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Sample records for dna vaccine protects

  1. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  2. Rabies DNA vaccines for protection and therapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2003-07-01

    DNA vaccines have shown efficacy in preclinical animal models in preventing or even treating a variety of diseases caused by infectious agents, malignancies or immunological disorders. One of the main perceived advantages of DNA vaccines for use in less developed countries is their low cost. Nevertheless, in general, immune responses elicited by DNA vaccines are less potent than those induced by traditional vaccines or second generation viral recombinant vaccines, and their efficacy in human Phase I trials has been disappointing. DNA vaccines have shown good efficacy in preventing rabies in some experimental animal models; their performance in postexposure treatment has been less impressive. Considering that rabies is nearly always fatal, efficacious vaccines are available and treatment in most cases is initiated after exposure, the development of current DNA vaccines to rabies for use in humans is, at the current time, not appropriate. PMID:12831368

  3. Rabies DNA vaccines for protection and therapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L

    1999-02-01

    Rabies is a successful zoonotic disease that has persisted over time, achieving worldwide distribution in a variety of species. Annually, in developing countries with limited access to high-quality antirabies biologics, approximately 50,000 individuals and millions of animals die of rabies. Many of these countries continue to use vaccines produced in sheep, goat or suckling mouse brain, with ultraviolet light or phenol inactivation of the virus. Although there are several efficacious rabies vaccines derived from cultured cells, such as the human diploid cell vaccine, they are costly to produce and prohibitively expensive for developing countries. DNA vaccines offer a new and powerful approach for the generation of needed vaccines. They are stable, inexpensive to produce, easy to construct and induce a full spectrum of long-lasting humoral and cellular immune responses. This review concerns the present state of rabies DNA vaccines, and addresses the technology that may enhance their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:15992067

  4. DNA vaccine protects ornamental koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) against North American spring viremia of carp virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) in the United States constitutes a potentially serious alien pathogen threat to susceptible fish stocks in North America. A DNA vaccine with an SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene from a North American isolate was constructed. In order to test the vaccine a challenge model utilizing a specific pathogen-free domestic koi stock and a cold water stress treatment was also developed. We have conducted four trial studies demonstrating that the pSGnc DNA vaccine provided protection in vaccinated fish against challenge at low, moderate, and high virus doses of the homologous virus. The protection was significant (p < 0.05) as compared to fish receiving a mock vaccine construct containing a luciferase reporter gene and to non-vaccinated controls in fish ranging in age from 3 to 14 months. In all trials, the SVCV-G DNA immunized fish were challenged 28-days post-vaccination (546 degree-days) and experienced low mortalities varying from 10 to 50% with relative percent survivals ranging from 50 to 88%. The non-vaccinated controls and mock construct vaccinated fish encountered high cumulative percent mortalities ranging from 70 to 100%. This is the first report of a SVCV DNA vaccine being tested successfully in koi. These experiments prove that the SVCV DNA (pSGnc) vaccine can elicit specific reproducible protection and validates its potential use as a prophylactic vaccine in koi and other vulnerable North American fish stocks.

  5. Infectious bursal disease DNA vaccination conferring protection by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of invading viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yi; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Tung, Chun-Yu; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2011-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the kinetics of viral load and immune response in protection against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) by DNA vaccination. Chickens were DNA-vaccinated and challenged with IBDV one week after the third vaccination. Tissues were collected at 12 hours postinfection (HPI), 1 day postinfection (DPI), 3, 5, 7 and 10 DPI. The vaccinated chickens had less viral RNA, with delayed appearance and shorter duration in the bursa of Fabricius, spleen, and cecal tonsil than the challenged control chickens. Their ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers were decreased at 12 HPI and significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those in the challenged control chickens at later time points. Their spleen IFNγ expression was up-regulated compared to that in the DNA-vaccinated chickens without IBDV challenge. These results indicate that DNA vaccination confers protection against IBDV challenge by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of the invading viruses. PMID:21984266

  6. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingying; Yuen, Pak-Wai; Lam, Jenny Ka-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents. PMID:25014738

  7. GRA7 provides protective immunity in cocktail DNA vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Jongert, E; de Craeye, S; Dewit, J; Huygen, K

    2007-09-01

    In a previous study, single-gene vaccination with GRA1, GRA7 or ROP2 was shown to elicit partial protection against Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, the contribution of each antigen in the evoked humoral and cellular immune responses was evaluated after vaccination with plasmid mixtures containing GRA1, GRA7 and ROP2. Cocktail DNA vaccinated mice developed high antibody titers against the antigens from two-gene DNA vaccine cocktails, but lower titres when immunized with the three-gene cocktail. High numbers of IFN-gamma secreting splenocytes were generated predominantly against GRA7. Brain cyst burden was reduced by 81% in mice vaccinated with the three-gene mixture and they were completely protected against acute toxoplasmosis. Similar high levels of brain cyst reductions were obtained after vaccination with cocktails composed of GRA1 and GRA7 (89% reduction), or GRA7 and ROP2 (79% reduction), but not with the cocktail composed of GRA1 and ROP2. In low dose single-gene vaccinations, IFN-gamma and strong protection could only be elicited by GRA7. Hence, the presence of GRA7 in the DNA vaccine formulation was important for optimal protection and this was correlated with GRA7-specific IFN-gamma production. We propose GRA7 as a main component in cocktail DNA vaccines for vaccination against T. gondii. PMID:17727568

  8. Protective immune responses to biolistic DNA vaccination of Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S K; Sambanthamoorthy, S; Dakshinamoorthy, G; Munirathinam, G; Ramaswamy, K

    2012-10-01

    Biolistic vaccination using gene gun is developed as a safer tool for delivery of DNA vaccines, a technique that combines high vaccine efficiency with lower antigen dosage and lower cost per vaccine dose. In this study, we compared the protective responses in mice after delivering the Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2 (BmALT-2) DNA vaccine using the conventional intradermal approach or with the needleless gene gun delivery approach. BmALT-2 is a leading vaccine candidate against B. malayi, a lymphatic filarial parasite of human. After optimizing the DNA dose and gene gun parameters for delivery into mouse skin, groups of mice were biolistically vaccinated with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. Groups of mice vaccinated intradermally with 5 μg or 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX was used for comparison of vaccine efficacy. Results demonstrated that gene gun vaccination with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX conferred significant protection against challenge infection that was comparable to the degree of protection conferred by intradermal vaccination with 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. This observation was further supported by an in vitro antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Analysis of the immune response showed that the gene gun vaccination predominantly induced an IgG1 antibody response and significantly high Th2 cytokine response (IL-4) from spleen cells compared to intradermal BmALT-2 DNA delivery that induced predominantly an IgG2a and Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α). These findings show that host protective responses could be achieved with 20 fold decrease in DNA dose using a gene gun and could prove to be an efficient delivery method in BmALT-2 DNA vaccination against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22885273

  9. A combined DNA vaccine provides protective immunity against Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xi-Dan; Yu, Da-Hai; Chen, Su-Ting; Li, Shu-Xia; Cai, Hong

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a combined DNA vaccine containing six genes encoding immunodominant antigens from Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus. The number of lymph node and spleen cultures positive for M. bovis and B. abortus from calves immunized with the combined DNA vaccine was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) compared with unvaccinated calves after challenge with virulent M. bovis and B. abortus 544. The combined DNA vaccine group displayed stronger antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses and antigen-specific IFN-gamma ELISPOT activities 2 months after final immunization and after challenge. Antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in the combined DNA vaccine group were higher than either the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-positive or S19-positive control group. Likewise, more calves in the DNA vaccine group exhibited antigen-specific IgG titers and had higher IgG titers than those in the BCG- or S19-immunized groups 2 months after the final immunization. Moreover, two antigens in the combined DNA vaccine induced significant antigen-specific IFN-gamma responses 6 months after challenge (p < 0.05). Bacterial counts and pathological analyses of the challenged animals indicated that the combined DNA vaccine provided significantly better protection than the BCG vaccine against M. bovis, and the protection level induced by the combined DNA vaccine was comparable to S19 against B. abortus. This is the first report to demonstrate that a single combined DNA vaccine protects cattle against two infectious diseases. PMID:19364278

  10. DNA prime-protein boost vaccination enhances protective immunity against infectious bursal disease virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Honglei; Li, Kai; Gao, Li; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Yulong; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-05-31

    Infectious bursal disease virus causes an acute contagious immunosuppressive disease in chickens. Using VP2 protein from IBDV (Gx strain) as the immunogen, the goal of the current study was to evaluate the immune responses and protective efficacy elicited by different prime-boost vaccination regimens (DNA only, protein only, and DNA plus protein) in chickens. The results indicated that both pCAGoptiVP2 plasmid and rVP2 protein induced humoral and cellular immune responses. Chickens in the DNA prime-protein boost group developed significantly higher levels of ELISA and neutralizing antibodies to IBDV compared with those immunized with either the DNA vaccine or the protein vaccine alone (P<0.05). Furthermore, the highest levels of lymphocyte proliferation response, IL-4 and IFN-γ production were induced following priming with the DNA vaccine and boosting with the rVP2 protein. Additionally, chickens inoculated with the DNA prime-protein boost vaccine had 100% protection against challenge with vvIBDV, as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs, mortality, and bursal atrophy. In contrast, chickens receiving the DNA vaccine and the rVP2 protein vaccine had 67% and 80% protection, respectively. These findings demonstrated that the DNA prime-protein boost immunization strategy was effective in eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses in chickens, highlighting the potential value of such an approach in the prevention of vvIBDV infection. PMID:23419823

  11. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms. PMID:27054895

  12. Smallpox DNA vaccine delivered by novel skin electroporation device protects mice against intranasal poxvirus challenge.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Jay W; Golden, Joseph W; Ferro, Anthony M; King, Alan D

    2007-02-26

    Previously, we demonstrated that an experimental smallpox DNA vaccine comprised of four vaccinia virus genes (4pox) administered by gene gun elicited protective immunity in mice challenged with vaccinia virus, and in nonhuman primates challenged with monkeypox virus (Hooper JW, et al. Smallpox DNA vaccine protects nonhuman primates against lethal monkeypox. J Virol 2004;78:4433-43). Here, we report that this 4pox DNA vaccine can be efficiently delivered by a novel method involving skin electroporation using plasmid DNA-coated microneedle arrays. Mice vaccinated with the 4pox DNA vaccine mounted robust antibody responses against the four immunogens-of-interest, including neutralizing antibody titers that were greater than those elicited by the traditional live virus vaccine administered by scarification. Moreover, vaccinated mice were completely protected against a lethal (>10LD(50)) intranasal challenge with vaccinia virus strain IHD-J. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a protective immune response being elicited by microneedle-mediated skin electroporation. PMID:17240007

  13. Protective immunity of grass carp immunized with DNA vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila by using carbon nanotubes as a carrier molecule.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gong, Yu-Xin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the economic losses caused by diseases in aquaculture industry, more efficient and economic prophylactic measures should be urgently investigated. In this research, the effects of a novel functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) applied as a delivery vehicle for DNA vaccine administration in juvenile grass carp against Aeromonas hydrophila were studied. Our results showed that SWCNTs loaded with DNA vaccine induced a better protection to juvenile grass carp against A. hydrophila. Moreover, SWCNTs conjugated with DNA vaccine provided significantly protective immunity compared with free DNA vaccine. Thereby, SWCNTs may be considered as a potential efficient DNA vaccine carrier to enhance the immunological activity. PMID:27343373

  14. Construction of Eimeria tenella multi-epitope DNA vaccines and their protective efficacies against experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Huang, Xinmei; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-08-15

    The search for effective vaccines against chicken coccidiosis remains a challenge because of the complex organisms with multiple life cycle stages of Eimeria. Combination of T-cell epitopes from different stages of Eimeria life cycle could be an optimal strategy to overcome the antigen complexity of the parasite. In this study, 4 fragments with concentrated T-cell epitopes from the sporozoite antigen SO7 and the merozoite antigen MZ5-7 of Eimeria tenella were cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 in different forms, with or without chicken cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ genes as genetic adjuvants, to construct multistage, multi-epitope DNA vaccines against Eimeria tenella. Transcription and expression of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines in vivo were detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. On the basis of survival rate, lesion score, body weight gain, oocyst decrease ratio and the anti-coccidial index (ACI), Animal experiments were carried out to evaluate the protective efficacy against Eimeria tenella. Results showed the constructed DNA vaccines were transcribed and translated successfully in vivo. Animal experiment showed that the multi-epitopes DNA vaccines were more effective to stimulate immune response than single fragment. Compared with the DNA vaccines composed with less T-cell epitopes, DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 containing 4 fragments with concentrated T-epitopes provided the highest ACI of 180.39. DNA vaccines composed of antigens from two developmental stages were more effective than the single-stage ones. Especially DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 180.39. Furthermore, cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ could improve the efficacy of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines significantly. Overall, pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2-IFN-γ provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 189.92. The multi-epitope DNA vaccines revealed in this study provide new candidates for Eimeria vaccine development

  15. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    PubMed Central

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2–24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10823919

  16. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  17. Introduction of translation stop codons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Kurath, G.

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  18. Protective Immunity to H7N9 Influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O.; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S.; Walters, Jewell N.; Morrow, Matthew P.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses’ ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. PMID:24631084

  19. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. PMID:24631084

  20. Protection of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus four days after specific or semi-specific DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, S.E.; Corbeil, S.; Jones, G.R.; Shewmaker, W.D.; Lorenzen, N.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2001-01-01

    A DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was shown to provide significant protection as soon as 4 d after intramuscular vaccination in 2 g rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) held at 15??C. Nearly complete protection was also observed at later time points (7, 14, and 28 d) using a standardized waterborne challenge model. In a test of the specificity of this early protection, immunization of rainbow trout with a DNA vaccine against another fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, provided a significant level of cross-protection against IHNV challenge for a transient period of time, whereas a rabies virus DNA vaccine was not protective. This indication of distinct early and late protective mechanisms was not dependent on DNA vaccine doses from 0.1 to 2.5 ??g. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Protection of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus four days after specific or semi-specific DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    LaPatra, S E; Corbeil, S; Jones, G R; Shewmaker, W D; Lorenzen, N; Anderson, E D; Kurath, G

    2001-07-16

    A DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was shown to provide significant protection as soon as 4 d after intramuscular vaccination in 2 g rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) held at 15 degrees C. Nearly complete protection was also observed at later time points (7, 14, and 28 d) using a standardized waterborne challenge model. In a test of the specificity of this early protection, immunization of rainbow trout with a DNA vaccine against another fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, provided a significant level of cross-protection against IHNV challenge for a transient period of time, whereas a rabies virus DNA vaccine was not protective. This indication of distinct early and late protective mechanisms was not dependent on DNA vaccine doses from 0.1 to 2.5 microg. PMID:11427277

  2. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  3. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  4. Limitations of plasmid vaccines to complex viruses: selected myxoma virus antigens as DNA vaccines were not protective.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mathew M; van Leeuwen, Barbara H; Kerr, Peter J

    2004-11-25

    Myxoma virus, a poxvirus of the genus Leporipoxvirus, is the causative agent of the disease myxomatosis which is highly lethal in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Current vaccines to protect against myxomatosis are either attenuated live strains of the virus or the antigenically related rabbit fibroma virus. We examined the immune response of outbred domestic rabbits to the individual myxoma virus antigens M055R, M073R, M115L and M121R, delivered as DNA vaccines co-expressing rabbit interleukin-2 or interleukin-4. M115L and M121R were also delivered simultaneously. None of the vaccine constructs were able to protect the rabbits from disease or reduce mortality after challenge with virulent myxoma virus, despite induction of antigen-specific cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. PMID:15531037

  5. DNA Vaccine that Targets Hemagglutinin to MHC Class II Molecules Rapidly Induces Antibody-Mediated Protection against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Mjaaland, Siri; Roux, Kenneth H.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik

    2013-01-01

    New influenza A viruses with pandemic potential periodically emerge due to viral genomic reassortment. In the face of pandemic threats, production of conventional egg-based vaccines is time consuming and of limited capacity. We have developed in this study a novel DNA vaccine in which viral hemagglutinin (HA) is bivalently targeted to MHC class II (MHC II) molecules on APCs. Following DNA vaccination, transfected cells secreted vaccine proteins that bound MHC II on APCs and initiated adaptive immune responses. A single DNA immunization induced within 8 d protective levels of strain-specific Abs and also cross-reactive T cells. During the Mexican flu pandemic, a targeted DNA vaccine (HA from A/California/07/2009) was generated within 3 wk after the HA sequences were published online. These results suggest that MHC II–targeted DNA vaccines could play a role in situations of pandemic threats. The vaccine principle should be extendable to other infectious diseases. PMID:23956431

  6. DNA Vaccines: Protective Immunizations by Parenteral, Mucosal, and Gene-Gun Inoculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynan, Ellen F.; Webster, Robert G.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Haynes, Joel R.; Santoro, Joseph C.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid DNAs expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoproteins have been tested for their ability to raise protective immunity against lethal influenza challenges of the same subtype. In trials using two inoculations of from 50 to 300 μg of purified DNA in saline, 67-95% of test mice and 25-63% of test chickens have been protected against a lethal influenza challenge. Parenteral routes of inoculation that achieved good protection included intramuscular and intravenous injections. Successful mucosal routes of vaccination included DNA drops administered to the nares or trachea. By far the most efficient DNA immunizations were achieved by using a gene gun to deliver DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis. In mice, 95% protection was achieved by two immunizations with beads loaded with as little as 0.4 μg of DNA. The breadth of routes supporting successful DNA immunizations, coupled with the very small amounts of DNA required for gene-gun immunizations, highlight the potential of this remarkably simple technique for the development of subunit vaccines.

  7. Protective immunity conferred by porcine circovirus 2 ORF2-based DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Seydou; Cong, Yan-Long; Sun, Yi-Xue; Yang, Gui-Lian; Ding, Xue-Mei; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Zhou, Yu-Long; Yang, Minnan; Wang, Chun-Feng; Ding, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) associated with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) has caused the swine industry significant health challenges and economic damage. Although inactivated and subunit vaccines against PMWS have been used widely, so far no DNA vaccine is available. In this study, with the aim of exploring a new route for developing a vaccine against PCV2, the immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine was evaluated in mice. The pEGFP-N1 vector was used to construct a PCV2 Cap gene recombinant vaccine. To assess the immunogenicity of pEGFP-Cap, 80 BALB/c mice were immunized three times at 2 weekly intervals with pEGFP-Cap, LG-strain vaccine, pEGFP-N1 vector or PBS and then challenged with PCV2. IgG and cytokines were assessed by indirect ELISA and ELISA, respectively. Specimens stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques were examined histopathologically. It was found that vaccination of the mice with the pEGFP-Cap induced solid protection against PCV2 infection through induction of highly specific serum IgG antibodies and cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-10), and a small PCV2 viral load. The mice treated with the pEGFP-Cap and LG-strain developed no histopathologically detectable lesions (HE stain) and IHC techniques revealed only a few positive cells. Thus, this study demonstrated that recombinant pEGFP-Cap substantially alleviates PCV2 infection in mice and provides evidence that a DNA vaccine could be an alternative to PCV2 vaccines against PMWS. PMID:24845706

  8. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  9. DNA vaccination with VP2 gene fragment confers protection against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Satya Narayan; Prince, Prabhu Rajaiah; Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Arunkumar, Chakkaravarthy; Roy, Parimal; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri; Antony, Usha

    2014-06-25

    Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) causes immunosuppression in young chickens by destruction of antibody producing B cells in the Bursa of Fabricius and poses a potential threat to the poultry industry. We have examined the protective efficacy of a subunit DNA vaccine against IBDV infection in chickens in this study. An immunodominant VP2 gene fragment (VP252-417) was cloned into CMV promoter based DNA vaccine vector pVAX1 and in vitro expression of the DNA encoded antigens was confirmed by transfection of CHO cells with vaccine constructs followed by RT-PCR and western blot analysis using IBDV-antiserum. Two weeks old chickens were immunized intramuscularly with pVAXVP252-417 and the in vivo transcription of the plasmid DNA was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of DNA injected muscle tissue at different intervals of post immunization. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that the plasmid DNA was extensively distributed in muscle, spleen, kidney, liver, and bursa tissues. Chickens immunized with pVAXVP252-417 developed high titer (1:12,000) of anti-VP252-417 antibodies. Further, chicken splenocytes from pVAXVP252-417 immunized group showed a significantly high proliferation to the whole viral and recombinant antigen (P<0.01) compared to control groups, which implies that pVAXVP252-417 codes for immunogenic fragment which has epitopes capable of eliciting both B and T cell responses. This is evident by the fact that, pVAXVP252-417 immunized chicken conferred 75% protection against virulent IBDV (vIBDV) challenge compared to the control group. Thus, the present study confirms that the immunodominant VP2 fragment can be used as a potential DNA vaccine against IBDV infection in chickens. PMID:24745626

  10. MPT-51/CpG DNA vaccine protects mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruna Daniella de Souza; da Silva, Ediane Batista; do Nascimento, Ivan Pereira; Dos Reis, Michelle Cristina Guerreiro; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2009-07-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a severe infectious disease that kills approximately two million people worldwide every year. Because BCG protection is variable and does not protects adults, there is a great need for a new vaccine against TB that does not represent a risk for immunocompromised patients and that is also capable of protecting adult individuals. MPT-51 is a protein found in the genome of mycobacteria and binds to the fibronectin of the extracellular matrix, which may have a role in host tissue attachment and virulence. In order to test the usefulness of MPT-51 as a subunit vaccine, BALB/c were vaccinated and challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection of BALB/c with M. tuberculosis increased the number of IFN-gamma(+) T lymphocytes specific to MPT-51 in the spleen and lungs. Inoculation with rMPT-51/FIA and with rMPT-51/CpG DNA in non-infected BALB/c increased the amounts of IFN-gamma(+) T lymphocytes. Inoculation with rMPT-51/FIA also induced a humoral response specific to MPT-51. CFU counts of lung tissues done 60 days after infection showed a reduction of about 2 log in the bacteria load in the group of animals inoculated with rMPT-51/CpG DNA. These results make MPT-51 a valuable component to be further evaluated in the development of other subunit vaccines. PMID:19500525

  11. Induction of Broad Cytotoxic T Cells by Protective DNA Vaccination Against Marburg and Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, Devon J; Aviles, Jenna; Talbott, Kendra T; Wong, Gary; Wu, Stephan J; Villarreal, Daniel O; Myles, Devin JF; Croyle, Maria A; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2013-01-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers have been described as the most virulent viral diseases known to man due to associative lethality rates of up to 90%. Death can occur within days to weeks of exposure and there is currently no licensed vaccine or therapeutic. Recent evidence suggests an important role for antiviral T cells in conferring protection, but little detailed analysis of this response as driven by a protective vaccine has been reported. We developed a synthetic polyvalent-filovirus DNA vaccine against Marburg marburgvirus (MARV), Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), and Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Preclinical efficacy studies were performed in guinea pigs and mice using rodent-adapted viruses, whereas murine T-cell responses were extensively analyzed using a novel modified assay described herein. Vaccination was highly potent, elicited robust neutralizing antibodies, and completely protected against MARV and ZEBOV challenge. Comprehensive T-cell analysis revealed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of great magnitude, epitopic breadth, and Th1-type marker expression. This model provides an important preclinical tool for studying protective immune correlates that could be applied to existing platforms. Data herein support further evaluation of this enhanced gene-based approach in nonhuman primate studies for in depth analyses of T-cell epitopes in understanding protective efficacy. PMID:23670573

  12. Bursal transcriptome of chickens protected by DNA vaccination versus those challenged with infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Chun; Kim, Bong-Suk; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) infection destroys the bursa of Fabricius, causing immunosuppression and rendering chickens susceptible to secondary bacterial or viral infections. IBDV large-segment-protein-expressing DNA has been shown to confer complete protection of chickens from infectious bursal disease (IBD). The purpose of the present study was to compare DNA-vaccinated chickens and unvaccinated chickens upon IBDV challenge by transcriptomic analysis of bursa regarding innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport. One-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly three times at weekly intervals with IBDV large-segment-protein-expressing DNA. Chickens were challenged orally with 8.2 × 10(2) times the egg infective dose (EID)50 of IBDV strain variant E (VE) one week after the last vaccination. Bursae collected at 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days post-challenge (dpc) were subjected to real-time RT-PCR quantification of bursal transcripts related to innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport. The expression levels of granzyme K and CD8 in DNA-vaccinated chickens were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those in unvaccinated chickens upon IBDV challenge at 0.5 or 1 dpc. The expression levels of other genes involved in innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport were not upregulated or downregulated in DNA-vaccinated chickens during IBDV challenge. Bursal transcripts related to innate immunity and inflammation, including TLR3, MDA5, IFN-α, IFN-β, IRF-1, IRF-10, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, granzyme A, granzyme K and IL-10, were upregulated or significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated at 3 dpc and later in unvaccinated chickens challenged with IBDV. The expression levels of genes related to immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport, including CD4, CD8, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12(p40), IL-18, GM-CSF, GATA-3

  13. Protection of guinea pigs against Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai by LipL21 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    He, Han Jiang; Wang, Wen Yu; Wu, Zhong Dao; Lv, Zhi Yue; Li, Jun; Tan, Li Zhi

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the full lipL21 gene fragment encoding outer membrane protein LipL21 was cloned from L. interrogans serovar Lai and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). The guinea pigs were immunized with pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21, pcDNA3.1(+) or PBS. Six weeks after the second immunization, the splenocytes were isolated to detect their proliferative ability by lymphocyte transformation experiments. In addition, microscopic agglutination test was used for quantitative detection of specific antibodies. The rest guinea pigs were challenged intraperitoneally with L. interogans sorevar Lai. Then, protective effect was evaluated on the basis of survival and histopathological lesions in the kidneys, lungs, and liver. The lipL21 gene was successfully expressed in COS-7 cells through recombinant pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21. The titer of specific antibodies substantially increased, and the stimulation index of splenocytes increased significantly. Hence, the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 could protect the immunized guinea pigs from homotypic Leptospira infection. Furthermore, no obvious pathologic changes were observed in the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 immunized guinea pigs. The results showed that the protective effect with pathogenic strains of Leptospira was shared by LipL21 mediated through a plasmid vector. Consequently, these results indicated that the lipL21 DNA vaccine was a promising candidate for the prevention of leptospirosis. PMID:18954563

  14. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  15. Hamsters vaccinated with Ace-mep-7 DNA vaccine produced protective immunity against Ancylostoma ceylanicum infection.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Marcin; Jaros, Sławomir; Bąska, Piotr; Cappello, Michael; Długosz, Ewa; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2016-04-01

    Hookworms are intestinal nematodes that infect up to 740 million people, mostly in tropical and subtropical regions. Adult worms suck blood from damaged vessels in the gut mucosa, digesting hemoglobin using aspartic-, cysteine- and metalloproteases. Targeting aspartic hemoglobinases using drugs or vaccines is therefore a promising approach to ancylostomiasis control. Based on homology to metalloproteases from other hookworm species, we cloned the Ancylostoma ceylanicum metalloprotease 7 cDNA (Ace-mep-7). The corresponding Ace-MEP-7 protein has a predicted molecular mass of 98.8 kDa. The homology to metallopeptidases from other hookworm species and its predicted transmembrane region support the hypothesis that Ace-MEP-7 may be involved in hemoglobin digestion in the hookworm gastrointestinal tract, especially that our analyses show expression of Ace-mep-7 in the adult stage of the parasite. Immunization of Syrian golden hamsters with Ace-mep-7 cDNA resulted in 50% (p < 0.01) intestinal worm burden reduction. Additionally 78% (p < 0.05) egg count reduction in both sexes was observed. These results suggest that immunization with Ace-mep-7 may contribute to reduction in egg count released into the environment during the A. ceylanicum infection. PMID:26795262

  16. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Kaur, Tejinder; Joshi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The current study was designed to examine the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on gp63 and Hsp70 against murine visceral leishmaniasis. Inbred BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at an interval of three weeks with pcDNA3.1(+) encoding T cell epitopes of gp63 and Hsp70 individually and in combination. Animals were challenged intracardially with 107 promastigotes of Leishmania donovani 10 days post immunization and sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 months post challenge. The immunized animals revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in splenic and hepatic parasite burden as compared to the infected controls. Maximum reduction in parasite load (P < 0.05) was observed in animals treated with a combination of pcDNA/gp63 and pcDNA/Hsp70. These animals also showed heightened DTH response, increased IgG2a, elevated Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and reduced IgG1 and IL-10 levels. Thus, mice immunized with the cocktail vaccine exhibited significantly greater protection in comparison to those immunized with individual antigens. PMID:27533939

  17. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Kaur, Tejinder; Joshi, Jyoti

    2016-07-01

    The current study was designed to examine the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on gp63 and Hsp70 against murine visceral leishmaniasis. Inbred BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at an interval of three weeks with pcDNA3.1(+) encoding T cell epitopes of gp63 and Hsp70 individually and in combination. Animals were challenged intracardially with 10(7) promastigotes of Leishmania donovani 10 days post immunization and sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 months post challenge. The immunized animals revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in splenic and hepatic parasite burden as compared to the infected controls. Maximum reduction in parasite load (P < 0.05) was observed in animals treated with a combination of pcDNA/gp63 and pcDNA/Hsp70. These animals also showed heightened DTH response, increased IgG2a, elevated Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and reduced IgG1 and IL-10 levels. Thus, mice immunized with the cocktail vaccine exhibited significantly greater protection in comparison to those immunized with individual antigens. PMID:27533939

  18. Vaxfectin-formulated influenza DNA vaccines encoding NP and M2 viral proteins protect mice against lethal viral challenge.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Gretchen S; Planchon, Rodrick; Wei, Qun; Rusalov, Denis; Geall, Andrew; Enas, Joel; Lalor, Peggy; Leamy, Vicky; Vahle, Ruth; Luke, Catherine J; Rolland, Alain; Kaslow, David C; Smith, Larry R

    2007-01-01

    Next generation influenza vaccines containing conserved antigens may enhance immunity against seasonal or pandemic influenza virus strains. Using a plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccine approach, we systematically tested combinations of NP, M1, and M2 antigens derived from consensus sequences for protection against lethal influenza challenge and compared formulations for adjuvanting low pDNA vaccine doses. The highest level of protection at the lowest pDNA doses was provided by Vaxfectin-formulated NP + M2. Vaxfectin adjuvanticity was confirmed with a low dose of HA pDNA. These promising proof-of-concept data support the clinical development of Vaxfectin-formulated pDNA encoding NP + M2 consensus proteins. PMID:17637571

  19. Protection against feline immunodeficiency virus using replication defective proviral DNA vaccines with feline interleukin-12 and -18.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Stephen P; Flynn, J Norman; Rigby, Mark A; Macdonald, Julie; Bruce, Jennifer; Cannon, Celia; Golder, Matthew C; Hanlon, Linda; Harbour, David A; Mackay, Nancy A; Spibey, Norman; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C

    2002-02-22

    A molecular clone of the Glasgow-8 isolate of FIV (FIVGL8) was rendered replication defective by an in-frame deletion in either reverse transcriptase (deltaRT) or integrase (deltaIN) genes for use as DNA vaccines. To test the ability of these multi-gene vaccines to protect against two feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolates of differing virulence, cats were immunized using either DNA vaccine alone or co-administered with interleukin-12 (IL-12) and/or interleukin-18 (IL-18) cytokine DNA. Animals were challenged sequentially with FIV-Petaluma (FIVPET) an FIV isolate of relatively low virulence and subsequently with the more virulent FIVGL8. A proportion of vaccinates (5/18 deltaIN and 2/12 deltaRT) were protected against primary challenge with FIV(PET). Five of the vaccinated-protected cats were re-challenged with FIV(PET); four (all deltaIN) remained free of viraemia whilst all naive controls became viraemic. Following subsequent challenge with the more virulent FIVGL8 these four vaccinated-protected animals all became viraemic but showed lower proviral loads than naive cats. This study suggests that while our current DNA vaccines may not produce sterilizing immunity against more virulent isolates of FIV, they may nevertheless significantly reduce the impact of infection. PMID:11858854

  20. Oral vaccination of mice with Trichinella spiralis nudix hydrolase DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella elicited protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Wang, Zhong Quan; Liu, Ruo Dan; Jiang, Peng; Long, Shao Rong; Liu, Li Na; Zhang, Xin Zhuo; Cheng, Xiang Chao; Yu, Chuan; Ren, Hui Jun; Cui, Jing

    2015-06-01

    We have previously reported that Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase (TsNd) bound to intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), and the vaccination of mice with recombinant TsNd protein (rTsNd) produced a partial protective immunity against challenge infection in mice. In this study, the full-length cDNA sequence of TsNd gene was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1, and the recombinant TsNd DNA was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain ⊿cyaSL1344. Oral immunization of mice with TsNd/S. typhimurium elicited a significant local mucosal IgA response and a systemic Th1/Th2 immune response. Cytokine profiling also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 10) responses in splenocytes of immunized mice upon stimulation with the rTsNd. The oral immunization of mice with TsNd/S. typhimurium displayed a statistically significant 73.32% reduction in adult worm burden and a 49.5% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis muscle larvae, compared with PBS control group. Our results demonstrated that TsNd DNA delivered by attenuated live S. typhimurium elicited a local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response, and produced a partial protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:25733024

  1. Induction of protective immunity against Eimeria tenella, Eimeria necatrix, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria acervulina infections using multivalent epitope DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Ren, Zhe; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-06-01

    Avian coccidiosis is mostly caused by mixed infection of several Eimeria species under natural conditions and immunity to avian coccidiosis is largely dependent on T-cell immune response. In this study, 14 T-cell epitope fragments from eight antigens of Eimeria tenella (E. tenella), Eimeria necatrix (E. necatrix), Eimeria maxima (E. maxima) and Eimeria acervulina (E. acervulina) were ligated with pVAX1 producing 14 monovalent DNA vaccines, respectively. Protective immunity of the monovalent DNA vaccines was assessed by in vivo challenge experiments and then four most protective fragments of each species were chosen to construct multivalent epitope DNA vaccines with or without chicken IL-2 as genetic adjuvant. Protective efficacies of the epitope DNA vaccines on chickens against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina were evaluated. The results showed that the constructed multivalent epitope DNA vaccines significantly increased body weight gain, alleviated enteric lesions and reduced oocyst output of the infected birds. Especially, the multivalent epitope DNA vaccines of pVAX1-NA4-1-TA4-1-LDH-2-EMCDPK-1 and pVAX1-NA4-1-TA4-1-LDH-2-EMCDPK-1-IL-2 not only significantly increased body weight gain, alleviated enteric lesions and reduced oocyst output of the infected birds, but also resulted in anti-coccidial index (ACI) more than 170 against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina, which indicated they could induce protective immunity against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina. Our findings suggest the constructed multivalent epitope DNA vaccines are the potential candidate multivalent vaccines against mixed infection of Eimeria. PMID:25921712

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  3. DC targeting DNA vaccines induce protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Cao, Wei; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Zhao, Guang-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-CD11c antibodies target to the CD11c receptor that mediates antigen presentation to T cells by dendritic cells (DCs). To exploit these properties for immunization purposes, we obtained DC-targeting DNA vaccines by fusing tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu ectodomain to single chain antibody fragment (scFv) from N418 (scFvN418), a monoclonal antibody binding the mouse DC-restricted surface molecule CD11c, and explored its antitumoral efficacy and underlying mechanisms in mouse breast cancer models. Methods: Induction of humoral and cellular immune responses and antitumoral activity of the DNA vaccines were tested in transplantable HER2/neu-expressing murine tumor models and in transgenic BALB-neuT mice developing spontaneous Neu-driven mammary carcinomas. Results: Upon injection of the breast tumor cell line D2F2/E2 (stably expressing human wild-type HER2), scFvN418-HER2 immunized mice were protected against tumor growth. Even more important for clinical applications, we were able to substantially slow the growth of implanted D2F2/E2 cells by injection of scFvN418-HER2 conjugates into tumor bearing hosts. The existing tumors were eradicated by treatment with scFvN418-HER2 combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CTX), which can make a temporary regulatory T cells (Treg) depletion. What’s more, in combination with the low-dose CTX, vaccination with scFvN418-neu significantly retarded the development of spontaneous mammary carcinomas in transgenic BALB-neuT mice. Conclusion: Our results show that DNA vaccine which targeting of dendritic cells in situ by the means of antibody-antigen conjugates may be a novel way to induce long-lasting antitumor immunity. PMID:26770347

  4. DNA-based influenza vaccines: evaluating their potential to provide universal protection.

    PubMed

    Choo, Andrew Y; Broderick, Kate E; Kim, Joseph J; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2010-10-01

    The recent outbreaks of the H5N1 and H1N1 pandemic influenza have highlighted the importance of developing fast, effective therapeutic strategies to prevent and/or limit the spread of future influenza outbreaks. Although current vaccines against influenza are generally effective, several limitations, including those associated with the amount of available vaccine, the time to vaccine production and vaccine efficacy, may encumber a mass vaccination strategy and effective targeting against future outbreaks. This feature review discusses the prospects of SynCon-derived DNA vaccines against influenza; such vaccines are expected to be effective at targeting many currently circulating influenza virus strains, as well as potentially targeting strains that may be associated with future outbreaks. Because of advantages associated with safety, time to production and ease of production, as well as the generation of more effective immune responses, influenza DNA vaccines provide a promising potential solution to a global medical concern. PMID:20878593

  5. Biotechnology and DNA vaccines for aquatic animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    Biotechnology has been used extensively in the development of vaccines for aquaculture. Modern molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and microarray analysis have facilitated antigen discovery, construction of novel candidate vaccines, and assessments of vaccine efficacy, mode of action, and host response. This review focuses on DNA vaccines for finfish to illustrate biotechnology applications in this field. Although DNA vaccines for fish rhabdoviruses continue to show the highest efficacy, DNA vaccines for several other viral and bacterial fish pathogens have now been proven to provide significant protection against pathogen challenge. Studies of the fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines have elucidated factors that affect DNA vaccine efficacy as well as the nature of the fish innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA vaccines. As tools for managing aquatic animal disease emergencies, DNA vaccines have advantages in speed, flexibility, and safety, and one fish DNA vaccine has been licensed.

  6. Protective cell-mediated immunity by DNA vaccination against Papillomavirus L1 capsid protein in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Reed, Cynthia A; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D

    2006-01-01

    Papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 has successfully stimulated protective immunity against virus infection by induction of neutralizing antibodies in animal models and in clinical trials. However, the potential impact of L1-induced protective cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses is difficult to measure in vivo because of the coincidence of anti-L1 antibody. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L1 could activate CMI, using the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model. A unique property of this model is that infections can be initiated with viral DNA, thus bypassing all contributions to protection via neutralizing anti-L1 antibody. DNA vaccines containing either CRPV L1, or subfragments of L1 (amino-terminal two-thirds of L1 [L1N] and the carboxylterminal two-thirds of L1 [L1C]), were delivered intracutaneously into rabbits, using a gene gun. After three booster immunizations, the rabbits were challenged with several viral DNA constructs: wild-type CRPV, CRPV L1ATGko (an L1 ATG knockout mutation), and CRPV-ROPV hybrid (CRPV with a replacement L1 from Rabbit Oral Papillomavirus). Challenge of L1 DNA-vaccinated rabbits with wild-type CRPV resulted in significantly fewer papillomas when compared with challenge with CRPV L1ATGko DNA. Significantly smaller papillomas were found in CRPV L1-, L1N-, and L1C-vaccinated rabbits. In addition, rabbits vaccinated with either L1 or L1N grew significantly fewer and smaller papillomas when challenged with CRPV-ROPV hybrid DNA. Therefore, CRPV L1 DNA vaccination induced CMI responses to CRPV DNA infections that can contribute to protective immunity. Cross-protective immunity against CRPV L1 and ROPV L1 was elicited in these CRPV L1- and subfragment-vaccinated rabbits. PMID:16987067

  7. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials. PMID:25625927

  8. Sublingual Immunization of Trivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine in Baculovirus Nanovector for Protection against Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Hansam; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Yeondong; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Park, Ki Hoon; Jin, Hyerim; Kim, Jinyoung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the immunogenicity of a sublingually delivered, trivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA vaccine encapsidated in a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus nanovector. The HERV envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based DNA vaccine, encoding HPV16L1, -18L1 and -58L1 (AcHERV-triHPV), was constructed and sublingually administered to mice without adjuvant. Following sublingual (SL) administration, AcHERV-triHPV was absorbed and distributed throughout the body. At 15 minutes and 1 day post-dose, the distribution of AcHERV-triHPV to the lung was higher than that to other tissues. At 30 days post-dose, the levels of AcHERV-triHPV had diminished throughout the body. Six weeks after the first of three doses, 1×108 copies of SL AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies to a degree comparable to that of IM immunization with 1×109 copies. AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific vaginal IgA titers in a dose-dependent manner. SL immunization with 1×1010 copies of AcHERV-triHPV induced Th1 and Th2 cellular responses comparable to IM immunization with 1×109 copies. Molecular imaging revealed that SL AcHERV-triHPV in mice provided complete protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16, HPV18, and HPV58 pseudoviruses. These results support the potential of SL immunization using multivalent DNA vaccine in baculovirus nanovector for induction of mucosal, systemic, and cellular immune responses. PMID:25789464

  9. Epitope analysis and protection by a ROP19 DNA vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lin; Lu, Gang; Zhou, Aihua; Zhu, Meiyan; Li, Qihang; Wang, Zhilin; Arken, Miradel; Wang, Ao; He, Shenyi

    2016-01-01

    We used bioinformatics approaches to identify B-cell and T-cell epitopes on the ROP19 protein of Toxoplasma gondii. Then, we constructed plasmids with ROP19 (pEGFP-C1-ROP19) and injected them into BALB/c mice to test the immunoprotection induced by this vaccine candidate. The results showed that immunization with pEGFP-C1-ROP19 induced effective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice; specifically, high serum levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and increased interferon-gamma production by splenocytes. Furthermore, the mice vaccinated with pROP19 had significantly fewer brain cysts (583 ± 160) than the mice injected with phosphate-buffered saline (1350 ± 243) or with the control plasmid, pEGFP-C1 (1300 ± 167). Compared with PBS-treated mice, those immunized with pROP19 had only 43% of the number of brain cysts. These results suggest that the DNA vaccine encoding ROP19 induced a significant immune response and provided protection against a challenge with T. gondii strain PRU cysts. PMID:27055564

  10. Chicken IL-7 as a potent adjuvant enhances IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine immunogenicity and protective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shanshan; Zuo, Yuzhu; Li, Nan; Li, Xiujin; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Liyue; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Jianlou; Cui, Dan; He, Pingyou; Xu, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhu, Xiutong; Zhong, Fei

    2016-09-25

    Our previous work has demonstrated that the mammalian interleukin-7 (IL-7) gene can enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Whether chicken IL-7 (chIL-7) possesses the ability to enhance the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) remained unknown. To investigate this, we constructed a VP2 antigenic region (VP2366) gene and chIL-7 gene vectors, co-immunized chicken with these vectors and analyzed the effects of the chIL-7 gene on VP2366 gene immunogenicity. Results showed that co-administrated chIL-7 gene with VP2 DNA vaccine significantly increased specific serum antibody titers against IBDV, and enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-4 productions. More importantly, chIL-7 gene significantly increased VP2366 gene-induced protection against virulent IBDV infection, indicating that the chIL-7 gene possessed the capacity to enhance VP2366 DNA vaccine immunogenicity, and therefore might function as a novel adjuvant for IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine. Mechanically, chIL-7 could stimulate the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) expressions in vitro and in vivo, which might be involved in chIL-7 enhancement of the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine. PMID:27599941

  11. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges

    PubMed Central

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed. PMID:25996997

  12. DNA Vaccines: Experiences in the Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Accensi, Francesc; Rodríguez, Fernando; Monteagudo, Paula L

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is one of the most fascinating vaccine-strategies currently in development. Two of the main advantages of DNA immunization rely on its simplicity and flexibility, being ideal to dissect both the immune mechanisms and the antigens involved in protection against a given pathogen. Here, we describe several strategies used to enhance the immune responses induced and the protection afforded by experimental DNA vaccines tested in swine and provide with very basic protocol describing the generation and in vivo application of a prototypic DNA vaccine. Only time will tell the last word regarding the definitive implementation of DNA vaccination in the field. PMID:26458829

  13. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  14. Immunization of Pigs with a Particle-Mediated DNA Vaccine to Influenza A Virus Protects against Challenge with Homologous Virus

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Michael D.; McCabe, Dennis; McGregor, Martha W.; Neumann, Veronica; Meyer, Todd; Callan, Robert; Hinshaw, Virginia S.; Swain, William F.

    1998-01-01

    Particle-mediated delivery of a DNA expression vector encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) of an H1N1 influenza virus (A/Swine/Indiana/1726/88) to porcine epidermis elicits a humoral immune response and accelerates the clearance of virus in pigs following a homotypic challenge. Mucosal administration of the HA expression plasmid elicits an immune response that is qualitatively different than that elicited by the epidermal vaccination in terms of inhibition of the initial virus infection. In contrast, delivery of a plasmid encoding an influenza virus nucleoprotein from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) to the epidermis elicits a strong humoral response but no detectable protection in terms of nasal virus shed. The efficacy of the HA DNA vaccine was compared with that of a commercially available inactivated whole-virus vaccine as well as with the level of immunity afforded by previous infection. The HA DNA and inactivated viral vaccines elicited similar protection in that initial infection was not prevented, but subsequent amplification of the infection is limited, resulting in early clearance of the virus. Convalescent animals which recovered from exposure to virulent swine influenza virus were completely resistant to infection when challenged. The porcine influenza A virus system is a relevant preclinical model for humans in terms of both disease and gene transfer to the epidermis and thus provides a basis for advancing the development of DNA-based vaccines. PMID:9445052

  15. Protective efficacy of a Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry protein 13 plasmid DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Petersen, Eskild; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Xiang; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Li, Hao-Xin; Lv, Zhi-Cheng; Cheng, Tian; Ren, Di; Yang, Gui-Lian; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite infecting humans and other warm-blooded animals, resulting in serious public health problems and economic losses worldwide. Rhoptries are involved in T. gondii invasion and host cell interaction and have been implicated as important virulence factors. In the present study, a DNA vaccine expressing rhoptry protein 13 (ROP13) of T. gondii inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX I was constructed, and the immune protection it induced in Kunming mice was evaluated. Kunming mice were immunized intramuscularly with pVAX-ROP13 and/or with interleukin-18 (IL-18). Then, we evaluated the immune response using a lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and antibody measurements, and the survival times of mice challenged with the virulent T. gondii RH strain (type I) and the cyst-forming PRU strain (type II). The results showed that pVAX-ROP13 alone or with pVAX/IL-18 induced a high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies and specific lymphocyte proliferative responses. Coinjection of pVAX/IL-18 significantly increased the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Further, challenge experiments showed that coimmunization of pVAX-ROP13 with pVAX/IL-18 significantly (P < 0.05) increased survival time (32.3 ± 2.7 days) compared with pVAX-ROP13 alone (24.9 ± 2.3 days). Immunized mice challenged with T. gondii cysts (strain PRU) had a significant reduction in the number of brain cysts, suggesting that ROP13 could trigger a strong humoral and cellular response against T. gondii cyst infection and that it is a potential vaccine candidate against toxoplasmosis, which provided the foundation for further development of effective vaccines against T. gondii. PMID:23015648

  16. DNA prime-protein boost based vaccination with a conserved region of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A and B proteins enhances protection against leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Karine M; Hartwig, Daiane D; Oliveira, Thaís L; Bacelo, Kátia L; Schuch, Rodrigo; Amaral, Marta G; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of theLeptospira genus. Vaccination with bacterins has severe limitations. Here, we evaluated the N-terminal region of the leptospiral immunoglobulin-like B protein (LigBrep) as a vaccine candidate against leptospirosis using immunisation strategies based on DNA prime-protein boost, DNA vaccine, and subunit vaccine. Upon challenge with a virulent strain ofLeptospira interrogans, the prime-boost and DNA vaccine approaches induced significant protection in hamsters, as well as a specific IgG antibody response and sterilising immunity. Although vaccination with recombinant fragment of LigBrep also produced a strong antibody response, it was not immunoprotective. These results highlight the potential of LigBrep as a candidate antigen for an effective vaccine against leptospirosis and emphasise the use of the DNA prime-protein boost as an important strategy for vaccine development. PMID:26676320

  17. DNA prime-protein boost based vaccination with a conserved region of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A and B proteins enhances protection against leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Forster, Karine M; Hartwig, Daiane D; Oliveira, Thaís L; Bacelo, Kátia L; Schuch, Rodrigo; Amaral, Marta G; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2015-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the Leptospira genus. Vaccination with bacterins has severe limitations. Here, we evaluated the N-terminal region of the leptospiral immunoglobulin-like B protein (LigBrep) as a vaccine candidate against leptospirosis using immunisation strategies based on DNA prime-protein boost, DNA vaccine, and subunit vaccine. Upon challenge with a virulent strain ofLeptospira interrogans, the prime-boost and DNA vaccine approaches induced significant protection in hamsters, as well as a specific IgG antibody response and sterilising immunity. Although vaccination with recombinant fragment of LigBrep also produced a strong antibody response, it was not immunoprotective. These results highlight the potential of LigBrep as a candidate antigen for an effective vaccine against leptospirosis and emphasise the use of the DNA prime-protein boost as an important strategy for vaccine development. PMID:26676320

  18. VCL-CB01, an injectable bivalent plasmid DNA vaccine for potential protection against CMV disease and infection

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R

    2010-01-01

    Vaccines for the prevention of human CMV (hCMV) infection and disease are a major public health priority. Immunization with DNA vaccines encoding key proteins involved in the immune response to hCMV has emerged as a major focus of hCMV vaccine research. Validation of the protective effect of DNA vaccination in animal models has provided support for clinical trials. VCL-CB01, under development byVical Inc for the prevention of hCMV infection and disease, is a poloxamer-formulated, bivalent DNA vaccine that contains plasmids encoding hCMV tegument phosphoprotein 65 and the major hCMV surface glycoprotein B. In a phase I trial in healthy adults, VCL-CB01 was well tolerated. In interim results from a phase II trial in hCMV-seropositive hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, VCL-CB01 increased T-cell responses compared with placebo. The final results from the phase II trial will be of value for developing strategies to prevent hCMV disease in hCMV-seropositive transplant recipients, and may lead to other trials of VCL-CB01 or related vaccines for the prevention of congenital hCMV infection. PMID:19806506

  19. A recombinant DNA vaccine protects mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor against lethal challenge with Usutu virus.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus whose circulation had been confined to Africa since it was first detected in 1959. However, in the last decade USUV has emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and sporadic severe neuroinvasive infections in humans. Remarkably, adult laboratory mice exhibit limited susceptibility to USUV infection, which has impaired the analysis of the immune responses, thus complicating the evaluation of virus-host interactions and of vaccine candidates against this pathogen. In this work, we showed that mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFNAR (-/-) mice) were highly susceptible to USUV infection and provided a lethal challenge model for vaccine testing. To validate this infection model, a plasmid DNA vaccine candidate encoding the precursor of membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of USUV was engineered. Transfection of cultured cells with this plasmid resulted in expression of USUV antigens and the assembly and secretion of small virus-like particles also known as recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). A single intramuscular immunization with this plasmid was sufficient to elicit a significant level of protection against challenge with USUV in IFNAR (-/-) mice. The characterization of the humoral response induced revealed that DNA vaccination primed anti-USUV antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. Overall, these results probe the suitability of IFNAR (-/-) mice as an amenable small animal model for the study of USUV host virus interactions and vaccine testing, as well as the feasibility of DNA-based vaccine strategies for the control of this pathogen. PMID:26993334

  20. DNA vaccination with a gene encoding Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Protein 17 induces partial protective immunity against lethal challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Wang, Yu-Jing; Pei, Yan-Jiang; Bai, Ji-Zhong; Yin, Li-Tian; Guo, Rui; Yin, Guo-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that affects humans and various vertebrate livestock and causes serious economic losses. To develop an effective vaccine against T. gondii infection, we constructed a DNA vaccine encoding the T. gondii rhoptry protein 17 (TgROP17) and evaluated its immune protective efficacy against acute T. gondii infection in mice. The DNA vaccine (p3×Flag-CMV-14-ROP17) was intramuscularly injected to BALB/c mice and the immune responses of the vaccinated mice were determined. Compared to control mice treated with empty vector or PBS, mice immunized with the ROP17 vaccine showed a relatively high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies, and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response with predominance of IgG2a production. The immunized mice also displayed a specific lymphocyte proliferative response, a Th1-type cellular immune response with production of IFN-γ and interleukin-2, and increased number of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with the ROP17 DNA significantly prolonged the survival time (15.6 ± 5.4 days, P < 0.05) of mice after challenge infection with the virulent T. gondii RH strain (Type I), compared with the control groups which died within 8 days. Therefore, our data suggest that DNA vaccination with TgROP17 triggers significant humoral and cellular responses and induces effective protection in mice against acute T. gondii infection, indicating that TgROP17 is a promising vaccine candidate against acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:26842927

  1. Effects of DDA, CpG-ODN, and plasmid-encoded chicken IFN-gamma on protective immunity by a DNA vaccine against IBDV in chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, Ha Jung; Sung, Haan Woo; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the adjuvant effects of dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) on a DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) against the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). A plasmid encoding chicken IFN-ã was constructed. Twice at 2-week intervals, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with either a DNA vaccine alone or a DNA vaccine together with the respective adjuvants. On week 2 after the second immunization, the chickens were orally challenged with the highly virulent IBDV. The groups that received the DNA vaccines plus either DDA or CpG-ODN showed significantly lower survival rates than the group that received the DNA vaccine alone. However, the survival rates for the DNA vaccine alone and for the DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma were similar. The chickens had no detectable antibodies to the IBDV before the challenge but all the surviving chickens in all groups except for the normal control group showed the induction of antibodies to the IBDV at day 10 after the challenge. As judged by the lymphocyte proliferation assays using the a WST-8 solution performed on the peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes, the stimulation indices (SI) of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in all groups except for the normal control group were similar immediately before the challenge. At 10 days post-challenge, the SI for DNA vaccine plus either CpG-ODN or ChIFN-gamma was similar to that of the DNA vaccine control group. For splenic lymphocytes, the SI in the DNA vaccine plus CpG-ODN and DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma groups were higher than for the DNA vaccine control. These results suggest that DDA actually compromises the protection against the IBDV by DNA vaccine, and CpG-ODN and IFN-gamma had no significant effect. PMID:17106228

  2. Novel linear DNA vaccines induce protective immune responses against lethal infection with influenza virus type A/H5N1.

    PubMed

    Kendirgi, Frédéric; Yun, Nadezda E; Linde, Nathaniel S; Zacks, Michele A; Smith, Jeanon N; Smith, Jennifer K; McMicken, Harilyn; Chen, Yin; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development for possible influenza pandemics has been challenging. Conventional vaccines such as inactivated and live attenuated virus preparations are limited in terms of production speed and capacity. DNA vaccination has emerged as a potential alternative to conventional vaccines against influenza pandemics. In this study, we use a novel, cell-free DNA manufacturing process (synDNA) to produce prototype linear DNA vaccines against the influenza virus type A/H5N1. This synDNA process does not require bacterial fermentation, so it avoids the use of antibiotic resistance genes and other nucleic acid sequences unrelated to the antigen gene expression in the actual therapeutic DNA construct. The efficacy of various vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins (H5N1 synDNA), hemagglutinin alone (H5 synDNA) or neuraminidase alone (N1 synDNA) was evaluated in mice. Two of the constructs (H5 synDNA and H5N1 synDNA) induced a robust protective immune response with up to 93% of treated mice surviving a lethal challenge of a virulent influenza A/Vietnam/1203/04 H5N1 isolate. In combination with a potent biological activity and simplified production footprint, these characteristics make DNA vaccines prepared with our synDNA process highly suitable as alternatives to other vaccine preparations. PMID:18443425

  3. Protective immune response against Toxoplasma gondii elicited by a recombinant DNA vaccine with a novel genetic adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huaiyu; Min, Juan; Zhao, Qunli; Gu, Qinmin; Cong, Hua; Li, Ying; He, Shenyi

    2012-02-27

    Previous immunological studies from our laboratory have demonstrated the potential role of Toxoplasma gondii antigens SAG1 and GRA2 as vaccine candidates. To further evaluate the vaccine's effects, a series of recombinant DNA vaccines pVAX1-SAG1, pVAX1-GRA2 and pVAX1-SAG1-GRA2, termed pSAG1, pGRA2 and pSAG1-GRA2, respectively, were constructed. A plasmid pVAX1-S/PreS2, termed pSPreS2 encoding hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) S and PreS2 as a novel genetic adjuvant, was also constructed. The expression abilities of those DNA plasmids were examined in HFF cells by Western blotting. Then BALB/c mice were intramuscularly immunized with DNA plasmids and followed by challenging with the highly virulent T. gondii RH strain. The results demonstrated that the recombinant DNA vaccine pSAG1-GRA2 was capable of eliciting high levels of antibodies, a Th1 type of immune response with significant production of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4 or IL-10 in BALB/c mice, and partial protection against the acute phase of toxoplasmosis as compared to pSAG1, pGRA2 and controls. In addition, the adjuvant pSPreS2 formulated with DNA vaccine induced a Th1 type of immune response and therefore might be a novel genetic adjuvant to DNA vaccine for further investigation. PMID:22240340

  4. A Nonhuman Primate Scrub Typhus Model: Protective Immune Responses Induced by pKarp47 DNA Vaccination in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S.; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi–specific, IFN-γ–producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine

  5. A nonhuman primate scrub typhus model: protective immune responses induced by pKarp47 DNA vaccination in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel H; Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D; Day, Nicholas P J; Richards, Allen L

    2015-02-15

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi-specific, IFN-γ-producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced immune

  6. A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein elicits immune responses and complete protection in mice from lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonal; Dahiya, Shyam S; Sonwane, Arvind A; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Saini, Mohini; Rai, A; Gupta, Praveen K

    2008-12-01

    A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein (G) was developed by subcloning rabies G gene into a sindbis virus replicon-based vaccine vector (pAlpha). The self-amplification of RNA transcripts and translation efficiency of rabies G was analyzed in pAlpha-Rab-G-transfected mammalian cells using RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The transfected cells also showed induction of apoptosis which is an important event in the enhancement of immune responses. Further, immune responses induced with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine (pAlpha-Rab-G) was compared with conventional rabies DNA vaccine and commercial cell culture vaccine (Rabipur) in intramuscularly injected mice. The mice immunized with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine induced humoral and cell mediated immune responses better than conventional rabies DNA vaccine however, comparable to Rabipur vaccine. On challenge with rabies virus CVS strain, replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine conferred complete protection similar to Rabipur. These results demonstrate that replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine is effective in inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective vaccine against rabies. PMID:18848857

  7. Induction of a Protective Response in Mice by the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein Using DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Simone M.; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Vidale, Mariana M.; Costa, Emmerson C. B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A.; Freire, Marcos S.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection. PMID:22031819

  8. Protective antibody responses against Clostridium difficile elicited by a DNA vaccine expressing the enzymatic domain of toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ke; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiao, Yanling; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2013-01-01

    A DNA vaccination approach was used in the current study to screen for the immunogenicity of different fragments of toxin A and toxin B from Clostridium difficile. With this approach, protein antigens do not need to be produced in vitro and the immunogenicity of candidate C. difficile antigens can be identified directly in animals. Codon optimized toxin gene fragments were individually cloned into the DNA vaccine vector and tested in mice and rabbits for their ability to elicit C. difficile toxin-specific antibody responses. Only a subset of the C. difficile toxin fragments, including the C-terminal receptor binding domain of toxin A and a novel N-terminal enzymatic domain of toxin B, were able to elicit protective antibody responses as determined by protection of target cells in a cytotoxicity assay or by preventing death of mice in a passive antibody protection study. Significantly, antibodies elicited by the novel N-terminus of the toxin B DNA vaccine were able to increase the level of protection when used in combination with anti-toxin A antibodies in a toxin challenge model in mice. PMID:23143772

  9. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. PMID:27123586

  10. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27170532

  11. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27170532

  12. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-05-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles.

  13. Anti-HER-2 DNA vaccine protects Syrian hamsters against squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Berta, G N; Mognetti, B; Spadaro, M; Trione, E; Amici, A; Forni, G; Di Carlo, F; Cavallo, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper illustrates the efficacy of DNA vaccination through electroporation in the prevention of oral transplantable carcinoma in Syrian hamsters. At 21 and 7 days before tumour challenge, 19 hamsters were vaccinated with plasmids coding for the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rat HER-2 receptor (EC-TM plasmids), whereas 19 control hamsters were injected intramuscularly with the empty plasmid. Immediately following plasmid injection, hamsters of both groups received two square-wave 25 ms, 375 V cm−1 electric pulses via two electrodes placed on the skin of the injection area. At day 0, all hamsters were challenged in the submucosa of the right cheek pouch with HER-2-positive HCPC I cells established in vitro from an 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced oral carcinoma. This challenge gave rise to HER-2-positive buccal neoplastic lesions in 14 controls (73.37%), compared with only seven (36.8%, P<0.0027) vaccinated hamsters. In addition, the vaccinated hamsters displayed both a stronger proliferative and cytotoxic response than the controls and a significant anti-HER-2 antibody response. Most of the hamsters that rejected the challenge displayed the highest antibody titres. These findings suggest that DNA vaccination may have a future in the prevention of HER-2-positive human oral cancer. PMID:16265350

  14. Bicistronic DNA Vaccines Simultaneously Encoding HIV, HSV and HPV Antigens Promote CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Vinicius C.; Diniz, Mariana O.; Cariri, Francisco A. M. O.; Ventura, Armando M.; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Almeida, Rafael R.; Campos, Marco A.; Lima, Graciela K.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are currently infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). For this enormous contingent of people, the search for preventive and therapeutic immunological approaches represents a hope for the eradication of latent infection and/or virus-associated cancer. To date, attempts to develop vaccines against these viruses have been mainly based on a monovalent concept, in which one or more antigens of a virus are incorporated into a vaccine formulation. In the present report, we designed and tested an immunization strategy based on DNA vaccines that simultaneously encode antigens for HIV, HSV and HPV. With this purpose in mind, we tested two bicistronic DNA vaccines (pIRES I and pIRES II) that encode the HPV-16 oncoprotein E7 and the HIV protein p24 both genetically fused to the HSV-1 gD envelope protein. Mice i.m. immunized with the DNA vaccines mounted antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, including in vivo cytotoxic responses, against the three antigens. Under experimental conditions, the vaccines conferred protective immunity against challenges with a vaccinia virus expressing the HIV-derived protein Gag, an HSV-1 virus strain and implantation of tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. Altogether, our results show that the concept of a trivalent HIV, HSV, and HPV vaccine capable to induce CD8+ T cell-dependent responses is feasible and may aid in the development of preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for the control of diseases associated with these viruses. PMID:23951135

  15. Bm86 antigen induces a protective immune response against Boophilus microplus following DNA and protein vaccination in sheep.

    PubMed

    De Rose, R; McKenna, R V; Cobon, G; Tennent, J; Zakrzewski, H; Gale, K; Wood, P R; Scheerlinck, J P; Willadsen, P

    1999-11-30

    Vaccination of sheep with a plasmid bearing the full length gene for the tick antigen Bm86 either alone or co-administered with plasmid carrying the ovine genes for the cytokines, granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin (IL)-1beta induced a relatively low level of protection against subsequent tick infestation. This tick damage reached statistical significance only for the groups which were vaccinated with plasmid encoding for Bm86, co-administered with plasmid encoding for ovine GM-CSF. Antibody titres measured against Bm86 were also low in all groups injected with the Bm86 DNA vaccine. Antibody production and anti-tick effect were significantly less than that achieved by two vaccinations with recombinant Bm86 protein. In all cases only a low level of antigen-specific stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes was recorded, as measured either by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine or the release of IFN-gamma. Injection of DNA encoding for Bm86, either alone or with co-administered cytokine genes, did however prime for a strong subsequent antibody response following a single injection of recombinant Bm86 protein in adjuvant. Antibody production nevertheless appeared to be slightly less effective than following two vaccinations with recombinant protein. The persistence of antibody following vaccination was the same regardless of the method of primary sensitization. In all cases the half-life of the antibody response was approximately 40-50 days indicating that, in contrast to results reported in mice, DNA vaccination in sheep did not result in sustained antibody production. PMID:10587297

  16. Protective Immunity Elicited by a Divalent DNA Vaccine Encoding Both the L7/L12 and Omp16 Genes of Brucella abortus in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Deyan; Ni, Bing; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Songle; Han, Yue; Mao, Liwei; He, Yangdong; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Xiliang

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding both the Brucella abortus L7/L12 protein (ribosomal protein) and Omp16 protein (outer membrane lipoprotein), designated pcDNA3.1-L7/L12-Omp16. Intramuscular injection of this divalent DNA vaccine into BALB/c mice elicited markedly both humoral and cellular immune responses. The specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the dual-gene DNA vaccine elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response and induced a large amount of gamma interferon-producing T cells upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant fusion protein L7/L12-Omp16, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in vivo. This divalent DNA vaccine could also induce a significant level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the protection level induced by the divalent DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that induced by the univalent DNA vaccines pcDNA3.1-L7/L12 or pcDNA3.1-Omp16. Taken together, the results of this study verify for the first time that the Omp16 gene can be a candidate target for a DNA vaccine against brucellosis. Additionally, a divalent genetic vaccine based on the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes can elicit a stronger cellular immune response and better immunoprotection than the relevant univalent vaccines can. PMID:16622210

  17. Novel approaches to tuberculosis prevention: DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R

    2014-03-01

    It is estimated that there are approximately eight million new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) worldwide annually. There is only 1 vaccine available for prevention: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). This has variable efficacy and is only protective for certain extrapulmonary TB cases in children, therefore new strategies for the creation of novel vaccines have emerged. One of the promising approaches is the DNA vaccine, used as a direct vaccination or as a prime-boost vaccine. This review describes the experimental data obtained during the design of DNA vaccines for TB. PMID:24450840

  18. Glycoprotein-Specific Antibodies Produced by DNA Vaccination Protect Guinea Pigs from Lethal Argentine and Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Maes, Piet; Kwilas, Steven A.; Ballantyne, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several members of the Arenaviridae can cause acute febrile diseases in humans, often resulting in lethality. The use of convalescent-phase human plasma is an effective treatment in humans infected with arenaviruses, particularly species found in South America. Despite this, little work has focused on developing potent and defined immunotherapeutics against arenaviruses. In the present study, we produced arenavirus neutralizing antibodies by DNA vaccination of rabbits with plasmids encoding the full-length glycoprotein precursors of Junín virus (JUNV), Machupo virus (MACV), and Guanarito virus (GTOV). Geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers, as measured by the 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50), exceeded 5,000 against homologous viruses. Antisera against each targeted virus exhibited limited cross-species binding and, to a lesser extent, cross-neutralization. Anti-JUNV glycoprotein rabbit antiserum protected Hartley guinea pigs from lethal intraperitoneal infection with JUNV strain Romero when the antiserum was administered 2 days after challenge and provided some protection (∼30%) when administered 4 days after challenge. Treatment starting on day 6 did not protect animals. We further formulated an IgG antibody cocktail by combining anti-JUNV, -MACV, and -GTOV antibodies produced in DNA-vaccinated rabbits. This cocktail protected 100% of guinea pigs against JUNV and GTOV lethal disease. We then expanded on this cocktail approach by simultaneously vaccinating rabbits with a combination of plasmids encoding glycoproteins from JUNV, MACV, GTOV, and Sabia virus (SABV). Sera collected from rabbits vaccinated with the combination vaccine neutralized all four targets. These findings support the concept of using a DNA vaccine approach to generate a potent pan-arenavirus immunotherapeutic. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are an important family of emerging viruses. In infected humans, convalescent-phase plasma containing neutralizing antibodies can

  19. Protection of mice against challenge with Bacillus anthracis STI spores after DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Ulrike K; Alex, Michaela; Czerny, Claus-Peter; Böhm, Reinhard; Beyer, Wolfgang

    2004-07-01

    Immune responses against the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis are known to confer immunity against anthrax. We evaluated the efficacy of genetic vaccination with plasmid vectors encoding PA, in protecting mice from a lethal challenge with B. anthracis STI spores. BALB/c and A/J mice were immunized via gene gun inoculation, using eukaryotic expression vectors with different cellular targeting signals for the encoded antigen. The vector pSecTag PA83, encoding the full-length PA protein, has a signal sequence for secretion of the expressed protein. The plasmids pCMV/ER PA83 and pCMV/ER PA63, encoding the full-length and the physiologically active form of PA, respectively, target and retain the expressed antigen in the endoplasmic reticulum of transfected cells. All three plasmids induced PA-specific humoral immune responses, predominantly IgG1 antibodies, in mice. Spleen cells collected from plasmid-vaccinated BALB/c mice produced PA-specific interleukin-4, interleukin-5, and interferon-gamma in vitro. Vaccination with either pSecTag PA83 or pCMV/ER PA83 showed significant protection of A/J mice against infection with B. anthracis STI spores. PMID:15293452

  20. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB. PMID:24773322

  1. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  2. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  3. The dose-dependent effect on protection and humoral response to a DNA vaccine against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) virus in subyearling rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, Scott E.; Corbeil, Serge; Jones, Gerald R.; Shewmaker, William D.; Kurath, Gael

    2000-01-01

    A dose–response study that used the DNA vaccine pIHNw-G against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) showed that complete and highly significant (P < 0.001) protection against a virus injection challenge can be attained in subyearling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (145–160 g, 8- to 10-months-old) 6 weeks after a single intramuscular injection with doses as low as 1 μg. Complete protection was also reproducibly demonstrated at higher vaccine doses; however, no protection was observed with a 0.1-μg dose. Virus-neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish that had been vaccinated with different doses of the DNA vaccine and then sham-infected; there appeared to be a dose-dependent effect, with higher titers obtained with higher doses of vaccine. The DNA-vaccinated animals that survived virus challenge had significantly (P < 0.05) higher neutralizing antibody titers than sham-infected, DNA-vaccinated control fish. Additionally, the titers detected in the IHN survivors exhibited a significant (P < 0.05) dose-dependent effect, with the highest titers being present in fish that received the highest vaccine doses.

  4. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  5. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines. PMID:25746201

  6. Prime-boost BCG vaccination with DNA vaccines based in β-defensin-2 and mycobacterial antigens ESAT6 or Ag85B improve protection in a tuberculosis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Biragyn, Arya; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Bodogai, Monica; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita; Sada, Eduardo; Trujillo, Valentin; Enciso-Moreno, Antonio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2013-01-11

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that there are about 8 million new cases annually of active Tuberculosis (TB). Despite its irregular effectiveness (0-89%), the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) BCG is the only vaccine available worldwide for prevention of TB; thus, the design is important of novel and more efficient vaccination strategies. Considering that β-defensin-2 is an antimicrobial peptide that induces dendritic cell maturation through the TLR-4 receptor and that both ESAT-6 and Ag85B are immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and efficient activators of the protective immune response, we constructed two DNA vaccines by the fusion of the gene encoding β-defensin-2 and antigens ESAT6 (pDE) and 85B (pDA). After confirming efficient local antigen expression that induced high and stable Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinated Balb/c mice, groups of mice were vaccinated with DNA vaccines in a prime-boost regimen with BCG and with BCG alone, and 2 months later were challenged with the mild virulence reference strain H37Rv and the highly virulent clinical isolate LAM 5186. The level of protection was evaluated by survival, lung bacilli burdens, and extension of tissue damage (pneumonia). Vaccination with both DNA vaccines showed similar protection to that of BCG. After the challenge with the highly virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, animals that were prime-boosted with BCG and then boosted with both DNA vaccines showed significant higher survival and less tissue damage than mice vaccinated only with BCG. These results suggest that improvement of BCG vaccination, such as the prime-boost DNA vaccine, represents a more efficient vaccination scheme against TB. PMID:23196205

  7. Protective efficiency of dendrosomes as novel nano-sized adjuvants for DNA vaccination against birch pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Balenga, Nariman Aghaei Bandbon; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Weiss, Richard; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi; Thalhamer, Joseph; Rafati, Sima

    2006-07-25

    We evaluated the use of a novel gene porter (Den123--a nontoxic self-assembled dendritic spheroidal nanoparticle made of biodegradable monomers), aiming to enhance and improve the desired immune response in protection from allergy. Footpad DNA immunization in Balb/c mice was done three times using the Bet v 1a gene with or without Den123 with 2-week intervals followed by sensitization with rBetv1 (5 microg) in alum twice in a weekly interval. Different doses of pCMV-Betv1 were used (10 microg and 100 microg). The protective role of different formulations was evaluated by measuring the IgG1, IgG2a and IgE antibody production, cytokine release of isolated splenocytes and beta-hexosaminidase release from the RBL cells. Higher and increasing ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 were seen in mice which received plasmids in combination with Den123. Den123 and DNA vaccine synergistically enhanced the Interferon gamma released from splenocytes. In the presence of Den123, IgE inhibition was independent of the dose and type of the injected DNA. All DNA-pre-immunized mice demonstrated low basophil degranulation. It is therefore concluded that administration of the DNA entrapped in Den123 nanoparticles results in sustained release of plasmids, Th1/Th2 balanced immune response with promising IgE inhibition. Also higher amounts of DNA contributed to stronger Th1 response. PMID:16515817

  8. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Josleyn, Matthew D.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W.; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  9. Evaluation of the protective immunogencity of the N, P, M, NV and G proteins of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss using DNA vaccines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Jones, J.; Vincent, B.; Hsu, Y.-L; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    The protective immunogenicity of the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), non-virion protein (NV) and glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was assessed in rainbow trout using DNA vaccine technology. DNA vaccines were produced by amplifying and cloning the viral genes in the plasmid pCDNA 3.1. The protective immunity elicited by each vaccine was evaluated through survival of immunized fry after challenge with live virus. Neutralizing antibody titers were also determined in vaccinated rainbow troutOncorhynchus mykiss fry (mean weight 2 g) and 150 g sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. The serum from the 150 g fish was also used in passive immunization studies with naïve fry. Our results showed that neither the internal structural proteins (N, P and M) nor the NV protein of IHNV induced protective immunity in fry or neutralizing antibodies in fry and 150 g fish when expressed by a DNA vaccine construct. The G protein, however, did confer significant protection in fry up to 80 d post-immunization and induced protective neutralizing antibodies. We are currently investigating the role of different arms of the fish immune system that contribute to the high level of protection against IHNV seen in vaccinated fish.

  10. Enhancement of DNA vaccine potency through coadministration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines via gene gun.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daejin; Hoory, Talia; Monie, Archana; Ting, Jenny Pan-Yun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-05-15

    Administration of DNA vaccines via gene gun has emerged as an important form of Ag-specific immunotherapy. The MHC CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and also induces expression of class I molecules. We reasoned that the gene gun administration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines employing different strategies to improve MHC I and II processing could enhance DNA vaccine potency. We observed that DC-1 cells transfected with CIITA DNA lead to higher expression of MHC I and II molecules, leading to enhanced Ag presentation through the MHC I/II pathways. Furthermore, our data suggested that coadministration of DNA-encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 Ag (CRT/E6) with CIITA DNA leads to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. In addition, coadministration of the combination of CRT/E6 DNA with CIITA DNA and DNA encoding the invariant chain (Ii) linked to the pan HLA-DR-reactive epitope (Ii-PADRE) further enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. Treatment with the combination vaccine was also shown to enhance the antitumor effects and to prolong survival in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. Vaccination with the combination vaccine also led to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) memory T cells and to long-term protection against TC-1 tumors and prolonged survival in vaccinated mice. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of CIITA DNA with CRT/E6 and Ii-PADRE DNA vaccines represents a potentially effective means to combat tumors in the clinical setting. PMID:18453624

  11. Novel linear DNA vaccines induce protective immune responses against lethal infection with influenza virus type A/H5N1

    PubMed Central

    Kendirgi, Frédéric; Yun, Nadezda E.; Linde, Nathaniel S.; Zacks, Michele A.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Smith, Jennifer K.; McMicken, Harilyn; Chen, Yin; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development for possible influenza pandemics has been challenging. Conventional vaccines such as inactivated and live attenuated virus preparations are limited in terms of production speed and capacity. DNA vaccination has emerged as a potential alternative to conventional vaccines against influenza pandemics. In this study, we use a novel, cell-free DNA manufacturing process (synDNA™) to produce prototype linear DNA vaccines against the influenza virus type A/H5N1. This synDNA™ process does not require bacterial fermentation, so it avoids the use of antibiotic resistance genes and other nucleic acid sequences unrelated to the antigen gene expression in the actual therapeutic DNA construct. The efficacy of various vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins (H5N1 synDNA™), hemagglutinin alone (H5 synDNA™) or neuraminidase alone (N1 synDNA™) was evaluated in mice. Two of the constructs (H5 synDNA™ and H5N1 synDNA™) induced a robust protective immune response with up to 93% of treated mice surviving a lethal challenge of a virulent influenza A/Vietnam/1203/04 H5N1 isolate. In combination with a potent biological activity and simplified production footprint, these characteristics make DNA vaccines prepared with our synDNA™ process highly suitable as alternatives to other vaccine preparations. PMID:18443425

  12. Rabies DNA vaccine encoding lysosome-targeted glycoprotein supplemented with Emulsigen-D confers complete protection in preexposure and postexposure studies in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Saxena, Ankur; Rai, Anant; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of rabies and the inability of currently used vaccination strategies to provide highly potent and cost-effective therapy indicate the need for an improved rabies vaccine. Thus, DNA vaccine based on lysosome-targeted glycoprotein of the rabies virus was evaluated in BALB/c mice. It imparted partial protection (60%) against challenge with 20 LD(50) of the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus. To improve the outcome of vaccination, to ultimately enhance the immune response, we investigated different routes for DNA vaccine delivery, varied doses of DNA, and the influence of adjuvant supplementation. The highest immune response pertaining to IgG antibody titer, with a predominantly IgG1/IgG2a subclass distribution, effective cellular immunity, and a high level of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNAs) was attained by the optimized DNA vaccine formulation comprising intramuscular administration of 100 microg of DNA vaccine supplemented with Emulsigen-D. In preexposure prophylaxis, a 3-dose regimen of this formulation generated a high RVNA titer (32 IU/ml) and conferred complete protection against challenge with 20 LD(50) of CVS. For postexposure efficacy analysis, rabies was experimentally induced with 50 LD(50) of CVS. Subsequent therapy with 5 doses of the formulation completely prevented rabies in BALB/c mice, which maintained protective RVNA titers of 4 IU/ml. The World Health Organization recommended rabies protective titer threshold is 0.5 IU/ml. Thus, this optimized DNA vaccine formulation provides an avenue for preventing and controlling rabies. PMID:19741168

  13. Protective Efficacy of the Conserved NP, PB1, and M1 Proteins as Immunogens in DNA- and Vaccinia Virus-Based Universal Influenza A Virus Vaccines in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenling; Li, Renqing; Deng, Yao; Lu, Ning; Chen, Hong; Meng, Xin; Wang, Wen; Wang, Xiuping; Yan, Kexia; Qi, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xiangmin; Xin, Wei; Lu, Zhenhua; Li, Xueren; Bian, Tao; Gao, Yingying; Tan, Wenjie; Ruan, Li

    2015-06-01

    The conventional hemagglutinin (HA)- and neuraminidase (NA)-based influenza vaccines need to be updated most years and are ineffective if the glycoprotein HA of the vaccine strains is a mismatch with that of the epidemic strain. Universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components might provide cross-protection and thus complement and improve conventional vaccines. In this study, we generated DNA plasmids and recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the conserved proteins nucleoprotein (NP), polymerase basic 1 (PB1), and matrix 1 (M1) from influenza virus strain A/Beijing/30/95 (H3N2). BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a single vaccine based on NP, PB1, or M1 alone or a combination vaccine based on all three antigens and were then challenged with lethal doses of the heterologous influenza virus strain A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). Vaccines based on NP, PB1, and M1 provided complete or partial protection against challenge with 1.7 50% lethal dose (LD50) of PR8 in mice. Of the three antigens, NP-based vaccines induced protection against 5 LD50 and 10 LD50 and thus exhibited the greatest protective effect. Universal influenza vaccines based on the combination of NP, PB1, and M1 induced a strong immune response and thus might be an alternative approach to addressing future influenza virus pandemics. PMID:25834017

  14. Evaluation of protective efficacy and immune mechanisms of using a non-structural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine against dengue 2 virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Fen; Liao, Ching-Len; Lin, Yi-Ling; Yeh, Chia-Tsui; Chen, Li-Kuang; Huang, Yung-Feng; Chou, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shaio, Men-Fang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the potential of DNA vaccine against dengue (DEN) infection, we characterize the protective efficacy and immune responses of mice intramuscularly injected with plasmid encoding DEN-2 non-structural protein 1 (NS1). Intravenously challenged by lethal DEN-2, mice vaccinated with NS1-DNA exhibited a delay onset of paralysis, a marked decrease of morbidity, and a significant enhancement of survival. In addition to a moderate increase of NS1-specific antibody titer from immunized mice measured by ELISA, a strong priming effect on anti-NS1 response was also noticed in plasmid NS1-vaccinated mice by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) or immunoblot analysis. Interestingly, newborn mice from NS1-DNA-immunized dam showed stronger resistance to viral challenge, as compared to those from vector DNA or PBS-immunized dams, indicating the protective role of NS1-specific antibody. In contrast to humoral immune response, DNA immunization can elicit strong cellular immune responses, including NS1-specific T cell proliferation and cytolytic activity. The NS1-DNA-induced protection can be further augmented by co-injection of plasmid encoding interleukin 12 (IL-12), suggesting an effector role of Th1 immunity against DEN infection. In summary, our results suggest the potential of NS1-DNA vaccine against DEN infection, and indicate both NS1-specific humoral and cellular immune responses contribute to the protection. PMID:12922127

  15. A synthetic consensus anti–spike protein DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Falzarano, Darryl; Reuschel, Emma L.; Tingey, Colleen; Flingai, Seleeke; Villarreal, Daniel O.; Wise, Megan; Patel, Ami; Izmirly, Abdullah; Aljuaid, Abdulelah; Seliga, Alecia M.; Soule, Geoff; Morrow, Matthew; Kraynyak, Kimberly A.; Khan, Amir S.; Scott, Dana P.; Feldmann, Friederike; LaCasse, Rachel; Meade-White, Kimberly; Okumura, Atsushi; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Kobinger, Gary; Feldmann, Heinz; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    First identified in 2012, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is caused by an emerging human coronavirus, which is distinct from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and represents a novel member of the lineage C betacoronoviruses. Since its identification, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been linked to more than 1372 infections manifesting with severe morbidity and, often, mortality (about 495 deaths) in the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and, most recently, the United States. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, with nosocomial transmission appearing to be an important route of infection. The recent increase in cases of MERS in the Middle East coupled with the lack of approved antiviral therapies or vaccines to treat or prevent this infection are causes for concern. We report on the development of a synthetic DNA vaccine against MERS-CoV. An optimized DNA vaccine encoding the MERS spike protein induced potent cellular immunity and antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice, macaques, and camels. Vaccinated rhesus macaques seroconverted rapidly and exhibited high levels of virus-neutralizing activity. Upon MERS viral challenge, all of the monkeys in the control-vaccinated group developed characteristic disease, including pneumonia. Vaccinated macaques were protected and failed to demonstrate any clinical or radiographic signs of pneumonia. These studies demonstrate that a consensus MERS spike protein synthetic DNA vaccine can induce protective responses against viral challenge, indicating that this strategy may have value as a possible vaccine modality against this emerging pathogen. PMID:26290414

  16. A synthetic consensus anti-spike protein DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Falzarano, Darryl; Reuschel, Emma L; Tingey, Colleen; Flingai, Seleeke; Villarreal, Daniel O; Wise, Megan; Patel, Ami; Izmirly, Abdullah; Aljuaid, Abdulelah; Seliga, Alecia M; Soule, Geoff; Morrow, Matthew; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Khan, Amir S; Scott, Dana P; Feldmann, Friederike; LaCasse, Rachel; Meade-White, Kimberly; Okumura, Atsushi; Ugen, Kenneth E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary; Feldmann, Heinz; Weiner, David B

    2015-08-19

    First identified in 2012, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is caused by an emerging human coronavirus, which is distinct from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and represents a novel member of the lineage C betacoronoviruses. Since its identification, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been linked to more than 1372 infections manifesting with severe morbidity and, often, mortality (about 495 deaths) in the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and, most recently, the United States. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, with nosocomial transmission appearing to be an important route of infection. The recent increase in cases of MERS in the Middle East coupled with the lack of approved antiviral therapies or vaccines to treat or prevent this infection are causes for concern. We report on the development of a synthetic DNA vaccine against MERS-CoV. An optimized DNA vaccine encoding the MERS spike protein induced potent cellular immunity and antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice, macaques, and camels. Vaccinated rhesus macaques seroconverted rapidly and exhibited high levels of virus-neutralizing activity. Upon MERS viral challenge, all of the monkeys in the control-vaccinated group developed characteristic disease, including pneumonia. Vaccinated macaques were protected and failed to demonstrate any clinical or radiographic signs of pneumonia. These studies demonstrate that a consensus MERS spike protein synthetic DNA vaccine can induce protective responses against viral challenge, indicating that this strategy may have value as a possible vaccine modality against this emerging pathogen. PMID:26290414

  17. Protection against H1N1 influenza challenge by a DNA vaccine expressing H3/H1 subtype hemagglutinin combined with MHC class II-restricted epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses have crossed the species barrier to infect humans and have the potential to cause a pandemic. Therefore, new influenza vaccines to prevent the co-existence of multiple subtypes within a host and cross-species transmission of influenza are urgently needed. Methods Here we report a multi-epitope DNA vaccine targeted towards multiple subtypes of the influenza virus. The protective hemagglutinin (HA) antigens from H5/H7/H9 subtypes were screened for MHC II class-restricted epitopes overlapping with predicted B cell epitopes. We then constructed a DNA plasmid vaccine, pV-H3-EHA-H1, based on HA antigens from human influenza H3/H1 subtypes combined with the H5/H7/H9 subtype Th/B epitope box. Results Epitope-specific IFN-γ ELISpot responses were significantly higher in the multi-epitope DNA group than in other vaccine and control groups (P < 0.05). The multi-epitope group significantly enhanced Th2 cell responses as determined by cytokine assays. The survival rate of mice given the multi-epitope vaccine was the highest among the vaccine groups, but it was not significantly different compared to those given single antigen expressing pV-H1HA1 vaccine and dual antigen expressing pV-H3-H1 vaccine (P > 0.05). No measurable virus titers were detected in the lungs of the multi-epitope immunized group. The unique multi-epitope DNA vaccine enhanced virus-specific antibody and cellular immunity as well as conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) influenza strain in mice. Conclusions This approach may be a promising strategy for developing a universal influenza vaccine to prevent multiple subtypes of influenza virus and to induce long-term protective immune against cross-species transmission. PMID:21134292

  18. Mucosal application of cationic poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles as carriers of DNA vaccine and adjuvants to protect chickens against infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed

    Negash, Tamiru; Liman, Martin; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2013-08-12

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an immunosuppressive virus of chickens. The virus protein (VP) 2 induces neutralizing antibodies, which protect chickens against the disease. The aim of this study was to develop a cationic poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticle (MP) based IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccine (MP-IBDV-DNA) for chickens to be delivered orally and by eye drop route. The tested IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccines were immunogenic for specific-pathogen-free chickens and induced an antibody response after intramuscular application. Co-inoculation with a plasmid encoding chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) or CpG-ODN did not significantly improve protection against IBDV challenge. However, the application of a MP-IBDV-DNA vaccine alone or in combination with a delayed oral and eye drop application of cationic MP loaded with CpG-ODN or chIL-2 improved protection against challenge. The MP-IBDV-DNA-vaccinated chickens showed less pathological and histopathological bursal lesions, a reduced IBDV antigen load as well as T-cell influx into the bursa of Fabricius (BF) compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The addition of chIL-2 loaded MP improved challenge virus clearance from the BF as demonstrated by lower neutralizing antibody titers and reduced IL-4 and IFN-α mRNA expression in the bursa at 7 days postchallenge compared to the other challenged groups. Overall, the efficacy of the IBDV-DNA vaccine was improved by adsorption of the DNA vaccine onto cationic PLGA-MP, which also allowed mucosal application of the DNA vaccine. PMID:23777953

  19. A combined DNA vaccine encoding BCSP31, SOD, and L7/L12 confers high protection against Brucella abortus 2308 by inducing specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Hai; Hu, Xi-Dan; Cai, Hong

    2007-06-01

    We constructed a combined DNA vaccine comprising genes encoding the antigens BCSP31, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and L7/L12 and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Immunization of mice with the combined DNA vaccine offered high protection against Brucella abortus (B. abortus) infection. The vaccine induced a vigorous specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response, with higher IgG2a than IgG1 titers. Cytokine profiling performed at the same time showed a biased Th1-type immune response with significantly increased interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation. CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells accumulated at significantly higher levels after administration of the vaccine. Granzyme B-producing CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher in number in samples prepared from combined DNA-vaccinated mice compared with S19-vaccinated mice, demonstrating that the cytotoxicity lysis pathway is involved in the response to Brucella infection. The success of our combined DNA vaccine in a mouse model suggests its potential efficacy against brucellosis infection in large animals. PMID:17570767

  20. Tetravalent DNA vaccine product as a vaccine candidate against dengue.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kevin R; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arbovirus worldwide and is the virus that causes dengue fever and the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. There are four serotypes of dengue with each possessing the ability to cause disease. Developing a preventive vaccine is the most efficient and effective way to prevent these diseases, and because immunity to one serotype does not protect against the other serotypes, a vaccine must provide tetravalent protection. We used DNA immunization as a platform to develop a tetravalent vaccine. In this chapter, we describe the laboratory, regulatory, and clinical methodology for evaluating a candidate tetravalent vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial. PMID:24715294

  1. Priming with two DNA vaccines expressing hepatitis C virus NS3 protein targeting dendritic cells elicits superior heterologous protective potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Yin, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    Development an effective vaccine may offer an alternative preventive and therapeutic strategy against HCV infection. DNA vaccination has been shown to induce robust humoral and cellular immunity and overcome many problems associated with conventional vaccines. In this study, mice were primed with either conventional pVRC-based or suicidal pSC-based DNA vaccines carrying DEC-205-targeted NS3 antigen (DEC-NS3) and boosted with type 5 adenoviral vectors encoding the partial NS3 and core antigens (C44P). The prime boost regimen induced a marked increase in antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses in comparison with either rAd5-based vaccines or DEC-205-targeted DNA immunization in isolation. The protective effect against heterogeneous challenge was correlated with high levels of anti-NS3 IgG and T-cell-mediated immunity against NS3 peptides. Moreover, priming with a suicidal DNA vaccine (pSC-DEC-NS3), which elicited increased TNF-α-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells against NS3-2 peptides (aa 1245-1461), after boosting, showed increased heterogeneous protective potential compared with priming with a conventional DNA vaccine (pVRC-DEC-NS3). In conclusion, a suicidal DNA vector (pSC-DEC-NS3) expressing DEC-205-targeted NS3 combined with boosting using an rAd5-based HCV vaccine (rAd5-C44P) is a good candidate for a safe and effective vaccine against HCV infection. PMID:26215441

  2. Dose-dependent protection against or exacerbation of disease by a polylactide glycolide microparticle-adsorbed, alphavirus-based measles virus DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Nair, Nitya; Adams, Robert J; Zink, M Christine; Lee, Eun-Young; Polack, Fernando P; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T; Griffin, Diane E

    2008-04-01

    Measles remains an important cause of vaccine-preventable child mortality. Development of a low-cost, heat-stable vaccine for infants under the age of 6 months could improve measles control by facilitating delivery at the time of other vaccines and by closing a window of susceptibility prior to immunization at 9 months of age. DNA vaccines hold promise for development, but achieving protective levels of antibody has been difficult and there is an incomplete understanding of protective immunity. In the current study, we evaluated the use of a layered alphavirus DNA/RNA vector encoding measles virus H (SINCP-H) adsorbed onto polylactide glycolide (PLG) microparticles. In mice, antibody and T-cell responses to PLG-formulated DNA were substantially improved compared to those to naked DNA. Rhesus macaques received two doses of PLG/SINCP-H delivered either intramuscularly (0.5 mg) or intradermally (0.5 or 0.1 mg). Antibody and T-cell responses were induced but not sustained. On challenge, the intramuscularly vaccinated monkeys did not develop rashes and had lower viremias than vector-treated control monkeys. Monkeys vaccinated with the same dose intradermally developed rashes and viremia. Monkeys vaccinated intradermally with the low dose developed more severe rashes, with histopathologic evidence of syncytia and intense dermal and epidermal inflammation, eosinophilia, and higher viremia compared to vector-treated control monkeys. Protection after challenge correlated with gamma interferon-producing T cells and with early production of high-avidity antibody that bound wild-type H protein. We conclude that PLG/SINCP-H is most efficacious when delivered intramuscularly but does not provide an advantage over standard DNA vaccines for protection against measles. PMID:18287579

  3. Electroporation enhances immune responses and protection induced by a bovine viral diarrhea virus DNA vaccine in newborn calves with maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Lawman, Zoe; Wilson, Don; Luxembourg, Alain; Ellefsen, Barry; van den Hurk, Jan V; Hannaman, Drew

    2010-09-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the major pathogens in cattle. In this study, newborn calves with maternal antibodies were vaccinated with a BVDV DNA vaccine, either by conventional intramuscular (IM) injection or with the TriGrid™ Delivery System for IM delivery (TDS-IM). The calves vaccinated with the TDS-IM developed more rapidly and effectively BVDV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. Overall, the immune responses induced by delivery with the TDS-IM remained stronger than those elicited by conventional IM injection of the BVDV DNA vaccine. Accordingly, electroporation-mediated delivery of the BVDV DNA vaccine resulted in close to complete protection from clinical signs of disease, while conventional IM administration did not fully prevent morbidity and mortality following challenge with BVDV-2. These results demonstrate the TDS-IM to be effective as a delivery system for a BVDV DNA vaccine in newborn calves in the presence of maternal antibodies, which supports the potential of electroporation as a delivery method for prophylactic DNA vaccines. PMID:20670907

  4. Interleukin-18-mediated enhancement of the protective effect of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus glycoprotein B plasmid DNA vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Li, Xin-Sheng; Cui, Bao-An; Wang, Shu-Juan; Geng, Jing-Wei; Li, Kun

    2011-01-01

    The immunogenicity of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoprotein B (gB) plasmid DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of chicken interleukin-18 (IL-18) were investigated in a challenge model. Two recombinant plasmids, pcDNA3.1/gB (pgB) and pcDNA3.1/IL-18 (pIL-18), containing gB and IL-18 were constructed. Chickens were intramuscularly administered two immunizations 2 weeks apart, and challenged with the virulent CG strain of ILTV 2 weeks later. All animals vaccinated with pgB alone or with a combination of pgB plus pIL-18 developed a specific anti-ILTV ELISA antibody and splenocyte proliferation response. The ratios of CD4(+) to CD8(+) T lymphocytes in chickens immunized with pgB plus pIL-18 were significantly higher than in those immunized with pgB alone. Co-injection of pIL-18 significantly increased the production of gamma interferon and IL-2, indicating that IL-18 enhances the T helper 1-dominant immune response. Challenge experiments showed that the morbidity rate in the pgB group (25  %) was significantly higher than that in the pgB plus pIL-18 group (10  %). The mortality rates in the pgB and pgB plus pIL-18 groups were 10 and 0 %, respectively, and the corresponding protection rates were 60 and 80  %. These results indicate that IL-18 may be an effective adjuvant for an ILTV vaccine. PMID:20829398

  5. Co-administration of interleukins 7 and 15 with DNA vaccine improves protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Li, Zhong-Yuan; Petersen, Eskild; Liu, Wen-Ge; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular parasite, which can infect all warm-blooded animals including humans. Cytokines, including IL-15 and IL-7, play a critical role in the regulation of the homeostasis of naive and memory T cells. Co-administration the DNA vaccine with cytokines may improve its efficacy. IL-7 and IL-15 from splenic tissues of Kunming mice were cloned, and eukaryotic plasmid pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 was constructed. Kunming mice were administrated with DNA vaccine expressing T. gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (TgCDPK1), pVAX-CDPK1, in the presence or absence of IL-7 and IL-15 plasmids (pVAX-IL-7-IL-15), immune responses were analyzed including lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and serum antibody measurements, flow cytometric surface markers on lymphocytes, and thus protective immunity against acute and chronic T. gondii infection was estimated. Mice injected with pVAX-CDPK1 supplemented with pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 showed higher Toxoplasma-specific IgG2a titers, Th1 responses associated with the production of IFN-γ, IL-2 as well as cell-mediated cytotoxic activity where stronger frequencies of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ and CD4+ T cells (CD8+/CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells) compared to controls. Co-administration of pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 and pVAX-CDPK1 significantly (P < 0.05) increased survival time (18.07 ± 5.43 days) compared with pVAX-CDPK1 (14.13 ± 3.85 days) or pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 (11.73 ± 1.83 days) alone, and pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 + pVAX-CDPK1 significantly reduced the number of brain cysts (73.5%) in contrast to pVAX-CDPK1 (46.0%) or pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 alone (45.0%). Our results indicate that supplementation of DNA vaccine with IL-7 and IL-15 would facilitate specific humoral and cellular immune responses elicited by DNA vaccine against acute and chronic T. gondii infection in mice. PMID:26706605

  6. A DNA vaccine encoding VP22 of herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) and OprF confers enhanced protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xian; Wang, Yan; Xia, Yifan; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Qin; Lei, Jun

    2016-08-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimicrobial resistance is a major therapeutic challenge. DNA vaccination is an attractive approach for antigen-specific immunotherapy against P. aeruginosa. We explored the feasibility of employing Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein, VP22, as a molecular tool to enhance the immunogenicity of an OprF DNA vaccine against P. aeruginosa. Recombinant DNA vaccines, pVAX1-OprF, pVAX1-OprF-VP22 (encoding a n-OprF-VP22-c fusion protein) and pVAX1-VP22-OprF (encoding a n-VP22-OprF-c fusion protein) were constructed. The humoral and cellular immune responses and immune protective effects of these DNA vaccines in mice were evaluated. In this report, we showed that vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 induced higher levels of IgG titer, T cell proliferation rate. It also provided better immune protection against the P. aeruginosa challenge when compared to that induced by pVAX1-OprF or pVAX1-VP22-OprF DNA vaccines. Molecular mechanistic analyses indicated vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 triggered immune responses characterized by a preferential increase in antigen specific IgG2a and IFN-γ in mice, indicating Th1 polarization. We concluded that VP22 is a potent stimulatory molecular tool for DNA vaccination when fused to the carboxyl end of OprF gene. Our study provides a novel strategy for prevention and treatment of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27449680

  7. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri 2a strains mucosally deliver DNA vaccines encoding measles virus hemagglutinin, inducing specific immune responses and protection in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Losonsky, Genevieve; Singh, Mahender; Medina-Moreno, Sandra M; Polo, John M; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Robinson, Harriet; Sztein, Marcelo B; Levine, Myron M

    2003-05-01

    Measles remains a leading cause of child mortality in developing countries. Residual maternal measles antibodies and immunologic immaturity dampen immunogenicity of the current vaccine in young infants. Because cotton rat respiratory tract is susceptible to measles virus (MV) replication after intranasal (i.n.) challenge, this model can be used to assess the efficacy of MV vaccines. Pursuing a new measles vaccine strategy that might be effective in young infants, we used attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CVD 908-htrA and Shigella flexneri 2a CVD 1208 vaccines to deliver mucosally to cotton rats eukaryotic expression plasmid pGA3-mH and Sindbis virus-based DNA replicon pMSIN-H encoding MV hemagglutinin (H). The initial i.n. dose-response with bacterial vectors alone identified a well-tolerated dosage (1 x 10(9) to 7 x 10(9) CFU) and a volume (20 micro l) that elicited strong antivector immune responses. Animals immunized i.n. on days 0, 28, and 76 with bacterial vectors carrying DNA plasmids encoding MV H or immunized parenterally with these naked DNA vaccine plasmids developed MV plaque reduction neutralizing antibodies and proliferative responses against MV antigens. In a subsequent experiment of identical design, cotton rats were challenged with wild-type MV 1 month after the third dose of vaccine or placebo. MV titers were significantly reduced in lung tissue of animals immunized with MV DNA vaccines delivered either via bacterial live vectors or parenterally. Since attenuated serovar Typhi and S. flexneri can deliver measles DNA vaccines mucosally in cotton rats, inducing measles immune responses (including neutralizing antibodies) and protection, boosting strategies can now be evaluated in animals primed with MV DNA vaccines. PMID:12692223

  8. DNA vaccines in veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Laurel; Werner, David B

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines represent a new frontier in vaccine technology. One important application of this technology is in the veterinary arena. DNA vaccines have already gained a foothold in certain fields of veterinary medicine. However, several important questions must be addressed when developing DNA vaccines for animals, including whether or not the vaccine is efficacious and cost effective compared with currently available options. Another important question to consider is how to apply this developing technology in a wide range of different situations, from the domestic pet to individual fish in fisheries with several thousand animals, to wildlife programs for disease control. In some cases, DNA vaccines represent an interesting option for vaccination, while in others, currently available options are sufficient. This review will examine a number of diseases of veterinary importance and the progress being made in DNA vaccine technology relevant to these diseases, and we compare these with the conventional treatment options available. PMID:19722897

  9. Protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine construct encoding the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease and a truncated HSP70 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Maity, Hemanta Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan; Khulape, Sagar A; Pathak, Dinesh C; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2015-02-18

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, infectious, immunosuppressive disease affecting young chicken worldwide. The etiological agent IBD virus (IBDV) is a double stranded RNA virus with outer capsid protein VP2 of IBDV is the major antigenic determinant capable of inducing neutralizing antibody. DNA vaccines encoding VP2 has been extensively studied achieving only partial protection. However, the efficacy of DNA vaccines against IBDV can be augmented by choosing a potential molecular adjuvant. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the C-terminal domain of the heat shock protein 70 (cHSP70) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene genetically fused with the full length VP2 gene of IBDV (pCIVP2-cHSP70) in comparison to a 'DNA prime-protein boost' approach and a DNA vaccine encoding the VP2 gene (pCIVP2) alone. The results indicate that both pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' elicited humoral as well as cellular immune responses. Chickens in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' groups developed significantly higher levels of ELISA titer to IBDV antigen compared to the group immunized with pCIVP2 alone (p<0.01). However, significantly higher levels of lymphocyte proliferative response, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were found in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 group compared to 'DNA prime-protein boost' group. Additionally, chickens immunized with pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' vaccines were completely protected against the vvIBDV whereas pCIVP2 DNA vaccine alone was able to protect only 70%. These findings suggest that the truncated C-terminal HSP70 mediated DNA vaccine genetically fused with the VP2 gene construct stimulated both humoral and cell mediated immune responses and conferred complete protection against IBDV. This novel strategy is perhaps a seminal concept in utilizing HSP70 as an adjuvant molecule to elicit an immune response against IBD affecting chickens. PMID

  10. Evaluation of protective efficacy using a nonstructural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine-loaded microspheres against dengue 2 virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-shiung; Li, I-Hsun; Hong, Po-da; Yeh, Ming-kung

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus results in dengue fever or severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome in humans. The purpose of this work was to develop an effective antidengue virus delivery system, by designing poly (dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid/polyethylene glycol (PLGA/PEG) microspheres using a double-emulsion solvent extraction method, for vaccination therapy based on locally and continuously sustained biological activity. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w), yield (85.2%), and entrapment efficiency (39%), the mean particle size 4.8 μm, and a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%), lag time (4 days), and continued released protein over 70 days. The distribution of protein on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core were 3.0%, 28.5%, and 60.7%, respectively. A release rate was noticed to be 1.07 μg protein/mg microspheres/day of protein release, maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at Days 1, 28, and 42 was 18.5, 53.7, and 62.66 μg protein/mg microspheres, respectively. The dengue virus challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 20 μg NS1 protein content of microspheres, in comparison with NS1 protein in Al(OH)3 or PBS solution, was evaluated after intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice. The study results show that the greatest survival was observed in the group of mice immunized with NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres (100%). In vivo vaccination studies also demonstrated that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres had a protective ability; its steady-state immune protection in rat plasma changed from 4,443 ± 1,384 pg/mL to 10,697 ± 3,197 pg/mL, which was 2.5-fold higher than that observed for dengue virus in Al(OH)3 at 21 days. These findings strongly suggest that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres offer a new therapeutic strategy in optimizing the vaccine incorporation

  11. Micro- and nanoparticulates for DNA vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Farris, Eric; Brown, Deborah M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Pannier, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional protein-based vaccines for the induction of protective immune responses. DNA vaccines offer several advantages over traditional vaccines, including increased stability, rapid and inexpensive production, and flexibility to produce vaccines for a wide variety of infectious diseases. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered as naked plasmid DNA is often weak due to degradation of the DNA by nucleases and inefficient delivery to immune cells. Therefore, biomaterial-based delivery systems based on micro- and nanoparticles that encapsulate plasmid DNA represent the most promising strategy for DNA vaccine delivery. Microparticulate delivery systems allow for passive targeting to antigen presenting cells through size exclusion and can allow for sustained presentation of DNA to cells through degradation and release of encapsulated vaccines. In contrast, nanoparticle encapsulation leads to increased internalization, overall greater transfection efficiency, and the ability to increase uptake across mucosal surfaces. Moreover, selection of the appropriate biomaterial can lead to increased immune stimulation and activation through triggering innate immune response receptors and target DNA to professional antigen presenting cells. Finally, the selection of materials with the appropriate properties to achieve efficient delivery through administration routes conducive to high patient compliance and capable of generating systemic and local (i.e. mucosal) immunity can lead to more effective humoral and cellular protective immune responses. In this review, we discuss the development of novel biomaterial-based delivery systems to enhance the delivery of DNA vaccines through various routes of administration and their implications for generating immune responses. PMID:27048557

  12. Enhanced immunogenicity of CD4(+) t-cell responses and protective efficacy of a DNA-modified vaccinia virus Ankara prime-boost vaccination regimen for murine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    McShane, H; Brookes, R; Gilbert, S C; Hill, A V

    2001-02-01

    DNA vaccines whose DNA encodes a variety of antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been evaluated for immunogenicity and protective efficacy. CD8(+) T-cell responses and protection achieved in other infectious disease models have been optimized by using a DNA immunization to prime the immune system and a recombinant virus encoding the same antigen(s) to boost the response. A DNA vaccine (D) and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M) in which the DNA encodes early secreted antigenic target 6 and mycobacterial protein tuberculosis 63 synthesized, and each was found to generate specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-secreting CD4(+) T cells. Enhanced CD4(+) IFN-gamma T-cell responses were produced by both D-M and M-D immunization regimens. Significantly higher levels of IFN-gamma were seen with a D-D-D-M immunization regimen. The most immunogenic regimens were assessed in a challenge study and found to produce protection equivalent to that produced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Thus, heterologous prime-boost regimens boost CD4(+) as well as CD8(+) T-cell responses, and the use of heterologous constructs encoding the same antigen(s) may improve the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines against tuberculosis and other diseases. PMID:11159955

  13. Molecular characterization of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis hsp60-hsp10 operon, and evaluation of the immune response and protective efficacy induced by hsp60 DNA vaccination in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important candidates for the development of vaccines because they are usually able to promote both humoral and cellular immune responses in mammals. We identified and characterized the hsp60-hsp10 bicistronic operon of the animal pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a Gram-positive bacterium of the class Actinobacteria, which causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in small ruminants. Findings To construct the DNA vaccine, the hsp60 gene of C. pseudotuberculosis was cloned in a mammalian expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized by intramuscular injection with the recombinant plasmid (pVAX1/hsp60). Conclusion This vaccination induced significant anti-hsp60 IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a isotype production. However, immunization with this DNA vaccine did not confer protective immunity. PMID:21774825

  14. Vaccine protection against Zika virus from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Larocca, Rafael A; Abbink, Peter; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Iampietro, M Justin; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Boyd, Michael; Ng'ang'a, David; Kirilova, Marinela; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Li, Zhenfeng; Moseley, Edward T; Bricault, Christine A; Borducchi, Erica N; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Neubauer, George; Nkolola, Joseph P; Maxfield, Lori F; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-08-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus that is responsible for the current epidemic in Brazil and the Americas. ZIKV has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction, and other birth defects in both humans and mice. The rapid development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is a global health priority, but very little is currently known about ZIKV immunology and mechanisms of immune protection. Here we show that a single immunization with a plasmid DNA vaccine or a purified inactivated virus vaccine provides complete protection in susceptible mice against challenge with a strain of ZIKV involved in the outbreak in northeast Brazil. This ZIKV strain has recently been shown to cross the placenta and to induce fetal microcephaly and other congenital malformations in mice. We produced DNA vaccines expressing ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prM-Env), as well as a series of deletion mutants. The prM-Env DNA vaccine, but not the deletion mutants, afforded complete protection against ZIKV, as measured by absence of detectable viraemia following challenge, and protective efficacy correlated with Env-specific antibody titers. Adoptive transfer of purified IgG from vaccinated mice conferred passive protection, and depletion of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes in vaccinated mice did not abrogate this protection. These data demonstrate that protection against ZIKV challenge can be achieved by single-shot subunit and inactivated virus vaccines in mice and that Env-specific antibody titers represent key immunologic correlates of protection. Our findings suggest that the development of a ZIKV vaccine for humans is likely to be achievable. PMID:27355570

  15. New Vaccines Help Protect You

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues New Vaccines Help Protect You Past Issues / Fall 2006 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Important new vaccines have recently been approved for use and ...

  16. Baculovirus-expressed virus-like particle vaccine in combination with DNA encoding the fusion protein confers protection against respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kwon, Young-Man; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Yoo, Si-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hye; Cho, Min Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, You Ri; Quan, Fu-Shi; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral agent causing significant morbidity and mortality in young infants and the elderly. There is no licensed vaccine against RSV and it is a high priority to develop a safe RSV vaccine. We determined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of combined virus-like particle and DNA vaccines presenting RSV glycoproteins (Fd.VLP) in comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). Immunization of mice with Fd.VLP induced higher ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses compared to those with FI-RSV. Upon live RSV challenge, Fd.VLP and FI-RSV vaccines were similarly effective in clearing lung viral loads. However, FI-RSV immunized mice showed a substantial weight loss and high levels of T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines as well as extensive lung histopathology and eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, Fd.VLP immunized mice did not exhibit Th2 type cytokines locally and systemically, which might contribute to preventing vaccine-associated RSV lung disease. These results indicate that virus-like particles in combination with DNA vaccines represent a potential approach for developing a safe and effective RSV vaccine. PMID:25173478

  17. Toxoplasma gondii: Protective immunity induced by a DNA vaccine expressing GRA1 and MIC3 against toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Pengtao; Cao, Lili; Guo, Yanbing; Dong, Hang; Yuan, Shuxian; Yao, Xinhua; Ren, Wenzhi; Yao, Lin; Xu, Zhilin; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Xichen

    2016-07-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a major cause of abortion and neonatal loss in livestock, and can cause severe illness to human with weakened immune system. The heavy incidence and severe consequence indicate the development of vaccines against T. gondii is required. In this study, DNA vaccines encoding GRA1 and MIC3 antigens were developed. The parasite-specific immune responses and protection efficiency against toxoplasmosis by these DNA vaccines were evaluated in BALB/c mice. The results demonstrated that the IgG antibody production was significantly increased in multi-antigenic vaccine encoding GRA1 and MIC3 immunized group, as well as the IFN-γ level, when compared with single-gene vaccines and controls groups (p < 0.05). Two weeks after the final vaccination, the mice were challenged with either 1 × 10(4) or 1 × 10(2) RH strain tachyzoites, and the mortality and parasite reduction were observed. The multi-antigenic vaccine encoding GRA1 and MIC3 lead to the longest survival time as well as the less parasite-loads in brain and liver of immunized mice (p < 0.01). The present study indicates that the GRA1 and MIC3 showed the potential as target for vaccine investigation against toxoplasmosis. And the immune efficacy induced by multi-antigenic vaccine encoding GRA1 and MIC3 was better than that induced by single-antigenic vaccines alone. PMID:27059254

  18. DNA based vaccination with a cocktail of plasmids encoding immunodominant Leishmania (Leishmania) major antigens confers full protection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sami Ben Hadj; Touihri, Leila; Chtourou, Yessine; Dellagi, Koussay; Bahloul, Chokri

    2009-01-01

    Despite the lack of effective vaccines against parasitic diseases, the prospects of developing a vaccine against leishmaniasis are still high. With this objective, we have tested four DNA based candidate vaccines encoding to immunodominant leishmania antigens (LACKp24, TSA, LmSTI1 and CPa). These candidates have been previously reported as capable of eliciting at least partial protections in the BALB/c mice model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. When tested under similar experimental conditions, all of them were able to induce similar partial protective effects, but none could induce a full protection. In order to improve the level of protection we have explored the approach of DNA based vaccination with different cocktails of plasmids encoding to the different immunodominant Leishmania antigens. A substantial increase of protection was achieved when the cocktail is composed of all of the four antigens; however, no full protection was achieved when mice were challenged with a high dose of parasite in their hind footpad. The full protection was only achieved after a challenge with a low parasitic dose in the dermis of the ear. It was difficult to determine clear protection correlates, other than the mixture of immunogens induced specific Th1 immune responses against each component. Therefore, such an association of antigens increased the number of targeted epitopes by the immune system with the prospects that the responses are at least additive if not synergistic. Even though, any extrapolation of this approach when applied to other animal or human models is rather hazardous, it undoubtedly increases the hopes of developing an effective leishmania vaccine. PMID:18951941

  19. Human Polyclonal Antibodies Produced through DNA Vaccination of Transchromosomal Cattle Provide Mice with Post-Exposure Protection against Lethal Zaire and Sudan Ebolaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bounds, Callie E.; Kwilas, Steven A.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Bakken, Russell R.; Dye, John M.; Hooper, Jay W.; Dupuy, Lesley C.; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination of transchromosomal bovines (TcBs) with DNA vaccines expressing the codon-optimized (co) glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Sudan virus (SUDV) produce fully human polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) that recognize both viruses and demonstrate robust neutralizing activity. Each TcB was vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation (IM-EP) a total of four times and at each administration received 10 mg of the EBOV-GPco DNA vaccine and 10 mg of the SUDV-GPco DNA vaccine at two sites on the left and right sides, respectively. After two vaccinations, robust antibody responses (titers > 1000) were detected by ELISA against whole irradiated EBOV or SUDV and recombinant EBOV-GP or SUDV-GP (rGP) antigens, with higher titers observed for the rGP antigens. Strong, virus neutralizing antibody responses (titers >1000) were detected after three vaccinations when measured by vesicular stomatitis virus-based pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA). Maximal neutralizing antibody responses were identified by traditional plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) after four vaccinations. Neutralizing activity of human immunoglobulins (IgG) purified from TcB plasma collected after three vaccinations and injected intraperitoneally (IP) into mice at a 100 mg/kg dose was detected in the serum by PsVNA up to 14 days after administration. Passive transfer by IP injection of the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) to groups of BALB/c mice one day after IP challenge with mouse adapted (ma) EBOV resulted in 80% protection while all mice treated with non-specific pAbs succumbed. Similarly, interferon receptor 1 knockout (IFNAR -/-) mice receiving the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) by IP injection one day after IP challenge with wild type SUDV resulted in 89% survival. These results are the first to demonstrate that filovirus GP DNA vaccines administered to TcBs by IM-EP can elicit neutralizing antibodies that provide post-exposure protection. Additionally, these data describe

  20. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines. PMID:25265876

  1. Evaluation of protection induced by a dengue virus serotype 2 envelope domain III protein scaffold/DNA vaccine in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    McBurney, Sean P; Sunshine, Justine E; Gabriel, Sarah; Huynh, Jeremy P; Sutton, William F; Fuller, Deborah H; Haigwood, Nancy L; Messer, William B

    2016-06-24

    We describe the preclinical development of a dengue virus vaccine targeting the dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2) envelope domain III (EDIII). This study provides proof-of-principle that a dengue EDIII protein scaffold/DNA vaccine can protect against dengue challenge. The dengue vaccine (EDIII-E2) is composed of both a protein particle and a DNA expression plasmid delivered simultaneously via intramuscular injection (protein) and gene gun (DNA) into rhesus macaques. The protein component can contain a maximum of 60 copies of EDIII presented on a multimeric scaffold of Geobacillus stearothermophilus E2 proteins. The DNA component is composed of the EDIII portion of the envelope gene cloned into an expression plasmid. The EDIII-E2 vaccine elicited robust antibody responses to DENV2, with neutralizing antibody responses detectable following the first boost and reaching titers of greater than 1:100,000 following the second and final boost. Vaccinated and naïve groups of macaques were challenged with DENV2. All vaccinated macaques were protected from detectable viremia by infectious assay, while naïve animals had detectable viremia for 2-7 days post-challenge. All naïve macaques had detectable viral RNA from day 2-10 post-challenge. In the EDIII-E2 group, three macaques were negative for viral RNA and three were found to have detectable viral RNA post challenge. Viremia onset was delayed and the duration was shortened relative to naïve controls. The presence of viral RNA post-challenge corresponded to a 10-30-fold boost in neutralization titers 28 days post challenge, whereas no boost was observed in the fully protected animals. Based on these results, we determine that pre-challenge 50% neutralization titers of >1:6000 correlated with sterilizing protection against DENV2 challenge in EDIII-E2 vaccinated macaques. Identification of the critical correlate of protection for the EDIII-E2 platform in the robust non-human primate model lays the groundwork for further

  2. Protective vaccination against experimental canine visceral leishmaniasis using a combination of DNA and protein immunization with cysteine proteinases type I and II of L. infantum.

    PubMed

    Rafati, Sima; Nakhaee, Alireza; Taheri, Tahere; Taslimi, Yasaman; Darabi, Haideh; Eravani, Davood; Sanos, Stephanie; Kaye, Paul; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Jamshidi, Shahram; Rad, Mohammad Ali

    2005-05-25

    Leishmania infantum is known to be associated with visceral leishmaniasis in Iran and canids are natural reservoirs. Control of disease in dogs appears to be one of the most effective approaches for interrupting the domestic cycle of the disease. In search for successful vaccine strategies, we evaluated the cysteine proteinases (CPs) type I and II using a heterologous prime-boost regime for vaccination against experimental visceral leishmaniasis in dogs. Following vaccination and challenge, dogs were followed for 12 months. Ten dogs vaccinated by prime/boost with DNA/recombinant CPs (in combination with CpG ODN and Montanide 720) remained free of infection in their bone morrow. In contrast, three out of four dogs in the control groups had infection in their bone marrow. The peripheral lymphocytes from protected animals had generally higher proliferation responses to F/T antigen, recombinant CPA (rCPA) and recombinant CPB (rCPB) than controls. During post-challenge period, the difference in stimulation index is significant (p<0.05) on months 11 and 12 to F/T antigens, all months for rCPA and 5, 7, 9, 11 and 12 months for rCPB. Analysis of cytokine mRNA level suggested that vaccinated dogs had elevated IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whereas there was a consistent increase in the level of IL-10 in the control groups and some vaccinated dogs. The level of total IgG and IgG2, but not IgG1, to rCPA and rCPB was significantly higher in the vaccinated group (p<0.05) than the control groups. We also showed that with the exception of one dog, all dogs in the vaccinated group in comparison to control dogs had strong DTH responses. We propose that the combination of DNA and recombinant protein vaccination using CPs could be instrumental to control (VL) in dogs. PMID:15882533

  3. Intralymphatic immunization enhances DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Erdmann, Iris; Basch, Veronique; Sierro, Sophie; Kramps, Thomas A.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Oehen, Stefan; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2001-03-01

    Although DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit potent immune responses in animal models, initial clinical trials in humans have been disappointing, highlighting a need to optimize their immunogenicity. Naked DNA vaccines are usually administered either i.m. or intradermally. The current study shows that immunization with naked DNA by direct injection into a peripheral lymph node enhances immunogenicity by 100- to 1,000-fold, inducing strong and biologically relevant CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Because injection directly into a lymph node is a rapid and easy procedure in humans, these results have important clinical implications for DNA vaccination.

  4. Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) induce partial protection against experimental Eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhang, Ruirui; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines co-expressing Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) and chicken IL-2 (IL-2) or interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were constructed and their efficacies against E. acervulina were evaluated. The open reading frame (ORF) of E.MIF was cloned from E. acervulina merozoites and subcloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 with chicken cytokine gene IFN-γ or IL-2 to construct the DNA vaccines pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-γ, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF. The in vivo transfection of the target genes was detected by use of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Immunizations were carried out by vaccinating chickens twice with a dose rate of 100 μg intramuscularly. Seven days post second immunization, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 1 × 105 sporulated oocysts of E. acervulina. Seven days later, the duodenum was collected. The results showed that the target genes were expressed effectively in vivo. DNA vaccines and the recombinant E.MIF protein could alleviate body weight loss and duodenal lesions significantly compared to the control groups. Furthermore, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-γ induced anticoccidial indexs (ACIs) of 179.12 and 170, respectively, which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-E.MIF (ACI = 162.31). Our results demonstrated that E.MIF is a potential vaccine candidate against E. acervulina and chicken IFN-γ or IL- 2 may be used as genetic adjuvants to improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis. PMID:26204190

  5. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen – and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish. PMID:24552235

  6. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... The hepatitis B vaccination is a non-infectious, vaccine prepared from recombinant yeast cultures, rather than human blood or plasma. There is no risk of contamination from other bloodborne pathogens nor is there any ... from the vaccine. The vaccine must be administered according to the ...

  7. Considerations in vaccine patent protection.

    PubMed

    Brazell, Lorna

    2010-12-01

    This feature article discusses the basic principles of patentability as related to vaccine research, and outlines recent cases in the US and EU in which vaccine patents have been considered. Issues regarding eligibility for supplementary protection, as currently being considered by the Court of Justice of the EU, are also outlined, as well as the implications of such issues in protecting future vaccine research. PMID:21154148

  8. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship. PMID:26320419

  9. Protective immunity with an E1 multivalent epitope DNA vaccine against cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection in an HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy; Peng, Xuwen; Balogh, Karla; Christensen, Neil D

    2008-02-01

    Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model is widely used to study pathogenesis of papillomavirus infections and malignant tumor progression. Recently, we established HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit lines and demonstrated efficacy for the testing of immunogenicity of a well-known A2-resticted epitope (HPV16E7/82-90) [Hu J, Peng X, Schell TD, Budgeon LR, Cladel NM, Christensen ND. An HLA-A2.1-transgenic rabbit model to study immunity to papillomavirus infection. J Immunol 2006;177(11):8037-45]. In the present study, we screened five HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes from CRPVE1 (selected using online MHCI epitope prediction software) and constructed a multivalent epitope DNA vaccine (CRPVE1ep1-5). CRPVE1ep1-5 and a control DNA vaccine (Ub3) were then delivered intracutaneously onto normal and HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits, respectively, by a helium-driven gene-gun delivery system. One, two or three immunizations were given to different groups of animals from both New Zealand White outbred and EIII/JC inbred genetic background. Two and three immunizations with CRPVE1ep1-5 DNA vaccine provided complete protection against viral DNA infection of HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits from both genetic backgrounds but not in the control-vaccinated groups. One immunization, however, failed to protect HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits against viral DNA infection. This study further demonstrated that the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits can be used to test the immunogenicity of HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes identified by MHCI epitope predication software. PMID:18187239

  10. Passive protection of shrimp against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using specific antibody from egg yolk of chickens immunized with inactivated virus or a WSSV-DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanan; Liu, Junjun; Jin, Liji; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhen, Yuhong; Xue, Hongyu; You, Jiansong; Xu, Yongping

    2008-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) causes high mortality and large economic losses in cultured shrimp. The VP28, VP19 and VP15 genes encode viral structural proteins of WSSV. In this study, hens were immunized with recombinant plasmid (pCI-VP28/VP19/VP15) with linkers or with inactivated WSSV, which used CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) and Freund's adjuvant as adjuvant, respectively. Egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) from hens immunized with inactivated vaccine and DNA vaccine was obtained, purified and used for protection of Metapenaeus ensis shrimp against WSSV. The data showed that the antibody response of the hens immunized with the DNA vaccine was improved by CpG ODNs as adjuvant, but was still inferior to inactivated WSSV in both sera and egg yolks. Using specific IgY from hens immunized with inactivated WSSV and DNA vaccine to neutralize WSSV, the challenged shrimp showed 73.3% and 33.3% survival, respectively. Thus, the results suggest that passive immunization strategy with IgY will be a valuable method against WSSV infection in shrimp. PMID:18805492

  11. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ilin; Sedegah, Martha; Cicatelli, Susan; Spring, Michele; Polhemus, Mark; Tamminga, Cindy; Patterson, Noelle; Guerrero, Melanie; Bennett, Jason W.; McGrath, Shannon; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Farooq, Fouzia; Abot, Esteban; Banania, Jo Glenna; Huang, Jun; Newcomer, Rhonda; Rein, Lisa; Litilit, Dianne; Richie, Nancy O.; Wood, Chloe; Murphy, Jittawadee; Sauerwein, Robert; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; McCoy, Andrea J.; Kamau, Edwin; Cummings, James; Komisar, Jack; Sutamihardja, Awalludin; Shi, Meng; Epstein, Judith E.; Maiolatesi, Santina; Tosh, Donna; Limbach, Keith; Angov, Evelina; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Bruder, Joseph T.; Doolan, Denise L.; King, C. Richter; Carucci, Daniel; Dutta, Sheetij; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Richie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA) followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad). The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1). The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea), possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3), preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27%) were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44–817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5–102) and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13–408; AMA1 348, range 88–1270) and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019). Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. Significance The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%). Protection was

  12. Pharmacokinetics and risk evaluation of DNA vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Feng; Li, Wei; Lu, Ming-Bo; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    DNA plasmid immunization is a novel approach of preventive and therapeutic vaccine. More than 100 DNA vaccines have been on preclinical or clinical phase trials, and four kinds of DNA vaccines for livestock have been approved by USDA, CFIA, and APVMA. Schistosomiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, and vaccine immunization is supposed to be a promising approach to control the health crisis. On the basis of former preclinical studies, we further focused on the pharmacokinetics and risk evaluation of DNA vaccine in vivo. In the present study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) report gene was fused with Schistosoma japonicum 23 kDa transmembrane protein antigen gene (Sj23) and constructed into DNA vaccine pVIVO2-Sj23.EGFP. After intramuscularly injecting 100 μg of purified DNA vaccine plasmid to immunizate BALB/c mice, we studied the tissue distribution of DNA plasmid and expressed Sj23.EGFP antigen, the persistence time of elicited antibodies, and the risk of DNA vaccine transferred into intestinal microorganisms. The results showed that DNA vaccine plasmid could be distributed into all tissues of the body after injection; however, only few organs including the injected muscle were detected DNA vaccine at postimmunization until the 100 days by PCR technology; the detection of green fluorescence protein displayed that DNA vaccine could be expressed in almost every tissue and organs; the ELISA assay indicated the immune antibody against Sj23 could persist over 70 days; and the DNA vaccine transferring intestinal flora results was negative. The results indicated that the DNA vaccine has systemic protection and long-lasting effectivity and is safe to intestinal flora. PMID:22990210

  13. A Combination DNA and Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Strategy Provides Enhanced Protection from Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced Disease†

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Rama Rao; Patel, Kalpana; Niedziela, Genevieve; Nigam, Pragati; Sharma, Sunita; Staprans, Silvija I.; Montefiori, David C.; Chenareddi, Lakshmi; Herndon, James G.; Robinson, Harriet L.; McClure, Harold M.; Novembre, Francis J.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most effective vaccine candidates tested in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque system, live attenuated viruses have been shown to provide the best protection from challenge. To investigate if preimmunization would increase the level of protection afforded by live attenuated SIVmac239Δnef (Δnef), macaques were given two priming immunizations of DNA encoding SIV Gag and Pol proteins, with control macaques receiving vector DNA immunizations. In macaques receiving the SIV DNA inoculation, SIV-specific cellular but not humoral responses were readily detectable 2 weeks after the second DNA inoculation. Following boosting with live attenuated virus, control of Δnef replication was superior in SIV-DNA-primed macaques versus vector-DNA-primed macaques and was correlated with higher levels of CD8+/gamma-interferon-positive and/or interleukin-2-positive cells. Challenge with an intravenous inoculation of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strain SHIV89.6p resulted in infection of all animals. However, macaques receiving SIV DNA as the priming immunizations had statistically lower viral loads than control animals and did not develop signs of disease, whereas three of seven macaques receiving vector DNA showed severe CD4+ T-cell decline, with development of AIDS in one of these animals. No correlation of immune responses to protection from disease could be derived from our analyses. These results demonstrate that addition of a DNA prime to a live attenuated virus provided better protection from disease following challenge than live attenuated virus alone. PMID:16306607

  14. AIDS Vaccination Studies with an Ex Vivo Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Model: Analysis of the Accessory ORF-A Protein and DNA as Protective Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Pistello, Mauro; Bonci, Francesca; Flynn, J. Norman; Mazzetti, Paola; Isola, Patrizia; Zabogli, Elisa; Camerini, Valentina; Matteucci, Donatella; Freer, Giulia; Pelosi, Paolo; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    Determining which antigen must be included in AIDS vaccines to confer maximum protection is of utmost importance. In primate models, vaccines consisting of or including accessory viral proteins have yielded conflicting results. We investigated the protective potential of the accessory protein ORF-A of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in cats. All three immunization strategies used (protein alone in alum adjuvant, DNA alone, or DNA prime-protein boost) clearly generated detectable immune responses. Upon challenge with ex vivo homologous FIV, ORF-A-immunized cats showed distinct enhancement of acute-phase infection relative to mock-immunized animals given alum or empty vector DNA. This effect was tentatively attributed to increased expression of the FIV receptor CD134 that was observed in the immunized cats. However, at subsequent sampling points that were continued for up to 10 months postchallenge, the average plasma viral loads of the ORF-A-immunized animals were slightly but consistently reduced relative to those of the control animals. In addition, CD4+ T lymphocytes in the circulation system declined more slowly in immunized animals than in control animals. These findings support the contention that immunization with lentiviral accessory proteins can improve the host's ability to control virus replication and slow down disease progression but also draw attention to the fact that even simple immunogens that eventually contribute to protective activity can transiently exacerbate subsequent lentiviral infections. PMID:16940498

  15. DNA vaccine (P1-2A-3C-pCDNA) co-administered with Bovine IL-18 gives protective immune response against Foot and Mouth Disease in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Sanghratna Vishanath, Bahire; H J, Dechamma; K, Ganesh; V V S, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G R

    2016-09-25

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals causing considerable economic loss in the affected countries. Presently used tissue culture inactivated vaccine protects the vaccinated animals for a short duration. DNA vaccines along with appropriate adjutants is one of the approach for the development of alternative vaccine. In the present study, we constructed P1-2A-3CpCDNA (containing P1-2A-3C coding sequences of FMDV Asia-1 Ind 63/72) and bovine IL-18 pCDNA plasmids and evaluated in cattle. Four groups of calves each group containing six calves were vaccinated with 200μg of plasmid DNA vaccine P1-2A-3CpCDNA, P1-2A-3CpCDNA+ bIL-18pCDNA and inactivated vaccine respectively where as fourth group was unvaccinated. P1-2A-3CpCDNA+bIL-18pCDNA vaccinated animals have shown higher levels of neutralizing antibodies and specific T-cell proliferation responses. Higher levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were observed in these animals. Similarly, IL-18 adjuvanted group has shown increased Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses. All the vaccinated animals were challenged with cattle adapted FMD homologous Asia1 virus two weeks after the booster dose. IL18 co administered DNA vaccine construct has protected four out of six animals challenged with homologous virus. PMID:27599937

  16. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the fusion protein of mycobacterium heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) with human interleukin-2 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Mei; Bai, Yin-Lan; Shi, Chang-Hong; Gao, Hui; Xue, Ying; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Zhi-Kai

    2008-12-01

    Developing a new generation of vaccines is important for preventing tuberculosis (TB). DNA vaccine is one promising candidate. In this study we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the DNA vaccine encoding the fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) with human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) in BALB/c mice. We showed that the DNA vaccine pcDNA-Hsp65-hIL-2 could induce high levels of antigen-specific antibody, IFN-gamma, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell production. When the immunized mice were infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv, the organ bacterial loads in the DNA immunized group were significantly reduced compared to those of the saline control group, but the ability to reduce bacteria was not better than for BCG. The histopathology in lungs of the DNA vaccine immunized mice was similar to that of BCG immunized mice, which was obviously ameliorated compared to that of the saline control group. Overall, the DNA vaccine could afford protection against M. tuberculosis infection, though the protection efficacy was not as great as that of conventional BCG. PMID:19133010

  17. Cooperation between CD4+ T Cells and Humoral Immunity Is Critical for Protection against Dengue Using a DNA Vaccine Based on the NS1 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Costa, Simone M.; Paes, Marciano V.; Silva, Juliana F. A.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.; Almeida, Cecília J.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. At present, the control of dengue disease is mainly hampered by the absence of antivirals or a vaccine, which results in an estimated half worldwide population at risk of infection. The immune response against DENV is not yet fully understood and a better knowledge of it is now recognized as one of the main challenge for vaccine development. In previous studies, we reported that a DNA vaccine containing the signal peptide sequence from the human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) fused to the DENV2 NS1 gene (pcTPANS1) induced protection against dengue in mice. In the present work, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of cellular and humoral responses elicited by this vaccine candidate for protective immunity. We observed that pcTPANS1 exerts a robust protection against dengue, inducing considerable levels of anti-NS1 antibodies and T cell responses. Passive immunization with anti-NS1 antibodies conferred partial protection in mice infected with low virus load (4 LD50), which was abrogated with the increase of viral dose (40 LD50). The pcTPANS1 also induced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We detected production of IFN-γ and a cytotoxic activity by CD8+ T lymphocytes induced by this vaccine, although its contribution in the protection was not so evident when compared to CD4+ cells. Depletion of CD4+ cells in immunized mice completely abolished protection. Furthermore, transfer experiments revealed that animals receiving CD4+ T cells combined with anti-NS1 antiserum, both obtained from vaccinated mice, survived virus infection with survival rates not significantly different from pcTPANS1-immunized animals. Taken together, results showed that the protective immune response induced by the expression of NS1 antigen mediated by the pcTPANS1 requires a cooperation between CD4+ T cells and the humoral immunity. PMID:26650916

  18. DNAVaxDB: the first web-based DNA vaccine database and its data analysis.

    PubMed

    Racz, Rebecca; Li, Xinna; Patel, Mukti; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2014-01-01

    Since the first DNA vaccine studies were done in the 1990s, thousands more studies have followed. Here we report the development and analysis of DNAVaxDB (http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb), the first publically available web-based DNA vaccine database that curates, stores, and analyzes experimentally verified DNA vaccines, DNA vaccine plasmid vectors, and protective antigens used in DNA vaccines. All data in DNAVaxDB are annotated from reliable resources, particularly peer-reviewed articles. Among over 140 DNA vaccine plasmids, some plasmids were more frequently used in one type of pathogen than others; for example, pCMVi-UB for G- bacterial DNA vaccines, and pCAGGS for viral DNA vaccines. Presently, over 400 DNA vaccines containing over 370 protective antigens from over 90 infectious and non-infectious diseases have been curated in DNAVaxDB. While extracellular and bacterial cell surface proteins and adhesin proteins were frequently used for DNA vaccine development, the majority of protective antigens used in Chlamydophila DNA vaccines are localized to the inner portion of the cell. The DNA vaccine priming, other vaccine boosting vaccination regimen has been widely used to induce protection against infection of different pathogens such as HIV. Parasitic and cancer DNA vaccines were also systematically analyzed. User-friendly web query and visualization interfaces are available in DNAVaxDB for interactive data search. To support data exchange, the information of DNA vaccines, plasmids, and protective antigens is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). DNAVaxDB is targeted to become a timely and vital source of DNA vaccines and related data and facilitate advanced DNA vaccine research and development. PMID:25104313

  19. DNAVaxDB: the first web-based DNA vaccine database and its data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the first DNA vaccine studies were done in the 1990s, thousands more studies have followed. Here we report the development and analysis of DNAVaxDB (http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb), the first publically available web-based DNA vaccine database that curates, stores, and analyzes experimentally verified DNA vaccines, DNA vaccine plasmid vectors, and protective antigens used in DNA vaccines. All data in DNAVaxDB are annotated from reliable resources, particularly peer-reviewed articles. Among over 140 DNA vaccine plasmids, some plasmids were more frequently used in one type of pathogen than others; for example, pCMVi-UB for G- bacterial DNA vaccines, and pCAGGS for viral DNA vaccines. Presently, over 400 DNA vaccines containing over 370 protective antigens from over 90 infectious and non-infectious diseases have been curated in DNAVaxDB. While extracellular and bacterial cell surface proteins and adhesin proteins were frequently used for DNA vaccine development, the majority of protective antigens used in Chlamydophila DNA vaccines are localized to the inner portion of the cell. The DNA vaccine priming, other vaccine boosting vaccination regimen has been widely used to induce protection against infection of different pathogens such as HIV. Parasitic and cancer DNA vaccines were also systematically analyzed. User-friendly web query and visualization interfaces are available in DNAVaxDB for interactive data search. To support data exchange, the information of DNA vaccines, plasmids, and protective antigens is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). DNAVaxDB is targeted to become a timely and vital source of DNA vaccines and related data and facilitate advanced DNA vaccine research and development. PMID:25104313

  20. A cationic liposome-DNA complexes adjuvant (JVRS-100) enhances the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy of pre-pandemic influenza A (H5N1) vaccine in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Xiangjie; Fairman, Jeffery; Lewis, David B; Katz, Jacqueline M; Levine, Min; Tumpey, Terrence M; Lu, Xiuhua

    2016-05-01

    Influenza A (H5N1) viruses continue to pose a public health threat. As inactivated H5N1 vaccines are poorly immunogenic, adjuvants are needed to improve the immunogenicity of H5N1 vaccine in humans. Here, we investigated the immunogenicity and cross-protective efficacy in ferrets of a clade 2.2-derived vaccine with addition of JVRS-100, an adjuvant consisting of cationic liposome-DNA complexes (CLDC). After the first vaccination, significantly higher levels of hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) and neutralizing antibody titers were detected in ferrets immunized with adjuvanted vaccine compared to unadjuvanted vaccine. Following a second dose of adjuvanted vaccine, HAI antibody titers of ≥ 40 were detected against viruses from multiple H5N1 clades. HAI antibodies against newly isolated H5N2 and H5N8 viruses were also augmented by JVRS-100. Ferrets were challenged with a heterologous H5N1 virus. All ferrets that received two doses of adjuvanted vaccine exhibited mild illness, significantly reduced nasal wash virus titers and protection from lethal challenge. In contrast, ferrets that received unadjuvanted vaccine showed greater weight loss, high viral titers and 3 of 6 animals succumbed to the lethal challenge. Our results indicate that the addition of JVRS-100 to H5N1 vaccine enhanced immunogenicity and cross-protection against lethal H5N1 virus disease in ferrets. JVRS-100 warrants further investigation as a potential adjuvant for influenza vaccines. PMID:26967975

  1. An optimized, synthetic DNA vaccine encoding the toxin A and toxin B receptor binding domains of Clostridium difficile induces protective antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baliban, Scott M; Michael, Amanda; Shammassian, Berje; Mudakha, Shikata; Khan, Amir S; Cocklin, Simon; Zentner, Isaac; Latimer, Brian P; Bouillaut, Laurent; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Welles, Seth L; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Weiner, David B; Kutzler, Michele A

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) constitutes a large majority of nosocomial diarrhea cases in industrialized nations and is mediated by the effects of two secreted toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Patients who develop strong antitoxin antibody responses can clear C. difficile infection and remain disease free. Key toxin-neutralizing epitopes have been found within the carboxy-terminal receptor binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB, which has generated interest in developing the RBD as a viable vaccine target. While numerous platforms have been studied, very little data describes the potential of DNA vaccination against CDAD. Therefore, we created highly optimized plasmids encoding the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB in which any putative N-linked glycosylation sites were altered. Mice and nonhuman primates were immunized intramuscularly, followed by in vivo electroporation, and in these animal models, vaccination induced significant levels of both anti-RBD antibodies (blood and stool) and RBD-specific antibody-secreting cells. Further characterization revealed that sera from immunized mice and nonhuman primates could detect RBD protein from transfected cells, as well as neutralize purified toxins in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mice that were immunized with plasmids or given nonhuman-primate sera were protected from a lethal challenge with purified TcdA and/or TcdB. Moreover, immunized mice were significantly protected when challenged with C. difficile spores from homologous (VPI 10463) and heterologous, epidemic (UK1) strains. These data demonstrate the robust immunogenicity and efficacy of a TcdA/B RBD-based DNA vaccine in preclinical models of acute toxin-associated and intragastric, spore-induced colonic disease. PMID:25024365

  2. An Optimized, Synthetic DNA Vaccine Encoding the Toxin A and Toxin B Receptor Binding Domains of Clostridium difficile Induces Protective Antibody Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baliban, Scott M.; Michael, Amanda; Shammassian, Berje; Mudakha, Shikata; Khan, Amir S.; Cocklin, Simon; Zentner, Isaac; Latimer, Brian P.; Bouillaut, Laurent; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Welles, Seth L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) constitutes a large majority of nosocomial diarrhea cases in industrialized nations and is mediated by the effects of two secreted toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Patients who develop strong antitoxin antibody responses can clear C. difficile infection and remain disease free. Key toxin-neutralizing epitopes have been found within the carboxy-terminal receptor binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB, which has generated interest in developing the RBD as a viable vaccine target. While numerous platforms have been studied, very little data describes the potential of DNA vaccination against CDAD. Therefore, we created highly optimized plasmids encoding the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB in which any putative N-linked glycosylation sites were altered. Mice and nonhuman primates were immunized intramuscularly, followed by in vivo electroporation, and in these animal models, vaccination induced significant levels of both anti-RBD antibodies (blood and stool) and RBD-specific antibody-secreting cells. Further characterization revealed that sera from immunized mice and nonhuman primates could detect RBD protein from transfected cells, as well as neutralize purified toxins in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mice that were immunized with plasmids or given nonhuman-primate sera were protected from a lethal challenge with purified TcdA and/or TcdB. Moreover, immunized mice were significantly protected when challenged with C. difficile spores from homologous (VPI 10463) and heterologous, epidemic (UK1) strains. These data demonstrate the robust immunogenicity and efficacy of a TcdA/B RBD-based DNA vaccine in preclinical models of acute toxin-associated and intragastric, spore-induced colonic disease. PMID:25024365

  3. Polyvalent DNA vaccines expressing HA antigens of H5N1 influenza viruses with an optimized leader sequence elicit cross-protective antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixia; Hackett, Anthony; Jia, Na; Zhang, Chunhua; Zhang, Lu; Parker, Chris; Zhou, An; Li, Jun; Cao, Wu-Chun; Huang, Zuhu; Li, Yan; Lu, Shan

    2011-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are circulating among poultry populations in parts of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, and have caused human infections with a high mortality rate. H5 subtype hemagglutinin (HA) has evolved into phylogenetically distinct clades and subclades based on viruses isolated from various avian species. Since 1997, humans have been infected by HPAI H5N1 viruses from several clades. It is, therefore, important to develop strategies to produce protective antibody responses against H5N1 viruses from multiple clades or antigenic groups. In the current study, we optimized the signal peptide design of DNA vaccines expressing HA antigens from H5N1 viruses. Cross reactivity analysis using sera from immunized rabbits showed that antibody responses elicited by a polyvalent formulation, including HA antigens from different clades, was able to elicit broad protective antibody responses against multiple key representative H5N1 viruses across different clades. Data presented in this report support the development of a polyvalent DNA vaccine strategy against the threat of a potential H5N1 influenza pandemic. PMID:22205966

  4. DNA vaccines: a review of developments.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G; Robinson, H L

    1997-10-01

    Immunisation with purified DNA is a powerful technique for inducing immune responses. The concept is very simple, involving insertion of the gene encoding the antigen of choice into a bacterial plasmid, and injection of the plasmid into the host where the antigen is expressed and induces humoral and cellular immunity. This technology can induce immunity to all antigens that can be encoded by DNA; this includes all protein, but not carbohydrate, antigens. DNA immunisation appears to result in presentation of antigens to the host's immune system in a natural form, similar to that achieved with live attenuated vaccines. The most efficacious routes for DNA immunisation are bombardment with particles coated with DNA (gene-gun), followed by intramuscular and intradermal administration. The efficiency of transfection of host cells is low, but sufficient to induce immunological responsiveness. The DNA plasmid is retained in the transfected cells in an unintegrated form for the life of the cell. The majority of transfected cells are eliminated, but residual expression has been detected for longer periods. In animal model systems, DNA immunisation has been shown to induce protective immunity to influenza, herpes, rabies, hepatitis B and lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses, and to malaria and mycobacteria. However, strategies to induce protective immunity to HIV and other disease agents remain to be developed. DNA vaccines permit modulation of the immune response by altering the route or method of DNA administration, by including immunostimulatory sequences in the plasmid, and by co-administration of cytokine genes with the gene encoding the antigen of interest. A T helper 1 response provides cell-mediated immune killing of infected cells and neutralising antibody production, while a T helper 2 response induces IgE and allergic responses. The advantages of DNA immunisation are: similarity to live attenuated vaccination but without the possibility of contamination with

  5. Co-administration of plasmid expressing IL-12 with 14-kDa Schistosoma mansoni fatty acid-binding protein cDNA alters immune response profiles and fails to enhance protection induced by Sm14 DNA vaccine alone.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Cristina T; Pacífico, Lucila G G; Barsante, Michele M; Rassi, Tatiana; Cassali, Geovanni D; Oliveira, Sérgio C

    2006-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. DNA-based vaccine is a promising strategy to induce protective immunity against schistosomiasis, since both humoral and cellular immune responses are involved in parasite elimination. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Sm14 cDNA alone or in association with a plasmid expressing murine interleukin (IL)-12 to induce protection against challenge infection. Mice were immunized with four doses of the DNA vaccine and the levels of protection were determined by worm burden recovery after challenge infection. Specific antibody production to rSm14 was determined by ELISA, and cytokine production was measured in splenocyte culture supernatants stimulated with rSm14 and in bronchoalveolar lavage of vaccinated mice after challenge infection. DNA immunization with pCI/Sm14 alone induced 40.5% of worm reduction. However, the use of pCI/IL-12 as adjuvant to pCI/Sm14 immunization failed to enhance protection against challenge infection. Protection induced by pCI/Sm14 immunization correlates with specific IgG antibody production against Sm14, Th1 type of immune response with high levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma and low levels of IL-4 in splenocyte culture supernatants and in bronchoalveolar lavage after challenge infection. IL-12 co-administration with pCI/Sm14 induced a significant production of nitric oxide in splenocyte culture supernatants and also lymphocyte suppression, with reduced percentage of T cells producing IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. PMID:16914349

  6. Co-administration of certain DNA vaccine combinations expressing different H5N1 influenza virus antigens can be beneficial or detrimental to immune protection.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami; Gray, Michael; Li, Yan; Kobasa, Darwyn; Yao, Xiaojian; Kobinger, Gary P

    2012-01-11

    Achieving broad-spectrum immunity against emerging zoonotic viruses such as avian influenza H5N1 and other possible pandemic viruses will require generation of cross-protective immune responses. Strong antibody responses generated against the H5HA protein are protective, however, antigenic variation between diverging isolates can interfere with virus neutralization. The current study investigates co-administration of an H5 HA DNA vaccine with other variable and conserved influenza antigens (NA, NP, and M2). All antigens were derived from the A/Hanoi/30408/2005 (H5N1) virus and the contribution towards overall protection and immune activation was assessed against lethal homologous and heterologous challenges. An (HA+NA) combination afforded the best protection against homologous challenge and (HA+NP) was comparable to HA alone against heterologous A/Hong Kong/483/1997 challenge. Interestingly, combining all four H5 antigens at a single site did not improve protection against matched challenge and unexpectedly reduced survival by 30% against a heterologous challenge. Survival was also significantly decreased against heterologous challenge following combination of (HA+NP) with an unrelated antigen. Although there were no significant changes in antibody titres, significantly lower T-cell responses were detected against all antigens except HA in each combination. Co-administration of the vaccines at different injection sites restored T-cell responses but did not improve overall protection. Similar observations were also recorded following combination of HA and NP antigens using two different adenovirus-based backbones. Overall, the data suggest that co-administering certain H5N1 antigens offer better or comparable protection to HA alone, however, combining extra antigens may be unnecessary and lead to unfavourable immune responses. PMID:22119588

  7. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins. PMID:26158319

  8. DNA-launched live-attenuated vaccines for biodefense applications.

    PubMed

    Pushko, Peter; Lukashevich, Igor S; Weaver, Scott C; Tretyakova, Irina

    2016-09-01

    A novel vaccine platform uses DNA immunization to launch live-attenuated virus vaccines in vivo. This technology has been applied for vaccine development against positive-strand RNA viruses with global public health impact including alphaviruses and flaviviruses. The DNA-launched vaccine represents the recombinant plasmid that encodes the full-length genomic RNA of live-attenuated virus downstream from a eukaryotic promoter. When administered in vivo, the genomic RNA of live-attenuated virus is transcribed. The RNA initiates limited replication of a genetically defined, live-attenuated vaccine virus in the tissues of the vaccine recipient, thereby inducing a protective immune response. This platform combines the strengths of reverse genetics, DNA immunization and the advantages of live-attenuated vaccines, resulting in a reduced chance of genetic reversions, increased safety, and improved immunization. With this vaccine technology, the field of DNA vaccines is expanded from those that express subunit antigens to include a novel type of DNA vaccines that launch live-attenuated viruses. PMID:27055100

  9. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  10. DNA Immunization for HIV Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuxin; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been studied in the last 20 years for HIV vaccine research. Significant experience has been accumulated in vector design, antigen optimization, delivery approaches and the use of DNA immunization as part of a prime-boost HIV vaccination strategy. Key historical data and future outlook are presented. With better understanding on the potential of DNA immunization and recent progress in HIV vaccine research, it is anticipated that DNA immunization will play a more significant role in the future of HIV vaccine development. PMID:26344472

  11. Technologies for enhanced efficacy of DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    Despite many years of research, human DNA vaccines have yet to fulfill their early promise. Over the past 15 years, multiple generations of DNA vaccines have been developed and tested in preclinical models for prophylactic and therapeutic applications in the areas of infectious disease and cancer, but have failed in the clinic. Thus, while DNA vaccines have achieved successful licensure for veterinary applications, their poor immunogenicity in humans when compared with traditional protein-based vaccines has hindered their progress. Many strategies have been attempted to improve DNA vaccine potency including use of more efficient promoters and codon optimization, addition of traditional or genetic adjuvants, electroporation, intradermal delivery and various prime–boost strategies. This review summarizes these advances in DNA vaccine technologies and attempts to answer the question of when DNA vaccines might eventually be licensed for human use. PMID:22309668

  12. Assembly and Assessment of DNA Scaffolded Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Wang, Lili; Yan, Hao; Chang, Yung

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines play an important role in preventing many life-threatening infectious diseases. To meet the demand of vaccination for treating a wide range of diseases, rational vaccine design has been recognized as a desirable and necessary strategy for development of safe and effective vaccines. DNA nanostructures are advantageous in the design and construction of synthetic vaccines, owing to their robust self-assembly, programmability, and precision control in complex organization, as well as their intrinsic adjuvant activity. Here, we describe a modular assembly of DNA scaffolded vaccine complex, composing of a model antigen, streptavidin, and adjuvant, CpG oligonucleotide. The DNA-assembled vaccines were found to elicit strong antigen-specific antibody responses, but causing little or no adverse reactions. Conceivably, this vaccine platform can be further optimized for improved immunogenicity and extended to the construction of various subunit vaccines. PMID:27076307

  13. [DNA--the future in vaccine technology?].

    PubMed

    Kjeken, Rune; Bogen, Bjarne; Mathiesen, Iacob

    2006-11-16

    DNA vaccines represent a new and promising technology that uses DNA to encode the antigen(s) of interest, instead of inoculating with attenuated or inactivated microbes or isolated antigens. Antigen is produced within the transfected cells minaicking a real life viral infection. This vaccine modality has been shown to elicit strong cellular immune responses and is promising for treating diseases where traditional vaccine approaches have failed. In spite of promising results in small animal models, DNA vaccines have so far proven less potent in human clinical trials. In this review we provide a general overview on the mechanisms of action for DNA vaccines, discuss potential benefits of traditional vaccine approaches and review current strategies for improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines to enable the successful transfer of the technology can be successfully transferred from mice to men. PMID:17117196

  14. Protective immunity induced with 23 kDa membrane protein dna vaccine of Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain in infected C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingchang; Ren, Jiangong; Harn, D A; Si, Jin; Yu, Chuanxin; Ming, Xu; Liang, Yousheng

    2003-12-01

    A 23 kDa membrane protein DNA vaccine for Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain was developed and tested for its protective efficacy and immune responses in infected C57BL/6 mice. The cDNA encoding SjC23 amplified from pUC19-SjC23 were subcloned into an eukaryotic expression vector (pcDNA3.1). Forty-eight female C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups. Each mouse of group A (control group) was immunized intramuscularly (i.m.) with 100 microg of pcDNA3.1; of group B (SjC23 group) was immunized (i.m.) with 100 microg of pcDNA3.1-SjC23; of group C (SjC23+IL-12) was immunized (i.m.) with a mixture of 100 microg of pcDNA3.1-SjC23, 100 microg of pcDNA3.1-p35 and 100 microg of pcDNA-p40. These were followed by two boosts of the same DNA once every two weeks. All mice were challenged with 45 cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain at week 8, and were killed and perfused at week 14. The numbers of recovered worms and hepatic eggs were counted. The expression of SjC23 and p35, p40 in muscle tissue was determined by immunohistochemical method. By culture of spleen cells, the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-gamma with the stimulation of specific antigen of the recombinant hydrophilic domain of SjC23 (rSjC23-HD) was determined after the last immunization (before challenge). Sera were collected from each group before immunization and two weeks before and after challenge. Anti-SjC23 antibodies were tested by Western blot. The results showed that SjC23 and p35, p40 of mouse IL-12 were expressed on the membrane and in the plasma of the muscle cells of immunized C57BL/6 mice. A rise of IL-2 and IFN-gamma in the SjC23 group and SjC23+IL-12 group was observed; No changes were found in IL-4 and IL-10. Detection of anti-SjC23 antibody with Western blot showed that after the third immunization (before challenge) all the serum samples from the control group were negative; 8 of 10 sera from the SjC23 group and 9 of 10 sera from the SjC23+IL-12 group were positive. The

  15. Vaccination of calves using the BRSV nucleocapsid protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects the lungs against BRSV replication and pathology.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Carine; Boxus, Mathieu; Rosar, Laurent; Toussaint, Jean-François; Walravens, Karl; Roels, Stefan; Meyer, Gilles; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Kerkhofs, Pierre

    2008-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in both cattle and young children. Despite the development of vaccines against bovine (B)RSV, incomplete protection and exacerbation of subsequent RSV disease have occurred. In order to circumvent these problems, calves were vaccinated with the nucleocapsid protein, known to be a major target of CD8(+) T cells in cattle. This was performed according to a DNA prime-protein boost strategy. The results showed that DNA vaccination primed a specific T-cell-mediated response, as indicated by both a lymphoproliferative response and IFN-gamma production. These responses were enhanced after protein boost. After challenge, mock-vaccinated calves displayed gross pneumonic lesions and viral replication in the lungs. In contrast, calves vaccinated by successive administrations of plasmid DNA and protein exhibited protection against the development of pneumonic lesions and the viral replication in the BAL fluids and the lungs. The protection correlated to the cell-mediated immunity and not to the antibody response. PMID:18644416

  16. Community Immunity: How Vaccines Protect Us All

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Community Immunity How Vaccines Protect Us All Parents know that kids are vulnerable to a ... countries and regions with lower vaccination rates. With all the international travel in the world these days, ...

  17. Safeguarding Our Health: Vaccines Protect Us All

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Safeguarding Our Health Vaccines Protect Us All We share more than food and culture within ... safeguarding your health. “There’s a huge benefit to all of us getting the recommended vaccines,” explains Dr. ...

  18. A Single Electroporation Delivery of a DNA Vaccine Containing the Hemagglutinin Gene of Asian H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Generated a Protective Antibody Response in Chickens against a North American Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Pasick, John; Kobinger, Gary P.; Hannaman, Drew; Berhane, Yohannes; Clavijo, Alfonso; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Protection against the avian influenza (AI) H5N1 virus is suspected to be mainly conferred by the presence of antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the virus. A single electroporation delivery of 100 or 250 μg of a DNA vaccine construct, pCAG-HA, carrying the HA gene of strain A/Hanoi/30408/2005 (H5N1), in chickens led to the development of anti-HA antibody response in 16 of 17 immunized birds, as measured by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), and an indirect ELISA. Birds vaccinated by electroporation (n = 11) were protected from experimental AI challenge with strain A/chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/1/1983 (H5N2) as judged by low viral load, absence of clinical symptoms, and absence of mortality (n = 11). In contrast, only two out of 10 birds vaccinated with the same vaccine dose (100 or 250 μg) but without electroporation developed antibodies. These birds showed high viral loads and significant morbidity and mortality after the challenge. Seroconversion was reduced in birds electroporated with a low vaccine dose (10 μg), but the antibody-positive birds were protected against virus challenge. Nonelectroporation delivery of a low-dose vaccine did not result in seroconversion, and the birds were as susceptible as those in the control groups that received the control pCAG vector. Electroporation delivery of the DNA vaccine led to enhanced antibody responses and to protection against the AI virus challenge. The HI test, cELISA, or indirect ELISA for anti-H5 antibodies might serve as a good predictor of the potency and efficacy of a DNA immunization strategy against AI in chickens. PMID:23365205

  19. DNA-antiviral vaccines: new developments and approaches--a review.

    PubMed

    Giese, M

    1998-01-01

    Current vaccines can be divided into "live," "recombinant" and "killed" vaccines. Live vaccines are traditionally composed of attenuated viruses or bacteria, selected for their reduced pathogenicity. Recombinant vaccines, driven by a viral or bacterial vector express foreign antigens, or only recombinant proteins injected as antigen. Killed vaccines consist of inactivated whole pathogens. But all these traditional vaccines have some disadvantages: Attenuated live vaccine are able to undergo mutation and as mutated viruses or bacteria can now provoke the diseases against which the vaccine should protect the organism. A further disadvantage of live vaccines is the possibility of shedding which is a real problem especially in veterinary medicine. Clearly, there is a need for better vaccines to protect against diseases without the disadvantages associated with vaccines presently in use. Modern vaccines might be characterized as safe, no risk of reversion to pathogenicity, and they should be stable without the necessity of a "cold chain." Production should be simple, standardized and inexpensive. Vaccine development has now been improved by the ability to use direct inoculations of plasmid DNA encoding viral or bacterial proteins. One of the major benefits of DNA-vaccines, variously termed "DNA-, genetic- or nucleic acid-immunization," is the endogenous synthesis of the encoded protein. Therefore DNA vaccines mimic natural infection and provoke both strong humoral and cellular immune response. This review summarizes new developments and approaches of DNA vaccination and explains the construction of expression plasmids as well as possible mechanisms of immune responses. PMID:9926398

  20. Prospects for developing an effective particle-mediated DNA vaccine against influenza.

    PubMed

    Yager, Eric J; Dean, Hansi J; Fuller, Deborah Heydenburg

    2009-09-01

    Vaccine strategies capable of conferring broad protection against both seasonal and pandemic strains of influenza are urgently needed. DNA vaccines are an attractive choice owing to their capacity to induce robust humoral and cellular immune responses at low doses and because they can be developed and manufactured rapidly to more effectively meet the threat of an influenza epidemic or pandemic. Particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED), or the gene gun, is a DNA vaccine delivery technology shown to induce protective levels of antibody and T-cell responses in animals and humans against a wide variety of diseases, including influenza. This review focuses on current advances toward the development of an effective PMED DNA vaccine against influenza, including strategies to enhance vaccine immunogenicity, the potential for PMED-based DNA vaccines to improve protection in the vulnerable elderly population, and the prospects for a vaccine capable of providing cross-protection against both seasonal and pandemic strains of influenza. PMID:19722894

  1. Prime-boost vaccination with plasmid DNA followed by recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP induced a partial protective immunity to inhibit Babesia gibsoni proliferation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shinuo; Mousa, Ahmed Abdelmoniem; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Zhou, Mo; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Masatani, Tatsunori; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Fukumoto, Shinya; Xuan, Xuenan

    2013-12-01

    A heterologous prime-boost vaccination regime with DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus (rvv) vectors expressing relevant antigens has been shown to induce effective immune responses against several infectious pathogens. In this study, we describe the effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy by immunizing dogs with a recombinant plasmid followed by vaccinia virus, both of which expressed the glutamic acid-rich protein (BgGARP) of Babesia gibsoni. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime developed a significantly high level of specific antibodies against BgGARP when compared with the control groups. The antibody level was strongly increased after a booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus. Two weeks after the booster immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing BgGARP, the dogs were challenged with B. gibsoni parasite. The dogs immunized with the prime-boost regime showed partial protection, manifested as a significantly low level of parasitemia. These results indicated that this type of DNA/rvv prime-boost immunization approach may have use against B. gibsoni infection in dogs. PMID:24338330

  2. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42-44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  3. Combined IL-12 Plasmid and Recombinant SjGST Enhance the Protective and Anti-pathology Effect of SjGST DNA Vaccine Against Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Po-Ching; Lin, Ching-Nan; Peng, Shih-Yi; Kang, Tsung-Fu; Lee, Kin-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is listed as one of most important tropical diseases and more than 200 million people are estimated to be infected. Development of a vaccine is thought to be the most effective way to control this disease. Recombinant 26-kDa glutathione S-transferase (rSjGST) has previously been reported to achieve a worm reduction rate of 42–44%. To improve the efficiency of the vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum, we immunized mice with a combination of pcDNA vector-encoded 26-kDa SjGST (pcDNA/SjGST), IL-12 expressing-plasmid (pIL-12), and rSjGST. Co-vaccination with pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST led to a reduction in worm burden, hepatic egg burden, and the size of liver tissue granulomas than that in the untreated infection controls. In addition, we detected high levels of specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a against the rSjGST antigen in infected mice vaccinated with this combination of pcDNA/SjGST, pIL-12, and rSjGST. Moreover, high expression levels of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-10, were also detected in this group, without diminished levels of IL-12, INF-γ, and TNF-α cytokines that are related to parasite killing. In conclusion, we have developed a new vaccination regimen against S. japonicum infection and shown that co-immunization with pcDNA/SjGST vaccine, pIL-12, and rSjGST has significant anti-parasite, anti-hepatic egg and anti-pathology effects in mice. The efficacy of this vaccination method should be further validated in large animals such as water buffalo. This method may help to reduce the transmission of zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica. PMID:26891172

  4. DNA vaccines encoding the envelope protein of West Nile virus lineages 1 or 2 administered intramuscularly, via electroporation and with recombinant virus protein induce partial protection in large falcons (Falco spp.).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dominik; Angenvoort, Joke; Ziegler, Ute; Fast, Christine; Maier, Kristina; Chabierski, Stefan; Eiden, Martin; Ulbert, Sebastian; Groschup, Martin H; Lierz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As West Nile virus (WNV) can cause lethal diseases in raptors, a vaccination prophylaxis of free-living and captive populations is desirable. In the absence of vaccines approved for birds, equine vaccines have been used in falcons, but full protection against WNV infection was not achieved. Therefore, two DNA vaccines encoding the ectodomain of the envelope protein of WNV lineages 1 and 2, respectively, were evaluated in 28 large falcons. Four different vaccination protocols were used, including electroporation and booster-injections of recombinant WNV domain III protein, before challenge with the live WNV lineage 1 strain NY99. Drug safety, plasmid shedding and antibody production were monitored during the vaccination period. Serological, virological, histological, immunohistochemical and molecular biological investigations were performed during the challenge trials. Antibody response following vaccination was low overall and lasted for a maximum of three weeks. Plasmid shedding was not detected at any time. Viremia, mortality and levels, but not duration, of oral virus shedding were reduced in all of the groups during the challenge trial compared to the non-vaccinated control group. Likewise, clinical scoring, levels of cloacal virus shedding and viral load in organs were significantly reduced in three vaccination groups. Histopathological findings associated with WNV infections (meningo-encephalitis, myocarditis, and arteritis) were present in all groups, but immunohistochemical detection of the viral antigen was reduced. In conclusion, the vaccines can be used safely in falcons to reduce mortality and clinical signs and to lower the risk of virus transmission due to decreased levels of virus shedding and viremia, but full protection was not achieved in all groups. PMID:26282836

  5. A DNA Prime-Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Boost Vaccine Encoding Thrombospondin-Related Adhesion Protein but Not Circumsporozoite Protein Partially Protects Healthy Malaria-Naive Adults against Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoite Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dunachie, S. J.; Walther, M.; Epstein, J. E.; Keating, S.; Berthoud, T.; Andrews, L.; Andersen, R. F.; Bejon, P.; Goonetilleke, N.; Poulton, I.; Webster, D. P.; Butcher, G.; Watkins, K.; Sinden, R. E.; Levine, G. L.; Richie, T. L.; Schneider, J.; Kaslow, D.; Gilbert, S. C.; Carucci, D. J.; Hill, A. V. S.

    2006-01-01

    The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of DNA and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) prime-boost regimes were assessed by using either thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (TRAP) with a multiple-epitope string ME (ME-TRAP) or the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium falciparum. Sixteen healthy subjects who never had malaria (malaria-naive subjects) received two priming vaccinations with DNA, followed by one boosting immunization with MVA, with either ME-TRAP or CS as the antigen. Immunogenicity was assessed by ex vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and antibody assay. Two weeks after the final vaccination, the subjects underwent P. falciparum sporozoite challenge, with six unvaccinated controls. The vaccines were well tolerated and immunogenic, with the DDM-ME TRAP regimen producing stronger ex vivo IFN-γ ELISPOT responses than DDM-CS. One of eight subjects receiving the DDM-ME TRAP regimen was completely protected against malaria challenge, with this group as a whole showing significant delay to parasitemia compared to controls (P = 0.045). The peak ex vivo IFN-γ ELISPOT response in this group correlated strongly with the number of days to parasitemia (P = 0.033). No protection was observed in the DDM-CS group. Prime-boost vaccination with DNA and MVA encoding ME-TRAP but not CS resulted in partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite challenge in the present study. PMID:16988273

  6. Enhancing vaccines with immune stimulatory CpG DNA.

    PubMed

    Krieg, A M; Davis, H L

    2001-02-01

    Certain vertebrate immune cells have evolved receptors that detect the presence of pathogen DNA based on its content of unmethylated CpG dinucleotides in particular base contexts. This 'CpG DNA' acts as a 'danger signal', triggering protective innate and acquired immune responses. The activity of CpG DNA can be mimicked with synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, which when added to a vaccine greatly boost the resulting immune response. PMID:11249727

  7. Immunization with a DNA Vaccine Cocktail Induces a Th1 Response and Protects Mice Against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several novel antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have been studied as vaccine components and their immunogenicity has been evaluated. Previously, we reported that 85 antigen complex (85A, 85B, and 85C), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 35kDa protein could induce significant lymph...

  8. Vectored vaccines to protect against PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jazmina L G; Zúñiga, Sonia; Bécares, Martina; Sola, Isabel; Ceriani, Juan E; Juanola, Sandra; Plana, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    2010-12-01

    PRRSV is the causative agent of the most important infectious disease affecting swine herds worldwide, producing great economic losses. Commercially available vaccines are only partially effective in protection against PRRSV. Moreover, modified live vaccines may allow virus shedding, and could revert generating virulent phenotypes. Therefore, new efficient vaccines are required. Vaccines based on recombinant virus genomes (virus vectored vaccines) against PRRSV could represent a safe alternative for the generation of modified live vaccines. In this paper, current vectored vaccines to protect against PRRSV are revised, including those based on pseudorabies virus, poxvirus, adenovirus, and virus replicons. Special attention has been provided to the use of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) as vector for the expression of PRRSV antigens. This vector has the capability of expressing high levels of heterologous genes, is a potent interferon-α inducer, and presents antigens in mucosal surfaces, eliciting both secretory and systemic immunity. A TGEV derived vector (rTGEV) was generated, expressing PRRSV wild type or modified GP5 and M proteins, described as the main inducers of neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune response, respectively. Protection experiments showed that vaccinated animals developed a faster and stronger humoral immune response than the non-vaccinated ones. Partial protection in challenged animals was observed, as vaccinated pigs showed decreased lung damage when compared with the non-vaccinated ones. Nevertheless, the level of neutralizing antibodies was low, what may explain the limited protection observed. Several strategies are proposed to improve current rTGEV vectors expressing PRRSV antigens. PMID:20600388

  9. Electroporation delivery of DNA vaccines: prospects for success.

    PubMed

    Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B

    2011-06-01

    A number of noteworthy technology advances in DNA vaccines research and development over the past few years have led to the resurgence of this field as a viable vaccine modality. Notably, these include--optimization of DNA constructs; development of new DNA manufacturing processes and formulations; augmentation of immune responses with novel encoded molecular adjuvants; and the improvement in new in vivo delivery strategies including electroporation (EP). Of these, EP mediated delivery has generated considerable enthusiasm and appears to have had a great impact in vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy by increasing antigen delivery upto a 1000 fold over naked DNA delivery alone. This increased delivery has resulted in an improved in vivo immune response magnitude as well as response rates relative to DNA delivery by direct injection alone. Indeed the immune responses and protection from pathogen challenge observed following DNA administration via EP in many cases are comparable or superior to other well studied vaccine platforms including viral vectors and live/attenuated/inactivated virus vaccines. Significantly, the early promise of EP delivery shown in numerous pre-clinical animal models of many different infectious diseases and cancer are now translating into equally enhanced immune responses in human clinical trials making the prospects for this vaccine approach to impact diverse disease targets tangible. PMID:21530212

  10. Enhanced protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis afforded by BCG prime-DNA boost regimen in an early challenge mouse model is associated with increased splenic interleukin-2-producing CD4 T-cell frequency post-vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Han, De-Ping; Wu, Kang; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2014-12-01

    The development of improved vaccines and vaccination strategies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been hindered by a limited understanding of the immune correlates of anti-tuberculosis protective immunity. Simple measurement of interferon-γ frequency or production per se does not provide adequate prediction of immune protection. In this study, we examined the relationship between T-cell immune responses and protective efficacy conferred by the heterologous vaccination strategy, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) prime-Ag85A DNA boost (B/D), in an early challenge mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. The results demonstrated that mice vaccinated with the B/D regimen had a significantly reduced bacillary load compared with BCG-vaccinated mice, and the reduction in colony-forming units was associated with decreased pathology and lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in the infected lungs. Further analysis of immunogenicity showed that the superior protection afforded by the B/D regimen was associated with significantly increased frequency of splenic interleukin-2 (IL-2) -producing CD4 T cells and increased IL-2 production when measured as integrated mean fluorescence intensity post-vaccination as well. These data suggest that measurement of elevated frequency of IL-2-producing CD4 T cells or IL-2 production in the spleens of vaccinated mice can predict vaccine efficacy, at least in the B/D strategy, and add to the accumulating body of evidence suggesting that BCG prime-boost strategies may be a useful approach to the control of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24965530

  11. Overview of recent DNA vaccine development for fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first description of DNA vaccines for fish in 1996, numerous studies of genetic immunisation against the rhabdovirus pathogens infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) have established their potential as both highly efficacious biologicals and useful basic research tools. Single small doses of rhabdovirus DNA constructs provide extremely strong protection against severe viral challenge under a variety of conditions. DNA vaccines for several other important fish viruses, bacteria, and parasites are under investigation, but they have not yet shown high efficacy. Therefore, current research is focussed on mechanistic studies to understand the basis of protection, and on improvement of the nucleic acid vaccine applications against a wider range of fish pathogens.

  12. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses. PMID:25270431

  13. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  14. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  15. Vaccination with DNA Encoding Truncated Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) Factor for Adherence-1 Gene (efa-1′) Confers Protective Immunity to Mice Infected with E. coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme-Neira, Roberto; Rivera, Alejandra; Sáez, Darwin; Fernández, Pablo; Osorio, Gonzalo; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan C.; Vidal, Roberto M.; Oñate, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is the predominant causative agent of hemorrhagic colitis in humans and is the cause of haemolytic uraemic syndrome and other illnesses. Cattle have been implicated as the main reservoir of this organism. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding conserved sequences of truncated EHEC factor for adherence-1 (efa-1′) in a mouse model. Intranasal administration of plasmid DNA carrying the efa-1′ gene (pVAXefa-1′) into C57BL/6 mice elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses. In animals immunized with pVAXefa-1′, EHEC-secreted protein-specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in sera at day 45. Anti-EHEC-secreted protein sIgA was also detected in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavages. In addition, antigen-specific T-cell-proliferation, IL-10, and IFN-γ were observed upon re-stimulation with either heat-killed bacteria or EHEC-secreted proteins. Vaccinated animals were also protected against challenge with E. coli O157:H7 strain EDL933. These results suggest that DNA vaccine encoding efa-1′ have therapeutic potential in interventions against EHEC infections. This approach could lead to a new strategy in the production of vaccines that prevent infections in cattle. PMID:26835434

  16. Vaccination with DNA Encoding Truncated Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) Factor for Adherence-1 Gene (efa-1') Confers Protective Immunity to Mice Infected with E. coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Riquelme-Neira, Roberto; Rivera, Alejandra; Sáez, Darwin; Fernández, Pablo; Osorio, Gonzalo; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan C; Vidal, Roberto M; Oñate, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is the predominant causative agent of hemorrhagic colitis in humans and is the cause of haemolytic uraemic syndrome and other illnesses. Cattle have been implicated as the main reservoir of this organism. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding conserved sequences of truncated EHEC factor for adherence-1 (efa-1') in a mouse model. Intranasal administration of plasmid DNA carrying the efa-1' gene (pVAXefa-1') into C57BL/6 mice elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses. In animals immunized with pVAXefa-1', EHEC-secreted protein-specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in sera at day 45. Anti-EHEC-secreted protein sIgA was also detected in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavages. In addition, antigen-specific T-cell-proliferation, IL-10, and IFN-γ were observed upon re-stimulation with either heat-killed bacteria or EHEC-secreted proteins. Vaccinated animals were also protected against challenge with E. coli O157:H7 strain EDL933. These results suggest that DNA vaccine encoding efa-1' have therapeutic potential in interventions against EHEC infections. This approach could lead to a new strategy in the production of vaccines that prevent infections in cattle. PMID:26835434

  17. SIV DNA vaccine trial in macaques: post-challenge necropsy in vaccine and control groups.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Manson, K; Wyand, M; Robinson, H L

    1997-06-01

    In this study we describe the histopathologic findings from nine macaques in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine trial evaluating the ability of a 5-plasmid DNA vaccine to protect against an uncloned SIVmac251 challenge (Lu et al., J. Virol. 1996, 70, 3978-3991). Three vaccinated and one control macaque developed disease and were euthanized in the first year following challenge. The other four vaccinated and one control macaque remained clinically normal and were euthanized at the end of the trial (60 weeks post-challenge). The necropsy data revealed that both diseased and clinically normal macaques had developed typical SIV-related lymphoid changes, inflammatory disorders and opportunistic infections. All animals had variable degrees of follicular and/or paracortical lymphoid hyperplasia suggesting immune activation. All but one vaccinated macaque and both control macaques had SIV-associated opportunistic infections. Within the small groups of animals, the ability to contain opportunistic infections was superior, and the overall lymphoid changes less severe, in the macaques that had received vaccine DNAs by three routes of inoculation (intravenous, intramuscular and gene gun) than in those that had received control DNAs or vaccine DNAs by gene gun only. In the future it will be important to further test how the route and method of DNA inoculation impact the efficacy of immunodeficiency virus vaccines. PMID:9234548

  18. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  19. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. PMID:25102364

  20. A single dose of a DNA vaccine encoding apa coencapsulated with 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate in microspheres confers long-term protection against tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-primed mice.

    PubMed

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C C; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon; Horn, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB. PMID:23740922

  1. Polymer multilayer tattooing for enhanced DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, Peter C.; Min, Younjin; Huang, Bonnie; Kramer, Joshua A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Barouch, Dan H.; Hammond, Paula T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccines have many potential benefits but have failed to generate robust immune responses in humans. Recently, methods such as in vivo electroporation have demonstrated improved performance, but an optimal strategy for safe, reproducible, and pain-free DNA vaccination remains elusive. Here we report an approach for rapid implantation of vaccine-loaded polymer films carrying DNA, immune-stimulatory RNA, and biodegradable polycations into the immune-cell-rich epidermis, using microneedles coated with releasable polyelectrolyte multilayers. Films transferred into the skin following brief microneedle application promoted local transfection and controlled the persistence of DNA and adjuvants in the skin from days to weeks, with kinetics determined by the film composition. These ‘multilayer tattoo’ DNA vaccines induced immune responses against a model HIV antigen comparable to electroporation in mice, enhanced memory T-cell generation, and elicited 140-fold higher gene expression in non-human primate skin than intradermal DNA injection, indicating the potential of this strategy for enhancing DNA vaccination.

  2. Laboratory and field evaluation of Schistosoma japonicum DNA vaccines in sheep and water buffalo in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, F; Zhang, Y; Ye, P; Lin, J; Cai, Y; Shen, W; Bickle, Q D; Taylor, M G

    2001-11-12

    Vaccines are needed to control zoonotic Schistosoma japonicum infection and several vaccine candidates have now been identified. Two of these (Sj28GST and Sj23) have shown particular promise in sheep when injected with Freund's adjuvants. The objective of the present work was to find a vaccine formulation which may have potential for widespread use in the field. DNA vaccine formulations of these antigens were produced and tested first in sheep under laboratory conditions and then in both the laboratory and the field in water buffalo. In both host species partial protection as evidenced by a reduction in parasite counts in vaccinated compared with control animals was induced by both vaccines, and in water buffalo the vaccines were shown to be partially protective in the field as well as in the laboratory. These results suggest that the two DNA vaccines tested here may have potential for large-scale field use. PMID:11672910

  3. Protection against multiple influenza A subtypes by vaccination with highly conserved nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Suzanne L; Kong, Wing-pui; Misplon, Julia A; Lo, Chia-Yun; Tumpey, Terrence M; Xu, Ling; Nabel, Gary J

    2005-11-16

    Influenza epidemic and pandemic strains cannot be predicted with certainty. Current vaccines elicit antibodies effective against specific strains, but new strategies are urgently needed for protection against unexpected strains. DNA vaccines encoding conserved antigens protect animals against diverse subtypes, but their potency needs improvement. We tested DNA prime-recombinant adenoviral boost immunization to nucleoprotein (NP). Strong antibody and T cell responses were induced. Protection against challenge was T cell-dependent and substantially more potent than DNA vaccination alone. Importantly, vaccination protected against lethal challenge with highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. Thus, gene-based vaccination with NP may contribute to protective immunity against diverse influenza viruses through its ability to stimulate cellular immunity. PMID:16011865

  4. DNA vaccines for cervical cancer: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Monie, Archana; Alvarez, Ronald D; Wu, T-C

    2007-12-31

    More than 99% of cervical cancers have been associated with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), particularly HPV type 16. The clear association between HPV infection and cervical cancer indicates that HPV serves as an ideal target for development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines. Although the recently licensed preventive HPV vaccine, Gardasil, has been shown to be safe and capable of generating significant protection against specific HPV types, it does not have therapeutic effect against established HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. Two HPV oncogenic proteins, E6 and E7, are consistently co-expressed in HPV-expressing cervical cancers and are important in the induction and maintenance of cellular transformation. Therefore, immunotherapy targeting E6 and/or E7 proteins may provide an opportunity to prevent and treat HPV-associated cervical malignancies. It has been established that T cell-mediated immunity is one of the most crucial components to defend against HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. Therefore, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines should generate strong E6/E7-specific T cell-mediated immune responses. DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive approach for antigen-specific T cell-mediated immunotherapy to combat cancers. Intradermal administration of DNA vaccines via a gene gun represents an efficient way to deliver DNA vaccines into professional antigen-presenting cells in vivo. Professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, are the most effective cells for priming antigen-specific T cells. Using the gene gun delivery system, we tested several DNA vaccines that employ intracellular targeting strategies for enhancing MHC class I and class II presentation of encoded model antigen HPV-16 E7. Furthermore, we have developed a strategy to prolong the life of DCs to enhance DNA vaccine potency. More recently, we have developed a strategy to generate antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell immune responses to further enhance DNA vaccine

  5. Multivalent Human Papillomavirus L1 DNA Vaccination Utilizing Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kihyuck; Jiang, Rosie; Jagu, Subhashini; Wang, Joshua W.; Wang, Chenguang; Christensen, Neil D.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Naked DNA vaccines can be manufactured simply and are stable at ambient temperature, but require improved delivery technologies to boost immunogenicity. Here we explore in vivo electroporation for multivalent codon-optimized human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 and L2 DNA vaccination. Methods Balb/c mice were vaccinated three times at two week intervals with a fusion protein comprising L2 residues ∼11−88 of 8 different HPV types (11−88×8) or its DNA expression vector, DNA constructs expressing L1 only or L1+L2 of a single HPV type, or as a mixture of several high-risk HPV types and administered utilizing electroporation, i.m. injection or gene gun. Serum was collected two weeks and 3 months after the last vaccination. Sera from immunized mice were tested for in-vitro neutralization titer, and protective efficacy upon passive transfer to naive mice and vaginal HPV challenge. Heterotypic interactions between L1 proteins of HPV6, HPV16 and HPV18 in 293TT cells were tested by co-precipitation using type-specific monoclonal antibodies. Results Electroporation with L2 multimer DNA did not elicit detectable antibody titer, whereas DNA expressing L1 or L1+L2 induced L1-specific, type-restricted neutralizing antibodies, with titers approaching those induced by Gardasil. Co-expression of L2 neither augmented L1-specific responses nor induced L2-specific antibodies. Delivery of HPV L1 DNA via in vivo electroporation produces a stronger antibody response compared to i.m. injection or i.d. ballistic delivery via gene gun. Reduced neutralizing antibody titers were observed for certain types when vaccinating with a mixture of L1 (or L1+L2) vectors of multiple HPV types, likely resulting from heterotypic L1 interactions observed in co-immunoprecipitation studies. High titers were restored by vaccinating with individual constructs at different sites, or partially recovered by co-expression of L2, such that durable protective antibody titers were achieved for each type

  6. DNA vaccination in skin enhanced by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines are a next generation branch of vaccines which offer major benefits over their conventional counterparts. However, to be effective in large mammals and humans, an enhancing delivery technology is required. Electroporation is a physical technique which results in improved delivery of large molecules through the cell membrane. In the case of plasmid DNA, electroporation enhances both the uptake and expression of the delivered DNA. The skin is an attractive tissue for DNA vaccination in a clinical setting due to the accessibility of the target, the ease of monitoring, and most importantly the immunocompetent nature of the dermis. Electroporation in the skin has the benefit of being minimally invasive and generally well tolerated. Previous studies have determined that optimized electroporation parameters (such as electrical field intensity, pulse length, pulse width, and plasmid formulation) majorly impact the efficiency of DNA delivery to the skin. We provide an overview of DNA vaccination in skin and muscle. In addition, we detail a protocol for the successful intradermal electroporation of plasmid DNA to guinea pig skin, an excellent dermatological animal model. The work detailed here suggests that the technique is safe and effective and could be highly applicable to a clinical setting. PMID:24715285

  7. Mucosal DNA vaccination with highly attenuated Shigella is superior to attenuated Salmonella and comparable to intramuscular DNA vaccination for T cells against HIV.

    PubMed

    Vecino, William H; Morin, Paul M; Agha, Rabia; Jacobs, William R; Fennelly, Glenn J

    2002-07-01

    An immunization strategy using attenuated bacteria to deliver DNA vaccine plasmids to mucosal sites may induce protective T cell responses against sexual HIV transmission. In a murine intranasal (i.n.) immunization model, we demonstrate that transiently persistent Deltaasd Shigella flexneri strain 15D harboring DNA vaccines induces HIV- and SIV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) producing CD8+ T cells among splenocytes more efficiently than either a longer persisting DeltaaroD Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207 or transiently persistent S. typhi strain Ty21a harboring DNA vaccines. Also, the frequency of antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) producing cells induced by Shigella 15D harboring a DNA vaccine were comparable to that induced by intramuscular (i.m.) immunization with purified DNA vaccine. Moreover, the magnitude of mucosal and systemic antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses after immunization were dependent upon the route (i.m. vs. i.n.) of inoculation, with i.n. Shigella 15D DNA vaccines generating higher levels of HIV-specific IgA in vaginal washings than i.m. purified DNA vaccine. Deltaasd S. flexneri is a promising vector for mucosal DNA vaccine immunization against HIV. PMID:12036602

  8. Use of S-[2,3-Bispalmitoyiloxy-(2R)-Propyl]-R-Cysteinyl-Amido-Monomethoxy Polyethylene Glycol as an Adjuvant Improved Protective Immunity Associated with a DNA Vaccine Encoding Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase of Brucella abortus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Retamal-Díaz, Angello; Riquelme-Neira, Roberto; Sáez, Darwin; Rivera, Alejandra; Fernández, Pablo; Cabrera, Alex; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) using the Toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist S-[2,3-bispalmitoyiloxy-(2R)-propyl]-R-cysteinyl-amido-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (BPPcysMPEG) as an adjuvant. Intranasal coadministration of BPPcysMPEG with a plasmid carrying the SOD-encoding gene (pcDNA-SOD) into BALB/c mice elicited antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Humoral responses were characterized by the stimulation of IgG2a and IgG1 and by the presence of SOD-specific secretory IgA in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Furthermore, T-cell proliferative responses and increased production of gamma interferon were also observed upon splenocyte restimulation with recombinant SOD. Cytotoxic responses were also stimulated, as demonstrated by the lysis of RB51-SOD-infected J774.A1 macrophages by cells recovered from immunized mice. The pcDNA-SOD/BPPcysMPEG formulation induced improved protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 in BALB/c mice over that provided by pcDNA-SOD, suggesting the potential of this vaccination strategy against Brucella infection. PMID:25165025

  9. Bench-to-bedside review: Vaccine protection strategies during pandemic flu outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective means for the prevention of influenza, including pandemic strains. An ideal pandemic influenza vaccine should provide effective protection with the fewest number of doses in the shortest amount of time, and among the greatest proportion of the population. The current manufacturing processes required for embryonated chicken-egg-based influenza vaccines are limited in their ability to respond to pandemic situations - these limitations include problems with surge capacity, the need for egg-adapted strains, the possibility of contamination, and the presence of trace egg protein. Several vaccine strategies to circumvent the deficiencies intrinsic to an egg-based influenza vaccine are in various phases of development. These include the use of cell-culture-based growth systems, concomitant use of adjuvants, whole virus vaccines, recombinant protein vaccines, plasmid DNA vaccines, virus-like particle vaccines, and universal flu vaccines. PMID:20497595

  10. Complete Protection of Mice against Lethal Murine Cytomegalovirus Challenge by Immunization with DNA Vaccines Encoding Envelope Glycoprotein Complex III Antigens gH, gL and gO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huadong; Huang, Chaoyang; Dong, Jinrong; Yao, Yanfeng; Xie, Zhenyuan; Liu, Xueying; Zhang, Wenjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus infects the majority of humanity which may lead to severe morbidity and mortality in newborns and immunocompromised adults. Humoral and cellular immunity are critical for controlling CMV infection. HCMV envelope glycoprotein complexes (gC I, II, III) represent major antigenic targets of antiviral immune responses. The gCIII complex is comprised of three glycoproteins, gH, gL, and gO. In the present study, DNA vaccines expressing the murine cytomegalovirus homologs of the gH, gL, and gO proteins were evaluated for protection against lethal MCMV infection in the mouse model. The results demonstrated that gH, gL, or gO single gene immunization could not yet offer good protection, whereas co-vaccination strategy apparently showed effects superior to separate immunization. Twice immunization with gH/gL/gO pDNAs could provide mice complete protection against lethal salivary gland-derived MCMV (SG-MCMV) challenge, while thrice immunization with pgH/pgL, pgH/pgO or pgL/pgO could not provide full protection. Co-vaccination with gH, gL and gO pDNAs elicited robust neutralizing antibody and cellular immune responses. Moreover, full protection was also achieved by simply passive immunization with anti-gH/gL/gO sera. These data demonstrated that gCIII complex antigens had fine immunogenicity and might be a promising candidate for the development of HCMV vaccines. PMID:25803721

  11. Protective efficacy of multiple vaccine platforms against Zika virus challenge in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Abbink, Peter; Larocca, Rafael A; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Bricault, Christine A; Moseley, Edward T; Boyd, Michael; Kirilova, Marinela; Li, Zhenfeng; Ng'ang'a, David; Nanayakkara, Ovini; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Borducchi, Erica N; Agarwal, Arshi; Brinkman, Amanda L; Cabral, Crystal; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Jimenez, Jessica; Lee, Benjamin C; Mojta, Shanell; Molloy, Katherine; Shetty, Mayuri; Neubauer, George H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Misamore, Johnathan; Finneyfrock, Brad; Lewis, Mark G; Alter, Galit; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for a major ongoing epidemic in the Americas and has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly. The development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is therefore an urgent global health priority. Here we demonstrate that three different vaccine platforms protect against ZIKV challenge in rhesus monkeys. A purified inactivated virus vaccine induced ZIKV-specific neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV strains from both Brazil and Puerto Rico. Purified immunoglobulin from vaccinated monkeys also conferred passive protection in adoptive transfer studies. A plasmid DNA vaccine and a single-shot recombinant rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 vector vaccine, both expressing ZIKV premembrane and envelope, also elicited neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV challenge. These data support the rapid clinical development of ZIKV vaccines for humans. PMID:27492477

  12. Molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun; Ge, Qing; Ting, David; Nguyen, David; Shen, Hui-Rong; Chen, Jianzhu; Eisen, Herman N.; Heller, Jorge; Langer, Robert; Putnam, David

    2004-03-01

    Genetic vaccination using plasmid DNA presents a unique opportunity for achieving potent immune responses without the potential limitations of many conventional vaccines. Here we report the design of synthetic biodegradable polymers specifically for enhancing DNA vaccine efficacy in vivo. We molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres that are non-toxic to cells, protect DNA from degradation, enable uptake by antigen-presenting cells, and release DNA rapidly in response to phagosomal pH. One type of microsphere of poly(ortho esters) that releases DNA vaccines in synchrony with the natural development of adaptive immunity, elicited distinct primary and secondary humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and suppressed the growth of tumour cells bearing a model antigen. This polymer microparticulate system could, with further study, have implications for advancing the clinical utility of DNA vaccines as well as other nucleic-acid-based therapeutics against viral infections and cancer.

  13. Trial watch: DNA vaccines for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner's work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23734328

  14. Mucosal immunization with high-mobility group box 1 in chitosan enhances DNA vaccine-induced protection against coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maowei; Yue, Yan; Dong, Chunsheng; Li, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wei; Xiong, Sidong

    2013-11-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a small single-stranded RNA virus, belongs to the Picornaviridae family. Its infection is the most common cause of myocarditis, with no vaccine available. Gastrointestinal mucosa is the major entry port for CVB3; therefore, the induction of local immunity in mucosal tissues may help control initial viral infections and alleviate subsequent myocardial injury. Here we evaluated the ability of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) encapsulated in chitosan particles to enhance the mucosal immune responses induced by the CVB3-specific mucosal DNA vaccine chitosan-pVP1. Mice were intranasally coimmunized with 4 doses of chitosan-pHMGB1 and chitosan-pVP1 plasmids, at 2-week intervals, and were challenged with CVB3 4 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with chitosan-pVP1 immunization alone, coimmunization with chitosan-pHMGB1 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced CVB3-specific fecal secretory IgA levels and promoted mucosal T cell immune responses. In accordance, reduced severity of myocarditis was observed in coimmunized mice, as evidenced by significantly (P < 0.05) reduced viral loads, decreased myocardial injury, and increased survival rates. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that HMGB1 enhanced dendritic cell (DC) recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes and promoted DC maturation, which might partly account for its mucosal adjuvant effect. This strategy may represent a promising approach to candidate vaccines against CVB3-induced myocarditis. PMID:24027262

  15. Induction of Neutralization Antibodies in Mice by Dengue-2 Envelope DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    PÉREZ-VÉLEZ, MARIEL E.; GARCÍA-NIEVES, TERESITA; COLÓN-SÁNCHEZ, CANDIMAR; MARTÍNEZ, IDALÍ

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue (DEN) viruses have become a public health problem that affects approximately 100 million people worldwide each year. Prevention measures rely on vector control programs, which are inefficient. Therefore, a vaccine is urgently needed. Methods The main goal of our laboratory is to develop an efficient tetravalent DEN DNA vaccine. In this study, we constructed four DEN-2 DNA vaccines expressing prM/env genes, using the homologous leader sequence (VecD2, VRD2E) or the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) secretory signal (VecD2tpa, VRD2tpa). In vitro expression was tested by transient transfections and Western blot. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the vaccine candidates was evaluated in BALB/c mice, using intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) vaccination routes. Results Envelope (E) protein expression was detected in transfected COS-7 or 293T cells. We found statistical differences in the antibody responses induced by these vaccine candidates. In addition, the strongest antibody responses and protection were observed when the vaccines were delivered intramuscularly. Moreover, the tPA leader sequence did not significantly improve the vaccine immunogenicity since VecD2 and VecD2tpa induced similar antibody responses. Conclusions We demonstrated that most of our DNA vaccine candidates could induce antibody responses and partial protection against DEN-2 virus in mice. These results provide valuable information for the design and construction of a tetravalent DEN DNA vaccine. PMID:19715116

  16. Protective Immunity and Vaccination Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no universally acceptable, safe, and effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not completely understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory) immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing safe, effective, and universally acceptable vaccine against the disease. Here we review the literature on the correlate of protective anti-Leishmania immunity and vaccination strategies against leishmaniasis with a bias emphasis on experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:22661975

  17. Increased immunogenicity of avian influenza DNA vaccine delivered to the skin using a microneedle patch

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Song, Jae-Min; Lipatov, Aleksandr S.; Choi, Seong-O; Lee, Jeong Woo; Donis, Ruben O.; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Effective public health responses to an influenza pandemic require an effective vaccine that can be manufactured and administered to large populations in the shortest possible time. In this study, we evaluated a method for vaccination against avian influenza virus that uses a DNA vaccine for rapid manufacturing and delivered by a microneedle skin patch for simplified administration and increased immunogenicity. We prepared patches containing 700 µm-long microneedles coated with an avian H5 influenza hemagglutinin DNA vaccine from A/Viet Nam/1203/04 influenza virus. The coating DNA dose increased with DNA concentration in the coating solution and the number of dip coating cycles. Coated DNA was released into the skin tissue by dissolution within minutes. Vaccination of mice using microneedles induced higher levels of antibody responses and hemagglutination inhibition titers, and improved protection against lethal infection with avian influenza as compared to conventional intramuscular delivery of the same dose of the DNA vaccine. Additional analysis showed that the microneedle coating solution containing carboxymethylcellulose and a surfactant may have negatively affected the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine. Overall, this study shows that DNA vaccine delivery by microneedles can be a promising approach for improved vaccination to mitigate an influenza pandemic. PMID:22504442

  18. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund's incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD(4+) and CD(8+) T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund's adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  19. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  20. DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis: a promising approach for prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Samant, M

    2016-05-01

    The visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani parasite severely affects large populations in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The arsenal of drugs available is limited, and resistance is common in clinical field isolates. Therefore, vaccines could be an important alternative for prevention against VL. Recently, some investigators advocated the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines, which induces the T cell-based immunity against VL. The vaccine antigens are selected as conserved in various Leishmania species and provide a viable strategy for DNA vaccine development. Our understanding for DNA vaccine development against VL is not enough and much technological advancement is required. Improved formulations and methods of delivery are required, which increase the uptake of DNA vaccine by cells; optimization of vaccine vectors/encoded antigens to augment and direct the host immune response in VL. Despite the many genes identified as vaccine candidates, the disappointing potency of the DNA vaccines in VL underscores the challenges encountered in the efforts to translate efficacy in preclinical models into clinical realities. This review will provide a brief background of DNA vaccines including the insights gained about the design, strategy, safety issues, varied candidates, progress and challenges that play a role in their ability against VL. PMID:27009772

  1. Differential genetic variation of chickens and MD vaccine protective efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine protective efficacy is determined by multiple factors including host genetics, the type of vaccine, vaccine dosage, the virulence and dose of challenging viruses, and the interval between vaccination and viral challenge. Studies on human immune responses to vaccinations suggest host genetic...

  2. DNA/Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Nanospheres Promote Low-dose DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Dorian; Barteau, Benoît; Cany, Jeannette; Richard, Peggy; Gourden, Clothilde; Conchon, Sophie; Pitard, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) DNA vaccination induces strong cellular immune responses in the mouse, but only at DNA doses that cannot be achieved in humans. Because antigen expression is weak after naked DNA injection, we screened five nonionic block copolymers of poly(ethyleneoxide)-poly(propyleneoxide) (PEO-PPO) for their ability to enhance DNA vaccination using a β-galactosidase (βGal) encoding plasmid, pCMV-βGal, as immunogen. At a high DNA dose, formulation with the tetrafunctional block copolymers 304 (molecular weight [MW] 1,650) and 704 (MW 5,500) and the triblock copolymer Lutrol (MW 8,600) increased βGal-specific interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) responses 2–2.5-fold. More importantly, 704 allowed significant reductions in the dose of antigen-encoding plasmid. A single injection of 2 µg pCMV-βGal with 704 gave humoral and ELISPOT responses equivalent to those obtained with 100 µg naked DNA and conferred protection in tumor vaccination models. However, 704 had no adjuvant properties for βGal protein, and immune responses were only elicited by low doses of pCMV-βGal formulated with 704 if noncoding carrier DNA was added to maintain total DNA dose at 20 µg. Overall, these results show that formulation with 704 and carrier DNA can reduce the dose of antigen-encoding plasmid by at least 50-fold. PMID:19417740

  3. Smallpox vaccines: targets of protective immunity

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Summary The eradication of smallpox, one of the great triumphs of medicine, was accomplished through the prophylactic administration of live vaccinia virus, a comparatively benign relative of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. Nevertheless, recent fears that variola virus may be used as a biological weapon together with the present susceptibility of unimmunized populations have spurred the development of new generation vaccines that are safer than the original and can be produced by modern methods. Predicting the efficacy of such vaccines in the absence of human smallpox, however, depends on understanding the correlates of protection. This review outlines the biology of poxviruses with particular relevance to vaccine development, describes protein targets of humoral and cellular immunity, compares animal models of orthopoxvirus disease with human smallpox, and considers the status of second and third generation smallpox vaccines. PMID:21198662

  4. DNA vaccination of poultry: The current status in 2015.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Marine; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising alternative strategy for developing new human and animal vaccines. The massive efforts made these past 25 years to increase the immunizing potential of this kind of vaccine are still ongoing. A relatively small number of studies concerning poultry have been published. Even though there is a need for new poultry vaccines, five parameters must nevertheless be taken into account for their development: the vaccine has to be very effective, safe, inexpensive, suitable for mass vaccination and able to induce immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies (when appropriate). DNA vaccination should meet these requirements. This review describes studies in this field performed exclusively on birds (chickens, ducks and turkeys). No evaluations of avian DNA vaccine efficacy performed on mice as preliminary tests have been taken into consideration. The review first describes the state of the art for DNA vaccination in poultry: pathogens targeted, plasmids used and different routes of vaccine administration. Second, it presents strategies designed to improve DNA vaccine efficacy: influence of the route of administration, plasmid dose and age of birds on their first inoculation; increasing plasmid uptake by host cells; addition of immunomodulators; optimization of plasmid backbones and codon usage; association of vaccine antigens and finally, heterologous prime-boost regimens. The final part will indicate additional properties of DNA vaccines in poultry: fate of the plasmids upon inoculation, immunological considerations and the use of DNA vaccines for purposes other than preventing infectious diseases. PMID:26620840

  5. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  6. Construction, purification, and evaluation of multivalent DNA vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu; Liu, Hai-Feng; Lu, Ming-Bo; Long, Quan-Ke; Shi, You-En; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    DNA vaccine encoding a multivalent antigen is a novel approach of protective immunization. Four Schistosoma japonicum candidate antigen genes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SjGAPDH), 23 kDa transmembrane protein (Sj23), 14 kDa fatty-acid binding protein (SjFABP) and 26 kDa glutathione-S-transferase (Sj26), are recombined into two pieces of fusion genes SjFABP.Sj23 and Sj26.SjGAPDH, respectively. Tetravalent DNA vaccine pVIVO2-SjFABP.Sj23/Sj26.SjGAPDH is constructed by co-expressing these two fusion genes. The super-coiled DNA vaccines for large-scale clinic application were purified by sequential chromatographies including group separation chromatography and affinitive chromatographies. The purified DNA vaccines were evaluated for in vivo and in vitro transfection assay. The immunoprotective properties of the different kinds of constructed DNA vaccines were appraised by pharmacological trials. The pharmacological trials results showed that tetravalent DNA vaccine has higher protective efficiency than other tested DNA vaccines. PMID:20852891

  7. Preparation, characterization, and in ovo vaccination of dextran-spermine nanoparticle DNA vaccine coexpressing the fusion and hemagglutinin genes against Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Webster, Thomas J; Ideris, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines have emerged as effective subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA vaccine, namely plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F, was applied in ovo against Newcastle disease (ND). Vaccination was carried out using the DNA vaccine alone or as a mixture of the pDNA and dextran-spermine (D-SPM), a nanoparticle used for pDNA delivery. The results showed that in ovo vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone induced high levels of antibody titer (P<0.05) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens at 3 and 4 weeks postvaccination compared to 2 weeks postvaccination. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer was not significantly different between groups injected with 40 μg pDNA + 64 μg D-SPM and 40 μg pDNA at 4 weeks postvaccination (P>0.05). Higher antibody titer was observed in the group immunized with 40 μg pDNA/egg at 4 weeks postvaccination. The findings also showed that vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone was able to confer protection against Newcastle disease virus strain NDIBS002 in two out of seven SPF chickens. Although the chickens produced antibody titers 3 weeks after in ovo vaccination, it was not sufficient to provide complete protection to the chickens from lethal viral challenge. In addition, vaccination with pDNA/D-SPM complex did not induce high antibody titer when compared with naked pDNA. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA vaccination with plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F can be suitable for in ovo application against ND, whereas D-SPM is not recommended for in ovo gene delivery. PMID:26834470

  8. Preparation, characterization, and in ovo vaccination of dextran-spermine nanoparticle DNA vaccine coexpressing the fusion and hemagglutinin genes against Newcastle disease

    PubMed Central

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Webster, Thomas J; Ideris, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines have emerged as effective subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA vaccine, namely plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F, was applied in ovo against Newcastle disease (ND). Vaccination was carried out using the DNA vaccine alone or as a mixture of the pDNA and dextran-spermine (D-SPM), a nanoparticle used for pDNA delivery. The results showed that in ovo vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone induced high levels of antibody titer (P<0.05) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens at 3 and 4 weeks postvaccination compared to 2 weeks postvaccination. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer was not significantly different between groups injected with 40 μg pDNA + 64 μg D-SPM and 40 μg pDNA at 4 weeks postvaccination (P>0.05). Higher antibody titer was observed in the group immunized with 40 μg pDNA/egg at 4 weeks postvaccination. The findings also showed that vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone was able to confer protection against Newcastle disease virus strain NDIBS002 in two out of seven SPF chickens. Although the chickens produced antibody titers 3 weeks after in ovo vaccination, it was not sufficient to provide complete protection to the chickens from lethal viral challenge. In addition, vaccination with pDNA/D-SPM complex did not induce high antibody titer when compared with naked pDNA. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA vaccination with plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F can be suitable for in ovo application against ND, whereas D-SPM is not recommended for in ovo gene delivery. PMID:26834470

  9. Perforin and gamma interferon expression are required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-dependent protective immunity against a human parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, elicited by heterologous plasmid DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Persechini, Pedro M; Haolla, Filipe A; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-10-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8(+) T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-gamma in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-gamma-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-gamma in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  10. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure. PMID:23171359

  11. Matrix protein 2 vaccination and protection against influenza viruses, including subtype H5N1.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Stephen Mark; Zhao, Zi-Shan; Lo, Chia-Yun; Misplon, Julia A; Liu, Teresa; Ye, Zhiping; Hogan, Robert J; Wu, Zhengqi; Benton, Kimberly A; Tumpey, Terrence M; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2007-03-01

    Changes in influenza viruses require regular reformulation of strain-specific influenza vaccines. Vaccines based on conserved antigens provide broader protection. Influenza matrix protein 2 (M2) is highly conserved across influenza A subtypes. To evaluate its efficacy as a vaccine candidate, we vaccinated mice with M2 peptide of a widely shared consensus sequence. This vaccination induced antibodies that cross-reacted with divergent M2 peptide from an H5N1 subtype. A DNA vaccine expressing full-length consensus-sequence M2 (M2-DNA) induced M2-specific antibody responses and protected against challenge with lethal influenza. Mice primed with M2-DNA and then boosted with recombinant adenovirus expressing M2 (M2-Ad) had enhanced antibody responses that crossreacted with human and avian M2 sequences and produced T-cell responses. This M2 prime-boost vaccination conferred broad protection against challenge with lethal influenza A, including an H5N1 strain. Vaccination with M2, with key sequences represented, may provide broad protection against influenza A. PMID:17552096

  12. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satparkash; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Sandey, Maninder; Ranjan, Rajeev; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-04-01

    Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS), an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA) has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS. PMID:24031690

  13. Cripto-1 vaccination elicits protective immunity against metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, M. A.; Witt, K.; Galvez-Cancino, F.; Sette, A.; Lundqvist, A.; Lladser, A.; Kiessling, R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metastatic melanoma is a fatal disease that responds poorly to classical treatments but can be targeted by T cell-based immunotherapy. Cancer vaccines have the potential to generate long-lasting cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses able to eradicate established and disseminated tumors. Vaccination against antigens expressed by tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential represents a highly attractive strategy to efficiently target deadly metastatic disease. Cripto-1 is frequently over-expressed in human carcinomas and melanomas, but is expressed only at low levels on normal differentiated tissues. Cripto-1 is particularly upregulated in cancer-initiating cells and is involved in cellular processes such as cell migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition, which are hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells able to initiate metastatic disease. Here, we explored the potential of Cripto-1 vaccination to target metastatic melanoma in a preclinical model. Cripto-1 was overexpressed in highly metastatic B16F10 cells as compared to poorly metastatic B16F1 cells. Moreover, B16F10 cells grown in sphere conditions to enrich for cancer stem cells (CSC) progressively upregulated cripto1 expression. Vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with a DNA vaccine encoding mouse Cripto-1 elicited a readily detectable/strong cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response specific for a H-2 Kb-restricted epitope identified based on its ability to bind H-2b molecules. Remarkably, Cripto-1 vaccination elicited a protective response against lung metastasis and subcutaneous challenges with highly metastatic B16F10 melanoma cells. Our data indicate that vaccination against Cripto-1 represents a novel strategy to be tested in the clinic.

  14. Development of a Salmonella cross-protective vaccine for food animal production systems.

    PubMed

    Heithoff, Douglas M; House, John K; Thomson, Peter C; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is associated with increased Salmonella exposure, transmission, animal disease, and contamination of food and water supplies. Modified live Salmonella enterica vaccines that lack a functional DNA adenine methylase (Dam) confer cross-protection to a diversity of salmonellae in experimental models of murine, avian, ovine, and bovine models of salmonellosis. However, the commercial success of any vaccine is dependent upon the therapeutic index, the ratio of safety/efficacy. Herein, secondary virulence-attenuating mutations targeted to genes involved in intracellular and/or systemic survival were introduced into Salmonella dam vaccines to screen for vaccine candidates that were safe in the animal and the environment, while maintaining the capacity to confer cross-protective immunity to pathogenic salmonellae serotypes. Salmonella dam mgtC, dam sifA, and dam spvB vaccine strains exhibited significantly improved vaccine safety as evidenced by the failure to give rise to virulent revertants during the infective process, contrary to the parental Salmonella dam vaccine. Further, these vaccines exhibited a low grade persistence in host tissues that was associated with reduced vaccine shedding, reduced environmental persistence, and induction of cross-protective immunity to pathogenic serotypes derived from infected livestock. These data indicate that Salmonella dam double mutant vaccines are suitable for commercial applications against salmonellosis in livestock production systems. Reducing pre-harvest salmonellae load through vaccination will promote the health and productivity of livestock and reduce contamination of livestock-derived food products, while enhancing overall food safety. PMID:25448106

  15. Towards a metalloprotease-DNA vaccine against piscine cryptobiosis caused by Cryptobia salmositica.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chung-Wei; Jesudhasan, Palmy; Woo, Patrick T K

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine protease is a metabolic enzyme, whereas metalloprotease is the virulent factor in cryptobiosis caused by Cryptobia salmositica. Recombinant DNA vaccines were produced with the insertion of either the metalloprotease or cysteine protease gene of C. salmositica into plasmid vectors (pEGFP-N). As expected, fishes (Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo salar) injected intramuscularly with the metalloprotease-DNA (MP-DNA) vaccine (50 microg/fish) were consistently more anemic (lower packed cell volume, PCV) than controls (injected only with the plasmid) at 3-5 weeks post-inoculation. Also, there were no difference in PCV between fish injected with the cysteine-DNA plasmids and the controls. In addition, agglutinating antibodies against Cryptobia were detected only in the blood of MP-DNA-vaccinated fish at 5-7 weeks post-vaccination and not in cysteine-DNA plasmids and the control groups. MP-DNA-vaccinated fish when challenged with the pathogen had consistently lower parasitemia, delayed peak parasitemia, and faster recovery compared with the controls. All fish vaccinated with attenuated strain were protected when challenged with the pathogen; this positive control group confirmed that the two vaccines operate through different mechanisms. PMID:17932691

  16. Turning self-destructing Salmonella into a universal DNA vaccine delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei; Brovold, Matthew; Koeneman, Brian A.; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine; Curtiss, Roy

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed a biological containment system using recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium strains that are attenuated yet capable of synthesizing protective antigens. The regulated delayed attenuation and programmed self-destructing features designed into these S. Typhimurium strains enable them to efficiently colonize host tissues and allow release of the bacterial cell contents after lysis. To turn such a recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strain into a universal DNA vaccine-delivery vehicle, our approach was to genetically modify RASV strains to display a hyperinvasive phenotype to maximize Salmonella host entry and host cell internalization, to enable Salmonella endosomal escape to release a DNA vaccine into the cytosol, and to decrease Salmonella-induced pyroptosis/apoptosis that allows the DNA vaccine time to traffic to the nucleus for efficient synthesis of encoded protective antigens. A DNA vaccine vector that encodes a domain that contributes to the arabinose-regulated lysis phenotype but has a eukaryotic promoter was constructed. The vector was then improved by insertion of multiple DNA nuclear-targeting sequences for efficient nuclear trafficking and gene expression, and by increasing nuclease resistance to protect the plasmid from host degradation. A DNA vaccine encoding influenza WSN virus HA antigen delivered by the RASV strain with the best genetic attributes induced complete protection to mice against a lethal influenza virus challenge. Adoption of these technological improvements will revolutionize means for effective delivery of DNA vaccines to stimulate mucosal, systemic, and cellular protective immunities, and lead to a paradigm shift in cost-effective control and prevention of a diversity of diseases. PMID:23129620

  17. Induction of immune responses and protection in mice against rabies using a self-replicating RNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonal; Sonwane, Arvind A; Dahiya, Shyam S; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Saini, Mohini; Rai, A; Gupta, Praveen K

    2009-04-14

    A self-replicating RNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein gene was developed utilizing sindbis virus RNA replicon. The in vitro transcribed RNA (Sin-Rab-G RNA) was transfected in mammalian cells and analysed for self-replication and expression of rabies glycoprotein. To generate immune responses against rabies, mice were immunized with 10microg of Sin-Rab-G RNA and immune responses developed were compared with mice immunized with rabies DNA vaccine and commercial cell culture vaccine (Rabipur). The self-replicating rabies RNA vaccine generated cellular and humoral IgG responses similar to rabies DNA vaccine. On challenge with rabies virus CVS strain, rabies RNA vaccine conferred protection similar to rabies DNA vaccine. These results demonstrated that replicon-based self-replicating rabies RNA vaccine with 10microg dose was effective in inducing immune responses and protection similar to rabies DNA vaccine. PMID:19081687

  18. Safety and efficacy of DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Stenler, Sofia; Blomberg, Pontus; Smith, CI Edvard

    2014-01-01

    While DNA vaccination using plasmid vectors is highly attractive, there is a need for further vector optimization regarding safety, stability, and efficiency. In this commentary, we review the minicircle vector (MC), which is an entity devoid of plasmid bacterial sequences, as an alternative to the traditional plasmid construct. The commentary highlights the recent discovery by Stenler et al. (2014) that the small size of an MC enables improved resistance to the shearing forces associated with e.g. pneumatic delivery methods. This observation may have implications for the regulatory agencies’ requirement of plasmid integrity and quality. PMID:24553064

  19. Clinical experience with a recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Andre, F E

    1988-09-01

    The clinical testing of EngerixR-B, the hepatitis B vaccine produced by SmithKline Biologicals using recombinant DNA technology, started in February 1984. Since extensive pre-clinical laboratory work had established that the polypeptide (HBsAg) expressed in genetically engineered yeast cells was after purification--physically, chemically and antigenically similar to the viral surface antigen particles found in the blood of chronic carriers, the aims of the clinical trials were to compare the safety, reactogenicity, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast-derived (YDV) and plasma-derived (PDV) vaccines. By September 1987, 89 studies had been initiated involving a total of 10,545 subjects aged from birth to 82 years. This extensive experience has established that the risk of hypersensitivity to yeast-derived contaminants is negligible since no hypersensitivity reaction has been observed in any vaccinee, the incidence and severity of local reactions have not increased after repeated inoculations and no anti-yeast antibodies were produced by vaccination. Reactogenicity has been comparable to that of PDV's consisting essentially of transient mild irritation at the site of injection presumably caused by the aluminium hydroxide used as adjuvant. The anti-HBs responses to YDV and PDV's were quantitatively (seroconversion rates, peak antibody levels and persistence) as well as qualitatively (epitope specificity and affinity) similar. The expected protective effect of the immune response to the vaccine was confirmed in a challenge study in chimpanzees and in vaccinated human populations (male homosexuals, institutionalized mentally retarded patients, neonates of carrier women) with historically a high infection rate. PMID:2464196

  20. c-DNA vaccination against parasitic infections: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2001-09-12

    Recently developed technology for DNA vaccination appears to offer the good prospect for the development of a multivalent vaccines that will effectively activate both the humoral and cell mediated mechanisms of the immune system. Currently, DNA vaccination against such important parasitic diseases like malaria, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, schistosomosis, fasciolosis offers several new opportunities. However, the outcome of vaccination depends very much on vaccine formulations, dose and route of vaccine delivery, and the species and even strain of the vaccinated host. To overcome these problems much research is still needed, specifically focused on cloning and testing of new c-DNA sequences in the following: genome projects: different ways of delivery: design of vectors containing appropriate immunostimulatory sequences and very detailed studies on safety. PMID:11522401

  1. Canine distemper virus DNA vaccination of mink can overcome interference by maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Pertoldi, Cino; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2015-03-10

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is highly contagious and can cause severe disease against which conventional live vaccines are ineffective in the presence of maternal antibodies. Vaccination in the presences of maternal antibodies was challenged by vaccination of 5 days old and 3 weeks old mink kits with CDV DNA vaccines. Virus neutralising (VN) antibody responses were induced in mink kits vaccinated with a plasmid encoding the haemaglutinin protein (H) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-H) or a combination of the H, fusion (F) and nucleoprotein (N) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-HFN). These DNA vaccinated kits were protected against virulent experimental infection with field strains of CDV. The pCDV-H was more efficient in inducing protective immunity in the presence of maternal antibodies compared to the pCDV-HFN. The results show that DNA vaccination with the pCDV-H or pCDV-HFN (n=4) only given once at 5 days of age induces virus specific immune response in neonatal mink and protection against virulent CDV exposure later in life. PMID:25637861

  2. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  3. DNA vaccine containing the mycobacterial hsp65 gene prevented insulitis in MLD-STZ diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rubens R; Sartori, Alexandrina; Lima, Deison S; Souza, Patrícia RM; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete AM; Bonato, Vânia LD; Silva, Célio L

    2009-01-01

    Background Our group previously demonstrated that a DNA plasmid encoding the mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (DNA-HSP65) displayed prophylactic and therapeutic effect in a mice model for tuberculosis. This protection was attributed to induction of a strong cellular immunity against HSP65. As specific immunity to HSP60 family has been detected in arthritis, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, the vaccination procedure with DNA-HSP65 could induce a cross-reactive immune response that could trigger or worsen these autoimmune diseases. Methods In this investigation was evaluated the effect of a previous vaccination with DNA-HSP65 on diabetes development induced by Streptozotocin (STZ). C57BL/6 mice received three vaccine doses or the corresponding empty vector and were then injected with multiple low doses of STZ. Results DNA-HSP65 vaccination protected mice from STZ induced insulitis and this was associated with higher production of IL-10 in spleen and also in the islets. This protective effect was also concomitant with the appearance of a regulatory cell population in the spleen and a decreased infiltration of the islets by T CD8+ lymphocytes. The vector (DNAv) also determined immunomodulation but its protective effect against insulitis was very discrete. Conclusion The data presented in this study encourages a further investigation in the regulatory potential of the DNA-HSP65 construct. Our findings have important implications for the development of new immune therapy strategies to combat autoimmune diseases. PMID:19754943

  4. Molecular and immunological characterisation of recombinant Brucella abortus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase, a T- and B-cell reactive protein that induces partial protection when co-administered with an interleukin-12-expressing plasmid in a DNA vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Rosinha, Gracia M S; Myioshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Splitter, Gary A; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2002-08-01

    To identify antigens of Brucella spp. that are potentially involved in stimulating a protective T-cell-mediated immune response, previous studies identified 10 clones from a Brucella abortus 2308 genomic library with primed lymphocytes as probes. One selected positive clone (182) contained an insert of 1.2 kb which was identified, sequenced and characterised. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame (ORF) revealed 82% and 81% identity to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) enzymes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Xanthobacter flavus, respectively. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the gap gene is present in only one copy in the Brucella genome. B. abortus GAPDH was then expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). To demonstrate the functional activity of Brucella GAPDH, E. coli gap mutants were transformed with a Brucella pMAL-gap construct. Genetic complementation was achieved and as a result E. coli mutants were able to grow on glucose or other carbon source medium. The humoral and cellular immune responses to the recombinant (r) GAPDH were characterised. In Western blots, sera from naturally infected cattle and sheep showed antibody reactivity against rGAPDH. In response to in-vitro stimulation by rGAPDH, splenocytes from mice vaccinated with rGAPDH or B. abortus S19 were able to produce gamma-interferon and tumour necrosis factor-a but not interleukin (IL)-4. Furthermore, gap associated with murine IL-12 gene in a DNA vaccine formulation partially protected mice against experimental infection. PMID:12171297

  5. Enhancement of the immunogenicity of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus DNA vaccine by a bicistronic plasmid encoding glycoprotein B and interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Zhao, Li; Wei, Zhan-Yong; Cui, Bao-An; Wang, Zhen-Ya; Li, Xin-Sheng; Xia, Ping-An; Liu, Jin-Peng

    2010-08-01

    A DNA vaccine against infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) can induce specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, compared to conventional vaccines, DNA vaccines usually induce poor antibody responses. To determine if co-expression of a cytokine can result in a more potent ILTV DNA vaccine, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a monocistronic vector encoding the glycoprotein B (gB) of ILTV was compared to that of a bicistronic vector separately encoding the gB and chicken interleukin-18. Humoral and cellular responses induced by the DNA vaccines administered to the quadriceps muscle of chickens were evaluated. There were significant differences in antibody levels elicited by either monocistronic or bicistronic DNA vaccines as determined by ELISA. The percentages of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) subgroups of peripheral blood T-lymphocytes in chickens immunized with the bicistronic DNA vaccine were higher than those in chickens immunized with monocistronic DNA vaccine. When chickens were challenged with a virulent CG strain of ILTV, the protective efficacy was enhanced significantly after immunization with the bicistronic DNA vaccine. These results demonstrated that co-expression of an adjuvant cytokine from a bicistronic DNA vaccine may be an effective approach to increasing ILTV DNA vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:20553764

  6. Virus neutralizing antibody response in mice and dogs with a bicistronic DNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein and canine parvovirus VP2.

    PubMed

    Patial, Sonika; Chaturvedi, V K; Rai, A; Saini, M; Chandra, Rajesh; Saini, Y; Gupta, Praveen K

    2007-05-16

    A bicistronic DNA vaccine against rabies and parvovirus infection of dogs was developed by subcloning rabies glycoprotein and canine parvovirus (CPV) VP2 genes into a bicistronic vector. After characterizing the expression of both the proteins in vitro, the bicistronic DNA vaccine was injected in mice and induced immune response was compared with monocistronic DNA vaccines. There was no significant difference in ELISA and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody responses against rabies and CPV in mice immunized with either bicistronic or monocistronic DNA vaccine. Further, there was significantly similar protection in mice immunized with either bicistronic or monocistronic rabies DNA vaccine on rabies virus challenge. Similarly, dogs immunized with monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccines developed comparable VN antibodies against rabies and CPV. This study indicated that bicistronic DNA vaccine can be used in dogs to induce virus neutralizing immune responses against both rabies and CPV. PMID:17391817

  7. Vector Design for Improved DNA Vaccine Efficacy, Safety and Production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a disruptive technology that offers the promise of a new rapidly deployed vaccination platform to treat human and animal disease with gene-based materials. Innovations such as electroporation, needle free jet delivery and lipid-based carriers increase transgene expression and immunogenicity through more effective gene delivery. This review summarizes complementary vector design innovations that, when combined with leading delivery platforms, further enhance DNA vaccine performance. These next generation vectors also address potential safety issues such as antibiotic selection, and increase plasmid manufacturing quality and yield in exemplary fermentation production processes. Application of optimized constructs in combination with improved delivery platforms tangibly improves the prospect of successful application of DNA vaccination as prophylactic vaccines for diverse human infectious disease targets or as therapeutic vaccines for cancer and allergy. PMID:26344110

  8. Optimization of a Der p 2-based prophylactic DNA vaccine against house dust mite allergy.

    PubMed

    Pulsawat, Pinya; Pitakpolrat, Patrawadee; Prompetchara, Eakachai; Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Hannaman, Drew; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Jacquet, Alain

    2013-03-01

    DNA vaccines encoding allergens are promising immunotherapeutics to prevent or to treat allergy through induction of allergen-specific Th1 responses. Despite anti-allergy effects observed in small rodents, DNA-based vaccines are weak immunogens in primates and humans and particularly when administered by conventional injection. The goal of the present study was to improve the immunogenicity of a prophylactic vaccine encoding the major house dust mite allergen Der p 2. In this context, we evaluated the influence of different DNA backbones including notably intron and CpG enriched sequence, the DNA dose, the in vivo delivery by electroporation as well as the heterologous prime boost regimen on the vaccine efficiency. We found that a minimal allergen expression level threshold must be reached to induce the production of specific antibodies but beyond this limit, the intensity of the immune response was independent on the DNA dose and allergen expression. The in vivo DNA delivery by electroporation drastically enhanced the production of specific antibodies but not the IFNg secretion. Vaccination of naïve mice with DNA encoding Der p 2 delivered by electroporation even at very low dose (2μg) prevented the development of house dust mite allergy through Th1-skewed immune response characterized by the drastic reduction of allergen-specific IgE, IL-5 and lung inflammation together with the induction of strong specific IgG2a titers and IFNg secretion. CpG cassette in the DNA backbone does not play a critical role in the efficient prophylaxis. Finally, comparable protective immune responses were observed when using heterologous DNA prime/protein boost or homologous DNA prime/boost. Taken together, these data suggest that the potent Th1 response induced by DNA-based vaccine encoding allergens through electroporation provides the rationale for the evaluation of DNA encoding Der p 2 into HDM allergy clinical trials. PMID:23396105

  9. Optimization of Electroporation-Enhanced Intradermal Delivery of DNA Vaccine Using a Minimally Invasive Surface Device

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M.; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P.; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S.; Broderick, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10–100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10–100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular

  10. Optimization of electroporation-enhanced intradermal delivery of DNA vaccine using a minimally invasive surface device.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-06-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10-100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10-100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular and humoral immune

  11. Mucosal co-immunization with AIM2 enhances protective SIgA response and increases prophylactic efficacy of chitosan-DNA vaccine against coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Dafei; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection is considered as the most common cause of viral myocarditis with no available vaccine. Considering that CVB3 mainly invades through the gastrointestinal mucosa, the development of CVB3-specific mucosal vaccine, which is the most efficient way to induce mucosal immune responses, gains more and more attention. In this study, we used absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) as a mucosal adjuvant to enhance the immunogenicity and immunoprotection of CVB3-specific chitosan-pVP1 vaccine. Mice were intranasally co-immunized with 50 μg chitosan-pAIM2 and equal amount of chitosan-pVP1 vaccine 4 times at 2 week-intervals, and then challenged with CVB3 2 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with chitosan-pVP1 vaccine immunization alone, chitosan-pAIM2 co-immunization enhanced resistance to CVB3-induced myocarditis evidenced by significantly enhanced ejection fractions from 55.40 ± 9.35 to 80.31 ± 11.35, improved myocarditis scores from 1.50 ± 0.45 to 0.30 ± 0.15, reduced viral load from 3.33 ± 0.50 to 0.50 ± 0.65, and increased survival rate from 40.0% to 75.5%. This increased immunoprotection might be attributed to the augmented level of CVB3-specific fecal SIgA with high affinity and neutralizing ability. In addition, co-immunization with chitosan-pAIM2 remarkably facilitated dendritic cells (DCs) recruitment to mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and promoted the expression of IgA-inducing factors (BAFF, APRIL, iNOS, RALDH1, IL-6, TGF-β), which might account for its mucosal adjuvant effect. This strategy may represent a promising prophylactic vaccine against CVB3-induced myocarditis. PMID:24614684

  12. Hepatitis B vaccines: protective efficacy and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Michel, M-L; Tiollais, P

    2010-08-01

    Worldwide, two billion people have at some time been infected by hepatitis B virus, 370 millions suffer from chronic infection and around one million die each year from HBV-related liver diseases of which liver cancer is the ultimate stage. Vaccination is the measure that is most effective in reducing the global incidence of hepatitis B and hepatitis B vaccines have now been available for over 20 years. The first hepatitis B vaccine was prepared from inactivated hepatitis B surface antigen particles purified from plasma of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Knowledge of the structure and genomic organization of hepatitis B virus has led to development of the first DNA recombinant vaccine. In preventing hepatocellular carcinoma development, hepatitis B virus vaccines are considered as the first available cancer vaccine. HBV vaccines have recently taken on a new role as therapeutic vaccines as an attempt to cure or to control hepatitis B virus infection in persistently infected individuals. PMID:20382485

  13. West Nile virus seroconversion in penguins after vaccination with a killed virus vaccine or a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michelle R; Langan, Jennifer N; Johnson, Yvette J; Ritchie, Branson W; Van Bonn, William

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the serologic response of penguins to West Nile virus (WNV) vaccines, four species of exclusively indoor-housed penguins, negative for WNV by serology, were evaluated: Humboldt (Spheniscus humboldti), Magellanic (Spheniscus magellanicus), Gentoo (Pygoscelis papua), and Rockhopper (Eudyptes chrysoscome) penguins. Birds were inoculated with either a killed virus vaccine or a plasmid-mediated DNA WNV vaccine, and postinoculation serology was evaluated. Both vaccines induced seroconversion in all four species, and no adverse reactions were noted. Postvaccination serology results varied across species and vaccine types. However, in all four species, the killed virus vaccine resulted in a greater seroconversion rate than the DNA vaccine and in a significantly shorter time period. Additionally, the duration of the seropositive titer was significantly longer in those birds vaccinated with the killed virus vaccine compared with those vaccinated with the DNA vaccine. A subset of unvaccinated penguins serving as negative controls remained negative throughout the duration of the study despite the presence of WNV in the geographic locations of the study, suggesting that indoor housing may minimize exposure to the virus and may be an additional means of preventing WNV infection in penguins. PMID:19110700

  14. Correlates of protective immunity following whole sporozoite vaccination against malaria.

    PubMed

    Doll, Katherine L; Harty, John T

    2014-08-01

    Human infection with Plasmodium parasites remains a serious global health crisis, leading to more than 600,000 deaths annually. Currently, no licensed vaccine is available to alleviate this malaria disease burden and vaccination with the most advanced antimalarial vaccine candidate, RTS,S, provides limited protection that wanes over time. To date, the only vaccination strategy capable of inducing complete, long-lasting protection in human subjects is administration of attenuated whole sporozoites. Several approaches for vaccination with attenuated whole sporozoites have been clinically tested in humans and include vaccination with radiation or genetically attenuated sporozoites or with virulent sporozoites concurrent with administration of antimalarial drug cover. Rodent studies with these three attenuated whole sporozoite vaccination (WSV) approaches provide insights into the immune correlates of vaccine-induced protection. The majority of these studies have identified a critical role for liver-stage parasite-directed CD8 T cells in providing protection with possible contributions from Plasmodium-specific CD4 T cells or antibodies. Together, rodent and human vaccination studies with attenuated WSV may lead to an understanding of the correlates of protective immunity against malarial disease, and the development of new, highly efficacious vaccines. PMID:24825778

  15. B cells Can Modulate the CD8 Memory T Cell after DNA Vaccination Against Experimental Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although B cells are important as antigen presenting cells (APC) during the immune response, their role in DNA vaccination models is unknown. Methods In this study in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of B cells to protect mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Results In vitro and in vivo studies showed that B cells efficiently present antigens after naked plasmid pcDNA3 encoding M. leprae 65-kDa heat shock protein (pcDNA3-Hsp65) internalization and protect B knock-out (BKO) mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. pcDNA3-Hsp65-transfected B cells adoptively transferred into BKO mice rescued the memory phenotypes and reduced the number of CFU compared to wild-type mice. Conclusions These data not only suggest that B cells play an important role in the induction of CD8 T cells but also that they improve bacterial clearance in DNA vaccine model. PMID:21401938

  16. Applications of nanoparticles for DNA based rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Ali A; Khan, Sajid Umar; Ali, Zeeshan; Yang, Haowen; Liu, Keke; Mao, Lanlan

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal encephalomyelitis. Most cases occur in developing countries and are transmitted by dogs. The cell culture vaccines as associated with high cost; therefore, have not replaced the unsafe brain-derived vaccines. In the developing countries these brain-derived rabies vaccines still can be seen in action. Moreover, there will be a need for vaccines against rabies-related viruses against which classical vaccines are not always effective. The worldwide incidence of rabies and the inability of currently used vaccination strategies to provide highly potent and cost-effective therapy indicate the need for alternate control strategies. DNA vaccines have emerged as the safest vaccines and best remedy for complicated diseases like hepatitis, HIV, and rabies. A number of recombinant DNA vaccines are now being developed against several diseases such as AIDS and malaria. Therefore, it can be a valuable alternative for the production of cheaper rabies vaccines against its larger spectrum of viruses. In this review we report published data on DNA-based immunization with sequences encoding rabies with special reference to nanotechnology. PMID:24730305

  17. Approved but non-funded vaccines: accessing individual protection.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, David W; Ward, Brian J; Halperin, Scott A; McNeil, Shelly A; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Bjornson, Gordean

    2014-02-01

    Funded immunization programs are best able to achieve high participation rates, optimal protection of the target population, and indirect protection of others. However, in many countries public funding of approved vaccines can be substantially delayed, limited to a portion of the at-risk population or denied altogether. In these situations, unfunded vaccines are often inaccessible to individuals at risk, allowing potentially avoidable morbidity and mortality to continue to occur. We contend that private access to approved but unfunded vaccines should be reconsidered and encouraged, with recognition that individuals have a prerogative to take advantage of a vaccine of potential benefit to them whether it is publicly funded or not. Moreover, numbers of "approved but unfunded" vaccines are likely to grow because governments will not be able to fund all future vaccines of potential benefit to some citizens. New strategies are needed to better use unfunded vaccines even though the net benefits will fall short of those of funded programs. Canada, after recent delays funding several new vaccine programs, has developed means to encourage private vaccine use. Physicians are required to inform relevant patients about risks and benefits of all recommended vaccines, publicly funded or not. Likewise, some provincial public health departments now recommend and promote both funded and unfunded vaccines. Pharmacists are key players in making unfunded vaccines locally available. Professional organizations are contributing to public and provider education about unfunded vaccines (e.g. herpes zoster, not funded in any province). Vaccine companies are gaining expertise with direct-to-consumer advertising. However, major challenges remain, such as making unfunded vaccines more available to low-income families and overcoming public expectations that all vaccines will be provided cost-free, when many other recommended personal preventive measures are user-pay. The greatest need is to

  18. Avian Influenza Vaccine Technologies and Laboratory Methods for Assessing Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines can be used in avian influenza (AI) control programs to prevent, manage or eradicate AI from poultry and other birds. The best protection is produced from the humoral response against the hemagglutinin (HA) protein and such protection is HA subtype specific. A variety of vaccines have been ...

  19. A DIVA vaccine for cross-protection against Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., a leading cause of human bacterial foodborne disease. Vaccination against Salmonella is effective for protection of animal health and enhancement of food safety. However, current vaccines for swine may only offer limited cross-protection agai...

  20. Avian Influenza vaccine technologies and laboratory methods for assessing protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines can be used in avian influenza (AI) control programs to prevent, manage or eradicate AI from poultry and other birds. The best protection is produced from the humoral response against the hemagglutinin (HA) protein and such protection is HA subtype specific. A variety of vaccines have been ...

  1. Effect of sperm DNA vaccine on fertility of female mice.

    PubMed

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2006-07-01

    Our laboratory has identified a sperm-specific dodecamer peptide sequence, designated as YLP(12), vaccination with which causes a long-term reversible immunocontraceptive effect in female mice. In the present study, the effects of YLP(12) DNA vaccine were examined. YLP(12) 36 bp cDNA was cloned into pVAX1 vector to prepare the DNA vaccine. Two additional vaccine constructs were made by in frame cloning of one and two CpG repeats in the YLP(12)-cDNA vaccine. Five groups of female mice were immunized intradermally by using gene gun with YLP(12)-cDNA, YLP(12)-cDNA-CpG, YLP(12)-cDNA-CpG-CpG, YLP(12)-cDNA mixed with exogenous synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), or vector DNA alone, respectively. Vaccination with all three constructs and the YLP(12) vaccine mixed with exogenous ODN raised antibody response both in the sera as well as locally in the vaginal tract. There was no antibody response in the mice injected with the vector alone. In sera, the highest titers were obtained for the IgG class for all constructs and formulation followed by IgA class. In vaginal washings the highest titers were obtained for the IgA class followed by IgG class. Within the IgG class, the titers for the IgG2a subclass were significantly greater than the IgG1 subclass. Immunization with all constructs and formulation caused a significant (P < 0.05 to <0.001) reduction (20-43%) in fertility of female mice. The highest reductions were seen in mice immunized with YLP(12)-cDNA-CpG-CpG (two repeats) (43% reduction) and with the YLP(12) vaccine administered with exogenous CpG ODN (42% reduction). T lymphocytes obtained from DNA-vaccinated mice showed clearly distinguished comparative RT-PCR analysis of cytokine mRNA expression for Th1 and Th2 immune responses compared to T lymphocytes obtained from control animals injected with vector DNA. Expression of both Th1 cytokines (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) was enhanced after DNA vaccination as compared to controls, with

  2. DNA vaccines and their applications in veterinary practice: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dhama, K; Mahendran, Mahesh; Gupta, P K; Rai, A

    2008-06-01

    Inoculation of plasmid DNA, encoding an immunogenic protein gene of an infectious agent, stands out as a novel approach for developing new generation vaccines for prevention of infectious diseases of animals. The potential of DNA vaccines to act in presence of maternal antibodies, its stability and cost effectiveness and the non-requirement of cold chain have heightened the prospects. Even though great strides have been made in nucleic acid vaccination, still there are many areas that need further research for its wholesome practical implementation. Major areas of concern are vaccine delivery, designing of suitable vectors and cytotoxic T cell responses. Also, the induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines is inconclusive due to the lack of knowledge regarding the concentration of the protein expressed in vivo. Alternative delivery systems having higher transfection efficiency and the use of cytokines, as immunomodulators, needs to be further explored. Recently, efforts are being made to modulate and prolong the active life of dendritic cells, in order to make antigen presentation a more efficacious one. For combating diseases like acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), influenza, malaria and tuberculosis in humans; and foot and mouth disease, Aujesky's disease, swine fever, rabies, canine distemper and brucellosis in animals, DNA vaccine clinical trials are underway. This review highlights the salient features of DNA vaccines, and measures to enhance their efficacy so as to devise an effective and novel vaccination strategy against animal diseases. PMID:18425596

  3. Targeting Improves the Efficacy of a DNA Vaccine against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Paul J.; De Rose, Robert; Boyle, Jefferey S.; McWaters, Peter; Kelly, Julie; Tennent, Jan M.; Lew, Andrew M.; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y.

    1999-01-01

    A large-scale DNA vaccination trial was performed with sheep to investigate whether an antigen targeted by CTLA-4 enhanced and accelerated the humoral immune response. Vaccination with genetically detoxified phospholipase D (ΔPLD) has been shown to be effective, at least partially, against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the causal agent of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep. CTLA-4 binds to B7 on antigen-presenting cells and thus was used to direct the fusion antigens to sites of immune induction. Here we demonstrated that targeting ΔPLD as a CTLA-4 fusion protein significantly enhanced the speed, magnitude, and longevity of the antibody response compared to that obtained with DNA encoding ΔPLD. While all groups of sheep vaccinated with DNA encoding ΔPLD were afforded better protection against an experimental challenge with C. pseudotuberculosis than those immunized with an irrelevant plasmid or those left unimmunized, the best protection was provided by the targeted DNA vaccine. We propose that targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells offers a generic strategy for enhancing the efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10569760

  4. Comparison of vaccines for induction of heterosubtypic immunity to influenza A virus: cold-adapted vaccine versus DNA prime-adenovirus boost strategies.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chia-Yun; Wu, Zhengqi; Misplon, Julia A; Price, Graeme E; Pappas, Claudia; Kong, Wing-Pui; Tumpey, Terrence M; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2008-04-16

    Influenza epidemics or pandemics can arise for which strain- or subtype-matched vaccines are unavailable. Heterosubtypic immunity (Het-I) targeting conserved influenza A antigens could reduce morbidity and mortality during preparation of matched vaccines. Various vaccines inducing Het-I in animals have been studied separately using different viruses and conditions, but effectiveness for inducing Het-I has not been directly compared. The present studies compared immunization with cold-adapted (ca) viruses to DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus (rAd) boost vaccination to conserved antigens nucleoprotein (NP), matrix-2 (M2), or A/NP+M2. Both ca and DNA-rAd vaccinations induced antibody and T cell responses, and protected against lethal H1N1 challenge. Only A/NP+M2 DNA-rAd protected against challenge with highly pathogenic A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1); ca vaccine did not. Existing ca vaccines may provide some Het-I, but experimental vaccination focusing on conserved antigens was more effective in this model for protection against a divergent, highly pathogenic virus. PMID:18378366

  5. A comparison of DNA vaccines for the rabies-related virus, Mokola.

    PubMed

    Nel, L H; Niezgoda, M; Hanlon, C A; Morril, P A; Yager, P A; Rupprecht, C E

    2003-06-01

    Mokola virus, a rabies-related virus, has been reported to date from the African continent only. Like rabies virus, it is highly pathogenic, causes acute encephalitis, and zoonotic events have been documented. Although believed to be rare, there has been an unexplained increase in the number of isolations of the virus in South Africa in recent years. We have cloned and sequenced the glycoprotein (G) and nucleoprotein (N) genes from a South African Mokola virus, and used these in the construction of different DNA vaccines for immunization against Mokola virus. Four vaccines, utilizing different promoters and DNA backbone compositions, were generated and compared for efficacy in protection against Mokola virus. In one of these, both the Mokola virus G and N genes were co-expressed. Two of the single G-expressing DNA vaccines (based on pSG5 and pCI-neo, respectively) protected laboratory mice against lethal challenge, despite major differences in their promoters. However, neither vaccine was fully protective in a single immunization only. Serological assays confirmed titers of virus-neutralizing antibodies after immunization, which increased upon booster vaccine administration. A third construct (based on pBudCE4) was less effective in inducing a protective immune response, despite employing a strong CMV enhancer/promoter also used in the pCI-neo plasmid. Dual expression of Mokola virus G and N genes in pBudCE4 did not enhance its efficacy, under the conditions described. In addition, no significant utility could be demonstrated for a combined prime-boost approach, as no cross-protective immunity was observed against rabies or Mokola viruses from the use of pSG5-mokG or vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccines, respectively, even though both vaccines provided 60-100% protection against homologous virus challenge. PMID:12744896

  6. Novel Attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidates Elicit Protective Immunity in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Kakoulidou, Maria; Lulla, Aleksei; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Johansson, Daniel X.; Mutso, Margit; Lulla, Valeria; Fazakerley, John K.; Roques, Pierre; Le Grand, Roger; Merits, Andres; Liljeström, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused severe epidemics in Africa and Asia and occasionally in Europe. As of today, there is no licensed vaccine available to prevent CHIKV infection. Here we describe the development and evaluation of novel CHIKV vaccine candidates that were attenuated by deleting a large part of the gene encoding nsP3 or the entire gene encoding 6K and were administered as viral particles or infectious genomes launched by DNA. The resulting attenuated mutants were genetically stable and elicited high magnitudes of binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as strong T cell responses after a single immunization in C57BL/6 mice. Subsequent challenge with a high dose of CHIKV demonstrated that the induced antibody responses protected the animals from viremia and joint swelling. The protective antibody response was long-lived, and a second homologous immunization further enhanced immune responses. In summary, this report demonstrates a straightforward means of constructing stable and efficient attenuated CHIKV vaccine candidates that can be administered either as viral particles or as infectious genomes launched by DNA. IMPORTANCE Similar to other infectious diseases, the best means of preventing CHIKV infection would be by vaccination using an attenuated vaccine platform which preferably raises protective immunity after a single immunization. However, the attenuated CHIKV vaccine candidates developed to date rely on a small number of attenuating point mutations and are at risk of being unstable or even sensitive to reversion. We report here the construction and preclinical evaluation of novel CHIKV vaccine candidates that have been attenuated by introducing large deletions. The resulting mutants proved to be genetically stable, attenuated, highly immunogenic, and able to confer durable immunity after a single immunization. Moreover, these mutants can be administered either as viral particles or as

  7. Protective immunity following vaccination: how is it defined?

    PubMed

    Amanna, Ian J; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Slifka, Mark K

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination represents an important medical breakthrough pioneered by Edward Jenner over 200 years ago when he developed the world's first vaccine against smallpox. To this day, vaccination remains the most effective means available for combating infectious disease. There are currently over 20 vaccines licensed for use within the US with many more vaccines in the R&D pipeline. Although vaccines must demonstrate clinical efficacy in order to receive FDA approval, the correlates of immunity vary remarkably between different vaccines and may be based primarily on animal studies, clinical evidence, or a combination of these sources of information. Correlates of protection are critical for measuring vaccine efficacy but researchers should know the history and limitations of these values. As vaccine technologies advance, the way in which we measure and define protective correlates may need to evolve as well. Here, we describe the correlates of protective immunity for vaccines against smallpox, tetanus, yellow fever and measles and compare these to a more recently introduced vaccine against varicella zoster virus, wherein a strict correlate of immunity has yet to be fully defined. PMID:18398296

  8. Protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Sambhara, S; Li, C X; Ewasyshyn, M; Parrington, M; Caterini, J; James, O; Cates, G; Du, R P; Klein, M

    1998-08-17

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly and is a continuing challenge for vaccine development. A murine T helper cell (Th) type 2 response associates with enhanced lung pathology, which has been observed in past infant trials using formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. In this study, we have engineered an optimized plasmid DNA vector expressing the RSV fusion (F) protein (DNA-F). DNA-F was as effective as live RSV in mice at inducing neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, protection against infection, and high mRNA expression of lung interferon gamma after viral challenge. Furthermore, a DNA-F boost could switch a preestablished anti-RSV Th2 response towards a Th1 response. Critical elements for the optimization of the plasmid constructs included expression of a secretory form of the F protein and the presence of the rabbit beta-globin intron II sequence upstream of the F-encoding sequence. In addition, anti-F systemic immune response profile could be modulated by the route of DNA-F delivery: intramuscular immunization resulted in balanced responses, whereas intradermal immunization resulted in a Th2 type of response. Thus, DNA-F immunization may provide a novel and promising RSV vaccination strategy. PMID:9705950

  9. Sterile Protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in Rhesus Monkeys from a Malaria Vaccine: Comparison of Heterologous Prime Boost Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, George; Shi, Meng; Conteh, Solomon; Richie, Nancy; Banania, Glenna; Geneshan, Harini; Valencia, Anais; Singh, Priti; Aguiar, Joao; Limbach, Keith; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Rayner, Jonathan; Smith, Jonathan; Bruder, Joseph T.; King, C. Richter; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Takeo, Satoru; Endo, Yaeta; Doolan, Denise L.; Richie, Thomas L.; Weiss, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA), alphavirus replicons (VRP), attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad), or attenuated poxvirus (Pox). These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost. PMID:19668343

  10. Fish DNA vaccine against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: efficacy of various routes of immunization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, Serge; Kurath, Gael; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA vaccine, pIHNVw-G, contains the gene for the glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a major pathogen of salmon and trout. The relative efficacy of various routes of immunisation with pIHNVw-G was evaluated using 1.8 g rainbow trout fry vaccinated via intramuscular injection, scarification of the skin, intraperitoneal injection, intrabuccal administration, cutaneous particle bombardment using a gene gun, or immersion in water containing DNA vaccine-coated beads. Twenty-seven days after vaccination neutralising antibody titres were determined, and 2 days later groups of vaccinated and control unvaccinated fish were subjected to an IHNV immersion challenge. Results of the virus challenge showed that the intramuscular injection and the gene gun immunisation induced protective immunity in fry, while intraperitoneal injection provided partial protection. Neutralising antibodies were not detected in sera of vaccinated fish regardless of the route of immunisation used, suggesting that cell mediated immunity may be at least partially responsible for the observed protection.