNA exposed to UVB- or UVA-activated DU were only slightly heat reactive, but were piperidine sensitive. The cytotoxicity of UVB-activated uranyl ion was measured in repair-proficient and repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The cytotoxicity of co-exposures of uranyl ion and UVB radiation was dependent on the order of exposure and was greater than co-exposures of arsenite and UVB radiation. Uranyl ion and UVB radiation were synergistically cytotoxic in cells, and cells exposed to photoactivated DU required different DNA repair pathways than cells exposed to non-photoactivated DU. This study contributes to our understanding of the DNA lesions formed by DU, as well as their repair. Results suggest that excitation of uranyl ion by UV radiation can provide a pathway for uranyl ion to be chemically genotoxic in populations with dermal exposures to uranium and UV radiation, which would make skin an overlooked target organ for uranium exposures. PMID:24832689

  15. A sequence-specific DNA-binding factor (VF1) from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cells binds to three adjacent sites in the xisA upstream region.

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, C J; Brusca, J S; Ramasubramanian, T S; Wei, T F; Golden, J W

    1990-01-01

    A DNA-binding factor (VF1) partially purified from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cell extracts by heparin-Sepharose chromatography was found to have affinity for the xisA upstream region. The xisA gene is required for excision of an 11-kilobase element from the nifD gene during heterocyst differentiation. Previous studies of the xisA upstream sequences demonstrated that deletion of this region is required for the expression of xisA from heterologous promoters in vegetative cells. Mobility shift assays with a labeled 250-base-pair fragment containing the binding sites revealed three distinct DNA-protein complexes. Competition experiments showed that VF1 also bound to the upstream sequences of the rbcL and glnA genes, but the rbcL and glnA fragments showed only single complexes in mobility shift assays. The upstream region of the nifH gene formed a weak complex with VF1. DNase footprinting and deletion analysis of the xisA binding site mapped the binding to a 66-base-pair region containing three repeats of the consensus recognition sequence ACATT. Images PMID:2118506

  16. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone of foot-and-mouth disease virus strain O/JPN/2010 isolated in Japan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tatsuya; Onozato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Seiichi; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manabu; Morioka, Kazuki; Kanno, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of the genome of a foot-and-mouth disease virus isolated from the 2010 epidemic in Japan was constructed and designated pSVL-f02. Transfection of Cos-7 or IBRS-2 cells with this clone allowed the recovery of infectious virus. The recovered virus had the same in vitro characterization as the parental virus with regard to antigenicity in neutralization and indirect immunofluorescence tests, plaque size and one-step growth. Pigs were experimentally infected with the parental virus or the recombinant virus recovered from pSVL-f02 transfected cells. There were no significant differences in clinical signs or antibody responses between the two groups, and virus isolation and viral RNA detection from clinical samples were similar. Virus recovered from transfected cells therefore retained the in vitro characteristics and the in vivo pathogenicity of their parental strain. This cDNA clone should be a valuable tool to analyze determinants of pathogenicity and mechanisms of virus replication, and to develop genetically engineered vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus. PMID:27234555

  17. Crystal structure of glutamine receptor protein from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7 in complex with its effector l-glutamine: implications of effector binding in molecular association and DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Nakano, Noboru; Ponnuraj, Karthe; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Sakamoto, Keiko; Shinkai, Akeo; Kumar, Penmetcha K. R.

    2008-01-01

    Genome analyses have revealed that members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulators are widely distributed among prokaryotes, including both bacteria and archaea. These regulatory proteins are involved in cellular metabolism in both global and specific manners, depending on the availability of the exogenous amino acid effectors. Here we report the first crystal structure of glutamine receptor protein (Grp) from Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7, in the ligand-free and glutamine-bound (Grp-Gln) forms. Although the overall structures of both molecules are similar, a significant conformational change was observed at the ligand [l-glutamine (Gln)] binding site in the effector domain, which may be essential for further stabilization of the octameric structure, and in turn for facilitating DNA binding. In addition, we predicted promoter for the grp gene, and these analyses suggested the importance of cooperative binding to the protein. To gain insights into the ligand-induced conformational changes, we mutated all of the ligand-binding residues in Grp, and revealed the importance of Gln binding by biochemical and structural analyses. Further structural analyses showed that Y77 is crucial for ligand binding, and that the residues T132 and T134, which are highly conserved among the Lrp family of proteins, fluctuates between the active and inactive conformations, thus affecting protein oligomerization for DNA binding. PMID:18653535

  18. Protecting the heritable genome: DNA damage response mechanisms in spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rübe, Claudia E; Zhang, Sheng; Miebach, Nadine; Fricke, Andreas; Rübe, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) must maintain the integrity of their genome to prevent reproduction failure and limit the hereditary risk associated with transmission to the progeny. SSCs must therefore have robust response mechanisms to counteract the potentially deleterious effects of DNA damage, with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) representing the greatest threat to genomic integrity. Through in vivo analysis of the DNA damage response of SSCs within their physiological tissue context, we aimed to gain insights into the mechanisms by which SSCs preserve genome integrity. After whole-body irradiation of repair-proficient and repair-deficient (DNA-PK- and ATM-deficient) mice, the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed in SSCs of testis compared with somatic cells of other tissues by enumerating γH2AX-, MDC1-, and 53BP1-foci. Caspase-3 and PARP-1 were used as markers for apoptotic cell death. Our results show that DNA damage response mechanisms in SSCs characterized by unique chromatin compositions are markedly different from those of somatic cells. In SSCs lacking compact heterochromatin, histone-associated signaling components of the DNA repair machinery are completely absent and radiation-induced DSBs are rejoined predominantly by DNA-PK-independent pathways, suggesting the existence of alternative repair mechanisms. As a complimentary mechanism characterized by low thresholds for ATM-dependent checkpoint activation, the differentiating progeny, but not the SSCs themselves, promote apoptosis in response to low levels of DNA damage. By evaluating SSCs within their stem cell niche, we show that DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis function together to maintain the integrity of the heritable genome. PMID:21123119

  19. Characterization of a Pathogenic Full-Length cDNA Clone and Transmission Model for Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC22A

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Anne; Yount, Boyd; Lin, Chun-Ming; Hou, Yixuan; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly pathogenic alphacoronavirus. In the United States, highly virulent PEDV strains cause between 80 and 100% mortality in suckling piglets and are rapidly transmitted between animals and farms. To study the genetic factors that regulate pathogenesis and transmission, we developed a molecular clone of PEDV strain PC22A. The infectious-clone-derived PEDV (icPEDV) replicated as efficiently as the parental virus in cell culture and in pigs, resulting in lethal disease in vivo. Importantly, recombinant PEDV was rapidly transmitted to uninoculated pigs via indirect contact, demonstrating virulence and efficient transmission while replicating phenotypes seen in the wild-type virus. Using reverse genetics, we removed open reading frame 3 (ORF3) and replaced this region with a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene to generate icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP. icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP replicated efficiently in vitro and in vivo, was efficiently transmitted among pigs, and produced lethal disease outcomes. However, the diarrheic scores in icPEDV-ΔORF3-RFP-infected pigs were lower than those in wild-type-virus- or icPEDV-infected pigs, and the virus formed smaller plaques than those of PC22A. Together, these data describe the development of a robust reverse-genetics platform for identifying genetic factors that regulate pathogenic outcomes and transmission efficiency in vivo, providing key infrastructural developments for developing and evaluating the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines and therapeutics in a clinical setting. PMID:26733065

  20. 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in DNA does not constitute a barrier to transcription, but is converted into transcription-blocking damage by OGG1

    PubMed Central

    Kitsera, Nataliya; Stathis, Dimitrios; Lühnsdorf, Bork; Müller, Heiko; Carell, Thomas; Epe, Bernd; Khobta, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    The common DNA base modification 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-G) affects the efficiency and fidelity of transcription. We constructed plasmid substrates carrying single 8-oxo-G residues, specifically positioned in the transcribed or the non-transcribed DNA strands, to investigate their effects on the expression of an EGFP reporter gene and to explore the role of base excision repair in the mechanism of transcription inhibition. We report that 8-oxo-G does not directly block transcription in cells, since a single 8-oxo-G in the transcribed DNA strand did not reduce the EGFP expression levels in repair-deficient (OGG1-null) mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines. Rather, inhibition of transcription by 8-oxo-G fully depends on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and, at the same time, does not require the localization of the lesion in the transcribed DNA strand. We propose that the interruption of transcription is induced by base excision repair intermediates and, therefore, could be a common consequence of various DNA base modifications. Concordantly, the non-blocking DNA modification uracil was also found to inhibit transcription, but in an OGG1-independent manner. PMID:21441539

  1. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Final report, August 1, 1977-January 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.H.

    1985-02-01

    We have compared the lethal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects of radiation and alkylating agents in several types of cells. In C3H 10T 1/2 cells, lethal effects decreased, while the frequency of ouabain-resistant mutants and of transformed cells increased during a 4-hour holding period following EMS treatment. To isolate repair-deficient mutants, we used diploid BHK cells which were characterized with regard to reactivation of uv- and x-irradiated Herpes Simplex virus (HSV). Three radiation-sensitive BHK strains were isolated using a host cell viral-reactivation suicide procedure. Two of these strains were sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of alkylating agents. One strain was hypermutable and one hypomutable following treatment with EMS. Mouse lymphoma strain L5178Y-S (LY-S), though more sensitive to the lethal effects of X radiation and alkylating agents than strain L5178Y-R (LY-R), was less mutable by these agents at the Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) loci. Strain LY-S exhibited less dose-rate dependence for lethal effects than strain LY-R, but no dose-rate dependence was observed in radiation-induced mutagenesis for either strain. Repair of x ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) at 25/sup 0/ was observed for strain LY-S but not LY-R. Addition of 3-aminobenzamide (2 mm) to the medium sensitized both strains to x radiation, uv radiation and MNU, and inhibited rapair of x ray-induced PLD in strain LY-S.

  2. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  4. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  5. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  6. FANCD2 Maintains Fork Stability in BRCA1/2-Deficient Tumors and Promotes Alternative End-Joining DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Kais, Zeina; Rondinelli, Beatrice; Holmes, Amie; O'Leary, Colin; Kozono, David; D'Andrea, Alan D; Ceccaldi, Raphael

    2016-06-14

    BRCA1/2 proteins function in homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair and cooperate with Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins to maintain genomic integrity through replication fork stabilization. Loss of BRCA1/2 proteins results in DNA repair deficiency and replicative stress, leading to genomic instability and enhanced sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Recent studies have shown that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors upregulate Polθ-mediated alternative end-joining (alt-EJ) repair as a survival mechanism. Whether other mechanisms maintain genomic integrity upon loss of BRCA1/2 proteins is currently unknown. Here we show that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors also upregulate FANCD2 activity. FANCD2 is required for fork protection and fork restart in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors. Moreover, FANCD2 promotes Polθ recruitment at sites of damage and alt-EJ repair. Finally, loss of FANCD2 in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors enhances cell death. These results reveal a synthetic lethal relationship between FANCD2 and BRCA1/2, and they identify FANCD2 as a central player orchestrating DNA repair pathway choice at the replication fork. PMID:27264184

  7. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  8. Defining the contribution of MC1R physiological ligands to ATR phosphorylation at Ser435, a predictor of DNA repair in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Stuart G.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS-coupled receptor that signals through cAMP and PKA, regulates pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and melanoma resistance. MC1R-cAMP signaling promotes PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) at Ser435 (ATR-pS435), a modification that enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER) by facilitating recruitment of the XPA protein to sites of UV-induced DNA damage. High-throughput methods were developed to quantify ATR-pS435, measure XPA-photodamage interactions and assess NER function. We report that melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) induce ATR-pS435, enhance XPA’s association with UV-damaged DNA and optimize melanocytic NER. In contrast, MC1R antagonists agouti signaling protein (ASIP) or human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) interfere with ATR-pS435 generation, impair the XPA-DNA interaction and reduce DNA repair. Although ASIP and HBD3 each blocked α-MSH-mediated induction of the signaling pathway, only ASIP depleted basal ATR-pS435. Our findings confirm that ASIP diminishes agonist-independent MC1R basal signaling whereas HBD3 is a neutral MC1R antagonist that blocks activation by melanocortins. Furthermore, our data suggest that ATR-pS435 may be a useful biomarker for the DNA repair-deficient MC1R phenotype. PMID:26168232

  9. Defining the Contribution of MC1R Physiological Ligands to ATR Phosphorylation at Ser435, a Predictor of DNA Repair in Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Stuart G; Wolf Horrell, Erin M; Boulanger, Mary C; D'Orazio, John A

    2015-12-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS-coupled receptor that signals through cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA), regulates pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and melanoma resistance. MC1R-cAMP signaling promotes PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) at Ser435 (ATR-pS435), a modification that enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER) by facilitating recruitment of the XPA protein to sites of UV-induced DNA damage. High-throughput methods were developed to quantify ATR-pS435, measure XPA-photodamage interactions, and assess NER function. We report that melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or ACTH induce ATR-pS435, enhance XPA's association with UV-damaged DNA and optimize melanocytic NER. In contrast, MC1R antagonists agouti signaling protein (ASIP) or human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) interfere with ATR-pS435 generation, impair the XPA-DNA interaction, and reduce DNA repair. Although ASIP and HBD3 each blocked α-MSH-mediated induction of the signaling pathway, only ASIP depleted basal ATR-pS435. Our findings confirm that ASIP diminishes agonist-independent MC1R basal signaling whereas HBD3 is a neutral MC1R antagonist that blocks activation by melanocortins. Furthermore, our data suggest that ATR-pS435 may be a useful biomarker for the DNA repair-deficient MC1R phenotype. PMID:26168232

  10. Effect of aspirin on DNA damage induced by MMC in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2007-06-01

    In our previous paper, we found that aspirin suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of antigenotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the protective effects of aspirin against the genotoxicity of MMC with the DNA repair test in Drosophila melanogaster. Three types of treatment of aspirin were performed as co-, post- and pre-treatment. Aspirin co-treatment suppressed effectively the genotoxicity of MMC in a dose-dependent manner and the sex ratio at a dose of aspirin 10mg/bottle elevated from 0.01 (without aspirin) to 0.65 at sc z(1) w(+(TE)) mei-9(a) mei-41(D5)/-C(1)DX, y f [mei-9 mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female] consists of DNA repair-deficient (Rec(-)) males and -proficient (Rec(+)) females. The antigenotoxic effect of aspirin on [mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female] was similar to that on [mei-9, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female]. But post- and pre-treatment by aspirin did not affect the genotoxicity of MMC on [mei-9 mei-41, Rec(-) male.Rec(+) female]. PMID:17336029

  11. The role of DNA repair on cell killing by charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Kanai, T.; Furusawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Ohara, H.; Yatagai, F.

    It can be noted that it is not simple double strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks that are associated with high biological effectiveness in the cell killing effect for high LET radiation. Here, we have examined the effectiveness of fast neutrons and low (initial energy = 12 MeV/u) or high (135 MeV/u) energy charged particles on cell death in 19 mammalian cell lines including radiosensitive mutants. Some of the radiosensitive lines were deficient in DNA dsb repair such as LX830, M10, V3, and L5178Y-S cells and showed lower values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for fast neutrons if compared with their parent cell lines. The other lines of human ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts, irs 1, irs 2, irs 3 and irs1SF cells, which were also radiosensitive but known as proficient in dsb repair, showed moderate RBEs. Dsb repair deficient mutants showed low RBE values for heavy ions. These experimental findings suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role against the attack of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Therefore, we hypothesize that a main cause of cell death induced by high LET radiations is due to non-reparable dsb, which are produced at a higher rate compared to low LET radiations.

  12. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, James E.; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M.; Swanson, Raymond A.; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human DNA repair-deficient disease that involves transcription coupled repair (TCR), in which three gene products, Cockayne syndrome A (CSA), Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), and ultraviolet stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) cooperate in relieving RNA polymerase II arrest at damaged sites to permit repair of the template strand. Mutation of any of these three genes results in cells with increased sensitivity to UV light and defective TCR. Mutations in CSA or CSB are associated with severe neurological disease but mutations in UVSSA are for the most part only associated with increased photosensitivity. This difference raises questions about the relevance of TCR to neurological disease in CS. We find that CSB-mutated cells, but not UVSSA-deficient cells, have increased levels of intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially when mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by rotenone. Increased ROS would result in oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. CSB appears to behave as an electron scavenger in the mitochondria whose absence leads to increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial ROS, however, did not cause detectable nuclear DNA damage even when base excision repair was blocked by an inhibitor of polyADP ribose polymerase. Neurodegeneration in Cockayne syndrome may therefore be associated with ROS-induced damage in the mitochondria, independent of nuclear TCR. An implication of our present results is that mitochondrial dysfunction involving ROS has a major impact on CS-B pathology, whereas nuclear TCR may have a minimal role. PMID:25136123

  13. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cleaver, James E; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M; Swanson, Raymond A; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-09-16

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human DNA repair-deficient disease that involves transcription coupled repair (TCR), in which three gene products, Cockayne syndrome A (CSA), Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), and ultraviolet stimulated scaffold protein A (UVSSA) cooperate in relieving RNA polymerase II arrest at damaged sites to permit repair of the template strand. Mutation of any of these three genes results in cells with increased sensitivity to UV light and defective TCR. Mutations in CSA or CSB are associated with severe neurological disease but mutations in UVSSA are for the most part only associated with increased photosensitivity. This difference raises questions about the relevance of TCR to neurological disease in CS. We find that CSB-mutated cells, but not UVSSA-deficient cells, have increased levels of intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially when mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by rotenone. Increased ROS would result in oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. CSB appears to behave as an electron scavenger in the mitochondria whose absence leads to increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial ROS, however, did not cause detectable nuclear DNA damage even when base excision repair was blocked by an inhibitor of polyADP ribose polymerase. Neurodegeneration in Cockayne syndrome may therefore be associated with ROS-induced damage in the mitochondria, independent of nuclear TCR. An implication of our present results is that mitochondrial dysfunction involving ROS has a major impact on CS-B pathology, whereas nuclear TCR may have a minimal role. PMID:25136123

  14. Surfactin production by strains of Bacillus mojavensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus mojavensis, RRC101 is an endophytic bacterium patented for control of fungal diseases in maize and other plants. DNA fingerprint analysis of the rep-PCR fragments of 35 B. mojavensis and 4 B. subtilis strains using the Diversilab genotyping system revealed genotypic distinctive strains alon...

  15. [Echinococcus and strain concepts].

    PubMed

    Utük, Armağan Erdem; Simsek, Sami

    2008-01-01

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is one of the most important parasitic zoonoses and remains a public health and economic problem all over the world. Echinococcus granulosus includes a number of genetic variants and, up to date, analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences have identified ten distinct genetic types (genotypes G1-10). This categorization follows closely the pattern of strain variation emerging based on biological characteristics. The extensive variation in E. granulosus may influence life-cycle patterns, host specificity, development rate, antigenicity, transmission dynamics, sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, and pathology. In this review, the recent genetic characterizations of Echinococcus genus have been summarized. PMID:18351549

  16. Taxonomy of oxalotrophic Methylobacterium strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Nurettin; Kato, Yuko; Yilmaz, Ferah

    2008-10-01

    Most of the oxalotrophic bacteria are facultative methylotrophs and play important ecological roles in soil fertility and cycling of elements. This study gives a detailed picture of the taxonomy and diversity of these bacteria and provides new information about the taxonomical variability within the genus Methylobacterium. Twelve mesophilic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic oxalate-oxidizing strains were included in this work that had been previously isolated from the soil and some plant tissues by the potassium oxalate enrichment method. The isolates were characterized using biochemical tests, cellular lipid profiles, spectral characteristics of carotenoid pigments, G+C content of the DNA, and 16S rDNA sequencing. The taxonomic similarities among the strains were analyzed using the simple matching ( S SM) and Jaccard ( S J) coefficients, and the UPGMA clustering algorithm. The phylogenetic position of the strains was inferred by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of the 16S rDNA sequences. All isolates were Gram-negative, facultatively methylotrophic, oxidase and catalase positive, and required no growth factors. Based on the results of numerical taxonomy, the strains formed four closely related clusters sharing ≥85% similarity. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences demonstrated that oxalotrophic, pink-pigmented, and facultatively methylotrophic strains could be identified as members of the genus Methylobacterium. Except for M. variabile and M. aquaticum, all of the Methylobacterium type strains tested had the ability of oxalate utilization. Our results indicate that the capability of oxalate utilization seems to be an uncommon trait and could be used as a valuable taxonomic criterion for differentiation of Methylobacterium species.

  17. Molecular analysis of plasmid DNA repair within ultraviolet-irradiated Escherichia coli. I. T4 endonuclease V-initiated excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gruskin, E.A.; Lloyd, R.S.

    1988-09-05

    The process by which DNA-interactive proteins locate specific sequences or target sites on cellular DNA within Escherichia coli is a poorly understood phenomenon. In this study, we present the first direct in vivo analysis of the interaction of a DNA repair enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, and its substrate, pyrimidine dimer-containing plasmid DNA, within UV-irradiated E. coli. A pyrimidine dimer represents a small target site within large domains of DNA. There are two possible paradigms by which endonuclease V could locate these small target sites: a processive mechanism in which the enzyme scans DNA for dimer sites or a distributive process in which dimers are located by random three-dimensional diffusion. In order to discriminate between these two possibilities in E. coli, an in vivo DNA repair assay was developed to study the kinetics of plasmid DNA repair and the dimer frequency (i.e. the number of dimer sites on a given plasmid molecule) in plasmid DNA as a function of time during repair. Our results demonstrate that the overall process of plasmid DNA repair initiated by T4 endonuclease V (expressed from a recombinant plasmid within repair-deficient E. coli) occurs by a processive mechanism. Furthermore, by reducing the temperature of the repair incubation, the endonuclease V-catalyzed incision step has been effectively decoupled from the subsequent steps including repair patch synthesis, ligation, and supercoiling. By this manipulation, it was determined that the overall processive mechanism is composed of two phases: a rapid processive endonuclease V-catalyzed incision reaction, followed by a slower processive mechanism, the ultimate product of which is the dimer-free supercoiled plasmid molecule.

  18. Cleaving DNA with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Nir; Balkhi, Shameelah R.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1998-03-01

    A DNA structure is described that can cleave single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides in the presence of ionic copper. This ``deoxyribozyme'' can self-cleave or can operate as a bimolecular complex that simultaneously makes use of duplex and triplex interactions to bind and cleave separate DNA substrates. Bimolecular deoxyribozyme-mediated strand scission proceeds with a kobs of 0.2 min-1, whereas the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction could not be detected. The duplex and triplex recognition domains can be altered, making possible the targeted cleavage of single-stranded DNAs with different nucleotide sequences. Several small synthetic DNAs were made to function as simple ``restriction enzymes'' for the site-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA.

  19. Identification of Different Agrobacterium Strains Isolated from the Same Forest Nursery

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Marie-France; Brasileiro, Ana Cristina Miranda; Depierreux, Christiane; Otten, Leon; Delmotte, Francis; Jouanin, Lise

    1990-01-01

    Several Agrobacterium strains isolated from the same forest nursery from 1982 to 1988 were compared by serological, biochemical, and DNA-DNA hybridization methods. Similarities among strains belonging to biovar 2 were observed by indirect immunofluorescence, whereas biovar 1 strains showed serological heterogeneity. Electrophoretic analysis of bacterial envelope-associated proteins showed that few bands appeared in the strains belonging to biovar 1, whereas many proteins appeared in the case of biovar 2 strains. Chromosomal DNA was analyzed with six random C58 chromosomal fragments. None of the six probes hybridized to the DNA of the two biovar 2 strains. One of the probes gave the same hybridization pattern with all biovar 1 strains, whereas the other probes yielded different patterns. The vir regions were closely related in the different pathogenic strains. The T-DNA and replication regions were less conserved and showed some variations among the strains. Images PMID:16348358

  20. DNA, a possible site of action of aluminum in Rhizobium spp

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.C.; Wood, M. )

    1990-12-01

    Al was found to penetrate the cell envelopes of both sensitive and tolerant Rhizobium strains and bind to DNA in vivo. Despite causing a reduction viability, Al stimulated DNA synthesis in the sensitive strain, which suggested that an excision repair mechanism was operating. The Al-stimulated DNA synthesis was reduced by the simultaneous addition of chloramphenicol. In contrast to the sensitive strain, DNA synthesis was unaffected by Al binding to DNA in the tolerant strain. It is proposed that Al enters the cell and binds to the DNA helix, increasing stabilization and preventing successful replication. Different repair mechanisms appear to operate in response to Al in tolerant and sensitive strains.

  1. Reclassification of Gluconacetobacter hansenii strains and proposals of Gluconacetobacter saccharivorans sp. nov. and Gluconacetobacter nataicola sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Lisdiyanti, Puspita; Navarro, Richard R; Uchimura, Tai; Komagata, Kazuo

    2006-09-01

    Ten strains previously assigned to Acetobacter hansenii (=Gluconacetobacter hansenii), Acetobacter pasteurianus LMG 1584 and eight reference strains of the genus Gluconacetobacter were reclassified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA similarity, DNA base composition and phenotypic characteristics. The A. hansenii strains and A. pasteurianus LMG 1584 were included in the cluster of acetic acid bacteria (family Acetobacteraceae) by 16S rRNA gene sequences. Further, they were separated into seven distinct groups by DNA-DNA similarity. DNA-DNA similarity group I was identified as G. hansenii. DNA-DNA similarity group II was retained as Gluconacetobacter sp., because DNA-DNA similarity between the strain and Gluconacetobacter entanii LTH 4560(T) could not be determined. This was due to a lack of availability of the type strain from any source. DNA-DNA similarity group III was regarded as a novel species, for which the name Gluconacetobacter saccharivorans sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 1582(T)=NRIC 0614(T)) is proposed. DNA-DNA similarity group IV included the type strains of Gluconacetobacter oboediens and Gluconacetobacter intermedius, and three A. hansenii strains. This group was identified as G. oboediens because high values of DNA-DNA similarity were obtained between the type strains and G. oboediens has priority over G. intermedius. DNA-DNA similarity group V was identified as Gluconacetobacter europaeus. DNA-DNA similarity group VI was regarded as a novel species, for which the name Gluconacetobacter nataicola sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 1536(T)=NRIC 0616(T)) is proposed. DNA-DNA similarity group VII was reclassified as Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The description of G. hansenii is emended. PMID:16957106

  2. Random mutagenesis strategies for construction of large and diverse clone libraries of mutated DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chusacultanachai, Sudsanguan; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2004-01-01

    The first important step toward a successful preparation of large and diverse DNA libraries with desired complexity is to select a suitable mutagenesis strategy. This chapter describes three different methods for random mutagenesis, the use of XL1-red cells, error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and degenerate oligonucleotides-Pfu (DOP). These mutagenesis strategies possess different benefits and pitfalls; thus, they are differentially useful for production of DNA libraries with different density and complexity. The use of XL1-red, an engineered Escherichia coli with DNA repair deficiency, is one of the simplest mutagenesis and requires no subcloning step. After plasmid encoding DNA of inter-est is transformed into the cells, the mutations are simply generated during each round of DNA replication. The mutation frequency of this method is reported to be 1 base change per 2000 nucleotides; however, it can be slightly increased by extending the culture period to allow the accumulation of more mutations. This strategy is suitable for generation of random mutations with low frequency in a large target DNA. Error-prone PCR is one of the most widely used random mutagenesis. During DNA amplification, misincorporation of nucleotides can be promoted by altering the nucleotide ratio and the concentration of divalent cations in the reaction. We discovered that, by adjusting template concentration, frequency of mutation could be controlled easily and a library with desired mutation rate could be obtained. Additionally, efficiency of subsequent cloning steps to insert the PCR product into plasmid DNA is also a key factor determining size and complexity of the libraries. DOP mutagenesis is a rapid and effective method for random mutagenesis of small DNA and peptides. This strategy uses two chemically synthesized degenerate oligonucleotides as primers. By controlling the positions and ratios of degenerate nucleotides used during oligonucleotide synthesis, it is possible to

  3. Delimination of brewing yeast strains using different molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Tornai-Lehoczki, J; Dlauchy, D

    2000-12-01

    In general, the genetic characteristics, the phenotype and the microbial purity of the production brewing yeast strains are among the most important factors in maintaining a consistently good quality of products. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns of 18S rRNA-coding DNA was investigated to group ale and lager strains. All production brewing yeast strains showed the same RFLP pattern as the type strain and synonym type strains of S. cerevisiae, and were quite different from the type and synonym type strains of S. pastorianus. Based on these data, all production brewing yeast strains investigated in this study appeared to belong to S. cerevisiae. Electrophoretic karyotyping and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis appeared to be suitable methods for distinguishing not only the type and synonym type strain of S. cerevisiae and S. pastorianus, but also the ale and the lager strains. PMID:11139020

  4. DNA–DNA hybridization study of strains of Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia and Empedobacter and of other usually indole-producing non-fermenters of CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi, mostly from human clinical sources, and proposals of Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov., Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov., Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, B.; Steigerwalt, A. G.; Nicholson, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomic classification of 182 phenotypically similar isolates was evaluated using DNA–DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. These bacterial isolates were mainly derived from clinical sources; all were Gram-negative non-fermenters and most were indoleproducing. Phenotypically, they resembled species from the genera Chryseobacterium, Elizabethkingia or Empedobacter or belonged to CDC groups IIc, IIe, IIh and IIi. Based on these analyses, four novel species are described: Chryseobacterium bernardetii sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13530T=CCUG 60564T=CDC G229T), Chryseobacterium carnis sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13525T=CCUG 60559T=CDC G81T), Chryseobacterium lactis sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 11390T=CCUG 60566T=CDC KC1864T) and Chryseobacterium nakagawai sp. nov. (type strain NCTC 13529T=CCUG 60563T=CDC G41T). The new combination Chryseobacterium taklimakanense comb. nov. (type strain NCTC 13490T=X-65T=CCTCC AB 208154T=NRRL B-51322T) is also proposed to accommodate the reclassified Planobacterium taklimakanense. PMID:23934253

  5. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  6. Variability among Rhizobium Strains Originating from Nodules of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, P; Beyene, D; Vera, F T; Keyser, H H

    1995-07-01

    Rhizobium strains from nodules of Vicia faba were diverse in plasmid content and serology. Results of multilocus gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated several deep chromosomal lineages among the strains. Linkage disequilibrium among the chromosomal types was detected and may have reflected variation of Rhizobium strains in the different geographical locations from which the strains originated. An investigation of pea strains with antibodies prepared against fava bean strains and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, targeting DNA regions coding for rRNA and nodulation, indicated that Rhizobium strains from V. faba nodules were distinguishable from those from Pisum sativum, V. villosa, and Trifolium spp. PMID:16535075

  7. Virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281 on legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, E.E.; Fraley, R.T.; Chilton, M.D.

    1987-03-01

    This study addresses the basis of host range on legumes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain A281, an L,L-succinamopine strain. The authors tested virulence of T-DNA and vir region constructs from this tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid with complementary Ti plasmid regions from heterologous nopaline and octopine strains.

  8. New Orientia tsutsugamushi strain from scrub typhus in Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Odorico, D. M.; Graves, S. R.; Currie, B.; Catmull, J.; Nack, Z.; Ellis, S.; Wang, L.; Miller, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent case of scrub typhus in Australia, Orientia tsutsugamushi isolated from the patient's blood was tested by sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA gene. The sequence showed a strain of O. tsutsugamushi that was quite different from the classic Karp, Kato, and Gilliam strains. The new strain has been designated Litchfield. PMID:9866742

  9. Polyphasic characterization of xanthomonas strains from onion.

    PubMed

    Gent, David H; Schwartz, Howard F; Ishimaru, Carol A; Louws, Frank J; Cramer, Robert A; Lawrence, Christopher B

    2004-02-01

    ABSTRACT Xanthomonas leaf blight has become an increasingly important disease of onion, but the diversity among Xanthomonas strains isolated from onion is unknown, as is their relationship to other species and pathovars of Xanthomonas. Forty-nine Xanthomonas strains isolated from onion over 27 years from 10 diverse geographic regions were characterized by pathogenicity to onion and dry bean, fatty acid profiles, substrate utilization patterns (Biolog), bactericide resistance, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting, rDNA internally transcribed spacer (ITS) region, and hrp b6 gene sequencing. Multiplication of onion Xanthomonas strain R-O177 was not different from X. axonopodis pv. phaseoli in dry bean, but typical common bacterial blight disease symptoms were absent in dry bean. Populations from each geographical region were uniformly sensitive to 100 mug of CuSO(4), 100 mug of ZnSO(4), and 100 mug of streptomycin sulfate per ml. Biolog substrate utilization and fatty acid profiles revealed close phenoltypic relatedness between onion strains of Xanthomonas and X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae (57% of strains) and X. arboricola pv. poinsettiicola (37% of strains), respectively. A logistic regression model based on fatty acid composition and substrate utilization classified 69% of strains into their geographical region of origin. Sequencing of a portion of the hrp B6 gene from 24 strains and ITS region from 25 strains revealed greater than 97% sequence similarity among strains. DNA fingerprinting revealed five genotype groups within onion strains of Xanthomonas and a high degree of genetic diversity among geographical regions of origin. Based on pathogenicity to onion, carbon substrate utilization, fatty acid profiles, rDNA genetic diversity, and genomic fingerprints, we conclude that the strains examined in this study are pathovar X. axonopodis pv. allii. Implications of genetic and phenotypic diversity within X. axonopodis pv. allii are

  10. Impact of DNA repair pathways on the cytotoxicity of piperlongumine in chicken DT40 cell-lines

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Saki; Narita, Takeo; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Tano, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    Piperlongumine is a naturally-occurring small molecule with various biological activities. Recent studies demonstrate that piperlongumine selectively kills various types of transformed cells with minimal toxicity to non-transformed cells by inducing a high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS generates various types of DNA lesions, including base modifications and single strand breaks. In order to examine the contribution of ROS-induced DNA damage to the cytotoxicity by piperlongumine, various DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell-lines with a single DNA repair gene deletion were tested for cellular sensitivity to piperlongumine. The results showed that cell lines defective in homologous recombination (HR) display hyper-sensitivity to piperlongumine, while other cell lines with a deficiency in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, or translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases, show no sensitivity to piperlongumine. The results strongly implicate that double strand breaks (DSBs) generated by piperlongumine are major cytotoxic DNA lesions. Furthermore, a deletion of 53BP1 or Ku70 in the BRCA1-deficient cell line restored cellular resistance to piperlongumine. This strongly supports the idea that piperlongumine induces DSB- mediated cell death. Interestingly, piperlongumine makes the wild type DT40 cell line hypersensitive to a PARP-inhibitor, Olaparib. The results implicate that piperlongumine inhibits HR. Further analysis with cell-based HR assay and the kinetic study of Rad51 foci formation confirmed that piperlongumine suppresses HR activity. Altogether, we revealed novel mechanisms of piperlongumine-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:25221646

  11. Impact of DNA repair pathways on the cytotoxicity of piperlongumine in chicken DT40 cell-lines.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Saki; Narita, Takeo; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Tano, Keizo

    2014-07-01

    Piperlongumine is a naturally-occurring small molecule with various biological activities. Recent studies demonstrate that piperlongumine selectively kills various types of transformed cells with minimal toxicity to non-transformed cells by inducing a high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS generates various types of DNA lesions, including base modifications and single strand breaks. In order to examine the contribution of ROS-induced DNA damage to the cytotoxicity by piperlongumine, various DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell-lines with a single DNA repair gene deletion were tested for cellular sensitivity to piperlongumine. The results showed that cell lines defective in homologous recombination (HR) display hyper-sensitivity to piperlongumine, while other cell lines with a deficiency in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, or translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases, show no sensitivity to piperlongumine. The results strongly implicate that double strand breaks (DSBs) generated by piperlongumine are major cytotoxic DNA lesions. Furthermore, a deletion of 53BP1 or Ku70 in the BRCA1-deficient cell line restored cellular resistance to piperlongumine. This strongly supports the idea that piperlongumine induces DSB- mediated cell death. Interestingly, piperlongumine makes the wild type DT40 cell line hypersensitive to a PARP-inhibitor, Olaparib. The results implicate that piperlongumine inhibits HR. Further analysis with cell-based HR assay and the kinetic study of Rad51 foci formation confirmed that piperlongumine suppresses HR activity. Altogether, we revealed novel mechanisms of piperlongumine-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:25221646

  12. Identification of over-expressed genes in modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to virulent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and th...

  13. Next-generation digital information storage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Church, George M; Gao, Yuan; Kosuri, Sriram

    2012-09-28

    Digital information is accumulating at an astounding rate, straining our ability to store and archive it. DNA is among the most dense and stable information media known. The development of new technologies in both DNA synthesis and sequencing make DNA an increasingly feasible digital storage medium. We developed a strategy to encode arbitrary digital information in DNA, wrote a 5.27-megabit book using DNA microchips, and read the book by using next-generation DNA sequencing. PMID:22903519

  14. The complete DNA sequence and analysis of the virulence plasmid and of five additional plasmids carried by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 strain H30

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains belonging to serogroup O26 have been associated with sporadic cases and outbreaks of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. STEC strains usually harbor a large plasmid carrying genes associated with virulence. The objective of this s...

  15. hMre11 and hRad50 nuclear foci are induced during the normal cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed Central

    Maser, R S; Monsen, K J; Nelms, B E; Petrini, J H

    1997-01-01

    We previously identified a conserved multiprotein complex that includes hMre11 and hRad50. In this study, we used immunofluorescence to investigate the role of this complex in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. hMre11 and hRad50 form discrete nuclear foci in response to treatment with DSB-inducing agents but not in response to UV irradiation. hMre11 and hRad50 foci colocalize after treatment with ionizing radiation and are distinct from those of the DSB repair protein, hRad51. Our data indicate that an irradiated cell is competent to form either hMre11-hRad50 foci or hRad51 foci, but not both. The multiplicity of hMre11 and hRad50 foci is much higher in the DSB repair-deficient cell line 180BR than in repair-proficient cells. hMre11-hRad50 focus formation is markedly reduced in cells derived from ataxia-telangiectasia patients, whereas hRad51 focus formation is markedly increased. These experiments support genetic evidence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicating that Mre11-Rad50 have roles distinct from that of Rad51 in DSB repair. Further, these data indicate that hMre11-hRad50 foci form in response to DNA DSBs and are dependent upon a DNA damage-induced signaling pathway. PMID:9315668

  16. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Pulled hip flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  17. Sequence analysis of the spliced-leader intergenic region (SL-IR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) of Trypanosoma rangeli strains isolated from Rhodnius ecuadoriensis, R. colombiensis, R. pallescens and R. prolixus suggests a degree of co-evolution between parasites and vectors.

    PubMed

    Urrea, Daniel Alfonso; Guhl, Felipe; Herrera, Claudia Patricia; Falla, Alejandra; Carranza, Julio César; Cuba-Cuba, César; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Grisard, Edmundo C; Vallejo, Gustavo Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Spliced leader intergenic region (SL-IR) sequences from 23 Trypanosoma rangeli strains isolated from the salivary glands of Rhodnius colombiensis, R. ecuadoriensis, R. pallescens and R. prolixus and two human strains revealed the existence of 4 genotypes with CA, GT, TA, ATT and GTAT microsatellite repeats and the presence of insertions/deletions (INDEL) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) characterizing each genotype. The strains isolated from the same vector species or the same Rhodnius evolutionary line presented the same genotypes, even in cases where strains had been isolated from vectors captured in geographically distant regions. The dendrogram constructed from the SL-IR sequences separated all of them into two main groups, one with the genotypes isolated from R. prolixus and the other group containing three well defined sub-groups with the genotypes isolated from R. pallescens, R. colombiensis and R. ecuadoriensis. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis showed the same two main groups and sub-groups supporting strict T. rangeli genotypes' association with Rhodnius species. Combined with other studies, these results suggest a possible co-evolutionary association between T. rangeli genotypes and their vectors. PMID:21718675

  18. Methanol exposure does not produce oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, liver or kidney of adult mice, rabbits or primates

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Gordon P.; Siu, Michelle; Sweeting, J. Nicole; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-15

    In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests indicate methanol (MeOH) is not mutagenic, but carcinogenic potential has been claimed in one controversial long-term rodent cancer bioassay that has not been replicated. To determine whether MeOH could indirectly damage DNA via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanisms, we treated male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) and 6 h later assessed oxidative damage to DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. We found no MeOH-dependent increases in 8-oxodG in lung, liver or kidney of any species. Chronic treatment of CD-1 mice with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) daily for 15 days also did not increase 8-oxodG levels in these organs. These results were corroborated in DNA repair-deficient oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) knockout (KO) mice, which accumulated 8-oxodG in lung, kidney and liver with age, but exhibited no increase following MeOH, despite a 2-fold increase in renal 8-oxodG in Ogg1 KO mice following treatment with a ROS-initiating positive control, the renal carcinogen potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}; 100 mg/kg ip). These observations suggest that MeOH exposure does not promote the accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, kidney or liver, and that environmental exposure to MeOH is unlikely to initiate carcinogenesis in these organs by DNA oxidation.

  19. DNA Polymorphisms in Lentinula edodes, the Shiitake Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Rajiv K.

    1991-01-01

    DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were examined in Lentinula edodes strains. Genomic DNA from strain 70 was cloned in plasmid vector pUC19, and 18 random clones containing low-copy DNA sequences were used to probe seven strains in Southern DNA-DNA hybridizations. Each cloned fragment revealed DNA polymorphism. An RFLP genotype was determined for each strain and the genetic relatedness was assessed. The coefficients of genetic similarity among the seven strains ranged from 0.43 to 0.90. The inheritance of RFLP markers was examined in single spore isolates. Homokaryons displayed a loss of polymorphic bands compared with the parent dikaryon. Hybrids constructed by crossing compatible homokaryons displayed the inheritance of RFLP markers from each parent homokaryon. Images PMID:16348509

  20. Effect of vanillin on toxicant-induced lethality in the Drosophila melanogaster DNA repair test.

    PubMed

    Furlanetto, Magda Patrícia; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Amaral, Viviane Souza do; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; de Andrade, Heloísa Helena Rodrigues

    2007-01-01

    Vanillin (VA) modulates the genotoxicity of chemical and physical agents in a complex manner. Previous studies indicate that VA inhibits the mutagenicity but increases the mitotic homologous recombination caused by at least some genotoxic agents. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of VA on the repair of lethal damage produced by three genotoxins, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), and mitomycin C (MMC), using the DNA repair test (DRT) in Drosophila melanogaster. VA, 0.25% and 0.5% (w/v), increased the toxicity of MMC and EMS in repair-deficient flies, as measured by a decrease in the proportion of male to female progeny in the DRT; sex ratios decreased from 18-48% for MMC and 21-97% for EMS. These effects may be caused by the inhibition of nonhomologous DNA end joining caused by VA. In contrast to the results with MMC and EMS, VA protected against the lethality of ENU in repair-defective flies, as measured by a 43-207% increase in the survival of male flies in the DRT. It was inferred that the protective effect was due to VA modulating stages prior to the induction of ENU lesions in DNA, including modulating the antioxidant properties of VA and/or to its interference with the metabolic activation and/or detoxification of specific genotoxins. The results from this study indicate that the characterization of VA as a promising agent for preventing damage to genes and chromosomes should be tempered by observations that VA can increase the toxicity of chemical agents. PMID:17177210

  1. Validation of 64Cu-ATSM damaging DNA via high-LET Auger electron emission.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Dayton D; Maeda, Junko; Bell, Justin J; Genet, Matthew D; Phoonswadi, Garrett; Mann, Kelly A; Kraft, Susan L; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2015-09-01

    Radioactive copper (II) (diacetyl-bis N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) isotopes were originally developed for the imaging of hypoxia in tumors. Because the decay of a (64)Cu atom is emitting not only positrons but also Auger electrons, this radionuclide has great potential as a theranostic agent. However, the success of (64)Cu-ATSM internal radiation therapy would depend on the contribution of Auger electrons to tumor cell killing. Therefore, we designed a cell culture system to define the contributions to cell death from Auger electrons to support or refute our hypothesis that the majority of cell death from (64)Cu-ATSM is a result of high-LET Auger electrons and not positrons or other low-LET radiation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) wild type and DNA repair-deficient xrs5 cells were exposed to (64)Cu-ATSM during hypoxic conditions. Surviving fractions were compared with those surviving gamma-radiation, low-LET hadron radiation, and high-LET heavy ion exposure. The ratio of the D(10) values (doses required to achieve 10% cell survival) between CHO wild type and xrs5 cells suggested that (64)Cu-ATSM toxicity is similar to that of high-LET Carbon ion radiation (70 keV/μm). γH2AX foci assays confirmed DNA double-strand breaks and cluster damage by high-LET Auger electrons from (64)Cu decay, and complex types of chromosomal aberrations typical of high-LET radiation were observed after (64)Cu-ATSM exposure. The majority of cell death was caused by high-LET radiation. This work provides strong evidence that (64)Cu-ATSM damages DNA via high-LET Auger electrons, supporting further study and consideration of (64)Cu-ATSM as a cancer treatment modality for hypoxic tumors. PMID:26251463

  2. Targeting the parasite's DNA with methyltriazenyl purine analogs is a safe, selective, and efficacious antitrypanosomal strategy.

    PubMed

    Rodenko, Boris; Wanner, Martin J; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A M; Ebiloma, Godwin U; Barnes, Rebecca L; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan; de Koning, Harry P

    2015-11-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2(-/-)) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  3. A mutation in the XPB/ERCC3 DNA repair transcription gene, associated with trichothiodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Weeda, G.; Donker, I.; Vermeulen, W.

    1997-02-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sulfur-deficient brittle hair and nails, mental retardation, impaired sexual development, and ichthyosis. Photosensitivity has been reported in {approximately}50% of the cases, but no skin cancer is associated with TTD. Virtually all photosensitive TTD patients have a deficiency in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced DNA damage that is indistinguishable from that of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D (XP-D) patients. DNA repair defects in XP-D are associated with two additional, quite different diseases; XP, a sun-sensitive and cancer-prone repair disorder, and Cockayne syndrome (CS), a photosensitive condition characterized by physical and mental retardation and wizened facial appearance. One photosensitive TTD case constitutes a new repair-deficient complementation group, TTD-A. Remarkably, both TTD-A and XP-D defects are associated with subunits of TFIIH, a basal transcription factor with a second function in DNA repair. Thus, mutations in TFIIH components may, on top of a repair defect, also cause transcriptional insufficiency, which may explain part of the non-XP clinical features of TTD. To date, three patients with the remarkable conjunction of XP and CS but not TM have been assigned to XP complementation group B (XP-B). Here we present the characterization of the NER defect in two mild TTD patients (TTD6VI and TTD4VI) and confirm the assignment to X-PB. The causative mutation was found to be a single base substitution resulting in a missense mutation (T119P) in a region of the XPB protein. These findings define a third TTD complementation group, extend the clinical heterogeneity associated with XP-B, stress the exclusive relationship between TTD and mutations in subunits of repair/transcription factor TFIIH, and strongly support the concept of {open_quotes}transcription syndromes.{close_quotes} 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Targeting the Parasite's DNA with Methyltriazenyl Purine Analogs Is a Safe, Selective, and Efficacious Antitrypanosomal Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Martin J.; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A. M.; Ebiloma, Godwin U.; Barnes, Rebecca L.; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2−/−) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  5. A Mouse Strain Defective in Both T Cells and NK Cells Has Enhanced Sensitivity to Tumor Induction by Plasmid DNA Expressing Both Activated H-Ras and c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Sheng-Fowler, Li; Tu, Wei; Fu, Haiqing; Murata, Haruhiko; Lanning, Lynda; Foseh, Gideon; Macauley, Juliete; Blair, Donald; Hughes, Stephen H.; Coffin, John M.; Lewis, Andrew M.; Peden, Keith

    2014-01-01

    As part of safety studies to evaluate the risk of residual cellular DNA in vaccines manufactured in tumorigenic cells, we have been developing in vivo assays to detect and quantify the oncogenic activity of DNA. We generated a plasmid expressing both an activated human H-ras gene and murine c-myc gene and showed that 1 µg of this plasmid, pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc, was capable of inducing tumors in newborn NIH Swiss mice. However, to be able to detect the oncogenicity of dominant activated oncogenes in cellular DNA, a more sensitive system was needed. In this paper, we demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon transgenic mouse, which is defective in both T-cell and NK-cell functions, can detect the oncogenic activity of 25 ng of the circular form of pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc. When this plasmid was inoculated as linear DNA, amounts of DNA as low as 800 pg were capable of inducing tumors. Animals were found that had multiple tumors, and these tumors were independent and likely clonal. These results demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon mouse is highly sensitive for the detection of oncogenic activity of DNA. To determine whether it can detect the oncogenic activity of cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-cell lines (HeLa, A549, HT-1080, and CEM), DNA (100 µg) was inoculated into newborn CD3 epsilon mice both in the presence of 1 µg of linear pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc as positive control and in its absence. While tumors were induced in 100% of mice with the positive-control plasmid, no tumors were induced in mice receiving any of the tumor DNAs alone. These results demonstrate that detection of oncogenes in cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-derived cell lines in this mouse system was not possible; the results also show the importance of including a positive-control plasmid to detect inhibitory effects of the cellular DNA. PMID:25302710

  6. Natural plasmid transformation in a high-frequency-of transformation marine Vibrio strain

    SciTech Connect

    Frischer, M.E.; Thurmond, J.M.; Paul, J.H. )

    1990-11-01

    The estuarine bacterium Vibrio strain DI-9 has been shown to be naturally transformable with both broad host range plasmid multimers and homologous chromosomal DNA at average frequencies of 3.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} and 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} transformants per recipient, respectively. Growth of plasmid transformants in nonselective medium resulted in cured strains that transformed 6 to 42,857 times more frequently than the parental strain, depending on the type of transforming DNA. These high-frequency-of-transformation (HfT) strains were transformed at frequencies ranging from 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} to 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} transformants per recipient with plasmid DNA and at an average frequency of 8.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} transformants per recipient with homologous chromosomal DNA. The highest transformation frequencies were observed by using multimers of an R1162 derivative carrying the transposon Tn5 (pQSR50). Probing of total DNA preparations from one of the cured strains demonstrated that no plasmid DNA remained in the cured strains which may have provided homology to the transforming DNA. All transformants and cured strains could be differentiated from the parental strains by colony morphology. DNA binding studies indicated that late-log-phase HfT strains bound ({sup 3}H)bacteriophage lambda DNA 2.1 times more rapidly than the parental strain. These results suggest that the original plasmid transformation event of strain DI-9 was the result of uptake and expression of plasmid DNA by a competent mutant (HfT strain). Additionally, it was found that a strain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, USFS 3420, could be naturally transformed with plasmid DNA. Natural plasmid transformation by high-transforming mutants may be a means of plasmid acquisition by natural aquatic bacterial populations.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  8. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  9. Nuclear alpha spectrin: Critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link repair and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-09-01

    Non-erythroid alpha spectrin (αIISp) is a structural protein which we have shown is present in the nucleus of human cells. It interacts with a number of nuclear proteins such as actin, lamin, emerin, chromatin remodeling factors, and DNA repair proteins. αIISp's interaction with DNA repair proteins has been extensively studied. We have demonstrated that nuclear αIISp is critical in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair in S phase, in both genomic (non-telomeric) and telomeric DNA, and in maintenance of genomic stability following ICL damage to DNA. We have proposed that αIISp acts as a scaffold aiding to recruit repair proteins to sites of damage. This involvement of αIISp in ICL repair and telomere maintenance after ICL damage represents new and critical functions for αIISp. These studies have led to development of a model for the role of αIISp in DNA ICL repair. They have been aided by examination of cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), a repair-deficient genetic disorder in which a deficiency in αIISp leads to defective ICL repair in genomic and telomeric DNA, telomere dysfunction, and chromosome instability following DNA ICL damage. We have shown that loss of αIISp in FA cells is due to increased breakdown by the protease, µ-calpain. Importantly, we have demonstrated that this deficiency can be corrected by knockdown of µ-calpain and restoring αIISp levels to normal. This corrects a number of the phenotypic deficiencies in FA after ICL damage. These studies suggest a new and unexplored direction for therapeutically restoring genomic stability in FA cells and for correcting numerous phenotypic deficiencies occurring after ICL damage. Developing a more in-depth understanding of the importance of the interaction of αIISp with other nuclear proteins could significantly enhance our knowledge of the consequences of loss of αIISp on critical nuclear processes. PMID:27480253

  10. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  11. Genetic analysis of repair and damage tolerance mechanisms for DNA-protein cross-links in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salem, Amir M H; Nakano, Toshiaki; Takuwa, Minako; Matoba, Nagisa; Tsuboi, Tomohiro; Terato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamada, Masami; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ide, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) are unique among DNA lesions in their unusually bulky nature. We have recently shown that nucleotide excision repair (NER) and RecBCD-dependent homologous recombination (HR) collaboratively alleviate the lethal effect of DPCs in Escherichia coli. In this study, to gain further insight into the damage-processing mechanism for DPCs, we assessed the sensitivities of a panel of repair-deficient E. coli mutants to DPC-inducing agents, including formaldehyde (FA) and 5-azacytidine (azaC). We show here that the damage tolerance mechanism involving HR and subsequent replication restart (RR) provides the most effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Translesion synthesis does not serve as an alternative damage tolerance mechanism for DPCs in cell survival. Elimination of DPCs from the genome relies primarily on NER, which provides a second and moderately effective means of cell survival against DPCs. Interestingly, Cho rather than UvrC seems to be an effective nuclease for the NER of DPCs. Together with the genes responsible for HR, RR, and NER, the mutation of genes involved in several aspects of DNA repair and transactions, such as recQ, xth nfo, dksA, and topA, rendered cells slightly but significantly sensitive to FA but not azaC, possibly reflecting the complexity of DPCs or cryptic lesions induced by FA. UvrD may have an additional role outside NER, since the uvrD mutation conferred a slight azaC sensitivity on cells. Finally, DNA glycosylases mitigate azaC toxicity, independently of the repair of DPCs, presumably by removing 5-azacytosine or its degradation product from the chromosome. PMID:19617358

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of Helicobacter cinaedi and Helicobacter fennelliae strains isolated from humans and animals.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehlbauch, J A; Brenner, D J; Cameron, D N; Steigerwalt, A G; Makowski, J M; Baker, C N; Patton, C M; Wachsmuth, I K

    1995-01-01

    By DNA-DNA hybridization, we classified 26 human strains, 4 dog and cat strains, and 4 hamster strains putatively identified as Helicobacter cinaedi as well as 2 human strains and 2 animal strains of Helicobacter fennelliae. All but one human strain belonged to the same hybridization group as the type strain of H. cinaedi. The animal strains also appeared to belong to this hybridization group. Both human strains of H. fennelliae were shown to be H. fennelliae by DNA-DNA hybridization, but both animal strains were less than 15% related to the type strain. All strains were also characterized by plasmid profiles and ribotyping. Plasmids were found in 23% of the human strains, 100% of the hamster strains, and 33% of the dog and cat strains. Human strains were essentially identical by ribotyping, but were clearly differentiated from the hamster and dog and cat strains. Some strains may be difficult to culture on primary isolation; we found that our strains grew well on anaerobic CDC agar, brucella agar, and tryptic soy agar II. Our H. cinaedi and H. fennelliae strains differed from those previously described because some were resistant to cephalothin: some H. cinaedi strains were also resistant to nalidixic acid. All isolates were also characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We found that human strains of H. cinaedi were more resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin than were animal isolates; 19% of the human strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Therefore, we recommend that antimicrobial susceptibility results be obtained before initiating therapy for H. cinaedi and H. fennelliae infections. PMID:8576350

  13. Heterogeneity within Corynebacterium minutissimum strains is explained by misidentified Corynebacterium amycolatum strains.

    PubMed

    Zinkernagel, A S; von Graevenitz, A; Funke, G

    1996-09-01

    Forty-eight clinical strains that were tentatively identified as Corynebacterium minutissimum on the basis of standard biochemical reactions (Hollis-Weaver tables) as well as by the use of the API (RAPID) Coryne system were examined further. Two different groups of strains were observed. The first group (including the type strain of C minutissimum) contained 27 strains showing creamy colonies. These strains grew homogeneously in 6.5% NaCl broth, exhibited DNase activity, were susceptible to the vibriocidal compound O/129, produced succinic acid, and contained mycolic acids. The second group comprised 21 strains with dry colonies. They grew in clumps at the surface of 6.5% NaCl broth, DNase activity was not detected, they were resistant against O/129, produced large amounts of propionic acid, and mycolic acids were not detected. In combination with quantitative DNA-DNA hybridizations, it was demonstrated that strains of the second cluster belonged, in fact, to C amycolatum. Furthermore, it was observed that a few C minutissimum strains may also ferment mannitol. These data indicate that the clinical microbiologist must be careful not to misidentify C amycolatum strains as C minutissimum. PMID:8816598

  14. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  15. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  16. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  17. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  18. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed Central

    García-Valdés, E; Cozar, E; Rotger, R; Lalucat, J; Ursing, J

    1988-01-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridization demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons. Images PMID:3202629

  19. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Valdes, E.; Cozar, E.; Rotger, R. Lalucat, J. ); Ursing, J. )

    1988-10-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridizations demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Identification, mapping and linkage analysis of randomly amplified DNA polymorphisms in Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Brickner, J.H.; Lynch, T.J.; Zeilinger, D.; Orias, E.

    1996-06-01

    Using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique and exploiting the unique genetics of Tetrahymena thermophila, we have identified and characterized 40 DNA polymorphisms occurring between two inbred strains (B and C3) of this ciliated protozoan. These RAPD markers permit the PCR amplification of a DNA species using template DNA from SB1969 (B strain) but fail to do so using DNA from C3-368-5 (C3 strain). Polymorphisms were mapped to chromosomes using a panel of monosomic strains constructed by crossing B strain-derived nullisomic strains to inbred strain C3. They map to all five chromosomes and appear to be evenly distributed throughout the genome. Chromosomal groups were then analyzed for linkage using meiotic segregants; four linkage groups were identified in chromosomes 1R, 2L, 3 and 5. The RAPD method appears useful for the construction of a genetic map of the Tetrahymena genome based on DNA polymorphisms. 37 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. BENZO[ A ]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE FORMS COVALENT-DNA ADDUCTS IN VITRO BUT NONE WERE DETECTED IN THE LUNGS OR LIVERS OF STRAIN A/J MICE IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a potent human and rodent lung carcinogen. This activity has been ascribed in part to the formation of B[a]P-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts. Other carcinogenic mechanisms have been proposed: 1.] The induction of apurinic si...

  2. BENZO[A]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE FORMS COVALENT-DNA ADDUCTS IN VITRO BUT NONE WERE DETECTED IN THE LUNGS OR LIVERS OF STRAIN A/J MICE IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a potent human and rodent lung carcinogen. This activity has been ascribed in part to the formation of B[a]P-7,8-dio1-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts. Other carcinogenic mechanisms have been proposed: 1.] The induction of apurinic sites from radical cati...

  3. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  4. Diversity among Streptomyces Strains Causing Potato Scab

    PubMed Central

    Doering-Saad, Christiane; Kämpfer, Peter; Manulis, Shulamit; Kritzman, Giora; Schneider, Jörg; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta; Schrempf, Hildgund; Barash, Isaac

    1992-01-01

    Eighty Streptomyces isolates, including 35 potato scab-inducing strains and 12 reference strains of Streptomyces scabies, were physiologically characterized by a total of 329 miniaturized tests. Overall similarities of all strains were determined by numerical taxonomy, with the unweighted average linkage (UPGMA) algorithm and simple matching (Ssm) and Jaccard (Sj) coefficients used as measures for similarity. Three cluster groups (A to C) were defined at a similarity level of 80.1% (Ssm); these groups contained 14 clusters and 24 unclustered strains defined at a similarity level of 86.5% (Ssm). Cluster group A contained strains phenotypically related to S. griseus or S. exfoliatus, whereas cluster group B contained strains which were phenotypically related to S. violaceus or S. rochei. The majority of the pathogenic isolates and reference strains were assigned to S. violaceus (57%) and S. griseus (22%). A DNA probe derived from the rRNA operon of S. coelicolor IMET 40271 was used to detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RELPs) among 40 pathogenic and nonpathogenic Streptomyces isolates. Southern blots revealed a high degree of diversity among the pathogenic strains tested. No significant correlation between numerical classification and RFLP grouping of Streptomyces strains could be revealed. The results obtained suggest that RFLP data are of minor importance in classification of Streptomyces species and that genes for pathogenicity determinants are spread among different Streptomyces species by mobilizable elements. Images PMID:16348823

  5. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children's Sports Injuries Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries Knee Injuries Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains Strains and Sprains ... Pain Going to a Physical Therapist Hamstring Strain Knee Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Dealing With Sports Injuries ...

  6. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  7. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  8. SEQUENCE SIMILARITIES IN THE GENES ENCODING POLY- CHLORINATED BIPHENYL DEGRADATION BY PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400 AND ALCALIGENES EUTROPHUS H850

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-DNA hybridization was used to compare the Pseudomonas strain LB400 genes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation with those from seven other PCB-degrading strains. Significant hybridization was detected to the genome of Alcaligenes eutrophus H850, a strain similar to L...

  9. Identification of Iron-reducing Thermus strains as Thermus scotoductus

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, David L.; Kieft, T L.; Tsukuda, Toyoko; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Onstott, T C.; Macnaughton, S.; Bownas, J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2004-02-01

    Thermus strain SA-01, previously isolated from a deep (3.2) South African gold mine, is closely related to Thermus strains NMX2 A.1 and VI-7 (previously isolated from thermal springs in New Mexico USA and Portugal, respectively). Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 have also been shown previously to grow using nitrate, Fe(III), , Mn(IV) or So as terminal electron acceptors and to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), U(VI), Co(III), and the quinine-containing compound anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The objectives of this study were to determine the phylogenetic positions of the three known metal-reducing Thermus strains and to determine the phylogenetic significance of metal reduction within the genus Thermus. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences, BOX PCR genomic fingerprinting, and DNA-DNA reassociation analyses indicated that these strains belong to the previously described genospecies T. scotoductus. The morphologies and lipid fatty acid profiles of these metal-reducing strains are consistent with their identification as T. scotoductus; however, the T. scotoductus strains tested in this study evinced a wide intraspecies variability in some other phenotypic traits, e.g., carbon substrate utilization and pigmentation. Iron reduction occurred in all strains of T. scotoductus tested except the mixotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing strain IT-7254. Thermus strains belonging to other species did not reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) or reduced it only poorly.

  10. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  11. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  12. Characterization of group A Streptococcus strains recovered from Mexican children with pharyngitis by automated DNA sequencing of virulence-related genes: unexpectedly large variation in the gene (sic) encoding a complement-inhibiting protein.

    PubMed

    Mejia, L M; Stockbauer, K E; Pan, X; Cravioto, A; Musser, J M

    1997-12-01

    Sequence variation was studied in several target genes in 54 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) cultured from children with pharyngitis in Mexico City. Although 16 distinct emm alleles were identified, only 4 had not been previously described. Virtually all bacteria (31 of 33 [94%] with the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene (speA) had emm1-related, emm3, or emm6 alleles. The gene (sic) encoding an extracellular GAS protein that inhibits complement function was unusually variable among isolates with the emm1 family of alleles, with a total of seven variants identified. The data suggest that many GAS strains infecting Mexican children are genetically similar to organisms commonly encountered in the United States and western Europe. Sequence variation in the sic gene is useful for rapid differentiation among GAS isolates with the emm1 family of alleles. PMID:9399523

  13. Characterization of group A Streptococcus strains recovered from Mexican children with pharyngitis by automated DNA sequencing of virulence-related genes: unexpectedly large variation in the gene (sic) encoding a complement-inhibiting protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, L M; Stockbauer, K E; Pan, X; Cravioto, A; Musser, J M

    1997-01-01

    Sequence variation was studied in several target genes in 54 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) cultured from children with pharyngitis in Mexico City. Although 16 distinct emm alleles were identified, only 4 had not been previously described. Virtually all bacteria (31 of 33 [94%] with the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene (speA) had emm1-related, emm3, or emm6 alleles. The gene (sic) encoding an extracellular GAS protein that inhibits complement function was unusually variable among isolates with the emm1 family of alleles, with a total of seven variants identified. The data suggest that many GAS strains infecting Mexican children are genetically similar to organisms commonly encountered in the United States and western Europe. Sequence variation in the sic gene is useful for rapid differentiation among GAS isolates with the emm1 family of alleles. PMID:9399523

  14. DNA homology studies on Clostridium botulinum and related clostridial species

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The genetic relationships among toxigenic Clostridium botulinum and nontoxigenic C. subterminale and C. hastiforme were examined. DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method at 50/sup 0/C and 65/sup 0/C) was used to determine genetic relatedness among these organisms. DNA was labeled in vitro with /sup 32/P by the nick translation method. C. botulinum type G had less than 20% DNA relatedness with strains of C. botulinum types A, B and F. All nine strains of C. botulinum type G, two of 10 strains of C. subterminale, and one of three strains of C. hastiforme formed one DNA hybridization group, with DNA relatedness ranging from 76 to 100%. The remaining strains formed six smaller hybridization groups: two groups contained single strains of C. hastiforme, and the other four contained strains of C. subterminale. Thus, DNA hybridization data indicate that all strains of the toxigenic C. botulinum type G and the few strains of nontoxigenic C. subterminale and C. hastiforme form a single new species with toxigenicity as a variable characteristic.

  15. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, W.; Kleijer, W.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Weeda, G. ); Scott, R.J.; Rodgers, S.; Mueller, H.J. ); Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F. )

    1994-02-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with the remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here the authors report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt[sup [minus

  16. Whole Genome Analysis of a Wine Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Nicole C.; Fellenberg, Kurt; Gil, Rosario; Bastuck, Sonja; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains frequently exhibit rather specific phenotypic features needed for adaptation to a special environment. Wine yeast strains are able to ferment musts, for example, while other industrial or laboratory strains fail to do so. The genetic differences that characterize wine yeast strains are poorly understood, however. As a first search of genetic differences between wine and laboratory strains, we performed DNA-array analyses on the typical wine yeast strain T73 and the standard laboratory background in S288c. Our analysis shows that even under normal conditions, logarithmic growth in YPD medium, the two strains have expression patterns that differ significantly in more than 40 genes. Subsequent studies indicated that these differences correlate with small changes in promoter regions or variations in gene copy number. Blotting copy numbers vs. transcript levels produced patterns, which were specific for the individual strains and could be used for a characterization of unknown samples. PMID:18628902

  17. Cloning a Eukaryotic DNA Glycosylase Repair Gene by the Suppression of a DNA Repair Defect in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Derfler, Bruce; Maskati, Azmat; Samson, Leona

    1989-10-01

    If eukaryotic genes could protect bacteria with defects in DNA repair, this effect could be exploited for the isolation of eukaryotic DNA repair genes. We have thus cloned a DNA repair gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that directs the synthesis of a DNA glycosylase that specifically releases 3-methyladenine from alkylated DNA and in so doing protects alkylation-sensitive Escherichia coli from killing by methylating agents. The cloned yeast gene was then used to generate a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae that carries a defect in the glycosylase gene and is extremely sensitive to DNA methylation. This approach may allow the isolation of a large number of eukaryotic DNA repair genes.

  18. Identification of in vitro upregulated genes in a modified live vaccine strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri compared to a virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using PCR-select subtractive cDNA hybridization technique, 41 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were isolated from a modified live vaccine strain (AQUAVAC-ESC©, formerly RE-33) vs a virulent parent strain (EILO) of Edwardsiella ictaluri. Transcriptional levels of the 41 ESTs in the vaccine strain and t...

  19. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  20. Specific detection and identification of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing oleander leaf scorch by polymerase chain reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pair of PCR primers, QH-OLS05/QH-OLS08, was developed that is specific for strains of Xylella fastidiosa causing oleander leaf scorch. The primers were designed based on DNA sequence of a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR product unique to oleander strains. The PCR assay using primer p...

  1. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black-pigment-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Christopher A; Saunders, Lauren P; Schisler, David A; Leathers, Timothy D; Naeem, Naveed; Cohan, Frederick M; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2016-08-01

    Two isolates of a Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a dark pigment on tryptic soy agar. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that these strains were related most closely to Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum (99.7 % similarity) and Bacillus axarquiensis (99.7 %). In phenotypic characterization, the novel strains were found to grow between 17 and 50 °C and can tolerate up to 9 % (w/v) NaCl. Furthermore, the strains grew in media of pH 5.5-10 (optimal growth at pH 7.0-8.0). The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 (34.8 %) and iso-C15 : 0 (21.9 %). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. A draft genome of both strains was completed. The DNA G+C content was 43.8 mol%. A phylogenomic analysis on the core genome of these two new strains and all members of the Bacillus subtilis group revealed these two strains formed a distinct monophyletic clade with the nearest neighbour Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. DNA-DNA relatedness studies using in silico DNA-DNA hybridizations showed the two strains were conspecific (93.8 %), while values with all other species (<31.5 %) were well below the species threshold of 70 %. Based on the consensus of phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses, these strains are considered to represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain NRRL B-41091T (=CCUG 68786T). PMID:27150918

  2. Program Calibrates Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okazaki, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    Program dramatically reduces personnel and time requirements for acceptance tests of hardware. Data-acquisition system reads output from Wheatstone full-bridge strain-gauge circuit and calculates strain by use of shunt calibration technique. Program nearly instantaneously tabulates and plots strain data against load-cell outputs. Modified to acquire strain data for other specimens wherever full-bridge strain-gauge circuits used. Written in HP BASIC.

  3. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  4. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  5. Enhanced Deletion Formation by Aberrant DNA Replication in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Saveson, C. J.; Lovett, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated genes and sequences are prone to genetic rearrangements including deletions. We have investigated deletion formation in Escherichia coli strains mutant for various replication functions. Deletion was selected between 787 base pair tandem repeats carried either on a ColE1-derived plasmid or on the E. coli chromosome. Only mutations in functions associated with DNA Polymerase III elevated deletion rates in our assays. Especially large increases were observed in strains mutant in dnaQ, the ε editing subunit of Pol III, and dnaB, the replication fork helicase. Mutations in several other functions also altered deletion formation: the α polymerase (dnaE), the γ clamp loader complex (holC, dnaX), and the β clamp (dnaN) subunits of Pol III and the primosomal proteins, dnaC and priA. Aberrant replication stimulated deletions through several pathways. Whereas the elevation in dnaB strains was mostly recA- and lexA-dependent, that in dnaQ strains was mostly recA- and lexA-independent. Deletion product analysis suggested that slipped mispairing, producing monomeric replicon products, may be preferentially increased in a dnaQ mutant and sister-strand exchange, producing dimeric replicon products, may be elevated in dnaE mutants. We conclude that aberrant Polymerase III replication can stimulate deletion events through several mechanisms of deletion and via both recA-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:9177997

  6. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-08-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  7. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  8. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  9. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  10. Genetic profiling of yeast industrial strains using in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Wnuk, Maciej; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Magda, Michal; Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Lewinska, Anna

    2015-09-20

    The genetic differences and changes in genomic stability may affect fermentation processes involving baker's, brewer's and wine yeast strains. Thus, it seems worthwhile to monitor the changes in genomic DNA copy number of industrial strains. In the present study, we developed an in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate the ploidy and genetic differences between selected industrial yeast strains. The CGH-based system was validated using the laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (haploid BY4741 and diploid BY4743). DNA isolated from BY4743 cells was considered a reference DNA. The ploidy and DNA gains and losses of baker's, brewer's and wine strains were revealed. Taken together, the in situ CGH was shown a helpful molecular tool to identify genomic differences between yeast industrial strains. Moreover, the in situ CGH-based system may be used at the single-cell level of analysis to supplement array-based techniques and high-throughput analyses at the population scale. PMID:26116136

  11. Caffeine-enhanced survival of radiation-sensitive, repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-11-01

    A clone of V79 Chinese hamster cells (V79-AL162/S-10) with unique properties has been isolated after a challenge of parental cells (V79-AL162) with 1 mM ouabain. Compared with parental cells, or with other clones isolated after the ouabain challenge, these cells form smaller colonies, are more sensitive to both x rays and fission-spectrum neutrons, and respond atypically to a postirradiation treatment with caffeine. Their enhanced response to x rays results mainly from a large reduction in the shoulder of their survival curve, probably because in late S phase, the most resistant phase in the cell cycle, the survival curve of these cells has a reduced shoulder width. Caffeine, and to a lesser extent theophylline, added to the colony-forming medium immediately after exposure appreciably increases the width of the shoulder of these sensitive cells, whereas caffeine has the opposite effect on the response of normal V79 cells. Thus the unique response of the V79-AL162/S-10 cells to a radiation posttreatment with caffeine (increased survival) results from a net increase in their ability to repair damage that is otherwise lethal; caffeine treatment ordinarly prevents normal V79 cells from repairing damage that is only potentially lethal.

  12. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  13. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  14. Miniature biaxial strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, I. S. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A reusable miniature strain transducer for use in the measurement of static or quasi-static, high level, biaxial strain on the surface of test specimens or structures was studied. Two cantilever arms, constructed by machining the material to appropriate flexibility, are self-aligning and constitute the transducing elements of the device. Used in conjunction with strain gages, the device enables testing beyond normal gage limits for high strains and number of load cycles. The device does not require conversion computations since the electrical output of the strain gages is directly proportional to the strain measured.

  15. Relatedness of Thermomyces lanuginosus strains producing a thermostable xylanase.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Reddy, P; Haarhoff, J; Biely, P; Janse, B; Pillay, B; Pillay, D; Prior, B A

    2000-08-25

    Properties of an endo-beta-xylanase produced by a locally isolated Thermomyces lanuginosus strain SSBP was compared to seven other T. lanuginosus strains isolated from different geographical regions. Strain SSBP produced the highest xylanase activity of 59600 nkat ml(-1) when cultivated on corn cobs (maize) medium, whereas the seven other strains produced xylanase activities ranging from 6000 to 32000 nkat ml(-1). No cellulase activity was produced by the strains. Despite the variability in the production of xylanase, little difference in the other characteristics of the strains could be found. The optimal temperature and pH for xylanase production by the strains was either 40 or 50 degrees C and between pH 6 and 7, respectively. Optimal xylanase activity of the strains was observed at 70 degrees C and at pH 6 or 6.5. Culture supernatant analysis by SDS-PAGE and isoelectric focusing PAGE of all strains revealed the presence of a single 24.7 kDa and pI 3.9 xylanase. Phylogenetic analysis by PCR amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear rRNA repeat units and 5.8S rDNA revealed no strain diversity. However, random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis pointed to greater diversity and with one primer (5'-GCCCGACGCG-3'), a relationship was established between xylanase levels and the RAPD pattern. PMID:10989171

  16. Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Jenny; Vare, Daniel; Motwani, Hitesh V; Jenssen, Dag; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration-time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration×cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at a rate of 0.08±0.01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study. PMID:27402481

  17. Rhodococcus sp. strain TM1 plays a synergistic role in the degradation of piperidine by Mycobacterium sp. strain THO100.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Kang, Un-Beom; Konishi, Kyoko; Lee, Cheolju

    2006-09-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain THO100 and Rhodococcus sp. strain TM1 were isolated from a morpholine-containing enrichment culture of activated sewage sludge. Strain THO100, but not strain TM1, was able to degrade alicyclic amines such as morpholine, piperidine, and pyrrolidine. The mixed strains THO100 and TM1 showed a better growth on piperidine as the substrate than the pure strain THO100 because strain TM1 was able to reduce the level of glutaraldehyde (GA) produced during piperidine degradation. GA was toxic to strain THO100 (IC(50) = 28.3 microM) but less toxic to strain TM1 (IC(50) = 215 microM). Strain THO100 possessed constitutive semialdehyde dehydrogenases, namely Sad1 and Sad2, whose activities toward succinic semialdehyde (SSA) were strongly inhibited by GA. The two isozymes were identified as catalase-peroxidase (KatG = Sad1) and semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Sad2) based on mass spectrometric analyses of tryptic peptides and database searches of the partial DNA sequences of their genes. In contrast, strain TM1 containing another constitutive enzyme Gad1 could oxidize both SSA and GA. This study suggested that strain TM1 possessing Gad1 played a synergistic role in reducing the toxic and inhibitory effects of GA produced in the degradation of piperidine by strain THO100. PMID:16832627

  18. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  19. Glucosyltransferase gene polymorphism among Streptococcus mutans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Chia, J S; Hsu, T Y; Teng, L J; Chen, J Y; Hahn, L J; Yang, C S

    1991-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases were detected among Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains by Southern blot analysis with DNA probes located within the gtfB gene (H. Aoki, T. Shiroza, M. Hayakawa, S. Sato, and H. K. Kuramitsu, Infect. Immun. 53:587-594, 1986). Restriction endonucleases were used to examine genomic DNAs isolated from serotype a to h strains. The variations were readily detected among 33 strains of serotype c by EcoRI and PstI restriction enzyme digestions. Serotypes e and f, which are genetically similar to serotype c, also had comparable polymorphism; however, serotypes a, b, d, g, and h did not hybridize to the same DNA probes in parallel experiments. Further analysis of enzymatic activities for glucan synthesis and sucrose-dependent adherence revealed no significant differences among the serotype c strains. Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms existing in S. mutans serotype c strains may reflect a complexity in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases, which are produced ubiquitously in members of the S. mutans group. Images PMID:1826894

  20. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA Segment in Wine Yeast Genomes by Extrachromosomal Circular DNA Formation

    PubMed Central

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations. PMID:21423766

  1. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  2. Existence of lysogenic bacteriophages in Bacillus thuringiensis type strains.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jong Yul; Park, Jong Bin; Liu, Qin; Kim, Song Eun; Tao, Xueying; Choi, Tae Woong; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Woo Jin; Jin, Byung Rae; Je, Yeon Ho

    2013-07-01

    We screened the existence of bacteriophages in 67 Bacillus thuringiensis type strains by phage DNA extraction and PCR using phage terminase small subunit (TerS)-specific primers to the supernatants and the precipitated pellets of Bt cultures, and by transmission electron microscopy. The various bacteriophages were observed from the supernatants of 22 type strains. Ten type strains showed the extracted phage DNAs and the amplified fragment by TerS PCR but 12 type strains showed only the phage DNAs. Their morphological characteristic suggests that they belong to Family Siphoviridae which had a long tail and symmetrical head. PMID:23632013

  3. Strains and Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... move the injured part, and you might even think you have broken a bone. How Does a Strain or Sprain Happen? Strains often happen when you put a lot of pressure on a muscle or you push it too far, such as when lifting a heavy object. Strains may be more likely to happen if ...

  4. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  5. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  6. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  7. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsby, W.S.; Torres-Bauza, L.J.; Wills, J.W.; Townes, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. The authors used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; they obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. They concluded that these strains are diploid.

  8. Modulating DNA configuration by interfacial traction: an elastic rod model to characterize DNA folding and unfolding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zaixing

    2011-01-01

    As a continuum model of DNA, a thin elastic rod subjected to interfacial interactions is used to investigate the equilibrium configuration of DNA in intracellular solution. The interfacial traction between the rod and the solution environment is derived in detail. Kirchhoff's theory of elastic rods is used to analyze the equilibrium configuration of a DNA segment under the action of the interfacial traction. The influences of the interfacial energy factor and bending stiffness on the toroidal spool formation of the DNA segment are discussed. The results show that the equilibrium configuration of DNA is mainly determined by competition between the interfacial energy and elastic strain energy of the DNA itself, and the interfacial traction is one of the forces that drives DNA folding and unfolding. PMID:22210963

  9. Different distribution patterns of ten virulence genes in Legionella reference strains and strains isolated from environmental water and patients.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Virulence genes are distinct regions of DNA which are present in the genome of pathogenic bacteria and absent in nonpathogenic strains of the same or related species. Virulence genes are frequently associated with bacterial pathogenicity in genus Legionella. In the present study, an assay was performed to detect ten virulence genes, including iraA, iraB, lvrA, lvrB, lvhD, cpxR, cpxA, dotA, icmC and icmD in different pathogenicity islands of 47 Legionella reference strains, 235 environmental strains isolated from water, and 4 clinical strains isolated from the lung tissue of pneumonia patients. The distribution frequencies of these genes in reference or/and environmental L. pneumophila strains were much higher than those in reference non-L. pneumophila or/and environmental non-L. pneumophila strains, respectively. L. pneumophila clinical strains also maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to four other types of Legionella strains. Distribution frequencies of these genes in reference L. pneumophila strains were similar to those in environmental L. pneumophila strains. In contrast, environmental non-L. pneumophila maintained higher frequencies of these genes compared to those found in reference non-L. pneumophila strains. This study illustrates the association of virulence genes with Legionella pathogenicity and reveals the possible virulence evolution of non-L. pneumophia strains isolated from environmental water. PMID:26757724

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Vagococcus fluvialis, including strains isolated from human sources.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, L M; Carvalho, M G; Merquior, V L; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Facklam, R R

    1997-01-01

    This study presents phenotypic and genotypic data for seven isolates of Vagococcus fluvialis, including four strains recovered from human clinical sources, one strain isolated from an environmental source, and two strains isolated from pigs. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, most isolates were initially classified as "unidentified enterococci," because they resembled atypical arginine-negative enterococcal species. All seven strains as well as the type strain of V. fluvialis reacted with the AccuProbe Enterococcus genetic probe. The seven isolates had virtually indistinguishable whole-cell protein profiles that were similar to that of the V. fluvialis type strain and distinct from those of Enterococcus and Lactococcus species. DNA-DNA reassociation experiments confirmed that the strains were V. fluvialis. They were 71% or more related to the V. fluvialis type strain under optimum and stringent conditions, with 2.5% or less divergence within related sequences. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin and were resistant to clindamycin, lomefloxacin, and ofloxacin. Strain-to-strain variation was observed in relation to susceptibilities to 18 other antimicrobial agents. Chromosomal DNA was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digestion with SmaI. Distinctive PFGE patterns were generated, suggesting the nonclonal nature of V. fluvialis strains. Although the number of strains was small, this report provides molecular characterization of V. fluvialis and the first evidence of a possible connection of this species with human infections. PMID:9350732

  11. Extracellular DNA Release by Undomesticated Bacillus subtilis Is Regulated by Early Competence

    PubMed Central

    de Figueras, Carolina González; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) release is a widespread capacity described in many microorganisms. We identified and characterized lysis-independent eDNA production in an undomesticated strain of Bacillus subtilis. DNA fragments are released during a short time in late-exponential phase. The released eDNA corresponds to whole genome DNA, and does not harbour mutations suggesting that is not the result of error prone DNA synthesis. The absence of eDNA was linked to a spread colony morphology, which allowed a visual screening of a transposon library to search for genes involved in its production. Transposon insertions in genes related to quorum sensing and competence (oppA, oppF and comXP) and to DNA metabolism (mfd and topA) were impaired in eDNA release. Mutants in early competence genes such as comA and srfAA were also defective in eDNA while in contrast mutations in late competence genes as those for the DNA uptake machinery had no effect. A subpopulation of cells containing more DNA is present in the eDNA producing strains but absent from the eDNA defective strain. Finally, competent B. subtilis cells can be transformed by eDNA suggesting it could be used in horizontal gene transfer and providing a rationale for the molecular link between eDNA release and early-competence in B. subtilis that we report. PMID:23133654

  12. Radiosensitization by PARP Inhibition in DNA Repair Proficient and Deficient Tumor Cells: Proliferative Recovery in Senescent Cells.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Moureq; Sharma, Khushboo; Saleh, Tareq; Povirk, Lawrence F; Hendrickson, Eric A; Gewirtz, David A

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy continues to be a primary modality in the treatment of cancer. In addition to promoting apoptosis, radiation-induced DNA damage can promote autophagy and senescence, both of which can theoretically function to prolong tumor survival. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that autophagy and/or senescence could be permissive for DNA repair, thereby facilitating tumor cell recovery from radiation-induced growth arrest and/or cell death. In addition, studies were designed to elucidate the involvement of autophagy and senescence in radiosensitization by PARP inhibitors and the re-emergence of a proliferating tumor cell population. In the context of this work, the relationship between radiation-induced autophagy and senescence was also determined. Studies were performed using DNA repair-proficient HCT116 colon carcinoma cells and a repair-deficient ligase IV(-/-) isogenic cell line. Exposure to radiation promoted a parallel induction of autophagy and senescence that was strongly correlated with the extent of persistent H2AX phosphorylation in both cell lines, however, inhibition of autophagy failed to suppress senescence, indicating that the two responses were dissociable. Exposure to radiation resulted in a transient arrest in the HCT116 cells while arrest was prolonged in the ligase IV(-/-) cells, however, both cell lines ultimately recovered proliferative function, which may reflect maintenance of DNA repair capacity. The PARP inhibitors, olaparib and niraparib, increased the extent of persistent DNA damage induced by radiation exposure as well as the extent of both autophagy and senescence. Neither cell line underwent significant apoptosis by radiation exposure alone or in the presence of the PARP inhibitors. Inhibition of autophagy failed to attenuate radiosensitization, indicating that autophagy was not involved in the action of the PARP inhibitors. As with radiation alone, despite sensitization by PARP inhibition, proliferative recovery was evident

  13. Genetic analyses of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains reveal distinct phylogenetic groups.

    PubMed

    Donahoo, R S; Jones, J B; Lacy, G H; Stromberg, V K; Norman, D J

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 175 Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae strains isolated from 10 Araceae hosts was done to identify pathogen variation. The strains were subjected to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction and four major phylogenetic clusters were generated. A subset of 40 strains isolated from Anthurium, Dieffenbachia, and Syngonium was further defined by amplified fragment length polymorphism and fatty acid methyl ester analysis and the same four phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of representative strains in the first three clusters using DNA-DNA hybridization and multilocus sequence analysis supports the previous reclassification of strains in cluster I, including the X. axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae pathovar reference strain (LMG695), to X. citri. Our research findings indicate that strains in cluster I, isolated primarily from anthurium, probably represent an undescribed pathovar. Other phylogenetic subclusters consisting primarily of strains isolated from xanthosoma and philodendron in clusters III and IV, respectively, may yet represent other undescribed species or pathovars of Xanthomonas. PMID:23134337

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Evolution in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen D.; Sage, Richard D.; Prager, Ellen M.; Ritte, Uzi; Wilson, Allan C.

    1983-01-01

    This study extends knowledge of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity in mice to include 208 animals belonging to eight species in the subgenus Mus. Highly purified mtDNA from each has been subjected to high-resolution restriction mapping with respect to the known sequence of one mouse mtDNA. Variation attributed to base substitutions was encountered at about 200 of the 300 cleavage sites examined, and a length mutation was located in or near the displacement loop. The variability of different functional regions in this genome was as follows, from least to most: ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, known proteins, displacement loop and unidentified reading frames.—Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the utility of the Sage and Marshall revision of mouse classification, according to which there are at least four species of commensal mice and three species of aboriginal mice in the complex that was formerly considered to be one species. The most thoroughly studied of these species is Mus domesticus, the house mouse of Western Europe and the Mediterranean region, which is the mitochondrial source of all 50 of the laboratory strains examined and of the representatives of wild house mice introduced by Europeans to North and South America during the past few hundred years.—The level of mtDNA variation among wild representatives of (M. musculus) and several other mammalian species. By contrast, among the many laboratory strains that are known or suspected to stem from the pet mouse trade, there is little interstrain variation, most strains having the "old inbred" type of domesticus mtDNA, whose frequency in the 145 wild mice examined is low, about 0.04. Also notable is the apparent homogeneity of mtDNA in domesticus races that have fixed six or more fused chromosomes and the close relationship of some of these mtDNAs to those of karyotypically normal mice.—In addition, this paper discusses fossil and other evidence for the view that in mice, as in many other mammals, the average

  15. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  16. A closer look at prion strains

    PubMed Central

    Solforosi, Laura; Milani, Michela; Mancini, Nicasio; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins that are responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and consist primarily of scrapie prion protein (PrPSc), a pathogenic isoform of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC). The absence of nucleic acids as essential components of the infectious prions is the most striking feature associated to these diseases. Additionally, different prion strains have been isolated from animal diseases despite the lack of DNA or RNA molecules. Mounting evidence suggests that prion-strain-specific features segregate with different PrPSc conformational and aggregation states. Strains are of practical relevance in prion diseases as they can drastically differ in many aspects, such as incubation period, PrPSc biochemical profile (e.g., electrophoretic mobility and glycoform ratio) and distribution of brain lesions. Importantly, such different features are maintained after inoculation of a prion strain into genetically identical hosts and are relatively stable across serial passages. This review focuses on the characterization of prion strains and on the wide range of important implications that the study of prion strains involves. PMID:23357828

  17. [The effect of DNA supercoiling DNA on nucleosome structure].

    PubMed

    Sivolob, A V; Khrapunov, S N

    1991-01-01

    The circular DNA which contains nucleosomes and additional supercoils has been considered theoretically. The different possible effect of increased negative supercoiling on the nucleosome structure have been studied. According to the model proposed all supercoils in the nucleosome-containing circular DNA are realized as torsional deformations of the double helix. The free energy of both supercoiling (torsional deformations) and nucleosome stabilization have been taken into consideration to obtain the equation for free energy of nucleosome-containing circular DNA. The analysis of this equation and the experimental data by Garner et al. (II Psoc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 1987. P. 2620-2623) about the maximum amount of supercoiling obtained by DNA-topoisomerase II treatment of nucleosome-containing pBR322 plasmid has been performed. It has been shown that two possibilities are consistent with both the equation and experimental data. These are: (1) the increased supercoiling induces the torsional strains not only in linker regions but also in nucleosome DNA and thus supercoiling causes an instability on nucleosome structure; (2) increased supercoiling induces a structural change of nucleosome which is accompanied by nucleosome DNA unwinding and its transition into form with approximately 11 base pairs per turn of double helix. It has been evaluated that in the first case the average torsional rigidity of nucleosome DNA should be approximately 2.5 times as much and in the second case--much more than the rigidity of naked DNA. Both types of nucleosome structural changes may cause its transition to a potentially active state for transcription. It is suggested that increased supercoiling can be a switch mechanism of chromatin activation. PMID:1654518

  18. Corynebacterium singulare sp. nov., a new species for urease-positive strains related to Corynebacterium minutissimum.

    PubMed

    Riegel, P; Ruimy, R; Renaud, F N; Freney, J; Prevost, G; Jehl, F; Christen, R; Monteil, H

    1997-10-01

    We studied two coryneform strains from clinical specimens. These strains had type IV and corynemycolic acids in their cell walls and also had phenotypic characteristics, such as urease activity and fermentation of glucose and sucrose but not trehalose, which did not permit assignment to any previously recognized taxon. According to DNA-DNA hybridization data, these two strains are members of the same species (level of DNA similarity, 86%). Phylogenetic analysis based on comparisons of almost complete small-subunit ribosomal DNA sequences revealed that these strains are closely related to Corynebacterium minutissimum, but DNA relatedness experiments clearly showed that they constitute a distinct new species with a level of DNA relatedness to the C. minutissimum type strain of less than 40%. This new species can be differentiated from C. minutissimum strains by its enzymatic activities and carbon source utilization, and the name Corynebacterium singulare is proposed for it. The type strain is strain IBS B52218 (= CCUG 37330), which was isolated from a semen specimen. PMID:9336912

  19. DNA computing.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, A; Amos, M; Hodgson, D

    1997-02-01

    DNA computation is a novel and exciting recent development at the interface of computer science and molecular biology. We describe the current activity in this field following the seminal work of Adleman, who recently showed how techniques of molecular biology may be applied to the solution of a computationally intractable problem. PMID:9013647

  20. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  1. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  2. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  3. Role of LrpC from Bacillus subtilis in DNA transactions during DNA repair and recombination

    PubMed Central

    López-Torrejón, Gema; Martínez-Jiménez, María I.; Ayora, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis LrpC is a sequence-independent DNA-binding and DNA-bending protein, which binds both single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) DNA and facilitates the formation of higher order protein–DNA complexes in vitro. LrpC binds at different sites within the same DNA molecule promoting intramolecular ligation. When bound to separate molecules, it promotes intermolecular ligation, and joint molecule formation between a circular ssDNA and a homologous ssDNA-tailed linear dsDNA. LrpC binding showed a higher affinity for 4-way (Holliday) junctions in their open conformation, when compared with curved dsDNA. Consistent with these biochemical activities, an lrpC null mutant strain rendered cells sensitive to DNA damaging agents such as methyl methanesulfonate and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and showed a segregation defect. These findings collectively suggest that LrpC may be involved in DNA transactions during DNA repair and recombination. PMID:16407330

  4. Genome sequence of Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present the whole genome sequence and annotation of the Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia. This strain was isolated from an aborting goat in 1991 in Windhoek, Namibia. The plasmid type QpRS was confirmed in our work. Further genomic typing placed the strain into a unique genomic group. The genome sequence is 2,101,438 bp long and contains 1,979 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including one rRNA operon. To overcome the poor yield from cell culture systems, an additional DNA enrichment with whole genome amplification (WGA) methods was applied. We describe a bioinformatics pipeline for improved genome assembly including several filters with a special focus on WGA characteristics. PMID:25593636

  5. Genomic diversity of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus strains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Peng; Cheng, Ruo-Lin; Xi, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2013-07-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a baculovirus that selectively infects the domestic silkworm. In this study, six BmNPV strains were compared at the whole genome level. We found that the number of bro genes and the composition of the homologous regions (hrs) are the two primary areas of divergence within these genomes. When we compared the ORFs of these BmNPV variants, we noticed a high degree of sequence divergence in the ORFs that are not baculovirus core genes. This result is consistent with the results derived from phylogenetic trees and evolutionary pressure analyses of these ORFs, indicating that ORFs that are not core genes likely play important roles in the evolution of BmNPV strains. The evolutionary relationships of these BmNPV strains might be explained by their geographic origins or those of their hosts. In addition, the total number of hr palindromes seems to affect viral DNA replication in Bm5 cells. PMID:23639478

  6. A Wide Extent of Inter-Strain Diversity in Virulent and Vaccine Strains of Alphaherpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Szpara, Moriah L.; Tafuri, Yolanda R.; Parsons, Lance; Shamim, S. Rafi; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Legendre, Matthieu; Enquist, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    Alphaherpesviruses are widespread in the human population, and include herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and 2, and varicella zoster virus (VZV). These viral pathogens cause epithelial lesions, and then infect the nervous system to cause lifelong latency, reactivation, and spread. A related veterinary herpesvirus, pseudorabies (PRV), causes similar disease in livestock that result in significant economic losses. Vaccines developed for VZV and PRV serve as useful models for the development of an HSV-1 vaccine. We present full genome sequence comparisons of the PRV vaccine strain Bartha, and two virulent PRV isolates, Kaplan and Becker. These genome sequences were determined by high-throughput sequencing and assembly, and present new insights into the attenuation of a mammalian alphaherpesvirus vaccine strain. We find many previously unknown coding differences between PRV Bartha and the virulent strains, including changes to the fusion proteins gH and gB, and over forty other viral proteins. Inter-strain variation in PRV protein sequences is much closer to levels previously observed for HSV-1 than for the highly stable VZV proteome. Almost 20% of the PRV genome contains tandem short sequence repeats (SSRs), a class of nucleic acids motifs whose length-variation has been associated with changes in DNA binding site efficiency, transcriptional regulation, and protein interactions. We find SSRs throughout the herpesvirus family, and provide the first global characterization of SSRs in viruses, both within and between strains. We find SSR length variation between different isolates of PRV and HSV-1, which may provide a new mechanism for phenotypic variation between strains. Finally, we detected a small number of polymorphic bases within each plaque-purified PRV strain, and we characterize the effect of passage and plaque-purification on these polymorphisms. These data add to growing evidence that even plaque-purified stocks of stable DNA viruses exhibit limited sequence

  7. A Novel High-Throughput Cell-Based Assay Aimed at Identifying Inhibitors of DNA Metabolism in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; de Jonge, Boudewijn L. M.; MacCormack, Kathy; Sriram, Shubha; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Plant, Helen; Preston, Marian; Fleming, Paul R.; Albert, Robert; Foulk, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biosensor strains can be useful tools for the discovery and characterization of antibacterial compounds. A plasmid-based reporter vector containing a transcriptional fusion between the recA promoter and green fluorescence protein gene was introduced into an Escherichia coli ΔtolC strain to create a biosensor strain that selectively senses inhibitors of DNA metabolism via the SOS response. The strain was used to develop a high-throughput assay to identify new inhibitors of DNA metabolism. Screening of the AstraZeneca compound library with this strain identified known inhibitors of DNA metabolism, as well as novel chemotypes. The cellular target of one novel series was elucidated as DNA gyrase through genetic characterization of laboratory-generated resistant mutants followed by 50% inhibitory concentration measurements in a DNA gyrase activity assay. These studies validated the use of this antibiotic biosensor strain to identify novel selective inhibitors of DNA metabolism by high-throughput screening. PMID:25246396

  8. Salt-Dependent DNA-DNA Spacings in Intact Bacteriophage lambda Reflect Relative Importance of DNA Self-Repulsion and Bending Energies

    SciTech Connect

    X Qiu; D Rau; V Parsegian; L Fang; C Knobler; W Gelbart

    2011-12-31

    Using solution synchrotron x-ray scattering, we measure the variation of DNA-DNA d spacings in bacteriophage {lambda} with mono-, di-, and polyvalent salt concentrations, for wild-type [48.5 x 10{sup 3} base pairs (bp)] and short-genome-mutant (37.8 kbp) strains. From the decrease in d spacings with increasing salt, we deduce the relative contributions of DNA self-repulsion and bending to the energetics of packaged phage genomes. We quantify the DNA-DNA interaction energies within the intact phage by combining the measured d spacings in the capsid with measurements of osmotic pressure in DNA assemblies under the same salt conditions in bulk solution. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, the DNA-DNA interaction energies inside the phage capsids are shown to be about 1 kT/bp, an order of magnitude larger than the bending energies.

  9. Salt-Dependent DNA-DNA Spacings in Intact Bacteriophage λ Reflect Relative Importance of DNA Self-Repulsion and Bending Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiangyun; Rau, Donald C.; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Fang, Li Tai; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Using solution synchrotron x-ray scattering, we measure the variation of DNA-DNA d spacings in bacteriophage λ with mono-, di-, and polyvalent salt concentrations, for wild-type [48.5×103 base pairs (bp)] and short-genome-mutant (37.8 kbp) strains. From the decrease in d spacings with increasing salt, we deduce the relative contributions of DNA self-repulsion and bending to the energetics of packaged phage genomes. We quantify the DNA-DNA interaction energies within the intact phage by combining the measured d spacings in the capsid with measurements of osmotic pressure in DNA assemblies under the same salt conditions in bulk solution. In the commonly used Tris-Mg buffer, the DNA-DNA interaction energies inside the phage capsids are shown to be about 1kT/bp, an order of magnitude larger than the bending energies.

  10. Characterization of Vibrio metschnikovii and Vibrio gazogenes by DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, J J; Hickman-Brenner, F W; Fanning, G R; Gordon, C M; Brenner, D J

    1988-01-01

    Vibrio metschnikovii and Vibrio gazogenes are two new Vibrio species that have been little studied. Thirteen strains of V. metschnikovii were highly related to the type strain, NCTC 8443, by DNA-DNA hybridization. Relatedness values were 83 to 90% at 60 degrees C and 75 to 84% at the more stringent 75 degrees C. Divergence values ranged from 0.7 to 1.9. Strains of V. metschnikovii were oxidase negative and did not reduce nitrate to nitrite. The other phenotypic characteristics agreed with published data. Twenty-three strains of V. gazogenes were isolated from salt marshes and marshy areas on the coast of North and South Carolina. A new medium, marine agar supplemented with an additional 2.5% agar, reduced the problem of swarming by marine Vibrio species and enhanced the isolation of V. gazogenes and other organisms. By DNA-DNA hybridization, 22 of 23 strains were 76% or more related to the type strain of V. gazogenes, ATCC 29988. However, four DNA hybridization subgroups were defined on the basis of divergence values and/or phenotype. Strains of DNA group 1 were more highly related to each other, and this group contained the type strain and six other strains. Strains of DNA group 2 were more highly related to each other, and this group contained reference strain ATCC 43942 and 14 other strains. Strains of DNA group 1 did not ferment melibiose or D-sorbitol (one strain was sorbitol positive), but strains of DNA group 2 fermented both sugars. A revised phenotypic description of V. gazogenes based on 24 strains was written on the basis of reactions (within 2 days of incubation) at 25 degrees C in media supplemented with Na+, K+, and Mg2+. Positive results (100% positive unless indicated) included motility; gas production during fermentation (96% at 2 days, 100% at 3 to 7 days); growth in nutrient broth with the addition of 1% NaCl (88%), 2% NaCl, 3.5% NaCl, 6% NaCl, 8% NaCl, and 10% NaCl (92%); dry red or orange colonies on marine agar; and fermentation of L

  11. Elevated temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittain, J. O.; Geslin, D.; Lei, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    One of the goals of the HOST Program is the development of electrical resistance strain gages for static strain measurements at temperatures equal to or greater than 1273 K. Strain gage materials must have a reproducible or predictable response to temperature, time and strain. It is the objective of this research to investigate criteria for the selection of materials for such applications through electrical properties studies. The results of the investigation of two groups of materials, refractory compounds and binary alloy solid solutions are presented.

  12. Thin film strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A strain transducer system and process for making the same is disclosed. A beryllium copper ring having four strain gages is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to the output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with strain on the surface causing bending of a ring which provides an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface strain. A photographic pattern of a one half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium copper for chem-mill etch formation is illustrated.

  13. Can strain magnetize light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Strain in photonic structures can induce pseudomagnetic fields and Landau levels. Nature Photonics spoke to Mordechai Segev, Mikael Rechtsman, Alexander Szameit and Julia Zeuner about their unique approach.

  14. Phylogenetic analyses of Chlamydia psittaci strains from birds based on 16S rRNA gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Masuda, M; Tsuruno, T; Mori, Y; Takashima, I; Hiramune, T; Kikuchi, N

    1997-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were determined for 39 strains of Chlamydia psittaci (34 from birds and 5 from mammals) and for 4 Chlamydia pecorum strains. The sequences were compared phylogenetically with the gene sequences of nine Chlamydia strains (covering four species of the genus) retrieved from nucleotide databases. In the neighbor-joining tree, C. psittaci strains were more closely related to each other than to the other Chlamydia species, although a feline pneumonitis strain was distinct (983 to 98.6% similarity to other strains) and appeared to form the deepest subline within the species of C. psittaci (bootstrap value, 99%). The other strains of C. psittaci exhibiting similarity values of more than 99% were branched into several subgroups. Two pigeon strains and one turkey strain formed a distinct clade recovered in 97% of the bootstrapped trees. The other pigeon strains seemed to be distinct from the strains from psittacine birds, with 88% of bootstrap value. In the cluster of psittacine strains, three parakeet strains and an ovine abortion strain exhibited a specific association (level of sequence similarity, 99.9% or more; bootstrap value, 95%). These suggest that at least four groups of strains exist within the species C. psittaci. The 16S rDNA sequence is a valuable phylogenetic marker for the taxonomy of chlamydiae, and its analysis is a reliable tool for identification of the organisms. PMID:9350757

  15. Geodetic Strain Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Sharon; Baxter, Sean C.; Parker, Jay W.; Webb, Frank H.; Owen, Susan E.; Sibthorpe, Anthony J.; Dong, Danan

    2011-01-01

    A geodetic software analysis tool enables the user to analyze 2D crustal strain from geodetic ground motion, and create models of crustal deformation using a graphical interface. Users can use any geodetic measurements of ground motion and derive the 2D crustal strain interactively. This software also provides a forward-modeling tool that calculates a geodetic velocity and strain field for a given fault model, and lets the user compare the modeled strain field with the strain field obtained from the user s data. Users may change parameters on-the-fly and obtain a real-time recalculation of the resulting strain field. Four data products are computed: maximum shear, dilatation, shear angle, and principal components. The current view and data dependencies are processed first. The remaining data products and views are then computed in a round-robin fashion to anticipate view changes. When an analysis or display parameter is changed, the affected data products and views are invalidated and progressively re-displayed as available. This software is designed to facilitate the derivation of the strain fields from the GPS and strain meter data that sample it to facilitate the understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the strain field derivation from continuous GPS (CGPS) and other geodetic data from a variety of tectonic settings, to converge on the "best practices" strain derivation strategy for the Solid Earth Science ESDR System (SESES) project given the CGPS station distribution in the western U.S., and to provide SESES users with a scientific and educational tool to explore the strain field on their own with user-defined parameters.

  16. Quantification of cytomegalovirus DNA in peripheral blood leukocytes by a branched-DNA signal amplification assay.

    PubMed Central

    Chernoff, D N; Miner, R C; Hoo, B S; Shen, L P; Kelso, R J; Jekic-McMullen, D; Lalezari, J P; Chou, S; Drew, W L; Kolberg, J A

    1997-01-01

    Quantification of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in blood may aid in the identification of patients at highest risk for developing CMV disease, the evaluation of new therapeutics, and the prompt recognition of drug-resistant CMV strains. A branched-DNA (bDNA) assay was developed for the reliable quantification of CMV DNA in peripheral blood leukocytes. The bDNA assay allowed for the highly specific and reproducible quantification of CMV DNA in clinical specimens. Furthermore, the bDNA assay was at least as sensitive as culture techniques and displayed a nearly 3 log10 dynamic range in quantification. Changes in CMV DNA levels measured by the bDNA assay in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient undergoing therapy were consistent with CMV culture, antigen, and genotype results and correlated with disease progression and resistance markers. The bDNA assay for the quantification of CMV DNA may provide a useful tool that can be used to aid physicians in monitoring disease progression, evaluating therapeutic regimens, and recognizing viral resistance and drug failure. PMID:9350724

  17. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 contains N6-methyladenine in its genome

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Bhaskar Jyoti; Sabnis, Ketaki; Deobagkar, Deepti D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.; E-mail: dndeo@unipune.ernet.in

    2005-09-23

    Methylation of DNA is known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in bacteria. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 on exposure to high radiation undergoes significant DNA damage, which is repaired without mutations. However, the presence of modified nucleotides has not been reported in its genome. We report here the detection of N6-methyladenine in the genome of D. radiodurans strain R1 using immunochemical techniques. This N6-methyladenine is not a part of GATC restriction-modification system. D. radiodurans cell extract also exhibited a DNA adenine methyltransferase activity which was reduced in the early post-irradiation recovery phase.

  18. Duplex PCR for differentiation of the vaccine strain Brucella suis S2 and B. suis biovar 1 from other strains of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Tan, Pengfei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zouliang; Mao, Kairong; Peng, Daxin; Chen, Yiping

    2014-09-01

    Immunisation with attenuated Brucella spp. vaccines prevents brucellosis, but may also interfere with diagnosis. In this study, a duplex PCR was developed to distinguish Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from field strains of B. suis biovar 1 and other Brucella spp. The PCR detected 60 fg genomic DNA of B. suis S2 or biovar 1 field strains and was able to distinguish B. suis S2 and wild-type strains of B. suis biovar 1 among 76 field isolates representing all the common species and biovars, as well as four vaccine strains, of Brucella. PMID:25011712

  19. Mechanical strain isolator mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Gordon E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical strain. A mechanical strain isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical strain isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral strain in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the strain by bending in the direction of the strain. An axial strain on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the strain. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.

  20. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  1. Isolation of Minicircular Deoxyribonucleic Acids from Wild Strains of Escherichia coli and their Relationship to other Bacterial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Werner; Schrempf, Hildgund

    1972-01-01

    Supercoiled minicircular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules with molecular weights of 1.8 × 106 and 2.3 × 106 have been isolated from two wild strains of Escherichia coli. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicate that these DNA molecules share extended homologies with the minicircular DNA of E. coli 15. The DNA of the colicinogenic factor E1 (ColE1) also hybridizes to a large extent with minicircular DNA of E. coli 15. In contrast, no hybridization could be detected with various large extrachromosomal DNA elements such as the colicinogenic factor V (ColV), the beta-hemolytic factor (Hly), or the P1-like DNA of E. coli 15. Two different insertion DNA species of E. coli integrated into λdg-DNA (λdg UPin 128, λdg UPin 308) do not show any annealing with minicircular DNA of E. coli 15. Images PMID:4340922

  2. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. Images PMID:2513480

  3. Sensitive and specific detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii with DNA primers and probes identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Manulis, S; Valinsky, L; Lichter, A; Gabriel, D W

    1994-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA method was used to distinguish strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. pelargonii from 21 other Xanthomonas species and/or pathovars. Among the 42 arbitrarily chosen primers evaluated, 3 were found to reveal diagnostic polymorphisms when purified DNAs from compared strains were amplified by the PCR. The three primers revealed DNA amplification patterns which were conserved among all 53 strains tested of X. campestris pv. pelargonii isolated from various locations worldwide. The distinctive X. compestris pv. pelargonii patterns were clearly different from those obtained with any of 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. An amplified 1.2-kb DNA fragment, apparently unique to X. campestris pv. pelargonii by these random amplified polymorphic DNA tests, was cloned and evaluated as a diagnostic DNA probe. It hybridized with total DNA from all 53 X. campestris pv. pelargonii strains tested and not with any of the 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. The DNA sequence of the terminal ends of this 1.2-kb fragment was obtained and used to design a pair of 18-mer oligonucleotide primers specific for X. campestris pv. pelargonii. The custom-synthesized primers amplified the same 1.2-kb DNA fragment from all 53 X. campestris pv. pelargonii strains tested and failed to amplify DNA from any of the 46 other Xanthomonas strains tested. DNA isolated from saprophytes associated with the geranium plant also did not produce amplified DNA with these primers. The sensitivity of the PCR assay using the custom-synthesized primers was between 10 and 50 cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7993095

  4. The effects of microgravity on induced mutation in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, S.; Masukawa, M.; Sekikawa, K.; Amano, T.; Nakano, T.; Nagaoka, S.; Ohnishi, T.

    2001-01-01

    We examined whether microgravity influences the induced-mutation frequencies through in vivo experiments during space flight aboard the space shuttle Discovery (STS-91). We prepared dried samples of repair-deficient strains and parental strains of Escherichia ( E.) coli and Saccharomyces ( S.) cerevisiae given DNA damage treatment. After culture in space, we measured the induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses under microgravity. The experimental findings indicate that almost the same induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses of space samples were observed in both strains compared with the ground control samples. It is suggested that microgravity might not influence induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses at the stages of DNA replication and/or DNA repair. In addition, we developed a new experimental apparatus for space experiments to culture and freeze stocks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae cells.

  5. DNA curvature and flexibility in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Justin P.; Maher, L. James

    2014-01-01

    It has been more than 50 years since the elucidation of the structure of double-helical DNA. Despite active research and progress in DNA biology and biochemistry, much remains to be learned in the field of DNA biophysics. Predicting the sequence-dependent curvature and flexibility of DNA is difficult. Applicability of the conventional worm-like chain polymer model of DNA has been challenged. The fundamental forces responsible for the remarkable resistance of DNA to bending and twisting remain controversial. The apparent “softening” of DNA measured in vivo in the presence of kinking proteins and superhelical strain is incompletely understood. New methods and insights are being applied to these problems. This review places current work on DNA biophysics in historical context and illustrates the ongoing interplay between theory and experiment in this exciting field. PMID:20478077

  6. The involvement of cell cycle checkpoint-mutations in the mutagenesis induced in Drosophila by a longer wavelength light band of solar UV.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Megumi; Takinami, Syogo; Hieda, Kotaro; Fursawa, Yoshiya; Negishi, Tomoe

    2002-03-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is considered to be injurious rather than necessary for most organisms living on the earth. It is reported that the risk of skin cancer in humans increases by the depletion of the ozone layer. We have examined the genotoxicity of solar ultraviolet, especially the longer wavelength light, using Drosophila. Recently, we have demonstrated that light of wavelength up to 340 nm is mutagenic on Drosophila larvae. Using an excision repair-deficient Drosophila strain (mus201), we have obtained results suggesting that the lesion caused in larvae by the 320 nm-light irradiation may be similar to the damage induced by irradiation at 310 nm, and that light of 330 and 340 nm may induce damage different from that induced by 310 and 320 nm-light. To examine the difference in DNA damage induced by light of a particular wavelength, we performed monochromatic irradiation on larvae of two Drosophila strains; one excision repair-deficient (mei-9) and another postreplication repair-deficient (mei-41). 310 and 320 nm-light was more mutagenic in the mei-9 strain than in mei-41, whereas 330 and 340 nm-light was more mutagenic in mei-41 than in mei-9. It is demonstrated that the mei-41 gene is a homologue of the human atm gene which is responsible for a cell cycle checkpoint. This result suggests that 310-320 nm-light induces DNA damage that is subject to nucleotide excision repair (NER) and that 330-360 nm-light causes damage to be recognized by the cell cycle checkpoint but it is not repairable by NER. PMID:12659514

  7. Taxonomic and strain-specific identification of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 within the Lactobacillus casei group.

    PubMed

    Coudeyras, Sophie; Marchandin, Hélène; Fajon, Céline; Forestier, Christiane

    2008-05-01

    Lactobacilli are lactic acid bacteria that are widespread in the environment, including the human diet and gastrointestinal tract. Some Lactobacillus strains are regarded as probiotics because they exhibit beneficial health effects on their host. In this study, the long-used probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 was characterized at a molecular level and compared with seven reference strains from the Lactobacillus casei group. Analysis of rrn operon sequences confirmed that L. rhamnosus 35 indeed belongs to the L. rhamnosus species, and both temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and ribotyping showed that it is closer to the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG) than to the species type strain. In addition, L. casei ATCC 334 gathered in a coherent cluster with L. paracasei type strains, unlike L. casei ATCC 393, which was closer to L. zeae; this is evidence of the lack of relatedness between the two L. casei strains. Further characterization of the eight strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis repetitive DNA element-based PCR identified distinct patterns for each strain, whereas two isolates of L. rhamnosus 35 sampled 40 years apart could not be distinguished. By subtractive hybridization using the L. rhamnosus GG genome as a driver, we were able to isolate five L. rhamnosus 35-specific sequences, including two phage-related ones. The primer pairs designed to amplify these five regions allowed us to develop rapid and highly specific PCR-based identification methods for the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus 35. PMID:18326671

  8. Taxonomic and Strain-Specific Identification of the Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 within the Lactobacillus casei Group▿

    PubMed Central

    Coudeyras, Sophie; Marchandin, Hélène; Fajon, Céline; Forestier, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacilli are lactic acid bacteria that are widespread in the environment, including the human diet and gastrointestinal tract. Some Lactobacillus strains are regarded as probiotics because they exhibit beneficial health effects on their host. In this study, the long-used probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 was characterized at a molecular level and compared with seven reference strains from the Lactobacillus casei group. Analysis of rrn operon sequences confirmed that L. rhamnosus 35 indeed belongs to the L. rhamnosus species, and both temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and ribotyping showed that it is closer to the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG) than to the species type strain. In addition, L. casei ATCC 334 gathered in a coherent cluster with L. paracasei type strains, unlike L. casei ATCC 393, which was closer to L. zeae; this is evidence of the lack of relatedness between the two L. casei strains. Further characterization of the eight strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis repetitive DNA element-based PCR identified distinct patterns for each strain, whereas two isolates of L. rhamnosus 35 sampled 40 years apart could not be distinguished. By subtractive hybridization using the L. rhamnosus GG genome as a driver, we were able to isolate five L. rhamnosus 35-specific sequences, including two phage-related ones. The primer pairs designed to amplify these five regions allowed us to develop rapid and highly specific PCR-based identification methods for the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus 35. PMID:18326671

  9. Identification and characterization of lactococcal and Acetobacter strains isolated from traditional Caucasusian fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tatsuya; Yokota, Akira; Umezawa, Yuka; Toda, Toshiya; Yamada, Kazuhiko

    2005-06-01

    The fermented milk, so-called "Caspian Sea Yogurt" in Japan, consists of two bacterial strains isolated from traditional Caucasusian fermented milk. In the present study, those strains were identified and characterized. Strain FC was Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic cocci and strain FA was Gram-negative, aerobic rods. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences showed that strain FC formed a cluster with Lactococcus lactis strains and was most closely related to L. lactis subsp. cremoris. Strain FA was included in the genus Acetobacter cluster and was most closely related to A. orientalis. The DNA G+C contents of strain FC and strain FA were 39.2 and 51.6 mol%, respectively. Biochemical tests and DNA-DNA hybridization clarified that strain FC belongs to L. lactis subsp. cremoris and strain FA belongs to A. orientalis. The culture supernatant of lactococcal strain FC inhibited the growth of L. lactis subsp. cremoris DSM 20069T and L. lactis subsp. hordniae JCM 1180T. The inhibitory activity was detected after incubation at 70 degrees C for 60 min or 100 degrees C for 30 min and was stable when the supernatant was adjusted to a pH ranging from 4.9 to 7.5. The antimicrobial activity was lost on treatment with proteolytic enzymes such as proteinase K, trypsin, pronase, and pepsin, although it was not affected by catalase. The gene of lactococcin B (lcnB) homolog was found in the strain FC. From the above results, the strain FC was thought to produce a bacteriocin-like substance. PMID:16161770

  10. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  11. The effect of DNA supercoiling on nucleosome structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbel, Tabea; Langowski, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Nucleosomes have to open to allow access to DNA in transcription, replication, and DNA damage repair. Changes in DNA torsional strain (e.g. during transcription elongation) influence the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated the effect of DNA supercoiling-induced torsional strain on nucleosome structure and stability by scanning force microscopy (SFM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Nucleosomes were reconstituted onto 2.7 kb DNA plasmids with varying superhelical densities. The SFM results show a clear dependence of the amount of DNA wrapped around the nucleosome core on the strength and type of supercoiling. Negative supercoiling led to smaller nucleosome opening angles as compared to relaxed or positively supercoiled DNA. FCS experiments show that nucleosomes reconstituted on negatively superhelical DNA are more resistant to salt-induced destabilization, as seen by reduced H2A-H2B dimer eviction from the nucleosome. Our results show that changes in DNA topology, e.g. during transcription elongation, affect the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA.

  12. Sequence determination of a mildly virulent strain (CU-2) of Gallid herpesvirus type 2 using 454 pyrosequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete DNA sequence of the mildly virulent Gallid herpesvirus type 2 strain CU-2 was determined and consists of 176,922 bp with an overall gene organization typical of class E alphaherpesviruses. Phylogenetically, this strain partitions in its own branch between the virulent strains RB-1B, Md1...

  13. A nosocomial outbreak due to Enterobacter cloacae strains with the E. hormaechei genotype in patients treated with fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Davin-Regli, A; Bosi, C; Charrel, R; Ageron, E; Papazian, L; Grimont, P A; Cremieux, A; Bollet, C

    1997-01-01

    During a 7-month period, we isolated 21 highly fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacter cloaecae strains in units from two hospitals in Marseille, France. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA showed clonal identity between isolates which, furthermore, presented the Enterobacter hormaechei genotype on DNA-DNA hybridization. The emergence of this clone was observed only in patients treated with fluoroquinolones. PMID:9157119

  14. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome Analysis of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain YL17, Isolated from a Compost Pile.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Roberts, Richard J; Ee, Robson; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we announce the complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila strain YL17. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) DNA sequencing was used to generate the complete genome sequence and the genome-wide DNA methylation profile of this environmental isolate. A total of five unique DNA methyltransferase recognition motifs were reported here. PMID:26941143

  15. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome Analysis of Aeromonas hydrophila Strain YL17, Isolated from a Compost Pile

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Roberts, Richard J.; Ee, Robson; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we announce the complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila strain YL17. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) DNA sequencing was used to generate the complete genome sequence and the genome-wide DNA methylation profile of this environmental isolate. A total of five unique DNA methyltransferase recognition motifs were reported here. PMID:26941143

  16. Molecular analysis of Boophilus spp. (Acari: Ixodidae) tick strains.

    PubMed

    Fuente, J; García-García, J C; González, D M; Izquierdo, G; Ochagavia, M E

    2000-10-01

    Boophilus spp. (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitize cattle and other farm and wild animals in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Ticks belonging to the genus Boophilus have undergone evolutionary processes associated with habitat adaptation following biogeographical separation, resulting in strains with marked morphological differences. We have characterized at the molecular level B. microplus strains from Latin America and Australia, employing sequences derived from the bm86 coding region, an intron located within the bm86 gene, and DNA short tandem repeats (STR). A B. annulatus strain was employed for comparison. The results indicated that variation within the bm86 coding region is higher between B. microplus strains than between some B. microplus strains and B. annulatus. The sequence of the intron was not informative for phylogenetic analysis, varying among individuals of the same strain. Two STRs were identified in B. microplus (STRs BmM1 and BmM2) and one in B. annulatus (STR Ba1). Southern hybridization experiments with STRs BmM1 and BmM2 as a probe revealed the prevalence of dispersed moderately repeated DNA in the genome of B. microplus. The analysis of polymorphism at STR locus BmM1 evidenced differences within and between populations of B. microplus. These results support at the molecular level the existing differences between B. microplus strains and suggest tools to characterize these populations. PMID:10962158

  17. Wrinkled DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, S; Chandrasekaran, R; Puigjaner, L C; Walker, J K; Hall, I H; Birdsall, D L; Ratliff, R L

    1983-01-01

    The B form of poly d(GC):poly d(GC) in orthorhombic microcrystallites in oriented fibers has a secondary structure in which a dinucleotide is the repeated motif rather than a mononucleotide as in standard, smooth B DNA. One set of nucleotides (probably GpC) has the same conformations as the smooth form but the alternate (CpG) nucleotides have a different conformation at C3'-O3'. This leads to a distinctive change in the orientation of the phosphate groups. Simi