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Sample records for dna-binding transcription factors

  1. Effects of nucleoside analog incorporation on DNA binding to the DNA binding domain of the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Omichinski, J G; Stahl, S; Maloney, D; West, J; Schweitzer, B I

    1999-02-01

    We investigate here the effects of the incorporation of the nucleoside analogs araC (1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine) and ganciclovir (9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl] guanine) into the DNA binding recognition sequence for the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor. A 10-fold decrease in binding affinity was observed for the ganciclovir-substituted DNA complex in comparison to an unmodified DNA of the same sequence composition. AraC substitution did not result in any changes in binding affinity. 1H-15N HSQC and NOESY NMR experiments revealed a number of chemical shift changes in both DNA and protein in the ganciclovir-modified DNA-protein complex when compared to the unmodified DNA-protein complex. These changes in chemical shift and binding affinity suggest a change in the binding mode of the complex when ganciclovir is incorporated into the GATA DNA binding site. PMID:10037146

  2. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Luis A; Vedenko, Anastasia; Kurland, Jesse V; Rogers, Julia M; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E; Bulyk, Martha L

    2016-03-25

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA binding activity and used universal protein-binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. PMID:27013732

  3. DNA-binding specificity changes in the evolution of forkhead transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, So; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Rogers, Julia M.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks entails the expansion and diversification of transcription factor (TF) families. The forkhead family of TFs, defined by a highly conserved winged helix DNA-binding domain (DBD), has diverged into dozens of subfamilies in animals, fungi, and related protists. We have used a combination of maximum-likelihood phylogenetic inference and independent, comprehensive functional assays of DNA-binding capacity to explore the evolution of DNA-binding specificity within the forkhead family. We present converging evidence that similar alternative sequence preferences have arisen repeatedly and independently in the course of forkhead evolution. The vast majority of DNA-binding specificity changes we observed are not explained by alterations in the known DNA-contacting amino acid residues conferring specificity for canonical forkhead binding sites. Intriguingly, we have found forkhead DBDs that retain the ability to bind very specifically to two completely distinct DNA sequence motifs. We propose an alternate specificity-determining mechanism whereby conformational rearrangements of the DBD broaden the spectrum of sequence motifs that a TF can recognize. DNA-binding bispecificity suggests a previously undescribed source of modularity and flexibility in gene regulation and may play an important role in the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:23836653

  4. High-resolution DNA-binding specificity analysis of yeast transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cong; Byers, Kelsey J.R.P.; McCord, Rachel Patton; Shi, Zhenwei; Berger, Michael F.; Newburger, Daniel E.; Saulrieta, Katrina; Smith, Zachary; Shah, Mita V.; Radhakrishnan, Mathangi; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Hu, Yanhui; De Masi, Federico; Pacek, Marcin; Rolfs, Andreas; Murthy, Tal; LaBaer, Joshua; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes through sequence-specific interactions with DNA-binding sites. However, despite recent progress in identifying in vivo TF binding sites by microarray readout of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip), nearly half of all known yeast TFs are of unknown DNA-binding specificities, and many additional predicted TFs remain uncharacterized. To address these gaps in our knowledge of yeast TFs and their cis regulatory sequences, we have determined high-resolution binding profiles for 89 known and predicted yeast TFs, over more than 2.3 million gapped and ungapped 8-bp sequences (“k-mers”). We report 50 new or significantly different direct DNA-binding site motifs for yeast DNA-binding proteins and motifs for eight proteins for which only a consensus sequence was previously known; in total, this corresponds to over a 50% increase in the number of yeast DNA-binding proteins with experimentally determined DNA-binding specificities. Among other novel regulators, we discovered proteins that bind the PAC (Polymerase A and C) motif (GATGAG) and regulate ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription and processing, core cellular processes that are constituent to ribosome biogenesis. In contrast to earlier data types, these comprehensive k-mer binding data permit us to consider the regulatory potential of genomic sequence at the individual word level. These k-mer data allowed us to reannotate in vivo TF binding targets as direct or indirect and to examine TFs' potential effects on gene expression in ∼1700 environmental and cellular conditions. These approaches could be adapted to identify TFs and cis regulatory elements in higher eukaryotes. PMID:19158363

  5. Quantification of transcription factor-DNA binding affinity in a living cell

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Sergey; Berg, Otto G.; Wrange, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR) to DNA was determined in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. The total nuclear receptor concentration was quantified as specifically retained [3H]-hormone in manually isolated oocyte nuclei. DNA was introduced by nuclear microinjection of single stranded phagemid DNA, chromatin is then formed during second strand synthesis. The fraction of DNA sites occupied by the expressed receptor was determined by dimethylsulphate in vivo footprinting and used for calculation of the receptor-DNA binding affinity. The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 enhanced the DNA binding by GR with an apparent Kd of ∼1 μM and dramatically stimulated DNA binding by AR with an apparent Kd of ∼0.13 μM at a composite androgen responsive DNA element containing one FoxA1 binding site and one palindromic hormone receptor binding site known to bind one receptor homodimer. FoxA1 exerted a weak constitutive- and strongly cooperative DNA binding together with AR but had a less prominent effect with GR, the difference reflecting the licensing function of FoxA1 at this androgen responsive DNA element. PMID:26657626

  6. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. PMID:27016204

  7. Engineering transcription factors with novel DNA-binding specificity using comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Tasha A.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Alm, Eric J.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2009-01-01

    The transcriptional program for a gene consists of the promoter necessary for recruiting RNA polymerase along with neighboring operator sites that bind different activators and repressors. From a synthetic biology perspective, if the DNA-binding specificity of these proteins can be changed, then they can be used to reprogram gene expression in cells. While many experimental methods exist for generating such specificity-altering mutations, few computational approaches are available, particularly in the case of bacterial transcription factors. In a previously published computational study of nitrogen oxide metabolism in bacteria, a small number of amino-acid residues were found to determine the specificity within the CRP (cAMP receptor protein)/FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulatory protein) family of transcription factors. By analyzing how these amino acids vary in different regulators, a simple relationship between the identity of these residues and their target DNA-binding sequence was constructed. In this article, we experimentally tested whether this relationship could be used to engineer novel DNA–protein interactions. Using Escherichia coli CRP as a template, we tested eight designs based on this relationship and found that four worked as predicted. Collectively, these results in this work demonstrate that comparative genomics can inform the design of bacterial transcription factors. PMID:19264798

  8. DNA-binding specificity of NGFI-A and related zinc finger transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Swirnoff, A H; Milbrandt, J

    1995-01-01

    NGFI-A is the prototypic member of a family of immediate-early gene-encoded transcription factors which includes NGFI-C, Egr3, and Krox20. These proteins possess highly homologous DNA-binding domains, composed of three Cys2-His2 zinc fingers, and all bind to and activate transcription from the sequence GCGGGGGCG. We used a PCR-mediated random site selection protocol to determine whether other sites could be bound by these proteins and the extent to which their binding site preferences are similar or different. The high-affinity consensus sites generated from the selection data are similar, and the combined consensus sequence is T-G-C-G-T/g-G/A-G-G-C/a/t-G-G/T (lowercase letters indicate bases selected less frequently). Using gel shift assays, we found that sequences that diverge from the consensus were bound by NGFI-A, confirming that there is greater variability in binding sites than has generally been acknowledged. We also provide evidence that protein-DNA interactions not noted, or whose importance was not apparent from the X-ray cocrystal structure of the NGFI-A zinc fingers complexed with DNA, contribute significantly to the binding energy of these proteins and confirm that an optimal site is at least 10 instead of 9 nucleotides in length. In contrast to the similarities in binding specificity among these proteins we found that while NGFI-A, Egr3, and Krox20 have comparable DNA binding affinities and kinetics of dissociation, the affinity of NGFI-C is more than threefold lower. This could result in differential regulation of target genes in cells where NGFI-C and the other proteins are coexpressed. Furthermore, we show that this affinity difference is a property not of the zinc fingers themselves but rather of the protein context of the DNA-binding domain. PMID:7891721

  9. Crystal Structure and DNA Binding of the Homeodomain of the Stem Cell Transcription Factor Nanog

    SciTech Connect

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C.; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.

    2010-02-08

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  10. Gene regulation knowledge commons: community action takes care of DNA binding transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Sushil; Vercruysse, Steven; Chawla, Konika; Christie, Karen R.; Blake, Judith A.; Huntley, Rachael P.; Orchard, Sandra; Hermjakob, Henning; Thommesen, Liv; Lægreid, Astrid; Kuiper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A large gap remains between the amount of knowledge in scientific literature and the fraction that gets curated into standardized databases, despite many curation initiatives. Yet the availability of comprehensive knowledge in databases is crucial for exploiting existing background knowledge, both for designing follow-up experiments and for interpreting new experimental data. Structured resources also underpin the computational integration and modeling of regulatory pathways, which further aids our understanding of regulatory dynamics. We argue how cooperation between the scientific community and professional curators can increase the capacity of capturing precise knowledge from literature. We demonstrate this with a project in which we mobilize biological domain experts who curate large amounts of DNA binding transcription factors, and show that they, although new to the field of curation, can make valuable contributions by harvesting reported knowledge from scientific papers. Such community curation can enhance the scientific epistemic process. Database URL: http://www.tfcheckpoint.org PMID:27270715

  11. Gene regulation knowledge commons: community action takes care of DNA binding transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sushil; Vercruysse, Steven; Chawla, Konika; Christie, Karen R; Blake, Judith A; Huntley, Rachael P; Orchard, Sandra; Hermjakob, Henning; Thommesen, Liv; Lægreid, Astrid; Kuiper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A large gap remains between the amount of knowledge in scientific literature and the fraction that gets curated into standardized databases, despite many curation initiatives. Yet the availability of comprehensive knowledge in databases is crucial for exploiting existing background knowledge, both for designing follow-up experiments and for interpreting new experimental data. Structured resources also underpin the computational integration and modeling of regulatory pathways, which further aids our understanding of regulatory dynamics. We argue how cooperation between the scientific community and professional curators can increase the capacity of capturing precise knowledge from literature. We demonstrate this with a project in which we mobilize biological domain experts who curate large amounts of DNA binding transcription factors, and show that they, although new to the field of curation, can make valuable contributions by harvesting reported knowledge from scientific papers. Such community curation can enhance the scientific epistemic process.Database URL: http://www.tfcheckpoint.org. PMID:27270715

  12. Widespread evidence of cooperative DNA binding by transcription factors in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Kazemian, Majid; Pham, Hannah; Wolfe, Scot A.; Brodsky, Michael H.; Sinha, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic gene transcription is often combinatorial in nature, with multiple transcription factors (TFs) regulating common target genes, often through direct or indirect mutual interactions. Many individual examples of cooperative binding by directly interacting TFs have been identified, but it remains unclear how pervasive this mechanism is during animal development. Cooperative TF binding should be manifest in genomic sequences as biased arrangements of TF-binding sites. Here, we explore the extent and diversity of such arrangements related to gene regulation during Drosophila embryogenesis. We used the DNA-binding specificities of 322 TFs along with chromatin accessibility information to identify enriched spacing and orientation patterns of TF-binding site pairs. We developed a new statistical approach for this task, specifically designed to accurately assess inter-site spacing biases while accounting for the phenomenon of homotypic site clustering commonly observed in developmental regulatory regions. We observed a large number of short-range distance preferences between TF-binding site pairs, including examples where the preference depends on the relative orientation of the binding sites. To test whether these binding site patterns reflect physical interactions between the corresponding TFs, we analyzed 27 TF pairs whose binding sites exhibited short distance preferences. In vitro protein–protein binding experiments revealed that >65% of these TF pairs can directly interact with each other. For five pairs, we further demonstrate that they bind cooperatively to DNA if both sites are present with the preferred spacing. This study demonstrates how DNA-binding motifs can be used to produce a comprehensive map of sequence signatures for different mechanisms of combinatorial TF action. PMID:23847101

  13. Transcription Factor Pip Can Enhance DNA Binding by E47, Leading to Transcriptional Synergy Involving Multiple Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nagulapalli, Sujatha; Atchison, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    The transcription factors E2A (E12/E47) and Pip are both required for normal B-cell development. Each protein binds to regulatory sequences within various immunoglobulin enhancer elements. Activity of E2A proteins can be regulated by interactions with other proteins which influence their DNA binding or activation potential. Similarly, Pip function can be influenced by interaction with the protein PU.1, which can recruit Pip to bind to DNA. We show here that a previously unidentified Pip binding site resides adjacent to the E2A binding site within the immunoglobulin κ 3′ enhancer. Both of these binding sites are crucial for high-level enhancer activity. We found that E47 and Pip can functionally interact to generate a very potent 100-fold transcriptional synergy. Through a series of mutagenesis experiments, we identified the Pip sequences necessary for transcriptional activation and for synergy with E47. Two synergy domains (residues 140 to 207 and 300 to 420) in addition to the Pip DNA binding domain (residues 1 to 134) are required for maximal synergy with E47. We also identified a Pip domain (residues 207 to 300) that appears to mask Pip transactivation potential. Part of the synergy mechanism between E47 and Pip appears to involve the ability of Pip to increase DNA binding by E47, perhaps by inducing a conformational change in the E47 protein. E47 may also induce a conformational change in Pip which unmasks sequences important for transcriptional activity. Based upon our results, we propose a model for E47-Pip transcriptional synergy. PMID:9671474

  14. Characterization of the DNA-binding properties of the Mohawk homeobox transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas M; George, Rajani; Noyes, Marcus B; Rowton, Megan; Liu, Wenjin; Jiang, Rulang; Wolfe, Scot A; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Rawls, Alan

    2012-10-12

    The homeobox transcription factor Mohawk (Mkx) is a potent transcriptional repressor expressed in the embryonic precursors of skeletal muscle, cartilage, and bone. MKX has recently been shown to be a critical regulator of musculoskeletal tissue differentiation and gene expression; however, the genetic pathways through which MKX functions and its DNA-binding properties are currently unknown. Using a modified bacterial one-hybrid site selection assay, we determined the core DNA-recognition motif of the mouse monomeric Mkx homeodomain to be A-C-A. Using cell-based assays, we have identified a minimal Mkx-responsive element (MRE) located within the Mkx promoter, which is composed of a highly conserved inverted repeat of the core Mkx recognition motif. Using the minimal MRE sequence, we have further identified conserved MREs within the locus of Sox6, a transcription factor that represses slow fiber gene expression during skeletal muscle differentiation. Real-time PCR and immunostaining of in vitro differentiated muscle satellite cells isolated from Mkx-null mice revealed an increase in the expression of Sox6 and down-regulation of slow fiber structural genes. Together, these data identify the unique DNA-recognition properties of MKX and reveal a novel role for Mkx in promoting slow fiber type specification during skeletal muscle differentiation. PMID:22923612

  15. Nε−Lysine Acetylation of a Bacterial Transcription Factor Inhibits Its DNA-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Sandy; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible Nε-lysine (Nε-Lys) acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of Nε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs). We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat). Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin)-like protein deacetylase (CobB) deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsBAc), demonstrating that Nε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsBAc and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible Nε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells. PMID:21217812

  16. Structural insights into the DNA-binding specificity of E2F family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Morgunova, Ekaterina; Yin, Yimeng; Jolma, Arttu; Dave, Kashyap; Schmierer, Bernhard; Popov, Alexander; Eremina, Nadejda; Nilsson, Lennart; Taipale, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cell cycle is controlled by the E2F family of transcription factors. Typical E2Fs bind to DNA as heterodimers with the related dimerization partner (DP) proteins, whereas the atypical E2Fs, E2F7 and E2F8 contain two DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and act as repressors. To understand the mechanism of repression, we have resolved the structure of E2F8 in complex with DNA at atomic resolution. We find that the first and second DBDs of E2F8 resemble the DBDs of typical E2F and DP proteins, respectively. Using molecular dynamics simulations, biochemical affinity measurements and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further show that both atypical and typical E2Fs bind to similar DNA sequences in vitro and in vivo. Our results represent the first crystal structure of an E2F protein with two DBDs, and reveal the mechanism by which atypical E2Fs can repress canonical E2F target genes and exert their negative influence on cell cycle progression. PMID:26632596

  17. Genomic repertoires of DNA-binding transcription factors across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Charoensawan, Varodom; Wilson, Derek; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) are important to genetic regulation in all organisms because they recognize and directly bind to regulatory regions on DNA. Here, we survey and summarize the TF resources available. We outline the organisms for which TF annotation is provided, and discuss the criteria and methods used to annotate TFs by different databases. By using genomic TF repertoires from ∼700 genomes across the tree of life, covering Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, we review TF abundance with respect to the number of genes, as well as their structural complexity in diverse lineages. While typical eukaryotic TFs are longer than the average eukaryotic proteins, the inverse is true for prokaryotes. Only in eukaryotes does the same family of DNA-binding domain (DBD) occur multiple times within one polypeptide chain. This potentially increases the length and diversity of DNA-recognition sequence by reusing DBDs from the same family. We examined the increase in TF abundance with the number of genes in genomes, using the largest set of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes to date. As pointed out before, prokaryotic TFs increase faster than linearly. We further observe a similar relationship in eukaryotic genomes with a slower increase in TFs. PMID:20675356

  18. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Newman, Joseph A.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K.; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40–200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. PMID:25866208

  19. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  20. Effect of DNA Binding on Geminate CO Recombination Kinetics in CO-sensing Transcription Factor CooA*

    PubMed Central

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas L.; Champion, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation activator (CooA) proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding in two CooA homologues, Rhodospirillum rubrum (RrCooA) and Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans (ChCooA). The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA-binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were specifically investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes take place on ultrafast time scales but remain non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the time scale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in the CooA proteins relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Comparison of the CO rebinding kinetics of RrCooA, truncated RrCooA, and DNA-bound RrCooA proteins reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA-binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases, and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted. The kinetic studies also offer insights into how the architecture of the heme environment can tune entropic barriers in order to control the geminate recombination of CO in heme proteins, whereas spin selection rules play a minor or non-existent role. PMID:22544803

  1. Effect of DNA binding on geminate CO recombination kinetics in CO-sensing transcription factor CooA.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas L; Champion, Paul M

    2012-06-22

    Carbon monoxide oxidation activator (CooA) proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding in two CooA homologues, Rhodospirillum rubrum (RrCooA) and Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans (ChCooA). The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA-binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were specifically investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes take place on ultrafast time scales but remain non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the time scale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in the CooA proteins relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Comparison of the CO rebinding kinetics of RrCooA, truncated RrCooA, and DNA-bound RrCooA proteins reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA-binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases, and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted. The kinetic studies also offer insights into how the architecture of the heme environment can tune entropic barriers in order to control the geminate recombination of CO in heme proteins, whereas spin selection rules play a minor or non-existent role. PMID:22544803

  2. Stk1-mediated phosphorylation stimulates the DNA-binding properties of the Staphylococcus aureus SpoVG transcriptional factor.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Markus; Brelle, Solène; Minatelli, Sabrina; Molle, Virginie

    2016-05-13

    The stage V sporulation protein G (SpoVG) homolog of Staphylococcus aureus is a modulator of virulence factor synthesis and antibiotic resistance in this clinically important gram-positive pathogen. Here we demonstrate that SpoVG can be phosphorylated by the staphylococcal Ser/Thr protein kinase Stk1 and that phosphorylation positively affects its DNA-binding properties. Mass spectrometric analyses and site directed mutagenesis identified Thr4, Thr13, Thr24 and Ser41 as phospho-acceptors. Stk1-mediated phosphorylation markedly enhanced the DNA binding activity of SpoVG towards the promoter regions of target genes such as capA, lip, and nuc1. Similarly, trans-complementation of the S. aureus ΔyabJ-spoVG mutant SM148 with a SpoVG derivative that mimics constitutive phosphorylation, SpoVG_Asp, exhibited capA, lip, and nuc1 transcript levels that were comparable to the levels seen with the wild-type, whereas trans-complementation with a phosphoablative variant of SpoVG (SpoVG_Ala) produced transcript levels similar to the ones seen in SM148. Our data suggest that the expression/activity of this transcription factor is tightly controlled in S. aureus by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. PMID:27091430

  3. Escherichia coli antitoxin MazE as transcription factor: insights into MazE-DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Zorzini, Valentina; Buts, Lieven; Schrank, Evelyne; Sterckx, Yann G.J.; Respondek, Michal; Engelberg-Kulka, Hanna; Loris, Remy; Zangger, Klaus; van Nuland, Nico A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are pairs of genes essential for bacterial regulation upon environmental stresses. The mazEF module encodes the MazF toxin and its cognate MazE antitoxin. The highly dynamic MazE possesses an N-terminal DNA binding domain through which it can negatively regulate its own promoter. Despite being one of the first TA systems studied, transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli mazEF remains poorly understood. This paper presents the solution structure of C-terminal truncated E. coli MazE and a MazE-DNA model with a DNA palindrome sequence ∼10 bp upstream of the mazEF promoter. The work has led to a transcription regulator-DNA model, which has remained elusive thus far in the E. coli toxin–antitoxin family. Multiple complementary techniques including NMR, SAXS and ITC show that the long intrinsically disordered C-termini in MazE, required for MazF neutralization, does not affect the interactions between the antitoxin and its operator. Rather, the MazE C-terminus plays an important role in the MazF binding, which was found to increase the MazE affinity for the palindromic single site operator. PMID:25564525

  4. Escherichia coli antitoxin MazE as transcription factor: insights into MazE-DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zorzini, Valentina; Buts, Lieven; Schrank, Evelyne; Sterckx, Yann G J; Respondek, Michal; Engelberg-Kulka, Hanna; Loris, Remy; Zangger, Klaus; van Nuland, Nico A J

    2015-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are pairs of genes essential for bacterial regulation upon environmental stresses. The mazEF module encodes the MazF toxin and its cognate MazE antitoxin. The highly dynamic MazE possesses an N-terminal DNA binding domain through which it can negatively regulate its own promoter. Despite being one of the first TA systems studied, transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli mazEF remains poorly understood. This paper presents the solution structure of C-terminal truncated E. coli MazE and a MazE-DNA model with a DNA palindrome sequence ∼ 10 bp upstream of the mazEF promoter. The work has led to a transcription regulator-DNA model, which has remained elusive thus far in the E. coli toxin-antitoxin family. Multiple complementary techniques including NMR, SAXS and ITC show that the long intrinsically disordered C-termini in MazE, required for MazF neutralization, does not affect the interactions between the antitoxin and its operator. Rather, the MazE C-terminus plays an important role in the MazF binding, which was found to increase the MazE affinity for the palindromic single site operator. PMID:25564525

  5. Phosphorylation Affects DNA-Binding of the Senescence-Regulating bZIP Transcription Factor GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Smykowski, Anja; Fischer, Stefan M.; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Massive changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana during onset and progression of leaf senescence imply a central role for transcription factors. While many transcription factors are themselves up- or down-regulated during senescence, the bZIP transcription factor G-box-binding factor 1 (GBF1/bZIP41) is constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis leaf tissue but at the same time triggers the onset of leaf senescence, suggesting posttranscriptional mechanisms for senescence-specific GBF1 activation. Here we show that GBF1 is phosphorylated by the threonine/serine CASEIN KINASE II (CKII) in vitro and that CKII phosphorylation had a negative effect on GBF1 DNA-binding to G-boxes of two direct target genes, CATALASE2 and RBSCS1a. Phosphorylation mimicry at three serine positions in the basic region of GBF1 also had a negative effect on DNA-binding. Kinase assays revealed that CKII phosphorylates at least one serine in the basic domain but has additional phosphorylation sites outside this domain. Two different ckII α subunit1 and one α subunit2 T-DNA insertion lines showed no visible senescence phenotype, but in all lines the expression of the senescence marker gene SAG12 was remarkably diminished. A model is presented suggesting that senescence-specific GBF1 activation might be achieved by lowering the phosphorylation of GBF1 by CKII. PMID:27135347

  6. Indirubin derivatives alter DNA binding activity of the transcription factor NF-Y and inhibit MDR1 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toru; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Saito, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Takashi; Tabata, Keiichi; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyairi, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    2014-10-15

    Indirubin derivatives exert antitumor activity. However, their effects on the expression of multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) have not been investigated. Here we found three derivatives that inhibit the MDR1 gene promoter. To investigate the effects of indirubins on the DNA binding of NF-Y, a major MDR1 gene transcription factor that recognizes an inverted CCAAT element in the promoter, gel mobility shift assay was performed using the element as a probe with nuclear extracts from NG108-15, MCF7, HepG2, C2C12, and SK-N-SH cells. Among 17 compounds, 5-methoxyindirubin inhibited the DNA binding of NF-Y significantly, whereas indirubin-3'-oxime and 7-methoxyindirubin 3'-oxime increased the binding considerably. After evaluating a suitable concentration of each compound for transcription analysis using living tumor cells, we performed a reporter gene assay using a reporter DNA plasmid containing EGFP cDNA fused to the MDR1 gene promoter region. Indirubin-3'-oxime exerted a significant inhibitory effect on the MDR1 promoter activity in MCF7 and HepG2 cells, and 5-methoxyindirubin inhibited the activity only in MCF7 cells; 7-methoxyindirubin 3'-oxime suppressed the activity in all of the cell lines. We further confirmed that the compounds reduced endogenous MDR1 transcription without any inhibitory effect on NF-Y expression. Moreover, each compound increased the doxorubicin sensitivity of MCF7 cells. These results indicate that each indirubin derivative acts on the DNA binding of NF-Y and represses the MDR1 gene promoter with tumor cell-type specificity. PMID:25066113

  7. DNA binding by GATA transcription factor suggests mechanisms of DNA looping and long-range gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongheng; Bates, Darren L.; Dey, Raja; Chen, Po-Han; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.; Rohs, Remo; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Summary GATA transcription factors regulate transcription during development and differentiation by recognizing distinct GATA sites with a tandem of two conserved zinc fingers and by mediating long-range DNA looping. However, the molecular basis of these processes is not well understood yet. Here, we determined three crystal structures of the full DNA binding domain (DBD) of human GATA3 protein, which contains both zinc fingers, in complex with different DNA sites. In one structure, both zinc fingers wrap around a palindromic GATA site, cooperatively enhancing the binding affinity and kinetic stability. Strikingly, in the other two structures, the two fingers of GATA DBD bind GATA sites on different DNA molecules, thus bridging two separate DNA fragments, which is confirmed in solution by an in-gel FRET analysis. These findings not only provide new insights into the structure and function of GATA proteins, but also shed light on the molecular basis of long-range gene regulation. PMID:23142663

  8. Elongation factor SII-dependent transcription by RNA polymerase II through a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reines, D; Mote, J

    1993-01-01

    In eukaryotes the genetic material is contained within a coiled, protein-coated structure known as chromatin. RNA polymerases must recognize specific nucleoprotein assemblies and maintain contact with the underlying DNA duplex for many thousands of base pairs. Template-bound lac operon repressor from Escherichia coli arrests RNA polymerase II in vitro and in vivo [Kuhn, A., Bartsch, I. & Grummt, I. (1990) Nature (London) 344, 559-562; Deuschele, U., Hipskind, R. A. & Bujard, H. (1990) Science 248, 480-483]. We show that in a reconstituted transcription system, elongation factor SII enables RNA polymerase II to proceed through this blockage at high efficiency. lac repressor-arrested elongation complexes display an SII-activated transcript cleavage reaction, an activity associated with transcriptional read-through of a previously characterized region of bent DNA. This demonstrates factor-dependent transcription by RNA polymerase II through a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Nascent transcript cleavage may be a general mechanism by which RNA polymerase II can bypass many transcriptional impediments. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8446609

  9. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  10. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    PubMed

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  11. Dual regulation of heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) activation and DNA-binding activity by H2O2: role of thioredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier-Sarlin, M R; Polla, B S

    1996-01-01

    The heat-shock (HS) response is a ubiquitous cellular response to stress, involving the transcriptional activation of HS genes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to regulate the activity of a number of transcription factors. We investigated the redox regulation of the stress response and report here that in the human pre-monocytic line U937 cells, H2O2 induced a concentration-dependent transactivation and DNA-binding activity of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF-1). DNA-binding activity was, however, lower with H2O2 than with HS. We thus hypothesized a dual regulation of HSF by oxidants. We found that oxidizing agents, such as H2O2 and diamide, as well as alkylating agents, such as iodoacetic acid, abolished, in vitro, the HSF-DNA-binding activity induced by HS in vivo. The effects of H2O2 in vitro were reversed by the sulphydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol and the endogenous reductor thioredoxin (TRX), while the effects of iodoacetic acid were irreversible. In addition, TRX also restored the DNA-binding activity of HSF oxidized in vivo, while it was found to be itself induced in vivo by both HS and H2O2. Thus, H2O2 exerts dual effects on the activation and the DNA-binding activity of HSF: on the one hand, H2O2 favours the nuclear translocation of HSF, while on the other, it alters HSF-DNA-binding activity, most likely by oxidizing critical cysteine residues within the DNA-binding domain. HSF thus belongs to the group of ROS-modulated transcription factors. We propose that the time required for TRX induction, which may restore the DNA-binding activity of oxidized HSF, provides an explanation for the delay in heat-shock protein synthesis upon exposure of cells to ROS. PMID:8761470

  12. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs. PMID:25824951

  13. Elucidating the evolutionary conserved DNA-binding specificities of WRKY transcription factors by molecular dynamics and in vitro binding assays

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Harter, Klaus; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein family in plants that is involved in the regulation of developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stimuli. The question arises how stimulus-specific responses are mediated given that the highly conserved WRKY DNA-binding domain (DBD) exclusively recognizes the ‘TTGACY’ W-box consensus. We speculated that the W-box consensus might be more degenerate and yet undetected differences in the W-box consensus of WRKYs of different evolutionary descent exist. The phylogenetic analysis of WRKY DBDs suggests that they evolved from an ancestral group IIc-like WRKY early in the eukaryote lineage. A direct descent of group IIc WRKYs supports a monophyletic origin of all other group II and III WRKYs from group I by loss of an N-terminal DBD. Group I WRKYs are of paraphyletic descent and evolved multiple times independently. By homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro DNA–protein interaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with AtWRKY50 (IIc), AtWRKY33 (I) and AtWRKY11 (IId) DBDs, we revealed differences in DNA-binding specificities. Our data imply that other components are essentially required besides the W-box-specific binding to DNA to facilitate a stimulus-specific WRKY function. PMID:23975197

  14. DNA binding by the ETS-domain transcription factor PEA3 is regulated by intramolecular and intermolecular protein.protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Greenall, A; Willingham, N; Cheung, E; Boam, D S; Sharrocks, A D

    2001-05-11

    The control of DNA binding by eukaryotic transcription factors represents an important regulatory mechanism. Many transcription factors are controlled by cis-acting autoinhibitory modules that are thought to act by blocking promiscuous DNA binding in the absence of appropriate regulatory cues. Here, we have investigated the determinants and regulation of the autoinhibitory mechanism employed by the ETS-domain transcription factor, PEA3. DNA binding is inhibited by a module composed of a combination of two short motifs located on either side of the ETS DNA-binding domain. A second type of protein, Ids, can act in trans to mimic the effect of these cis-acting inhibitory motifs and reduce DNA binding by PEA3. By using a one-hybrid screen, we identified the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor USF-1 as an interaction partner for PEA3. PEA3 and USF-1 form DNA complexes in a cooperative manner. Moreover, the formation of ternary PEA3.USF-1.DNA complexes requires parts of the same motifs in PEA3 that form the autoinhibitory module. Thus the binding of USF-1 to PEA3 acts as a switch that modifies the autoinhibitory motifs in PEA3 to first relieve their inhibitory action, and second, promote ternary nucleoprotein complex assembly. PMID:11278941

  15. Overlapping sites for constitutive and induced DNA binding factors involved in interferon-stimulated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, T C; Rosen, J M; Guille, M J; Lewin, A R; Porter, A G; Kerr, I M; Stark, G R

    1989-01-01

    A 14 bp interferon (IFN)-stimulated response element (ISRE) from 6-16, a human gene regulated by alpha-IFN, confers IFN inducibility on a heterologous thymidine kinase promoter. A 39 bp double-stranded oligonucleotide corresponding to a 5' region of 6-16 which includes the ISRE competes for factors required for gene expression by alpha-IFN in transfected cells and a single base change (A-11 to C) within the ISRE (GGGAAAATGAAACT) abolishes this competition. Band-shift assays performed with whole-cell extracts and the 39 bp oligonucleotide reveal specific complexes formed by rapidly induced and constitutive factors, both of which fail to bind to the A-11 to C oligonucleotide. A detailed footprinting analysis reveals that these two types of factors bind to overlapping sites within the ISRE, but in very different ways. These data were used to design oligonucleotides which decreased the formation of the inducible complex without affecting the constitutive one. Changes at the 5' margin of the ISRE and upstream of it markedly decrease formation of the induced but not the constitutive complex and also abolish the ability of the 39 bp sequence to function as an inducible enhancer with the thymidine kinase promoter. Thus, induction of 6-16 transcription in IFN-treated cells is likely to be stimulated by binding of the induced factor to the ISRE and upstream sequences, while the subsequent suppression of transcription may involve competition for the ISRE by the other class of factors. Images PMID:2721502

  16. Regulation of the HMOX1 gene by the transcription factor AP-2δ with unique DNA binding site.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyun; Zhao, Yuxia; Gu, Shaohua; Mao, Yumin; Ji, Chaoneng; Xin, Xiujuan

    2014-07-01

    AP-2 transcription factors are important sequence-specific DNA-binding regulators that are expressed in the neural crest and other tissues during mammalian development. The human AP-2 family of transcription factors consists of five members, AP-2α, -β, -γ, -δ and -ε, which have an important role in the regulation of gene expression during development and in the differentiation of multiple organs and tissues. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which AP-2δ mediates heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene expression. It was identified that the human AP-2δ protein exhibited weak binding to a suboptimal AP-2 sequence, 5'-GCCN3GGC-3', to which all other AP-2 proteins bind in vitro, providing the first example of DNA target specificity amongst the AP-2 family. AP-2δ protein bound to an optimized AP-2 consensus DNA sequence, 5'-GCCTGAGGC-3', in vitro and transactivated gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The transactivation domain of Ap-2δ differs notably from those in the other AP-2 proteins as it lacks the PY motif (XPPXY) and several other conserved residues that are important for the transcriptional activity of AP-2 proteins, yet it functions as an equally strong activator. PMID:24789576

  17. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain (“BEN-solo” factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  18. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  19. Repression of CIITA by the Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta is independent of its dimerization and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Balan, Nicolae; Osborn, Kay; Sinclair, Alison J

    2016-03-01

    Repression of the cellular CIITA gene is part of the immune evasion strategy of the γherpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during its lytic replication cycle in B-cells. In part, this is mediated through downregulation of MHC class II gene expression via the targeted repression of CIITA, the cellular master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. This repression is achieved through a reduction in CIITA promoter activity, initiated by the EBV transcription and replication factor, Zta (BZLF1, EB1, ZEBRA). Zta is the earliest gene expressed during the lytic replication cycle. Zta interacts with sequence-specific elements in promoters, enhancers and the replication origin (ZREs), and also modulates gene expression through interaction with cellular transcription factors and co-activators. Here, we explore the requirements for Zta-mediated repression of the CIITA promoter. We find that repression by Zta is specific for the CIITA promoter and can be achieved in the absence of other EBV genes. Surprisingly, we find that the dimerization region of Zta is not required to mediate repression. This contrasts with an obligate requirement of this region to correctly orientate the DNA contact regions of Zta to mediate activation of gene expression through ZREs. Additional support for the model that Zta represses the CIITA promoter without direct DNA binding comes from promoter mapping that shows that repression does not require the presence of a ZRE in the CIITA promoter. PMID:26653871

  20. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  1. DNA binding and transcription activation by chicken interferon regulatory factor-3 (chIRF-3)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Caroline E.; May, Donna L.; Deeley, Roger G.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the cellular response to interferons and viral infection. Previously we isolated an IRF from a chicken embryonic liver cDNA library. Using a PCR-based binding site selection assay, we have characterised the binding specificity of chIRF-3. The optimal binding site (OBS) fits within the consensus interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) but the specificity of chIRF-3 binding allows less variation in nucleotides outside the core IRF-binding sequence. A comparison of IRF-1 and chIRF-3 binding to ISREs in electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the binding specificity of chIRF-3 was clearly distinguishable from IRF-1. The selection assay also showed that chIRF-3 is capable of binding an inverted repeat of two half OBSs separated by 10–13 nt. ChIRF-3 appears to bind both the OBS and inverted repeat sites as a dimer with the protein–protein interaction requiring a domain between amino acids 117 and 311. In transfection experiments expression of chIRF-3 strongly activated a promoter containing the OBS. The activation domain was mapped to between amino acids 138 and 221 and a domain inhibitory to activation was also mapped to the C-terminal portion of chIRF-3. PMID:11095692

  2. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  3. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping of DNA binding by a zinc-finger domain from the yeast transcription factor ADR1.

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedeskamp, M.; Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies have revealed that the minimal DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor ADR1 consists of two Cys2-His2 zinc fingers plus an additional 20 residues proximal and N-terminal to the fingers. We have assigned NMR 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shifts for the entire minimal DNA-binding domain of ADR1 both free and bound to specific DNA. 1H chemical shift values suggest little structural difference between the zinc fingers in this construct and in single-finger constructs, and 13C alpha chemical shift index analysis indicates little change in finger structure upon DNA binding. 1H chemical shift perturbations upon DNA binding are observed, however, and these are mapped to define the protein-DNA interface. The two zinc fingers appear to bind DNA with different orientations, as the entire helix of finger 1 is perturbed, while only the extreme N-terminus of the finger 2 helix is affected. Furthermore, residues N-terminal to the first finger undergo large chemical shift changes upon DNA binding suggesting a role at the protein-DNA interface. A striking correspondence is observed between the protein-DNA interface mapped by chemical shift changes and that previously mapped by mutagenesis. PMID:9300483

  4. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits p53 sequence-specific DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and association with transcription factor ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X W; Forrester, K; Yeh, H; Feitelson, M A; Gu, J R; Harris, C C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic active hepatitis caused by infection with hepatitis B virus, a DNA virus, is a major risk factor for human hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the oncogenicity of several DNA viruses is dependent on the interaction of their viral oncoproteins with cellular tumor-suppressor gene products, we investigated the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) and human wild-type p53 protein. HBX complexes with the wild-type p53 protein and inhibits its sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro. HBX expression also inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo and the in vitro association of p53 and ERCC3, a general transcription factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. Therefore, HBX may affect a wide range of p53 functions and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:8134379

  5. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  6. Dual DNA binding specificity of a petal epidermis-specific MYB transcription factor (MYB.Ph3) from Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed

    Solano, R; Nieto, C; Avila, J; Cañas, L; Diaz, I; Paz-Ares, J

    1995-04-18

    The MYB.Ph3 protein recognized two DNA sequences that resemble the two known types of MYB DNA binding site: consensus I (MBSI), aaaAaaC(G/C)-GTTA, and consensus II (MBSII), aaaAGTTAGTTA. Optimal MBSI was recognized by animal c-MYB and not by Am305 from Antirrhinum, whereas MBSII showed the reverse behaviour. Different constraints on MYB.Ph3 binding to the two classes of sequences were demonstrated. DNA binding studies with mutated MBSI and MBSII and hydroxyl radical footprinting analysis, pointed to the N-terminal MYB repeat (R2) as the most involved in determining the dual DNA binding specificity of MYB.Ph3 and supported the idea that binding to MBSI and MBSII does not involve alternative orientations of the two repeats of MYB.Ph3. Minimal promoters containing either MBSI and MBSII were activated to the same extent by MYB.Ph3 in yeast, indicating that both types of binding site can be functionally equivalent. MYB.Ph3 binding sites are present in the promoter of flavonoid biosynthetic genes, such as the Petunia chsJ gene, which was transcriptionally activated by MYB.Ph3 in tobacco protoplasts. MYB.Ph3 was immunolocalized in the epidermal cell layer of petals, where flavonoid biosynthetic genes are actively expressed. This strongly suggests a role for MYB.Ph3 in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis. PMID:7737128

  7. DNA-binding proteins in plant mitochondria: implications for transcription.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, José M; Kühn, Kristina

    2014-11-01

    The structural complexity of plant mitochondrial genomes correlates with the variety of single-strand DNA-binding proteins found in plant mitochondria. Most of these are plant-specific and have roles in homologous recombination and genome maintenance. Mitochondrial nucleoids thus differ fundamentally between plants and yeast or animals, where the principal nucleoid protein is a DNA-packaging protein that binds double-stranded DNA. Major transcriptional cofactors identified in mitochondria of non-plant species are also seemingly absent from plants. This article reviews current knowledge on plant mitochondrial DNA-binding proteins and discusses that those may affect the accessibility and conformation of transcription start sites, thus functioning as transcriptional modulators without being dedicated transcription factors. PMID:24561574

  8. A conserved motif N-terminal to the DNA-binding domains of myogenic bHLH transcription factors mediates cooperative DNA binding with pbx-Meis1/Prep1.

    PubMed

    Knoepfler, P S; Bergstrom, D A; Uetsuki, T; Dac-Korytko, I; Sun, Y H; Wright, W E; Tapscott, S J; Kamps, M P

    1999-09-15

    The t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of pediatric pre-B cell leukemia produces chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1, which contains the N-terminal transactivation domain of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, E2a, joined to the majority of the homeodomain protein, Pbx1. There are three Pbx family members, which bind DNA as heterodimers with both broadly expressed Meis/Prep1 homeo-domain proteins and specifically expressed Hox homeodomain proteins. These Pbx heterodimers can augment the function of transcriptional activators bound to adjacent elements. In heterodimers, a conserved tryptophan motif in Hox proteins binds a pocket on the surface of the Pbx homeodomain, while Meis/Prep1 proteins bind an N-terminal Pbx domain, raising the possibility that the tryptophan-interaction pocket of the Pbx component of a Pbx-Meis/Prep1 complex is still available to bind trypto-phan motifs of other transcription factors bound to flanking elements. Here, we report that Pbx-Meis1/Prep1 binds DNA cooperatively with heterodimers of E2a and MyoD, myogenin, Mrf-4 or Myf-5. As with Hox proteins, a highly conserved tryptophan motif N-terminal to the DNA-binding domains of each myogenic bHLH family protein is required for cooperative DNA binding with Pbx-Meis1/Prep1. In vivo, MyoD requires this tryptophan motif to evoke chromatin remodeling in the Myogenin promoter and to activate Myogenin transcription. Pbx-Meis/Prep1 complexes, therefore, have the potential to cooperate with the myogenic bHLH proteins in regulating gene transcription. PMID:10471746

  9. Gene Ontology annotation of sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factors: setting the stage for a large-scale curation effort

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Sushil; Christie, Karen R.; Balakrishnan, Rama; Huntley, Rachael; Hill, David P.; Thommesen, Liv; Blake, Judith A.; Kuiper, Martin; Lægreid, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors control which information in a genome becomes transcribed to produce RNAs that function in the biological systems of cells and organisms. Reliable and comprehensive information about transcription factors is invaluable for large-scale network-based studies. However, existing transcription factor knowledge bases are still lacking in well-documented functional information. Here, we provide guidelines for a curation strategy, which constitutes a robust framework for using the controlled vocabularies defined by the Gene Ontology Consortium to annotate specific DNA binding transcription factors (DbTFs) based on experimental evidence reported in literature. Our standardized protocol and workflow for annotating specific DNA binding RNA polymerase II transcription factors is designed to document high-quality and decisive evidence from valid experimental methods. Within a collaborative biocuration effort involving the user community, we are now in the process of exhaustively annotating the full repertoire of human, mouse and rat proteins that qualify as DbTFs in as much as they are experimentally documented in the biomedical literature today. The completion of this task will significantly enrich Gene Ontology-based information resources for the research community. Database URL: www.tfcheckpoint.org PMID:23981286

  10. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of vIRF-1 from the oncogenic KSHV reveals a conserved fold for DNA binding and reinforces its role as a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Venkatachalam, Rajakannan; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Lim, Bee Ting; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes four viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), where the most studied is vIRF-1. Even though vIRF-1 shows sequence homology to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of human IRFs, a specific role for this domain in vIRF-1’s function has remained uncertain. To provide insights into the function of the vIRF-1 DBD, we have determined the crystal structure of it in complex with DNA and in its apo-form. Using a thermal stability shift assay (TSSA), we show that the vIRF-1 DBD binds DNA, whereas full-length vIRF-1 does not, suggesting a cis-acting regulatory mechanism in similarity to human IRFs. The complex structure of vIRF-1 DBD reveals interactions with the DNA backbone and the positioning of two arginines for specific recognition in the major grove. A superimposition with human IRF-3 reveals a similar positioning of the two specificity-determining arginines, and additional TSSAs indicate binding of vIRF-1 to an IRF-3 operator consensus sequence. The results from this study, therefore, provide support that vIRF-1 has evolved to bind DNA and plays a role in DNA binding in the context of transcriptional regulation and might act on some of the many operator sequences controlled by human IRF-3. PMID:23435230

  11. GSK3β-Dependent Phosphorylation Alters DNA Binding, Transactivity and Half-Life of the Transcription Factor USF2

    PubMed Central

    Horbach, Tina; Chi, Tabughang Franklin; Götz, Claudia; Sharma, Satyan; Juffer, André H.; Dimova, Elitsa Y.; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2) is a regulator of important cellular processes and is supposed to have also a role during tumor development. However, the knowledge about the mechanisms that control the function of USF2 is limited. The data of the current study show that USF2 function is regulated by phosphorylation and identified GSK3β as an USF2-phosphorylating kinase. The phosphorylation sites within USF2 could be mapped to serine 155 and threonine 230. In silico analyses of the 3-dimensional structure revealed that phosphorylation of USF2 by GSK3β converts it to a more open conformation which may influence transactivity, DNA binding and target gene expression. Indeed, experiments with GSK-3β-deficient cells revealed that USF2 transactivity, DNA binding and target gene expression were reduced upon lack of GSK3β. Further, experiments with USF2 variants mimicking GSK3β phosphorylated USF2 in GSK3β-deficient cells showed that phosphorylation of USF2 by GSK3β did not affect cell proliferation but increased cell migration. Together, this study reports a new mechanism by which USF2 may contribute to cancerogenesis. PMID:25238393

  12. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  13. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Zsolt; Sebastian, Alvaro; Xu, Wenjia; Grain, Damaris; Salsac, Fabien; Avon, Alexandra; Berger, Nathalie; Tran, Joseph; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Lurin, Claire; Lepiniec, Loïc; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Dubos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs). Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments) with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences. PMID:26484765

  14. Runx transcription factors repress human and murine c-Myc expression in a DNA-binding and C-terminally dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Paejonette T; Cao, Li; Samon, Jeremy B; Kane, Christyne A; Hedblom, Emmett E; Bowcock, Anne; Telfer, Janice C

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors Runx1 and c-Myc have individually been shown to regulate important gene targets as well as to collaborate in oncogenesis. However, it is unknown whether there is a regulatory relationship between the two genes. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of endogenous c-Myc by Runx1 in the human T cell line Jurkat and murine primary hematopoietic cells. Endogenous Runx1 binds to multiple sites in the c-Myc locus upstream of the c-Myc transcriptional start site. Cells transduced with a C-terminally truncated Runx1 (Runx1.d190), which lacks important cofactor interaction sites and can block C-terminal-dependent functions of all Runx transcription factors, showed increased transcription of c-Myc. In order to monitor c-Myc expression in response to early and transiently-acting Runx1.d190, we generated a cell membrane-permeable TAT-Runx1.d190 fusion protein. Murine splenocytes treated with TAT-Runx1.d190 showed an increase in the transcription of c-Myc within 2 hours, peaking at 4 hours post-treatment and declining thereafter. This effect is dependent on the ability of Runx1.d190 to bind to DNA. The increase in c-Myc transcripts is correlated with increased c-Myc protein levels. Collectively, these data show that Runx1 directly regulates c-Myc transcription in a C-terminal- and DNA-binding-dependent manner. PMID:23874874

  15. Runx Transcription Factors Repress Human and Murine c-Myc Expression in a DNA-Binding and C-Terminally Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Paejonette T.; Cao, Li; Samon, Jeremy B.; Kane, Christyne A.; Hedblom, Emmett E.; Bowcock, Anne; Telfer, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors Runx1 and c-Myc have individually been shown to regulate important gene targets as well as to collaborate in oncogenesis. However, it is unknown whether there is a regulatory relationship between the two genes. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of endogenous c-Myc by Runx1 in the human T cell line Jurkat and murine primary hematopoietic cells. Endogenous Runx1 binds to multiple sites in the c-Myc locus upstream of the c-Myc transcriptional start site. Cells transduced with a C-terminally truncated Runx1 (Runx1.d190), which lacks important cofactor interaction sites and can block C-terminal-dependent functions of all Runx transcription factors, showed increased transcription of c-Myc. In order to monitor c-Myc expression in response to early and transiently-acting Runx1.d190, we generated a cell membrane-permeable TAT-Runx1.d190 fusion protein. Murine splenocytes treated with TAT-Runx1.d190 showed an increase in the transcription of c-Myc within 2 hours, peaking at 4 hours post-treatment and declining thereafter. This effect is dependent on the ability of Runx1.d190 to bind to DNA. The increase in c-Myc transcripts is correlated with increased c-Myc protein levels. Collectively, these data show that Runx1 directly regulates c-Myc transcription in a C-terminal- and DNA-binding-dependent manner. PMID:23874874

  16. Conserved Ser residues in the basic region of the bZIP-type transcription factor HBP-1a(17): importance in DNA binding and possible targets for phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Moda, I; Minami, M; Okanami, M; Iwabuchi, M

    1998-01-01

    HBP-1a(17) is representative of a group of plant bZIP-type transcription factors which includes HBP-1a proteins and G-box-binding factors. We found kinase activity in wheat nuclear extract that phosphorylated HBP-1a(17). Experiments using recombinant HBP-1a(17) derivatives as substrates revealed that all three of the Ser residues in the basic region, Ser-261, Ser-265, and Ser-269, were phosphorylated in a Ca(2+)-stimulated manner. DNA-binding analysis of mutants with a Ser-to-Glu change, prepared to mimic the phosphorylated proteins, indicated that introduction of a negative charge at position 265 or 269 prevents HBP-1a(17) from binding DNA not only in the homodimer of mutants but also in heterodimers with a wild-type protein. It is therefore suggested that the phosphorylation regulates the function of HBP-1a(17) at least at the level of DNA binding. Since Ser-265 and Ser-269 are highly conserved among the plant bZIP-type factors known to date, a common Ca(2+)-mediated regulatory mechanism may exert an effect on the bZIP-type factors through phosphorylation of these conserved Ser residues. PMID:9484468

  17. The MotA transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 contains a novel DNA-binding domain : the 'double wing' motif.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Sickmier, E. A.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; White, S. W.; Biosciences Division; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center; Corixa Inc.

    2002-01-01

    MotA is a transcription factor from bacteriophage T4 that helps adapt the host Escherichia coli transcription apparatus to T4 middle promoters. We have determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of MotA (MotCF) to 1.6 A resolution using multiwavelength, anomalous diffraction methods. The structure reveals a novel DNA-binding alpha/beta motif that contains an exposed beta-sheet surface that mediates interactions with the DNA. Independent biochemical experiments have shown that MotCF binds to one surface of a single turn of DNA through interactions in adjacent major and minor grooves. We present a model of the interaction in which beta-ribbons at opposite corners of the six-stranded beta-sheet penetrate the DNA grooves, and call the motif a 'double wing' to emphasize similarities to the 'winged-helix' motif. The model is consistent with data on how MotA functions at middle promoters, and provides an explanation for why MotA can form non-specific multimers on DNA.

  18. Genome-Wide Mapping of the Binding Sites and Structural Analysis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 2 Reveal that It Is a DNA-Binding Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haidai; Dong, Jiazhen; Liang, Deguang; Gao, Zengqiang; Bai, Lei; Sun, Rui; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oncogenic herpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is known to encode four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4) to subvert the host antiviral immune response, but their detailed DNA-binding profiles as transcription factors in the host remain uncharacterized. Here, we first performed genome-wide vIRF2-binding site mapping in the human genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). vIRF2 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of 100 putative target genes. Importantly, we confirmed that vIRF2 can specifically interact with the promoters of the genes encoding PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL, which are associated with autophagosome formation or tumor progression and metastasis, and regulate their transcription in vivo. The crystal structure of the vIRF2 DNA-binding domain (DBD) (referred to here as vIRF2DBD) showed variable loop conformations and positive-charge distributions different from those of vIRF1 and cellular IRFs that are associated with DNA-binding specificities. Structure-based mutagenesis revealed that Arg82 and Arg85 are required for the in vitro DNA-binding activity of vIRF2DBD and can abolish the transcription regulation function of vIRF2 on the promoter reporter activity of PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL. Collectively, our study provided unique insights into the DNA-binding potency of vIRF2 and suggested that vIRF2 could act as a transcription factor of its target genes in the host antiviral immune response. IMPORTANCE The oncogenic herpesvirus KSHV is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to subvert the host antiviral immune responses by encoding four homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4). However, none of their DNA-binding profiles in the human genome have been characterized until now, and the structural basis for their diverse

  19. GT-2: a transcription factor with twin autonomous DNA-binding domains of closely related but different target sequence specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Dehesh, K; Hung, H; Tepperman, J M; Quail, P H

    1992-01-01

    A triplet of adjacent, highly similar GT motifs in the phyA promoter of rice functions to support maximal expression of this gene. We have obtained a recombinant clone that encodes a full-length nuclear protein, designated GT-2, which binds specifically to these target sequences. This novel protein contains acidic, basic and proline- + glutamine-rich regions, as well as two autonomous DNA-binding domains, one NH2-terminal and the other COOH-terminal, that discriminate with high resolution between the three GT motifs. A duplicated sequence of 75 amino acids, present once in each DNA-binding domain, appears likely to mediate DNA target element recognition. Each copy of this duplicated protein sequence is predicted to form three amphipathic alpha-helices separated from each other by two short loops. The absence of sequence similarity to other known proteins suggests that this predicted structural unit, which we term the trihelix motif, might be representative of a new class of DNA-binding proteins. Images PMID:1396594

  20. Synergy of aromatic residues and phosphoserines within the intrinsically disordered DNA-binding inhibitory elements of the Ets-1 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Meeker, Charles A.; Bhachech, Niraja; Currie, Simon L.; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    2014-01-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (Ets-1) transcription factor is autoinhibited by a conformationally disordered serine-rich region (SRR) that transiently interacts with its DNA-binding ETS domain. In response to calcium signaling, autoinhibition is reinforced by calmodulin-dependent kinase II phosphorylation of serines within the SRR. Using mutagenesis and quantitative DNA-binding measurements, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-enhanced autoinhibition requires the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine (ϕ) residues adjacent to the SRR phosphoacceptor serines. The introduction of additional phosphorylated Ser-ϕ-Asp, but not Ser-Ala-Asp, repeats within the SRR dramatically reinforces autoinhibition. NMR spectroscopic studies of phosphorylated and mutated SRR variants, both within their native context and as separate trans-acting peptides, confirmed that the aromatic residues and phosphoserines contribute to the formation of a dynamic complex with the ETS domain. Complementary NMR studies also identified the SRR-interacting surface of the ETS domain, which encompasses its positively charged DNA-recognition interface and an adjacent region of neutral polar and nonpolar residues. Collectively, these studies highlight the role of aromatic residues and their synergy with phosphoserines in an intrinsically disordered regulatory sequence that integrates cellular signaling and gene expression. PMID:25024220

  1. SP Transcription Factor Paralogs and DNA-Binding Sites Coevolve and Adaptively Converge in Mammals and Birds

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ken Daigoro; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Functional modification of regulatory proteins can affect hundreds of genes throughout the genome, and is therefore thought to be almost universally deleterious. This belief, however, has recently been challenged. A potential example comes from transcription factor SP1, for which statistical evidence indicates that motif preferences were altered in eutherian mammals. Here, we set out to discover possible structural and theoretical explanations, evaluate the role of selection in SP1 evolution, and discover effects on coregulatory proteins. We show that SP1 motif preferences were convergently altered in birds as well as mammals, inducing coevolutionary changes in over 800 regulatory regions. Structural and phylogenic evidence implicates a single causative amino acid replacement at the same SP1 position along both lineages. Furthermore, paralogs SP3 and SP4, which coregulate SP1 target genes through competitive binding to the same sites, have accumulated convergent replacements at the homologous position multiple times during eutherian and bird evolution, presumably to preserve competitive binding. To determine plausibility, we developed and implemented a simple model of transcription factor and binding site coevolution. This model predicts that, in contrast to prevailing beliefs, even small selective benefits per locus can drive concurrent fixation of transcription factor and binding site mutants under a broad range of conditions. Novel binding sites tend to arise de novo, rather than by mutation from ancestral sites, a prediction substantiated by SP1-binding site alignments. Thus, multiple lines of evidence indicate that selection has driven convergent evolution of transcription factors along with their binding sites and coregulatory proteins. PMID:23019068

  2. Structure of the DNA-binding and RNA polymerase-binding region of transcription antitermination factor λQ

    PubMed Central

    Vorobiev, Sergey M.; Gensler, Yocheved; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Su, Min; Huang, Janet Y.; Xiao, Rong; Kornhaber, Gregory; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Tong, Liang; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacteriophage λ Q protein is a transcription antitermination factor that controls expression of the phage late genes as a stable component of the transcription elongation complex. To join the elongation complex, λQ binds a specific DNA sequence element and interacts with RNA polymerase that is paused during early elongation. λQ’s interaction with the paused early elongation complex involves interactions between λQ and two regions of RNA polymerase: region 4 of the σ70 subunit and the flap domain of the β subunit. We present the 2.1 Å resolution crystal structure of a portion of λQ containing determinants for interaction with DNA, interaction with region 4 of σ70, and interaction with the β flap. The structure provides a framework for interpreting prior genetic and biochemical analysis and sets the stage for future structural studies to elucidate the mechanism by which λQ alters the functional properties of the transcription elongation complex. PMID:24440517

  3. Histidine switch controlling pH-dependent protein folding and DNA binding in a transcription factor at the core of synthetic network devices.

    PubMed

    Deochand, D K; Perera, I C; Crochet, R B; Gilbert, N C; Newcomer, M E; Grove, A

    2016-07-19

    Therapeutic strategies have been reported that depend on synthetic network devices in which a urate-sensing transcriptional regulator detects pathological levels of urate and triggers production or release of urate oxidase. The transcription factor involved, HucR, is a member of the multiple antibiotic resistance (MarR) protein family. We show that protonation of stacked histidine residues at the pivot point of long helices that form the scaffold of the dimer interface leads to reversible formation of a molten globule state and significantly attenuated DNA binding at physiological temperatures. We also show that binding of urate to symmetrical sites in each protein lobe is communicated via the dimer interface. This is the first demonstration of regulation of a MarR family transcription factor by pH-dependent interconversion between a molten globule and a compact folded state. Our data further suggest that HucR may be utilized in synthetic devices that depend on detection of pH changes. PMID:27282811

  4. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  5. Coupling of folding and DNA-binding in the bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimeric transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Seldeen, Kenneth L; McDonald, Caleb B; Deegan, Brian J; Farooq, Amjad

    2008-05-01

    In response to mitogenic stimuli, the heterodimeric transcription factor Jun-Fos binds to the promoters of a diverse array of genes involved in critical cellular responses such as cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle regulation, embryogenic development and cancer. In so doing, Jun-Fos heterodimer regulates gene expression central to physiology and pathology of the cell in a specific and timely manner. Here, using the technique of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we report detailed thermodynamics of the bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimer to synthetic dsDNA oligos containing the TRE and CRE consensus promoter elements. Our data suggest that binding of the bZIP domains to both TRE and CRE is under enthalpic control and accompanied by entropic penalty at physiological temperatures. Although the bZIP domains bind to both TRE and CRE with very similar affinities, the enthalpic contributions to the free energy of binding to CRE are more favorable than TRE, while the entropic penalty to the free energy of binding to TRE is smaller than CRE. Despite such differences in their thermodynamic signatures, enthalpy and entropy of binding of the bZIP domains to both TRE and CRE are highly temperature-dependent and largely compensate each other resulting in negligible effect of temperature on the free energy of binding. From the plot of enthalpy change versus temperature, the magnitude of heat capacity change determined is much larger than that expected from the direct association of bZIP domains with DNA. This observation is interpreted to suggest that the basic regions in the bZIP domains are largely unstructured in the absence of DNA and only become structured upon interaction with DNA in a coupled folding and binding manner. Our new findings are rationalized in the context of 3D structural models of bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimer in complex with dsDNA oligos containing the TRE and CRE consensus sequences. Taken together, our study demonstrates that enthalpy is

  6. Zn-, Cd-, and Pb-transcription factor IIIA: properties, DNA binding, and comparison with TFIIIA-finger 3 metal complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meilin; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Hu, Weining; Petering, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the metal ion binding sites of Zn-transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) were investigated to understand the potential of this type of zinc finger to undergo reactions that remove Zn2+ from the protein. Zn–TFIIIA was purified from E. coli containing the cloned sequence for Xenopus laevis oocyte TFIIIA and its stoichiometry of bound Zn2+ was shown to depend on the details of the isolation process. The average dissociation constant of Zn2+ in Zn-TFIIIIA was 10−7. The dissociation constant for Zn-F3, the third finger from the N-terminus of TFIIIA, was 1.0 × 10−8. The reactivity of Zn–TFIIIA with a series of metal binding ligands, including 2-carboxy-2′-hydroxy-5′-sulfoformazylbenzene (zincon), 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR), and 3-ethoxy-2-oxo-butyraldehyde-bis-(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (H2KTSM2) revealed similar kinetics. The reactivity of PAR with Zn–TFIIIA declined substantially when the protein was bound to the internal control region (ICR) of the 5S ribosomal DNA. Both Cd2+ and Pb2+ disrupt TFIIIA binding to its cognate DNA sequence. The Pb2+ dissociation constant of Pb-F3 was measured as 2.5 × 10−8. According to NMR spectroscopy, F3 does not fold into a regular conformation in the presence of Pb2+. PMID:15134923

  7. Silk Gland Factor-2, Involved in Fibroin Gene Transcription, Consists of LIM Homeodomain, LIM-interacting, and Single-stranded DNA-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Kaoru; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kimoto, Mai; Matsumoto, Akiko; Tsubota, Takuya; Uchino, Keiro; Hui, Chi-chung; Sezutsu, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    SGF-2 binds to promoter elements governing posterior silk gland-specific expression of the fibroin gene in Bombyx mori. We purified SGF-2 and showed that SGF-2 contains at least four gene products: the silkworm orthologues of LIM homeodomain protein Awh, LIM domain-binding protein (Ldb), a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein (Lcaf), and the silk protein P25/fibrohexamerin (fhx). Using co-expression of these factors in Sf9 cells, Awh, Ldb, and Lcaf proteins were co-purified as a ternary complex that bound to the enhancer sequence in vitro. Lcaf interacts with Ldb as well as Awh through the conserved regions to mediate transcriptional activation in yeast. Misexpression of Awh in transgenic silkworms induces ectopic expression of the fibroin gene in the middle silk glands, where Ldb and Lcaf are expressed. Taken together, this study demonstrates that SGF-2 is a multisubunit activator complex containing Awh. Moreover, our results suggest that the Ldb·Lcaf protein complex serves as a scaffold to facilitate communication between transcriptional control elements. PMID:24022586

  8. DNA binding and regulatory effects of transcription factors SP1 and USF at the rat amyloid precursor protein gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, P W; Chernak, J M

    1995-01-01

    Two DNA elements which we have termed SAA and GAG have been shown to control expression of the rat amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, and the region containing the SAA element has been shown to interact with nuclear proteins [Hoffman and Chernak (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 201, 610-617]. In this report we study DNA sequences and proteins which influence the activity of the SAA element. An oligonucleotide containing the SAA element is specifically bound by nuclear proteins derived from rat PC12 cells, consistently forming four complexes designated C25, C30, C35 and C40 in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). We demonstrate that the C25, C30 and C40 complexes involve the binding of nuclear proteins to an SP1 consensus sequence located within the SAA element and that the C25 complex contains a protein antigenically related to the human SP1 protein. We establish further that the C35 complex requires a USF recognition site located within the SAA element and contains a protein antigenically related to the human upstream stimulatory factor (USF) protein. Using APP promoter/luciferase reporter gene constructs, we demonstrate that both the SP1 and the USF sites can play a role in the transcriptional activity of the SAA element. Finally, we show that complexes similar to the C25, C30 and C35 complexes are formed by rat cortex nuclear extracts and the SAA element in EMSA experiments, suggesting the relevance of our in vitro observations to the in vivo functioning of the rat APP promoter. Images PMID:7610052

  9. The Transcription Factor AmrZ Utilizes Multiple DNA Binding Modes to Recognize Activator and Repressor Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Edward E.; Waligora, Elizabeth A.; Xu, Binjie; Dellos-Nolan, Sheri; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Hollis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    AmrZ, a member of the Ribbon-Helix-Helix family of DNA binding proteins, functions as both a transcriptional activator and repressor of multiple genes encoding Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors. The expression of these virulence factors leads to chronic and sustained infections associated with worsening prognosis. In this study, we present the X-ray crystal structure of AmrZ in complex with DNA containing the repressor site, amrZ1. Binding of AmrZ to this site leads to auto-repression. AmrZ binds this DNA sequence as a dimer-of-dimers, and makes specific base contacts to two half sites, separated by a five base pair linker region. Analysis of the linker region shows a narrowing of the minor groove, causing significant distortions. AmrZ binding assays utilizing sequences containing variations in this linker region reveals that secondary structure of the DNA, conferred by the sequence of this region, is an important determinant in binding affinity. The results from these experiments allow for the creation of a model where both intrinsic structure of the DNA and specific nucleotide recognition are absolutely necessary for binding of the protein. We also examined AmrZ binding to the algD promoter, which results in activation of the alginate exopolysaccharide biosynthetic operon, and found the protein utilizes different interactions with this site. Finally, we tested the in vivo effects of this differential binding by switching the AmrZ binding site at algD, where it acts as an activator, for a repressor binding sequence and show that differences in binding alone do not affect transcriptional regulation. PMID:22511872

  10. bZIP Transcription Factors in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans with Novel DNA-Binding Domains Are Involved in Defense against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs. PMID:23975888

  11. Activation of the E2F transcription factor in adenovirus-infected cells involves E1A-dependent stimulation of DNA-binding activity and induction of cooperative binding mediated by an E4 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, P; Bagchi, S; Neill, S D; Nevins, J R

    1990-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that the DNA-binding activity of the E2F transcription factor is increased upon adenovirus infection and that both the E1A and E4 genes are required for activation. In this study, we demonstrated that this enhanced binding of E2F to the E2 promoter is the result of two events. (i) There is stimulation of the DNA-binding activity of the E2F factor; this stimulation is E1A dependent but independent of E4. (ii) There is also induction of a stabilized interaction between E2F molecules bound to adjacent promoter sites; induction of stable E2F binding requires E4 gene function. This two-step activation process was also demonstrated in vitro. A heat-stable fraction from extracts of adenovirus-infected cells, which contains the 19-kilodalton E4 protein, was capable of stimulating stable E2F binding in an ATP-independent manner and appeared to involve direct interaction of the E4 protein with E2F. An extract from virus-infected cells devoid of the E4 19-kilodalton protein stimulated E2F DNA binding without forming the stable complex. This reaction required ATP. We conclude that activation of E2F during adenovirus infection is a two-step process involving a change in both the DNA-binding activity of the factor and the capacity to stabilize the interaction through protein-protein contacts. Images PMID:2139893

  12. Identification of a Bipartite Jasmonate-Responsive Promoter Element in the Catharanthus roseus ORCA3 Transcription Factor Gene That Interacts Specifically with AT-Hook DNA-Binding Proteins1[W

    PubMed Central

    Vom Endt, Débora; Soares e Silva, Marina; Kijne, Jan W.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Memelink, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant signaling molecules that play key roles in defense against certain pathogens and insects, among others, by controlling the biosynthesis of protective secondary metabolites. In Catharanthus roseus, the APETALA2-domain transcription factor ORCA3 is involved in the jasmonate-responsive activation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic genes. ORCA3 gene expression is itself induced by jasmonate. By loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we located a 74-bp region within the ORCA3 promoter, which contains an autonomous jasmonate-responsive element (JRE). The ORCA3 JRE is composed of two important sequences: a quantitative sequence responsible for a high level of expression and a qualitative sequence that appears to act as an on/off switch in response to methyl jasmonate. We isolated 12 different DNA-binding proteins having one of four different types of DNA-binding domains, using the ORCA3 JRE as bait in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) one-hybrid transcription factor screening. The binding of one class of proteins bearing a single AT-hook DNA-binding motif was affected by mutations in the quantitative sequence within the JRE. Two of the AT-hook proteins tested had a weak activating effect on JRE-mediated reporter gene expression, suggesting that AT-hook family members may be involved in determining the level of expression of ORCA3 in response to jasmonate. PMID:17496112

  13. Structural Determinants of DNA Binding by a P. falciparum ApiAP2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Scott E.; De Silva, Erandi K.; Keck, James L.; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-11-05

    Putative transcription factors have only recently been identified in the Plasmodium spp., with the major family of regulators comprising the Apicomplexan Apetala2 (AP2) proteins. To better understand the DNA-binding mechanisms of these transcriptional regulators, we characterized the structure and in vitro function of an AP2 DNA-binding domain from a prototypical Apicomplexan AP2 protein, PF14{_}0633 from Plasmodium falciparum. The X-ray crystal structure of the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain bound to DNA reveals a {beta}-sheet fold that binds the DNA major groove through base-specific and backbone contacts; a prominent {alpha}-helix supports the {beta}-sheet structure. Substitution of predicted DNA-binding residues with alanine weakened or eliminated DNA binding in solution. In contrast to plant AP2 domains, the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain dimerizes upon binding to DNA through a domain-swapping mechanism in which the {alpha}-helices of the AP2 domains pack against the {beta}-sheets of the dimer mates. DNA-induced dimerization of PF14{_}0633 may be important for tethering two distal DNA loci together in the nucleus and/or for inducing functional rearrangements of its domains to facilitate transcriptional regulation. Consistent with a multisite binding mode, at least two copies of the consensus sequence recognized by PF14{_}0633 are present upstream of a previously identified group of sporozoite-stage genes. Taken together, these findings illustrate how Plasmodium has adapted the AP2 DNA-binding domain for genome-wide transcriptional regulation.

  14. Structural determinants of DNA binding by a P. falciparum ApiAP2 transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Scott E.; De Silva, Erandi K.; Keck, James L.; Llinás, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Putative transcription factors have only recently been identified in the Plasmodium spp., with the major family of regulators comprising the Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) proteins. To better understand the DNA-binding mechanisms of these transcriptional regulators, we characterized the structure and in vitro function of an AP2 DNA-binding domain from a prototypical ApiAP2 protein, PF14_0633 from Plasmodium falciparum. The X-ray crystal structure of the PF14_0633 AP2 domain bound to DNA reveals a β-sheet fold that binds the DNA major groove through base-specific and backbone contacts; a prominent α-helix supports the β-sheet structure. Substitution of predicted DNA-binding residues with alanine weakened or eliminated DNA binding in solution. In contrast to plant AP2 domains, the PF14_0633 AP2 domain dimerizes upon binding to DNA through a domain-swapping mechanism in which the α-helices of the AP2 domains pack against the β-sheets of the dimer mates. DNA-induced dimerization of PF14_0633 may be important for tethering two distal DNA loci together in the nucleus and/or for inducing functional rearrangements of its domains to facilitate transcriptional regulation. Consistent with a multi-site binding mode, at least two copies of the consensus sequence recognized by PF14_0633 are present upstream of a previously identified group of sporozoite-stage genes. Taken together, these findings illustrate how Plasmodium has adapted the AP2 DNA-binding domain for genome-wide transcriptional regulation. PMID:19913037

  15. Activation of heat shock gene transcription by heat shock factor 1 involves oligomerization, acquisition of DNA-binding activity, and nuclear localization and can occur in the absence of stress.

    PubMed Central

    Sarge, K D; Murphy, S P; Morimoto, R I

    1993-01-01

    The existence of multiple heat shock factor (HSF) genes in higher eukaryotes has promoted questions regarding the functions of these HSF family members, especially with respect to the stress response. To address these questions, we have used polyclonal antisera raised against mouse HSF1 and HSF2 to examine the biochemical, physical, and functional properties of these two factors in unstressed and heat-shocked mouse and human cells. We have identified HSF1 as the mediator of stress-induced heat shock gene transcription. HSF1 displays stress-induced DNA-binding activity, oligomerization, and nuclear localization, while HSF2 does not. Also, HSF1 undergoes phosphorylation in cells exposed to heat or cadmium sulfate but not in cells treated with the amino acid analog L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, indicating that phosphorylation of HSF1 is not essential for its activation. Interestingly, HSF1 and HSF2 overexpressed in transfected 3T3 cells both display constitutive DNA-binding activity, oligomerization, and transcriptional activity. These results demonstrate that HSF1 can be activated in the absence of physiological stress and also provide support for a model of regulation of HSF1 and HSF2 activity by a titratable negative regulatory factor. Images PMID:8441385

  16. Deciphering the Combinatorial DNA-binding Code of the CCAAT-binding Complex and the Iron-regulatory Basic Region Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Transcription Factor HapX*

    PubMed Central

    Hortschansky, Peter; Ando, Eriko; Tuppatsch, Katja; Arikawa, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Haas, Hubertus; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    The heterotrimeric CCAAT-binding complex (CBC) is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, plants, and mammals. The CBC consists of three subunits, which are named in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans HapB, HapC, and HapE. HapX, a fourth CBC subunit, was identified exclusively in fungi, except for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the closely related Saccharomycotina species. The CBC-HapX complex acts as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. HapX belongs to the class of basic region leucine zipper transcription factors. We demonstrated that the CBC and HapX bind cooperatively to bipartite DNA motifs with a general HapX/CBC/DNA 2:1:1 stoichiometry in a class of genes that are repressed by HapX-CBC in A. nidulans during iron limitation. This combinatorial binding mode requires protein-protein interaction between the N-terminal domain of HapE and the N-terminal CBC binding domain of HapX as well as sequence-specific DNA binding of both the CBC and HapX. Initial binding of the CBC to CCAAT boxes is mandatory for DNA recognition of HapX. HapX specifically targets the minimal motif 5′-GAT-3′, which is located at a distance of 11–12 bp downstream of the respective CCAAT box. Single nucleotide substitutions at the 5′- and 3′-end of the GAT motif as well as different spacing between the CBC and HapX DNA-binding sites revealed a remarkable promiscuous DNA-recognition mode of HapX. This flexible DNA-binding code may have evolved as a mechanism for fine-tuning the transcriptional activity of CBC-HapX at distinct target promoters. PMID:25589790

  17. An RNA aptamer that interferes with the DNA binding of the HSF transcription activator

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoching; Shi, Hua; Sevilimedu, Aarti; Liachko, Nicole; Nelson, Hillary C. M.; Lis, John T.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor (HSF) is a conserved and highly potent transcription activator. It is involved in a wide variety of important biological processes including the stress response and specific steps in normal development. Reagents that interfere with HSF function would be useful for both basic studies and practical applications. We selected an RNA aptamer that binds to HSF with high specificity. Deletion analysis defined the minimal binding motif of this aptamer to be two stems and one stem–loop joined by a three-way junction. This RNA aptamer interferes with normal interaction of HSF with its DNA element, which is a key regulatory step for HSF function. The DNA-binding domain plus a flanking linker region on the HSF (DL) is essential for the RNA binding. Additionally, this aptamer inhibits HSF-induced transcription in vitro in the complex milieu of a whole cell extract. In contrast to the previously characterized NF-κB aptamer, the HSF aptamer does not simply mimic DNA binding, but rather binds to HSF in a manner distinct from DNA binding to HSF. PMID:16893958

  18. HMG1 interacts with HOX proteins and enhances their DNA binding and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Zappavigna, V; Falciola, L; Helmer-Citterich, M; Mavilio, F; Bianchi, M E

    1996-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1 (HMG1) is a non-histone, chromatin-associated nuclear protein with a proposed role in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. We show that HMG1 interacts with proteins encoded by the HOX gene family by establishing protein-protein contacts between the HMG box domains and the HOX homeodomain. The functional role of these interactions was studied using the transcriptional activity of the human HOXD9 protein as a model. HMG1 enhances, in a dose-dependent fashion, the sequence-specific DNA binding activity in vitro, and the transcriptional activation in a co-transfection assay in vivo, of the HOXD9 protein. Functional interaction between HMG1 and HOXD9 is dependent on the DNA binding activity of the homeodomain, and requires the HOXD9 transcriptional activation domain. HMG1 enhances activation by HOXD9, but not by HOXD8, of the HOXD9-controlled element. Specific target recognition and functional interaction with HMG1 can be transferred to HOXD8 by homeodomain swapping. We propose that HMG1-like proteins might be general co-factors in HOX-mediated transcriptional activation, which facilitate access of HOX proteins to specific DNA targets, and/or introduce architectural constraints in the assembly of HOX-containing transcriptional complexes. Images PMID:8890171

  19. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-08-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  20. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  1. [Recruiting of insulator protein ZIPIC of Drosophila melanogaster to minor binding sites in vivo depends on other DNA-binding transcription factors].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, N A; Kyrchanova, O V; Maksimenko, O G; Georgiev, P G

    2015-01-01

    ZIPIC insulator protein of Drosophila has seven zinc finger domains at the C-terminus. Some of this zinc fingers are involved in binding of specific DNA sequence: CAGGGCTG. ZIPIC can interact only in vivo with minor form of this site (substitution of G to T at position 4). Possible explanation is interaction with additional transcription factors can help ZIPIC to bind minor form of consensus. On the other hand ZIPIC can efficiently bind in vitro other minor form of consensus (substitution of C to A at 6 position). PMID:26710784

  2. ChIP analysis unravels an exceptionally wide distribution of DNA binding sites for the NtcA transcription factor in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The CRP-family transcription factor NtcA, universally found in cyanobacteria, was initially discovered as a regulator operating N control. It responds to the N regime signaled by the internal 2-oxoglutarate levels, an indicator of the C to N balance of the cells. Canonical NtcA-activated promoters bear an NtcA-consensus binding site (GTAN8TAC) centered at about 41.5 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start point. In strains of the Anabaena/Nostoc genera NtcA is pivotal for the differentiation of heterocysts in response to N stress. Results In this study, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to identify the whole catalog of NtcA-binding sites in cells of the filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 three hours after the withdrawal of combined N. NtcA has been found to bind to 2,424 DNA regions in the genome of Anabaena, which have been ascribed to 2,153 genes. Interestingly, only a small proportion of those genes are involved in N assimilation and metabolism, and 65% of the binding regions were located intragenically. Conclusions The distribution of NtcA-binding sites identified here reveals the largest bacterial regulon described to date. Our results show that NtcA has a much wider role in the physiology of the cell than it has been previously thought, acting both as a global transcriptional regulator and possibly also as a factor influencing the superstructure of the chromosome (and plasmids). PMID:24417914

  3. Complex Structure of the DNA-binding Domain of AdpA, the Global Transcription Factor in Streptomyces griseus, and a Target Duplex DNA Reveals the Structural Basis of Its Tolerant DNA Sequence Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ming Dong; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Zhi, Yuehua; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Tanokura, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    AdpA serves as the global transcription factor in the A-factor regulatory cascade, controlling the secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation of the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces griseus. AdpA binds to over 500 operator regions with the consensus sequence 5′-TGGCSNGWWY-3′ (where S is G or C, W is A or T, Y is T or C, and N is any nucleotide). However, it is still obscure how AdpA can control hundreds of genes. To elucidate the structural basis of this tolerant DNA recognition by AdpA, we focused on the interaction between the DNA-binding domain of AdpA (AdpA-DBD), which consists of two helix-turn-helix motifs, and a target duplex DNA containing the consensus sequence 5′-TGGCGGGTTC-3′. The crystal structure of the AdpA-DBD-DNA complex and the mutant analysis of AdpA-DBD revealed its unique manner of DNA recognition, whereby only two arginine residues directly recognize the consensus sequence, explaining the strict recognition of G and C at positions 2 and 4, respectively, and the tolerant recognition of other positions of the consensus sequence. AdpA-DBD confers tolerant DNA sequence specificity to AdpA, allowing it to control hundreds of genes as a global transcription factor. PMID:24019524

  4. The DNA-binding domain of two bZIP transcription factors, the Epstein-Barr virus switch gene product EB1 and Jun, is a bipartite nuclear targeting sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Mikaélian, I; Drouet, E; Marechal, V; Denoyel, G; Nicolas, J C; Sergeant, A

    1993-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 gene product EB1 (also called ZEBRA and Zta), is a transcription factor belonging to the bZIP (basic domain leucine zipper) family of nuclear proteins. Translocation to the nucleus of EB1 (J. Becker, U. Leser, M. Marschall, A. Langford, W. Jilg, H. Gelderblom, P. Reichart, and H. Wolf, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:8332-8336, 1991) and of two other bZIP proteins, c-Jun and c-Fos (P. Roux, J.-M. Blanchard, A. Fernandez, N. Lamb, P. Jeanteur, and M. Piechaczyk, Cell 63:341-351, 1990), has been shown to be subject to regulation. We show here that for both EB1 and Jun the nuclear targeting signals (NTS) in the proteins' primary sequences are two clusters of positively charged amino acids. These clusters, called BRA and BRB, are necessary and sufficient to direct beta-galactosidase to the nuclear compartment and act as a bipartite NTS. They are conserved among all the bZIP proteins, and although they are not identical, they probably share the same function. Site-directed mutagenesis studies made on these basic clusters suggest that they also act as a bipartite NTS in the EB1 protein. Our results also demonstrate that in EB1 and Jun, these bipartite NTS are superimposed with bipartite DNA-binding domains, since BRA and BRB are required in vitro for direct and specific contact between these proteins and their DNA-binding sites. Images PMID:8380464

  5. The BEN domain is a novel sequence-specific DNA-binding domain conserved in neural transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Serganov, Artem A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lai, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that Drosophila Insensitive (Insv) promotes sensory organ development and has activity as a nuclear corepressor for the Notch transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)]. Insv lacks domains of known biochemical function but contains a single BEN domain (i.e., a “BEN-solo” protein). Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis confirmed binding of Insensitive to Su(H) target genes in the Enhancer of split gene complex [E(spl)-C]; however, de novo motif analysis revealed a novel site strongly enriched in Insv peaks (TCYAATHRGAA). We validate binding of endogenous Insv to genomic regions bearing such sites, whose associated genes are enriched for neural functions and are functionally repressed by Insv. Unexpectedly, we found that the Insv BEN domain binds specifically to this sequence motif and that Insv directly regulates transcription via this motif. We determined the crystal structure of the BEN–DNA target complex, revealing homodimeric binding of the BEN domain and extensive nucleotide contacts via α helices and a C-terminal loop. Point mutations in key DNA-contacting residues severely impair DNA binding in vitro and capacity for transcriptional regulation in vivo. We further demonstrate DNA-binding and repression activities by the mammalian neural BEN-solo protein BEND5. Altogether, we define novel DNA-binding activity in a conserved family of transcriptional repressors, opening a molecular window on this extensive gene family. PMID:23468431

  6. Distinct DNA Binding Sites Contribute to the TCF Transcriptional Switch in C. elegans and Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bhambhani, Chandan; Ravindranath, Aditi J.; Mentink, Remco A.; Chang, Mikyung V.; Betist, Marco C.; Yang, Yaxuan X.; Koushika, Sandhya P.; Korswagen, Hendrik C.; Cadigan, Ken M.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by signaling pathways often occurs through a transcriptional switch, where the transcription factor responsible for signal-dependent gene activation represses the same targets in the absence of signaling. T-cell factors (TCFs) are transcription factors in the Wnt/ß-catenin pathway, which control numerous cell fate specification events in metazoans. The TCF transcriptional switch is mediated by many co-regulators that contribute to repression or activation of Wnt target genes. It is typically assumed that DNA recognition by TCFs is important for target gene location, but plays no role in the actual switch. TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) and some vertebrate TCF isoforms bind DNA through two distinct domains, a High Mobility Group (HMG) domain and a C-clamp, which recognize DNA motifs known as HMG and Helper sites, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that POP-1 (the C. elegans TCF) also activates target genes through HMG and Helper site interactions. Helper sites enhanced the ability of a synthetic enhancer to detect Wnt/ß-catenin signaling in several tissues and revealed an unsuspected role for POP-1 in regulating the C. elegans defecation cycle. Searching for HMG-Helper site clusters allowed the identification of a new POP-1 target gene active in the head muscles and gut. While Helper sites and the C-clamp are essential for activation of worm and fly Wnt targets, they are dispensable for TCF-dependent repression of targets in the absence of Wnt signaling. These data suggest that a fundamental change in TCF-DNA binding contributes to the transcriptional switch that occurs upon Wnt stimulation. PMID:24516405

  7. Distinct DNA binding sites contribute to the TCF transcriptional switch in C. elegans and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Chandan; Ravindranath, Aditi J; Mentink, Remco A; Chang, Mikyung V; Betist, Marco C; Yang, Yaxuan X; Koushika, Sandhya P; Korswagen, Hendrik C; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-02-01

    Regulation of gene expression by signaling pathways often occurs through a transcriptional switch, where the transcription factor responsible for signal-dependent gene activation represses the same targets in the absence of signaling. T-cell factors (TCFs) are transcription factors in the Wnt/ß-catenin pathway, which control numerous cell fate specification events in metazoans. The TCF transcriptional switch is mediated by many co-regulators that contribute to repression or activation of Wnt target genes. It is typically assumed that DNA recognition by TCFs is important for target gene location, but plays no role in the actual switch. TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) and some vertebrate TCF isoforms bind DNA through two distinct domains, a High Mobility Group (HMG) domain and a C-clamp, which recognize DNA motifs known as HMG and Helper sites, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that POP-1 (the C. elegans TCF) also activates target genes through HMG and Helper site interactions. Helper sites enhanced the ability of a synthetic enhancer to detect Wnt/ß-catenin signaling in several tissues and revealed an unsuspected role for POP-1 in regulating the C. elegans defecation cycle. Searching for HMG-Helper site clusters allowed the identification of a new POP-1 target gene active in the head muscles and gut. While Helper sites and the C-clamp are essential for activation of worm and fly Wnt targets, they are dispensable for TCF-dependent repression of targets in the absence of Wnt signaling. These data suggest that a fundamental change in TCF-DNA binding contributes to the transcriptional switch that occurs upon Wnt stimulation. PMID:24516405

  8. DNA binding by Corynebacterium glutamicum TetR-type transcription regulator AmtR

    PubMed Central

    Muhl, Daniela; Jeßberger, Nadja; Hasselt, Kristin; Jardin, Christophe; Sticht, Heinrich; Burkovski, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background The TetR family member AmtR is the central regulator of nitrogen starvation response in Corynebacterium glutamicum. While the AmtR regulon was physiologically characterized in great detail up to now, mechanistic questions of AmtR binding were not addressed. This study presents a characterization of functionally important amino acids in the DNA binding domain of AmtR and of crucial nucleotides in the AmtR recognition motif. Results Site-directed mutagenesis, the characterization of corresponding mutant proteins by gel retardation assays and surface plasmon resonance and molecular modelling revealed several amino acids, which are directly involved in DNA binding, while others have more structural function. Furthermore, we could show that the spacing of the binding motif half sites is crucial for repression of transcription by AmtR. Conclusion Although the DNA binding domain of TetR-type repressors is highly conserved and a core binding motif was identified for AmtR and TetR(D), the AmtR binding domain shows individual properties compared to other TetR proteins. Besides by distinct amino acids of AmtR, DNA binding is influenced by nucleotides not only of the conserved binding motif but also by spacing nucleotides in C. glutamicum. PMID:19627583

  9. Genomewide analysis of Drosophila GAGA factor target genes reveals context-dependent DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel, Bas; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2003-01-01

    The association of sequence-specific DNA-binding factors with their cognate target sequences in vivo depends on the local molecular context, yet this context is poorly understood. To address this issue, we have performed genomewide mapping of in vivo target genes of Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF). The resulting list of ≈250 target genes indicates that GAF regulates many cellular pathways. We applied unbiased motif-based regression analysis to identify the sequence context that determines GAF binding. Our results confirm that GAF selectively associates with (GA)n repeat elements in vivo. GAF binding occurs in upstream regulatory regions, but less in downstream regions. Surprisingly, GAF binds abundantly to introns but is virtually absent from exons, even though the density of (GA)n is roughly the same. Intron binding occurs equally frequently in last introns compared with first introns, suggesting that GAF may not only regulate transcription initiation, but possibly also elongation. We provide evidence for cooperative binding of GAF to closely spaced (GA)n elements and explain the lack of GAF binding to exons by the absence of such closely spaced GA repeats. Our approach for revealing determinants of context-dependent DNA binding will be applicable to many other transcription factors. PMID:12601174

  10. Structure, function, and tethering of DNA-binding domains in σ⁵⁴ transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Vidangos, Natasha; Maris, Ann E; Young, Anisa; Hong, Eunmi; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Batchelor, Joseph D; Wemmer, David E

    2013-12-01

    We compare the structure, activity, and linkage of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) from σ(54) transcriptional activators and discuss how the properties of the DBDs and the linker to the neighboring domain are affected by the overall properties and requirements of the full proteins. These transcriptional activators bind upstream of specific promoters that utilize σ(54)-polymerase. Upon receiving a signal the activators assemble into hexamers, which then, through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis, drive a conformational change in polymerase that enables transcription initiation. We present structures of the DBDs of activators nitrogen regulatory protein C 1 (NtrC1) and Nif-like homolog 2 (Nlh2) from the thermophile Aquifex aeolicus. The structures of these domains and their relationship to other parts of the activators are discussed. These structures are compared with previously determined structures of the DBDs of NtrC4, NtrC, ZraR, and factor for inversion stimulation. The N-terminal linkers that connect the DBDs to the central domains in NtrC1 and Nlh2 were studied and found to be unstructured. Additionally, a crystal structure of full-length NtrC1 was solved, but density of the DBDs was extremely weak, further indicating that the linker between ATPase and DBDs functions as a flexible tether. Flexible linking of ATPase and DBDs is likely necessary to allow assembly of the active hexameric ATPase ring. The comparison of this set of activators also shows clearly that strong dimerization of the DBD only occurs when other domains do not dimerize strongly. PMID:23818155

  11. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01). The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01). The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle. PMID:27414795

  12. Cloning of two sea urchin DNA-binding proteins involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Megli, Fiammetta; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Roberti, Marina

    2002-03-01

    The cloning of the cDNA for two mitochondrial proteins involved in sea urchin mtDNA replication and transcription is reported here. The cDNA for the mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has been cloned by a polymerase chain reaction-based approach. The protein displays a very high similarity with the Paracentrotus lividus homologue as it contains also the two leucine zipper-like domains which are thought to be involved in intramolecular interactions needed to expose the two DNA binding domains in the correct position for contacting DNA. The cDNA for the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB) from P. lividus has been also cloned by a similar approach. The precursor protein is 146 amino acids long with a presequence of 16 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shows the highest homology with the Xenopus laevis protein and the lowest with the Drosophila mtSSB. The computer modeling of the tertiary structure of P. lividus mtSSB shows a structure very similar to that experimentally determined for human mtSSB, with the conservation of the main residues involved in protein tetramerization and in DNA binding. PMID:11943466

  13. Prolactin, growth hormone, erythropoietin and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor induce MGF-Stat5 DNA binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gouilleux, F; Pallard, C; Dusanter-Fourt, I; Wakao, H; Haldosen, L A; Norstedt, G; Levy, D; Groner, B

    1995-01-01

    The molecular components which mediate cytokine signaling from the cell membrane to the nucleus were studied. Upon the interaction of cytokines with their receptors, members of the janus kinase (Jak) family of cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases and of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) family of transcription factors are activated through tyrosine phosphorylation. It has been suggested that the Stat proteins are substrates of the Jak protein tyrosine kinases. MGF-Stat5 is a member of the Stat family which has been found to confer the prolactin response. MGF-Stat5 can be phosphorylated and activated in its DNA binding activity by Jak2. The activation of MGF-Stat5 is not restricted to prolactin. Erythropoietin (EPO) and growth hormone (GH) stimulate the DNA binding activity of MGF-Stat5 in COS cells transfected with vectors encoding EPO receptor and MGF-Stat5 or vectors encoding GH receptor and MGF-Stat5. The activation of DNA binding by prolactin, EPO and GH requires the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 694 of MGF-Stat5. The transcriptional induction of a beta-casein promoter luciferase construct in transiently transfected COS cells is specific for the prolactin activation of MGF-Stat5; it is not observed in EPO- and GH-treated cells. In the UT7 human hematopoietic cell line, EPO and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor activate the DNA binding activity of a factor closely related to MGF-Stat5 with respect to its immunological reactivity, DNA binding specificity and molecular weight. These results suggest that MGF-Stat5 regulates physiological processes in mammary epithelial cells, as well as in hematopoietic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7744007

  14. Prolactin induces phosphorylation of Tyr694 of Stat5 (MGF), a prerequisite for DNA binding and induction of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gouilleux, F; Wakao, H; Mundt, M; Groner, B

    1994-01-01

    Mammary gland factor (MGF) is a transcription factor discovered initially in the mammary epithelial cells of lactating animals. It confers the lactogenic hormone response to the milk protein genes. We reported recently the isolation of the cDNA encoding MGF. MGF is a novel member of the cytokine-regulated transcription factor gene family. Members of this gene family mediate interferon alpha/beta and interferon gamma induction of gene transcription, as well as the response to epidermal growth factor and interleukin-6, and have been named signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat). The name Stat5 has been assigned to MGF. We studied the mechanisms involved in the prolactin activation of Stat5 in COS cells co-transfected with cDNA encoding Stat5 and the prolactin receptor. Prolactin treatment of the transfected cells caused activation of Stat5 within 5-10 min. This activation does not require ongoing protein synthesis. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors prevent Stat5 activation in transfected COS cells. Treatment of recombinant Stat5 with a tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase in vitro abolishes its DNA binding activity. Prolactin stimulation of transfected cells induces Stat5 phosphorylation on tyrosine. Phosphorylation of in vitro transcribed and translated Stat5 with the Jak2 tyrosine kinase, but not with fyn, lyn or lck, confers DNA binding activity. The prolactin response of the beta-casein milk protein gene promoter can be observed in COS cells transfected with cDNA vectors encoding Stat5 and the long form of the prolactin receptor. The short form of the prolactin receptor is unable to promote Stat5 phosphorylation and confer transcriptional induction in COS cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7925280

  15. Modulation of Promoter Occupancy by Cooperative DNA Binding and Activation-Domain Function is a Major Determinant of Transcriptional Regulation by Activators in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masafumi

    1996-04-01

    Binding of transcriptional activators to a promoter is a prerequisite process in transcriptional activation. It is well established that the efficiency of activator binding to a promoter is determined by the affinity of direct interactions between the DNA-binding domain of an activator and its specific target sequences. However, I describe here that activator binding to a promoter is augmented in vivo by the effects of two other determinants that have not been generally appreciated: (i) the number of activator binding sites present in a promoter and (ii) the potency of activation domains of activators. Multiple sites within a promoter can cooperatively recruit cognate factors regardless of whether they contain an effective activation domain. This cooperativity can result in the synergistic activation of transcription. The second effect is the enhancement of activator binding to a promoter by the presence of activation domains. In this case, activation domains are not simply tethered to the promoter by the DNA-binding domain but instead assist the DNA-binding domain being tethered onto the promoter. This effect of activation domains on DNA binding is instrumental in determining how potent activators can induce steep transcriptional increases at low concentrations.

  16. Regulation of WT1 by phosphorylation: inhibition of DNA binding, alteration of transcriptional activity and cellular translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Y; Raychaudhuri, B; Gurney, A; Campbell, C E; Williams, B R

    1996-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the major post-translational mechanisms by which the activity of transcription factors is regulated. We have investigated the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of nucleic acid binding activity and the nuclear translocation of WT1. Two recombinant WT1 proteins containing the DNA binding domain with or without a three amino acid (KTS) insertion (WT1ZF + KTS and WT1ZF - KTS) were strongly phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro. Both PKA and PKC phosphorylation inhibited the ability of WT1ZF + KTS or WT1ZF - KTS to bind to a sequence derived from the WT1 promoter region in gel mobility shift assays. The binding of WT1ZF - KTS to an EGR1 consensus binding site was also inhibited by prior PKA and PKC phosphorylation. We also demonstrate the RNA binding activity of WT1, but this was not altered by phosphorylation. PKA activation by dibutyryl cAMP in WT1-transfected cells resulted in the reversal of WT1 suppression of a reporter construct. Although WT1 protein is predominantly localized to the nucleus, this expression pattern is altered upon PKA activation, resulting in the cytoplasmic retention of WT1. Accordingly, phosphorylation may play a role in modulating the transcriptional regulatory activity of WT1 through interference with nuclear translocation, as well as by inhibition of WT1 DNA binding. Images PMID:8896454

  17. AmrZ Beta-Sheet Residues Are Essential for DNA Binding and Transcriptional Control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Genes ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Waligora, Elizabeth A.; Ramsey, Deborah M.; Pryor, Edward E.; Lu, Haiping; Hollis, Thomas; Sloan, Gina P.; Deora, Rajendar; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    AmrZ is a putative ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) transcriptional regulator. RHH proteins utilize residues within the β-sheet for DNA binding, while the α-helices promote oligomerization. AmrZ is of interest due to its dual roles as a transcriptional activator and as a repressor, regulating genes encoding virulence factors associated with both chronic and acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. In this study, cross-linking revealed that AmrZ forms oligomers in solution but that the amino terminus, containing an unordered region and a β-sheet, were not required for oligomerization. The first 12 unordered residues (extended amino terminus) contributed minimally to DNA binding. Mutagenesis of the AmrZ β-sheet demonstrated that residues 18, 20, and 22 were essential for DNA binding at both activation and repressor sites, suggesting that AmrZ utilizes a similar mechanism for binding to these sites. Mice infected with amrZ mutants exhibited reduced bacterial burden, morbidity, and mortality. Direct in vivo competition assays showed a 5-fold competitive advantage for the wild type over an isogenic amrZ mutant. Finally, the reduced infection phenotype of the amrZ-null strain was similar to that of a strain expressing a DNA-binding-deficient AmrZ variant, indicating that DNA binding and transcriptional regulation by AmrZ is responsible for the in vivo virulence defect. These recent infection data, along with previously identified AmrZ-regulated virulence factors, suggest the necessity of AmrZ transcriptional regulation for optimal virulence during acute infection. PMID:20709902

  18. A rat brain mRNA encoding a transcriptional activator homologous to the DNA binding domain of retroviral integrases.

    PubMed Central

    Duilio, A; Zambrano, N; Mogavero, A R; Ammendola, R; Cimino, F; Russo, T

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a rat cDNA, named FE65, hybridizing to an mRNA of about 2,300 nucleotides present in rat brain, undetectable in rat liver and very poorly represented in other tissues. An mRNA of the same size is present in human neuroblastoma cells and is absent from other human cell lines. The FE65 cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a polypeptide of 499 amino acids in which 143 residues can be aligned with the DNA binding domain of the integrases encoded by mammalian immunodeficiency viruses. The remaining part of the FE65 ORF is not homologous with the correspondent regions of the integrases; the first 206 residues of the FE65 ORF show numerous negative charges and a short sequence not dispensable for the function of the transactivating acidic domain of the jun family transcriptional factors. A plasmid which expresses FE65 amino acids 1-232 fused to the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain was co-transfected with a plasmid containing five GAL4 binding sites upstream of a minimal Adenovirus promoter controlling the expression of the CAT gene. This experiment showed that the fused protein GAL4-FE65 is able to obtain a 30-40 fold increase of the CAT gene expression compared to the expression observed in the presence of the GAL4 DNA binding domain alone. Two types of FE65 mRNA are present in rat brain, differing only for six nucleotides. We demonstrate that this is the consequence of a neuron-specific alternative splicing of a six-nucleotide miniexon, which is also present in the human genome, in an intron/exon context very similar to that of the rat FE65 gene. Images PMID:1923810

  19. A pleiotropic element in the medium-chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene promoter mediates transcriptional regulation by multiple nuclear receptor transcription factors and defines novel receptor-DNA binding motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, M E; Gulick, T; Moore, D D; Kelly, D P

    1994-01-01

    We previously identified a complex regulatory element in the medium-chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene promoter that confers transcriptional regulation by the retinoid receptors RAR and RXR and the orphan nuclear receptor HNF-4. In this study we demonstrate a trans-repressing regulatory function for the orphan receptor COUP-TF at this same nuclear receptor response element (NRRE-1). The transcriptional regulatory properties and receptor binding sequences of each nuclear receptor response element within NRRE-1 are also characterized. NRRE-1 consists of four potential nuclear hormone receptor hexamer binding sites, arranged as [<--1-(n)s-2-->-3-->(n)4<--4], three of which are used in alternative pairwise binding by COUP-TF and HNF-4 homodimers and by RAR-RXR heterodimers, as demonstrated by mobility shift assays and methylation interference analysis. Binding and transactivation studies with mutant NRRE-1 elements confirmed the existence of distinct retinoid, COUP-TF, and HNF-4 response elements that define novel receptor binding motifs: COUP-TF homodimers bound sites 1 and 3 (two hexamer repeat sequences arranged as an everted imperfect repeat separated by 14 bp or ER14), RAR-RXR heterodimers bound sites 1 and 2 (ER8), and HNF-4 homodimers bound sites 2 and 3 (imperfect DR0). Mixing cotransfection experiments demonstrated that the nuclear receptor dimers compete at NRRE-1 to modulate constitutive and ligand-mediated transcriptional activity. These data suggest a mechanism for the transcriptional modulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8007945

  20. A Unique DNA Binding Domain Converts T-Cell Factors into Strong Wnt Effectors▿

    PubMed Central

    Atcha, Fawzia A.; Syed, Adeela; Wu, Beibei; Hoverter, Nate P.; Yokoyama, Noriko N.; Ting, Ju-Hui T.; Munguia, Jesus E.; Mangalam, Harry J.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Waterman, Marian L.

    2007-01-01

    Wnt regulation of gene expression requires binding of LEF/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) transcription factors to Wnt response elements (WREs) and recruitment of the activator β-catenin. There are significant differences in the abilities of LEF/TCF family members to regulate Wnt target genes. For example, alternatively spliced isoforms of TCF-1 and TCF-4 with a C-terminal “E” tail are uniquely potent in their activation of LEF1 and CDX1. Here we report that the mechanism responsible for this unique activity is an auxiliary 30-amino-acid DNA interaction motif referred to here as the “cysteine clamp” (or C-clamp). The C-clamp contains invariant cysteine, aromatic, and basic residues, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies with recombinant C-clamp protein showed that it binds double-stranded DNA but not single-stranded DNA or RNA (equilibrium dissociation constant = 16 nM). CASTing (Cyclic Amplification and Selection of Targets) experiments were used to test whether this motif influences WRE recognition. Full-length LEF-1, TCF-1E, and TCF-1E with a mutated C-clamp all bind nearly identical WREs (TYYCTTTGATSTT), showing that the C-clamp does not alter WRE specificity. However, a GC element downstream of the WRE (RCCG) is enriched in wild-type TCF-1E binding sites but not in mutant TCF-1E binding sites. We conclude that the C-clamp is a sequence-specific DNA binding motif. C-clamp mutations destroy the ability of β-catenin to regulate the LEF1 promoter, and they severely impair the ability of TCF-1 to regulate growth in colon cancer cells. Thus, E-tail isoforms of TCFs utilize two DNA binding activities to access a subset of Wnt targets important for cell growth. PMID:17893322

  1. Embryonic Neural Inducing Factor Churchill is not a DNA-Binding Zinc Finger Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian M.; Buck-Koehntop, Bethany A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A.; Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.

    2007-01-01

    Churchill is a zinc-containing protein that is involved in neural induction during embryogenesis. At the time of its discovery, it was thought on the basis of sequence alignment to contain two zinc fingers of the C4 type. Further, binding of an N-terminal GST-Churchill fusion protein to a particular DNA sequence was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation selection assay, suggesting that Churchill may function as a transcriptional regulator by sequence-specific DNA binding. We show by NMR solution structure determination that, far from containing canonical C4 zinc fingers, the protein contains three bound zinc ions in novel coordination sites, including an unusual binuclear zinc cluster. The secondary structure of Churchill is also unusual, consisting of a highly solvent exposed single-layer β-sheet. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and backbone relaxation measurements reveals that Churchill is unusually dynamic on a number of time scales, with the exception of regions surrounding the zinc coordinating sites, which serve to stabilize the otherwise unstructured N-terminus and the single-layer β-sheet. No binding of Churchill to the previously-identified DNA sequence could be detected, and extensive searches using DNA sequence selection techniques could find no other DNA sequence that was bound by Churchill. Since the N-terminal amino acids of Churchill form part of the zinc-binding motif, the addition of a fusion protein at the N-terminus causes loss of zinc and unfolding of Churchill. This observation most likely explains the published DNA-binding results, which would arise due to non-specific interaction of the unfolded protein in the immunoprecipitation selection assay. Since Churchill does not appear to bind DNA, we suggest that it may function in embryogenesis as a protein-interaction factor. PMID:17610897

  2. Cooperative DNA binding and sequence discrimination by the Opaque2 bZIP factor.

    PubMed Central

    Yunes, J A; Vettore, A L; da Silva, M J; Leite, A; Arruda, P

    1998-01-01

    The maize Opaque2 (O2) protein is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that controls the expression of distinct classes of endosperm genes through the recognition of different cis-acting elements in their promoters. The O2 target region in the promoter of the alpha-coixin gene was analyzed in detail and shown to comprise two closely adjacent binding sites, named O2u and O2d, which are related in sequence to the GCN4 binding site. Quantitative DNase footprint analysis indicated that O2 binding to alpha-coixin target sites is best described by a cooperative model. Transient expression assays showed that the two adjacent sites act synergistically. This synergy is mediated in part by cooperative DNA binding. In tobacco protoplasts, O2 binding at the O2u site is more important for enhancer activity than is binding at the O2d site, suggesting that the architecture of the O2-DNA complex is important for interaction with the transcriptional machinery. PMID:9811800

  3. Cooperative DNA binding of the bovine papillomavirus E2 transcriptional activator is antagonized by truncated E2 polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Monini, P; Blitz, I L; Cassai, E

    1993-01-01

    Cooperative DNA binding of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) E2 transcriptional activator (E2-TA) is thought to play a role in the transcriptional synergism of multiple E2-responsive DNA elements (J. Ham, N. Dostatni, J.-M. Gauthier, and M. Yaniv, Trends Biochem. Sci. 16:440-444, 1991). Binding-equilibrium considerations show that such involvement is unlikely, thereby suggesting that the E2-TA cooperative capacity may have evolved to play other, different roles. The role of cooperative interactions in the antagonistic activity of BPV-1-positive and BPV-1-negative E2 regulatory proteins was investigated by an in vitro quantitative gel shift assay. Viral repressor E2-TR, a truncated peptide encompassing the activator DNA-binding domain, possesses a small but measurable cooperative capacity. Furthermore, the minimal E2 DNA-binding domain interacts with the activator in a positive, heterocooperative manner. As a result, the in vitro competition of full-length and truncated E2 peptides appears to be (macroscopically) noncooperative. This heterocooperative effect is probably dominant in latently infected G0-G1 cells, in which repressor E2-TR is 10- to 20-fold more abundant than the activator. The data are discussed considering the possible role of homo- and heterocooperative DNA binding in E2-conditional gene expression. Images PMID:8394466

  4. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  5. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  6. Phosphorylation-Induced Dimerization of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Unmasks DNA Binding and a Bipartite Transactivation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Marié, Isabelle; Smith, Eric; Prakash, Arun; Levy, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is an interferon (IFN)-inducible transcription factor required for activation of a subset of IFN-α genes that are expressed with delayed kinetics following viral infection. IRF7 is synthesized as a latent protein and is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation in infected cells. Phosphorylation required a carboxyl-terminal regulatory domain that controlled the retention of the active protein exclusively in the nucleus, as well as its binding to specific DNA target sequences, multimerization, and ability to induce target gene expression. Transcriptional activation by IRF7 mapped to two distinct regions, both of which were required for full activity, while all functions were masked in latent IRF7 by an autoinhibitory domain mapping to an internal region. A conditionally active form of IRF7 was constructed by fusing IRF7 with the ligand-binding and dimerization domain of estrogen receptor (ER). Hormone-dependent dimerization of chimeric IRF7-ER stimulated DNA binding and transcriptional transactivation of endogenous target genes. These studies demonstrate the regulation of IRF7 activity by phosphorylation-dependent allosteric changes that result in dimerization and that facilitate nuclear retention, derepress transactivation, and allow specific DNA binding. PMID:11073981

  7. Applying DNA affinity chromatography to specifically screen for sucrose-related DNA-binding transcriptional regulators of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Alkhateeb, Rabeaa S; Schulte, Fabian; Steffens, Tim; Loka, Tobias Pascal; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg

    2016-08-20

    At a molecular level, the regulation of many important cellular processes is still obscure in xanthomonads, a bacterial group of outstanding relevance as world-wide plant pathogens and important for biotechnology as producers of the polysaccharide xanthan. Transcriptome analysis indicated a sucrose-dependent regulation of 18 genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) B100. The expression of 12 of these genes was clearly increased in the presence of sucrose. Only part of these genes was obviously involved in sucrose utilization. To identify regulatory proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, a DNA fragment-specific pull-down approach was established for Xcc. Putative promoter regions were identified and used to isolate DNA-binding proteins, which were separated by SDS PAGE and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. This led to the identification of four transcriptional regulators, among them the global transcriptional regulator Clp and a previously identified regulator of sucrose utilization, SuxR, plus a third DNA-binding transcriptional regulator encoded by xcc-b100_2861 and recently shown to interact with a cyclic di-GMP-binding protein. The fourth regulatory protein was encoded by xcc-b100_2791. These results indicate DNA fragment-specific pull-down experiments as promising approaches to screen for specific DNA-binding regulatory proteins in Xcc. PMID:27060555

  8. Genome-wide specificity of DNA binding, gene regulation, and chromatin remodeling by TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activators

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Kocak, D. Dewran; Vockley, Christopher M.; Bledsoe, Peggy; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome engineering technologies based on the CRISPR/Cas9 and TALE systems are enabling new approaches in science and biotechnology. However, the specificity of these tools in complex genomes and the role of chromatin structure in determining DNA binding are not well understood. We analyzed the genome-wide effects of TALE- and CRISPR-based transcriptional activators in human cells using ChIP-seq to assess DNA-binding specificity and RNA-seq to measure the specificity of perturbing the transcriptome. Additionally, DNase-seq was used to assess genome-wide chromatin remodeling that occurs as a result of their action. Our results show that these transcription factors are highly specific in both DNA binding and gene regulation and are able to open targeted regions of closed chromatin independent of gene activation. Collectively, these results underscore the potential for these technologies to make precise changes to gene expression for gene and cell therapies or fundamental studies of gene function. PMID:26025803

  9. The protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates SNAP190 to negatively regulate SNAPC DNA binding and human U6 transcription by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Gu, Liping; Husain-Ponnampalam, Rhonda; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Henry, R William

    2007-09-21

    Human U6 small nuclear RNA gene transcription by RNA polymerase III requires the general transcription factor SNAP(C), which binds to human small nuclear RNA core promoter elements and nucleates pre-initiation complex assembly with the Brf2-TFIIIB complex. Multiple components in this pathway are phosphorylated by the protein kinase CK2, including the Bdp1 subunit of the Brf2-TFIIIB complex, and RNA polymerase III, with negative and positive outcomes for U6 transcription, respectively. However, a role for CK2 phosphorylation of SNAP(C) in U6 transcription has not been defined. In this report, we investigated the role of CK2 in modulating the transcriptional properties of SNAP(C) and demonstrate that within SNAP(C), CK2 phosphorylates the N-terminal half of the SNAP190 subunit at two regions (amino acids 20-63 and 514-545) that each contain multiple CK2 consensus sites. SNAP190 phosphorylation by CK2 inhibits both SNAP(C) DNA binding and U6 transcription activity. Mutational analyses of SNAP190 support a model wherein CK2 phosphorylation triggers an allosteric inhibition of the SNAP190 Myb DNA binding domain. PMID:17670747

  10. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  11. Plant transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1995-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression relies on the recognition of promoter elements by transcription factors. In the past several years, a considerable number of (putative) transcription factors have been identified in plants. Some genes coding for these factors were isolated by south-western screening with oligonucleotides as a probe or by homology-based screening, and others were initially isolated by genetic means and subsequently identified as the genes for transcription factors. These transcription factors often form families of structurally related proteins with similar DNA-binding specificities and in addition, they are sometimes involved in related phenomena. Some groups of factors homo- and/or heterodimerize to increase the length and variability of the target sequences. Transcriptional activators, in general, comprise a modular activation domain. The activities of the transcription factors are controlled by post-translational modification, like phosphorylation and glycosylation, as well as at the levels of nuclear transport, oligomerization, etc. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of plant transcription factors to help understand the mechanistic aspects of the transcriptional regulation of genes. PMID:8589926

  12. DNA-binding specificity of Mcm1: operator mutations that alter DNA-bending and transcriptional activities by a MADS box protein.

    PubMed Central

    Acton, T B; Zhong, H; Vershon, A K

    1997-01-01

    The yeast Mcm1 protein is a member of the MADS box family of transcriptional regulatory factors, a class of DNA-binding proteins found in such diverse organisms as yeast, plants, flies, and humans. To explore the protein-DNA interactions of Mcm1 in vivo and in vitro, we have introduced an extensive series of base pair substitutions into an Mcm1 operator site and examined their effects on Mcm1-mediated transcriptional regulation and DNA-binding affinity. Our results show that Mcm1 uses a mechanism to contact the DNA that has some significant differences from the one used by the human serum response factor (SRF), a closely related MADS box protein in which the three-dimensional structure has been determined. One major difference is that 5-bromouracil-mediated photo-cross-linking experiments indicate that Mcm1 is in close proximity to functional groups in the major groove at the center of the recognition site whereas the SRF protein did not exhibit this characteristic. A more significant difference is that mutations at a position outside of the conserved CC(A/T)6GG site significantly reduce Mcm1-dependent DNA bending, while these substitutions have no effect on DNA bending by SRF. This result shows that the DNA bending by Mcm1 is sequence dependent and that the base-specific requirements for bending differ between Mcm1 and SRF. Interestingly, although these substitutions have a large effect on DNA bending and transcriptional activation by Mcm1, they have a relatively small effect on the DNA-binding affinity of the protein. This result suggests that the degree of DNA bending is important for transcriptional activation by Mcm1. PMID:9121436

  13. Repression of platelet-derived growth factor A-chain gene transcription by an upstream silencer element. Participation by sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Maul, R S; Kaetzel, D M

    1996-10-18

    Platelet-derived growth factor A-chain is a potent mitogen expressed in a restricted number of normal and transformed cells. Transient transfection and deletion analysis in BSC-1 (African green monkey, renal epithelial) cells revealed that the -1680 to -1374 region of the A-chain gene repressed homologous and heterologous promoter activities by 60-80%. An S1 nuclease-hypersensitive region (5'SHS) was identified within this region (-1418 to -1388) that exhibited transcriptional silencer activity in BSC-1 and a variety of human tumor cell lines (U87, HepG2, and HeLa). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays conducted with 5'SHS oligodeoxynucleotide probes revealed several binding protein complexes that displayed unique preferences for binding to sense, antisense, and double-stranded forms of the element. Southwestern blot analysis revealed that the antisense strand of 5'SHS binds to nuclear proteins of molecular mass 97, 87, 44, and 17 kDa, whereas the double-stranded form of 5'SHS is recognized by a 70-kDa factor. Mutations within 5'SHS element indicated the necessity of a central 5'-GGGGAGGGGG-3' motif for protein binding and silencer function, while nucleotides flanking both sides of the motif were also critical for repression. These results support a model in which silencer function of 5'SHS is mediated by antisense strand binding proteins, possibly by stabilizing single-stranded DNA conformations required for interaction with enhancer sequences in the proximal promoter region of the A-chain gene. PMID:8824279

  14. Transcriptional activation and repression by cellular DNA-binding protein C/EBP.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, D Q; Shih, C H

    1990-01-01

    A putative transcription factor, C/EBP, isolated from rat liver nuclei, has been shown to bind to at least two different sequence motifs: the CCAAT promoter domain and a core sequence [GTGG(T/A)(T/A)(T/A)G] common to many viral enhancers, including simian virus 40 and human hepatitis B virus. It has been proposed that C/EBP might function as a positive transcription factor by facilitating the communication between promoter and enhancer elements through its dual binding activities to DNA. Surprisingly, results from three different approaches suggest that C/EBP functions as a transcriptional repressor to hepatitis B virus and simian virus 40. Further investigation indicated that C/EBP can function as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor, depending on the reporter gene system. Images PMID:2157040

  15. Insights into the DNA-binding mechanism of a LytTR-type transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Behr, Stefan; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial response regulators (RRs) make contact with DNA through a recognition α-helix in their DNA-binding domains. An emerging class of RRs interacts with DNA via a relatively novel type of binding domain, called the LytTR domain, which is mainly composed of β-strands. YpdB belongs to this latter class, is part of a nutrient-sensing network in Escherichia coli and triggers expression of its only target gene, yhjX, in response to extracellular pyruvate. Expression of yhjX mainly occurs in the late exponential growth phase, and in a pulsed manner. Although the DNA-binding sites for YpdB are well defined, exactly how YpdB initiates pulsed gene expression has remained elusive. To address this question, we measured the binding kinetics of wild-type YpdB and the phosphomimetic variant YpdB-D53E to the yhjX promoter region (PyhjX) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy combined with interaction map® (IM) analysis. Both YpdB and YpdB-D53E bound as monomers to the tandem-repeat sequences in the promoter, with YpdB-D53E displaying a higher maximal binding rate than YpdB. Furthermore, we identified a high-affinity (A-site) and a low-affinity binding site (B-site) within the yhjX promoter. Only YpdB-D53E utilizes an 'AB-BA' DNA-binding mechanism, involving sequential and cooperative promoter binding, and rapid, successive promoter clearance. We propose that response regulator phosphorylation, in combination with the cycle of cooperative DNA binding and rapid promoter clearance just described, can account for pulsed gene expression. PMID:27013338

  16. Insights into the DNA-binding mechanism of a LytTR-type transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Stefan; Heermann, Ralf; Jung, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial response regulators (RRs) make contact with DNA through a recognition α-helix in their DNA-binding domains. An emerging class of RRs interacts with DNA via a relatively novel type of binding domain, called the LytTR domain, which is mainly composed of β-strands. YpdB belongs to this latter class, is part of a nutrient-sensing network in Escherichia coli and triggers expression of its only target gene, yhjX, in response to extracellular pyruvate. Expression of yhjX mainly occurs in the late exponential growth phase, and in a pulsed manner. Although the DNA-binding sites for YpdB are well defined, exactly how YpdB initiates pulsed gene expression has remained elusive. To address this question, we measured the binding kinetics of wild-type YpdB and the phosphomimetic variant YpdB-D53E to the yhjX promoter region (PyhjX) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy combined with interaction map® (IM) analysis. Both YpdB and YpdB-D53E bound as monomers to the tandem-repeat sequences in the promoter, with YpdB-D53E displaying a higher maximal binding rate than YpdB. Furthermore, we identified a high-affinity (A-site) and a low-affinity binding site (B-site) within the yhjX promoter. Only YpdB-D53E utilizes an ‘AB-BA’ DNA-binding mechanism, involving sequential and cooperative promoter binding, and rapid, successive promoter clearance. We propose that response regulator phosphorylation, in combination with the cycle of cooperative DNA binding and rapid promoter clearance just described, can account for pulsed gene expression. PMID:27013338

  17. Domains of ERRgamma that mediate homodimerization and interaction with factors stimulating DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Hentschke, Moritz; Süsens, Ute; Borgmeyer, Uwe

    2002-08-01

    The estrogen receptor-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma/ERR3/NR3B3) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily closely related to the estrogen receptors. To explore the DNA binding characteristics, the protein-DNA interaction was studied in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). In vitro translated ERRgamma binds as a homodimer to direct repeats (DR) without spacing of the nuclear receptor half-site 5'-AGGTCA-3' (DR-0), to extended half-sites, and to the inverted estrogen response element. Using ERRgamma deletion constructs, binding was found to be dependent on the presence of sequences in the ligand binding domain (LBD). A far-Western analysis revealed that ERRgamma forms dimers even in the absence of DNA. Two elements, located in the hinge region and in the LBD, respectively, are necessary for DNA-independent dimerization. DNA binding of bacterial expressed ERRgamma requires additional factors present in the serum and in cellular extracts. Fusion proteins of the germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF/NR6A1) with ERRgamma showed that the characteristic feature to be stimulated by additional factors can be transferred to a heterologous protein. The stimulating activity was further characterized and its target sequence narrowed down to a small element in the hinge region. PMID:12180985

  18. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  19. A trihelix DNA binding protein counterbalances hypoxia-responsive transcriptional activation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Giuntoli, Beatrice; Lee, Seung Cho; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule-insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein-protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  20. Biochemical and genetic characterization of a yeast TFIID mutant that alters transcription in vivo and DNA binding in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, K M; Ricupero, S L; Eisenmann, D M; Winston, F

    1992-01-01

    A mutation in the gene that encodes Saccharomyces cerevisiae TFIID (SPT15), which was isolated in a selection for mutations that alter transcription in vivo, changes a single amino acid in a highly conserved region of the second direct repeat in TFIID. Among eight independent spt15 mutations, seven cause this same amino acid change, Leu-205 to Phe. The mutant TFIID protein (L205F) binds with greater affinity than that of wild-type TFIID to at least two nonconsensus TATA sites in vitro, showing that the mutant protein has altered DNA binding specificity. Site-directed mutations that change Leu-205 to five different amino acids cause five different phenotypes, demonstrating the importance of this amino acid in vivo. Virtually identical phenotypes were observed when the same amino acid changes were made at the analogous position, Leu-114, in the first repeat of TFIID. Analysis of these mutations and additional mutations in the most conserved regions of the repeats, in conjunction with our DNA binding results, suggests that these regions of the repeats play equivalent roles in TFIID function, possibly in TATA box recognition. Images PMID:1569955

  1. DNA binding, but not interaction with Bmal1, is responsible for DEC1-mediated transcription regulation of the circadian gene mPer1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    DEC1 (differentially expressed in chondrocytes 1) and DEC2 are E-box-binding transcription factors and exhibit a circadian expression pattern. Recently, both proteins were found to repress the Clock/Bmal1-activated E-box promoters (e.g. mPer1). Yeast two-hybrid assay detected interactions between Bmal1 and DECs. It was hypothesized that DEC-mediated repression on the mPer1 promoter is achieved by binding to E-box elements and interacting with Bmal1. In the present study, we report that E-box binding rather than Bmal1 interaction is responsible for the observed repression. In the absence of Clock/Bmal1, both DEC1 and DEC2 markedly repressed the mPer1 promoter reporter; however, DNA-binding mutants showed no repressive activity. Similarly, DEC1, but not its DNA-binding mutants, repressed the Clock/Bmal1-induced activation. In addition, DEC1R58P, a DNA-binding mutant with Bmal1 interactivity, repressed neither the mPer1 reporter directly nor the Clock/Bmal1-induced activation, providing direct evidence that DNA binding, rather than Bmal1 interactions, is responsible for the repression on the mPer1 promoter. Furthermore, disruption of the Sp1 site in the proximal promoter of mPer1 increased the repression of DEC1 proteins. Previous studies with mouse DEC2 showed that this factor interacts with Sp1. These findings suggest that DEC proteins regulate the expression of mPer1 through E-box binding and Sp1 interaction. Alterations on circadian systems are increasingly recognized as important risk factors for disease initiation and progression, and the expression of Dec genes is rapidly induced by environmental stimuli and is highly increased in tumour tissues. Therefore de-regulated expression of DEC genes probably alters normal circadian rhythms and contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. PMID:15193144

  2. The Regulatory T Cell Lineage Factor Foxp3 Regulates Gene Expression through Several Distinct Mechanisms Mostly Independent of Direct DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Betz, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The lineage factor Foxp3 is essential for the development and maintenance of regulatory T cells, but little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal proline-rich interaction region is crucial for Foxp3’s function. Subdomains within this key region link Foxp3 to several independent mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Our study suggests that Foxp3, even in the absence of its DNA-binding forkhead domain, acts as a bridge between DNA-binding interaction partners and proteins with effector function permitting it to regulate a large number of genes. We show that, in one such mechanism, Foxp3 recruits class I histone deacetylases to the promoters of target genes, counteracting activation-induced histone acetylation and thereby suppressing their expression. PMID:26107960

  3. A conserved lysine in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-α1 DNA binding domain, mutated in hepatocellular carcinoma, serves as a sensor for transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ivan H.; Privalsky, Martin L.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors that play key roles in normal physiology and development; conversely, mutant nuclear receptors are associated with a wide variety of neoplastic and endocrine disorders. Typically these receptor mutants function as dominant-negatives and can interfere with wild-type receptor activity. Dominant-negative thyroid hormone receptor (TR) mutations have been identified in over 60% of the human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) analyzed. Most of these mutant TRs are defective for corepressor release or coactivator binding in vitro, accounting for their transcriptional defects in vivo. However, two HCC-TR mutants that function as dominant-negative receptors in cells display near-normal properties in vitro, raising questions as to the molecular basis behind their transcriptional defects. We report here that a single amino acid substitution, located at the same position in the DNA binding domain of both mutants, is responsible for their impaired transcriptional activation and dominant negative properties. Significantly, this amino acid, K74 in TRα, is highly conserved in all known nuclear receptors, and appears to function as an allosteric sensor that regulates the transcriptional activity of these receptors in response to binding to their DNA recognition sequences. We provide evidence that these two HCC mutants have acquired dominant-negative function as a result of disruption of this allosteric sensing. Our results suggest a novel mechanism by which nuclear receptors can acquire transcriptional defects and contribute to neoplastic disease. PMID:20053725

  4. Steric mechanism of auto-inhibitory regulation of specific and non-specific DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6

    PubMed Central

    De, Soumya; Chan, Anson C. K.; Coyne, H. Jerome; Bhachech, Niraja; Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Okon, Mark; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Graves, Barbara J.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    2014-01-01

    DNA binding by the ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6 (or TEL) is auto-inhibited ~ 50-fold due to an α-helix that sterically blocks its ETS domain binding interface. Using NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this marginally-stable helix is unfolded, and not displaced to a non-inhibitory position, when ETV6 is bound to DNA containing a consensus 5’GGAA3’ recognition site. Although significantly lower in affinity, binding to non-specific DNA is auto-inhibited ~ 5-fold and also accompanied by helix unfolding. Based on NMR chemical shift perturbations, both specific and non-specific DNA are bound via the same canonical ETS domain interface. However, spectral perturbations are smaller for the non-specific complex, suggesting weaker and less well-defined interactions than in the specific complex. In parallel, the crystal structure of ETV6 bound to a specific DNA duplex was determined. The structure of this complex reveals that a non-conserved histidine residue in the ETS domain recognition helix helps establish the specificity of ETV6 for DNA-binding sites containing 5’GGAA3’ versus 5’GGAT3’. These studies provide a unified steric mechanism for attenuating ETV6 binding to both specific and non-specific DNA and expand the repertoire of characterized auto-inhibitory strategies utilized to regulate ETS factors. PMID:24333486

  5. Characterization of the Pathway-Specific Positive Transcriptional Regulator for Actinorhodin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as a DNA-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Paloma; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Malpartida, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    The ActII-ORF4 protein has been characterized as a DNA-binding protein that positively regulates the transcription of the actinorhodin biosynthetic genes. The target regions for the ActII-ORF4 protein were located within the act cluster. These regions, at high copy number, generate a nonproducer strain by in vivo titration of the regulator. The mutant phenotype could be made to revert with extra copies of the wild-type actII-ORF4 gene but not with the actII-ORF4-177 mutant. His-tagged recombinant wild-type ActII-ORF4 and mutant ActII-ORF4-177 proteins were purified from Escherichia coli cultures; both showed specific DNA-binding activity for the actVI-ORF1–ORFA and actIII-actI intergenic regions. DNase I footprinting assays clearly located the DNA-binding sites within the −35 regions of the corresponding promoters, showing the consensus sequence 5′-TCGAG-3′. Although both gene products (wild-type and mutant ActII-ORF4) showed DNA-binding activity, only the wild-type gene was capable of activating transcription of the act genes; thus, two basic functions can be differentiated within the regulatory protein: a specific DNA-binding activity and a transcriptional activation of the act biosynthetic genes. PMID:10559161

  6. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed “mitotic bookmarking.” Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors. PMID:23547918

  7. Novel GC-rich DNA-binding compound produced by a genetically engineered mutant of the mithramycin producer Streptomyces argillaceus exhibits improved transcriptional repressor activity: implications for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Veronica; Jain, Aklank; Vignati, Sara; Napoli, Sara; Rinaldi, Andrea; Kwee, Ivo; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Bergant, Julia; Bertoni, Francesco; Carbone, Giuseppina M; Rohr, Jürgen; Catapano, Carlo V

    2006-01-01

    The aureolic acid antibiotic mithramycin (MTM) binds selectively to GC-rich DNA sequences and blocks preferentially binding of proteins, like Sp1 transcription factors, to GC-rich elements in gene promoters. Genetic approaches can be applied to alter the MTM biosynthetic pathway in the producing microorganism and obtain new products with improved pharmacological properties. Here, we report on a new analog, MTM SDK, obtained by targeted gene inactivation of the ketoreductase MtmW catalyzing the last step in MTM biosynthesis. SDK exhibited greater activity as transcriptional inhibitor compared to MTM. SDK was a potent inhibitor of Sp1-dependent reporter activity and interfered minimally with reporters of other transcription factors, indicating that it retained a high degree of selectivity toward GC-rich DNA-binding transcription factors. RT-PCR and microarray analysis showed that SDK repressed transcription of multiple genes implicated in critical aspects of cancer development and progression, including cell cycle, apoptosis, migration, invasion and angiogenesis, consistent with the pleiotropic role of Sp1 family transcription factors. SDK inhibited proliferation and was a potent inducer of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells while it had minimal effects on viability of normal cells. The new MTM derivative SDK could be an effective agent for treatment of cancer and other diseases with abnormal expression or activity of GC-rich DNA-binding transcription factors. PMID:16571899

  8. GATA Transcription Factors and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been almost a quarter century since it was first appreciated that a class of oncogenes contained in rapidly transforming avian retroviruses encoded DNA-binding transcription factors. As with other oncogenes, genetic recombination with the viral genome led to their overexpression or functional alteration. In the years that followed, alterations of numerous transcription factors were shown to be causatively involved in various cancers in human patients and model organisms. Depending on their normal cellular functions, these factors were subsequently categorized as proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This review focuses on the role of GATA transcription factors in carcinogenesis. GATA factors are zinc finger DNA binding proteins that control the development of diverse tissues by activating or repressing transcription. GATA factors thus coordinate cellular maturation with proliferation arrest and cell survival. Therefore, a role of this family of genes in human cancers is not surprising. Prominent examples include structural mutations in GATA1 that are found in almost all megakaryoblastic leukemias in patients with Down syndrome; loss of GATA3 expression in aggressive, dedifferentiated breast cancers; and silencing of GATA4 and GATA5 expression in colorectal and lung cancers. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis vis-à-vis the normal functions of GATA factors as they pertain to human patients and mouse models of cancer. PMID:21779441

  9. Dynamic phosphorylation of RelA on Ser42 and Ser45 in response to TNFα stimulation regulates DNA binding and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lanucara, Francesco; Lam, Connie; Mann, Jelena; Monie, Tom P.; Colombo, Stefano A. P.; Holman, Stephen W.; Boyd, James; Dange, Manohar C.; Mann, Derek A.; White, Michael R. H.

    2016-01-01

    The NF-κB signalling module controls transcription through a network of protein kinases such as the IKKs, as well as inhibitory proteins (IκBs) and transcription factors including RelA/p65. Phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits is critical for dictating system dynamics. Using both non-targeted discovery and quantitative selected reaction monitoring-targeted proteomics, we show that the cytokine TNFα induces dynamic multisite phosphorylation of RelA at a number of previously unidentified residues. Putative roles for many of these phosphorylation sites on RelA were predicted by modelling of various crystal structures. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation determination of Ser45 and Ser42 revealed preferential early phosphorylation of Ser45 in response to TNFα. Quantitative analyses subsequently confirmed differential roles for pSer42 and pSer45 in promoter-specific DNA binding and a role for both of these phosphosites in regulating transcription from the IL-6 promoter. These temporal dynamics suggest that RelA-mediated transcription is likely to be controlled by functionally distinct NF-κB proteoforms carrying different combinations of modifications, rather than a simple ‘one modification, one effect’ system. PMID:27466442

  10. Dynamic phosphorylation of RelA on Ser42 and Ser45 in response to TNFα stimulation regulates DNA binding and transcription.

    PubMed

    Lanucara, Francesco; Lam, Connie; Mann, Jelena; Monie, Tom P; Colombo, Stefano A P; Holman, Stephen W; Boyd, James; Dange, Manohar C; Mann, Derek A; White, Michael R H; Eyers, Claire E

    2016-07-01

    The NF-κB signalling module controls transcription through a network of protein kinases such as the IKKs, as well as inhibitory proteins (IκBs) and transcription factors including RelA/p65. Phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits is critical for dictating system dynamics. Using both non-targeted discovery and quantitative selected reaction monitoring-targeted proteomics, we show that the cytokine TNFα induces dynamic multisite phosphorylation of RelA at a number of previously unidentified residues. Putative roles for many of these phosphorylation sites on RelA were predicted by modelling of various crystal structures. Stoichiometry of phosphorylation determination of Ser45 and Ser42 revealed preferential early phosphorylation of Ser45 in response to TNFα. Quantitative analyses subsequently confirmed differential roles for pSer42 and pSer45 in promoter-specific DNA binding and a role for both of these phosphosites in regulating transcription from the IL-6 promoter. These temporal dynamics suggest that RelA-mediated transcription is likely to be controlled by functionally distinct NF-κB proteoforms carrying different combinations of modifications, rather than a simple 'one modification, one effect' system. PMID:27466442

  11. 11q23 Translocations split the [open quotes]AT-hook[close quotes] cruciform DNA-binding region and the transcriptional repression domain from the activation domain of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zeleznik-Le, N.J.; Harden, A.M.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1994-10-25

    Translocations involving chromosome band 11q23, found in acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias, disrupt the MLL gene. This gene encodes a putative transcription factor with homology to the zinc fingers and other domains of the Drosophila trithorax gene product and to the [open quotes]AT-hook[close quotes] motif of high mobility group proteins. To map potential transcriptional activation or repression domains of the MLL protein, yeast GAL4 DNA-binding domain and MLL hybrid protein-expressing plasmids were cotransfected with chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter plasmids in a transient transfection system. We found that MLL contains a strong activation domain and a repression domain. The former, located telomeric (3[prime]) to the breakpoint region, activated transcription 18-fold to >200-fold, depending on the promoter and cell line used for transfection. A repression domain that repressed transcription 4-fold was located centromeric (5[prime]) to the breakpoint region of MLL. The MLL AT-hook domain protein was expressed in bacteria and was utilized in a gel mobility shift assay to assess DNA-binding activity. The MLL AT-hook domain could bind cruciform DNA, recognizing structure rather than sequence of the target DNA. In translocations involving MLL, loss of an activation domain with retention of a repression domain and a DNA-binding domain on the der(11) chromosome could alter the expression of downstream target genes, suggesting a potential mechanism of action for MLL in leukemia. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Interferon regulatory factor subcellular localization is determined by a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the DNA-binding domain and interaction with cytoplasmic retention factors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joe F.; Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Horvath, Curt M.

    2000-01-01

    The transduction of type I interferon signals to the nucleus relies on activation of a protein complex, ISGF3, involving two signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, STAT1 and STAT2, and the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) protein, p48/ISGF3γ. The STAT subunits are cytoplasmically localized in unstimulated cells and rapidly translocate to the nucleus of IFN-stimulated cells, but the p48/ISGF3γ protein is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, regardless of IFN stimulation. Here, we demonstrate that p48 is efficiently and constitutively targeted to the nucleus. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of green fluorescent protein-p48 fragments indicates that p48 contains a bipartite nuclear retention signal within its amino-terminal DNA-binding domain. This signal is preserved in two other IRF proteins involved in immune responses, ICSBP and IRF4. Mutations to clustered basic residues within amino acids 50–100 of p48 or IRF4 disrupt their nuclear accumulation, and DNA-binding ability is not required for nuclear targeting. This is the only example of a nuclear localization signal for any ISGF3 component and assigns a second function to the IRF DNA-binding domain. We also demonstrate that the nuclear distribution of p48 is dramatically altered by coexpression of the STAT2 protein, indicating that STAT2 forms a cytoplasmic complex with p48, overriding the intrinsic p48 nuclear targeting. Retention by STAT2 may serve to regulate the activity of free p48 and/or guarantee that cytoplasmic pools of preassociated STAT2:p48 are available for rapid activation of the IFN response. These findings suggest that analogous mechanisms may exist for regulating the distribution of other IRF proteins. PMID:10860992

  13. Loss of DNA-binding and new transcriptional trans-activation function in polyomavirus large T-antigen with mutation of zinc finger motif.

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, A; Nilsson, M; Bondeson, K; Magnusson, G

    1990-01-01

    A putative zinc finger in polyomavirus large T-antigen was investigated. We were unable to demonstrate unequivocally a requirement for zinc in specific DNA-binding using the chelating agent 1, 10-phenanthroline. An involvement of the putative zinc finger in specific DNA-binding was nevertheless suggested by the properties of a mutant protein with a cys----ser replacement in the finger motif. Probably as a result of the defective DNA-binding, the mutant protein had lost its activity in initiation of viral DNA-replication and in negative regulation of viral early transcription. However, the trans-activation of the viral late promoter was normal. The analysis also revealed a previously unrecognized activity of large T-antigen. The mutant protein trans-activated the viral early promoter. In the wild-type protein this activity is probably concealed by the separate, negative regulatory function. Images PMID:2160069

  14. Acetylation of lysine 109 modulates pregnane X receptor DNA binding and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Pasquel, Danielle; Doricakova, Aneta; Li, Hao; Kortagere, Sandhya; Krasowski, Matthew D; Biswas, Arunima; Walton, William G; Redinbo, Matthew R; Dvorak, Zdenek; Mani, Sridhar

    2016-09-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a major transcriptional regulator of xenobiotic metabolism and transport pathways in the liver and intestines, which are critical for protecting organisms against potentially harmful xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds. Inadvertent activation of drug metabolism pathways through PXR is known to contribute to drug resistance, adverse drug-drug interactions, and drug toxicity in humans. In both humans and rodents, PXR has been implicated in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer. Because of PXR's important functions, it has been a therapeutic target of interest for a long time. More recent mechanistic studies have shown that PXR is modulated by multiple PTMs. Herein we provide the first investigation of the role of acetylation in modulating PXR activity. Through LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified lysine 109 (K109) in the hinge as PXR's major acetylation site. Using various biochemical and cell-based assays, we show that PXR's acetylation status and transcriptional activity are modulated by E1A binding protein (p300) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). Based on analysis of acetylation site mutants, we found that acetylation at K109 represses PXR transcriptional activity. The mechanism involves loss of RXRα dimerization and reduced binding to cognate DNA response elements. This mechanism may represent a promising therapeutic target using modulators of PXR acetylation levels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26855179

  15. Dynamic DNA binding licenses a repair factor to bypass roadblocks in search of DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maxwell W.; Kim, Yoori; Williams, Gregory M.; Huck, John D.; Surtees, Jennifer A.; Finkelstein, Ilya J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins search for specific targets via facilitated diffusion along a crowded genome. However, little is known about how crowded DNA modulates facilitated diffusion and target recognition. Here we use DNA curtains and single-molecule fluorescence imaging to investigate how Msh2–Msh3, a eukaryotic mismatch repair complex, navigates on crowded DNA. Msh2–Msh3 hops over nucleosomes and other protein roadblocks, but maintains sufficient contact with DNA to recognize a single lesion. In contrast, Msh2–Msh6 slides without hopping and is largely blocked by protein roadblocks. Remarkably, the Msh3-specific mispair-binding domain (MBD) licences a chimeric Msh2–Msh6(3MBD) to bypass nucleosomes. Our studies contrast how Msh2–Msh3 and Msh2–Msh6 navigate on a crowded genome and suggest how Msh2–Msh3 locates DNA lesions outside of replication-coupled repair. These results also provide insights into how DNA repair factors search for DNA lesions in the context of chromatin. PMID:26837705

  16. Inducible nuclear expression of newly synthesized I kappa B alpha negatively regulates DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Arenzana-Seisdedos, F; Thompson, J; Rodriguez, M S; Bachelerie, F; Thomas, D; Hay, R T

    1995-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-kappa B is exploited by many viruses, including the human immunodeficiency virus, for expression of viral genes, but its primary role appears to be in the rapid induction of cellular genes during immune and inflammatory responses. The inhibitor protein I kappa B alpha maintains NF-kappa B in an inactive form in the cytoplasms of unstimulated cells, but upon cell activation, I kappa B alpha is rapidly degraded, leading to nuclear translocation of free NF-kappa B. However, NF-kappa B-dependent transcription of the I kappa B alpha gene leads to rapid resynthesis of the I kappa B alpha protein and inhibition of NF-kappa B-dependent transcription. Here we demonstrate a new regulatory function of I kappa B alpha exerted on NF-kappa B in the nuclear compartment. Although normally found in the cytoplasm, I kappa B alpha, newly synthesized in response to tumor necrosis factor or interleukin I, is transported to the nucleus. In the nucleus I kappa B alpha associates with the p50 and p65 subunits of NF-kappa B, inhibiting DNA binding of the transcription factor. Furthermore, nuclear expression of I kappa B alpha correlates with transcription termination of transfected NF-kappa B-dependent luciferase genes. Following the appearance of I kappa B alpha in the nuclei of activated cells, a dramatic reduction in the amount of nuclear p50 occurs, suggesting that NF-kappa B-I kappa B alpha complexes are cleared from the nucleus. PMID:7739549

  17. A point mutation in the DNA-binding domain of HPV-2 E2 protein increases its DNA-binding capacity and reverses its transcriptional regulatory activity on the viral early promoter

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein. The transcriptional activity of HPV E2 is mediated by binding to its specific binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of the HPV genomes. Previously we reported a HPV-2 variant from a verrucae vulgaris patient with huge extensive clustered cutaneous, which have five point mutations in its E2 ORF, L118S, S235P, Y287H, S293R and A338V. Under the control of HPV-2 LCR, co-expression of the mutated HPV E2 induced an increased activity on the viral early promoter. In the present study, a series of mammalian expression plasmids encoding E2 proteins with one to five amino acid (aa) substitutions for these mutations were constructed and transfected into HeLa, C33A and SiHa cells. Results CAT expression assays indicated that the enhanced promoter activity was due to the co-expressions of the E2 constructs containing A338V mutation within the DNA-binding domain. Western blots analysis demonstrated that the transiently transfected E2 expressing plasmids, regardless of prototype or the A338V mutant, were continuously expressed in the cells. To study the effect of E2 mutations on its DNA-binding activity, a serial of recombinant E2 proteins with various lengths were expressed and purified. Electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that the binding affinity of E2 protein with A338V mutation to both an artificial probe with two E2 binding sites or HPV-2 and HPV-16 promoter-proximal LCR sequences were significantly stronger than that of the HPV-2 prototype E2. Furthermore, co-expression of the construct containing A338V mutant exhibited increased activities on heterologous HPV-16 early promoter P97 than that of prototype E2. Conclusions These results suggest that the mutation from Ala to Val at aa 338 is critical for E2 DNA-binding and its transcriptional regulation. PMID:22333459

  18. Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Transcriptional Regulator FUBP1 Is Essential for Fetal and Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal.

    PubMed

    Rabenhorst, Uta; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Gerlach, Katharina; Kijonka, Marek; Böhm, Stefanie; Krause, Daniela S; Vauti, Franz; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Schroeder, Timm; Schnütgen, Frank; von Melchner, Harald; Rieger, Michael A; Zörnig, Martin

    2015-06-30

    The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to self-renew is a prerequisite for the establishment of definitive hematopoiesis and life-long blood regeneration. Here, we report the single-stranded DNA-binding transcriptional regulator far upstream element (FUSE)-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) as an essential factor of HSC self-renewal. Functional inactivation of FUBP1 in two different mouse models resulted in embryonic lethal anemia at around E15.5 caused by severely diminished HSCs. Fetal and adult HSCs lacking FUBP1 revealed an HSC-intrinsic defect in their maintenance, expansion, and long-term blood reconstitution, but could differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages. FUBP1-deficient adult HSCs exhibit significant transcriptional changes, including upregulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21 and the pro-apoptotic Noxa molecule. These changes caused an increase in generation time and death of HSCs as determined by video-microscopy-based tracking. Our data establish FUBP1 and its recognition of single-stranded genomic DNA as an important element in the transcriptional regulation of HSC self-renewal. PMID:26095368

  19. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types of residue, i.e. serine, threonine, tyrosine and cysteine, is also quite common. The phosphorylation of the ester type (phospho-serine/threonine/tyrosine) is more stable than the aspartate phosphorylation of TCSs. The kinases which catalyse these phosphorylation events (Hanks-type serine/threonine protein kinases and bacterial protein tyrosine kinases) are also much more promiscuous than the TCS kinases, i.e. each of them can phosphorylate several substrate proteins. As a consequence, the dynamics and topology of the signal transduction networks depending on these kinases differ significantly from the TCSs. Here, we present an overview of different classes of bacterial TR phosphorylated and regulated by serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. Particular attention is given to examples when serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases interact with TCSs, phosphorylating either the histidine kinases or the response regulators. We argue that these promiscuous kinases connect several signal transduction pathways and serve the role of signal integration. PMID:26220449

  20. T(lys), a newly identified Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 transcript expressed in the lysogenic state, encodes a DNA-binding protein interacting at the promoters of the early genes.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; She, Qunxin; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Contursi, Patrizia

    2013-05-01

    While studying the gene expression of the Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1) in Sulfolobus solfataricus lysogenic cells, a novel viral transcript (T(lys)) was identified. Transcriptional analysis revealed that T(lys) is expressed only in the absence of UV irradiation and is downregulated during the growth of the lysogenic host. The correponding gene f55 lies between two transcriptional units (T6 and T(ind)) that are upregulated upon UV irradiation. The open reading frame f55 encodes a 6.3-kDa protein which shows sequence identity with negative regulators that fold into the ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding motif. DNA-binding assays demonstrated that the recombinant F55, purified from Escherichia coli, is indeed a putative transcription factor able to recognize site specifically target sequences in the promoters of the early induced T5, T6, and T(ind) transcripts, as well as of its own promoter. Binding sites of F55 are included within a tandem-repeated sequence overlapping the transcription start sites and/or the B recognition element of the pertinent genes. The strongest binding was observed with the promoters of T5 and T6, and an apparent cooperativity in binding was observed with the T(ind) promoter. Taking together the transcriptional analysis data and the biochemical evidences, we surmise that the protein F55 is involved in the regulation of the lysogenic state of SSV1. PMID:23514883

  1. Identification of Preferred DNA-Binding Sites for the Thermus thermophilus Transcriptional Regulator SbtR by the Combinatorial Approach REPSA

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Matthew D.; Clay, Emily; Hiam, Kamir J.; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    One of the first steps towards elucidating the biological function of a putative transcriptional regulator is to ascertain its preferred DNA-binding sequences. This may be rapidly and effectively achieved through the application of a combinatorial approach, one involving very large numbers of randomized oligonucleotides and reiterative selection and amplification steps to enrich for high-affinity nucleic acid-binding sequences. Previously, we had developed the novel combinatorial approach Restriction Endonuclease Protection, Selection and Amplification (REPSA), which relies not on the physical separation of ligand-nucleic acid complexes but instead selects on the basis of ligand-dependent inhibition of enzymatic template inactivation, specifically cleavage by type IIS restriction endonucleases. Thus, no prior knowledge of the ligand is required for REPSA, making it more amenable for discovery purposes. Here we describe using REPSA, massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics to identify the preferred DNA-binding sites for the transcriptional regulator SbtR, encoded by the TTHA0167 gene from the model extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus HB8. From the resulting position weight matrix, we can identify multiple operons potentially regulated by SbtR and postulate a biological role for this protein in regulating extracellular transport processes. Our study provides a proof-of-concept for the application of REPSA for the identification of preferred DNA-binding sites for orphan transcriptional regulators and a first step towards determining their possible biological roles. PMID:27428627

  2. Identification of Preferred DNA-Binding Sites for the Thermus thermophilus Transcriptional Regulator SbtR by the Combinatorial Approach REPSA.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Michael W; Beyer, Matthew D; Clay, Emily; Hiam, Kamir J; McMurry, Jonathan L; Xie, Ying

    2016-01-01

    One of the first steps towards elucidating the biological function of a putative transcriptional regulator is to ascertain its preferred DNA-binding sequences. This may be rapidly and effectively achieved through the application of a combinatorial approach, one involving very large numbers of randomized oligonucleotides and reiterative selection and amplification steps to enrich for high-affinity nucleic acid-binding sequences. Previously, we had developed the novel combinatorial approach Restriction Endonuclease Protection, Selection and Amplification (REPSA), which relies not on the physical separation of ligand-nucleic acid complexes but instead selects on the basis of ligand-dependent inhibition of enzymatic template inactivation, specifically cleavage by type IIS restriction endonucleases. Thus, no prior knowledge of the ligand is required for REPSA, making it more amenable for discovery purposes. Here we describe using REPSA, massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics to identify the preferred DNA-binding sites for the transcriptional regulator SbtR, encoded by the TTHA0167 gene from the model extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus HB8. From the resulting position weight matrix, we can identify multiple operons potentially regulated by SbtR and postulate a biological role for this protein in regulating extracellular transport processes. Our study provides a proof-of-concept for the application of REPSA for the identification of preferred DNA-binding sites for orphan transcriptional regulators and a first step towards determining their possible biological roles. PMID:27428627

  3. Effects of exercise on cyclooxygenase-2 expression and nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Young; Jun, Tae-Won; Lee, Young-Soo; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon; Song, Wook

    2009-08-01

    There are multiple lines of compelling evidence supporting the beneficial effect of exercise on the prevention and/or improvement of certain chronic diseases. However, exhaustive or intense exercise causes oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress, which can lead to injuries and chronic fatigue as well as inflammation. Abnormal upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, has been implicated in many inflammation-associated chronic disorders. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is a major transcription factor involved in regulation of COX-2 gene expression. To determine whether inflammation induction is dependent on intensity of exercise, COX-2 expression and NF-kappaB activation were adopted as the main targets. Thirteen volunteers who participated in the exercise program were subject to four exercise intensities [40, 60, 80, and 100% of heart rate reserve (HRR)] on a treadmill and to resting conditions. Isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected during the resting state and immediately after exercise and subjected to the electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay and Western blot analysis. As exercise intensity increased, both COX-2 expression and NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity were enhanced. The expression of IkappaB kinase alpha (IKKalpha) and IkappaBalpha were not significantly altered. However, exhaustive/vigorous exercise (100% HRR) could induce the phosphorylation of both IKKalpha and IkappaBalpha. In conclusion, a single bout of exercise induced COX-2 expression and DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB in human PBMCs, and both COX-2 expression and DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB were dependent on exercise intensity. PMID:19723090

  4. A genomic explanation connecting "Mediterranean diet", olive oil and cancer: oleic acid, the main monounsaturated fatty acid of olive oil, induces formation of inhibitory "PEA3 transcription factor-PEA3 DNA binding site" complexes at the Her-2/neu (erbB-2) oncogene promoter in breast, ovarian and stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Papadimitropoulou, Adriana; Vellon, Luciano; Lupu, Ruth

    2006-10-01

    Olive oil is an integral ingredient of the "Mediterranean diet" and accumulating evidence suggests that it may have a potential role in lowering risk of several cancers. We recently hypothesized that the anti-cancer actions of olive oil may relate to its monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) oleic acid (OA; 18:1n-9) content to specifically regulate oncogenes. In this study, transient transfection experiments with human Her-2/neu promoter-driven luciferase gene established the ability of OA to specifically repress the transcriptional activity of Her-2/neu gene. Gene repression was seen in tumour-derived cell lines with Her-2/neu gene amplification and overexpression, including SK-Br3 (56% reduction), SK-OV3 (75% reduction) and NCI-N87 (55% reduction) breast, ovarian and stomach cancer cell lines, respectively. Also marginal decreases in promoter activity were observed in cancer cells expressing physiological levels of Her-2/neu (20% reduction in MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Remarkably, OA treatment in Her-2/neu-overexpressing cancer cells was found to induce up-regulation of the Ets protein polyomavirus enhancer activator 3 (PEA3), a transcriptional repressor of Her-2/neu promoter. Also, an intact PEA3 DNA-binding-site at endogenous Her-2/neu gene promoter was essential for OA-induced repression of this gene. Moreover, OA treatment failed to decrease Her-2/neu protein levels in MCF-7/Her2-18 transfectants, which stably express full-length human Her-2/neu cDNA controlled by a SV40 viral promoter. OA-induced transcriptional repression of Her-2/neu through the action of PEA3 protein at the promoter level may represent a novel mechanism linking "Mediterranean diet" and cancer. PMID:16406575

  5. The DNA-binding network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Minch, Kyle J.; Rustad, Tige R.; Peterson, Eliza J. R.; Winkler, Jessica; Reiss, David J.; Ma, Shuyi; Hickey, Mark; Brabant, William; Morrison, Bob; Turkarslan, Serdar; Mawhinney, Chris; Galagan, James E.; Price, Nathan D.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Sherman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infects 30% of all humans and kills someone every 20–30 s. Here we report genome-wide binding for ~80% of all predicted MTB transcription factors (TFs), and assayed global expression following induction of each TF. The MTB DNA-binding network consists of ~16,000 binding events from 154 TFs. We identify >50 TF-DNA consensus motifs and >1,150 promoter-binding events directly associated with proximal gene regulation. An additional ~4,200 binding events are in promoter windows and represent strong candidates for direct transcriptional regulation under appropriate environmental conditions. However, we also identify >10,000 ‘dormant’ DNA-binding events that cannot be linked directly with proximal transcriptional control, suggesting that widespread DNA binding may be a common feature that should be considered when developing global models of coordinated gene expression. PMID:25581030

  6. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  7. Molecular Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Integration Host Factor Reveals Novel Insights into the Mode of DNA Binding and Nucleoid Compaction*

    PubMed Central

    Sharadamma, Narayanaswamy; Harshavardhana, Yadumurthy; Ravishankar, Apoorva; Anand, Praveen; Chandra, Nagasuma; Muniyappa, K.

    2014-01-01

    The annotated whole-genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that Rv1388 (Mtihf) is likely to encode for a putative 20-kDa integration host factor (mIHF). However, very little is known about the functional properties of mIHF or the organization of the mycobacterial nucleoid. Molecular modeling of the mIHF three-dimensional structure, based on the cocrystal structure of Streptomyces coelicolor IHF duplex DNA, a bona fide relative of mIHF, revealed the presence of Arg-170, Arg-171, and Arg-173, which might be involved in DNA binding, and a conserved proline (Pro-150) in the tight turn. The phenotypic sensitivity of Escherichia coli ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains to UV and methyl methanesulfonate could be complemented with the wild-type Mtihf but not its alleles bearing mutations in the DNA-binding residues. Protein-DNA interaction assays revealed that wild-type mIHF, but not its DNA-binding variants, binds with high affinity to fragments containing attB and attP sites and curved DNA. Strikingly, the functionally important amino acid residues of mIHF and the mechanism(s) underlying its binding to DNA, DNA bending, and site-specific recombination are fundamentally different from that of E. coli IHFαβ. Furthermore, we reveal novel insights into IHF-mediated DNA compaction depending on the placement of its preferred binding sites; mIHF promotes DNA compaction into nucleoid-like or higher order filamentous structures. We therefore propose that mIHF is a distinct member of a subfamily of proteins that serve as essential cofactors in site-specific recombination and nucleoid organization and that these findings represent a significant advance in our understanding of the role(s) of nucleoid-associated proteins. PMID:25324543

  8. Cell Fate Determination by Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Gurdon, John B

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors fulfill a key role in the formation and maintenance of different cell-types during development. It is known that transcription factors largely dissociate from chromosomes during mitosis. We found, previously, that mitosis is also a time when somatic nuclei can be far more easily reprogrammed after nuclear transfer than the nuclei of interphase cells. We refer to this as a mitotic advantage. Here, the rate of exchange of a transcription factor on its designated DNA-binding site is discussed. It is proposed that the Xenopus oocyte could serve as an experimental system in which the duration of binding site occupancy could be usefully analyzed. In particular, the Xenopus oocyte has several characteristics which make it possible to determine accurately the concentration and duration of transcription factor binding. It is proposed that the concentration and time are the key variables which govern the action of transcription factors when they activate genes needed for cell lineage determination. PMID:26970633

  9. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Oxombre, Bénédicte; Kouach, Mostafa; Moerman, Ericka; Formstecher, Pierre; Laine, Bernard

    2004-11-01

    HNF4alpha (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4alpha gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115-->Ser) HNF4alpha mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4alpha-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic beta-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4alpha transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1alpha, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115-->Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4alpha DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4alpha function. PMID:15233628

  10. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    HNF4α (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4α gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115→Ser) HNF4α mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4α-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic β-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4α transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1α, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115→Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4α DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4α function. PMID:15233628

  11. Mechanism for attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators by small molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Wilkinson, Steven P; Grove, Anne

    2009-07-31

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family control gene expression in a variety of metabolic processes in bacteria and archaea. Hypothetical uricase regulator (HucR), which belongs to the ligand-responsive branch of the MarR family, regulates uricase expression in Deinococcus radiodurans by binding a shared promoter region between uricase and HucR genes. We show here that HucR responds only to urate and, to a lesser extent, to xanthine by attenuated DNA binding, compared to other intermediates of purine degradation. Using molecular-dynamics-guided mutational analysis, we identified the ligand-binding site in HucR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and intrinsic Trp fluorescence have identified W20 from the N-terminal helix and R80 from helix 3, which serves as a scaffold for the DNA recognition helix, as being essential for ligand binding. Using structural data combined with in silico and in vitro analyses, we propose a mechanism for the attenuation of DNA binding in which a conformational change initiated by charge repulsion due to a bound ligand propagates to DNA recognition helices. This mechanism may apply generally to MarR homologs that bind anionic phenolic ligands. PMID:19501097

  12. Spermine Attenuates the Action of the DNA Intercalator, Actinomycin D, on DNA Binding and the Inhibition of Transcription and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion. PMID:23144800

  13. Inhibitor of DNA Binding 1 Is Induced during Kidney Ischemia-Reperfusion and Is Critical for the Induction of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dan; Zou, Yan-Fang; Gao, Yao-Hui; Zhao, Qian; Xie, Yin-Yin; Shen, Ping-Yan; Xu, Yao-Wen; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yong-Xi; Feng, Xiao-Bei; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, rat models of acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and HK-2 cell models of hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) were established to investigate the expression of inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1) in AKI, and the regulation relationship between ID1 and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). Through western blot, quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and other experiment methods, the induction of ID1 after renal I/R in vivo was observed, which was expressed mainly in renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs). ID1 expression was upregulated in in vitro H/R models at both the protein and mRNA levels. Via RNAi, it was found that ID1 induction was inhibited with silencing of HIF-1α. Moreover, the suppression of ID1 mRNA expression could lead to decreased expression and transcription of HIF-1α during hypoxia and reoxygenation. In addition, it was demonstrated that both ID1 and HIF-1α can regulate the transcription of twist. This study demonstrated that ID1 is induced in renal TECs during I/R and can regulate the transcription and expression of HIF-1α. PMID:27127787

  14. The DNA binding factor Hmg20b is a repressor of erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; van Dijk, Thamar Bryn; Braun, Harald; Dekker, Sylvia; van der Linden, Reinier; Hou, Jun; Fanis, Pavlos; Demmers, Jeroen; van IJcken, Wilfred; Özgür, Zeliha; Horos, Rastislav; Pourfarzad, Farzin; von Lindern, Marieke; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2011-01-01

    Background In erythroblasts, the CoREST repressor complex is recruited to target promoters by the transcription factor Gfi1b, leading to repression of genes mainly involved in erythroid differentiation. Hmg20b is a subunit of CoREST, but its role in erythropoiesis has not yet been established. Design and Methods To study the role of Hmg20b in erythropoiesis, we performed knockdown experiments in a differentiation-competent mouse fetal liver cell line, and in primary mouse fetal liver cells. The effects on globin gene expression were determined. We used microarrays to investigate global gene expression changes induced by Hmg20b knockdown. Functional analysis was carried out on Hrasls3, an Hmg20b target gene. Results We show that Hmg20b depletion induces spontaneous differentiation. To identify the target genes of Hmg20b, microarray analysis was performed on Hmg20b knockdown cells and controls. In line with its association to the CoREST complex, we found that 85% (527 out of 620) of the deregulated genes are up-regulated when Hmg20b levels are reduced. Among the few down-regulated genes was Gfi1b, a known repressor of erythroid differentiation. Among the consistently up-regulated targets were embryonic β-like globins and the phospholipase HRAS-like suppressor 3 (Hrasls3). We show that Hrasls3 expression is induced during erythroid differentiation and that knockdown of Hrasls3 inhibits terminal differentiation of proerythroblasts. Conclusions We conclude that Hmg20b acts as an inhibitor of erythroid differentiation, through the down-regulation of genes involved in differentiation such as Hrasls3, and activation of repressors of differentiation such as Gfi1b. In addition, Hmg20b suppresses embryonic β-like globins. PMID:21606163

  15. Expression and purification of recombinant human c-Fos/c-Jun that is highly active in DNA binding and transcriptional activation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Heather A.; Goodrich, James A.

    2001-01-01

    c-Fos and c-Jun are members of the AP-1 family of transcriptional activators that regulate the expression of genes during cell proliferation. To facilitate in vitro studies of mechanisms of transcriptional activation by c-Jun and c-Fos we developed a method for obtaining recombinant c-Fos/c-Jun that is highly active in DNA binding and transcriptional activation in vitro. Full-length human c-Fos and c-Jun were expressed in Escherichia coli. The expression of c-Fos was dependent on a helper plasmid that encodes rare ArgtRNAs. Both over-expressed c-Fos and c-Jun were recovered from inclusion bodies. A c-Fos/c-Jun complex was generated by co-renaturation and purified via a His-tag on the full-length human c-Fos. The resulting c-Fos/c-Jun bound DNA with high affinity and specificity, and activated transcription in a reconstituted human RNA polymerase II transcription system. The availability of active recombinant human c-Fos/c-Jun will allow future biochemical studies of these important transcriptional activators. PMID:11600717

  16. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  17. Experimental determination of the evolvability of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2009-11-01

    Sequence-specific binding of a transcription factor to DNA is the central event in any transcriptional regulatory network. However, relatively little is known about the evolutionary plasticity of transcription factors. For example, the exact functional consequence of an amino acid substitution on the DNA-binding specificity of most transcription factors is currently not predictable. Furthermore, although the major structural families of transcription factors have been identified, the detailed DNA-binding repertoires within most families have not been characterized. We studied the sequence recognition code and evolvability of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family by creating all possible 95 single-point mutations of five DNA-contacting residues of Max, a human helix-loop-helix transcription factor and measured the detailed DNA-binding repertoire of each mutant. Our results show that the sequence-specific repertoire of Max accessible through single-point mutations is extremely limited, and we are able to predict 92% of the naturally occurring diversity at these positions. All naturally occurring basic regions were also found to be accessible through functional intermediates. Finally, we observed a set of amino acids that are functional in vitro but are not found to be used naturally, indicating that functionality alone is not sufficient for selection. PMID:19841254

  18. Jun Kinase Phosphorylates and Regulates the DNA Binding Activity of an Octamer Binding Protein, T-Cell Factor β1†

    PubMed Central

    Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Tailor, Pankaj; Bonefoy-Berard, Nathalie; Mustelin, Tomas; Altman, Amnon; Fotedar, Arun

    1999-01-01

    POU domain proteins have been implicated as key regulators during development and lymphocyte activation. The POU domain protein T-cell factor β1 (TCFβ1), which binds octamer and octamer-related sequences, is a potent transactivator. In this study, we showed that TCFβ1 is phosphorylated following activation via the T-cell receptor or by stress-induced signals. Phosphorylation of TCFβ1 occurred predominantly at serine and threonine residues. Signals which upregulate Jun kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase activity also lead to association of JNK with TCFβ1. JNK associates with the activation domain of TCFβ1 and phosphorylates its DNA binding domain. The phosphorylation of recombinant TCFβ1 by recombinant JNK enhances the ability of TCFβ1 to bind to a consensus octamer motif. Consistent with this conclusion, TCFβ1 upregulates reporter gene transcription in an activation- and JNK-dependent manner. In addition, inhibition of JNK activity by catalytically inactive MEKK (in which methionine was substituted for the lysine at position 432) also inhibits the ability of TCFβ1 to drive inducible transcription from the interleukin-2 promoter. These results suggest that stress-induced signals and T-cell activation induce JNK, which then acts on multiple cis sequences by modulating distinct transactivators like c-Jun and TCFβ1. This demonstrates a coupling between the JNK activation pathway and POU domain proteins and implicates TCFβ1 as a physiological target in the JNK signal transduction pathway leading to coordinated biological responses. PMID:10022889

  19. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  20. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  1. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  2. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  3. Using protein-binding microarrays to study transcription factor specificity: homologs, isoforms and complexes

    PubMed Central

    Andrilenas, Kellen K.; Penvose, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Protein–DNA binding is central to specificity in gene regulation, and methods for characterizing transcription factor (TF)–DNA binding remain crucial to studies of regulatory specificity. High-throughput (HT) technologies have revolutionized our ability to characterize protein–DNA binding by significantly increasing the number of binding measurements that can be performed. Protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) are a robust and powerful HT platform for studying DNA-binding specificity of TFs. Analysis of PBM-determined DNA-binding profiles has provided new insight into the scope and mechanisms of TF binding diversity. In this review, we focus specifically on the PBM technique and discuss its application to the study of TF specificity, in particular, the binding diversity of TF homologs and multi-protein complexes. PMID:25431149

  4. A designed DNA binding motif that recognizes extended sites and spans two adjacent major grooves†

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jéssica; Mosquera, Jesús; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the rational design of a DNA-binding peptide construct composed of the DNA-contacting regions of two transcription factors (GCN4 and GAGA) linked through an AT-hook DNA anchor. The resulting chimera, which represents a new, non-natural DNA binding motif, binds with high affinity and selectivity to a long composite sequence of 13 base pairs (TCAT-AATT-GAGAG). PMID:27252825

  5. Effect of dietary protein restriction on liver transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Marten, N W; Sladek, F M; Straus, D S

    1996-01-01

    The transcription of several genes that are preferentially expressed in the liver, including the serum albumin, transthyretin and carbamyl phosphate synthetase-I genes, is specifically decreased in animals consuming inadequate amounts of dietary protein. The high level of transcription of these genes in the liver is directed in part by a number of liver-enriched transcription factors, including hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1, -3, and -4, and proteins of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family. In the present study, we investigated the possibility that the co-ordinate decrease in transcription of the nutritionally sensitive genes in protein-deprived rats results from altered activity of one or more of the liver-enriched transcription factors. For HNF-4, Western blots indicated no change in the level of nuclear HNF-4 protein in liver of protein-deprived animals, whereas we observed a 40% reduction in the DNA binding activity of HNF-4 as measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Furthermore, the binding affinity of HNF-4 for DNA was unaltered by dietary protein deprivation, while the number of HNF-4 molecules able to bind to DNA (Bmax) was reduced, as determined by Scatchard analysis. This indicates that in the protein-restricted rats a portion of the pool of HNF-4 protein is inactivated or otherwise prevented from binding to DNA. The overall DNA binding activity of C/EBP alpha and beta was increased in protein-restricted animals. This change occurred in the absence of a change in the amount of the full-length forms of these two proteins, quantified by Western blotting. Interestingly, dietary protein restriction specifically increased the level of a truncated form of C/EBP beta (liver-enriched transcriptional inhibitory protein, LIP), which is a protein dominant negative inhibitor of C/EBP function. Analysis of HNF-3 DNA-binding activity by EMSA revealed that HNF-3 alpha and beta DNA binding was increased and that HNF-3 gamma DNA-binding

  6. Identification of DNA-Damage DNA-Binding Protein 1 as a Conditional Essential Factor for Cytomegalovirus Replication in Interferon-γ-Stimulated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trilling, Mirko; Le, Vu Thuy Khanh; Fiedler, Manuela; Zimmermann, Albert; Bleifuß, Elke; Hengel, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    The mouse cytomegaloviral (MCMV) protein pM27 represents an indispensable factor for viral fitness in vivo selectively, antagonizing signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2)-mediated interferon signal transduction. We wished to explore by which molecular mechanism pM27 accomplishes this effect. We demonstrate that pM27 is essential and sufficient to curtail the protein half-life of STAT2 molecules. Pharmacologic inhibition of the proteasome restored STAT2 amounts, leading to poly-ubiquitin-conjugated STAT2 forms. PM27 was found in complexes with an essential host ubiquitin ligase complex adaptor protein, DNA-damage DNA-binding protein (DDB) 1. Truncation mutants of pM27 showed a strict correlation between DDB1 interaction and their ability to degrade STAT2. SiRNA-mediated knock-down of DDB1 restored STAT2 in the presence of pM27 and strongly impaired viral replication in interferon conditioned cells, thus phenocopying the growth attenuation of M27-deficient virus. In a constructive process, pM27 recruits DDB1 to exploit ubiquitin ligase complexes catalyzing the obstruction of the STAT2-dependent antiviral state of cells to permit viral replication. PMID:21698215

  7. Phosphate Control of Oxytetracycline Production by Streptomyces rimosus Is at the Level of Transcription from Promoters Overlapped by Tandem Repeats Similar to Those of the DNA-Binding Sites of the OmpR Family

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Kenneth J.; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Hunter, Iain S.

    1999-01-01

    Physiological studies have shown that Streptomyces rimosus produces the polyketide antibiotic oxytetracycline abundantly when its mycelial growth is limited by phosphate starvation. We show here that transcripts originating from the promoter for one of the biosynthetic genes, otcC (encoding anhydrotetracycline oxygenase), and from a promoter for the divergent otcX genes peak in abundance at the onset of antibiotic production induced by phosphate starvation, indicating that the synthesis of oxytetracycline is controlled, at least in part, at the level of transcription. Furthermore, analysis of the sequences of the promoters for otcC, otcX, and the polyketide synthase (otcY) genes revealed tandem repeats having significant similarity to the DNA-binding sites of ActII-Orf4 and DnrI, which are Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins (SARPs) related to the OmpR family of transcription activators. Together, the above results suggest that oxytetracycline production by S. rimosus requires a SARP-like transcription factor that is either produced or activated or both under conditions of low phosphate concentrations. We also provide evidence consistent with the otrA resistance gene being cotranscribed with otcC as part of a polycistronic message, suggesting a simple mechanism of coordinate regulation which ensures that resistance to the antibiotic increases in proportion to production. PMID:10322002

  8. THAP5 is a DNA binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-01

    THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death. PMID:21110952

  9. The DNA-binding domain of the transcriptional activator protein NifA resides in its carboxy terminus, recognises the upstream activator sequences of nif promoters and can be separated from the positive control function of NifA.

    PubMed Central

    Morett, E; Cannon, W; Buck, M

    1988-01-01

    The positive control protein NifA activates transcription of nitrogen fixation promoters in Klebsiella pneumoniae. NifA is believed to bind to specific sites, the upstream activator sequences (UAS's), of the nif promoters which it activates. We have now shown by mutation of the carboxy terminus of NifA that this is the DNA-binding domain and that the DNA-binding and positive activator functions of NifA can be separated. Mutational analysis of the nifH UAS and in vivo methylation protection analysis of the interaction of NifA with the nifH promoter demonstrates that the UAS is recognised by the carboxy terminus of NifA. The UAS's of K. pneumoniae nif promoters are also required for activation by the Rhizobium meliloti NifA indicating that this activator also possesses DNA-binding activity. Images PMID:3062575

  10. Proteopedia: 3D Visualization and Annotation of Transcription Factor-DNA Readout Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Saleebyan, Skyler B.; Holmes, Bailey T.; Karelina, Maria; Tam, Julia; Kim, Sharon Y.; Kim, Keziah H.; Dror, Iris; Hodis, Eran; Martz, Eric; Compeau, Patricia A.; Rohs, Remo

    2012-01-01

    3D visualization assists in identifying diverse mechanisms of protein-DNA recognition that can be observed for transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins. We used Proteopedia to illustrate transcription factor-DNA readout modes with a focus on DNA shape, which can be a function of either nucleotide sequence (Hox proteins) or base pairing…

  11. Nerve growth factor inhibits the synthesis of a single-stranded DNA binding protein in pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12).

    PubMed Central

    Biocca, S; Cattaneo, A; Calissano, P

    1984-01-01

    Arrest of mitosis and neurite outgrowth induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12) is accompanied by a progressive inhibition of the synthesis of a protein that binds to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. Time course experiments show that this inhibition is already apparent after a 2-day incubation with NGF and is maximum (85-95%) upon achievement of complete PC12 cell differentiation. Inhibition of the synthesis of this single-stranded DNA binding protein after 48 hr of incubation with NGF is potentiated by concomitant treatment of PC12 cells with antimitotic drugs acting at different levels of DNA replication. Purification on a preparative scale of this protein and analysis of its major physicochemical properties show that: (i) it constitutes 0.5% of total soluble proteins of naive PC12 cells; (ii) its molecular weight measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE is Mr 34,000 (sucrose gradient centrifugation under nondenaturing conditions yields a sedimentation coefficient s20,w of 8.1 S, indicating that the native protein is an oligomer); (iii) amino acid analysis demonstrates a preponderance of acidic over basic residues, while electrofocusing experiments show that it has an isoelectric point around 8.0; (iv) approximately 15% of the protein is phosphorylated in vivo. It is postulated that control of the synthesis of this protein is connected with activation of a differentiative program triggered by NGF in the PC12 neoplastic cell line at some step(s) of DNA activity. Images PMID:6585787

  12. Inhibition of host cell RNA polymerase III-mediated transcription by poliovirus: Inactivation of specific transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, L.G.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Berk, A.J.; Dasgupta, A.

    1987-11-01

    The inhibition of transcription by RNA polymerase III in poliovirus-infected cells was studied. Experiments utilizing two different cell lines showed that the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase III was impaired by infection of these cells with the virus. The observed inhibition of transcription was not due to shut-off of host cell protein synthesis by poliovirus. Among four distinct components required for accurate transcription in vitro from cloned DNA templates, activities of RNA polymerase III and transcription factor TFIIIA were not significantly affected by virus infection. The activity of transcription factor TFIIIC, the limiting component required for transcription of RNA polymerase III genes, was severely inhibited in infected cells, whereas that of transcription factor TFIIIB was inhibited to a lesser extent. The sequence-specific DNA-binding of TFIIIC to the adenovirus VA1 gene internal promoted, however, was not altered by infection of cells with the virus. The authors conclude that (i) at least two transcription factors, TFIIIB and TFIIIC, are inhibited by infection of cells with poliovirtus, (ii) inactivation of TFIIIC does not involve destruction of its DNA-binding domain, and (iii) sequence-specific DNA binding by TFIIIC may be necessary but is not sufficient for the formation of productive transcription complexes.

  13. Isolation and DNA-binding characteristics of a protein involved in transcription activation of two divergently transcribed, essential yeast genes.

    PubMed Central

    Halfter, H; Müller, U; Winnacker, E L; Gallwitz, D

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a protein, BAF1, which has two oppositely oriented, partially overlapping binding sites within a symmetrical sequence located midway between and upstream of the divergently transcribed YPT1 and TUB2 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 120 kd BAF1 protein was purified to near homogeneity and used to delineate the two binding sites and to identify apparent protein contact sites by the missing contact technique, methylation interference and by site-directed mutagenesis. The BAF1-recognition sequence contains a conserved TCN7ACG element recently identified at autonomously replicating sequences (ARS) and in the 5' and 3' flanking region of other yeast genes. The symmetrical sequence of the YPT1/TUB2 intergene region seems not to be involved in DNA replication but activates transcription in an orientation-independent fashion. Images PMID:2684633

  14. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (ID4) acts as an inhibitor of ID-1, -2 and -3 and promotes basic helix loop helix (bHLH) E47 DNA binding and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Chinaranagari, Swathi; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-05-01

    The four known ID proteins (ID1-4, Inhibitor of Differentiation) share a homologous helix loop helix (HLH) domain and act as dominant negative regulators of basic-HLH transcription factors. ID proteins also interact with many non-bHLH proteins in complex networks. The expression of ID proteins is increasingly observed in many cancers. Whereas ID-1, ID-2 and ID-3, are generally considered as tumor promoters, ID4 on the contrary has emerged as a tumor suppressor. In this study we demonstrate that ID4 heterodimerizes with ID-1, -2 and -3 and promote bHLH DNA binding, essentially acting as an inhibitor of inhibitors of differentiation proteins. Interaction of ID4 was observed with ID1, ID2 and ID3 that was dependent on intact HLH domain of ID4. Interaction with bHLH protein E47 required almost 3 fold higher concentration of ID4 as compared to ID1. Furthermore, inhibition of E47 DNA binding by ID1 was restored by ID4 in an EMSA binding assay. ID4 and ID1 were also colocalized in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. The alpha helix forming alanine stretch N-terminal, unique to HLH ID4 domain was required for optimum interaction. Ectopic expression of ID4 in DU145 prostate cancer line promoted E47 dependent expression of CDKNI p21. Thus counteracting the biological activities of ID-1, -2 and -3 by forming inactive heterodimers appears to be a novel mechanism of action of ID4. These results could have far reaching consequences in developing strategies to target ID proteins for cancer therapy and understanding biologically relevant ID-interactions. PMID:25778840

  15. Inhibitor of Differentiation 4 (ID4) Acts as an Inhibitor of ID-1, -2 and -3 and Promotes basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH) E47 DNA Binding and Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pankaj; Chinaranagari, Swathi; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    The four known ID proteins (ID1-4, Inhibitor of Differentiation) share a homologous helix loop helix (HLH) domain and act as dominant negative regulators of basic-HLH transcription factors. ID proteins also interact with many non-bHLH proteins in complex networks. The expression of ID proteins is increasingly observed in many cancers. Whereas ID-1, ID-2 and ID-3, are generally considered as tumor promoters, ID4 on the contrary has emerged as a tumor suppressor. In this study we demonstrate that ID4 heterodimerizes with ID-1, -2 and -3 and promote bHLH DNA binding, essentially acting as an inhibitor of inhibitors of differentiation proteins. Interaction of ID4 was observed with ID1, ID2 and ID3 that was dependent on intact HLH domain of ID4. Interaction with bHLH protein E47 required almost 3 fold higher concentration of ID4 as compared to ID1. Furthermore, inhibition of E47 DNA binding by ID1 was restored by ID4 in an EMSA binding assay. ID4 and ID1 were also colocalized in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. The alpha helix forming alanine stretch N-terminal, unique to HLH ID4 domain was required for optimum interaction. Ectopic expression of ID4 in DU145 prostate cancer line promoted E47 dependent expression of CDKNI p21. Thus counteracting the biological activities of ID-1, -2 and -3 by forming inactive heterodimers appears to be a novel mechanism of action of ID4. These results could have far reaching consequences in developing strategies to target ID proteins for cancer therapy and understanding biologically relevant ID- interactions. PMID:25778840

  16. Overexpression of heat shock factor 1 maintains TAR DNA binding protein 43 solubility via induction of inducible heat shock protein 70 in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Folorunso, Oluwarotimi; Taglialatela, Giulio; Pierce, Anson

    2016-07-01

    TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a nuclear protein that has been shown to have altered homeostasis in the form of neuronal nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates in some familial and almost all cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as well as 51% of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and 57% of Alzheimer's disease cases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), such as HSP70, recognize misfolded or aggregated proteins and refold, disaggregate, or turn them over and are upregulated by the master transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). Here, we explore the effect of HSF1 overexpression on proteotoxic stress-related alterations in TDP-43 solubility, proteolytic processing, and cytotoxicity. HSF1 overexpression reduced TDP-43-positive puncta concomitantly with upregulating HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels. HSF1 overexpression or pharmacological activation sustained TDP-43 solubility and significantly reduced truncation of TDP-43 in response to inhibition of the proteasome with Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-al, and this was reversed by HSF1 inhibition. HSF1 activation conferred protection against toxicity associated with TDP-43 C-terminal fragments without globally increasing the activity of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) while concomitantly reducing the induction of autophagy, suggesting that HSF1 protection is an early event. In support of this, inhibition of HSP70 ATPase activity further reduced TDP-43 solubility. HSF1 knockout significantly increased TDP-43 insolubility and accelerated TDP-43 fragmentation in response to proteotoxic stress. Overall, this study shows that HSF1 overexpression protects against TDP-43 pathology by upregulation of chaperones, especially HSP70, rather than enhancing autophagy or the UPS during times of proteotoxic stress. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26994698

  17. The Methanosarcina acetivorans thioredoxin system activates DNA binding of the redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator MsvR

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Ryan; McCarver, Addison C.; Isom, Catherine E.; Karr, Elizabeth A.; Lessner, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of biogas (methane) by anaerobic digestion is an important facet to renewable energy, but is subject to instability due to the sensitivity of strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea (methanogens) to environmental perturbations, such as oxygen. An understanding of the oxidant-sensing mechanisms used by methanogens may lead to the development of more oxidant tolerant (i.e. stable) methanogen strains. MsvR is a redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator that is found exclusively in methanogens. We show here that oxidation of MsvR from Methanosarcina acetivorans (MaMsvR) with hydrogen peroxide oxidizes cysteine thiols, which inactivates MaMsvR binding to its own promoter (PmsvR). Incubation of oxidized MaMsvR with the M. acetivorans thioredoxin system (NADPH, MaTrxR, and MaTrx7) results in reduction of the cysteines back to thiols and activation of PmsvR binding. These data confirm that cysteines are critical for the thiol-disulfide regulation of PmsvR binding by MaMsvR and support a role for the M. acetivorans thioredoxin system in the in vivo activation of MaMsvR. The results support the feasibility of using MaMsvR and PmsvR, along with the Methanosarcina genetic system, to design methanogen strains with oxidant-regulated gene expression systems, which may aid in stabilizing anaerobic digestion. PMID:25791378

  18. Ab initio prediction of transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, L Angela; Bader, Joel S

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors are DNA-binding proteins that control gene transcription by binding specific short DNA sequences. Experiments that identify transcription factor binding sites are often laborious and expensive, and the binding sites of many transcription factors remain unknown. We present a computational scheme to predict the binding sites directly from transcription factor sequence using all-atom molecular simulations. This method is a computational counterpart to recent high-throughput experimental technologies that identify transcription factor binding sites (ChIP-chip and protein-dsDNA binding microarrays). The only requirement of our method is an accurate 3D structural model of a transcription factor-DNA complex. We apply free energy calculations by thermodynamic integration to compute the change in binding energy of the complex due to a single base pair mutation. By calculating the binding free energy differences for all possible single mutations, we construct a position weight matrix for the predicted binding sites that can be directly compared with experimental data. As water-bridged hydrogen bonds between the transcription factor and DNA often contribute to the binding specificity, we include explicit solvent in our simulations. We present successful predictions for the yeast MAT-alpha2 homeodomain and GCN4 bZIP proteins. Water-bridged hydrogen bonds are found to be more prevalent than direct protein-DNA hydrogen bonds at the binding interfaces, indicating why empirical potentials with implicit water may be less successful in predicting binding. Our methodology can be applied to a variety of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:17990512

  19. Interaction of the DNA-binding domain of Drosophila heat shock factor with its cognate DNA site: a thermodynamic analysis using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. J.; Tsukiyama, T.; Lewis, M. S.; Wu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) mediates the activation of heat shock genes by binding to its cognate sites with high affinity and specificity. The high-affinity binding of HSF is dependent on the formation of an HSF homotrimer, which interacts specifically with the heat shock response element (HSE), comprised of 3 inverted repeats of the 5-bp sequence NGAAN. In order to investigate the thermodynamic basis of the interaction between HSF and HSE, we have overexpressed and purified a polypeptide (dHSF(33-163)) encompassing only the DNA-binding domain of HSF from Drosophila and analyzed its binding to DNA by equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation using a multiwavelength scan technique. We demonstrate that dHSF(33-163) can bind as a monomer with 1:1 stoichiometry to a synthetic 13-bp DNA containing a single NGAAN sequence. The values of the thermodynamic parameters obtained from the temperature dependence of the equilibrium binding constants indicate that the changes of free energy for the binding of dHSF(33-163) to the wild-type site and a mutant DNA site are predominantly characterized by substantial negative changes of enthalpy. Binding to the wild-type DNA is characterized by a significant positive change of entropy, whereas binding to the mutant DNA is distinguished by a negative change of entropy of comparable magnitude. The binding to the mutant DNA was also highly sensitive to increasing salt concentrations, indicating a dominance of ionic interactions. The sequence-specific, 1:1 binding of dHSF(33-163) to the NGAAN sequence provides a basis for the analysis of higher order interactions between HSF trimers and the HSE. PMID:7920249

  20. Transcriptional Repressor TrmBL2 from Thermococcus kodakarensis Forms Filamentous Nucleoprotein Structures and Competes with Histones for DNA Binding in a Salt- and DNA Supercoiling-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem K; Qu, Yuanyuan; Maruyama, Hugo; Lim, Ci J; Takeyasu, Kunio; Yan, Jie

    2015-06-19

    Architectural DNA proteins play important roles in the chromosomal DNA organization and global gene regulation in living cells. However, physiological functions of some DNA-binding proteins from archaea remain unclear. Recently, several abundant DNA-architectural proteins including histones, Alba, and TrmBL2 have been identified in model euryarchaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. Although histones and Alba proteins have been previously characterized, the DNA binding properties of TrmBL2 and its interplay with the other major architectural proteins in the chromosomal DNA organization and gene transcription regulation remain largely unexplored. Here, we report single-DNA studies showing that at low ionic strength (<300 mM KCl), TrmBL2 binds to DNA largely in non-sequence-specific manner with positive cooperativity, resulting in formation of stiff nucleoprotein filamentous patches, whereas at high ionic strength (>300 mM KCl) TrmBL2 switches to more sequence-specific interaction, suggesting the presence of high affinity TrmBL2-filament nucleation sites. Furthermore, in vitro assays indicate the existence of DNA binding competition between TrmBL2 and archaeal histones B from T. kodakarensis, which can be strongly modulated by DNA supercoiling and ionic strength of surrounding solution. Overall, these results advance our understanding of TrmBL2 DNA binding properties and provide important insights into potential functions of architectural proteins in nucleoid organization and gene regulation in T. kodakarensis. PMID:25931116

  1. Transcriptional Repressor TrmBL2 from Thermococcus kodakarensis Forms Filamentous Nucleoprotein Structures and Competes with Histones for DNA Binding in a Salt- and DNA Supercoiling-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, Artem K.; Qu, Yuanyuan; Maruyama, Hugo; Lim, Ci J.; Takeyasu, Kunio; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Architectural DNA proteins play important roles in the chromosomal DNA organization and global gene regulation in living cells. However, physiological functions of some DNA-binding proteins from archaea remain unclear. Recently, several abundant DNA-architectural proteins including histones, Alba, and TrmBL2 have been identified in model euryarchaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. Although histones and Alba proteins have been previously characterized, the DNA binding properties of TrmBL2 and its interplay with the other major architectural proteins in the chromosomal DNA organization and gene transcription regulation remain largely unexplored. Here, we report single-DNA studies showing that at low ionic strength (<300 mm KCl), TrmBL2 binds to DNA largely in non-sequence-specific manner with positive cooperativity, resulting in formation of stiff nucleoprotein filamentous patches, whereas at high ionic strength (>300 mm KCl) TrmBL2 switches to more sequence-specific interaction, suggesting the presence of high affinity TrmBL2-filament nucleation sites. Furthermore, in vitro assays indicate the existence of DNA binding competition between TrmBL2 and archaeal histones B from T. kodakarensis, which can be strongly modulated by DNA supercoiling and ionic strength of surrounding solution. Overall, these results advance our understanding of TrmBL2 DNA binding properties and provide important insights into potential functions of architectural proteins in nucleoid organization and gene regulation in T. kodakarensis. PMID:25931116

  2. TFCat: the curated catalog of mouse and human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Debra L; Sundararajan, Saravanan; Badis, Gwenael; Hughes, Timothy R; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Roach, Jared C; Sladek, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Unravelling regulatory programs governed by transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to understanding biological systems. TFCat is a catalog of mouse and human TFs based on a reliable core collection of annotations obtained by expert review of the scientific literature. The collection, including proven and homology-based candidate TFs, is annotated within a function-based taxonomy and DNA-binding proteins are organized within a classification system. All data and user-feedback mechanisms are available at the TFCat portal . PMID:19284633

  3. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H.; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  4. A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sayou, Camille; Nanao, Max H; Jamin, Marc; Posé, David; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Grégoire, Laura; Tichtinsky, Gabrielle; Denay, Grégoire; Ott, Felix; Peirats Llobet, Marta; Schmid, Markus; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF. PMID:27097556

  5. PAX transcription factors in neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2015-08-01

    The nine vertebrate PAX transcription factors (PAX1-PAX9) play essential roles during early development and organogenesis. Pax genes were identified in vertebrates using their homology with the Drosophila melanogaster paired gene DNA-binding domain. PAX1-9 functions are largely conserved throughout vertebrate evolution, in particular during central nervous system and neural crest development. The neural crest is a vertebrate invention, which gives rise to numerous derivatives during organogenesis, including neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton and mesenchyme, the heart outflow tract, endocrine and pigment cells. Human and mouse spontaneous mutations as well as experimental analyses have evidenced the critical and diverse functions of PAX factors during neural crest development. Recent studies have highlighted the role of PAX3 and PAX7 in neural crest induction. Additionally, several PAX proteins - PAX1, 3, 7, 9 - regulate cell proliferation, migration and determination in multiple neural crest-derived lineages, such as cardiac, sensory, and enteric neural crest, pigment cells, glia, craniofacial skeleton and teeth, or in organs developing in close relationship with the neural crest such as the thymus and parathyroids. The diverse PAX molecular functions during neural crest formation rely on fine-tuned modulations of their transcriptional transactivation properties. These modulations are generated by multiple means, such as different roles for the various isoforms (formed by alternative splicing), or posttranslational modifications which alter protein-DNA binding, or carefully orchestrated protein-protein interactions with various co-factors which control PAX proteins activity. Understanding these regulations is the key to decipher the versatile roles of PAX transcription factors in neural crest development, differentiation and disease. PMID:26410165

  6. Autoactivation by a Candida glabrata copper metalloregulatory transcription factor requires critical minor groove interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K A; Thiele, D J

    1996-01-01

    Rapid transcriptional autoactivation of the Candida glabrata AMT1 copper metalloregulatory transcription factor gene is essential for survival in the presence of high extracellular copper concentrations. Analysis of the interactions between purified recombinant AMT1 protein and the AMT1 promoter metal regulatory element was carried out by a combination of missing-nucleoside analysis, ethylation interference, site-directed mutagenesis, and quantitative in vitro DNA binding studies. The results of these experiments demonstrate that monomeric AMT1 binds the metal regulatory element with very high affinity and utilizes critical contacts in both the major and minor grooves. A single adenosine residue in the minor groove, conserved in all known yeast Cu metalloregulatory transcription factor DNA binding sites, plays a critical role in both AMT1 DNA binding in vitro and Cu-responsive AMT1 gene transcription in vivo. Furthermore, a mutation in the AMT1 Cu-activated DNA binding domain which converts a single arginine, found in a conserved minor groove binding domain, to lysine markedly reduces AMT1 DNA binding affinity in vitro and results in a severe defect in the ability of C. glabrata cells to mount a protective response against Cu toxicity. PMID:8552101

  7. Phosphorylation Regulates Functions of ZEB1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Llorens, M Candelaria; Lorenzatti, Guadalupe; Cavallo, Natalia L; Vaglienti, Maria V; Perrone, Ana P; Carenbauer, Anne L; Darling, Douglas S; Cabanillas, Ana M

    2016-10-01

    ZEB1 transcription factor is important in both development and disease, including many TGFβ-induced responses, and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by which many tumors undergo metastasis. ZEB1 is differentially phosphorylated in different cell types; however the role of phosphorylation in ZEB1 activity is unknown. Luciferase reporter studies and electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that a decrease in phosphorylation of ZEB1 increases both DNA-binding and transcriptional repression of ZEB1 target genes. Functional analysis of ZEB1 phosphorylation site mutants near the second zinc finger domain (termed ZD2) show that increased phosphorylation (due to either PMA plus ionomycin, or IGF-1) can inhibit transcriptional repression by either a ZEB1-ZD2 domain clone, or full-length ZEB1. This approach identifies phosphosites that have a substantial effect regulating the transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of ZEB1. Immunoprecipitation with anti-ZEB1 antibodies followed by western analysis with a phospho-Threonine-Proline-specific antibody indicates that the ERK consensus site at Thr-867 is phosphorylated in ZEB1. In addition to disrupting in vitro DNA-binding measured by EMSA, IGF-1-induced MEK/ERK phosphorylation is sufficient to disrupt nuclear localization of GFP-ZEB1 fusion clones. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ZEB1 integrates TGFβ signaling with other signaling pathways such as IGF-1. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2205-2217, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868487

  8. Multiple steps in the regulation of transcription-factor level and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Calkhoven, C F; Ab, G

    1996-01-01

    This review focuses on the regulation of transcription factors, many of which are DNA-binding proteins that recognize cis-regulatory elements of target genes and are the most direct regulators of gene transcription. Transcription factors serve as integration centres of the different signal-transduction pathways affecting a given gene. It is obvious that the regulation of these regulators themselves is of crucial importance for differential gene expression during development and in terminally differentiated cells. Transcription factors can be regulated at two, principally different, levels, namely concentration and activity, each of which can be modulated in a variety of ways. The concentrations of transcription factors, as of intracellular proteins in general, may be regulated at any of the steps leading from DNA to protein, including transcription, RNA processing, mRNA degradation and translation. The activity of a transcription factor is often regulated by (de) phosphorylation, which may affect different functions, e.g. nuclear localization DNA binding and trans-activation. Ligand binding is another mode of transcription-factor activation. It is typical for the large super-family of nuclear hormone receptors. Heterodimerization between transcription factors adds another dimension to the regulatory diversity and signal integration. Finally, non-DNA-binding (accessory) factors may mediate a diverse range of functions, e.g. serving as a bridge between the transcription factor and the basal transcription machinery, stabilizing the DNA-binding complex or changing the specificity of the target sequence recognition. The present review presents an overview of different modes of transcription-factor regulation, each illustrated by typical examples. PMID:8713055

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation by reducing the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}/retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, Adam J.; Luo Zhengyu; Vincent, Karen A.; Akita, Geoffrey Y.; Cheng, Seng H.; Gregory, Richard J.; Jiang Canwen

    2007-12-21

    In response to cellular hypoxia, cardiomyocytes adapt to consume less oxygen by shifting ATP production from mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation to glycolysis. The transcriptional activation of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In this study, we examined whether HIF-1 was involved in the suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We showed that either hypoxia or adenovirus-mediated expression of a constitutively stable hybrid form (HIF-1{alpha}/VP16) suppressed mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by an accumulation of intracellular neutral lipid. Both treatments also reduced the mRNA levels of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mitochondrial import of fatty acids for {beta}-oxidation. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression of HIF-1{alpha}/VP16 in cardiomyocytes under normoxic conditions also mimicked the reduction in the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})/retinoid X receptor (RXR), in the presence or absence of a PPAR{alpha} ligand. These results suggest that HIF-1 may be involved in hypoxia-induced suppression of fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes by reducing the DNA binding activity of PPAR{alpha}/RXR.

  10. The DNA binding specificity of the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 can be changed by substitution of a single amino acid.

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, M; von Wilcken-Bergmann, B; Müller-Hill, B

    1993-01-01

    The X-ray structure of a GCN4 DNA complex (1) shows, that specific DNA binding of the GCN4 basic region is mediated by a complicated network of base pair and DNA backbone contacts. According to the X-ray structure, alanine -14 of the basic region of GCN4 (we define the first leucine of the leucine zipper as +1) makes a hydrophobic contact to the methyl group of the thymine next to the center of the GCN4 binding site 5' ATGACTCAT 3'. We tested the DNA binding properties of the nineteen derivatives of GCN4, which carry all possible amino acids in position -14 of the basic region. Substitution of alanine -14 of GCN4 by either asparagine or cysteine changes the DNA binding specificity. Serine in this position broadens the specificity for position 1 of the target, whereas other amino acids either retain or decrease GCN4 specificity. Images PMID:8502548

  11. WRKY transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  12. In silico Analysis of Transcription Factor Repertoire and Prediction of Stress Responsive Transcription Factors in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Keiichi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are often termed as ‘master regulators’ which bind to DNA and either activate or repress gene transcription. We have computationally analysed the soybean genome sequence data and constructed a proper set of TFs based on the Hidden Markov Model profiles of DNA-binding domain families. Within the soybean genome, we identified 4342 loci encoding 5035 TF models which grouped into 61 families. We constructed a database named SoybeanTFDB (http://soybeantfdb.psc.riken.jp) containing the full compilation of soybean TFs and significant information such as: functional motifs, full-length cDNAs, domain alignments, promoter regions, genomic organization and putative regulatory functions based on annotations of gene ontology (GO) inferred by comparative analysis with Arabidopsis. With particular interest in abiotic stress signalling, we analysed the promoter regions for all of the TF encoding genes as a means to identify abiotic stress responsive cis-elements as well as all types of cis-motifs provided by the PLACE database. SoybeanTFDB enables scientists to easily access cis-element and GO annotations to aid in the prediction of TF function and selection of TFs with functions of interest. This study provides a basic framework and an important user-friendly public information resource which enables analyses of transcriptional regulation in soybean. PMID:19884168

  13. PCB-INDUCED CHANGES IN THE DNA BINDING OF SEVERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLUM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of persistent chemical pollutants prevalent in the environment despite the ban of their use for decades. Disturbances in brain development and cognition are among the neurotoxic manifestations of PCBs. The cellular and molecular basis...

  14. DNA-binding and regulation mechanisms of the SIX family of retinal determination proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengyong; Mamedova, Aygun; Hegde, Rashmi S

    2008-03-18

    The Six/sine oculis proteins are homeodomain transcription factors that are part of the Pax/Eya/Six/Dach retinal determination cascade involved in embryonic cell fate determination. There are six mammalian Six homologues, divided into three classes on the basis of sequence homology. In the present study we examined the DNA-binding specificity and mechanisms of Six2 and Six6 toward the Trex/MEF3 consensus sequence and the core tetranucleotide ATTA commonly recognized by homeodomain proteins. The results suggest that the Six homeodomain does not bind DNA owing to the absence of a key structural feature, the basic N-terminal arm, implicated in canonical homeodomain-DNA binding. Furthermore, the DNA-binding mechanisms and DNA sequence specificity differ among these Six proteins despite the complete conservation of predicted DNA-contacting residues in their homeodomains. Inclusion of 14 amino acid residues immediately C-terminal to the homeodomain of Six6 yields a protein construct able to bind both DNA sequences tested with nanomolar affinity. However, an analogous Six2 construct remains unable to bind DNA. Furthermore, we show that the DNA-binding affinity of Six2 is increased nearly 12-fold by complex formation with the Eyes Absent tyrosine phosphatase, while Six6-DNA binding is not similarly enhanced. This phenomenon could contribute to the synergy observed between Six2 and Eyes Absent in transcriptional activation and in eye development. PMID:18293925

  15. Identification and characterisation of Dof transcription factors in the cucumber genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber is susceptible to many foliage diseases. Although candidate genes for resistances to several pathogens in cucumber have been reported, the underlying defence mechanisms remain unclear. The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are a group of plant-specific transcription factors that ha...

  16. Inhibition of DNA binding of Sox2 by the SUMO conjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuruzoe, Shu |; Ishihara, Ko; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Sugiko; Sekita, Yoko; Aoto, Takahiro; Saitoh, Hisato; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Niwa, Hitoshi; Kawasuji, Michio; Baba, Hideo; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi . E-mail: mnakao@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-29

    Sox2 is a member of the high mobility group (HMG) domain DNA-binding proteins for transcriptional control and chromatin architecture. The HMG domain of Sox2 binds the DNA to facilitate transactivation by the cooperative transcription factors such as Oct3/4. We report that mouse Sox2 is modified by SUMO at lysine 247. Substitution of the target lysine to arginine lost the sumoylation but little affected transcriptional potential or nuclear localization of Sox2. By contrast with the unmodified form, Sox2 fused to SUMO-1 did not augment transcription via the Fgf4 enhancer in the presence of Oct3/4. Further, SUMO-1-conjugated Sox2 at the lysine 247 or at the carboxyl terminus reduced the binding to the Fgf4 enhancer. These indicate that Sox2 sumoylation negatively regulates its transcriptional role through impairing the DNA binding.

  17. YY1 is autoregulated through its own DNA-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Do; Yu, Sungryul; Kim, Joomyeong

    2009-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional protein that controls a large number of genes and biological processes in vertebrates. As a general transcription factor, the proper levels of YY1 protein need to be maintained for the normal function of cells and organisms. However, the mechanism for the YY1 homeostasis is currently unknown. Results The current study reports that the YY1 gene locus of all vertebrates contains a cluster of its own DNA-binding sites within the 1st intron. The intact structure of these DNA-binding sites is absolutely necessary for transcriptional activity of the YY1 promoter. In an inducible cell line system that over-expresses an exogenous YY1 gene, the overall increased levels of YY1 protein caused a reduction in transcription levels of the endogenous YY1 gene. Reversion to the normal levels of YY1 protein restored the transcriptional levels of the endogenous YY1 to normal levels. This homeostatic response was also mediated through its cluster of YY1 binding sites. Conclusion Taken together, the transcriptional level of YY1 is self-regulated through its internal DNA-binding sites. This study identifies YY1 as the first known autoregulating transcription factor in mammalian genomes. PMID:19712462

  18. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  19. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  20. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahijdak, W.M.; Yang, Chin-Rang; Zuckerman, J.S.; Meyers, M.; Boothman, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Targeting transcription factors by small compounds-Current strategies and future implications.

    PubMed

    Hagenbuchner, Judith; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Transcription factors are central regulators of gene expression and critically steer development, differentiation and death. Except for ligand-activated nuclear receptors, direct modulation of transcription factor function by small molecules is still widely regarded as "impossible". This "un-druggability" of non-ligand transcription factors is due to the fact that the interacting surface between transcription factor and DNA is huge and subject to significant changes during DNA-binding. Besides some "success studies" with compounds that directly interfere with DNA binding, drug targeting approaches mostly address protein-protein interfaces with essential co-factors, transcription factor dimerization partners, chaperone proteins or proteins that regulate subcellular shuttling. An alternative strategy represent DNA-intercalating, alkylating or DNA-groove-binding compounds that either block transcription factor-binding or change the 3D-conformation of the consensus DNA-strand. Recently, much interest has been focused on chromatin reader proteins that steer the recruitment and activity of transcription factors to a gene transcription start site. Several small compounds demonstrate that these epigenetic reader proteins are exciting new drug targets for inhibiting lineage-specific transcription in cancer therapy. In this research update we will discuss recent advances in targeting transcription factors with small compounds, the challenges that are related to the complex function and regulation of these proteins and also the possible future directions and applications of transcription factor drug targeting. PMID:26686579

  2. Forkhead transcription factors regulate mosquito reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Munro, James B.; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Cruz, Josefa; Lee, Iris W.; Heraty, John M.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Forkhead box (Fox) genes encode a family of transcription factors defined by a ‘winged helix’ DNA-binding domain. In this study we aimed to identify Fox factors that are expressed within the fat body of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and determine whether any of these are involved in the regulation of mosquito yolk protein gene expression. The Ae. aegypti genome contains eighteen loci that encode putative Fox factors. Our stringent cladistic analysis has profound implications for the use of Fox genes as phylogenetic markers. Twelve Ae. aegypti Fox genes are expressed within various tissues of adult females, six of which are expressed within the fat body. All six Fox genes expressed in the fat body displayed dynamic expression profiles following a blood meal. We knocked down the ’fat body Foxes’ through RNAi to determine whether these “knockdowns” hindered amino acid-induced vitellogenin gene expression. We also determined the effect of these knockdowns on the number of eggs deposited following a blood meal. Knockdown of FoxN1, FoxN2, FoxL, and FoxO, had a negative effect on amino acid- induced vitellogenin gene expression and resulted in significantly fewer eggs laid. Our analysis stresses the importance of Fox transcription factors in regulating mosquito reproduction. PMID:17681238

  3. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  4. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  5. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Xiao, Shu; Xie, Dan; Cao, Xiaoyi; Song, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ting; He, Chuan; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq), DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq), and histone modifications (ChIP-seq). We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs) for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq) and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg). PMID:24339764

  6. Gamma and alpha motor neurons distinguished by expression of transcription factor Err3.

    PubMed

    Friese, Andreas; Kaltschmidt, Julia A; Ladle, David R; Sigrist, Markus; Jessell, Thomas M; Arber, Silvia

    2009-08-11

    Spinal motor neurons are specified to innervate different muscle targets through combinatorial programs of transcription factor expression. Whether transcriptional programs also establish finer aspects of motor neuron subtype identity, notably the prominent functional distinction between alpha and gamma motor neurons, remains unclear. In this study, we identify DNA binding proteins with complementary expression profiles in alpha and gamma motor neurons, providing evidence for molecular distinctions in these two motor neuron subtypes. The transcription factor Err3 is expressed at high levels in gamma but not alpha motor neurons, whereas the neuronal DNA binding protein NeuN marks alpha but not gamma motor neurons. Signals from muscle spindles are needed to support the differentiation of Err3(on)/NeuN(off) presumptive gamma motor neurons, whereas direct proprioceptive sensory input to a motor neuron pool is apparently dispensable. Together, these findings provide evidence that transcriptional programs define functionally distinct motor neuron subpopulations, even within anatomically defined motor pools. PMID:19651609

  7. SoxD Transcription Factors: Multifaceted Players of Neural Development

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Hye; Kim, Jaesang

    2016-01-01

    SoxD transcription factor subfamily includes three members, Sox5, Sox6, and Sox13. Like other Sox genes, they contain the High-Mobility-Group (HMG) box as the DNA binding domain but in addition feature the subgroup-specific leucine zipper motif. SoxD genes are expressed in diverse cell types in multiple organs during embryogenesis and in adulthood. Among the cells expressing them are those present in the developing nervous system including neural stem (or progenitor) cells as well as differentiating neurons and oligodendrocytes. SoxD transcription factors do not contain distinct activator or repressor domain, and they are believed to function in modulation of other transcription factors in promoter-specific manners. This brief review article will attempt to summarize the latest studies on the function of SoxD genes in embryogenesis with a particular emphasis on the regulation of neural development. PMID:27426080

  8. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  9. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Sigova, Alla A.; Abraham, Brian J.; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M.; Eric Guo, Yang; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Young, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and distal DNA elements in order to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA-binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF YY1 binds to both gene regulatory elements and also to their associated RNA species genome-wide. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  10. Both HMG boxes in Hmo1 are essential for DNA binding in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Ayako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Kasahara, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Hmo1, a member of the high mobility group B family proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, associates with the promoters of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) to direct accurate transcriptional initiation. Here, to identify factors involved in the binding of Hmo1 to its targets and the mechanism of Hmo1-dependent transcriptional initiation, we developed a novel reporter system using the promoter of the RPG RPS5. A genetic screen did not identify any factors that influence Hmo1 binding, but did identify a number of mutations in Hmo1 that impair its DNA binding activity in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that Hmo1 binds to its target promoters autonomously without any aid of additional factors. Furthermore, characterization of Hmo1 mutants showed that the box A domain plays a pivotal role in DNA binding and may be required for the recognition of structural properties of target promoters that occur in native chromatin. PMID:25410521

  11. dimerization and DNA binding alter phosphorylation of Fos and Jun

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, C.; Baker, S.J.; Curran, T. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Marshak, D.R. )

    1993-07-15

    Fos and Jun form dimeric complexes that bind to activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. The levels of expression and activities of these proteins are regulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. They are thought to function in nuclear signal transduction processes in many different cell types. The role of Fos and Jun in gene transcription is complex and may be regulated in several ways including association with different dimerization partners, interactions with other transcription factors, effects on DNA topology, and reduction/oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding domain. In addition, phosphorylation has been suggested to control the activity of Fos and Jun. Here the authors show that phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by several protein kinases is affected by dimerization and binding to DNA. Jun homodimers are phosphorylated efficiently by casein kinase II, whereas Fos-Jun heterodimers are not. DNA binding also reduces phosphorylation of Jun by casein kinase II, p34[sup cdc2] (cdc2) kinase, and protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of Fos by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cdc2 is relatively insensitive to dimerization and DNA binding, whereas phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by DNA-dependent protein kinase is dramatically stimulated by binding to the AP-1 site. These results imply that different protein kinases can distinguish among Fos and Jun proteins in the form of monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers and between DNA-bound and non-DNA-bound proteins. Thus, potentially, these different states of Fos and Jun can be recognized and regulated independently by phosphorylation. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  12. DNA-binding site for two skeletal actin promoter factors is important for expression in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, K.; Schimmel, P.

    1988-04-01

    Two nuclear factors bind to the same site in the chicken skeletal actin promoter. Mutations in the footprint sequence which eliminate detectable binding decrease expression in transfected skeletal muscle cells by a factor of 25 to 50 and do not elevate the flow expression in nonmuscle cells. These results show that the factor-binding site contributes to the activation of expression in muscle cells and that it alone does not contribute significantly to repress expression in nonmuscle cells.

  13. Repression of DNA-binding dependent glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Muzikar, Katy A.; Nickols, Nicholas G.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) affects the transcription of genes involved in diverse processes, including energy metabolism and the immune response, through DNA-binding dependent and independent mechanisms. The DNA-binding dependent mechanism occurs by direct binding of GR to glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at regulatory regions of target genes. The DNA-binding independent mechanism involves binding of GR to transcription factors and coactivators that, in turn, contact DNA. A small molecule that competes with GR for binding to GREs could be expected to affect the DNA-dependent pathway selectively by interfering with the protein-DNA interface. We show that a DNA-binding polyamide that targets the consensus GRE sequence binds the glucocorticoid-induced zipper (GILZ) GRE, inhibits expression of GILZ and several other known GR target genes, and reduces GR occupancy at the GILZ promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of the effects of this polyamide on a set of glucocorticoid-induced and -repressed genes could help to elucidate the mechanism of GR regulation for these genes. PMID:19805343

  14. A comparative analysis of the 'other roles' of transcriptional factors from pathogenic organisms.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Angshuman

    2016-07-25

    Transcription factors are the proteins that regulate gene expressions by binding to the promoter DNA regions of the corresponding genes. There are a number of different transcription factors and all of them have DNA-binding signature sequences. Transcription factors are structurally classified as belonging to different families on the basis of the distribution of their secondary structural patterns. The amino acid sequences of the DNA-binding regions of the transcription factors belonging to the same family should therefore be identical. But careful analyses of these sequences reveal the presence of different mutations in them. On further analyses, the mutations are found to create new domains in the transcription factors thereby conferring them with some new functionality in addition to their regulatory roles. Here, an attempt has been made to analyze the mutations present in the transcription factors of pathogenic organisms. The possible effects of these mutations have been identified and correlated with the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. So far this is the first report that predicts the presence of the new functionality of the transcription factors, which also can augment disease propagation by the pathogens. This analysis would therefore be beneficial to future genetic studies to identify the effects of the mutations in the transcription factors for disease propagation. PMID:27083770

  15. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  16. Dynamics, mechanisms, and functional implications of transcription factor binding evolution in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Transcription factor binding differences can contribute to organismal evolution by altering downstream gene expression programmes. Recent genome-wide studies in Drosophila and mammals have revealed common quantitative and combinatorial properties of in vivo DNA-binding, as well as significant differences in the rate and mechanisms of metazoan transcription factor binding evolution. Here, we review the recently-discovered, rapid re-wiring of in vivo transcription factor binding between related metazoan species and summarize general principles underlying the observed patterns of evolution. We then consider what might explain genome evolution differences between metazoan phyla, and outline the conceptual and technological challenges facing the field. PMID:24590227

  17. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of DNA-binding (Id) Proteins and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Increased Apoptosis in Ovarian Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Jung; Park, Sea Hee; Moon, Sung Eun; Koo, Ja Seong; Moon, Hwa Sook; Joo, Bo Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the expression of inhibitor of DNA-binding (Id) proteins and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the ovary according to female age using a mice model as the first step in investigating the potential role of Ids and VEGF in ovarian aging. C57BL inbred female mice of three age groups (6-9, 14-16, and 23-26 weeks) were injected with 5 IU pregnant mare’s serum gonadotropin (PMSG) in order to synchronize the estrus cycle. After 48 h, ovarian expression of Ids and VEGF was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot and immunohistochemistry. Ovarian apoptosis was examined by ovarian expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Expression of Id-1 and VEGF was decreased with advancing female age, but not Id-2, Id-3, and Id-4. In particular, their expressions were significantly decreased in aged mice of 23-26 weeks compared with the young mice of 6-9 weeks (p < 0.05). In contrast, ovarian apoptosis was greatly increased in the aged mice compared to the young mice. This result suggests that Id-1 may have an implicated role in ovarian aging by associating with VEGF. PMID:25949117

  18. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  19. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  20. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  1. The functional landscape bound to the transcription factors of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by the experimental evidences accumulated in the last ten years and based on information deposited in RegulonDB, literature look up, and sequence analysis, we analyze the repertoire of 304 DNA-binding Transcription factors (TFs) in Escherichia coli K-12. These regulators were grouped in 78 evolutionary families and are regulating almost half of the total genes in this bacterium. In structural terms, 60% of TFs are composed by two-domains, 30% are monodomain, and 10% three- and four-structural domains. As previously noticed, the most abundant DNA-binding domain corresponds to the winged helix-turn-helix, with few alternative DNA-binding structures, resembling the hypothesis of successful protein structures with the emergence of new ones at low scales. In summary, we identified and described the characteristics associated to the DNA-binding TF in E. coli K-12. We also identified twelve functional modules based on a co-regulated gene matrix. Finally, diverse regulons were predicted based on direct associations between the TFs and potential regulated genes. This analysis should increase our knowledge about the gene regulation in the bacterium E. coli K-12, and provide more additional clues for comprehensive modelling of transcriptional regulatory networks in other bacteria. PMID:26094112

  2. Positive Control Mutations in the MyoD Basic Region Fail to Show Cooperative DNA Binding and Transcriptional Activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengal, Eyal; Flores, Osvaldo; Rangarajan, Pundi N.; Chen, Amy; Weintraub, Harold; Verma, Inder M.

    1994-06-01

    An in vitro transcription system from HeLa cells has been established in which MyoD and E47 proteins activate transcription both as homodimers and heterodimers. However, heterodimers activate transcription more efficiently than homodimers, and function synergistically from multiple binding sites. Positive control mutants in the basic region of MyoD that have previously been shown to be defective in initiating the myogenic program, can bind DNA but have lost their ability to function as transcriptional activators in vitro. Additionally, positive control mutants, unlike wild-type MyoD, fail to bind cooperatively to DNA. We propose that binding of MyoD complexes to high affinity MyoD binding sites induces conformational changes that facilitate cooperative binding to multiple sites and promote transcriptional activation.

  3. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni < 0.5. This result is counterintuitive because there

  4. Complex SUMO-1 Regulation of Cardiac Transcription Factor Nkx2-5

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Mauro W.; Lee, Stella; Furtado, Milena B.; Xin, Li; Sparrow, Duncan B.; Martinez, Camila G.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Mohun, Tim; Rosenthal, Nadia; Harvey, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Reversible post-translational protein modifications such as SUMOylation add complexity to cardiac transcriptional regulation. The homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2-5/Csx is essential for heart specification and morphogenesis. It has been previously suggested that SUMOylation of lysine 51 (K51) of Nkx2-5 is essential for its DNA binding and transcriptional activation. Here, we confirm that SUMOylation strongly enhances Nkx2-5 transcriptional activity and that residue K51 of Nkx2-5 is a SUMOylation target. However, in a range of cultured cell lines we find that a point mutation of K51 to arginine (K51R) does not affect Nkx2-5 activity or DNA binding, suggesting the existence of additional Nkx2-5 SUMOylated residues. Using biochemical assays, we demonstrate that Nkx2-5 is SUMOylated on at least one additional site, and this is the predominant site in cardiac cells. The second site is either non-canonical or a “shifting” site, as mutation of predicted consensus sites and indeed every individual lysine in the context of the K51R mutation failed to impair Nkx2-5 transcriptional synergism with SUMO, or its nuclear localization and DNA binding. We also observe SUMOylation of Nkx2-5 cofactors, which may be critical to Nkx2-5 regulation. Our data reveal highly complex regulatory mechanisms driven by SUMOylation to modulate Nkx2-5 activity. PMID:21931855

  5. Human biliverdin reductase is a leucine zipper-like DNA-binding protein and functions in transcriptional activation of heme oxygenase-1 by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Salim, Mohammad; Maines, Mahin D

    2002-03-15

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) is a serine/threonine kinase that catalyzes reduction of the heme oxygenase (HO) activity product, biliverdin, to bilirubin. A domain of biliverdin reductase (BVR) has primary structural features that resemble leucine zipper proteins. A heptad repeat of five leucines (L(1)--L(5)), a basic domain, and a conserved alanine characterize the domain. In hBVR, a lysine replaces L(3). The secondary structure model of hBVR predicts an alpha-helix-turn-beta-sheet for this domain. hBVR translated by the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system appears on a nondenaturing gel as a single band with molecular mass of approximately 69 kDa. The protein on a denaturing gel separates into two anti-hBVR immunoreactive proteins of approximately 39.9 + 34.6 kDa. The dimeric form, but not purified hBVR, binds to a 100-mer DNA fragment corresponding to the mouse HO-1 (hsp32) promoter region encompassing two activator protein (AP-1) sites. The specificity of DNA binding is suggested by the following: (a) hBVR does not bind to the same DNA fragment with one or zero AP-1 sites; (b) a 56-bp random DNA with one AP-1 site does not form a complex with hBVR; (c) in vitro translated HO-1 does not interact with the 100-mer DNA fragment with two AP-1 sites; (d) mutation of Lys(143), Leu(150), or Leu(157) blocks both the formation of the approximately 69-kDa specimens and hBVR DNA complex formation; and (e) purified preparations of hBVR or hHO-1 do not bind to DNA with two AP-1 sites. The potential significance of the AP-1 binding is suggested by the finding that the response of HO-1, in COS cells stably transfected with antisense hBVR, with 66% reduced BVR activity, to superoxide anion (O(2)()) formed by menadione is attenuated, whereas induction by heme is not affected. We propose a role for BVR in the signaling cascade for AP-1 complex activation necessary for HO-1 oxidative stress response. PMID:11773068

  6. Discovering protein–DNA binding sequence patterns using association rule mining

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wong, Man-Hon; Lee, Kin-Hong; Lau, Chi-Kong; Tsui, Stephen K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Protein–DNA bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) play an essential role in transcriptional regulation. Over the past decades, significant efforts have been made to study the principles for protein–DNA bindings. However, it is considered that there are no simple one-to-one rules between amino acids and nucleotides. Many methods impose complicated features beyond sequence patterns. Protein-DNA bindings are formed from associated amino acid and nucleotide sequence pairs, which determine many functional characteristics. Therefore, it is desirable to investigate associated sequence patterns between TFs and TFBSs. With increasing computational power, availability of massive experimental databases on DNA and proteins, and mature data mining techniques, we propose a framework to discover associated TF–TFBS binding sequence patterns in the most explicit and interpretable form from TRANSFAC. The framework is based on association rule mining with Apriori algorithm. The patterns found are evaluated by quantitative measurements at several levels on TRANSFAC. With further independent verifications from literatures, Protein Data Bank and homology modeling, there are strong evidences that the patterns discovered reveal real TF–TFBS bindings across different TFs and TFBSs, which can drive for further knowledge to better understand TF–TFBS bindings. PMID:20529874

  7. Identification and characterization of Ref-1, a nuclear protein that facilitates AP-1 DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Xanthoudakis, S; Curran, T

    1992-01-01

    Fos and Jun form a heterodimeric complex that regulates gene transcription by binding to the activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA sequence motif. Previously, we demonstrated that the DNA-binding activity of Fos and Jun is regulated in vitro by a novel redox (reduction-oxidation) mechanism. Reduction of a conserved cysteine (cys) residue in the DNA-binding domains of Fos and Jun by chemical reducing agents or by a nuclear redox factor stimulates DNA-binding activity. Here, we describe purification and characterization of a 37 kDa protein (Ref-1) corresponding to the redox factor. Although Ref-1 does not bind to the AP-1 site in association with Fos and Jun, it partially copurifies with a subset of AP-1 proteins. Purified Ref-1 protein stimulates AP-1 DNA-binding activity through the conserved Cys residues in Fos and Jun, but it does not alter the DNA-binding specificity of Fos and Jun. Ref-1 may represent a novel redox component of the signal transduction processes that regulate eukaryotic gene expression. Images PMID:1537340

  8. CK2 Phosphorylation Inactivates DNA Binding by the Papillomavirus E1 and E2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Stephen; Ruse, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have complex life cycles that are understood only superficially. Although it is well established that the viral E1 and E2 proteins play key roles in controlling viral transcription and DNA replication, how these factors are regulated is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation by the protein kinase CK2 controls the biochemical activities of the bovine papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins by modifying their DNA binding activity. Phosphorylation at multiple sites in the N-terminal domain in E1 results in the loss of sequence-specific DNA binding activity, a feature that is also conserved in human papillomavirus (HPV) E1 proteins. The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2 protein, when phosphorylated by CK2 on two specific sites in the hinge, also loses its site-specific DNA binding activity. Mutation of these sites in E2 results in greatly increased levels of latent viral DNA replication, indicating that CK2 phosphorylation of E2 is a negative regulator of viral DNA replication during latent viral replication. In contrast, mutation of the N-terminal phosphorylation sites in E1 has no effect on latent viral DNA replication. We propose that the phosphorylation of the N terminus of E1 plays a role only in vegetative viral DNA replication, and consistent with such a role, caspase 3 cleavage of E1, which has been shown to be necessary for vegetative viral DNA replication, restores the DNA binding activity to phosphorylated E1. PMID:23637413

  9. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factors in flower development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the mechanisms by which these factors dynamically regulate the expression of their target genes at different developmental stages are still poorly understood. Results We characterized the relationship of chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and DNA binding of two MADS-domain proteins at different stages of Arabidopsis flower development. Dynamic changes in APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 DNA binding correlated with changes in gene expression, and many of the target genes could be associated with the developmental stage in which they are transcriptionally controlled. We also observe dynamic changes in chromatin accessibility during flower development. Remarkably, DNA binding of APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 is largely independent of the accessibility status of their binding regions and it can precede increases in DNA accessibility. These results suggest that APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 may modulate chromatin accessibility, thereby facilitating access of other transcriptional regulators to their target genes. Conclusions Our findings indicate that different homeotic factors regulate partly overlapping, yet also distinctive sets of target genes in a partly stage-specific fashion. By combining the information from DNA-binding and gene expression data, we are able to propose models of stage-specific regulatory interactions, thereby addressing dynamics of regulatory networks throughout flower development. Furthermore, MADS-domain TFs may regulate gene expression by alternative strategies, one of which is modulation of chromatin accessibility. PMID:24581456

  10. A rapid method for the isolation of DNA-binding proteins from purified nuclei of tissues and cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hagenbüchle, O; Wellauer, P K

    1992-01-01

    We describe a rapid and general method for isolating DNA-binding proteins in high yield from purified nuclei of animal cells. The method has been tested for the isolation of a series of different DNA-binding activities including those of transcription factors PTF1 and SP1. The rationale consists of first preparing purified nuclei from tissue or cells in culture by centrifugation over sucrose cushions. A synthetic, biotinylated oligonucleotide bearing the binding site for the protein of interest is then added directly to nuclei resuspended in binding buffer. At the end of the binding reaction, nuclei are removed by centrifugation; and protein-DNA complexes present in the postnuclear supernatant are attached to streptavidin-agarose. Two rounds of DNA-affinity chromatography are carried out to yield highly purified preparations of DNA-binding proteins. Images PMID:1641323

  11. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  12. Serine phosphorylation by SYK is critical for nuclear localization and transcription factor function of Ikaros

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Jian; Ozer, Zahide; Dovat, Sinisa; Mao, Cheney; Ishkhanian, Rita; Goodman, Patricia; Qazi, Sanjive

    2012-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger-containing DNA-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in immune homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of the earliest stages of lymphocyte ontogeny and differentiation. Functional deficiency of Ikaros has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common form of childhood cancer. Therefore, a stringent regulation of Ikaros activity is considered of paramount importance, but the operative molecular mechanisms responsible for its regulation remain largely unknown. Here we provide multifaceted genetic and biochemical evidence for a previously unknown function of spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) as a partner and posttranslational regulator of Ikaros. We demonstrate that SYK phoshorylates Ikaros at unique C-terminal serine phosphorylation sites S358 and S361, thereby augmenting its nuclear localization and sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Mechanistically, we establish that SYK-induced Ikaros activation is essential for its nuclear localization and optimal transcription factor function. PMID:23071339

  13. Transcription factors controlling development and function of innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Yakup; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphocytes, which play an important role in tissue homeostasis at epithelial surfaces. They are scarce in spleen and lymph nodes, but substantial numbers can be found in the intestinal mucosa even at steady state. There, they represent the first line of defence against invading pathogens and contribute to lymphorganogenesis, tissue repair and, when inappropriately activated, immune pathology. Lineage-specific development, function and maintenance of these cells depend on a restricted set of transcription factors that partially emerged as a result of diversification and selection during vertebrate evolution. The differential expression of transcription factors regulates unique developmental programs, which endow the different ILC subsets with specific effector functions. Despite this division of labour, ILCs are considered to share a common origin, as they all are progeny of the common lymphoid progenitor, rely on the common γ-chain (γc) used by various cytokine receptors and show a developmental requirement for the transcriptional regulator Id2 (inhibitor of DNA binding 2). Here, we review the transcriptional programs required for the development and function of ILCs and give an overview of the evolution of transcription factors and cytokines expressed by ILCs. PMID:24585669

  14. Deregulated transcription factors in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yutaka; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2011-08-01

    Specific chromosomal translocations and other mutations associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) often involve transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators. Such target genes include AML1, C/EBPα, RARα, MOZ, p300/CBP, and MLL, all of which are important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. The resultant fusion or mutant proteins deregulate the transcription of the affected genes and disrupt their essential role in hematopoiesis, causing differentiation block and abnormal proliferation and/or survival. This review focuses on such transcription factors and coactivators, and describes their roles in leukemogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:21823042

  15. Distal substitutions drive divergent DNA specificity among paralogous transcription factors through subdivision of conformational space.

    PubMed

    Hudson, William H; Kossmann, Bradley R; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Chuo, Shih-Wei; Weikum, Emily R; Eick, Geeta N; Thornton, Joseph W; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Kojetin, Douglas J; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-01-12

    Many genomes contain families of paralogs--proteins with divergent function that evolved from a common ancestral gene after a duplication event. To understand how paralogous transcription factors evolve divergent DNA specificities, we examined how the glucocorticoid receptor and its paralogs evolved to bind activating response elements [(+)GREs] and negative glucocorticoid response elements (nGREs). We show that binding to nGREs is a property of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA-binding domain (DBD) not shared by other members of the steroid receptor family. Using phylogenetic, structural, biochemical, and molecular dynamics techniques, we show that the ancestral DBD from which GR and its paralogs evolved was capable of binding both nGRE and (+)GRE sequences because of the ancestral DBD's ability to assume multiple DNA-bound conformations. Subsequent amino acid substitutions in duplicated daughter genes selectively restricted protein conformational space, causing this dual DNA-binding specificity to be selectively enhanced in the GR lineage and lost in all others. Key substitutions that determined the receptors' response element-binding specificity were far from the proteins' DNA-binding interface and interacted epistatically to change the DBD's function through DNA-induced allosteric mechanisms. These amino acid substitutions subdivided both the conformational and functional space of the ancestral DBD among the present-day receptors, allowing a paralogous family of transcription factors to control disparate transcriptional programs despite high sequence identity. PMID:26715749

  16. Structural insights into the autoregulation and cooperativity of the human transcription factor Ets-2.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joseph A; Cooper, Christopher D O; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-03-27

    Ets-2, like its closely related homologue Ets-1, is a member of the Ets family of DNA binding transcription factors. Both proteins are subject to multiple levels of regulation of their DNA binding and transactivation properties. One such regulatory mechanism is the presence of an autoinhibitory module, which in Ets-1 allosterically inhibits the DNA binding activity. This inhibition can be relieved by interaction with protein partners or cooperative binding to closely separated Ets binding sites in a palindromic arrangement. In this study we describe the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of a DNA complex of the Ets-2 Ets domain. The Ets domain crystallized with two distinct species in the asymmetric unit, which closely resemble the autoinhibited and DNA bound forms of Ets-1. This discovery prompted us to re-evaluate the current model for the autoinhibitory mechanism and the structural basis for cooperative DNA binding. In contrast to Ets-1, in which the autoinhibition is caused by a combination of allosteric and steric mechanisms, we were unable to find clear evidence for the allosteric mechanism in Ets-2. We also demonstrated two possibly distinct types of cooperative binding to substrates with Ets binding motifs separated by four and six base pairs and suggest possible molecular mechanisms for this behavior. PMID:25670864

  17. Structural Insights into the Autoregulation and Cooperativity of the Human Transcription Factor Ets-2*

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Joseph A; Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets-2, like its closely related homologue Ets-1, is a member of the Ets family of DNA binding transcription factors. Both proteins are subject to multiple levels of regulation of their DNA binding and transactivation properties. One such regulatory mechanism is the presence of an autoinhibitory module, which in Ets-1 allosterically inhibits the DNA binding activity. This inhibition can be relieved by interaction with protein partners or cooperative binding to closely separated Ets binding sites in a palindromic arrangement. In this study we describe the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of a DNA complex of the Ets-2 Ets domain. The Ets domain crystallized with two distinct species in the asymmetric unit, which closely resemble the autoinhibited and DNA bound forms of Ets-1. This discovery prompted us to re-evaluate the current model for the autoinhibitory mechanism and the structural basis for cooperative DNA binding. In contrast to Ets-1, in which the autoinhibition is caused by a combination of allosteric and steric mechanisms, we were unable to find clear evidence for the allosteric mechanism in Ets-2. We also demonstrated two possibly distinct types of cooperative binding to substrates with Ets binding motifs separated by four and six base pairs and suggest possible molecular mechanisms for this behavior. PMID:25670864

  18. Regulation of Lactobacillus casei sorbitol utilization genes requires DNA-binding transcriptional activator GutR and the conserved protein GutM.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2008-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the five genes (gutRMCBA) downstream from the previously described sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding Lactobacillus casei gutF gene revealed that they constitute a sorbitol (glucitol) utilization operon. The gutRM genes encode putative regulators, while the gutCBA genes encode the EIIC, EIIBC, and EIIA proteins of a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)). The gut operon is transcribed as a polycistronic gutFRMCBA messenger, the expression of which is induced by sorbitol and repressed by glucose. gutR encodes a transcriptional regulator with two PTS-regulated domains, a galactitol-specific EIIB-like domain (EIIB(Gat) domain) and a mannitol/fructose-specific EIIA-like domain (EIIA(Mtl) domain). Its inactivation abolished gut operon transcription and sorbitol uptake, indicating that it acts as a transcriptional activator. In contrast, cells carrying a gutB mutation expressed the gut operon constitutively, but they failed to transport sorbitol, indicating that EIIBC(Gut) negatively regulates GutR. A footprint analysis showed that GutR binds to a 35-bp sequence upstream from the gut promoter. A sequence comparison with the presumed promoter region of gut operons from various firmicutes revealed a GutR consensus motif that includes an inverted repeat. The regulation mechanism of the L. casei gut operon is therefore likely to be operative in other firmicutes. Finally, gutM codes for a conserved protein of unknown function present in all sequenced gut operons. A gutM mutant, the first constructed in a firmicute, showed drastically reduced gut operon expression and sorbitol uptake, indicating a regulatory role also for GutM. PMID:18676710

  19. Regulation of Lactobacillus casei Sorbitol Utilization Genes Requires DNA-Binding Transcriptional Activator GutR and the Conserved Protein GutM▿

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Cristina; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the five genes (gutRMCBA) downstream from the previously described sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding Lactobacillus casei gutF gene revealed that they constitute a sorbitol (glucitol) utilization operon. The gutRM genes encode putative regulators, while the gutCBA genes encode the EIIC, EIIBC, and EIIA proteins of a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTSGut). The gut operon is transcribed as a polycistronic gutFRMCBA messenger, the expression of which is induced by sorbitol and repressed by glucose. gutR encodes a transcriptional regulator with two PTS-regulated domains, a galactitol-specific EIIB-like domain (EIIBGat domain) and a mannitol/fructose-specific EIIA-like domain (EIIAMtl domain). Its inactivation abolished gut operon transcription and sorbitol uptake, indicating that it acts as a transcriptional activator. In contrast, cells carrying a gutB mutation expressed the gut operon constitutively, but they failed to transport sorbitol, indicating that EIIBCGut negatively regulates GutR. A footprint analysis showed that GutR binds to a 35-bp sequence upstream from the gut promoter. A sequence comparison with the presumed promoter region of gut operons from various firmicutes revealed a GutR consensus motif that includes an inverted repeat. The regulation mechanism of the L. casei gut operon is therefore likely to be operative in other firmicutes. Finally, gutM codes for a conserved protein of unknown function present in all sequenced gut operons. A gutM mutant, the first constructed in a firmicute, showed drastically reduced gut operon expression and sorbitol uptake, indicating a regulatory role also for GutM. PMID:18676710

  20. Regulation of apo A-IV transcription by lipid in newborn swine is associated with a promoter DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Song; Yao, Ying; Wang, Heng; Meng, Songmei; Cheng, Xiangying; Black, Dennis D

    2003-02-01

    Dietary lipid acutely upregulates apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV expression by sevenfold at the pretranslational level in neonatal swine jejunum. To determine the mechanism of this regulation, two-day-old female swine received intraduodenal infusions of low- and high-triacylglycerol (TG) isocaloric diets for 24 h. Nuclear runoff assay confirmed apo A-IV gene transcriptional regulation by the high-TG diet. Footprinting analysis using the swine apo A-IV proximal promoter sequence (+14 to -246 bp) demonstrated three regions protected by the low-TG extracts. Of these three motifs, only ACCTTC showed 100% homology to the human sequence and was further studied. EMSA was performed using probes containing wild-type (WT) and mutant (M) motifs. A shift was noted with the low-TG nuclear extracts with the WT probe but not with the M probe. Excess unlabeled free WT probe competed out the shift, whereas the M probe did not. No significant shift occurred with either probe using high-TG extracts. These results suggest that a repressor protein binds to the ACCTTC motif and becomes unbound during lipid absorption, allowing transcriptional activation of the apo A-IV gene in newborn swine small intestine. PMID:12388193

  1. Costimulation by B7-1 and LFA-3 targets distinct nuclear factors that bind to the interleukin-2 promoter: B7-1 negatively regulates LFA-3-induced NF-AT DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Parra, E; Varga, M; Hedlund, G; Kalland, T; Dohlsten, M

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the regulation of nuclear factors involved in transcriptional control of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) promoter-enhancer activity in Jurkat T cells stimulated with superantigen presented on HLA-DR transfectants combined with the ligands LFA-3 (CD58) and B7-1 (CD80). Gel shift analyses showed that NF-AT was strongly induced in LFA-3-costimulated Jurkat T cells, suggesting that NF-AT is a key target nuclear factor for the CD2-LFA-3 pathway. Studies using HLA-DR-B7-1-LFA-3 triple transfectants showed that the LFA-3-induced NF-AT DNA binding activity was negatively regulated by B7-1 costimulation. In contrast, induction of a CD28 response complex containing only c-Rel proteins was seen after B7-1 costimulation. Both LFA-3 costimulation and B7-1 costimulation induced the AP-1 and NF-kappaB nuclear factors. Distinct compositions of the NF-AT complexes were seen in B7-1- and LFA-3-costimulated cells. LFA-3 induced primarily Jun-D, Fra-1, and Fra-2, while B7-1 induced June-D-Fos complexes. In contrast, AP-1 and NF-kappaB complexes induced in B7-1- and LFA-3-costimulated T cells showed similar contents. Transient transfection of Jurkat T cells with a construct encoding the IL-2 enhancer-promoter region (position -500 to +60) linked to a luciferase reporter gene revealed that B7-1 costimulation was required to induce strong transcriptional activity. Combined B7-1-LFA-3 costimulation resulted in a synergistic increase in IL-2 transcriptional activity. Multimers of the AP-1, NF-AT, NF-kappaB, and CD28 response elements showed distinct kinetics and activity after LFA-3 and B7-1 costimulation and revealed that B7-1 and LFA-3 converge to superinduce transcriptional activity of the AP-1, NF-AT, and CD28 response elements. Transcriptional studies with an IL-2 enhancer-promoter carrying a mutation in the CD28 response element site revealed that the activity was reduced by 80% after B7-1 and B7-1-LFA-3 costimulation whereas the transcriptional activity induced by LFA

  2. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  3. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  4. Mapping and analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor sequence specificities

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Lambert, Samuel A; Yang, Ally WH; Riddell, Jeremy; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Zheng, Hong; Albu, Mihai; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Walhout, Albertha JM; Weirauch, Matthew T; Hughes, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model for studying gene regulation, as it has a compact genome and a wealth of genomic tools. However, identification of regulatory elements has been limited, as DNA-binding motifs are known for only 71 of the estimated 763 sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). To address this problem, we performed protein binding microarray experiments on representatives of canonical TF families in C. elegans, obtaining motifs for 129 TFs. Additionally, we predict motifs for many TFs that have DNA-binding domains similar to those already characterized, increasing coverage of binding specificities to 292 C. elegans TFs (∼40%). These data highlight the diversification of binding motifs for the nuclear hormone receptor and C2H2 zinc finger families and reveal unexpected diversity of motifs for T-box and DM families. Motif enrichment in promoters of functionally related genes is consistent with known biology and also identifies putative regulatory roles for unstudied TFs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06967.001 PMID:25905672

  5. Effects of Cigarette Smoke on the Activation of Oxidative Stress-Related Transcription Factors in Female A/J Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tharappel, Job C.; Cholewa, Jill; Espandiari, Parvaneh; Spear, Brett T.; Gairola, C. Gary; Glauert, Howard P.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke contains a high concentration of free radicals and induces oxidative stress in the lung and other tissues. Several transcription factors are known to be activated by oxidative stress, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Studies were therefore undertaken to examine if cigarette smoke could activate these transcription factors, as well as other transcription factors that may be important in lung carcinogenesis. Female A/J mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 42, or 56 days (6 hr/day, 5 days/wk). Cigarette smoke did not increase NF-κB activation at any of these times, but NF-κB DNA binding activity was lower after 15 days and 56 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of AP-1 was lower after 10 days and 56 days but was not changed after 42 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of HIF was quantitatively increased after 42 days of smoke exposure but decreased after 56 days. Whether the activation of other transcription factors in the lung could be altered after exposure to cigarette smoke was subsequently examined. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2, myc-CF1, RORE, and p53 were examined after 10 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53 were quantitatively increased, but those of myc-CF1 and RORE were unaffected. These studies show that cigarette smoke exposure leads to quantitative increases in DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53, while the activations of NF-κB, AP-1, and HIF are largely unaffected or reduced. PMID:20711931

  6. Anti-Transcription Factor RNA Aptamers as Potential Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón, Estefanía

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are DNA-binding proteins that play critical roles in regulating gene expression. These proteins control all major cellular processes, including growth, development, and homeostasis. Because of their pivotal role, cells depend on proper TF function. It is, therefore, not surprising that TF deregulation is linked to disease. The therapeutic drug targeting of TFs has been proposed as a frontier in medicine. RNA aptamers make interesting candidates for TF modulation because of their unique characteristics. The products of in vitro selection, aptamers are short nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) that bind their targets with high affinity and specificity. Aptamers can be expressed on demand from transgenes and are intrinsically amenable to recognition by nucleic acid-binding proteins such as TFs. In this study, we review several natural prokaryotic and eukaryotic examples of RNAs that modulate the activity of TFs. These examples include 5S RNA, 6S RNA, 7SK, hepatitis delta virus-RNA (HDV-RNA), neuron restrictive silencer element (NRSE)-RNA, growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), trophoblast STAT utron (TSU), the 3′ untranslated region of caudal mRNA, and heat shock RNA-1 (HSR1). We then review examples of unnatural RNA aptamers selected to inhibit TFs nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), TATA-binding protein (TBP), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1). The field of RNA aptamers for DNA-binding proteins continues to show promise. PMID:26509637

  7. Acetyl Coenzyme A Stimulates RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Promoter Binding by Transcription Factor IID in the Absence of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Galasinski, Shelly K.; Lively, Tricia N.; Grebe de Barron, Alexandra; Goodrich, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Protein acetylation has emerged as a means of controlling levels of mRNA synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Here we report that acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) stimulates RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro in the absence of histones. The effect of acetyl-CoA on basal and activated transcription was studied in a human RNA polymerase II transcription system reconstituted from recombinant and highly purified transcription factors. Both basal and activated transcription were stimulated by the addition of acetyl-CoA to transcription reaction mixtures. By varying the concentrations of general transcription factors in the reaction mixtures, we found that acetyl-CoA decreased the concentration of TFIID required to observe transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting revealed that acetyl-CoA increased the affinity of the general transcription factor TFIID for promoter DNA in a TBP-associated factor (TAF)-dependent manner. Interestingly, acetyl-CoA also caused a conformational change in the TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex as assessed by DNase I footprinting. These results show that acetyl-CoA alters the DNA binding activity of TFIID and indicate that this biologically important cofactor functions at multiple levels to control gene expression. PMID:10688640

  8. Lineage-specific and ubiquitous biological roles of the mammalian transcription factor LSF

    PubMed Central

    Veljkovic, Jelena; Hansen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation in mammalian cells is driven by a complex interplay of multiple transcription factors that respond to signals from either external or internal stimuli. A single transcription factor can control expression of distinct sets of target genes, dependent on its state of post-translational modifications, interacting partner proteins, and the chromatin environment of the cellular genome. Furthermore, many transcription factors can act as either transcriptional repressors or activators, depending on promoter and cellular contexts (Alvarez, et al., 2003). Even in this light, the versatility of LSF (Late SV40 Factor) is remarkable. A hallmark of LSF is its unusual DNA binding domain, as evidenced both by lack of homology to any other established DNA-binding domains and by its DNA recognition sequence. Although a dimer in solution, LSF requires additional multimerization with itself or partner proteins in order to interact with DNA. Transcriptionally, LSF can function as an activator or a repressor. It is a direct target of an increasing number of signal transduction pathways. Biologically, LSF plays roles in cell cycle progression and cell survival, as well as in cell lineage-specific functions, shown most strikingly to date in hematopoietic lineages. This review discusses how the unique aspects of LSF DNA-binding activity may make it particularly susceptible to regulation by signal transduction pathways and may relate to its distinct biological roles. We present current progress in elucidation of both tissue-specific and more universal cellular roles of LSF. Finally, we discuss suggestive data linking LSF to signaling by the amyloid precursor protein and to Alzheimer's disease, as well as to the regulation of latency of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). PMID:15563829

  9. Structure-function relationships of the PEA3 group of Ets-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    de Launoit, Y; Baert, J L; Chotteau, A; Monte, D; Defossez, P A; Coutte, L; Pelczar, H; Leenders, F

    1997-08-01

    The PEA3 group of transcription factors belongs to the Ets family and is composed of PEA3, ERM, and ER81, which are more than 95% identical within the DNA-binding domain--the ETS domain--and which demonstrate 50% aa identity overall. We present here a review of the current knowledge of these transcription factors, which possess functional domains responsible for DNA-binding, DNA-binding inhibition, and transactivation. Recent data suggest that these factors are targets for signaling cascades, such as the Ras-dependent ones, and thus may contribute first to the nuclear response to cell stimulation and second to Ras-induced cell transformation. The expression of the PEA3 group members in numerous developing murine organs, and, especially, in epithelial-mesenchymal interaction events, suggests a key role in murine organogenesis. Moreover, their expression in certain breast cancer cells suggests a possible involvement of these genes in the appearance, progression, and invasion of malignant cells. PMID:9259977

  10. The functional significance of common polymorphisms in zinc finger transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Sarah H; Guan, Anna; Yu, Abigail S; Zhang, Chi; Zykovich, Artem; Korf, Ian; Rannala, Bruce; Segal, David J

    2014-09-01

    Variants that alter the DNA-binding specificity of transcription factors could affect the specificity for and expression of potentially many target genes, as has been observed in several tumor-derived mutations. Here we examined if such trans expression quantitative trait loci (trans-eQTLs) could similarly result from common genetic variants. We chose to focus on the Cys2-His2 class of zinc finger transcription factors because they are the most abundant superfamily of transcription factors in human and have well-characterized DNA binding interactions. We identified 430 SNPs that cause missense substitutions in the DNA-contacting residues. Fewer common missense SNPs were found at DNA-contacting residues compared with non-DNA-contacting residues (P = 0.00006), consistent with possible functional selection against SNPs at DNA-contacting positions. Functional predictions based on zinc finger transcription factor (ZNF) DNA binding preferences also suggested that many common substitutions could potentially alter binding specificity. However, Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium analysis and examination of seven orthologs within the primate lineage failed to find evidence of trans-eQTLs associated with the DNA-contacting positions or evidence of a different selection pressure on a contemporary and evolutionary timescales. The overall conclusion was that common SNPs that alter the DNA-contacting residues of these factors are unlikely to produce strong trans-eQTLs, consistent with the observations by others that trans-eQTLs in humans tend to be few and weak. Some rare SNPs might alter specificity and remained rare due to purifying selection. The study also underscores the need for large-scale eQTLs mapping efforts that might provide experimental evidence for SNPs that alter the choice of transcription factor binding sites. PMID:24970883