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Sample records for dna-pkcs deficiency leads

  1. DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to persistence of oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Peddi, Prakash; Loftin, Charles W.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Hair, Jessica M.; Burns, Kara J.; Aziz, Khaled; Francisco, Dave C.; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Sedelnikova, Olga A.; Bonner, William M.; Winters, Thomas A.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2010-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase involved in various DNA metabolic and damage signaling pathways contributing to the maintenance of genomic stability and prevention of cancer. In order to examine the role of DNA-PK in processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage, we have used three different models of DNA-PK deficiency i.e. chemical inactivation of its kinase activity by novel inhibitors IC86621 and NU7026, knock-down and complete absence of the protein in human breast cancer (MCF-7) and glioblastoma cell lines (MO59-J/K). Compromised DNA-PK repair pathway has lead to accumulation of clustered DNA lesions induced by γ-rays. Tumor cells lacking protein expression or with inhibited kinase activity showed a marked decrease in their ability to process oxidatively-induced non-DSB clustered DNA lesions measured using a modified version of pulsed field gel electrophoresis or single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). In all cases, DNA-PK inactivation lead to a higher level of lesion persistence even after 24–72 hrs of repair. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK deficiency affects the processing of these clusters by first compromising base excision repair and second by the presence of catalytically inactive DNA-PK inhibiting the efficient processing of these lesions due to the failure of DNA-PK to disassociate from the DNA ends. The information rendered will be important not only for understating cancer etiology in the presence of a NHEJ deficiency but also lead to a better understanding of cancer treatments based on the induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of cluster repair. PMID:20193758

  2. Restoration of ATM Expression in DNA-PKcs-Deficient Cells Inhibits Signal End Joining.

    PubMed

    Neal, Jessica A; Xu, Yao; Abe, Masumi; Hendrickson, Eric; Meek, Katheryn

    2016-04-01

    Unlike most DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)-deficient mouse cell strains, we show in the present study that targeted deletion of DNA-PKcs in two different human cell lines abrogates VDJ signal end joining in episomal assays. Although the mechanism is not well defined, DNA-PKcs deficiency results in spontaneous reduction of ATM expression in many cultured cell lines (including those examined in this study) and in DNA-PKcs-deficient mice. We considered that varying loss of ATM expression might explain differences in signal end joining in different cell strains and animal models, and we investigated the impact of ATM and/or DNA-PKcs loss on VDJ recombination in cultured human and rodent cell strains. To our surprise, in DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse cell strains that are proficient in signal end joining, restoration of ATM expression markedly inhibits signal end joining. In contrast, in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells that are deficient in signal end joining, complete loss of ATM enhances signal (but not coding) joint formation. We propose that ATM facilitates restriction of signal ends to the classical nonhomologous end-joining pathway. PMID:26921311

  3. Spontaneous tumor development in bone marrow-rescued DNA-PKcs(3A/3A) mice due to dysfunction of telomere leading strand deprotection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Matsunaga, S; Lin, Y-F; Sishc, B; Shang, Z; Sui, J; Shih, H-Y; Zhao, Y; Foreman, O; Story, M D; Chen, D J; Chen, B P C

    2016-07-28

    Phosphorylation of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) at the Thr2609 cluster is essential for its complete function in DNA repair and tissue stem cell homeostasis. This phenomenon is demonstrated by congenital bone marrow failure occurring in DNA-PKcs(3A/3A) mutant mice, which require bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to prevent early mortality. Surprisingly, an increased incidence of spontaneous tumors, especially skin cancer, was observed in adult BMT-rescued DNA-PKcs(3A/3A) mice. Upon further investigation, we found that spontaneous γH2AX foci occurred in DNA-PKcs(3A/3A) skin biopsies and primary keratinocytes and that these foci overlapped with telomeres during mitosis, indicating impairment of telomere replication and maturation. Consistently, we observed significantly elevated frequencies of telomere fusion events in DNA-PKcs(3A/3A) cells as compared with wild-type and DNA-PKcs-knockout cells. In addition, a previously identified DNA-PKcs Thr2609Pro mutation, found in breast cancer, also induces a similar impairment of telomere leading-end maturation. Taken together, our current analyses indicate that the functional DNA-PKcs T2609 cluster is required to facilitate telomere leading strand maturation and prevention of genomic instability and cancer development. PMID:26616856

  4. Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient breast cancer by ATM or DNA-PKcs blockade either alone or in combination with cisplatin for personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Albarakati, Nada; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Doherty, Rachel; Russell, Roslin; Agarwal, Devika; Moseley, Paul; Perry, Christina; Arora, Arvind; Alsubhi, Nouf; Seedhouse, Claire; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew; Ball, Graham; Chan, Stephen; Caldas, Carlos; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, a key factor in homologous recombination (HR) repair may also regulate base excision repair (BER). Targeting BRCA1-BER deficient cells by blockade of ATM and DNA-PKcs could be a promising strategy in breast cancer. We investigated BRCA1, XRCC1 and pol β protein expression in two cohorts (n = 1602 sporadic and n = 50 germ-line BRCA1 mutated) and mRNA expression in two cohorts (n = 1952 and n = 249). Artificial neural network analysis for BRCA1-DNA repair interacting genes was conducted in 249 tumours. Pre-clinically, BRCA1 proficient and deficient cells were DNA repair expression profiled and evaluated for synthetic lethality using ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitors either alone or in combination with cisplatin. In human tumours, BRCA1 negativity was strongly associated with low XRCC1, and low pol β at mRNA and protein levels (p < 0.0001). In patients with BRCA1 negative tumours, low XRCC1 or low pol β expression was significantly associated with poor survival in univariate and multivariate analysis compared to high XRCC1 or high pol β expressing BRCA1 negative tumours (ps < 0.05). Pre-clinically, BRCA1 negative cancer cells exhibit low mRNA and low protein expression of XRCC1 and pol β. BRCA1-BER deficient cells were sensitive to ATM and DNA-PKcs inhibitor treatment either alone or in combination with cisplatin and synthetic lethality was evidenced by DNA double strand breaks accumulation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We conclude that XRCC1 and pol β expression status in BRCA1 negative tumours may have prognostic significance. BRCA1-BER deficient cells could be targeted by ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors for personalized therapy. PMID:25205036

  5. DNA-PKcs is critical for telomere capping

    SciTech Connect

    Gilley, David; Tanaka, Hiromi; Hande, M. Prakash; Kurimasa,Akihiro; Li, Gloria C.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is critical for DNA repair via the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. Previously, it was reported that bone marrow cells and spontaneously transformed fibroblasts from SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice have defects in telomere maintenance. The genetically defective SCID mouse arose spontaneously from its parental strain CB17. One known genomic alteration in SCID mice is a truncation of the extreme carboxyl-terminus of DNA-PKcs, but other as yet unidentified alterations may also exist. We have used a defined system, the DNA-PKcs knockout mouse, to investigate specifically the role DNA-PKcs specifically plays in telomere maintenance. We report that primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary cultured kidney cells from 6-8 month old DNA-PKcs deficient mice accumulate a large number of telomere fusions, yet still retain wildtype telomere length. Thus, the phenotype of this defect separates the two-telomere related phenotypes, capping and length maintenance. DNA-PKcs deficient MEFs also exhibit elevated levels of chromosome fragments and breaks, which correlate with increased telomere fusions. Based on the high levels of telomere fusions observed in DNA-PKcs deficient cells, we conclude that DNA-PKcs plays an important capping role at the mammalian telomere.

  6. A deficiency in DNA repair and DNA-PKcs expression in the radiosensitive BALB/c mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okayasu, R.; Suetomi, K.; Yu, Y.; Silver, A.; Bedford, J. S.; Cox, R.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the efficiency of DNA double strand break (DSB) rejoining in primary cells from mouse strains that show large differences in in vivo radiosensitivity and tumor susceptibility. Cells from radiosensitive, cancer-prone BALB/c mice showed inefficient end joining of gamma ray-induced DSBs as compared with cells from all of the other commonly used strains and F1 hybrids of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. The BALB/c repair phenotype was accompanied by a significantly reduced expression level of DNA-PKcs protein as well as a lowered DNA-PK activity level as compared with the other strains. In conjunction with published reports, these data suggest that natural genetic variation in nonhomologous end joining processes may have a significant impact on the in vivo radiation response of mice.

  7. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  8. Translational reprogramming following UVB irradiation is mediated by DNA-PKcs and allows selective recruitment to the polysomes of mRNAs encoding DNA repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Ian R.; Kondrashov, Alexander; Young, Lucy A.; Dobbyn, Helen C.; Hill, Kirsti; Cannell, Ian G.; Stoneley, Mark; Kong, Yi-Wen; Cotes, Julia A.; Smith, Graeme C.M.; Wek, Ron; Hayes, Christopher; Gant, Timothy W.; Spriggs, Keith A.; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    UVB-induced lesions in mammalian cellular DNA can, through the process of mutagenesis, lead to carcinogenesis. However, eukaryotic cells have evolved complex mechanisms of genomic surveillance and DNA damage repair to counteract the effects of UVB radiation. We show that following UVB DNA damage, there is an overall inhibition of protein synthesis and translational reprogramming. This reprogramming allows selective synthesis of DDR proteins, such as ERCC1, ERCC5, DDB1, XPA, XPD, and OGG1 and relies on upstream ORFs in the 5′ untranslated region of these mRNAs. Experiments with DNA-PKcs-deficient cell lines and a specific DNA-PKcs inhibitor demonstrate that both the general repression of mRNA translation and the preferential translation of specific mRNAs depend on DNA-PKcs activity, and therefore our data establish a link between a key DNA damage signaling component and protein synthesis. PMID:19451221

  9. DNA-PKcs Is Involved in Ig Class Switch Recombination in Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Andrea; Du, Likun; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Rosner, Cornelia; Pankaj Kamdar, Radhika; Kokaraki, Georgia; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Davies, E Graham; van der Burg, Mirjam; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hammarström, Lennart; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2015-12-15

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is one of the major DNA double-strand break repair pathways in mammalian cells and is required for both V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination (CSR), two Ig gene-diversification processes occurring during B cell development. DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is a component of the classical NHEJ machinery and has a critical function during V(D)J recombination. However, its role in CSR has been controversial. In this study, we examined the pattern of recombination junctions from in vivo-switched B cells from two DNA-PKcs-deficient patients. One of them harbored mutations that did not affect DNA-PKcs kinase activity but caused impaired Artemis activation; the second patient had mutations resulting in diminished DNA-PKcs protein expression and kinase activity. These results were compared with those from DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse B cells. A shift toward the microhomology-based alternative end-joining at the recombination junctions was observed in both human and mouse B cells, suggesting that the classical NHEJ pathway is impaired during CSR when DNA-PKcs is defective. Furthermore, cells from the second patient showed additional or more severe alterations in CSR and/or NHEJ, which may suggest that DNA-PKcs and/or its kinase activity have additional, Artemis-independent functions during these processes. PMID:26546606

  10. DNA-PKcs-Dependent Modulation of Cellular Radiosensitivity by a Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kodym, Elisabeth; Kodym, Reinhard; Chen, Benjamin P.; Chen, David J.; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 has been shown to increase radiosensitivity. Recently, the suppression of radiation-induced DNA-dependant protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity by the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib was reported. Given the importance of DNA-PK for repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and the clinical use of the substance, we investigated the relevance of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) for the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. Methods and Materials: We used a syngeneic model of Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines: AA8, possessing a wild-type DNK-PKcs; V3, lacking a functional DNA-PKcs; and V3/WT11, V3 stably transfected with the DNA-PKcs. The cells were treated with celecoxib (50 {mu}M) for 24 h before irradiation. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined using the colony formation assay. Results: Treatment with celecoxib increased the cellular radiosensitivity in the DNA-PKcs-deficient cell line V3 with a dose-enhancement ratio of 1.3 for a surviving fraction of 0.5. In contrast, clonogenic survival was increased in DNA-PKcs wild-type-expressing AA8 cells and in V3 cells transfected with DNA-PKcs (V3/WT11). The decrease in radiosensitivity was comparable to the radiosensitization in V3 cells, with a dose-enhancement ratio of 0.76 (AA8) and 0.80 (V3/WT11) for a survival of 0.5. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a DNA-PKcs-dependent differential modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. These effects might be attributed to alterations in signaling cascades downstream of DNA-PK toward cell survival. These findings offer an explanation for the poor outcomes in some recently published clinical trials.

  11. KU-0060648 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cells through DNA-PKcs-dependent and DNA-PKcs-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mu-Xin; Tang, Min; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Xu, Jun-Ying; Zhou, Xiao-zhong; Chen, Gang; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Here we tested anti-tumor activity of KU-0060648 in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models. Our results demonstrated that KU-0060648 was anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic in established (HepG2, Huh-7 and KYN-2 lines) and primary human HCC cells, but was non-cytotoxic to non-cancerous HL-7702 hepatocytes. DNA-PKcs (DNA-activated protein kinase catalytic subunit) is an important but not exclusive target of KU-0060648. DNA-PKcs knockdown or dominant negative mutation inhibited HCC cell proliferation. On the other hand, overexpression of wild-type DNA-PKcs enhanced HepG2 cell proliferation. Importantly, KU-0060648 was still cytotoxic to DNA-PKcs-silenced or -mutated HepG2 cells, although its activity in these cells was relatively weak. Further studies showed that KU-0060648 inhibited PI3K-AKT-mTOR activation, independent of DNA-PKcs. Introduction of constitutively-active AKT1 (CA-AKT1) restored AKT-mTOR activation after KU-0060648 treatment in HepG2 cells, and alleviated subsequent cytotoxicity. In vivo, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of KU-0060648 significantly inhibited HepG2 xenograft growth in nude mice. AKT-mTOR activation was also inhibited in xenografted tumors. Finally, we showed that DNA-PKcs expression was significantly upregulated in human HCC tissues. Yet miRNA-101, an anti-DNA-PKcs miRNA, was downregulated. Over-expression of miR-101 in HepG2 cells inhibited DNA-PKcs expression and cell proliferation. Together, these results indicate that KU-0060648 inhibits HCC cells through DNA-PKcs-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:26933997

  12. 53BP1 mediates the fusion of mammalian telomeres rendered dysfunctional by DNA-PKcs loss or inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rybanska-Spaeder, Ivana; Ghosh, Rajib; Franco, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction promotes genomic instability and carcinogenesis via inappropriate end-to-end chromosomal rearrangements, or telomere fusions. Previous work indicates that the DNA Damage Response (DDR) factor 53BP1 promotes the fusion of telomeres rendered dysfunctional by loss of TRF2, but is dispensable for the fusion of telomeres lacking Pot1 or critically shortened (in telomerase-deficient mice). Here, we examine a role for 53BP1 at telomeres rendered dysfunctional by loss or catalytic inhibition of DNA-PKcs. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking 53BP1 and/or DNA-PKcs, we show that 53BP1 deficiency suppresses G1-generated telomere fusions that normally accumulate in DNA-PKcs-deficient fibroblasts with passage. Likewise, we find that 53BP1 promotes telomere fusions during the replicative phases of the cell cycle in cells treated with the specific DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7026. However, telomere fusions are not fully abrogated in DNA-PKcs-inhibited 53BP1-deficient cells, but occur with a frequency approximately 10-fold lower than in control 53BP1-proficient cells. Treatment with PARP inhibitors or PARP1 depletion abrogates residual fusions, while Ligase IV depletion has no measurable effect, suggesting that PARP1-dependent alternative end-joining operates at low efficiency at 53BP1-deficient, DNA-PKcs-inhibited telomeres. Finally, we have also examined the requirement for DDR factors ATM, MDC1 or H2AX in this context. We find that ATM loss or inhibition has no measurable effect on the frequency of NU7026-induced fusions in wild-type MEFs. Moreover, analysis of MEFs lacking both ATM and 53BP1 indicates that ATM is also dispensable for telomere fusions via PARP-dependent end-joining. In contrast, loss of either MDC1 or H2AX abrogates telomere fusions in response to DNA-PKcs inhibition, suggesting that these factors operate upstream of both 53BP1-dependent and -independent telomere rejoining. Together, these experiments define a novel requirement for 53BP1 in

  13. Involvement of DNA-PKcs in the Type I IFN Response to CpG-ODNs in Conventional Dendritic Cells in TLR9-Dependent or -Independent Manners

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi; Spies, Narrissa P.; Gong, Ting; Jones, Can Xin; Chu, Wen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    CpG-ODNs activate dendritic cells (DCs) to produce interferon alpha (IFNα) and beta (IFNβ). Previous studies demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) deficient DCs exhibited a residual IFNα response to CpG-A, indicating that yet-unidentified molecules are also involved in induction of IFNα by CpG-A. Here, we report that the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) but not Ku70 deficient BMDCs showed defective IFNα and IFNβ responses to CpG-A or CpG-B. Loss of both DNA-PKcs and TLR9 further reduced the IFNα response to CpG-A. These DNA-PKcs and TLR9 effects were mediated by their downstream Akt/mTORC1 pathway and downstream events IRAK1 and IKKα. Loss of DNA-PKcs, TLR9, MyD88 or IRAK4 impaired phosphorylation of Akt(S473), S6K, S6, IRAK1, or IKKα in BMDCs in response to CpG-ODNs. The residual IFNα and IFNβ in DNA-PKcs-deficient BMDCs were partially responsible for the induction of IL-6 and IL-12 by CpG-ODNs and their stimulatory effect was blocked by IFNAR1 neutralizing antibodies. Further analysis indicated that CpG-ODN associated with DNA-PKcs and Ku70, and induced DNA-PKcs’s interaction with TRAF3. Intriguingly, DNA-PKcs but not Ku70 expression level was reduced in TLR9-deficient BMDCs. Taken together, our data suggest that DNA-PKcs is an important mediator in the type I IFN response to CpG-ODNs in TLR9-dependent or -independent fashions. PMID:25812014

  14. Identification of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a Novel Target of Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Nashimoto, Akihiro; Hase, Yasuyoshi; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER) and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80), is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM), high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100–300 μM). The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR)-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient). Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK. PMID:23227178

  15. DNA-PKcs-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation Drives Prostate Cancer Progression and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jonathan F; Kothari, Vishal; Drake, Justin M; Zhao, Shuang; Dylgjeri, Emanuela; Dean, Jeffry L; Schiewer, Matthew J; McNair, Christopher; Jones, Jennifer K; Aytes, Alvaro; Magee, Michael S; Snook, Adam E; Zhu, Ziqi; Den, Robert B; Birbe, Ruth C; Gomella, Leonard G; Graham, Nicholas A; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Graeber, Thomas G; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Takhar, Mandeep; Davicioni, Elai; Tomlins, Scott A; Abate-Shen, Cory; Sharifi, Nima; Witte, Owen N; Feng, Felix Y; Knudsen, Karen E

    2015-07-13

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the DNA repair kinase DNA-PKcs exerts divergent roles in transcriptional regulation of unsolved consequence. Here, in vitro and in vivo interrogation demonstrate that DNA-PKcs functions as a selective modulator of transcriptional networks that induce cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Accordingly, suppression of DNA-PKcs inhibits tumor metastases. Clinical assessment revealed that DNA-PKcs is significantly elevated in advanced disease and independently predicts for metastases, recurrence, and reduced overall survival. Further investigation demonstrated that DNA-PKcs in advanced tumors is highly activated, independent of DNA damage indicators. Combined, these findings reveal unexpected DNA-PKcs functions, identify DNA-PKcs as a potent driver of tumor progression and metastases, and nominate DNA-PKcs as a therapeutic target for advanced malignancies. PMID:26175416

  16. Lysines 3241 and 3260 of DNA-PKcs are important for genomic stability and radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Mori, Eiichiro; Davis, Anthony J; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Chen, David J

    2016-08-19

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an essential role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The DNA-PK holoenzyme consists of a catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and DNA-binding subunit (Ku70/80, Ku). Ku is a molecular sensor for double-stranded DNA and once bound to DSB ends it recruits DNA-PKcs to the DSB site. Subsequently, DNA-PKcs is activated and heavily phosphorylated, with these phosphorylations modulating DNA-PKcs. Although phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs is well studied, other post-translational modifications of DNA-PKcs are not. In this study, we aimed to determine if acetylation of DNA-PKcs regulates DNA-PKcs-dependent DSB repair. We report that DNA-PKcs is acetylated in vivo and identified two putative acetylation sites, lysine residues 3241 and 3260. Mutating these sites to block potential acetylation results in increased radiosensitive, a slight decrease in DSB repair capacity as assessed by γH2AX resolution, and increased chromosomal aberrations, especially quadriradial chromosomes. Together, our results provide evidence that acetylation potentially regulates DNA-PKcs. PMID:27297111

  17. Hyperactivation of ATM upon DNA-PKcs inhibition modulates p53 dynamics and cell fate in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Finzel, Ana; Grybowski, Andrea; Strasen, Jette; Cristiano, Elena; Loewer, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    A functional DNA damage response is essential for maintaining genome integrity in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks. It is mainly coordinated by the kinases ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs, which control the repair of broken DNA strands and relay the damage signal to the tumor suppressor p53 to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or senescence. Although many functions of the individual kinases have been identified, it remains unclear how they act in concert to ensure faithful processing of the damage signal. Using specific inhibitors and quantitative analysis at the single-cell level, we systematically characterize the contribution of each kinase for regulating p53 activity. Our results reveal a new regulatory interplay in which loss of DNA-PKcs function leads to hyperactivation of ATM and amplification of the p53 response, sensitizing cells for damage-induced senescence. This interplay determines the outcome of treatment regimens combining irradiation with DNA-PKcs inhibitors in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27280387

  18. Interaction between HIV-1 Tat and DNA-PKcs modulates HIV transcription and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, He; Yang, Tian-Yi; Ying, Tian-Yi; Yang, Pei-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Tang, Sheng-Jian; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 tat targets a variety of host cell proteins to facilitate viral transcription and disrupts host cellular immunity by inducing lymphocyte apoptosis, but whether it influences humoral immunity remains unclear. Previously, our group demonstrated that tat depresses expression of DNA-PKcs, a critical component of the non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks repair, immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and V(D)J recombination, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat down-regulates DNA-PKcs expression by directly binding to the core promoter sequence. In addition, Tat interacts with and activates the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs in a dose-dependent and DNA independent manner. Furthermore, Tat inhibits class switch recombination (CSR) at low concentrations (≤ 4 µg/ml) and stimulates CSR at high concentrations (≥ 8 µg/ml). On the other hand, low protein level and high kinase activity of DNA-PKcs promotes HIV-1 transcription, while high protein level and low kinase activity inhibit HIV-1 transcription. Co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that DNA-PKcs forms a large complex comprised of Cyclin T1, CDK9 and Tat via direct interacting with CDK9 and Tat but not Cyclin T1. Taken together, our results provide new clues that Tat regulates host humoral immunity via both transcriptional depression and kinase activation of DNA-PKcs. We also raise the possibility that inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PKcs may inhibit HIV-1 transcription in AIDS patients. PMID:25332688

  19. Interaction between HIV-1 Tat and DNA-PKcs modulates HIV transcription and class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, He; Yang, Tian-Yi; Ying, Tian-Yi; Yang, Pei-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Tang, Sheng-Jian; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 tat targets a variety of host cell proteins to facilitate viral transcription and disrupts host cellular immunity by inducing lymphocyte apoptosis, but whether it influences humoral immunity remains unclear. Previously, our group demonstrated that tat depresses expression of DNA-PKcs, a critical component of the non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks repair, immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and V(D)J recombination, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat down-regulates DNA-PKcs expression by directly binding to the core promoter sequence. In addition, Tat interacts with and activates the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs in a dose-dependent and DNA independent manner. Furthermore, Tat inhibits class switch recombination (CSR) at low concentrations (≤4 µg/ml) and stimulates CSR at high concentrations (≥8 µg/ml). On the other hand, low protein level and high kinase activity of DNA-PKcs promotes HIV-1 transcription, while high protein level and low kinase activity inhibit HIV-1 transcription. Co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that DNA-PKcs forms a large complex comprised of Cyclin T1, CDK9 and Tat via direct interacting with CDK9 and Tat but not Cyclin T1. Taken together, our results provide new clues that Tat regulates host humoral immunity via both transcriptional depression and kinase activation of DNA-PKcs. We also raise the possibility that inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PKcs may inhibit HIV-1 transcription in AIDS patients. PMID:25332688

  20. The profiles of gamma-H2AX along with ATM/DNA-PKcs activation in the lymphocytes and granulocytes of rat and human blood exposed to gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yin, Lina; Zhang, Junxiang; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Xuxia; Ding, Defang; Gao, Yun; Li, Qiang; Chen, Honghong

    2016-08-01

    Establishing a rat model suitable for γ-H2AX biodosimeter studies has important implications for dose assessment of internal radionuclide contamination in humans. In this study, γ-H2AX, p-ATM and p-DNA-PKcs foci were enumerated using immunocytofluorescence method, and their protein levels were measured by Western blot in rat blood lymphocytes and granulocytes exposed to γ-rays compared with human blood lymphocytes and granulocytes. It was found that DNA double-strand break repair kinetics and linear dose responses in rat lymphocytes were similar to those observed in the human counterparts. Moreover, radiation induced clear p-ATM and p-DNA-PKcs foci formation and an increase in ratio of co-localization of p-ATM or p-DNA-PKcs with γ-H2AX foci in rat lymphocytes similar to those of human lymphocytes. The level of γ-H2AX protein in irradiated rat and human lymphocytes was significantly reduced by inhibitors of ATM and DNA-PKcs. Surprisingly, unlike human granulocytes, rat granulocytes with DNA-PKcs deficiency displayed a rapid accumulation, but delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci with essentially no change from 10 h to 48 h post-irradiation. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM activity in rat granulocytes also decreased radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci formation. In comparison, human granulocytes showed no response to irradiation regarding γ-H2AX, p-ATM or p-DNA-PKcs foci. Importantly, incidence of γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes after total-body radiation of rats was consistent with that of in vitro irradiation of rat lymphocytes. These findings show that rats are a useful in vivo model for validation of γ-H2AX biodosimetry for dose assessment in humans. ATM and DNA-PKcs participate together in DSB repair in rat lymphocytes similar to that of human lymphocytes. Further, rat granulocytes, which have the characteristic of delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci in response to radiation, may be a useful experimental system for biodosimetry studies. PMID:27260225

  1. DNA-PKcs Expression Predicts Response to Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchaert, Patrick; Guerif, Stephane; Debiais, Celine; Irani, Jacques; Fromont, Gaelle

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Double-strand breaks, the most lethal DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are mainly repaired by the nonhomologous end-joining system. The expression of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway has never been studied in prostate cancer, and its prognostic value for patients undergoing radiotherapy remains unknown. Methods: Pretreatment biopsies from 238 patients treated with exclusive external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer with {>=}2 years of follow-up were reviewed to reassess the Gleason score. Of these 238 cases, 179 were suitable for in situ analysis and were included in the tissue microarrays. Expression of the nonhomologous end-joining proteins Ku70, Ku80, DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunits (DNA-PKcs), and X-ray repair cross complementing 4-like factor was studied by immunohistochemistry, together with the proliferation marker Ki67. Results: The predictive value of the Gleason score for biochemical relapse (using the Phoenix criteria) was markedly improved after review (P<.0001) compared with the initial score (P=.003). The clinical stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, and perineural invasion status were also associated with progression-free survival (P=.005, P<.0001, and P=.03, respectively). High proliferation (>4%) tends to be associated with biochemical recurrence; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance (P=.06). Although the expression of Ku70, Ku80, and X-ray repair cross complementing 4-like factor was not predictive of relapse, positive DNA-PKcs nuclear staining was closely associated with biochemical recurrence (P=.0002). On multivariate analysis, only the Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen level, and DNA-PKcs status remained predictive of recurrence (P=.003, P=.002, and P=.01, respectively). Conclusions: The results of the present study highly suggest that DNA-PKcs could be a predictive marker of recurrence after radiotherapy, independently of the classic

  2. DNA-PKcs mutations in dogs and horses: allele frequency and association with neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qi; Bramble, Lori; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Bell, Thomas; Meek, Katheryn

    2002-01-23

    Previously, spontaneous genetic immunodeficiencies in mice, Arabian foals, and recently in Jack Russell terriers have been ascribed to defects in DNA-PKcs (catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase) expression. In severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) foals, a 5 bp deletion at codon 9480 results in a frameshift and a 967 amino acid deletion from the C terminus (including the entire PI3 kinase domain) and an unstable mutant protein. In SCID mice, a single base pair mutation results in a premature stop codon and deletion of 83 amino acids; as in SCID foals, the mutant protein is unstable. Here, we define the mutation within the canine DNA-PKcs gene that results in SCID. In this case, a point mutation results in a stop codon at nucleotide 10,828 and premature termination at a position 517 amino acids before the normal C terminus resulting in a functionally null allele. Thus, this is the third documentation of a spontaneous germline mutation in the C terminus of DNA-PKcs. Emerging data implicate DNA repair factors as potential tumor suppressors. Here, we have ascertained the carrier frequency of the defective DNA-PKcs genes in Arabian horses and in Jack Russell terriers. Our data indicate (in good agreement with a previous report) that the carrier frequency of the equine SCID allele is approximately 8%; in contrast, the carrier frequency of the canine SCID allele is less than 1.1%. We also assessed the frequency of the equine SCID allele in a series of 295 tumors from Arabian horses. We find a statistically significant correlation between the development of a virally induced tumor (sarcoid) and heterozygosity for the equine SCID allele. These data provide further support for an emerging consensus: that DNA-PK may normally act as a tumor suppressor through its caretaker role in maintaining chromosomal stability. PMID:11867233

  3. Over-expression of DNA-PKcs in renal cell carcinoma regulates mTORC2 activation, HIF-2α expression and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bing; Mao, Jia-Hui; Li, Xiao-Qing; Qian, Lin; Zhu, Hua; Gu, Dong-Hua; Pan, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrated that DNA-PKcs is over-expressed in multiple human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tissues and in primary/established human RCCs. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DNA-PKcs suppressed proliferation of RCC cells. DNA-PKcs was in the complex of mTOR and SIN1, mediating mTORC2 activation and HIF-2α expression in RCC cells. Inhibiting or silencing DNA-PKcs suppressed AKT Ser-473 phosphorylation and HIF-2α expression. In vivo, DNA-PKcs knockdown or oral administration of the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU-7441 inhibited AKT Ser-473 phosphorylation, HIF-2α expression and 786-0 RCC xenograft growth in nude mice. We showed that miRNA-101 level was decreased in RCC tissues/cells, which could be responsible for DNA-PKcs overexpression and DNA-PKcs mediated oncogenic actions in RCC cells. We show that DNA-PKcs over-expression regulates mTORC2-AKT activation, HIF-2α expression and RCC cell proliferation. PMID:27412013

  4. Over-expression of DNA-PKcs in renal cell carcinoma regulates mTORC2 activation, HIF-2α expression and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bing; Mao, Jia-Hui; Li, Xiao-Qing; Qian, Lin; Zhu, Hua; Gu, Dong-hua; Pan, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrated that DNA-PKcs is over-expressed in multiple human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tissues and in primary/established human RCCs. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of DNA-PKcs suppressed proliferation of RCC cells. DNA-PKcs was in the complex of mTOR and SIN1, mediating mTORC2 activation and HIF-2α expression in RCC cells. Inhibiting or silencing DNA-PKcs suppressed AKT Ser-473 phosphorylation and HIF-2α expression. In vivo, DNA-PKcs knockdown or oral administration of the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU-7441 inhibited AKT Ser-473 phosphorylation, HIF-2α expression and 786-0 RCC xenograft growth in nude mice. We showed that miRNA-101 level was decreased in RCC tissues/cells, which could be responsible for DNA-PKcs overexpression and DNA-PKcs mediated oncogenic actions in RCC cells. We show that DNA-PKcs over-expression regulates mTORC2-AKT activation, HIF-2α expression and RCC cell proliferation. PMID:27412013

  5. Geometry of a complex formed by double strand break repair proteins at a single DNA end: recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces inward translocation of Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S; Dynan, W S

    1999-12-15

    Ku protein and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) are essential components of the double-strand break repair machinery in higher eukaryotic cells. Ku protein binds to broken DNA ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form an enzymatically active complex. To characterize the arrangement of proteins in this complex, we developed a set of photocross-linking probes, each with a single free end. We have previously used this approach to characterize the contacts in an initial Ku-DNA complex, and we have now applied the same technology to define the events that occur when Ku recruits DNA-PKcs. The new probes allow the binding of one molecule of Ku protein and one molecule of DNA-PKcs in a defined position and orientation. Photocross-linking reveals that DNA-PKcs makes direct contact with the DNA termini, occupying an approximately 10 bp region proximal to the free end. Characterization of the Ku protein cross-linking pattern in the presence and absence of DNA-PKcs suggests that Ku binds to form an initial complex at the DNA ends, and that recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces an inward translocation of this Ku molecule by about one helical turn. The presence of ATP had no effect on protein-DNA contacts, suggesting that neither DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation nor a putative Ku helicase activity plays a role in modulating protein conformation under the conditions tested. PMID:10572166

  6. Differential phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs regulates the interplay between end-processing and end-ligation during non-homologous end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennifer L.; Liu, Xiangyu; Nakajima, Satoshi; Wang, Yunyue; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J.; Dubois, Richard L.; Liu, Chao; Yu, Xiaochun; Lan, Li; Zha, Shan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major DNA double strand break repair pathway that is conserved in eukaryotes. In vertebrates, NHEJ further acquires end-processing capacities (e.g., hairpin opening) in addition to direct end-ligation. The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) is a vertebrate specific NHEJ factor that can be auto-phosphorylated or trans-phosphorylated by ATM kinase. Using a mouse model expressing a kinase-dead (KD) DNA-PKcs protein, we show that ATM-mediated trans-phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs regulates end-processing at the level of Artemis recruitment, while strictly auto-phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs is necessary to relieve the physical blockage on end-ligation imposed by the DNA-PKcs protein itself. Accordingly, DNA-PKcsKD/KD mice and cells show severe end-ligation defects and p53- and Ku-dependent embryonic lethality, but open hairpin-sealed ends normally in the presence of ATM kinase activity. Together, our findings identify DNA-PKcs as the molecular switch that coordinates end-processing and end-ligation at the DNA ends through differential phosphorylations. PMID:25818648

  7. Knocking Down Nucleolin Expression Enhances the Radiosensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Influencing DNA-PKcs Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Yu; Lu, Shan; Xu, Xiang-Ying; Hu, Song-Liu; Li, Bin; Qi, Rui-Xue; Chen, Lin; Chang, Joe Y

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolin (C23) is an important anti-apoptotic protein that is ubiquitously expressed in exponentially growing eukaryotic cells. In order to understand the impact of C23 in radiation therapy, we attempted to investigate the relationship of C23 expression with the radiosensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We investigated the role of C23 in activating the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA- PKcs), which is a critical protein for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair. As a result, we found that the expression of C23 was negatively correlated with the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cell lines. In vitro clonogenic survival assays revealed that C23 knockdown increased the radiosensitivity of a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, potentially through the promotion of radiation-induced apoptosis and adjusting the cell cycle to a more radiosensitive stage. Immunofluorescence data revealed an increasing quantity of γ-H2AX foci and decreasing radiation-induced DNA damage repair following knockdown of C23. To further clarify the mechanism of C23 in DNA DSBs repair, we detected the expression of DNA-PKcs and C23 proteins in NSCLC cell lines. C23 might participate in DNA DSBs repair for the reason that the expression of DNA-PKcs decreased at 30, 60, 120 and 360 minutes after irradiation in C23 knockdown cells. Especially, the activity of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation sites at the S2056 and T2609 was significantly suppressed. Therefore we concluded that C23 knockdown can inhibit DNA-PKcs phosphorylation activity at the S2056 and T2609 sites, thus reducing the radiation damage repair and increasing the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells. Taken together, the inhibition of C23 expression was shown to increase the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells, as implied by the relevance to the notably decreased DNA-PKcs phosphorylation activity at the S2056 and T2609 clusters. Further research on targeted C23 treatment may promote effectiveness of radiotherapy

  8. Enhanced Genotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in DNA Repair Deficient Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Asharani, P. V.; Hande, M. Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) have been used in medicine and commercially due to their anti-microbial properties. Therapeutic potentials of these nanoparticles are being explored extensively despite the lack of information on their mechanism of action at molecular and cellular level. Here, we have investigated the DNA damage response and repair following Ag-np treatment in mammalian cells. Studies have shown that Ag-np exerts genotoxicity through double-strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs, the catalytic subunit of DNA dependent protein kinase, is an important caretaker of the genome which is known to be the main player mediating Non-homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs is responsible for the repair of Ag-np induced DNA damage. In vitro studies have been carried out to investigate both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by Ag-np in normal human cells, DNA-PKcs proficient, and deficient mammalian cells. Chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity with NU7026, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, has been performed to further validate the role of DNA-PKcs in this model. Our results suggest that Ag-np induced more prominent dose-dependent decrease in cell viability in DNA-PKcs deficient or inhibited cells. The deficiency or inhibition of DNA-PKcs renders the cells with higher susceptibility to DNA damage and genome instability which in turn contributed to greater cell cycle arrest/cell death. These findings support the fact that DNA-PKcs is involved in the repair of Ag-np induced genotoxicity and NHEJ repair pathway and DNA-PKcs particularly is activated to safeguard the genome upon Ag-np exposure. PMID:22707954

  9. Regulatory roles of tankyrase 1 at telomeres and in DNA repair: suppression of T-SCE and stabilization of DNA-PKcs

    PubMed Central

    Dregalla, Ryan C.; Zhou, Junqing; Idate, Rupa R.; Battaglia, Christine L.R.; Liber, Howard L.; Bailey, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Intrigued by the dynamics of the seemingly contradictory yet integrated cellular responses to the requisites of preserving telomere integrity while also efficiently repairing damaged DNA, we investigated roles of the telomere associated poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) tankyrase 1 in both telomere function and the DNA damage response following exposure to ionizing radiation. Tankyrase 1 siRNA knockdown in human cells significantly elevated recombination specifically within telomeres, a phenotype with the potential of accelerating cellular senescence. Additionally, depletion of tankyrase 1 resulted in concomitant and rapid reduction of the nonhomologous end-joining protein DNA-PKcs, while Ku86 and ATM protein levels remained unchanged; DNA-PKcs mRNA levels were also unaffected. We found that the requirement of tankyrase 1 for DNA-PKcs protein stability reflects the necessity of its PARP enzymatic activity. We also demonstrated that depletion of tankyrase 1 resulted in proteasome-mediated DNA-PKcs degradation, explaining the associated defective damage response observed; i.e., increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing, mutagenesis, chromosome aberration and telomere fusion. We provide the first evidence for regulation of DNA-PKcs by tankyrase 1 PARP activity and taken together, identify roles of tankyrase 1 with implications not only for DNA repair and telomere biology, but also for cancer and aging. PMID:21037379

  10. Non-redundant Functions of ATM and DNA-PKcs in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Pierre; Choudjaye, Jonathan; Clouaire, Thomas; Bugler, Béatrix; Daburon, Virginie; Aguirrebengoa, Marion; Mangeat, Thomas; Iacovoni, Jason S.; Álvarez-Quilón, Alejandro; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Legube, Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) elicit the so-called DNA damage response (DDR), largely relying on ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), two members of the PI3K-like kinase family, whose respective functions during the sequential steps of the DDR remains controversial. Using the DIvA system (DSB inducible via AsiSI) combined with high-resolution mapping and advanced microscopy, we uncovered that both ATM and DNA-PKcs spread in cis on a confined region surrounding DSBs, independently of the pathway used for repair. However, once recruited, these kinases exhibit non-overlapping functions on end joining and γH2AX domain establishment. More specifically, we found that ATM is required to ensure the association of multiple DSBs within “repair foci.” Our results suggest that ATM acts not only on chromatin marks but also on higher-order chromatin organization to ensure repair accuracy and survival. PMID:26586426

  11. Preventing Damage Limitation: Targeting DNA-PKcs and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathways for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dungl, Daniela A.; Maginn, Elaina N.; Stronach, Euan A.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the cornerstone of ovarian cancer treatment, and its efficacy is dependent on the generation of DNA damage, with subsequent induction of apoptosis. Inappropriate or aberrant activation of the DNA damage response network is associated with resistance to platinum, and defects in DNA repair pathways play critical roles in determining patient response to chemotherapy. In ovarian cancer, tumor cell defects in homologous recombination – a repair pathway activated in response to double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) – are most commonly associated with platinum-sensitive disease. However, despite initial sensitivity, the emergence of resistance is frequent. Here, we review strategies for directly interfering with DNA repair pathways, with particular focus on direct inhibition of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), another DSB repair pathway. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is a core component of NHEJ and it has shown considerable promise as a chemosensitization target in numerous cancer types, including ovarian cancer where it functions to promote platinum-induced survival signaling, via AKT activation. The development of pharmacological inhibitors of DNA-PKcs is on-going, and clinic-ready agents offer real hope to patients with chemoresistant disease. PMID:26579492

  12. TNKS1BP1 functions in DNA double-strand break repair though facilitating DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation dependent on PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Lian-Hong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Tan, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Xu, Qin-Zhi; Song, Man; Wang, Yu; Guan, Hua; Zhang, Shi-Meng; Yu, Lan; Zhong, Cai-Gao; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2015-01-01

    TNKS1BP1 was originally identified as an interaction protein of tankyrase 1, which belongs to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) superfamily. PARP members play important roles for example in DNA repair, telomere stability and mitosis regulation. Although the TNKS1BP1 protein was considered to be a poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation acceptor of tankyrase 1, its function is still unknown. Here we firstly identified that TNKS1BP1 was up-regulated by ionizing radiation (IR) and the depletion of TNKS1BP1 significantly sensitized cancer cells to IR. Neutral comet assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and γH2AX foci analysis indicated that TNKS1BP1 is required for the efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). The TNKS1BP1 protein was demonstrated to interact with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), by co-immunoprecipitation analysis. Moreover, TNKS1BP1 was shown to promote the association of PARP-1 and DNA-PKcs. Overexpression of TNKS1BP1 induced the autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs/Ser2056 in a PARP-1 dependent manner, which contributed to an increased capability of DNA DSB repair. Inhibition of PARP-1 blocked the TNKS1BP1-mediated DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and attenuated the PARylation of DNA-PKcs. TNKS1BP1 is a newly described component of the DNA DSB repair machinery, which provides much more mechanistic evidence for the rationale of developing effective anticancer measures by targeting PARP-1 and DNA-PKcs. PMID:25749521

  13. G(2)-M phase-correlative bystander effects are co-mediated by DNA-PKcs and ATM after carbon ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenzhi; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uchihori, Yukio; Xie, Yuexia; Dang, Bingrong; Li, Wenjian; Shao, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has shown that radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) may have significant implications to the efficiency of radiotherapy. Although cellular radiosensitivity relies on cell cycle status, it is largely unknown how about the relationship between RIBE and cell cycle distribution, much less the underlying mechanism. In the present study, the lung cancer A549 cells were synchronized into different cell cycle phases of G1, S and G2/M and irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) carbon ions. By treating nonirradiated cells with the conditioned medium from these irradiated cells, it was found that the G2-M phase cells had the largest contribution to RIBE. Meanwhile, the activity of DNA-PKcs but not ATM was increased in the synchronized G2-M phase cells in spite of both of them were activated in the asynchronous cells after carbon ion irradiation. When the G2-M phased cells were transferred with DNA-PKcs siRNA and ATM siRNA individually or treated with an inhibitor of either DNA-PKcs or ATM before carbon ion irradiation, the RIBE was effectively diminished. These results provide new evidence linking cell cycle to bystander responses and demonstrate that DNA-PKcs and ATM are two associated factors in co-regulating G2-M phase-related bystander effects. PMID:26774662

  14. Ku86 deficiency leads to reduced intrachromosomal homologous recombination in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Reliene, Ramune; Bishop, Alexander J R; Li, Gloria; Schiestl, Robert H

    2004-02-01

    Ku70 and Ku86 together with DNA-PKcs form the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex that is involved in DNA double-strand break repair by nonhomologous end joining. We investigated the effect of Ku86 mutation on intrachromosomal homologous recombination (HR) resulting in deletions in vivo in mice. We quantified such deletion events using a phenotypic pigmentation assay. Deletion of one copy of a 70 kb DNA duplication in the pink-eyed unstable (pun) allele results in reversion to the wildtype pink-eyed dilution (p) gene, allowing black pigment accumulation in cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We found that the frequency of homologous recombination was significantly reduced in Ku86 deficient mice. Furthermore, the proliferation of cells in which recombination events occurred was reduced and developmentally delayed in the Ku86 deficient mice. These data indicate a role for Ku86 directly or indirectly in homologous recombination in vivo. PMID:14706343

  15. Repair of radiation-induced heat-labile sites is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 or PARP

    SciTech Connect

    Stenerlöw, Bo; Karlsson, Karin H.; Radulescu, Irina; Rydberg, Bjorn; Stenerlow, Bo

    2008-04-29

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of different DNA lesions: in addition to the most critical DNA damage, the DSB, numerous base alterations, SSBs and other modifications of the DNA double-helix are formed. When several non-DSB lesions are clustered within a short distance along DNA, or close to a DSB, they may interfere with the repair of DSBs and affect the measurement of DSB induction and repair. We have previously shown that a substantial fraction of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are in fact due to heat-labile sites (HLS) within clustered lesions, thus reflecting an artifact of preparation of genomic DNA at elevated temperature. To further characterize the influence of HLS on DSB induction and repair, four human cell lines (GM5758, GM7166, M059K, U-1810) with apparently normal DSB rejoining were tested for bi-phasic rejoining after gamma irradiation. When heat-released DSBs were excluded from the measurements the fraction of fast rejoining decreased to less than 50% of the total. However, neither the half-times of the fast (t{sub 1/2} = 7-8 min) or slow (t{sub 1/2} = 2.5 h) DSB rejoining were changed significantly. At t=0 the heat-released DSBs accounted for almost 40% of the DSBs, corresponding to 10 extra DSB/cell/Gy in the initial DSB yield. These heat-released DSBs were repaired within 60-90 min in all tested cells, including M059K cells treated with wortmannin or DNA-PKcs defect M059J cells. Furthermore, cells lacking XRCC1 or Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) rejoined both total DSBs and heat-released DSBs similar to normal cells. In summary, the presence of heat-labile sites have a substantial impact on DSB induction yields and DSB rejoining rates measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and HLS repair is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 and PARP.

  16. Repair of a minimal DNA double-strand break by NHEJ requires DNA-PKcs and is controlled by the ATM/ATR checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Kühne, Christian; Tjörnhammar, Marie-Louise; Pongor, Sándor; Banks, Lawrence; Simoncsits, András

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian cells primarily rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The joining of the broken DNA ends appears directly without template and accuracy is ensured by the NHEJ factors that are under ATM/ATR regulated checkpoint control. In the current study we report the engineering of a mono-specific DNA damaging agent. This was used to study the molecular requirements for the repair of the least complex DSB in vivo. Single-chain PvuII restriction enzymes fused to protein delivery sequences transduce cells efficiently and induce blunt end DSBs in vivo. We demonstrate that beside XRCC4/LigaseIV and KU, the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is also essential for the joining of this low complex DSB in vivo. The appearance of blunt end 3′-hydroxyl and 5′-phosphate DNA DSBs induces a significantly higher frequency of anaphase bridges in cells that do not contain functional DNA-PKcs, suggesting an absolute requirement for DNA-PKcs in the control of chromosomal stability during end joining. Moreover, these minimal blunt end DSBs are sufficient to induce a p53 and ATM/ATR checkpoint function. PMID:14654698

  17. Structure-Specific nuclease activities of Artemis and the Artemis: DNA-PKcs complex

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Howard H.Y.; Lieber, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Artemis is a vertebrate nuclease with both endo- and exonuclease activities that acts on a wide range of nucleic acid substrates. It is the main nuclease in the non-homologous DNA end-joining pathway (NHEJ). Not only is Artemis important for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in NHEJ, it is essential in opening the DNA hairpin intermediates that are formed during V(D)J recombination. Thus, humans with Artemis deficiencies do not have T- or B-lymphocytes and are diagnosed with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). While Artemis is the only vertebrate nuclease capable of opening DNA hairpins, it has also been found to act on other DNA substrates that share common structural features. Here, we discuss the key structural features that all Artemis DNA substrates have in common, thus providing a basis for understanding how this structure-specific nuclease recognizes its DNA targets. PMID:27198222

  18. Oversized AAV Transductifon Is Mediated via a DNA-PKcs-independent, Rad51C-dependent Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Bellon, Isabella; Yin, Chaoying; Chavala, Sai; Pryadkina, Marina; Richard, Isabelle; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the DNA packaging restriction of the viral capsid (<4.7 kb). Recent observations demonstrate oversized AAV genome transduction through an unknown mechanism. Herein, AAV production using an oversized reporter (6.2 kb) resulted in chloroform and DNase-resistant particles harboring distinct “fragment” AAV (fAAV) genomes (5.0, 2.4, and 1.6 kb). Fractionation experiments determined that only the larger “fragments” mediated transduction in vitro, and relatively efficient transduction was also demonstrated in the muscle, the eye, and the liver. In contrast with concatemerization-dependent large-gene delivery by split AAV, fAAV transduction is independent of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in vitro and in vivo while disproportionately reliant on the DNA strand–annealing protein Rad51C. Importantly, fAAV's unique dependence on DNA repair proteins, compared with intact AAV, strongly suggests that the majority of oversized AAV transduction is mediated by fragmented genomes. Although fAAV transduction is less efficient than intact AAV, it is enhanced fourfold in muscle and sevenfold in the retina compared with split AAV transduction. Furthermore, fAAV carrying codon-optimized therapeutic dysferlin cDNA in a 7.5 kb expression cassette restored dysferlin levels in a dystrophic model. Collectively, oversized AAV genome transduction requires unique DNA repair pathways and offers an alternative, more efficient strategy for large-gene therapy. PMID:23939025

  19. K-RAS(V12) Induces Autocrine Production of EGFR Ligands and Mediates Radioresistance Through EGFR-Dependent Akt Signaling and Activation of DNA-PKcs

    SciTech Connect

    Minjgee, Minjmaa; Toulany, Mahmoud; Kehlbach, Rainer; Giehl, Klaudia; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: It is known that postirradiation survival of tumor cells presenting mutated K-RAS is mediated through autocrine activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this study the molecular mechanism of radioresistance of cells overexpressing mutated K-RAS(V12) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Head-and-neck cancer cells (FaDu) presenting wild-type K-RAS were transfected with empty vector or vector expressing mutated K-RAS(V12). The effect of K-RAS(V12) on autocrine production of EGFR ligands, activation of EGFR downstream pathways, DNA damage repair, and postirradiation survival was analyzed. Results: Conditioned medium collected from K-RAS(V12)-transfected cells enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt pathway and increased postirradiation survival of wild-type K-RAS parental cells when compared with controls. These effects were reversed by amphiregulin (AREG)-neutralizing antibody. In addition, secretion of the EGFR ligands AREG and transforming growth factor {alpha} was significantly increased upon overexpression of K-RAS(V12). Expression of mutated K-RAS(V12) resulted in an increase in radiation-induced DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation at S2056. This increase was accompanied by increased repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Abrogation of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation by serum depletion or AREG-neutralizing antibody underscored the role of autocrine production of EGFR ligands, namely, AREG, in regulating DNA-PKcs activation in K-RAS mutated cells. Conclusions: These data indicate that radioresistance of K-RAS mutated tumor cells is at least in part due to constitutive production of EGFR ligands, which mediate enhanced repair of DNA double-strand breaks through the EGFR-phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt cascade.

  20. DNA-PK Deficiency in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal death with an accumulaton of intra-cellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and extracellular amyloid plaques. Reduced DNA repair ability has been reported in AD brains. In neurons, the predominant mechanism to repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) is non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that requires DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. DNA-PK is a holoenzyme comprising the p460 kD DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and its activator Ku, a heterodimer of p86 (Ku80) and p70 (Ku70) subunits. Upon binding to double-stranded DNA ends, Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to process NHEJ. In AD brains, reduced NHEJ activity as well as DNA-PKcs and Ku protein levels have been shown. Normal aging brains also show a reduction in both DNA-PKcs and Ku levels questioning a direct link between NHEJ ability and AD, and suggesting additional players/events in AD pathogenesis. Deficiency of Ku80, a somatostatin receptor, can disrupt somatostatin signaling thus inducing amyloid beta (Aβ) generation, which in turn can potentiate DNA-PKcs degradation and consequently loss of NHEJ activity, an additional step negatively affecting DSB repair. Trigger of these two different pathways culminating in genome instability may differentiate the outcomes between AD and normal aging. PMID:27376156

  1. XR-C1, a new CHO cell mutant which is defective in DNA-PKcs, is impaired in both V(D)J coding and signal joint formation.

    PubMed Central

    Errami, A; He, D M; Friedl, A A; Overkamp, W J; Morolli, B; Hendrickson, E A; Eckardt-Schupp, F; Oshimura, M; Lohman, P H; Jackson, S P; Zdzienicka, M Z

    1998-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays an important role in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination. We have isolated a new X-ray-sensitive CHO cell line, XR-C1, which is impaired in DSB repair and which was assigned to complementation group 7, the group that is defective in the XRCC7 / SCID ( Prkdc ) gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs). Consistent with this complementation analysis, XR-C1 cells lackeddetectable DNA-PKcs protein, did not display DNA-PK catalytic activity and were complemented by the introduction of a single human chromosome 8 (providing the Prkdc gene). The impact of the XR-C1 mutation on V(D)J recombination was quite different from that found in most rodent cells defective in DNA-PKcs, which are preferentially blocked in coding joint formation, whereas XR-C1 cells were defective in forming both coding and signal joints. These results suggest that DNA-PKcs is required for both coding and signal joint formation during V(D)J recombination and that the XR-C1 mutant cell line may prove to be a useful tool in understanding this pathway. PMID:9628911

  2. Cadmium delays non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair via inhibition of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation and downregulation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Gu, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Kong, Jinxin; Ding, Nan; Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Jufang; Huang, Dejun

    2015-09-01

    Although studies have shown that cadmium (Cd) interfered with DNA damage repair (DDR), whether Cd could affect non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair remains elusive. To further understand the effect of Cd on DDR, we used X-ray irradiation of Hela cells as an in vitro model system, along with γH2AX and 53BP1 as markers for DNA damage. Results showed that X-ray significantly increased γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in Hela cells (p < 0.01), all of which are characteristic of accrued DNA damage. The number of foci declined rapidly over time (1-8h postirradiation), indicating an initiation of NHEJ process. However, the disappearance of γH2AX and 53BP1 foci was remarkably slowed by Cd pretreatment (p < 0.01), suggesting that Cd reduced the efficiency of NHEJ. To further elucidate the mechanisms of Cd toxicity, several markers of NHEJ pathway including Ku70, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and Ligase IV were examined. Our data showed that Cd altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, and reduced the expression of both XRCC4 and Ligase IV in irradiated cells. These observations are indicative of the impairment of NHEJ-dependent DNA repair pathways. In addition, zinc (Zn) mitigated the effects of Cd on NHEJ, suggesting that the Cd-induced NHEJ alteration may partly result from the displacement of Zn or from an interference with the normal function of Zn-containing proteins by Cd. Our findings provide a new insight into the toxicity of Cd on NHEJ repair and its underlying mechanisms in human cells. PMID:26201248

  3. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  4. NSCLC cells demonstrate differential mode of cell death in response to the combined treatment of radiation and a DNA-PKcs inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Feng-Ming; Zhang, Zhang; Tumati, Vasu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Saha, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    The current standard of care for lung cancer consists of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation. Several studies have shown that the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441 is a highly potent radiosensitizer, however, the mechanism of NU7441's anti-proliferation effect has not been fully elucidated. In this study, the combined effect of NU7441 and ionizing radiation (IR) in a panel of non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460 and H1299) has been investigated. We found that NU7441 significantly enhances the effect of IR in all cell lines. The notable findings in response to this combined treatment are (i) prolonged delay in IR-induced DNA DSB repair, (ii) induced robust G2/M checkpoint, (iii) increased aberrant mitosis followed by mitotic catastrophe specifically in H1299, (iv) dramatically induced autophagy in A549 and (v) IR-induced senescence specifically in H460. H1299 cells show greater G2 checkpoint adaptation after combined treatment, which can be attributed to higher expression level of Plk1 compared to A549 and H460. The enhanced autophagy after NU7441 treatment in A549 is possibly due to the higher endogenous expression of pS6K compared to H1299 and H460 cells. In conclusion, choice of cell death pathway is dependent on the mutation status and other genetic factors of the cells treated. PMID:25714019

  5. DNA-PKcs and PARP1 Bind to Unresected Stalled DNA Replication Forks Where They Recruit XRCC1 to Mediate Repair.

    PubMed

    Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihui; Medhurst, Annette L; Neal, Jessica A; Bao, Zhengqiang; Mortusewicz, Oliver; McGouran, Joanna; Song, Xinming; Shen, Huahao; Hamdy, Freddie C; Kessler, Benedikt M; Meek, Katheryn; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    A series of critical pathways are responsible for the detection, signaling, and restart of replication forks that encounter blocks during S-phase progression. Small base lesions may obstruct replication fork progression and processing, but the link between repair of small lesions and replication forks is unclear. In this study, we investigated a hypothesized role for DNA-PK, an important enzyme in DNA repair, in cellular responses to DNA replication stress. The enzyme catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs was phosphorylated on S2056 at sites of stalled replication forks in response to short hydroxyurea treatment. Using DNA fiber experiments, we found that catalytically active DNA-PK was required for efficient replication restart of stalled forks. Furthermore, enzymatically active DNA-PK was also required for PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 to stalled replication forks. This activity was enhanced by preventing Mre11-dependent DNA end resection, suggesting that XRCC1 must be recruited early to an unresected stalled fork. We also found that XRCC1 was required for effective restart of a subset of stalled replication forks. Overall, our work suggested that DNA-PK and PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 is necessary to effectively protect, repair, and restart stalled replication forks, providing new insight into how genomic stability is preserved. Cancer Res; 76(5); 1078-88. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26603896

  6. Lead toxicity and iron deficiency in Utah migrant children

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, S.D.; Lee, J.; Lutz, L.J.; Woolley, F.R.; Baxter, S. ); Civish, F. ); Johnson, M. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors determined the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, ages 9-72 months, during the summer of 1985. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity, 13% of those tested and 30% of the children ages 9-23 months were iron deficient. Hematocrit determinations accurately predicted iron deficiency in only 35% of the children confirmed to have this disorder via erythrocyte protoporphyrin screening.

  7. Cernunnos deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Turul, T; Tezcan, I; Sanal, O

    2011-01-01

    B cell-negative severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is caused by molecules involved in the variable (diversity) joining (V[D]J) recombination process. Four genes involved in the nonhomologous end joining pathway--Artemis, DNA-PKcs, DNA ligase 4, and Cernunnos--are involved in B cell-negative radiosensitive SCID. Deficiencies in DNA ligase 4 and the recently described Cernunnos gene result in microcephaly, growth retardation, and typical bird-like facies. Lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia with normal or elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) M levels indicate a defect in V(D)J recombination. We present a case with recurrent postnatal pulmonary infections leading to chronic lung disease, disseminated molluscum contagiosum, lymphopenia, low IgG, IgA and normal IgM levels. Our patient had phenotypic features such as microcephaly and severe growth retardation. Clinical presentation in patients with the B cell-negative subtype ranges from SCID to atypical combined immunodeficiency, occasionally associated with autoimmune manifestations and cytomegalovirus infection. Our patient survived beyond infancy with combined immunodeficiency and no autoimmune manifestations. PMID:21721379

  8. Sleep Deficiency and Deprivation Leading to Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kohansieh, Michelle; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep plays a vital role in an individual's mental, emotional, and physiological well-being. Not only does sleep deficiency lead to neurological and psychological disorders, but also the literature has explored the adverse effects of sleep deficiency on the cardiovascular system. Decreased quantity and quality of sleep have been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. We explore the literature correlating primary sleep deficiency and deprivation as a cause for cardiovascular disease and cite endothelial dysfunction as a common underlying mechanism. PMID:26495139

  9. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress independent of DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Palchik, Guillermo; Matsunaga, Shinji; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are the two major kinases involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and are required for cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. While ATM is the key upstream kinase for DSB signaling, DNA-PKcs is primarily involved in DSB repair through the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. In addition to DSB repair, ATM has been shown to be involved in oxidative stress response and could be activated directly in vitro upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. However, the role of DNA-PKcs in cellular response to oxidative stress is not clear. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs may participate in the regulation of ATM activation in response to oxidative stress, and that this regulatory role is independent of its role in DNA double strand break repair. Our findings reveal that H2O2 induces hyperactivation of ATM signaling in DNA-PKcs deficient, but not Ligase 4 deficient cells, suggesting an NHEJ-independent role for DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to a decrease in cellular survival against H2O2. For the first time, our results reveal that DNA-PKcs plays a non-canonical role in the cellular response to oxidative stress, which is independent from its role in NHEJ. In addition, DNA-PKcs is a critical regulator of the oxidative stress response and contributes to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Our findings reveal that DNA-PKcs is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and suppression of ROS build-up independently to its function in DSB repair. PMID:25224041

  10. Lead phytotoxicity in soils and nutrient solutions is related to lead induced phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cheyns, Karlien; Peeters, Sofie; Delcourt, Dorien; Smolders, Erik

    2012-05-01

    This study was set up to relate lead (Pb) bioavailability with its toxicity to plants in soils. Tomato and barley seedlings were grown in six different PbCl(2) spiked soils (pH: 4.7-7.4; eCEC: 4.2-41.7 cmol(c)/kg). Soils were leached and pH corrected after spiking to exclude confounding factors. Plant growth was halved at 1600-6500 mg Pb/kg soil for tomato and at 1900-8300 mg Pb/kg soil for barley. These soil Pb threshold were unrelated to soil pH, organic carbon, texture or eCEC and neither soil solution Pb nor Pb(2+) ion activity adequately explained Pb toxicity among soils. Shoot phosphorus (P) concentrations significantly decreased with increasing soil Pb concentrations. Tomato grown in hydroponics at either varying P supply or at increasing Pb (equal initial P) illustrated that shoot P explained growth response in both scenarios. The results suggest that Pb toxicity is partially related to Pb induced P deficiency, likely due to lead phosphate precipitation. PMID:22377902

  11. Nonsense mutation at Tyr-4046 in the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit of severe combined immune deficiency mice

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Ryoko; Fujimori, Akira; Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Mita, Kazuei; Saito, Toshiyuki; Mori, Masahiko; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Morimyo, Mitsuoki; Muto, Masahiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Tatsumi, Kouichi; Abe, Masumi

    1997-01-01

    The severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mouse was reported as an animal model for human immune deficiency. Through the course of several studies, the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) gene came to be considered a candidate for the SCID-responsible gene. We isolated an ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene from SCID mice and their parent strain C.B-17 mice and determined the DNA sequences. The ORF of the murine DNA-PKcs gene contained 4128-aa residues and had 78.9% homology with the human DNA-PKcs gene. A particularly important finding is that a T to A transversion results in the substitution of termination codon in SCID mice for the Tyr-4046 in C.B-17 mice. No other mutation was detected in the ORF of the gene. The generality of this transversion was confirmed using four individual SCID and wild-type mice. The substitution took place in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase domain, and the mutated gene encodes the truncated products missing 83 residues of wild-type DNA-PKcs products. Furthermore, the quantity of DNA-PKcs transcript in wild-type and SCID cells was almost equal. These observations indicate that the DNA-PKcs gene is the SCID-responsible gene itself and that the detected mutation leads to the SCID aberration. PMID:9122213

  12. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to alteration in the kidney proteome in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shadab; Basak, Trayambak; Anand Kumar, K; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Lalitha, A; Yadav, Dilip K; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    Maternal nutritional deficiency significantly perturbs the offspring's physiology predisposing them to metabolic diseases during adulthood. Vitamin B12 and folate are two such micronutrients, whose deficiency leads to elevated homocysteine levels. We earlier generated B12 and/or folate deficient rat models and using high-throughput proteomic approach, showed that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the liver of pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway. In this study, using similar approach, we identified 26 differentially expressed proteins in the kidney of pups born to mothers fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet while only four proteins were identified in the folate deficient group. Importantly, proteins like calreticulin, cofilin 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase B that are involved in the functioning of the kidney were upregulated in B12 deficient group. Our results hint towards a larger effect of vitamin B12 deficiency compared to that of folate presumably due to greater elevation of homocysteine in vitamin B12 deficient group. In view of widespread vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and its association with several diseases like anemia, cardiovascular and renal diseases, our results may have large implications for kidney diseases in populations deficient in vitamin B12 especially in vegetarians and the elderly people.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25982389

  13. Multiferroic grain boundaries in oxygen-deficient ferroelectric lead titanate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takahiro; Wang, Jie; Ueda, Taku; Uratani, Yoshitaka; Arisue, Kou; Mrovec, Matous; Elsässer, Christian; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-01-14

    Ultimately thin multiferroics arouse remarkable interest, motivated by the diverse utility of coexisting ferroelectric and (anti)ferromagnetic order parameters for novel functional device paradigms. However, the ferroic order is inevitably destroyed below a critical size of several nanometers. Here, we demonstrate a new path toward realization of atomically thin multiferroic monolayers while resolving a controversial origin for unexpected "dilute ferromagnetism" emerged in nanocrystals of nonmagnetic ferroelectrics PbTiO3. The state-of-the-art hybrid functional of Hartree-Fock and density functional theories successfully identifies the origin and underlying physics; oxygen vacancies interacting with grain boundaries (GBs) bring about (anti)ferromagnetism with localized spin moments at the neighboring Ti atoms. This is due to spin-polarized defect states with broken orbital symmetries at GBs. In addition, the energetics of oxygen vacancies indicates their self-assembling nature at GBs resulting in considerably high concentration, which convert the oxygen-deficient GBs into multiferroic monolayers due to their atomically thin interfacial structure. This synthetic concept that realizes multiferroic and multifunctional oxides in a monolayered geometry through the self-assembly of atomic defects and grain boundary engineering opens a new avenue for promising paradigms of novel functional devices. PMID:25485474

  14. Iron deficiency associated with higher blood lead in children living in contaminated environments.

    PubMed Central

    Bradman, A; Eskenazi, B; Sutton, P; Athanasoulis, M; Goldman, L R

    2001-01-01

    The evidence that iron deficiency increases lead child exposure is based primarily on animal data and limited human studies, and some of this evidence is contradictory. No studies of iron status and blood lead levels in children have accounted for environmental lead contamination and, therefore, the source of their exposure. Thus, no studies have directly determined whether iron deficiency modifies the relationship of environmental lead and blood lead. In this study, we compared blood lead levels of iron-deficient and iron-replete children living in low, medium, or highly contaminated environments. Measurements of lead in paint, soil, dust, and blood, age of housing, and iron status were collected from 319 children ages 1-5. We developed two lead exposure factors to summarize the correlated exposure variables: Factor 1 summarized all environmental measures, and Factor 2 was weighted for lead loading of house dust. The geometric mean blood lead level was 4.9 microg/dL; 14% exceeded 10 microg/dL. Many of the children were iron deficient (24% with ferritin < 12 ng/dL). Seventeen percent of soil leads exceeded 500 microg/g, and 23% and 63% of interior and exterior paint samples exceeded 5,000 microg/g. The unadjusted geometric mean blood lead level for iron-deficient children was higher by 1 microg/dL; this difference was greater (1.8 microg/dL) after excluding Asians. Blood lead levels were higher for iron-deficient children for each tertile of exposure as estimated by Factors 1 and 2 for non-Asian children. Elevated blood lead among iron-deficient children persisted after adjusting for potential confounders by multivariate regression; the largest difference in blood lead levels between iron-deficient and -replete children, approximately 3 microg/dL, was among those living in the most contaminated environments. Asian children had a paradoxical association of sufficient iron status and higher blood lead level, which warrants further investigation. Improving iron status

  15. Sun1 deficiency leads to cerebellar ataxia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Ya; Yu, I.-Shing; Huang, Chien-Chi; Chen, Chia-Yen; Wang, Wan-Ping; Lin, Shu-Wha; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Chi, Ya-Hui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Migration and organization of the nucleus are essential for the proliferation and differentiation of cells, including neurons. However, the relationship between the positioning of the nucleus and cellular morphogenesis remains poorly understood. Inherited recessive cerebellar ataxia has been attributed to mutations in SYNE1, a component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Regardless, Syne1-mutant mice present with normal cerebellar development. The Sad1-Unc-84 homology (SUN)-domain proteins are located at the inner nuclear membrane and recruit Syne proteins through the KASH domain to the outer nuclear membrane. Here, we report an unrecognized contribution of Sun1 and Sun2 to the postnatal development of murine cerebellum. Mice depleted of Sun1 showed a marked reduction in the cerebellar volume, and this phenotype is exacerbated with additional loss of a Sun2 allele. Consistent with these histological changes, Sun1−/− and Sun1−/−Sun2+/− mice exhibited defective motor coordination. Results of immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Sun1 is highly expressed in Purkinje cells and recruits Syne2 to the periphery of the nucleus. Approximately 33% of Purkinje cells in Sun1−/− mice and 66% of Purkinje cells in Sun1−/−Sun2+/− mice were absent from the surface of the internal granule layer (IGL), whereas the proliferation and migration of granule neurons were unaffected. Furthermore, the Sun1−/−Sun2+/− Purkinje cells exhibited retarded primary dendrite specification, reduced dendritic complexity and aberrant patterning of synapses. Our findings reveal a cell-type-specific role for Sun1 and Sun2 in nucleokinesis during cerebellar development, and we propose the use of Sun-deficient mice as a model for studying cerebellar ataxia that is associated with mutation of human SYNE genes or loss of Purkinje cells. PMID:26035387

  16. Blood and hair lead in children with different extents of iron deficiency in Karachi

    SciTech Connect

    Ataur Rahman, Muhammad; Rahman, Bushra; Saeed Ahmad, Muhammad; Blann, Andrew; Ahmed, Nessar

    2012-10-15

    Childhood iron deficiency has a high incidence in Pakistan. Some but not all studies have shown that dietary iron deficiency may cause increased absorption of lead as both compete for the same transporters in the small intestine. Therefore, children in Pakistan, residing in heavily polluted cities like Karachi may be prone to lead poisoning. This hypothesis was tested by investigating blood and hair lead concentrations in children from Karachi who were divided into four groups of iron status; normal, borderline iron deficiency, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia. A prospective observational study was conducted where 269 children were categorized into four groups of iron status using the World Health Organization criteria and one based on soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood iron status was determined using a full blood count, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor measurements. Blood lead was determined by graphite atomic absorption spectroscopy, whereas hair lead was assessed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in children with iron deficiency anaemia (mean [95% confidence intervals] were 24.9 [22.6-27.2] {mu}g/dL) compared to those with normal iron status (19.1 [16.8-21.4] {mu}g/dL) using WHO criteria. In contrast, hair lead content was not significantly different in children of different iron status. Our findings reinforce the importance of not only reducing environmental lead pollution but also the development of national health strategies to reduce childhood iron deficiency in Pakistan.

  17. RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Peter

    2009-05-15

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

  18. Hypolactasia: a common enzyme deficiency leading to lactose malabsorption and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Lember, Margus

    2012-01-01

    Adult‑type hypolactasia (lactase nonpersistence or lactase deficiency) is the most common enzyme deficiency leading to lactose intolerance and primary lactose malabsorption. Clinical presentation of the condition includes symptoms resulting from bacterial fermentation of undigested lactose in the colon, which gives rise to gas bloat, increased motility, and loose stools. Diagnosis of the disease is based on clinical symptoms, biochemical, functional, histochemical and genetic tests. Treatment includes dietary restrictions, namely, use of low‑lactose milk, in which lactose has been prehydrolyzed, or non‑lactose milk. PMID:23222197

  19. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  20. Inducible arginase 1 deficiency in mice leads to hyperargininemia and altered amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Mukherjee, Kamalika; St Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing "floxed" Arg1 mice with CreER(T2) mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  1. Four-Quasiparticle High-K States in Neutron-Deficient Lead and Polonium Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Xu, Furong

    2012-06-01

    Configuration-constrained potential energy surface calculations have been performed to investigate four-quasiparticle high-K configurations in neutron-deficient lead and polonium isotopes. A good agreement between the calculations and the experimental data has been found for the excitation energy of the observed Kπ = 19- state in 188Pb. Several lowly excited high-K states are predicted, and the large oblate deformation and low energy indicate high-K isomerism in these nuclei.

  2. Estrogen Deficiency Leads to Further Bone Loss in the Mandible of CKD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuchen; Sun, Ningyuan; Duan, Xiaobo; Xu, Xin; Zheng, Liwei; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Wang, Yongyue; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been regarded as a grave public health problem. Estrogen is a critical factor for both renal protection and bone remodeling. Our previous study demonstrated that CKD impairs the healing of titanium implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of estrogen deficiency on the mandibular bone in CKD mice. Methods Forty eleven-week-old female C57BL mice were used in this study. Uremia and estrogen deficiency were induced by 5/6 nephrectomy and ovariectomy (OVX), respectively. After 8 weeks, the mice were sacrificed, and their mandibles were collected for micro-CT analysis and histological examination. Results All the mice survived the experimental period. Serum measurements confirmed a significant increase in BUN in the CKD group that was further increased by OVX. OVX led to significant decreases in both the BV/TV and cortical thickness of the mandibular bone in CKD mice. Conclusion In summary, our findings indicate that estrogen deficiency leads to further mandibular bone loss in CKD mice. PMID:26886008

  3. GRK5 deficiency leads to susceptibility to intermittent hypoxia-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhakar; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Ding, XueFeng; Suo, William Z

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to cognitive impairment in about 25% patients, though it remains elusive what makes one more susceptible than the other to be cognitively impaired. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) deficiency is recently found to render subjects more susceptible to cognitive impairment triggered by over-expression of Swedish mutant ß-amyloid precursor protein. This study is to determine whether GRK5 deficiency also renders subjects more susceptible to the OSA-triggered cognitive impairment. Both wild type (WT) and GRK5 knockout (KO) mice were placed in conditions absence and presence of intermittent hypoxia (IH) with 8%/21% O2 90-s cycle for 8h a day for a month, and then followed by behavioral assessments with battery of tasks. We found that the selected IH condition only induced marginally abnormal behavior (slightly elevated anxiety with most others unchanged) in the WT mice but it caused significantly more behavioral deficits in the KO mice, ranging from elevated anxiety, impaired balancing coordination, and impaired short-term spatial memory. These results suggest that GRK5 deficiency indeed makes the mice more susceptible to wide range of behavioral impairments, including cognitive impairments. PMID:26778781

  4. PARP Inhibition Sensitizes to Low Dose-Rate Radiation TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Gene-Expressing and PTEN-Deficient Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Payel; Choudhary, Gaurav S.; Sharma, Arishya; Singh, Kamini; Heston, Warren D.; Ciezki, Jay; Klein, Eric A.; Almasan, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to genotoxic agents, such as irradiation produces DNA damage, the toxicity of which is augmented when the DNA repair is impaired. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors were found to be “synthetic lethal” in cells deficient in BRCA1 and BRCA2 that impair homologous recombination. However, since many tumors, including prostate cancer (PCa) rarely have on such mutations, there is considerable interest in finding alternative determinants of PARP inhibitor sensitivity. We evaluated the effectiveness of radiation in combination with the PARP inhibitor, rucaparib in PCa cells. The combination index for clonogenic survival following radiation and rucaparib treatments revealed synergistic interactions in a panel of PCa cell lines, being strongest for LNCaP and VCaP cells that express ETS gene fusion proteins. These findings correlated with synergistic interactions for senescence activation, as indicated by β--galactosidase staining. Absence of PTEN and presence of ETS gene fusion thus facilitated activation of senescence, which contributed to decreased clonogenic survival. Increased radiosensitivity in the presence of rucaparib was associated with persistent DNA breaks, as determined by χ-H2AX, p53BP1, and Rad51 foci. VCaP cells, which harbor the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion and PC3 cells that stably express a similar construct (fusion III) showed enhanced sensitivity towards rucaparib, which, in turn, increased the radiation response to a similar extent as the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441. Rucaparib radiosensitized PCa cells, with a clear benefit of low dose-rate radiation (LDR) administered over a longer period of time that caused enhanced DNA damage. LDR mimicking brachytherapy, which is used successfully in the clinic, was most effective when combined with rucaparib by inducing persistent DNA damage and senescence, leading to decreased clonogenic survival. This combination was most effective in the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG and in the absence of PTEN

  5. Influence of iron deficiency and lead treatment on behavior and cerebellar and hippocampal polyamine levels in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Adhami, V M; Husain, R; Husain, R; Seth, P K

    1996-08-01

    Effect of lead exposure and iron-deficiency on polyamine levels in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus was investigated in weaned rats. Lactating dams with one day old litters were given 0.2% (w/v) lead acetate in drinking water from postnatal day one to twenty one and maintained on an iron-deficient diet. There was an overall reduction of putrescine, spermidine and spermine in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus consequent to lead exposure and iron-deficiency alone. Lead exposure and iron-deficiency together did not potentiate the polyamine levels in neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum and hippocampus uniformly. However, the enhanced lowering of putrescine in the hippocampal glia, spermidine in cerebellar neuronal and spermine in both neuronal and glial cells of cerebellum during the critical stage of brain development may result in stunted neuronal growth and sprouting in lead exposed and iron-deficient animals. The behavioral alterations as observed in the present study may be due to impaired neuronal development resulting from a depressed polyamine pathway and which could be attributed to cognitive deficits in growing children. PMID:8895845

  6. Atrogin-1 Deficiency Leads to Myopathy and Heart Failure in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Anja; Kustermann, Monika; Bummer, Tiziana; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Sandri, Marco; Just, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Orchestrated protein synthesis and degradation is fundamental for proper cell function. In muscle, impairment of proteostasis often leads to severe cellular defects finally interfering with contractile function. Here, we analyze for the first time the role of Atrogin-1, a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase known to be involved in the regulation of protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome and the autophagy/lysosome systems, in the in vivo model system zebrafish (Danio rerio). We found that targeted inactivation of zebrafish Atrogin-1 leads to progressive impairment of heart and skeletal muscle function and disruption of muscle structure without affecting early cardiogenesis and skeletal muscle development. Autophagy is severely impaired in Atrogin-1-deficient zebrafish embryos resulting in the disturbance of the cytoarchitecture of cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle cells. These observations are consistent with molecular and ultrastructural findings in an Atrogin-1 knockout mouse and demonstrate that the zebrafish is a suitable vertebrate model to study the molecular mechanisms of Atrogin-1-mediated autophagic muscle pathologies and to screen for novel therapeutically active substances in high-throughput in vivo small compound screens (SCS). PMID:26840306

  7. Deficiency in the metabolite receptor SUCNR1 (GPR91) leads to outer retinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lapalme, Eric; Leboeuf, Dominique; Carbadillo, Jose; Rubic, Tina; Picard, Emilie; Mawambo, Gaelle; Tetreault, Nicolas; Joyal, Jean-Sebastien; Chemtob, Sylvain; Sennlaub, Florian; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Guimond, Martin; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a prominent cause of blindness in the Western world. To date, its molecular pathogenesis as well as the sequence of events leading to retinal degeneration remain largely ill-defined. While the invasion of choroidal neovasculature in the retina is the primary mechanism that precipitates loss of sight, an earlier dry form may accompany it. Here we provide the first evidence for the protective role of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE)-resident metabolite receptor, succinate receptor 1 (SUCNR1; G-Protein coupled Receptor-91 (GPR91), in preventing dry AMD-like lesions of the outer retina. Genetic analysis of 925 patients with geographic atrophy and 1199 AMD-free peers revealed an increased risk of developing geographic atrophy associated with intronic variants in the SUCNR1 gene. In mice, outer retinal expression of SUCNR1 is observed in the RPE as well as microglial cells and decreases progressively with age. Accordingly, Sucnr1−/− mice show signs of premature sub-retinal dystrophy with accumulation of oxidized-LDL, abnormal thickening of Bruch's membrane and a buildup of subretinal microglia. The accumulation of microglia in Sucnr1-deficient mice is likely triggered by the inefficient clearance of oxidized lipids by the RPE as bone marrow transfer of wild-type microglia into Sucnr1−/− mice did not salvage the patho-phenotype and systemic lipolysis was equivalent between wild-type and control mice. Our findings suggest that deficiency in SUCNR1 is a possible contributing factor to the pathogenesis of dry AMD and thus broaden our understanding of this clinically unmet need. PMID:23833031

  8. Dietary xenosterols lead to infertility and loss of abdominal adipose tissue in sterolin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Solca, Curzio; Tint, G Stephen; Patel, Shailendra B

    2013-02-01

    The investigation of the human disease sitosterolemia (MIM 210250) has shed light not only on the pathways by which dietary sterols may traffic but also on how the mammalian body rids itself of cholesterol and defends against xenosterols. Two genes, ABCG5 and ABCG8, located at the sitosterolemia locus, each encodes a membrane-bound ABC half-transporter and constitutes a functional unit whose activity has now been shown to account for biliary and intestinal sterol excretion. Knockout mice deficient in Abcg5 or Abcg8 recapitulate many of the phenotypic features of sitosterolemia. During the course of our studies to characterize these knockout mice, we noted that these mice, raised on normal rodent chow, exhibited infertility as well as loss of abdominal fat. We show that, although sitosterolemia does not lead to any structural defects or to any overt endocrine defects, fertility could be restored if xenosterols are specifically blocked from entry and that the loss of fat is also reversed by a variety of maneuvers that limit xenosterol accumulation. These studies show that xenosterols may have a significant biological impact on normal mammalian physiology and that the Abcg5 or Abcg8 knockout mouse model may prove useful in investigating the role of xenosterols on mammalian physiology. PMID:23180829

  9. Homozygous calreticulin mutations in patients with myelofibrosis lead to acquired myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Theocharides, Alexandre P A; Lundberg, Pontus; Lakkaraju, Asvin K K; Lysenko, Veronika; Myburgh, Renier; Aguzzi, Adriano; Skoda, Radek C; Manz, Markus G

    2016-06-23

    The pathogenesis of acquired myeloperoxidase (MPO) deficiency, a rare phenomenon observed in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), is unknown. MPO is a glycoprotein (GP) chaperoned by calreticulin (CALR) in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in CALR are frequently found in patients with myelofibrosis (MF) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) with nonmutated Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). We hypothesized that acquired MPO deficiency in MPN could be associated with the presence of CALR mutations. A cohort of 317 patients with MPN (142 polycythemia vera [PV], 94 ET, and 81 MF) was screened for MPO deficiency. MPO deficiency was observed in 6/81 MF patients (7.4%), but not in PV or ET patients. Susceptibility to infections had been documented in 2/6 (33%) MPO-deficient patients. Five out of 6 patients with MPO deficiency carried a homozygous CALR mutation and were also deficient in eosinophilic peroxidase (EPX). In contrast, 1 patient with MF, a JAK2-V617F mutation, and MPO deficiency, carried 2 previously reported MPO mutations and showed normal EPX activity. Patients with homozygous CALR mutations had reduced MPO protein, but normal MPO messenger RNA (mRNA) levels supporting a posttranscriptional defect in MPO production. Finally, we demonstrate in vitro that in the absence of CALR, immature MPO protein precursors are degraded in the proteasome. Therefore, 4 decades after the first description of acquired MPO deficiency in MPN, we provide the molecular correlate associated with this phenomenon and evidence that CALR mutations can affect the biosynthesis of GPs. PMID:27013444

  10. CX3CR1 deficiency leads to impairment of hippocampal cognitive function and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Justin, T. Rogers; Josh, M. Morganti; Adam, D. Bachstetter; Charles, E. Hudson; Melinda, M. Peters; Bethany, A. Grimmig; Edwin, J. Weeber; Paula, C. Bickford; Gemma, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    The protective/neurotoxic role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) and its receptor CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) signaling in neurodegenerative disease is an intricate and highly debated research topic and it is becoming even more complicated as new studies reveal discordant results. It appears that the CX3CL1/CX3CR1 axis plays a direct role in neurodegeneration and/or neuroprotection depending upon the CNS insult. However, all the above studies focused on the role of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in pathological conditions, ignoring the relevance of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling under physiological conditions. No approach to date has been taken to decipher the significance of defects in CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling in physiological condition. In the present study we used CX3CR1−/−, CX3CR1+/− and wild-type mice to investigate the physiological role of CX3CR1 receptor in cognition and synaptic plasticity. Our results demonstrated for the first time that mice lacking CX3CR1 receptor show contextual fear conditioning and Morris water maze deficits. CX3CR1 deficiency also affects motor learning. Importantly, mice lacking the receptor have a significant impairment in long term potentiation (LTP). Infusion with IL-1β receptor antagonist significantly reversed the deficit in cognitive function and impairment in LTP. Our results reveal that under physiological conditions, disruption in CX3CL1 signaling will lead to impairment in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity via increased action of IL-1β. PMID:22072675

  11. Manganese deficiency leads to genotype-specific changes in fluorescence induction kinetics and state transitions.

    PubMed

    Husted, Søren; Laursen, Kristian H; Hebbern, Christopher A; Schmidt, Sidsel B; Pedas, Pai; Haldrup, Anna; Jensen, Poul E

    2009-06-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotypes display a marked difference in their ability to tolerate growth at low manganese (Mn) concentrations, a phenomenon designated as differential Mn efficiency. Induction of Mn deficiency in two genotypes differing in Mn efficiency led to a decline in the quantum yield efficiency for both, although faster in the Mn-inefficient genotype. Leaf tissue and thylakoid Mn concentrations were reduced under Mn deficiency, but no difference between genotypes was observed and no visual Mn deficiency symptoms were developed. Analysis of the fluorescence induction kinetics revealed that in addition to the usual O-J-I-P steps, clear K and D steps were developed in the Mn-inefficient genotype under Mn deficiency. These marked changes indicated damages to photosystem II (PSII). This was further substantiated by state transition measurements, indicating that the ability of plants to redistribute excitation energy was reduced. The percentage change in state transitions for control plants with normal Mn supply of both genotypes was 9% to 11%. However, in Mn-deficient leaves of the Mn-inefficient genotypes, state transitions were reduced to less than 1%, whereas no change was observed for the Mn-efficient genotypes. Immunoblotting and the chlorophyll a/b ratio confirmed that Mn deficiency in general resulted in a significant reduction in abundance of PSII reaction centers relative to the peripheral antenna. In addition, PSII appeared to be significantly more affected by Mn limitation than PSI. However, the striking genotypic differences observed in Mn-deficient plants, when analyzing state transitions and fluorescence induction kinetics, could not be correlated with specific changes in photosystem proteins. Thus, there is no simple linkage between protein expression and the differential reduction in state transition and fluorescence induction kinetics observed for the genotypes under Mn deficiency. PMID:19369593

  12. Acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) deficiency leads to abnormal microglia behavior and disturbed retinal function

    SciTech Connect

    Dannhausen, Katharina; Karlstetter, Marcus; Caramoy, Albert; Volz, Cornelia; Jägle, Herbert; Liebisch, Gerhard; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Langmann, Thomas

    2015-08-21

    Mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) coding gene sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) cause Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type A and B. Sphingomyelin storage in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system cause hepatosplenomegaly and severe neurodegeneration in the brain of NPD patients. However, the effects of aSMase deficiency on retinal structure and microglial behavior have not been addressed in detail yet. Here, we demonstrate that retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice did not display overt neuronal degeneration but showed significantly reduced scotopic and photopic responses in electroretinography. In vivo fundus imaging of aSMase{sup −/−} mice showed many hyperreflective spots and staining for the retinal microglia marker Iba1 revealed massive proliferation of retinal microglia that had significantly enlarged somata. Nile red staining detected prominent phospholipid inclusions in microglia and lipid analysis showed significantly increased sphingomyelin levels in retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, the aSMase-deficient mouse is the first example in which microglial lipid inclusions are directly related to a loss of retinal function. - Highlights: • aSMase-deficient mice show impaired retinal function and reactive microgliosis. • aSMase-deficient microglia express pro-inflammatory transcripts. • aSMase-deficient microglia proliferate and have increased cell body size. • In vivo imaging shows hyperreflective spots in the fundus of aSMase-deficient mice. • aSMase-deficient microglia accumulate sphingolipid-rich intracellular deposits.

  13. Chelation in metal intoxication XXI: chelation in lead intoxication during vitamin B complex deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    The vitamin B-complex deficiency increases the vulnerability to neuro- and systemic toxicity of Pb in young rats. Thus, the nutritional status of vitamins like that of protein or minerals seems to influence the etiology of Pb toxicity and may be expected to affect the response toward Pb chelators. 2,3 dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylene-diamine triacetic acid (HEDTA) have been found to be effective antidotes to Pb intoxication. In the present study, these selective metal chelating agents were compared for their ability to reduce the body burden of Pb and restore the altered biochemical parameters in young developing Pb intoxicated rats maintained on normal or vitamin B-complex deficient diet. The investigation was aimed to suggest suitable prophylaxis of Pb poisoning prevalent among children who may also be suffering from vitamin deficiency in developing and poor countries.

  14. Siglec-G Deficiency Leads to Autoimmunity in Aging C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jennifer; Lunz, Benjamin; Schwab, Inessa; Acs, Andreas; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Daniel, Christoph; Nitschke, Lars

    2015-07-01

    Siglec-G, a member of the sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin (Siglec) family, is expressed on B cell and dendritic cell surfaces. It acts as an inhibitory coreceptor and modulates B cell activation, especially on B1 cells, as Siglec-G-deficient mice show mainly a B1 cell-restricted phenotype resulting in increased B1 cell numbers. Although higher B1 cell numbers are discussed to be associated with autoimmunity, loss of Siglec-G does not result in autoimmune disease in BALB/c mice. However, there is evidence from Siglec-G × CD22 double-deficient mice and Siglec-G(-/-) mice on an autoimmune-prone MRL/lpr background that Siglec-G is important to maintain tolerance in B cells. In this study, we analyzed the role of Siglec-G in induction and maintenance of B cell tolerance on C57BL/6 background and in the FcγRIIb-deficient background. We find that aging Siglec-G-deficient and Siglec-G × FcγRIIb double-deficient mice develop an autoimmune phenotype with elevated autoantibody levels and mild glomerulonephritis. Aging Siglec-G-deficient mice have elevated numbers of plasma cells and germinal center B cells, as well as a higher number of activated CD4 T cells, which likely all contribute to autoantibody production. Additional loss of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb in Siglec-G(-/-) mice does not result in exacerbation of disease. These results indicate that Siglec-G is important to maintain tolerance in B cells and prevent autoimmunity. PMID:25987743

  15. Deficiency of NPGPx, an oxidative stress sensor, leads to obesity in mice and human

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Yu-Hsiang; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lee, Wei-Jei; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Chen, Yen-Hui; Chen, Yet-Ran; Wei, Pei-Chi; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Elevated oxidative stress is closely associated with obesity. Emerging evidence shows that instead of being a consequence of obesity, oxidative stress may also contribute to fat formation. Nonselenocysteine-containing phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (NPGPx) is a conserved oxidative stress sensor/transducer and deficiency of NPGPx causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this communication, we show that NPGPx was highly expressed in preadipocytes of adipose tissue. Deficiency of NPGPx promoted preadipocytes to differentiate to adipocytes via ROS-dependent dimerization of protein kinase A regulatory subunits and activation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ). This enhanced adipogenesis was alleviated by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Consistently, NPGPx-deficient mice exhibited markedly increased fat mass and adipocyte hypertrophy, while treatment with NAC ablated these phenotypes. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human NPGPx gene, which correlated with lower NPGPx expression level in adipose tissue, were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) in several independent human populations. These results indicate that NPGPx protects against fat accumulation in mice and human via modulating ROS, and highlight the importance of targeting redox homeostasis in obesity management. Deficiency of the glutathione peroxidase NPGPx increases ROS levels in preadipocytes and promotes adipocyte differentiation via increasing oxidative stress and consequent increased fat mass and adipocyte hypertrophy. PMID:23828861

  16. Alteration in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated epigenetic regulation leads to Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhang, Ying; Hart, Ronald P; Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl; Li, Jiali

    2015-12-01

    A long-standing mystery surrounding ataxia-telangiectasia is why it is mainly cerebellar neurons, Purkinje cells in particular, that appear vulnerable to ATM deficiency. Here we present data showing that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a newly recognized epigenetic marker found at high levels in neurons, is substantially reduced in human ataxia-telangiectasia and Atm(-/-) mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. We further show that TET1, an enzyme that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5hmC, responds to DNA damage and manipulation of TET1 activity directly affects the DNA damage signalling and ATM-deficient neuronal cell cycle re-entry and death. Quantitative genome-wide analysis of 5hmC-containing sequences shows that in ATM deficiency there is a cerebellum- and Purkinje cell-specific shift in 5hmC enrichment in both regulatory elements and repeated sequences. Finally, we verify that TET1-mediated 5hmC production is linked to the degenerative process of Purkinje cells and behavioural deficits in Atm(-/-) mice. Taken together, the selective loss of 5hmC plays a critical role in driving Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency. PMID:26510954

  17. Pyrimidine Pool Disequilibrium Induced by a Cytidine Deaminase Deficiency Inhibits PARP-1 Activity, Leading to the Under Replication of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gemble, Simon; Ahuja, Akshay; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Dairou, Julien; Biard, Denis S. F.; Lambert, Sarah; Lopes, Massimo; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2015-01-01

    Genome stability is jeopardized by imbalances of the dNTP pool; such imbalances affect the rate of fork progression. For example, cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency leads to an excess of dCTP, slowing the replication fork. We describe here a novel mechanism by which pyrimidine pool disequilibrium compromises the completion of replication and chromosome segregation: the intracellular accumulation of dCTP inhibits PARP-1 activity. CDA deficiency results in incomplete DNA replication when cells enter mitosis, leading to the formation of ultrafine anaphase bridges between sister-chromatids at “difficult-to-replicate” sites such as centromeres and fragile sites. Using molecular combing, electron microscopy and a sensitive assay involving cell imaging to quantify steady-state PAR levels, we found that DNA replication was unsuccessful due to the partial inhibition of basal PARP-1 activity, rather than slower fork speed. The stimulation of PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells restores replication and, thus, chromosome segregation. Moreover, increasing intracellular dCTP levels generates under-replication-induced sister-chromatid bridges as efficiently as PARP-1 knockdown. These results have direct implications for Bloom syndrome (BS), a rare genetic disease combining susceptibility to cancer and genomic instability. BS results from mutation of the BLM gene, encoding BLM, a RecQ 3’-5’ DNA helicase, a deficiency of which leads to CDA downregulation. BS cells thus have a CDA defect, resulting in a high frequency of ultrafine anaphase bridges due entirely to dCTP-dependent PARP-1 inhibition and independent of BLM status. Our study describes previously unknown pathological consequences of the distortion of dNTP pools and reveals an unexpected role for PARP-1 in preventing DNA under-replication and chromosome segregation defects. PMID:26181065

  18. Msh2 deficiency leads to chromosomal abnormalities, centrosome amplification, and telomere capping defect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2006-01-01

    Msh2 is a key mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene and mutations or deficiencies in mammalian Msh2 gene result in microsatellite instability (MSI+) and the development of cancer. Here, we report that primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in the murine MMR gene Msh2 (Msh2-/-) showed a significant increase in chromosome aneuploidy, centrosome amplification, and defective mitotic spindle organization and unequal chromosome segregation. Although Msh2-/- mouse tissues or primary MEFs had no apparent change in telomerase activity, telomere length, or recombination at telomeres, Msh2-/- MEFs showed an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA. These data suggest that MSH2 helps to maintain genomic stability through the regulation of the centrosome and normal telomere capping in vivo and that defects in MMR can contribute to oncogenesis through multiple pathways.

  19. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L.; Molinari, Beatriz; Palmieri, Mónica; Kreiner, Andrés; Valda, Alejandro; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

  20. Zinc Deficiency Leads to Lipofuscin Accumulation in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium of Pigmented Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinou, Despina; Eibl, Oliver; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with lipofuscin accumulation whereas the content of melanosomes decreases. Melanosomes are the main storage of zinc in the pigmented tissues. Since the elderly population, as the most affected group for AMD, is prone to zinc deficit, we investigated the chemical and ultrastructural effects of zinc deficiency in pigmented rat eyes after a six-month zinc penury diet. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult Long Evans (LE) rats were investigated. The control animals were fed with a normal alimentation whereas the zinc-deficiency rats (ZD-LE) were fed with a zinc deficient diet for six months. Quantitative Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis yielded the zinc mole fractions of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The lateral resolution of the analysis was 100 nm. The zinc mole fractions of melanosomes were significantly smaller in the RPE of ZD-LE rats as compared to the LE control rats. Light, fluorescence and electron microscopy, as well as immunohistochemistry were performed. The numbers of lipofuscin granules in the RPE and of infiltrated cells (Ø>3 µm) found in the choroid were quantified. The number of lipofuscin granules significantly increased in ZD-LE as compared to control rats. Infiltrated cells bigger than 3 µm were only detected in the choroid of ZD-LE animals. Moreover, the thickness of the Bruch's membrane of ZD-LE rats varied between 0.4–3 µm and thin, rangy ED1 positive macrophages were found attached at these sites of Bruch's membrane or even inside it. Conclusions/Significance In pigmented rats, zinc deficiency yielded an accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE and of large pigmented macrophages in the choroids as well as the appearance of thin, rangy macrophages at Bruch's membrane. Moreover, we showed that a zinc diet reduced the zinc mole fraction of melanosomes in the RPE and modulated the thickness of the Bruch's membrane. PMID:22216222

  1. p63 deficiency activates a program of cellular senescence and leads to accelerated aging

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, William M.; Wu, Ying; Vogel, Hannes; Guo, Xuecui; Lowe, Scott W.; Mills, Alea A.

    2005-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a key role in organismal aging. A cellular mechanism postulated to drive the aging process is cellular senescence, mediated in part by p53. Although senescent cells accumulate in elderly individuals, most studies have relied on correlating in vitro senescence assays with in vivo phenotypes of aging. Here, using two different mouse models in which the p53-related protein p63 is compromised, we demonstrate that cellular senescence and organismal aging are intimately linked and that these processes are mediated by p63 loss. We found that p63+/- mice have a shortened life span and display features of accelerated aging. Both germline and somatically induced p63 deficiency activates widespread cellular senescence with enhanced expression of senescent markers SA-β-gal, PML, and p16INK4a. Using an inducible tissue-specific p63 conditional model, we further show that p63 deficiency induces cellular senescence and causes accelerated aging phenotypes in the adult. Our results thus suggest a causative link between cellular senescence and aging in vivo, and demonstrate that p63 deficiency accelerates this process. PMID:16107615

  2. Deficient DNA damage signaling leads to chemoresistance to cisplatin in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam J; Oakley, Gregory G; Peng, Aimin

    2012-11-01

    Activation of the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is an important determinant of cell sensitivity to cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic drugs that eliminate tumor cells through induction of DNA damage. It is therefore important to investigate whether alterations of the DNA damage-signaling pathway confer chemoresistance in cancer cells and whether pharmacologic manipulation of the DDR pathway can resensitize these cells to cancer therapy. In a panel of oral/laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines, we observed deficiencies in DNA damage signaling in correlation with cisplatin resistance, but not with DNA repair. These deficiencies are consistent with reduced expression of components of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent signaling pathway and, in particular, strong upregulation of Wip1, a negative regulator of the ATM pathway. Wip1 knockdown or inhibition enhanced DNA damage signaling and resensitized oral SCC cells to cisplatin. In contrast to the previously reported involvement of Wip1 in cancer, Wip1 upregulation and function in these SCC cells is independent of p53. Finally, using xenograft tumor models, we showed that Wip1 upregulation promotes tumorigenesis and its inhibition improves the tumor response to cisplatin. Thus, this study reveals that chemoresistance in oral SCCs is partially attributed to deficiencies in DNA damage signaling, and Wip1 is an effective drug target for enhanced cancer therapy. PMID:22973056

  3. Deficient DNA damage signaling leads to chemoresistance to cisplatin in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam J.; Oakley, Gregory G.; Peng, Aimin

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is an important determinant of cell sensitivity to cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic drugs that eliminate tumor cells through induction of DNA damage. It is therefore important to investigate whether alterations of the DNA damage signaling pathway confer chemoresistance in cancer cells, and whether pharmacological manipulation of the DDR pathway can re-sensitize these cells to cancer therapy. In a panel of oral/laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines, we observed deficiencies in DNA damage signaling in correlation with cisplatin-resistance, but not with DNA repair. These deficiencies are consistent with reduced expression of components of the ATM-dependent signaling pathway and, in particular, strong up-regulation of Wip1, a negative regulator of the ATM pathway. Wip1 knockdown or inhibition enhanced DNA damage signaling and re-sensitized oral SCC cells to cisplatin. In contrast to the previously reported involvement of Wip1 in cancer, Wip1 up-regulation and function in these SCC cells is independent of p53. Finally, using xenograft tumor models, we demonstrated that Wip1 up-regulation promotes tumorigenesis and its inhibition improves the tumor response to cisplatin. Thus, this study reveals that chemoresistance in oral SCCs is partially attributed to deficiencies in DNA damage signaling, and Wip1 is an effective drug target for enhanced cancer therapy. PMID:22973056

  4. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  5. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Samannodi, Mohammed; Zhao, Andrew; Nemshah, Yaser; Shiley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  6. Renal Papillary Necrosis Caused by Protein C Deficiency Leading to Recurrent Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Olorunnisomo, Vincent; Fowle, Evan James; Modica, Ippolito; Meisels, Ira; Gupta, Mantu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A patient with history of a solitary functioning kidney and protein C deficiency (PCD) presented with recurrent severe hydronephrosis causing acute kidney injury upon chronic kidney disease. Work-up with endoscopic evaluation revealed renal papillary necrosis (RPN) and sloughed renal papillae to be the true cause of the recurrent obstruction. Pathologic evaluation of the sloughed tissue confirmed the diagnosis of RPN. This is the first case reported in the literature illustrating the unique presentation of RPN in the setting of PCD. PMID:27579411

  7. Renal Papillary Necrosis Caused by Protein C Deficiency Leading to Recurrent Hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Rohit Kumar; Olorunnisomo, Vincent; Fowle, Evan James; Modica, Ippolito; Meisels, Ira; Gupta, Mantu

    2016-01-01

    A patient with history of a solitary functioning kidney and protein C deficiency (PCD) presented with recurrent severe hydronephrosis causing acute kidney injury upon chronic kidney disease. Work-up with endoscopic evaluation revealed renal papillary necrosis (RPN) and sloughed renal papillae to be the true cause of the recurrent obstruction. Pathologic evaluation of the sloughed tissue confirmed the diagnosis of RPN. This is the first case reported in the literature illustrating the unique presentation of RPN in the setting of PCD. PMID:27579411

  8. Human USP18 deficiency underlies type 1 interferonopathy leading to severe pseudo-TORCH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meuwissen, Marije E C; Schot, Rachel; Buta, Sofija; Oudesluijs, Grétel; Tinschert, Sigrid; Speer, Scott D; Li, Zhi; van Unen, Leontine; Heijsman, Daphne; Goldmann, Tobias; Lequin, Maarten H; Kros, Johan M; Stam, Wendy; Hermann, Mark; Willemsen, Rob; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Martin-Fernandez, Marta; de Coo, Irenaeus; Dudink, Jeroen; de Vries, Femke A T; Bertoli Avella, Aida; Prinz, Marco; Crow, Yanick J; Verheijen, Frans W; Pellegrini, Sandra; Bogunovic, Dusan; Mancini, Grazia M S

    2016-06-27

    Pseudo-TORCH syndrome (PTS) is characterized by microcephaly, enlarged ventricles, cerebral calcification, and, occasionally, by systemic features at birth resembling the sequelae of congenital infection but in the absence of an infectious agent. Genetic defects resulting in activation of type 1 interferon (IFN) responses have been documented to cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, which is a cause of PTS. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 18 (USP18) is a key negative regulator of type I IFN signaling. In this study, we identified loss-of-function recessive mutations of USP18 in five PTS patients from two unrelated families. Ex vivo brain autopsy material demonstrated innate immune inflammation with calcification and polymicrogyria. In vitro, patient fibroblasts displayed severely enhanced IFN-induced inflammation, which was completely rescued by lentiviral transduction of USP18. These findings add USP18 deficiency to the list of genetic disorders collectively termed type I interferonopathies. Moreover, USP18 deficiency represents the first genetic disorder of PTS caused by dysregulation of the response to type I IFNs. Therapeutically, this places USP18 as a promising target not only for genetic but also acquired IFN-mediated CNS disorders. PMID:27325888

  9. Orai1 deficiency leads to heart failure and skeletal myopathy in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Völkers, Mirko; Dolatabadi, Nima; Gude, Natalie; Most, Patrick; Sussman, Mark A; Hassel, David

    2012-01-15

    Mutations in the store-operated Ca²⁺ entry pore protein ORAI1 have been reported to cause myopathies in human patients but the mechanism involved is not known. Cardiomyocytes express ORAI1 but its role in heart function is also unknown. Using reverse genetics in zebrafish, we demonstrated that inactivation of the highly conserved zebrafish orthologue of ORAI1 resulted in severe heart failure, reduced ventricular systolic function, bradycardia and skeletal muscle weakness. Electron microscopy of Orai1-deficient myocytes revealed progressive skeletal muscle instability with loss of myofiber integrity and ultrastructural abnormalities of the z-disc in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Isolated Orai1-deficient cardiomyocytes showed loss of the calcineurin-associated protein calsarcin from the z-discs. Furthermore, we found mechanosignal transduction was affected in Orai1-depleted hearts, indicating an essential role for ORAI1 in establishing the cardiac signaling transduction machinery at the z-disc. Our findings identify ORAI1 as an important regulator of cardiac and skeletal muscle function and provide evidence linking ORAI1-mediated calcium signaling to sarcomere integrity and cardiomyocyte function. PMID:22302996

  10. GRK5 Deficiency Leads to Selective Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neuronal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    He, Minchao; Singh, Prabhakar; Cheng, Shaowu; Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Wei; Ding, XueFeng; Li, Longxuan; Liu, Jun; Premont, Richard T.; Morgan, Dave; Burns, Jeffery M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Suo, William Z.

    2016-01-01

    Why certain diseases primarily affect one specific neuronal subtype rather than another is a puzzle whose solution underlies the development of specific therapies. Selective basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurodegeneration participates in cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the first recapitulation of the selective BFC neuronal loss that is typical of human AD in a mouse model termed GAP. We created GAP mice by crossing Tg2576 mice that over-express the Swedish mutant human β-amyloid precursor protein gene with G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) knockout mice. This doubly defective mouse displayed significant BFC neuronal loss at 18 months of age, which was not observed in either of the singly defective parent strains or in the wild type. Along with other supporting evidence, we propose that GRK5 deficiency selectively renders BFC neurons more vulnerable to degeneration. PMID:27193825

  11. Human Surfactant Protein A2 Gene Mutations Impair Dimmer/Trimer Assembly Leading to Deficiency in Protein Sialylation and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Haitao; Li, Hui; Yang, Wenbing; Pan, Bing; Huang, Guowei; Lin, Guangyu; Ma, Lian; Willard, Belinda; Gu, Jiang; Zheng, Lemin; Wang, Yongyu

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) plays an essential role in surfactant metabolism and lung host defense. SP-A2 mutations in the carbohydrate recognition domain have been related to familial pulmonary fibrosis and can lead to a recombinant protein secretion deficiency in vitro. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism of protein secretion deficiency and the subsequent biological effects in CHO-K1 cells expressing both wild-type and several different mutant forms of SP-A2. We demonstrate that the SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the formation of dimmer/trimer SP-A2 which contributes to the protein secretion defect. A deficiency in sialylation, but not N-linked glycosylation, is critical to the observed dimmer/trimer impairment-induced secretion defect. Furthermore, both mutant forms accumulate in the ER and form NP-40-insoluble aggregates. In addition, the soluble mutant SP-A2 could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway but not the lysosome or autophagy pathway. Intriguingly, 4-phenylbutyrate acid (4-PBA), a chemical chaperone, alleviates aggregate formation and partially rescued the protein secretion of SP-A2 mutants. In conclusion, SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the dimmer/trimer assembly, which contributes to the protein sialylation and secretion deficiency. The intracellular protein mutants could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway and also formed aggregates. The treatment of the cells with 4-PBA resulted in reduced aggregation and rescued the secretion of mutant SP-A2. PMID:23056344

  12. Uterine Dysfunction in Biglycan and Decorin Deficient Mice Leads to Dystocia during Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiping; Aron, Abraham W.; Macksoud, Elyse E.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Hai, Chi-Ming; Lechner, Beatrice E.

    2012-01-01

    Cesarean birth rates are rising. Uterine dysfunction, the exact mechanism of which is unknown, is a common indication for Cesarean delivery. Biglycan and decorin are two small leucine-rich proteoglycans expressed in the extracellular matrix of reproductive tissues and muscle. Mice deficient in biglycan display a mild muscular dystrophy, and, along with mice deficient in decorin, are models of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a connective tissue anomaly associated with uterine rupture. As a variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is caused by a genetic mutation resulting in abnormal biglycan and decorin secretion, we hypothesized that biglycan and decorin play a role in uterine function. Thus, we assessed wild-type, biglycan, decorin and double knockout pregnancies for timing of birth and uterine function. Uteri were harvested at embryonic days 12, 15 and 18. Nonpregnant uterine samples of the same genotypes were assessed for tissue failure rate and spontaneous and oxytocin-induced contractility. We discovered that biglycan/decorin mixed double-knockout dams displayed dystocia, were at increased risk of delayed labor onset, and showed increased tissue failure in a predominantly decorin-dependent manner. In vitro spontaneous uterine contractile amplitude and oxytocin-induced contractile force were decreased in all biglycan and decorin knockout genotypes compared to wild-type. Notably, we found no significant compensation between biglycan and decorin using quantitative real time PCR or immunohistochemistry. We conclude that the biglycan/decorin mixed double knockout mouse is a model of dystocia and delayed labor onset. Moreover, decorin is necessary for uterine function in a dose-dependent manner, while biglycan exhibits partial compensatory mechanisms in vivo. Thus, this model is poised for use as a model for testing novel targets for preventive or therapeutic manipulation of uterine dysfunction. PMID:22253749

  13. tPA Deficiency in Mice Leads to Rearrangement in the Cerebrovascular Tree and Cerebroventricular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Stefanitsch, Christina; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa E.; Olverling, Anna; Nilsson, Ingrid; Fredriksson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is used as a thrombolytic agent in the management of ischemic stroke, but concerns for hemorrhagic conversion greatly limits the number of patients that receive this treatment. It has been suggested that the bleeding complications associated with thrombolytic tPA may be due to unanticipated roles of tPA in the brain. Recent work has suggested tPA regulation of neurovascular barrier integrity, mediated via platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-C/PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα) signaling, as a possible molecular mechanism affecting the outcome of stroke. To better understand the role of tPA in neurovascular regulation we conducted a detailed analysis of the cerebrovasculature in brains from adult tPA deficient (tPA−/−) mice. Our analysis demonstrates that life-long deficiency of tPA is associated with rearrangements in the cerebrovascular tree, including a reduction in the number of vascular smooth-muscle cell covered, large diameter, vessels and a decrease in vessel-associated PDGFRα expression as compared to wild-type (WT) littermate controls. In addition, we found that ablation of tPA results in an increased number of ERG-positive endothelial cells and increased junctional localization of the tight junction protein ZO1. This is intriguing since ERG is an endothelial transcription factor implicated in regulation of vascular integrity. Based on these results, we propose that the protection of barrier properties seen utilizing these tPA−/− mice might be due, at least in part, to these cerebrovascular rearrangements. In addition, we found that tPA−/− mice displayed mild cerebral ventricular malformations, a feature previously associated with ablation of PDGF-C, thereby providing an in vivo link between tPA and PDGF signaling in central nervous system (CNS) development. Taken together, the data presented here will advance our understanding of the role of tPA within the CNS and in regulation of

  14. FGF23 Deficiency Leads to Mixed Hearing Loss and Middle Ear Malformation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lysaght, Andrew C.; Yuan, Quan; Fan, Yi; Kalwani, Neil; Caruso, Paul; Cunnane, MaryBeth; Lanske, Beate; Stanković, Konstantina M.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating hormone important in phosphate homeostasis. Abnormal serum levels of FGF23 result in systemic pathologies in humans and mice, including renal phosphate wasting diseases and hyperphosphatemia. We sought to uncover the role FGF23 plays in the auditory system due to shared molecular mechanisms and genetic pathways between ear and kidney development, the critical roles multiple FGFs play in auditory development and the known hearing phenotype in mice deficient in klotho (KL), a critical co-factor for FGF23 signaling. Using functional assessments of hearing, we demonstrate that Fgf mice are profoundly deaf. Fgf mice have moderate hearing loss above 20 kHz, consistent with mixed conductive and sensorineural pathology of both middle and inner ear origin. Histology and high-voltage X-ray computed tomography of Fgf mice demonstrate dysplastic bulla and ossicles; Fgf mice have near-normal morphology. The cochleae of mutant mice appear nearly normal on gross and microscopic inspection. In wild type mice, FGF23 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the cochlea. Measurements from Fgf mice do not match the auditory phenotype of Kl−/− mice, suggesting that loss of FGF23 activity impacts the auditory system via mechanisms at least partially independent of KL. Given the extensive middle ear malformations and the overlap of initiation of FGF23 activity and Eustachian tube development, this work suggests a possible role for FGF23 in otitis media. PMID:25243481

  15. Claudin-16 Deficiency Impairs Tight Junction Function in Ameloblasts, Leading to Abnormal Enamel Formation.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Claire; Courson, Frédéric; Wu, Yong; Khaddam, Mayssam; Salmon, Benjamin; Ribes, Sandy; Thumfart, Julia; Yamaguti, Paulo M; Rochefort, Gael Y; Figueres, Marie-Lucile; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Garcia-Castaño, Alejandro; Vallée, Benoit; Le Denmat, Dominique; Baroukh, Brigitte; Guilbert, Thomas; Schmitt, Alain; Massé, Jean-Marc; Bazin, Dominique; Lorenz, Georg; Morawietz, Maria; Hou, Jianghui; Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Manzanares, Maria Cristina; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Talmud, Deborah; Demontis, Renato; Neves, Francisco; Zenaty, Delphine; Berdal, Ariane; Kiesow, Andreas; Petzold, Matthias; Menashi, Suzanne; Linglart, Agnes; Acevedo, Ana Carolina; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Müller, Dominik; Houillier, Pascal; Chaussain, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Claudin-16 protein (CLDN16) is a component of tight junctions (TJ) with a restrictive distribution so far demonstrated mainly in the kidney. Here, we demonstrate the expression of CLDN16 also in the tooth germ and show that claudin-16 gene (CLDN16) mutations result in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the 5 studied patients with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC). To investigate the role of CLDN16 in tooth formation, we studied a murine model of FHHNC and showed that CLDN16 deficiency led to altered secretory ameloblast TJ structure, lowering of extracellular pH in the forming enamel matrix, and abnormal enamel matrix protein processing, resulting in an enamel phenotype closely resembling human AI. This study unravels an association of FHHNC owing to CLDN16 mutations with AI, which is directly related to the loss of function of CLDN16 during amelogenesis. Overall, this study indicates for the first time the importance of a TJ protein in tooth formation and underlines the need to establish a specific dental follow-up for these patients. PMID:26426912

  16. Astroglial glutamate transporter deficiency increases synaptic excitability and leads to pathological repetitive behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Aida, Tomomi; Yoshida, Junichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanimura, Asami; Iino, Yusuke; Soma, Miho; Bai, Ning; Ito, Yukiko; Cui, Wanpeng; Aizawa, Hidenori; Yanagisawa, Michiko; Nagai, Terumi; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kano, Masanobu; Götz, Magdalena; Hirase, Hajime; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2015-06-01

    An increase in the ratio of cellular excitation to inhibition (E/I ratio) has been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's syndrome (TS). A proper E/I ratio is achieved via factors expressed in neuron and glia. In astrocytes, the glutamate transporter GLT1 is critical for regulating an E/I ratio. However, the role of GLT1 dysfunction in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders remains unknown because mice with a complete deficiency of GLT1 exhibited seizures and premature death. Here, we show that astrocyte-specific GLT1 inducible knockout (GLAST(CreERT2/+)/GLT1(flox/flox), iKO) mice exhibit pathological repetitive behaviors including excessive and injurious levels of self-grooming and tic-like head shakes. Electrophysiological studies reveal that excitatory transmission at corticostriatal synapse is normal in a basal state but is increased after repetitive stimulation. Furthermore, treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine ameliorated the pathological repetitive behaviors in iKO mice. These results suggest that astroglial GLT1 has a critical role in controlling the synaptic efficacy at corticostriatal synapses and its dysfunction causes pathological repetitive behaviors. PMID:25662838

  17. Astroglial Glutamate Transporter Deficiency Increases Synaptic Excitability and Leads to Pathological Repetitive Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Tomomi; Yoshida, Junichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanimura, Asami; Iino, Yusuke; Soma, Miho; Bai, Ning; Ito, Yukiko; Cui, Wanpeng; Aizawa, Hidenori; Yanagisawa, Michiko; Nagai, Terumi; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kano, Masanobu; Götz, Magdalena; Hirase, Hajime; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the ratio of cellular excitation to inhibition (E/I ratio) has been proposed to underlie the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's syndrome (TS). A proper E/I ratio is achieved via factors expressed in neuron and glia. In astrocytes, the glutamate transporter GLT1 is critical for regulating an E/I ratio. However, the role of GLT1 dysfunction in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders remains unknown because mice with a complete deficiency of GLT1 exhibited seizures and premature death. Here, we show that astrocyte-specific GLT1 inducible knockout (GLASTCreERT2/+/GLT1flox/flox, iKO) mice exhibit pathological repetitive behaviors including excessive and injurious levels of self-grooming and tic-like head shakes. Electrophysiological studies reveal that excitatory transmission at corticostriatal synapse is normal in a basal state but is increased after repetitive stimulation. Furthermore, treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine ameliorated the pathological repetitive behaviors in iKO mice. These results suggest that astroglial GLT1 has a critical role in controlling the synaptic efficacy at corticostriatal synapses and its dysfunction causes pathological repetitive behaviors. PMID:25662838

  18. Vav3 proto-oncogene deficiency leads to sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiovascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Sevilla, María A; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; de Álava, Enrique; Montero, María J; López-Novoa, José M; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2007-01-01

    Although much is known about environmental factors that predispose individuals to hypertension and cardiovascular disease, little information is available regarding the genetic and signaling events involved1-3. Indeed, few genes associated with the progression of these pathologies have been discovered despite intensive research in animal models and human populations1-3. Here we identify Vav3, a GDP-GTP exchange factor that stimulates Rho and Rac GTPases4, as an essential factor regulating the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system.Vav3-deficient mice exhibited tachycardia, systemic arterial hypertension and extensive cardiovascular remodeling. These mice also showed hyperactivity of sympathetic neurons from the time of birth. The high catecholamine levels associated with this condition led to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, increased levels of kidney-related hormones and the progressive loss of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with drugs targeting sympathetic and renin-angiotensin responses confirmed the causative role and hierarchy of these events in the development of theVav3-null mouse phenotype. These observations uncover the crucial role of Vav3 in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and cardiovascular physiology, and reveal a signaling pathway that could be involved in the pathophysiology of human disease states involving tachycardia and sympathetic hyperactivity with unknown etiologies2,5,6. PMID:16767097

  19. Mutations of protocadherin 19 in female epilepsy (PCDH19-FE) lead to allopregnanolone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chuan; Shard, Chloe; Ranieri, Enzo; Hynes, Kim; Pham, Duyen H; Leach, Damian; Buchanan, Grant; Corbett, Mark; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Kumar, Raman; Douglas, Evelyn; Nguyen, Lam S; Mcmahon, Jacinta; Sadleir, Lynette; Specchio, Nicola; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Moller, Rikke S; Depienne, Christel; Haan, Eric; Thomas, Paul Q; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gecz, Jozef

    2015-09-15

    Protocadherin 19 (PCDH19) female limited epilepsy (PCDH19-FE; also known as epilepsy and mental retardation limited to females, EFMR; MIM300088) is an infantile onset epilepsy syndrome with or without intellectual disability (ID) and autism. We investigated transcriptomes of PCDH19-FE female and control primary skin fibroblasts, which are endowed to metabolize neurosteroid hormones. We identified a set of 94 significantly dysregulated genes in PCDH19-FE females. Intriguingly, 43 of the 94 genes (45.7%) showed gender-biased expression; enrichment of such genes was highly significant (P = 2.51E-47, two-tailed Fisher exact test). We further investigated the AKR1C1-3 genes, which encode crucial steroid hormone-metabolizing enzymes whose key products include allopregnanolone and estradiol. Both mRNA and protein levels of AKR1C3 were significantly decreased in PCDH19-FE patients. In agreement with this, the blood levels of allopregnanolone were also (P < 0.01) reduced. In conclusion, we show that the deficiency of neurosteroid allopregnanolone, one of the most potent GABA receptor modulators, may contribute to PCDH19-FE. Overall our findings provide evidence for a role of neurosteroids in epilepsy, ID and autism and create realistic opportunities for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:26123493

  20. Creatine transporter deficiency leads to increased whole body and cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Perna, Marla K; Kokenge, Amanda N; Miles, Keila N; Udobi, Kenea C; Clark, Joseph F; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J; Khuchua, Zaza; Skelton, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Creatine (Cr) is a guanidino compound required for rapid replenishment of ATP in cells with a high-energy demand. In humans, mutations in the Cr transporter (CRT;SLC6A8) prevent Cr entry into tissue and result in a significant intellectual impairment, epilepsy, and aphasia. The lack of Cr on both the whole body and cellular metabolism was evaluated in Crt knockout (Crt (-/y) ) mice, a high-fidelity model of human CRT deficiency. Crt (-/y) mice have reduced body mass and, however, show a twofold increase in body fat. There was increased energy expenditure in a home cage environment and during treadmill running in Crt (-/y) mice. Consistent with the increases in the whole-body metabolic function, Crt (-/y) mice show increased cellular metabolism as well. Mitochondrial respiration increased in skeletal muscle fibers and hippocampal lysates from Crt (-/y) mice. In addition, Crt (-/y) mice had increased citrate synthase activity, suggesting a higher number of mitochondria instead of an increase in mitochondrial activity. To determine if the increase in respiration was due to increased mitochondrial numbers, we measured oxygen consumption in an equal number of mitochondria from Crt (+/y) and Crt (-/y) mice. There were no changes in mitochondrial respiration when normalized to mitochondrial number, suggesting that the increase in respiration observed could be to higher mitochondrial content in Crt (-/y) mice. PMID:27401086

  1. Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutations in the CYP27B1 Gene Lead to Pseudovitamin D-Deficient Rickets.

    PubMed

    Koek, W Nadia H; Zillikens, M Carola; van der Eerden, Bram C J; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2016-09-01

    Pseudovitamin D deficiency is the consequence of a genetic defect in the CYP27B1 gene resulting in diminished or absent conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-(OH)D3) into 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) and leads to growth retardation and rickets, usually in the first 2 years of life. DNA obtained from human leucocytes from a patient suspected of pseudovitamin D deficiency and her healthy parents was sequenced for a genetic defect in the CYP27B1 gene. In silico analyses on the mutations were performed using online available software. The 1α-hydroxylase activity of the patient, her parents, and a sample derived from a mixed buffy coat of healthy blood donors was measured by culturing peripheral blood mononuclear cells with 25-(OH)D3 and measuring 1,25-(OH)2D3 production. DNA sequencing of the patient suspected of pseudovitamin D deficiency revealed compound heterozygosity in the CYP27B1 gene for a (c413G>T) mutation in exon 3 (R138L) and a (c1232G>A) mutation in exon 8 (C411Y). In silico analyses confirmed that mutations at these positions are probably damaging for the protein since the amino acids are situated in a highly conserved region. In vitro analyses showed a nearly absent 1α-hydroxylase activity in the patient compared to the healthy blood donors. Her healthy parents each of whom carried one of the mutations also had compromised conversion of 25-(OH)D3 into 1,25-(OH)2D3 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, being only marginally higher than in the patient. We discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in the CYP27B1 gene in a young girl presenting with pseudovitamin D-deficient rickets, leading to severely decreased 1,25-(OH)2D3 production. Furthermore, both heterozygous parents showed a diminished 1α-hydroxylase activity. PMID:27364341

  2. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia May Not Lead to Neurocognitive Dysfunction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Valérie; Mailloux, Chantal; Bonnefoy, Arnaud; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Pastore, Yves

    2016-07-01

    Iron deficiency is a common cause of anemia (IDA) in infancy and can be associated with neurocognitive impairments. Iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA) has recently been described as an inherited cause of IDA due to loss-of-function mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene. IRIDA is characterized by a lack of response to iron replacement. Here we report a new case of IRIDA with its biological parameters and its functional consequences, including neuropsychological impact. The latter was evaluated by the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition and subtests. We report a 5-year-old French Canadian boy who was incidentally diagnosed with a severe microcytic anemia at 2 years of age (hemoglobin 52 g/L, mean corpuscular volume 50 fL). Except mild pallor, he was asymptomatic of his anemia. Although he had a slight response to intravenous iron therapy, his hemoglobin remained <92 g/L, with persistent microcytosis, low serum iron, but normal ferritin levels. Blood hepcidin level was higher than those of his parents and control (patient 11.2 nM, father 9.06 nM, mother 4.07 nM). Compound heterozygosity for TMPRSS6 paternally inherited c.1324G>A and maternally inherited c.1807G>C mutations were eventually identified. The patient had normal development and growth. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed excellent performance, with high Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition scores (ie, 82nd percentile for both global intelligence and general ability index). In conclusion, TMPRSS6 c.1807G>C in conjunction with c.1324G>A results in IRIDA. In contrast to the usual form of IDA, IRIDA may not be associated with neuropsychological deficits. PMID:27365303

  3. Olfactomedin 1 Deficiency Leads to Defective Olfaction and Impaired Female Fertility.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Diao, Honglu; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Shuo; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Dudley, Elizabeth A; Mattson, Mark P; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2015-09-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the brain. Olfm1(-/-) female mice were previously reported to have reduced fertility. Previous microarray analysis revealed Olfm1 among the most highly upregulated genes in the uterine luminal epithelium upon embryo implantation, which was confirmed by in situ hybridization. We hypothesized that Olfm1 deficiency led to defective embryo implantation and thus impaired fertility. Indeed, Olfm1(-/-) females had defective embryo implantation. However, Olfm1(-/-) females rarely mated and those that mated rarely became pregnant. Ovarian histology indicated the absence of corpora lutea in Olfm1(-/-) females, indicating defective ovulation. Superovulation using equine chorionic gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin rescued mating, ovulation, and pregnancy, and equine chorionic gonadotropin alone rescued ovulation in Olfm1(-/-) females. Olfm1(-/-) females had a 13% reduction of hypothalamic GnRH neurons but comparable basal serum LH levels and GnRH-induced LH levels compared with wild-type controls. These results indicated no obvious local defects in the female reproductive system and a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Olfm1(-/-) females were unresponsive to the effects of male bedding stimulation on pubertal development and estrous cycle. There were 41% fewer cFos-positive cells in the mitral cell layer of accessory olfactory bulb upon male urine stimulation for 90 minutes. OLFM1 was expressed in the main and accessory olfactory systems including main olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, main olfactory bulb, and accessory olfactory bulb, with the highest expression detected in the axon bundles of olfactory sensory neurons. These data demonstrate that defective fertility in Olfm1(-/-) females is most likely a secondary effect of defective olfaction. PMID:26107991

  4. Olfactomedin 1 Deficiency Leads to Defective Olfaction and Impaired Female Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong; Diao, Honglu; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Shuo; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E.; Dudley, Elizabeth A.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the brain. Olfm1−/− female mice were previously reported to have reduced fertility. Previous microarray analysis revealed Olfm1 among the most highly upregulated genes in the uterine luminal epithelium upon embryo implantation, which was confirmed by in situ hybridization. We hypothesized that Olfm1 deficiency led to defective embryo implantation and thus impaired fertility. Indeed, Olfm1−/− females had defective embryo implantation. However, Olfm1−/− females rarely mated and those that mated rarely became pregnant. Ovarian histology indicated the absence of corpora lutea in Olfm1−/− females, indicating defective ovulation. Superovulation using equine chorionic gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin rescued mating, ovulation, and pregnancy, and equine chorionic gonadotropin alone rescued ovulation in Olfm1−/− females. Olfm1−/− females had a 13% reduction of hypothalamic GnRH neurons but comparable basal serum LH levels and GnRH-induced LH levels compared with wild-type controls. These results indicated no obvious local defects in the female reproductive system and a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Olfm1−/− females were unresponsive to the effects of male bedding stimulation on pubertal development and estrous cycle. There were 41% fewer cFos-positive cells in the mitral cell layer of accessory olfactory bulb upon male urine stimulation for 90 minutes. OLFM1 was expressed in the main and accessory olfactory systems including main olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, main olfactory bulb, and accessory olfactory bulb, with the highest expression detected in the axon bundles of olfactory sensory neurons. These data demonstrate that defective fertility in Olfm1−/− females is most likely a secondary effect of defective olfaction. PMID:26107991

  5. High folic acid consumption leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, altered lipid metabolism, and liver injury in mice12345

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Karen E; Mikael, Leonie G; Leung, Kit-Yi; Lévesque, Nancy; Deng, Liyuan; Wu, Qing; Malysheva, Olga V; Best, Ana; Caudill, Marie A; Greene, Nicholas DE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased consumption of folic acid is prevalent, leading to concerns about negative consequences. The effects of folic acid on the liver, the primary organ for folate metabolism, are largely unknown. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) provides methyl donors for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesis and methylation reactions. Objective: Our goal was to investigate the impact of high folic acid intake on liver disease and methyl metabolism. Design: Folic acid–supplemented diet (FASD, 10-fold higher than recommended) and control diet were fed to male Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr+/− mice for 6 mo to assess gene-nutrient interactions. Liver pathology, folate and choline metabolites, and gene expression in folate and lipid pathways were examined. Results: Liver and spleen weights were higher and hematologic profiles were altered in FASD-fed mice. Liver histology revealed unusually large, degenerating cells in FASD Mthfr+/− mice, consistent with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. High folic acid inhibited MTHFR activity in vitro, and MTHFR protein was reduced in FASD-fed mice. 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, SAM, and SAM/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratios were lower in FASD and Mthfr+/− livers. Choline metabolites, including phosphatidylcholine, were reduced due to genotype and/or diet in an attempt to restore methylation capacity through choline/betaine-dependent SAM synthesis. Expression changes in genes of one-carbon and lipid metabolism were particularly significant in FASD Mthfr+/− mice. The latter changes, which included higher nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, higher Srepb2 messenger RNA (mRNA), lower farnesoid X receptor (Nr1h4) mRNA, and lower Cyp7a1 mRNA, would lead to greater lipogenesis and reduced cholesterol catabolism into bile. Conclusions: We suggest that high folic acid consumption reduces MTHFR protein and activity levels, creating a pseudo-MTHFR deficiency. This deficiency results in hepatocyte degeneration, suggesting a 2

  6. Deficiency of ATP13A2 leads to lysosomal dysfunction, α-synuclein accumulation and neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Usenovic, Marija; Tresse, Emilie; Mazzulli, Joseph R.; Taylor, J. Paul; Krainc, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal pathway plays an important role in the clearance of long-lived proteins and dysfunctional organelles. Lysosomal dysfunction has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease and related synucleinopathies that are characterized by accumulations of α-synuclein in Lewy bodies. Recent identification of mutations in genes linked to lysosomal function and neurodegeneration has offered a unique opportunity to directly examine the role of lysosomes in disease pathogenesis. Mutations in lysosomal membrane protein ATP13A2 (PARK9) cause familial Kufor-Rakeb syndrome characterized by early-onset parkinsonism, pyramidal degeneration and dementia. While previous data suggested a role of ATP13A2 in α-synuclein misfolding and toxicity, the mechanistic link has not been established. Here we report that loss of ATP13A2 in human fibroblasts from patients with Kufor-Rakeb syndrome or in mouse primary neurons leads to impaired lysosomal degradation capacity. This lysosomal dysfunction results in accumulation of α-synuclein and toxicity in primary cortical neurons. Importantly, silencing of endogenous α-synuclein attenuated the toxicity in ATP13A2-depleted neurons, suggesting that loss of ATP13A2 mediates neurotoxicity at least in part via the accumulation of α-synuclein. Our findings implicate lysosomal dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Kufor-Rakeb syndrome and suggest that upregulation of lysosomal function and downregulation of α-synuclein represent important therapeutic strategies for this disorder. PMID:22442086

  7. PICK1 and ICA69 Control Insulin Granule Trafficking and Their Deficiencies Lead to Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Chuen; Xiao, Nan; Cao, Xiaoxing; Shen, Chong; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Xu, Aimin; Lee, Kwong-Man; Jiang, Liwen; Xia, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. Insulin, which is secreted by pancreatic beta cells, is recognized as the critical regulator of blood glucose, but the molecular machinery responsible for insulin trafficking remains poorly defined. In particular, the roles of cytosolic factors that govern the formation and maturation of insulin granules are unclear. Here we report that PICK1 and ICA69, two cytosolic lipid-binding proteins, formed heteromeric BAR-domain complexes that associated with insulin granules at different stages of their maturation. PICK1-ICA69 heteromeric complexes associated with immature secretory granules near the trans-Golgi network (TGN). A brief treatment of Brefeldin A, which blocks vesicle budding from the Golgi, increased the amount of PICK1 and ICA69 at TGN. On the other hand, mature secretory granules were associated with PICK1 only, not ICA69. PICK1 deficiency in mice caused the complete loss of ICA69 and led to increased food and water intake but lower body weight. Glucose tolerance tests demonstrated that these mutant mice had high blood glucose, a consequence of insufficient insulin. Importantly, while the total insulin level was reduced in PICK1-deficient beta cells, proinsulin was increased. Lastly, ICA69 knockout mice also displayed similar phenotype as the mice deficient in PICK1. Together, our results indicate that PICK1 and ICA69 are key regulators of the formation and maturation of insulin granules. Author Summary Insulin is a key regulator of blood glucose and insufficient insulin leads to diabetes. Insulin is synthesized as proinsulin, processed in endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, and eventually packaged into insulin granules, a type of dense core vesicles. Despite its importance, the molecular mechanisms governing the biogenesis and maturation of insulin granules are not fully understood. In this study, we identified two cytosolic proteins, PICK1 and ICA69, as important regulators of insulin granule

  8. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Lead Poisoning is Preventable If your home was built before ... of the RRP rule. Read more . Learn about Lead Poisoning Prevention Week . Report Uncertified Contractors and Environmental Violations ...

  9. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People ... Lead Levels Information for Parents Tips for preventing lead poisoning About Us Overview of CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning ...

  10. Loss of p53-regulatory protein IFI16 induces NBS1 leading to activation of p53-mediated checkpoint by phosphorylation of p53 SER37.

    PubMed

    Tawara, Hideyuki; Fujiuchi, Nobuko; Sironi, Juan; Martin, Sarah; Aglipay, Jason; Ouchi, Mutsuko; Taga, Makoto; Chen, Phang-Lang; Ouchi, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Our previous results that IFI16 is involved in p53 transcription activity under conditions of ionizing radiation (IR), and that the protein is frequently lost in human breast cancer cell lines and breast adenocarcinoma tissues suggesting that IFI16 plays a crucial role in controlling cell growth. Here, we show that loss of IFI16 by RNA interference in cell culture causes elevated phosphorylation of p53 Ser37 and accumulated NBS1 (nibrin) and p21WAF1, leading to growth retardation. Consistent with these observations, doxycyclin-induced NBS1 caused accumulation of p21WAF1 and increased phosphorylation of p53 Ser37, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Wortmannin treatment was found to decrease p53 Ser37 phosphorylation in NBS-induced cells. These results suggest that loss of IFI16 activates p53 checkpoint through NBS1-DNA-PKcs pathway. PMID:17981542

  11. A canine Arylsulfatase G (ARSG) mutation leading to a sulfatase deficiency is associated with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Marie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Olby, Natasha J.; Hitte, Christophe; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Maurer, Marie; Pilot-Storck, Fanny; Hédan, Benoit; Dréano, Stéphane; Brahimi, Sandra; Delattre, Delphine; André, Catherine; Gray, Françoise; Delisle, Françoise; Caillaud, Catherine; Bernex, Florence; Panthier, Jean-Jacques; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Tiret, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) represent the most common group of inherited progressive encephalopathies in children. They are characterized by progressive loss of vision, mental and motor deterioration, epileptic seizures, and premature death. Rare adult forms of NCL with late onset are known as Kufs’ disease. Loci underlying these adult forms remain unknown due to the small number of patients and genetic heterogeneity. Here we confirm that a late-onset form of NCL recessively segregates in US and French pedigrees of American Staffordshire Terrier (AST) dogs. Through combined association, linkage, and haplotype analyses, we mapped the disease locus to a single region of canine chromosome 9. We eventually identified a worldwide breed-specific variant in exon 2 of the Arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene, which causes a p.R99H substitution in the vicinity of the catalytic domain of the enzyme. In transfected cells or leukocytes from affected dogs, the missense change leads to a 75% decrease in sulfatase activity, providing a functional confirmation that the variant might be the NCL-causing mutation. Our results uncover a protein involved in neuronal homeostasis, identify a family of candidate genes to be screened in patients with Kufs' disease, and suggest that a deficiency in sulfatase is part of the NCL pathogenesis. PMID:20679209

  12. Chernobyl and iodine deficiency in the Russian Federation: an environmental disaster leading to a public health opportunity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Richard J; DeLozier, David M; Gerasimov, Gregory; Borisova, Olga; Garbe, Paul L; Goultchenko, Lioudmila; Shakarishvili, George; Hollowell, Joseph G; Miller, Dayton T

    2002-01-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear disaster of April 26, 1986, triggered a chain of devastating events that later included an unexpected increase in childhood thyroid cancer and evidence of iodine deficiency (ID) in Russia. For the Russian people the Chernobyl event had profound psychological impacts, provoking anxiety about nuclear technology and mistrust of governmental control efforts. Frequently in public health a crisis is required to create the political will to manage longstanding problems, and public health officials must rapidly mobilize to take advantage of the opportunity. In this case, ID, previously not seen as a problem in Russia, was recognized to be potentially serious, and the Russian Federation, assisted by the catalytic bi-national effort of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Economic and Technological Cooperation (Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission (GCC)) established a model salt iodization policy, developed a planning process, and implemented a program to prevent ID through a systematic approach that included the people, government, and private groups using open communication, dissemination of the findings, and action plans. By 1999, political will had been mobilized and over 20% of the nation's salt was being iodized, up from about 1% in 1996. Universal iodization of salt was not a specific objective of the GCC; however, the increasing availability of iodized salt is leading to the elimination of ID, which is now a political goal in Russia. The full realization of this goal will require more time for education, marketing, and possibly legislative action. PMID:12532684

  13. Msh2 deficiency leads to dysmyelination of the corpus callosum, impaired locomotion, and altered sensory function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Devaraju, Prakash; Janke, Laura J.; Fan, Yiping; Frase, Sharon; Eddins, Donnie; Peters, Jennifer L.; Kim, Jieun; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Evans, William E.

    2016-01-01

    A feature in patients with constitutional DNA-mismatch repair deficiency is agenesis of the corpus callosum, the cause of which has not been established. Here we report a previously unrecognized consequence of deficiency in MSH2, a protein known primarily for its function in correcting nucleotide mismatches or insertions and deletions in duplex DNA caused by errors in DNA replication or recombination. We documented that Msh2 deficiency causes dysmyelination of the axonal projections in the corpus callosum. Evoked action potentials in the myelinated corpus callosum projections of Msh2-null mice were smaller than wild-type mice, whereas unmyelinated axons showed no difference. Msh2-null mice were also impaired in locomotive activity and had an abnormal response to heat. These findings reveal a novel pathogenic consequence of MSH2 deficiency, providing a new mechanistic hint to previously recognized neurological disorders in patients with inherited DNA-mismatch repair deficiency. PMID:27476972

  14. Reprint of "The clinical impact of deficiency in DNA non-homologous end-joining".

    PubMed

    Woodbine, Lisa; Gennery, Andrew R; Jeggo, Penny A

    2014-05-01

    DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammalian cells. Defects in NHEJ proteins confer marked radiosensitivity in cell lines and mice models, since radiation potently induces DSBs. The process of V(D)J recombination functions during the development of the immune response, and involves the introduction and rejoining of programmed DSBs to generate an array of diverse T and B cells. NHEJ rejoins these programmed DSBs. Consequently, NHEJ deficiency confers (severe) combined immunodeficiency - (S)CID - due to a failure to carry out V(D)J recombination efficiently. NHEJ also functions in class switch recombination, another step enhancing T and B cell diversity. Prompted by these findings, a search for radiosensitivity amongst (S)CID patients revealed a radiosensitive sub-class, defined as RS-SCID. Mutations in NHEJ genes, defining human syndromes deficient in DNA ligase IV (LIG4 Syndrome), XLF-Cernunnos, Artemis or DNA-PKcs, have been identified in such patients. Mutations in XRCC4 or Ku70,80 in patients have not been identified. RS-SCID patients frequently display additional characteristics including microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features and growth delay. Here, we overview the clinical spectrum of RS-SCID patients and discuss our current understanding of the underlying biology. PMID:24780557

  15. The clinical impact of deficiency in DNA non-homologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Woodbine, Lisa; Gennery, Andrew R; Jeggo, Penny A

    2014-04-01

    DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammalian cells. Defects in NHEJ proteins confer marked radiosensitivity in cell lines and mice models, since radiation potently induces DSBs. The process of V(D)J recombination functions during the development of the immune response, and involves the introduction and rejoining of programmed DSBs to generate an array of diverse T and B cells. NHEJ rejoins these programmed DSBs. Consequently, NHEJ deficiency confers (severe) combined immunodeficiency - (S)CID - due to a failure to carry out V(D)J recombination efficiently. NHEJ also functions in class switch recombination, another step enhancing T and B cell diversity. Prompted by these findings, a search for radiosensitivity amongst (S)CID patients revealed a radiosensitive sub-class, defined as RS-SCID. Mutations in NHEJ genes, defining human syndromes deficient in DNA ligase IV (LIG4 Syndrome), XLF-Cernunnos, Artemis or DNA-PKcs, have been identified in such patients. Mutations in XRCC4 or Ku70,80 in patients have not been identified. RS-SCID patients frequently display additional characteristics including microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features and growth delay. Here, we overview the clinical spectrum of RS-SCID patients and discuss our current understanding of the underlying biology. PMID:24629483

  16. Methionine deficiency leads to hepatic fat accretion via impairment of fatty acid import by carnitine palmitoyltransferase I.

    PubMed

    Kikusato, M; Sudo, S; Toyomizu, M

    2015-04-01

    1. To clarify the underlying mechanism of hepatic fat accretion due to methionine (Met) deficiency in broiler chickens, the present study investigated the effect of Met deficiency on the hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) system, which imports fatty acids into mitochondria. 2. Fifteen-d-old male meat-type chickens were fed on either a control diet (containing 0.52 g/100 g Met) or a Met-deficient diet (containing 0.27 g Met/100 g). After a 10-d feeding period, the birds were killed by decapitation and their livers excised to determine hepatic CPT1 and CPT2 mRNA levels and for the related hepatic fatty acid-supported mitochondrial respiration to be measured. 3. Met deficiency decreased body weight gain and feed efficiency and increased hepatic lipid content compared to the control group. Whereas the hepatic CPT2 mRNA level in the Met-deficient group remained unchanged compared to that of the control group, the CPT1 mRNA level was decreased in the Met-deficient group and CPT1-dependent hepatic mitochondrial respiration was impaired. 4. Our results suggest that the hepatic lipid accretion that occurs in response to Met deficiency might be attributable to the impairment of CPT1-mediated fatty acid import into mitochondria. PMID:25561085

  17. TLR9 Deficiency Leads to Accelerated Renal Disease and Myeloid Lineage Abnormalities in Pristane-Induced Murine Lupus.

    PubMed

    Bossaller, Lukas; Christ, Anette; Pelka, Karin; Nündel, Kerstin; Chiang, Ping-I; Pang, Catherine; Mishra, Neha; Busto, Patricia; Bonegio, Ramon G; Schmidt, Reinhold Ernst; Latz, Eicke; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2016-08-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, life-threatening autoimmune disorder, leading to multiple organ pathologies and kidney destruction. Analyses of numerous murine models of spontaneous SLE have revealed a critical role for endosomal TLRs in the production of autoantibodies and development of other clinical disease manifestations. Nevertheless, the corresponding TLR9-deficient autoimmune-prone strains consistently develop more severe disease pathology. Injection of BALB/c mice with 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD), commonly known as pristane, also results in the development of SLE-like disease. We now show that Tlr9(-/-) BALB/c mice injected i.p. with TMPD develop more severe autoimmunity than do their TLR-sufficient cohorts. Early indications include an increased accumulation of TLR7-expressing Ly6C(hi) inflammatory monocytes at the site of injection, upregulation of IFN-regulated gene expression in the peritoneal cavity, and an increased production of myeloid lineage precursors (common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte myeloid precursors) in the bone marrow. TMPD-injected Tlr9(-/-) BALB/c mice develop higher autoantibody titers against RNA, neutrophil cytoplasmic Ags, and myeloperoxidase than do TMPD-injected wild-type BALB/c mice. The TMP-injected Tlr9(-/-) mice, and not the wild-type mice, also develop a marked increase in glomerular IgG deposition and infiltrating granulocytes, much more severe glomerulonephritis, and a reduced lifespan. Collectively, the data point to a major role for TLR7 in the response to self-antigens in this model of experimental autoimmunity. Therefore, the BALB/c pristane model recapitulates other TLR7-driven spontaneous models of SLE and is negatively regulated by TLR9. PMID:27354219

  18. Farnesoid X Receptor Deficiency in Mice Leads to Increased Intestinal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Tumor DevelopmentS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Rengasamy R.M.; Thomas, Ann; Roth, Megan; Sheng, Zhonghua; Esterly, Noriko; Pinson, David; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Yawei; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Guo, Grace L.

    2009-01-01

    Increased dietary fat consumption is associated with colon cancer development. The exact mechanism by which fat induces colon cancer is not clear, however, increased bile acid excretion in response to high-fat diet may promote colon carcinogenesis. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, and bile acids are endogenous ligands of FXR. FXR is highly expressed in the intestine and liver where FXR is essential for maintaining bile acid homeostasis. The role of FXR in intestine cancer development is not known. The current study evaluated the effects of FXR deficiency in mice on intestinal cell proliferation and cancer development. The results showed that FXR deficiency resulted in increased colon cell proliferation, which was accompanied by an up-regulation in the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression and inflammation, including cyclin D1 and interleukin-6. Most importantly, FXR deficiency led to an increase in the size of small intestine adenocarcinomas in adenomatous polyposis coli mutant mice. Furthermore, after treatment with a colon carcinogen, azoxymethane, FXR deficiency increased the adenocarcinoma multiplicity and size in colon and rectum of C57BL/6 mice. Loss of FXR function also increased the intestinal lymphoid nodule numbers in the intestine. Taken together, the current study is the first to show that FXR deficiency promotes cell proliferation, inflammation, and tumorigenesis in the intestine, suggesting that activation of FXR by nonbile acid ligands may protect against intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:18981289

  19. Autophagy-deficiency in hepatic progenitor cells leads to the defects of stemness and enhances susceptibility to neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Hu, Lei; Ge, Ruiliang; Yang, Lixue; Liu, Kai; Li, Yunyun; Sun, Yanfu; Wang, Kui

    2016-02-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved and lysosome-dependent degradation process which assists in cell survival and tissue homeostasis. Although previous reports have shown that deletion of the essential autophagy gene disturbs stem cell maintenance in some cell types such as hematopoietic and neural cells, it remains unclear how autophagy-deficiency influences hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here we report that Atg5-deficiency in HPCs delays HPC-mediated rat liver regeneration in vivo. In vitro researches further demonstrate that loss of autophagy decreases the abilities of colony and spheroid formations, and disrupts the induction of hepatic differentiation in HPCs. Meanwhile, autophagy-deficiency increases the accumulations of damaged mitochondria and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and suppresses homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA damage repair in HPCs. Moreover, in both diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and CCl4 models, autophagy-deficiency accelerates neoplastic transformation of HPCs. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that autophagy contributes to stemness maintenance and reduces susceptibility to neoplastic transformation in HPCs. PMID:26607902

  20. Gestational Vitamin B Deficiency Leads to Homocysteine-Associated Brain Apoptosis and Alters Neurobehavioral Development in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Blaise, Sébastien A.; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Schroeder, Henri; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia has been identified as a risk factor for neurological disorders. To study the influence of early deficiency in nutritional determinants of hyperhomocysteinemia on the developing rat brain, dams were fed a standard diet or a diet lacking methyl groups during gestation and lactation. Homocysteinemia progressively increased in the offspring of the deficient group and at 21 days reached 13.3 ± 3.7 μmol/L versus 6.8 ± 0.3 μmol/L in controls. Homocysteine accumulated in both neurons and astrocytes of selective brain structures including the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the striatum, and the neurogenic subventricular zone. Most homocysteine-positive cells expressed p53 and displayed fragmented DNA indicative of apoptosis. Righting reflex and negative geotaxis revealed a delay in the onset of integration capacities in the deficient group. Between 19 and 21 days, a poorer success score was recorded in deficient animals in a locomotor coordination test. A switch to normal food after weaning allowed restoration of normal homocysteinemia. Nevertheless, at 80 days of age, the exploratory behavior in the elevated-plus maze and the learning and memory behavior in the eight-arm maze revealed that early vitamin B deprivation is associated with persistent functional disabilities, possibly resulting from the ensuing neurotoxic effects of homocysteine. PMID:17255334

  1. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  2. Mutation in NDUFA13/GRIM19 leads to early onset hypotonia, dyskinesia and sensorial deficiencies, and mitochondrial complex I instability.

    PubMed

    Angebault, Claire; Charif, Majida; Guegen, Naig; Piro-Megy, Camille; Mousson de Camaret, Benedicte; Procaccio, Vincent; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gael; Leboucq, Nicolas; Rivier, François; Hamel, Christian P; Lenaers, Guy; Roubertie, Agathe

    2015-07-15

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiencies are causing debilitating neurological diseases, among which, the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and Leigh Syndrome are the most frequent. Here, we describe the first germinal pathogenic mutation in the NDUFA13/GRIM19 gene encoding a CI subunit, in two sisters with early onset hypotonia, dyskinesia and sensorial deficiencies, including a severe optic neuropathy. Biochemical analysis revealed a drastic decrease in CI enzymatic activity in patient muscle biopsies, and reduction of CI-driven respiration in fibroblasts, while the activities of complex II, III and IV were hardly affected. Western blots disclosed that the abundances of NDUFA13 protein, CI holoenzyme and super complexes were drastically reduced in mitochondrial fractions, a situation that was reproduced by silencing NDUFA13 in control cells. Thus, we established here a correlation between the first mutation yet identified in the NDUFA13 gene, which induces CI instability and a severe but slowly evolving clinical presentation affecting the central nervous system. PMID:25901006

  3. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Taisuke; Nagamatsu, Go; Kosaka, Takeo; Takubo, Keiyo; Hotta, Akitsu; Ellis, James; Suda, Toshio

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} iPS cells were induced with a fluorescence monitoring system. {yields} ATM-deficient tail-tip fibroblasts exhibited quite a low reprogramming efficiency. {yields} iPS cells obtained from ATM-deficient cells had pluripotent cell characteristics. {yields} ATM-deficient iPS cells had abnormal chromosomes, which were accumulated in culture. -- Abstract: During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  4. Deficiency of prolactin-inducible protein leads to impaired Th1 immune response and susceptibility to Leishmania major in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jintao; Liu, Dong; Mou, Zhirong; Ihedioha, Olivia C; Blanchard, Anne; Jia, Ping; Myal, Yvonne; Uzonna, Jude E

    2015-04-01

    Although the strategic production of prolactin-inducible protein (PIP) at several ports of pathogen entry into the body suggests it might play a role in host defense, no study has directly implicated it in immunity against any infectious agent. Here, we show for the first time that PIP deficiency is associated with reduced numbers of CD4(+) T cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues and impaired CD4(+) Th1-cell differentiation in vitro. In vivo, CD4(+) T cells from OVA-immunized, PIP-deficient mice showed significantly impaired proliferation and IFN-γ production following in vitro restimulation. Furthermore, PIP-deficient mice were highly susceptible to Leishmani major infection and failed to control lesion progression and parasite proliferation. This susceptibility was associated with impaired NO production and leishmanicidal activity of PIP KO macrophages following IFN-γ and LPS stimulation. Collectively, our findings implicate PIP as an important regulator of CD4(+) Th1-cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25594453

  5. ATP Synthase Deficiency due to TMEM70 Mutation Leads to Ultrastructural Mitochondrial Degeneration and Is Amenable to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Braczynski, Anne K.; Vlaho, Stefan; Müller, Klaus; Wittig, Ilka; Blank, Anna-Eva; Tews, Dominique S.; Drott, Ulrich; Kleinle, Stephanie; Abicht, Angela; Horvath, Rita; Plate, Karl H.; Stenzel, Werner; Goebel, Hans H.; Schulze, Andreas; Harter, Patrick N.; Kieslich, Matthias; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-01-01

    TMEM70 is involved in the biogenesis of mitochondrial ATP synthase and mutations in the TMEM70 gene impair oxidative phosphorylation. Herein, we report on pathology and treatment of ATP synthase deficiency in four siblings. A consanguineous family of Roma (Gipsy) ethnic origin gave birth to 6 children of which 4 were affected presenting with dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, cardiomyopathy, metabolic crises, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria as clinical symptoms. Genetic testing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.317-2A>G) in the TMEM70 gene. While light microscopy was unremarkable, ultrastructural investigation of muscle tissue revealed accumulation of swollen degenerated mitochondria with lipid crystalloid inclusions, cristae aggregation, and exocytosis of mitochondrial material. Biochemical analysis of mitochondrial complexes showed an almost complete ATP synthase deficiency. Despite harbouring the same mutation, the clinical outcome in the four siblings was different. Two children died within 60 h after birth; the other two had recurrent life-threatening metabolic crises but were successfully managed with supplementation of anaplerotic amino acids, lipids, and symptomatic treatment during metabolic crisis. In summary, TMEM70 mutations can cause distinct ultrastructural mitochondrial degeneration and almost complete deficiency of ATP synthase but are still amenable to treatment. PMID:26550569

  6. PICK1 and ICA69 control insulin granule trafficking and their deficiencies lead to impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mian; Mao, Zhuo; Kam, Chuen; Xiao, Nan; Cao, Xiaoxing; Shen, Chong; Cheng, Kenneth K Y; Xu, Aimin; Lee, Kwong-Man; Jiang, Liwen; Xia, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. Insulin, which is secreted by pancreatic beta cells, is recognized as the critical regulator of blood glucose, but the molecular machinery responsible for insulin trafficking remains poorly defined. In particular, the roles of cytosolic factors that govern the formation and maturation of insulin granules are unclear. Here we report that PICK1 and ICA69, two cytosolic lipid-binding proteins, formed heteromeric BAR-domain complexes that associated with insulin granules at different stages of their maturation. PICK1-ICA69 heteromeric complexes associated with immature secretory granules near the trans-Golgi network (TGN). A brief treatment of Brefeldin A, which blocks vesicle budding from the Golgi, increased the amount of PICK1 and ICA69 at TGN. On the other hand, mature secretory granules were associated with PICK1 only, not ICA69. PICK1 deficiency in mice caused the complete loss of ICA69 and led to increased food and water intake but lower body weight. Glucose tolerance tests demonstrated that these mutant mice had high blood glucose, a consequence of insufficient insulin. Importantly, while the total insulin level was reduced in PICK1-deficient beta cells, proinsulin was increased. Lastly, ICA69 knockout mice also displayed similar phenotype as the mice deficient in PICK1. Together, our results indicate that PICK1 and ICA69 are key regulators of the formation and maturation of insulin granules. PMID:23630453

  7. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. PMID:24275069

  8. Deficiency and Also Transgenic Overexpression of Timp-3 Both Lead to Compromised Bone Mass and Architecture In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Mark; Poulet, Blandine; Pollard, Andrea S.; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Chang, Yu-Mei; Francis-West, Philippa; Bou-Gharios, George; Pitsillides, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) regulates extracellular matrix via its inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and membrane-bound sheddases. Timp-3 is expressed at multiple sites of extensive tissue remodelling. This extends to bone where its role, however, remains largely unresolved. In this study, we have used Micro-CT to assess bone mass and architecture, histological and histochemical evaluation to characterise the skeletal phenotype of Timp-3 KO mice and have complemented this by also examining similar indices in mice harbouring a Timp-3 transgene driven via a Col-2a-driven promoter to specifically target overexpression to chondrocytes. Our data show that Timp-3 deficiency compromises tibial bone mass and structure in both cortical and trabecular compartments, with corresponding increases in osteoclasts. Transgenic overexpression also generates defects in tibial structure predominantly in the cortical bone along the entire shaft without significant increases in osteoclasts. These alterations in cortical mass significantly compromise predicted tibial load-bearing resistance to torsion in both genotypes. Neither Timp-3 KO nor transgenic mouse growth plates are significantly affected. The impact of Timp-3 deficiency and of transgenic overexpression extends to produce modification in craniofacial bones of both endochondral and intramembranous origins. These data indicate that the levels of Timp-3 are crucial in the attainment of functionally-appropriate bone mass and architecture and that this arises from chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages. PMID:27519049

  9. Carnitine Deficiency in OCTN2−/− Newborn Mice Leads to a Severe Gut and Immune Phenotype with Widespread Atrophy, Apoptosis and a Pro-Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, Srinivas; Shekhawat, Prem S.; Matern, Dietrich; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Ignatowicz, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the gross, microscopic and molecular effects of carnitine deficiency in the neonatal gut using a mouse model with a loss-of-function mutation in the OCTN2 (SLC22A5) carnitine transporter. The tissue carnitine content of neonatal homozygous (OCTN2−/−) mouse small intestine was markedly reduced; the intestine displayed signs of stunted villous growth, early signs of inflammation, lymphocytic and macrophage infiltration and villous structure breakdown. Mitochondrial β-oxidation was active throughout the GI tract in wild type newborn mice as seen by expression of 6 key enzymes involved in β-oxidation of fatty acids and genes for these 6 enzymes were up-regulated in OCTN2−/− mice. There was increased apoptosis in gut samples from OCTN2−/− mice. OCTN2−/− mice developed a severe immune phenotype, where the thymus, spleen and lymph nodes became atrophied secondary to increased apoptosis. Carnitine deficiency led to increased expression of CD45-B220+ lymphocytes with increased production of basal and anti-CD3-stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells. Real-time PCR array analysis in OCTN2−/− mouse gut epithelium demonstrated down-regulation of TGF-β/BMP pathway genes. We conclude that carnitine plays a major role in neonatal OCTN2−/− mouse gut development and differentiation, and that severe carnitine deficiency leads to increased apoptosis of enterocytes, villous atrophy, inflammation and gut injury. PMID:23112839

  10. Carnitine deficiency in OCTN2-/- newborn mice leads to a severe gut and immune phenotype with widespread atrophy, apoptosis and a pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Srinivas; Shekhawat, Prem S; Matern, Dietrich; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Ignatowicz, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the gross, microscopic and molecular effects of carnitine deficiency in the neonatal gut using a mouse model with a loss-of-function mutation in the OCTN2 (SLC22A5) carnitine transporter. The tissue carnitine content of neonatal homozygous (OCTN2(-/-)) mouse small intestine was markedly reduced; the intestine displayed signs of stunted villous growth, early signs of inflammation, lymphocytic and macrophage infiltration and villous structure breakdown. Mitochondrial β-oxidation was active throughout the GI tract in wild type newborn mice as seen by expression of 6 key enzymes involved in β-oxidation of fatty acids and genes for these 6 enzymes were up-regulated in OCTN2(-/-) mice. There was increased apoptosis in gut samples from OCTN2(-/-) mice. OCTN2(-/-) mice developed a severe immune phenotype, where the thymus, spleen and lymph nodes became atrophied secondary to increased apoptosis. Carnitine deficiency led to increased expression of CD45-B220(+) lymphocytes with increased production of basal and anti-CD3-stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells. Real-time PCR array analysis in OCTN2(-/-) mouse gut epithelium demonstrated down-regulation of TGF-β/BMP pathway genes. We conclude that carnitine plays a major role in neonatal OCTN2(-/-) mouse gut development and differentiation, and that severe carnitine deficiency leads to increased apoptosis of enterocytes, villous atrophy, inflammation and gut injury. PMID:23112839

  11. Deficiency in the nuclear-related factor erythroid 2 transcription factor (Nrf1) leads to genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Diane H; Rigas, Diamanda; Cho, Ara; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1) regulates cellular stress response genes, and has also been suggested to play a role in other cellular processes. We previously demonstrated that hepatocyte-specific deletion of Nrf1 in mice resulted in spontaneous apoptosis, inflammation, and development of liver tumors. Here, we showed that both fibroblasts derived from Nrf1 null mouse embryos and fibroblasts expressing a conditional Nrf1 allele showed increased micronuclei and formation of abnormal nuclei. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown of Nrf1 in SAOS-2 cells also resulted in increased micronuclei, abnormal mitosis and multi-nucleated cells. Metaphase analyses showed increased aneuploidy in Nrf1(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts. Nuclear defects in Nrf1-deficient cells were associated with decreased expression of various genes encoding kinetochore and mitotic checkpoint proteins. Our findings suggest that Nrf1 may play a role in maintaining genomic integrity, and that Nrf1 dysregulation may induce tumorigenesis. PMID:22971132

  12. NADPH oxidase 4 deficiency leads to impaired wound repair and reduced dityrosine-crosslinking, but does not affect myofibroblast formation.

    PubMed

    Lévigne, Dominik; Modarressi, Ali; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Pittet-Cuénod, Brigitte

    2016-07-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOX) mediate redox signaling by generating superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide, which are involved in biosynthetic pathways, e.g. thyroid hormone generation, dityrosine crosslinking, as well as bacterial killing. Data investigating the role of NOX enzymes in cutaneous wound repair is limited and specifically their function in skin myofibroblast expression is unknown. The isoform NOX4 was recently shown to be a pre-requisite for the differentiation of cardiac and pulmonary myofibroblasts. In this study we investigate the role of NOX4 in wound repair using a wound model in NOX4 knockout mice (n=16) and wildtype mice (n=16). Wounds were photographed daily until complete wound closure. Mice were sacrificed at day 3, 7, 14; wound tissue was harvested. NOX4-deficient mice healed significantly slower (22 days, SD=1.9) than wild-type mice (17 days, SD=1.4, p<0.005). However, there was no difference in myofibroblast expression. Strong dityrosine formation was observed, but was significantly weaker in NOX4-/- mice (p<0.05). NOX2, HIF1α and CD31 expression was significantly weaker in NOX4-/- mice (p<0.05). In this study we show for the first time that NOX4 plays a role in cutaneous wound repair. Our data suggests that NOX4 mediates HIF1α expression and neoangiogenesis during wound repair. NOX4 deletion led to a decreased expression of NOX2, implying a role of NOX4 in phagocytic cell recruitment. NOX4 was required for effective wound contraction but not myofibroblast expression. We suggest that myofibroblast contraction in NOX4-deficient mice is less effective in contracting the wound because of insufficient dityrosine-crosslinking of the ECM, providing the first indication for a physiological function of dityrosine crosslinking in higher animals. PMID:27140231

  13. Depletion of ATR selectively sensitizes ATM-deficient human mammary epithelial cells to ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Palii, Stela S; Innes, Cynthia L; Paules, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) to double strand breaks is coordinated by 3 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members: the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM), the ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase and the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). ATM and ATR are central players in activating cell cycle checkpoints and function as an active barrier against genome instability and tumorigenesis in replicating cells. Loss of ATM function is frequently reported in various types of tumors, thus placing more reliance on ATR for checkpoint arrest and cell survival following DNA damage. To investigate the role of ATR in the G2/M checkpoint regulation in response to ionizing radiation (IR), particularly when ATM is deficient, cell lines deficient of ATM, ATR, or both were generated using a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral system. Our data suggests that while depletion of ATR or ATM alone in wild-type human mammary epithelial cell cultures (HME-CCs) has little effect on radiosensitivity or IR-induced G2/M checkpoint arrest, depletion of ATR in ATM-deficient cells causes synthetic lethality following IR, which correlates with severe G2/M checkpoint attenuation. ATR depletion also inhibits IR-induced autophagy, regardless of the ATM status, and enhances IR-induced apoptosis particularly when ATM is deficient. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that ATR function is required for the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint activation and subsequent survival of cells with ATM deficiency. The synthetic lethal interaction between ATM and ATR in response to IR supports ATR as a therapeutic target for improved anti-cancer regimens, especially in tumors with a dysfunctional ATM pathway. PMID:25483091

  14. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world. PMID:1745900

  15. Deficient activation by a human cell strain leads to mitomycin resistance under aerobic but not hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, R S; Paterson, M C; Rauth, A M

    1989-03-01

    Two non-transformed human skin fibroblast strains, GM38 and 3437T, were found to be more sensitive to the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) under hypoxic compared to aerobic conditions. One of these strains, 3437T, was 6-7 times more resistant to these agents under aerobic exposure conditions, but was identical in sensitivity to the normal strain, GM38, under hypoxic conditions. Aerobic 3437T cells demonstrated no increased resistance to cisplatin compared to the normal strain, arguing against enhanced ability to repair DNA interstrand cross-links as the underlying explanation for the mitomycin resistance. The aerobic resistance of 3437T was not altered by dicumarol, an inhibitor of the enzyme DT-diaphorase which is believed to be involved in aerobic activation of MMC and PM. Dicumarol did increase the resistance of GM38, but not to the same level of resistance demonstrated by 3437T. These results suggest that the aerobic MMC and PM resistance of 3437T may arise, in part, from a deficiency in DT-diaphorase activity. The identical sensitivities under hypoxic conditions indicate that drug activation pathways operative in the absence of oxygen are similar in both the normal and 3437T cells. PMID:2467684

  16. Deficient activation by a human cell strain leads to mitomycin resistance under aerobic but not hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R. S.; Paterson, M. C.; Rauth, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    Two non-transformed human skin fibroblast strains, GM38 and 3437T, were found to be more sensitive to the bioreductive alkylating agents mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PM) under hypoxic compared to aerobic conditions. One of these strains, 3437T, was 6-7 times more resistant to these agents under aerobic exposure conditions, but was identical in sensitivity to the normal strain, GM38, under hypoxic conditions. Aerobic 3437T cells demonstrated no increased resistance to cisplatin compared to the normal strain, arguing against enhanced ability to repair DNA interstrand cross-links as the underlying explanation for the mitomycin resistance. The aerobic resistance of 3437T was not altered by dicumarol, an inhibitor of the enzyme DT-diaphorase which is believed to be involved in aerobic activation of MMC and PM. Dicumarol did increase the resistance of GM38, but not to the same level of resistance demonstrated by 3437T. These results suggest that the aerobic MMC and PM resistance of 3437T may arise, in part, from a deficiency in DT-diaphorase activity. The identical sensitivities under hypoxic conditions indicate that drug activation pathways operative in the absence of oxygen are similar in both the normal and 3437T cells. PMID:2467684

  17. Mutations in the selenocysteine insertion sequence–binding protein 2 gene lead to a multisystem selenoprotein deficiency disorder in humans

    PubMed Central

    Schoenmakers, Erik; Agostini, Maura; Mitchell, Catherine; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Papp, Laura; Rajanayagam, Odelia; Padidela, Raja; Ceron-Gutierrez, Lourdes; Doffinger, Rainer; Prevosto, Claudia; Luan, Jian’an; Montano, Sergio; Lu, Jun; Castanet, Mireille; Clemons, Nick; Groeneveld, Matthijs; Castets, Perrine; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Aitken, Sri; Dixon, Adrian; Williams, Jane; Campi, Irene; Blount, Margaret; Burton, Hannah; Muntoni, Francesco; O’Donovan, Dominic; Dean, Andrew; Warren, Anne; Brierley, Charlotte; Baguley, David; Guicheney, Pascale; Fitzgerald, Rebecca; Coles, Alasdair; Gaston, Hill; Todd, Pamela; Holmgren, Arne; Khanna, Kum Kum; Cooke, Marcus; Semple, Robert; Halsall, David; Wareham, Nicholas; Schwabe, John; Grasso, Lucia; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Ogunko, Arthur; Dattani, Mehul; Gurnell, Mark; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Selenium, a trace element that is fundamental to human health, is incorporated into some proteins as selenocysteine (Sec), generating a family of selenoproteins. Sec incorporation is mediated by a multiprotein complex that includes Sec insertion sequence–binding protein 2 (SECISBP2; also known as SBP2). Here, we describe subjects with compound heterozygous defects in the SECISBP2 gene. These individuals have reduced synthesis of most of the 25 known human selenoproteins, resulting in a complex phenotype. Azoospermia, with failure of the latter stages of spermatogenesis, was associated with a lack of testis-enriched selenoproteins. An axial muscular dystrophy was also present, with features similar to myopathies caused by mutations in selenoprotein N (SEPN1). Cutaneous deficiencies of antioxidant selenoenzymes, increased cellular ROS, and susceptibility to ultraviolet radiation–induced oxidative damage may mediate the observed photosensitivity. Reduced levels of selenoproteins in peripheral blood cells were associated with impaired T lymphocyte proliferation, abnormal mononuclear cell cytokine secretion, and telomere shortening. Paradoxically, raised ROS in affected subjects was associated with enhanced systemic and cellular insulin sensitivity, similar to findings in mice lacking the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1). Thus, mutation of SECISBP2 is associated with a multisystem disorder with defective biosynthesis of many selenoproteins, highlighting their role in diverse biological processes. PMID:21084748

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the brain leads to DNA hypomethylation in the TCblR/CD320 knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is an epigenetic phenomenon that can modulate gene function by up or downregulation of gene expression. Vitamin B12 and folate pathways are involved in the production of S-Adenosylmethionine, the universal methyl donor. Findings Brain vitamin B12 concentration and global DNA methylation was determined in transcobalamin receptor (TCblR/CD320) knock out (KO) (n = 4) and control mice (n = 4) at 20–24 weeks of age. Median [IQR] brain vitamin B12 concentrations (pg/mg) in TCblR/CD320 KO mice compared with control mice was 8.59 [0.52] vs 112.42 [33.12]; p < 0.05. Global DNA methylation levels in brain genomic DNA were lower in TCblR/CD320 KO compared with control mice (Median [IQR]: 0.31[0.16] % vs 0.55[0.15] %; p < 0.05.). Conclusions In TCblR/CD320 KO mice, brain vitamin B12 drops precipitously by as much as 90% during a 20 week period. This decrease is associated with a 40% decrease in global DNA methylation in the brain. Future research will reveal whether the disruption in gene expression profiles due to changes in DNA hypomethylation contribute to central nervous system pathologies that are frequently seen in vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:22607050

  19. Rapid degradation of an active formylglycine generating enzyme variant leads to a late infantile severe form of multiple sulfatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schlotawa, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Baumgartner, Matthias; Schmid, Regula; Schmidt, Bernhard; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn error of metabolism affecting posttranslational activation of sulfatases by the formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE). Due to mutations in the encoding SUMF1 gene, FGE's catalytic capacity is impaired resulting in reduced cellular sulfatase activities. Both, FGE protein stability and residual activity determine disease severity and have previously been correlated with the clinical MSD phenotype. Here, we report a patient with a late infantile severe course of disease. The patient is compound heterozygous for two so far undescribed SUMF1 mutations, c.156delC (p.C52fsX57) and c.390A>T (p.E130D). In patient fibroblasts, mRNA of the frameshift allele is undetectable. In contrast, the allele encoding FGE-E130D is expressed. FGE-E130D correctly localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has a very high residual molecular activity in vitro (55% of wildtype FGE); however, it is rapidly degraded. Thus, despite substantial residual enzyme activity, protein instability determines disease severity, which highlights that potential MSD treatment approaches should target protein folding and stabilization mechanisms. PMID:23321616

  20. Rapid degradation of an active formylglycine generating enzyme variant leads to a late infantile severe form of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Baumgartner, Matthias; Schmid, Regula; Schmidt, Bernhard; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn error of metabolism affecting posttranslational activation of sulfatases by the formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE). Due to mutations in the encoding SUMF1 gene, FGE's catalytic capacity is impaired resulting in reduced cellular sulfatase activities. Both, FGE protein stability and residual activity determine disease severity and have previously been correlated with the clinical MSD phenotype. Here, we report a patient with a late infantile severe course of disease. The patient is compound heterozygous for two so far undescribed SUMF1 mutations, c.156delC (p.C52fsX57) and c.390A>T (p.E130D). In patient fibroblasts, mRNA of the frameshift allele is undetectable. In contrast, the allele encoding FGE-E130D is expressed. FGE-E130D correctly localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has a very high residual molecular activity in vitro (55% of wildtype FGE); however, it is rapidly degraded. Thus, despite substantial residual enzyme activity, protein instability determines disease severity, which highlights that potential MSD treatment approaches should target protein folding and stabilization mechanisms. PMID:23321616

  1. Meiosis I Arrest Abnormalities Lead to Severe Oligozoospermia in Meiosis 1 Arresting Protein (M1ap)-Deficient Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Nelson Alexander; Li, Li; Dabir, Deepa; Nicolau, Fotini; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Koehler, Carla; McCarrey, John R.; Lu, Naifang; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meiosis 1 arresting protein (M1ap) is a novel vertebrate gene expressed exclusively in germ cells of the embryonic ovary and the adult testis. In male mice, M1ap expression, which is present from spermatogonia to secondary spermatocytes, is evolutionarily conserved and has a specific spatial and temporal pattern suggestive of a role during germ cell development. To test its function, mice deficient in M1ap were created. Whereas females had histologically normal ovaries, males exhibited reduced testicular size and a myriad of tubular defects, which led to severe oligozoospermia and infertility. Although some germ cells arrested at the zygotene/pachytene stages, most cells advanced to metaphase I before arresting and entering apoptosis. Cells that reached metaphase I were unable to properly align their chromosomes at the metaphase plate due to abnormal chromosome synapses and failure to form crossover foci. Depending on the state of tubular degeneration, all germ cells, with the exemption of spermatogonia, disappeared; with further deterioration, tubules displaying only Sertoli cells reminiscent of Sertoli cell-only syndrome in humans were observed. Our results uncovered an essential role for M1ap as a novel germ cell gene not previously implicated in male germ cell development and suggest that mutations in M1AP could account for some cases of nonobstructive oligozoospermia in men. PMID:23269666

  2. Loss of the starvation-induced gene Rack1 leads to glycogen deficiency and impaired autophagic responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Érdi, Balázs; Nagy, Péter; Zvara, Ágnes; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Ménesi, Dalma; Puskás, László G.; Juhász, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic material for lysosomal degradation in eukaryotic cells. Starvation induces high levels of autophagy to promote survival in the lack of nutrients. We compared genome-wide transcriptional profiles of fed and starved control, autophagy-deficient Atg7 and Atg1 null mutant Drosophila larvae to search for novel regulators of autophagy. Genes involved in catabolic processes including autophagy were transcriptionally upregulated in all cases. We also detected repression of genes involved in DNA replication in autophagy mutants compared with control animals. The expression of Rack1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) increased 4.1- to 5.5-fold during nutrient deprivation in all three genotypes. The scaffold protein Rack1 plays a role in a wide range of processes including translation, cell adhesion and migration, cell survival and cancer. Loss of Rack1 led to attenuated autophagic response to starvation, and glycogen stores were decreased 11.8-fold in Rack1 mutant cells. Endogenous Rack1 partially colocalized with GFP-Atg8a and early autophagic structures on the ultrastructural level, suggesting its involvement in autophagosome formation. Endogenous Rack1 also showed a high degree of colocalization with glycogen particles in the larval fat body, and with Shaggy, the Drosophila homolog of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK-3B). Our results, for the first time, demonstrated the fundamental role of Rack1 in autophagy and glycogen synthesis. PMID:22562043

  3. Deficiency of Lipoprotein Lipase in Neurons Decreases AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Leads to Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Taussig, Matthew D.; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele; Bergman, Bryan C.; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.; Eckel, Robert H.; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been found in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerides in lipoproteins and regulates lipid metabolism in multiple organs and tissues, including the central nervous system (CNS). Though many brain regions express LPL, the functions of this lipase in the CNS remain largely unknown. We developed mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency that became obese on chow by 16 wks in homozygous mutant mice (NEXLPL-/-) and 10 mo in heterozygous mice (NEXLPL+/-). In the present study, we show that 21 mo NEXLPL+/- mice display substantial cognitive function decline including poorer learning and memory, and increased anxiety with no difference in general motor activities and exploratory behavior. These neurobehavioral abnormalities are associated with a reduction in the 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA1 and its phosphorylation, without any alterations in amyloid β accumulation. Importantly, a marked deficit in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the hippocampus precedes the development of the neurobehavioral phenotype of NEXLPL+/- mice. And, a diet supplemented with n-3 PUFA can improve the learning and memory of NEXLPL+/- mice at both 10 mo and 21 mo of age. We interpret these findings to indicate that LPL regulates the availability of PUFA in the CNS and, this in turn, impacts the strength of synaptic plasticity in the brain of aging mice through the modification of AMPA receptor and its phosphorylation. PMID:26263173

  4. Deficiency of PTP1B in POMC neurons leads to alterations in energy balance and homeostatic response to cold exposure

    PubMed Central

    De Jonghe, Bart C.; Hayes, Matthew R.; Banno, Ryoichi; Skibicka, Karolina P.; Zimmer, Derek J.; Bowen, Kerisha A.; Leichner, Theresa M.; Alhadeff, Amber L.; Kanoski, Scott E.; Cyr, Nicole E.; Nillni, Eduardo A.; Grill, Harvey J.

    2011-01-01

    The adipose tissue-derived hormone leptin regulates energy balance through catabolic effects on central circuits, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. Leptin activation of POMC neurons increases thermogenesis and locomotor activity. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an important negative regulator of leptin signaling. POMC neuron-specific deletion of PTP1B in mice results in reduced high-fat diet-induced body weight and adiposity gain due to increased energy expenditure and greater leptin sensitivity. Mice lacking the leptin gene (ob/ob mice) are hypothermic and cold intolerant, whereas leptin delivery to ob/ob mice induces thermogenesis via increased sympathetic activity to brown adipose tissue (BAT). Here, we examined whether POMC PTP1B mediates the thermoregulatory response of CNS leptin signaling by evaluating food intake, body weight, core temperature (TC), and spontaneous physical activity (SPA) in response to either exogenous leptin or 4-day cold exposure (4°C) in male POMC-Ptp1b-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. POMC-Ptp1b−/− mice were hypersensitive to leptin-induced food intake and body weight suppression compared with wild types, yet they displayed similar leptin-induced increases in TC. Interestingly, POMC-Ptp1b−/− mice had increased BAT weight and elevated plasma triiodothyronine (T3) levels in response to a 4-day cold challenge, as well as reduced SPA 24 h after cold exposure, relative to controls. These data show that PTP1B in POMC neurons plays a role in short-term cold-induced reduction of SPA and may influence cold-induced thermogenesis via enhanced activation of the thyroid axis. PMID:21406615

  5. Hematopoietic deletion of transferrin receptor 2 in mice leads to a block in erythroid differentiation during iron-deficient anemia.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Gautam; Secondes, Eriza S; Wallace, Daniel F; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2016-08-01

    Iron metabolism and erythropoiesis are inherently interlinked physiological processes. Regulation of iron metabolism is mediated by the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin limits the amount of iron released into the blood by binding to and causing the internalization of the iron exporter, ferroportin. A number of molecules and physiological stimuli, including erythropoiesis, are known to regulate hepcidin. An increase in erythropoietic demand decreases hepcidin, resulting in increased bioavailable iron in the blood. Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) is involved in the systemic regulation of iron metabolism. Patients and mice with mutations in TFR2 develop hemochromatosis due to inappropriate hepcidin levels relative to body iron. Recent studies from our laboratory and others have suggested an additional role for TFR2 in response to iron-restricted erythropoiesis. These studies used mouse models with perturbed systemic iron metabolism: anemic mice lacking matriptase-2 and Tfr2, or bone marrow transplants from iron-loaded Tfr2 null mice. We developed a novel transgenic mouse model which lacks Tfr2 in the hematopoietic compartment, enabling the delineation of the role of Tfr2 in erythroid development without interfering with its role in systemic iron metabolism. We show that in the absence of hematopoietic Tfr2 immature polychromatic erythroblasts accumulate with a concordant reduction in the percentage of mature erythroid cells in the spleen and bone marrow of anemic mice. These results demonstrate that erythroid Tfr2 is essential for an appropriate erythropoietic response in iron-deficient anemia. These findings may be of relevance in clinical situations in which an immediate and efficient erythropoietic response is required. Am. J. Hematol. 91:812-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27169626

  6. Regioselective carboannulation of electron-deficient allenes with dialkyl (2-formylphenyl)malonates leading to multisubstituted naphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Koppanathi, Nagaraju; Swamy, K C Kumara

    2016-06-14

    An efficient base-catalysed regioselective carboannulation of allenoates (or allenylphosphonates) with dialkyl 2-(2-formylphenyl)malonates that leads to multi-substituted naphthalenes in high yields has been developed. This cascade reaction proceeds through Michael addition, cyclisation, dealkoxycarboxylation and tautomerisation. By using an allenylphosphine oxide, a species analogous to one of the intermediate species in the mechanistic pathway has been isolated. PMID:27180679

  7. Disruption of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 gene leads to cytochrome c oxidase depletion and reorchestrated respiratory metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Jennifer; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Macherel, David; Benamar, Abdelilah; Belcram, Katia; Quadrado, Martine; Arnal, Nadège; Mireau, Hakim

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the last respiratory complex of the electron transfer chain in mitochondria and is responsible for transferring electrons to oxygen, the final acceptor, in the classical respiratory pathway. The essentiality of this step makes it that depletion in complex IV leads to lethality, thereby impeding studies on complex IV assembly and respiration plasticity in plants. Here, we characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryo-lethal mutant lines impaired in the expression of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 (COD1) gene, which encodes a mitochondria-localized PentatricoPeptide Repeat protein. Although unable to germinate under usual conditions, cod1 homozygous embryos could be rescued from immature seeds and developed in vitro into slow-growing bush-like plantlets devoid of a root system. cod1 mutants were defective in C-to-U editing events in cytochrome oxidase subunit2 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit4 transcripts, encoding subunits of respiratory complex IV and I, respectively, and consequently lacked cytochrome c oxidase activity. We further show that respiratory oxygen consumption by cod1 plantlets is exclusively associated with alternative oxidase activity and that alternative NADH dehydrogenases are also up-regulated in these plants. The metabolomics pattern of cod1 mutants was also deeply altered, suggesting that alternative metabolic pathways compensated for the probable resulting restriction in NADH oxidation. Being the first complex IV-deficient mutants described in higher plants, cod1 lines should be instrumental to future studies on respiration homeostasis. PMID:25301889

  8. Disruption of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 Gene Leads to Cytochrome c Oxidase Depletion and Reorchestrated Respiratory Metabolism in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Jennifer; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Macherel, David; Benamar, Abdelilah; Belcram, Katia; Quadrado, Martine; Arnal, Nadège; Mireau, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the last respiratory complex of the electron transfer chain in mitochondria and is responsible for transferring electrons to oxygen, the final acceptor, in the classical respiratory pathway. The essentiality of this step makes it that depletion in complex IV leads to lethality, thereby impeding studies on complex IV assembly and respiration plasticity in plants. Here, we characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryo-lethal mutant lines impaired in the expression of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 (COD1) gene, which encodes a mitochondria-localized PentatricoPeptide Repeat protein. Although unable to germinate under usual conditions, cod1 homozygous embryos could be rescued from immature seeds and developed in vitro into slow-growing bush-like plantlets devoid of a root system. cod1 mutants were defective in C-to-U editing events in cytochrome oxidase subunit2 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit4 transcripts, encoding subunits of respiratory complex IV and I, respectively, and consequently lacked cytochrome c oxidase activity. We further show that respiratory oxygen consumption by cod1 plantlets is exclusively associated with alternative oxidase activity and that alternative NADH dehydrogenases are also up-regulated in these plants. The metabolomics pattern of cod1 mutants was also deeply altered, suggesting that alternative metabolic pathways compensated for the probable resulting restriction in NADH oxidation. Being the first complex IV-deficient mutants described in higher plants, cod1 lines should be instrumental to future studies on respiration homeostasis. PMID:25301889

  9. Cd59a deficiency in mice leads to preferential innate immune activation in the retinal pigment epithelium-choroid with age.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Philipp; Cowing, Jill A; Cristante, Enrico; Liyanage, Sidath E; Ribeiro, Joana; Duran, Yanai; Abelleira Hervas, Laura; Carvalho, Livia S; Bainbridge, James W B; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Ali, Robin R

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulation of the complement system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. To investigate consequences of altered complement regulation in the eye with age, we examined Cd59a complement regulator deficient (Cd59a(-/-)) mice between 4 and 15 months. In vivo imaging revealed an increased age-related accumulation of autofluorescent spots in Cd59a(-/-) mice, a feature that reflects accumulation of subretinal macrophages and/or microglia. Despite this activation of myeloid cells in the eye, Cd59a(-/-) mice showed normal retinal histology and function as well as normal choroidal microvasculature. With age, they revealed increased expression of activators of the alternative complement pathway (C3, Cfb, Cfd), in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid but less in the retina. This molecular response was not altered by moderately-enhanced light exposure. Cd59a deficiency therefore leads to a preferential age-related dysregulation of the complement system in the RPE-choroid, that alone or in combination with light as a trigger, is not sufficient to cause choroidal vascular changes or retinal degeneration and dysfunction. This data emphasizes the particular vulnerability of the RPE-choroidal complex to dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway during aging. PMID:26234657

  10. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-10-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  11. PLEKHG5 deficiency leads to an intermediate form of autosomal-recessive Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Azzedine, Hamid; Zavadakova, Petra; Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Vaz Pato, Maria; Pinto, Nuno; Bartesaghi, Luca; Zenker, Jennifer; Poirot, Olivier; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Arnaud Gouttenoire, Estelle; Cartoni, Romain; Title, Alexandra; Venturini, Giulia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Makowski, Edward; Schöls, Ludger; Claeys, Kristl G.; Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Weis, Joachim; Dubourg, Odile; Leal Loureiro, José; Stevanin, Giovanni; Said, Gérard; Amato, Anthony; Baraban, Jay; LeGuern, Eric; Senderek, Jan; Rivolta, Carlo; Chrast, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities and distal sensory loss. Following the analysis of two consanguineous families affected by a medium to late-onset recessive form of intermediate CMT, we identified overlapping regions of homozygosity on chromosome 1p36 with a combined maximum LOD score of 5.4. Molecular investigation of the genes from this region allowed identification of two homozygous mutations in PLEKHG5 that produce premature stop codons and are predicted to result in functional null alleles. Analysis of Plekhg5 in the mouse revealed that this gene is expressed in neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, and that knockout mice display reduced nerve conduction velocities that are comparable with those of affected individuals from both families. Interestingly, a homozygous PLEKHG5 missense mutation was previously reported in a recessive form of severe childhood onset lower motor neuron disease (LMND) leading to loss of the ability to walk and need for respiratory assistance. Together, these observations indicate that different mutations in PLEKHG5 lead to clinically diverse outcomes (intermediate CMT or LMND) affecting the function of neurons and glial cells. PMID:23777631

  12. Arp2/3 complex-deficient mouse fibroblasts are viable and have normal leading-edge actin structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Alessia; Cicchetti, Gregor; Falet, Hervé; Hartwig, John H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Kwiatkowski, David J.

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference silencing of up to 90% of Arp3 protein expression, a major subunit of the Arp2/3 complex, proportionately decreases the intracellular motility of Listeria monocytogenes and actin nucleation activity ascribable to the Arp2/3 complex in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. However, the Arp2/3-deficient cells exhibit unimpaired lamellipodial actin network structure, translational locomotion, spreading, actin assembly, and ruffling responses. In addition, Arp3-silenced cells expressing neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-derived peptides that inhibit Arp2/3 complex function in wild-type cells retained normal PDGF-induced ruffling. The Arp2/3 complex can be dispensable for leading-edge actin remodeling. PMID:16254049

  13. Clinical significance of complement deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, H David; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-09-01

    The complement system is composed of more than 30 serum and membrane-bound proteins, all of which are needed for normal function of complement in innate and adaptive immunity. Historically, deficiencies within the complement system have been suspected when young children have had recurrent and difficult-to-control infections. As our understanding of the complement system has increased, many other diseases have been attributed to deficiencies within the complement system. Generally, complement deficiencies within the classical pathway lead to increased susceptibility to encapsulated bacterial infections as well as a syndrome resembling systemic lupus erythematosus. Complement deficiencies within the mannose-binding lectin pathway generally lead to increased bacterial infections, and deficiencies within the alternative pathway usually lead to an increased frequency of Neisseria infections. However, factor H deficiency can lead to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Finally, deficiencies within the terminal complement pathway lead to an increased incidence of Neisseria infections. Two other notable complement-associated deficiencies are complement receptor 3 and 4 deficiency, which result from a deficiency of CD18, a disease known as leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1, and CD59 deficiency, which causes paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Most inherited deficiencies of the complement system are autosomal recessive, but properidin deficiency is X-linked recessive, deficiency of C1 inhibitor is autosomal dominant, and mannose-binding lectin and factor I deficiencies are autosomal co-dominant. The diversity of clinical manifestations of complement deficiencies reflects the complexity of the complement system. PMID:19758139

  14. Disruption of murine Hexa gene leads to enzymatic deficiency and to neuronal lysosomal storage, similar to that observed in Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tannoudji, M; Marchand, P; Akli, S; Sheardown, S A; Puech, J P; Kress, C; Gressens, P; Nassogne, M C; Beccari, T; Muggleton-Harris, A L

    1995-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by beta-hexosaminidase A deficiency and leads to death in early childhood. The disease results from mutations in the HEXA gene, which codes for the alpha chain of beta-hexosaminidase. The castastrophic neurodegenerative progression of the disease is thought to be a consequence of massive neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and related glycolipids in the brain and nervous system of the patients. Fuller understanding of the pathogenesis and the development of therapeutic procedures have both suffered from the lack of an animal model. We have used gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells to disrupt the mouse Hexa gene. Mice homozygous for the disrupted allele mimic several biochemical and histological features of human Tay-Sachs disease. Hexa-/- mice displayed a total deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A activity, and membranous cytoplasmic inclusions typical of GM2 gangliosidoses were found in the cytoplasm of their neurons. However, while the number of storage neurons increased with age, it remained low compared with that found in human, and no apparent motor or behavioral disorders could be observed. This suggests that the presence of beta-hexosaminidase A is not an absolute requirement of ganglioside degradation in mice. These mice should help us to understand several aspects of the disease as well as the physiological functions of hexosaminidase in mice. They should also provide a valuable animal model in which to test new forms of therapy, and in particular gene delivery into the central nervous system. PMID:8747922

  15. IκBα deficiency in brain leads to elevated basal neuroinflammation and attenuated response following traumatic brain injury: implications for functional recovery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The transcription factor NFκB is an important mediator of cell survival and inflammation in the immune system. In the central nervous system (CNS), NFκB signaling has been implicated in regulating neuronal survival following acute pathologic damage such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. NFκB is normally bound by the principal inhibitory protein, IκBα, and sequestered in the cytoplasm. Activation of NFκB requires the degradation of IκBα, thereby freeing NFκB to translocate to the nucleus and activate the target genes. Mice deficient in IκBα display deregulated and sustained NFκB activation and early postnatal lethality, highlighting a critical role of IκBα in NFκB regulation. Results We investigated the role of IκBα in regulating NFκB activity in the brain and the effects of the NFκB/IκBα pathway in mediating neuroinflammation under both physiological and brain injury conditions. We report that astrocytes, but not neurons, exhibit prominent NFκB activity, and that basal NFκB activity in astrocytes is elevated in the absence of IκBα. By generating mice with brain-specific deletion of IκBα, we show that IκBα deficiency does not compromise normal brain development. However, basal neuroinflammation detected by GFAP and Iba1 immunoreactivity is elevated. This leads to impaired inflammatory responses following TBI and worsened brain damage including higher blood brain barrier permeability, increased injury volumes and enlarged ventricle volumes. Conclusions We conclude that, in the CNS, astrocyte is the primary cell type subject to NFκB regulation. We further demonstrate that IκBα plays an important role in regulating NFκB activity in the brain and a robust NFκB/IκBα-mediated neuroinflammatory response immediately following TBI is beneficial. PMID:22992283

  16. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion blocks XRCC4-mediated non-homologous end-joining repair and radiosensitizes prostate cancer cells to PARP inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Payel; Choudhary, Gaurav S.; Alswillah, Turkeyah; Xiong, Xiahui; Heston, Warren D.; Magi-Galuzzi, Cristina; Zhang, Junran; Klein, Eric A.; Almasan, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to genotoxic agents, such as ionizing radiation (IR) produces DNA damage leading to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); IR toxicity is augmented when the DNA repair is impaired. We reported that radiosensitization by a PARP inhibitor (PARPi) was highly prominent in prostate cancer (PCa) cells expressing the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein. Here, we show that TMPRSS2-ERG blocks non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair by inhibiting DNA-PKcs. VCaP cells, which harbor TMPRSS2-ERG and PC3 cells that stably express it displayed γH2AX and 53BP1 foci constitutively, indicating persistent DNA damage that was absent if TMPRSS2-ERG was depleted by siRNA in VCaP cells. The extent of DNA damage was enhanced and associated with TMPRSS2-ERG’s ability to inhibit DNA-PKcs function, as indicated by its own phosphorylation (Thr2609, Ser2056) and that of its substrate, Ser1778-53BP1. DNA-PKcs deficiency caused by TMPRSS2-ERG destabilized critical NHEJ components on chromatin. Thus, XRCC4 was not recruited to chromatin, with retention of other NHEJ core factors being reduced. DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation was restored to the level of parental cells when TMPRSS2-ERG was depleted by siRNA. Following IR, TMPRSS2-ERG-expressing PC3 cells had elevated Rad51 foci and homologous recombination (HR) activity, indicating that HR compensated for defective NHEJ in these cells, hence addressing why TMPRSS2-ERG alone did not lead to radiosensitization. However, the presence of TMPRSS2-ERG, by inhibiting NHEJ DNA repair, enhanced PARPi-mediated radiosensitization. IR in combination with PARPi resulted in enhanced DNA damage in TMPRSS2-ERG-expressing cells. Thus, by inhibiting NHEJ, TMPRSS2-ERG provides a synthetic lethal interaction with PARPi in PCa patients expressing TMPRSS2-ERG. PMID:26026052

  17. The TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Blocks XRCC4-Mediated Nonhomologous End-Joining Repair and Radiosensitizes Prostate Cancer Cells to PARP Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Payel; Choudhary, Gaurav S; Alswillah, Turkeyah; Xiong, Xiahui; Heston, Warren D; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Zhang, Junran; Klein, Eric A; Almasan, Alexandru

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to genotoxic agents, such as ionizing radiation (IR), produces DNA damage, leading to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB); IR toxicity is augmented when the DNA repair is impaired. We reported that radiosensitization by a PARP inhibitor (PARPi) was highly prominent in prostate cancer cells expressing the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein. Here, we show that TMPRSS2-ERG blocks nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair by inhibiting DNA-PKcs. VCaP cells, which harbor TMPRSS2-ERG and PC3 cells that stably express it, displayed γH2AX and 53BP1 foci constitutively, indicating persistent DNA damage that was absent if TMPRSS2-ERG was depleted by siRNA in VCaP cells. The extent of DNA damage was enhanced and associated with TMPRSS2-ERG's ability to inhibit DNA-PKcs function, as indicated by its own phosphorylation (Thr2609, Ser2056) and that of its substrate, Ser1778-53BP1. DNA-PKcs deficiency caused by TMPRSS2-ERG destabilized critical NHEJ components on chromatin. Thus, XRCC4 was not recruited to chromatin, with retention of other NHEJ core factors being reduced. DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation was restored to the level of parental cells when TMPRSS2-ERG was depleted by siRNA. Following IR, TMPRSS2-ERG-expressing PC3 cells had elevated Rad51 foci and homologous recombination (HR) activity, indicating that HR compensated for defective NHEJ in these cells, hence addressing why TMPRSS2-ERG alone did not lead to radiosensitization. However, the presence of TMPRSS2-ERG, by inhibiting NHEJ DNA repair, enhanced PARPi-mediated radiosensitization. IR in combination with PARPi resulted in enhanced DNA damage in TMPRSS2-ERG-expressing cells. Therefore, by inhibiting NHEJ, TMPRSS2-ERG provides a synthetic lethal interaction with PARPi in prostate cancer patients expressing TMPRSS2-ERG. PMID:26026052

  18. Autoantibody stabilization of the classical pathway C3 convertase leading to C3 deficiency and Neisserial sepsis: C4 nephritic factor revisited

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth C.; Chase, Nicole M.; Densen, Peter; Hintermeyer, Mary K.; Casper, James T.; Atkinson, John P.

    2012-01-01

    C3 deficiency is a rare disorder that leads to recurrent pyogenic infections. Here we describe a previously healthy 18 y/o Caucasian male with severe meningococcal disease. Total hemolytic activity was zero secondary to an undetectable C3. The C3 gene was normal by sequencing. Mixing the patient’s serum with normal human serum led to C3 consumption. An IgG autoantibody in the patient’s serum was identified that stabilized the classical pathway C3 and C5 convertases, thus preventing decay of these enzyme complexes. This autoantibody is an example of a C4 nephritic factor, with an additional feature of stabilizing the C5 convertase. Previous patients with C4 nephritic factor had membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Two years after presentation, this patient’s C3 remains undetectable with no evidence of renal disease. We revisit the role of autoantibodies to classical pathway convertases in disease, reviews the literature on C4-NeF and we comment on its detection in the clinical laboratory. PMID:23117396

  19. Mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh) "Sash" mutant mice display aberrant myelopoiesis leading to the accumulation of splenocytes that act as myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anastasija; Schüler, Andrea; Friedrich, Pamela; Döner, Fatma; Bopp, Tobias; Radsak, Markus; Hoffmann, Markus; Relle, Manfred; Distler, Ute; Kuharev, Jörg; Tenzer, Stefan; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Becker, Marc; Stassen, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh) "sash" mice are widely used to investigate mast cell functions. However, mutations of c-Kit also affect additional cells of hematopoietic and nonimmune origin. In this study, we demonstrate that Kit(W-sh) causes aberrant extramedullary myelopoiesis characterized by the expansion of immature lineage-negative cells, common myeloid progenitors, and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors in the spleen. A consistent feature shared by these cell types is the reduced expression of c-Kit. Populations expressing intermediate and high levels of Ly6G, a component of the myeloid differentiation Ag Gr-1, are also highly expanded in the spleen of sash mice. These cells are able to suppress T cell responses in vitro and phenotypically and functionally resemble myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). MDSC typically accumulate in tumor-bearing hosts and are able to dampen immune responses. Consequently, transfer of MDSC from naive sash mice into line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma tumor-bearing wild-type littermates leads to enhanced tumor progression. However, although it can also be observed in sash mice, accelerated growth of transplanted line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma tumors is a mast cell-independent phenomenon. Thus, the Kit(W-sh) mutation broadly affects key steps in myelopoiesis that may have an impact on mast cell research. PMID:23636054

  20. Wnt5a Deficiency Leads to Anomalies in Ureteric Tree Development, Tubular Epithelial Cell Organization and Basement Membrane Integrity Pointing to a Role in Kidney Collecting Duct Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Pietilä, Ilkka; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Kaisto, Susanna; Tika, Elisavet; van Eerde, Albertien M.; Salo, Antti M.; Garma, Leonardo; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Feitz, Wout F.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; Juffer, André; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Renkema, Kirsten Y.; Myllyharju, Johanna; Vainio, Seppo J.

    2016-01-01

    The Wnts can be considered as candidates for the Congenital Anomaly of Kidney and Urinary Tract, CAKUT diseases since they take part in the control of kidney organogenesis. Of them Wnt5a is expressed in ureteric bud (UB) and its deficiency leads to duplex collecting system (13/90) uni- or bilateral kidney agenesis (10/90), hypoplasia with altered pattern of ureteric tree organization (42/90) and lobularization defects with partly fused ureter trunks (25/90) unlike in controls. The UB had also notably less tips due to Wnt5a deficiency being at E15.5 306 and at E16.5 765 corresponding to 428 and 1022 in control (p<0.02; p<0.03) respectively. These changes due to Wnt5a knock out associated with anomalies in the ultrastructure of the UB daughter epithelial cells. The basement membrane (BM) was malformed so that the BM thickness increased from 46.3 nm to 71.2 nm (p<0.01) at E16.5 in the Wnt5a knock out when compared to control. Expression of a panel of BM components such as laminin and of type IV collagen was also reduced due to the Wnt5a knock out. The P4ha1 gene that encodes a catalytic subunit of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase I (C-P4H-I) in collagen synthesis expression and the overall C-P4H enzyme activity were elevated by around 26% due to impairment in Wnt5a function from control. The compound Wnt5a+/-;P4ha1+/- embryos demonstrated Wnt5a-/- related defects, for example local hyperplasia in the UB tree. A R260H WNT5A variant was identified from renal human disease cohort. Functional studies of the consequence of the corresponding mouse variant in comparison to normal ligand reduced Wnt5a-signalling in vitro. Together Wnt5a has a novel function in kidney organogenesis by contributing to patterning of UB derived collecting duct development contributing putatively to congenital disease. PMID:26794322

  1. Wnt5a Deficiency Leads to Anomalies in Ureteric Tree Development, Tubular Epithelial Cell Organization and Basement Membrane Integrity Pointing to a Role in Kidney Collecting Duct Patterning.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Ilkka; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Kaisto, Susanna; Tika, Elisavet; van Eerde, Albertien M; Salo, Antti M; Garma, Leonardo; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Feitz, Wout F; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Juffer, André; Knoers, Nine V A M; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Myllyharju, Johanna; Vainio, Seppo J

    2016-01-01

    The Wnts can be considered as candidates for the Congenital Anomaly of Kidney and Urinary Tract, CAKUT diseases since they take part in the control of kidney organogenesis. Of them Wnt5a is expressed in ureteric bud (UB) and its deficiency leads to duplex collecting system (13/90) uni- or bilateral kidney agenesis (10/90), hypoplasia with altered pattern of ureteric tree organization (42/90) and lobularization defects with partly fused ureter trunks (25/90) unlike in controls. The UB had also notably less tips due to Wnt5a deficiency being at E15.5 306 and at E16.5 765 corresponding to 428 and 1022 in control (p<0.02; p<0.03) respectively. These changes due to Wnt5a knock out associated with anomalies in the ultrastructure of the UB daughter epithelial cells. The basement membrane (BM) was malformed so that the BM thickness increased from 46.3 nm to 71.2 nm (p<0.01) at E16.5 in the Wnt5a knock out when compared to control. Expression of a panel of BM components such as laminin and of type IV collagen was also reduced due to the Wnt5a knock out. The P4ha1 gene that encodes a catalytic subunit of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase I (C-P4H-I) in collagen synthesis expression and the overall C-P4H enzyme activity were elevated by around 26% due to impairment in Wnt5a function from control. The compound Wnt5a+/-;P4ha1+/- embryos demonstrated Wnt5a-/- related defects, for example local hyperplasia in the UB tree. A R260H WNT5A variant was identified from renal human disease cohort. Functional studies of the consequence of the corresponding mouse variant in comparison to normal ligand reduced Wnt5a-signalling in vitro. Together Wnt5a has a novel function in kidney organogenesis by contributing to patterning of UB derived collecting duct development contributing putatively to congenital disease. PMID:26794322

  2. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects. PMID:26835453

  3. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects. PMID:26835453

  4. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs-deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality. PMID:25925375

  5. Iron deficiency leads to inhibition of oxygen transfer and enhanced formation of virulence factors in cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Sabra, Wael; Zeng, An-Ping

    2003-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was recently found to exhibit two remarkable physiological responses to oxidative stress: (1) a strong reduction in the efficiency of oxygen transfer from the gas phase into the liquid phase, thus causing oxygen limitation in the culture and (2) formation of a clear polysaccharide capsule on the cell surface. In this work, it has been shown that the iron concentration in the culture plays a crucial role in evoking these phenomena. The physiological responses of two P. aeruginosa PAO1 isolates (NCCB 2452 and ATCC 15692) were examined in growth media with varied iron concentrations. In a computer-controlled bioreactor cultivation system for controlled dissolved oxygen tension (pO2), a strong correlation between the exhaustion of iron and the onset of oxygen limitation was observed. The oxygen transfer rate of the culture, characterized by the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, kLa, significantly decreased under iron-limited conditions. The formation of alginate and capsule was more strongly affected by iron concentration than by oxygen concentration. The reduction of the oxygen transfer rate and the subsequent oxygen limitation triggered by iron deficiency may represent a new and efficient way for P. aeruginosa PAO1 to adapt to growth conditions of iron limitation. Furthermore, the secretion of proteins into the culture medium was strongly enhanced by iron limitation. The formation of the virulence factor elastase and the iron chelators pyoverdine and pyochelin also significantly increased under iron-limited conditions. These results have implications for lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients by P. aeruginosa in view of the prevalence of iron limitation at the site of infection and the respiratory failure leading to death. PMID:12949186

  6. A Lethal Murine Infection Model for Dengue Virus 3 in AG129 Mice Deficient in Type I and II Interferon Receptors Leads to Systemic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarathy, Vanessa V.; White, Mellodee; Li, Li; Gorder, Summer R.; Pyles, Richard B.; Campbell, Gerald A.; Milligan, Gregg N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mosquito-borne disease dengue (DEN) is caused by four serologically and genetically related viruses, termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. Infection with one DENV usually leads to acute illness and results in lifelong homotypic immunity, but individuals remain susceptible to infection by the other three DENVs. The lack of a small-animal model that mimics systemic DEN disease without neurovirulence has been an obstacle, but DENV-2 models that resemble human disease have been recently developed in AG129 mice (deficient in interferon alpha/beta and interferon gamma receptor signaling). However, comparable DENV-1, -3, and -4 models have not been developed. We utilized a non-mouse-adapted DENV-3 Thai human isolate to develop a lethal infection model in AG129 mice. Intraperitoneal inoculation of six to eight-week-old animals with strain C0360/94 led to rapid, fatal disease. Lethal C0360/94 infection resulted in physical signs of illness, high viral loads in the spleen, liver, and large intestine, histological changes in the liver and spleen tissues, and increased serum cytokine levels. Importantly, the animals developed vascular leakage, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. Overall, we have developed a lethal DENV-3 murine infection model, with no evidence of neurotropic disease based on a non-mouse-adapted human isolate, which can be used to investigate DEN pathogenesis and to evaluate candidate vaccines and antivirals. This suggests that murine models utilizing non-mouse-adapted isolates can be obtained for all four DENVs. IMPORTANCE Dengue (DEN) is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four DENV serotypes (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4) that have no treatments or vaccines. Primary infection with one DENV usually leads to acute illness followed by lifelong homotypic immunity, but susceptibility to infection by the other three DENVs remains. Therefore, a vaccine needs to protect from all four DENVs simultaneously. To date a suitable animal model to mimic systemic human illness

  7. Adult vitamin D deficiency leads to behavioural and brain neurochemical alterations in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Groves, Natalie J; Kesby, James P; Eyles, Darryl W; McGrath, John J; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Burne, Thomas H J

    2013-03-15

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that low levels of vitamin D may predispose people to develop depression and cognitive impairment. While rodent studies have demonstrated that prenatal vitamin D deficiency is associated with altered brain development, there is a lack of research examining adult vitamin D (AVD) deficiency. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of AVD deficiency on behaviour and brain function in the mouse. Ten-week old male C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice were fed a control or vitamin D deficient diet for 10 weeks prior to, and during behavioural testing. We assessed a broad range of behavioural domains, excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in brain tissue, and, in separate groups of mice, locomotor response to d-amphetamine and MK-801. Overall, AVD deficiency resulted in hyperlocomotion in a novel open field and reduced GAD65/67 levels in brain tissue. AVD-deficient BALB/c mice had altered behaviour on the elevated plus maze, altered responses to heat, sound and shock, and decreased levels of glutamate and glutamine, and increased levels of GABA and glycine. By contrast C57BL/6J mice had a more subtle phenotype with no further behavioural changes but significant elevations in serine, homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. Although the behavioural phenotype of AVD did not seem to model a specific disorder, the overall reduction in GAD65/67 levels associated with AVD deficiency may be relevant to a number of neuropsychiatric conditions. This is the first study to show an association between AVD deficiency and prominent changes in behaviour and brain neurochemistry in the mouse. PMID:23238039

  8. Factor X deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Factor X (ten) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor X in the blood. It leads to problems with ... or are not functioning like they should. Factor X is one such coagulation factor. Factor X deficiency ...

  9. Clinical laboratory standard capillary protein electrophoresis alerted of a low C3 state and lead to the identification of a Factor I deficiency due to a novel homozygous mutation.

    PubMed

    Franco-Jarava, Clara; Colobran, Roger; Mestre-Torres, Jaume; Vargas, Victor; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Complement factor I (CFI) deficiency is typically associated to recurrent infections with encapsulated microorganisms and, less commonly, to autoimmunity. We report a 53-years old male who, in a routine control for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, presented a flat beta-2 fraction at the capillary protein electropherogram. Patient's clinical records included multiple oropharyngeal infections since infancy and an episode of invasive meningococcal infection. Complement studies revealed reduced C3, low classical pathway activation and undetectable Factor I. CFI gene sequencing showed a novel inherited homozygous deletion of 5 nucleotides in exon 12, causing a frameshift leading to a truncated protein. This study points out that capillary protein electrophoresis can alert of possible states of low C3, which, once confirmed and common causes ruled out, can lead to CFI and other complement deficiency diagnosis. This is important since they constitute a still underestimated risk of invasive meningococcemia that can be greatly reduced by vaccination. PMID:27091480

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency can lead to a loss of bone density (size and strength), broken bones (fractures), muscle weakness, ... get too much calcium in their blood or urine. Careful monitoring of blood vitamin D levels will ...

  11. Requirement for the Kinase Activity of Human DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit in DNA Strand Break Rejoining

    PubMed Central

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Kumano, Satoshi; Boubnov, Nikolai V.; Story, Michael D.; Tung, Chang-Shung; Peterson, Scott R.; Chen, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an enormous, 470-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase that has homology with members of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase superfamily. This protein contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by assembling broken ends of DNA molecules in combination with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. It may also serve as a molecular scaffold for recruiting DNA repair factors to DNA strand breaks. This study attempts to better define the role of protein kinase activity in the repair of DNA DSBs. We constructed a contiguous 14-kb human DNA-PKcs cDNA and demonstrated that it can complement the DNA DSB repair defects of two mutant cell lines known to be deficient in DNA-PKcs (M059J and V3). We then created deletion and site-directed mutations within the conserved PI 3-kinase domain of the DNA-PKcs gene to test the importance of protein kinase activity for DSB rejoining. These DNA-PKcs mutant constructs are able to express the protein but fail to complement the DNA DSB or V(D)J recombination defects of DNA-PKcs mutant cells. These results indicate that the protein kinase activity of DNA-PKcs is essential for the rejoining of DNA DSBs in mammalian cells. We have also determined a model structure for the DNA-PKcs kinase domain based on comparisons to the crystallographic structure of a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. This structure gives some insight into which amino acid residues are crucial for the kinase activity in DNA-PKcs. PMID:10207111

  12. Deficiency of the parathyroid hormone-related peptide nuclear localization and carboxyl terminal sequences leads to premature skin ageing partially mediated by the upregulation of p27.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Minyue; Chen, Guangpei; Lu, Na; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Shulei; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-11-01

    We previously reported that deficiency of the PTHrP nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and C-terminus in PTHrP knockin (PTHrP KI) mice resulted in premature ageing of skin. P27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, was upregulated in PTHrP KI mice and acted as a downstream target of the PTHrP NLS to regulate the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. To determine the effects of p27 deficiency on premature skin ageing of PTHrP KI mice, we compared the skin phenotypes of PTHrP KI mice to those of p27 knockout (p27(-/-) ) mice and to those of double homozygous p27-deficient and PTHrP KI (p27(-/-) PTHrP KI) mice at 2 weeks age. Compared with wild-type littermates, PTHrP KI mice displayed thinner skin and decreased subcutaneous fat and collagen fibres, decreased skin cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, higher expression of p27, p19 and p53 and lower expression of cyclin E and CDK2, and increased reactive oxygen species levels and decreased antioxidant capacity. Deficiency of p27 in the PTHrP KI mice at least in part corrected the skin premature ageing phenotype resulting in thicker skin and increased subcutaneous fat and collagen. These alternations were associated with higher expression of CDK2 and cyclin E, lower expression of p19 and p53, and enhanced antioxidant capacity with increased skin cell proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. Our results indicate that the NLS and C-terminus of PTHrP play a critical role in preventing skin from premature ageing that is partially mediated by p27. PMID:26121068

  13. Frataxin Deficiency Leads to Defects in Expression of Antioxidants and Nrf2 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia of the Friedreich's Ataxia YG8R Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yuxi; Schoenfeld, Robert A.; Hayashi, Genki; Napoli, Eleonora; Akiyama, Tasuku; Iodi Carstens, Mirela; Carstens, Earl E.; Pook, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative stress is thought to be involved in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), yet it has not been demonstrated in the target neurons that are first to degenerate. Using the YG8R mouse model of FRDA, microarray and neuritic growth experiments were carried out in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), the primary site of neurodegeneration in this disease. Results: YG8R hemizygous mice exhibited defects in movement, and DRG neurites had growth defects. Microarray of DRG tissue identified decreased transcripts encoding the antioxidants, including peroxiredoxins, glutaredoxins, and glutathione S-transferase, and these were confirmed by immunoblots and quantitative real-time PCR. Because the decreased gene transcripts are the known targets of the antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), Nrf2 expression was measured; it was significantly decreased at the transcript and protein level in both the DRG and the cerebella of the YG8R hemizygous mouse; further, frataxin expression was significantly correlated with Nrf2 expression. Functionally, in YG8R hemizygous DRG, the total glutathione levels were reduced and explanted cells were more sensitive to the thioredoxin reductase (TxnRD) inhibitor auranofin, a thiol oxidant. In cell models of FRDA, including Schwann and the DRG, frataxin deficiency caused a decreased expression of the Nrf2 protein level in the nucleus, but not a defect in its translocation from the cytosol. Further, frataxin-deficient cells had decreased enzyme activity and expression of TxnRD, which is regulated by Nrf2, and were sensitive the TxnRD inhibitor auranofin. Innovation and Conclusion: These results support a mechanistic hypothesis in which frataxin deficiency decreases Nrf2 expression in vivo, causing the sensitivity to oxidative stress in target tissues the DRG and the cerebella, which contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1481–1493. PMID:23350650

  14. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  15. Thiamine deficiency and delirium.

    PubMed

    Osiezagha, Kenneth; Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C; Barker, Narviar C; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke's encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  16. High LET Radiation Amplifies Centrosome Overduplication Through a Pathway of γ-Tubulin Monoubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Mikio; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation induces centrosome overduplication, leading to mitotic catastrophe and tumorigenesis. Because mitotic catastrophe is one of the major tumor cell killing factors in high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation therapy and long-term survivors from such treatment have a potential risk of secondary tumors, we investigated LET dependence of radiation-induced centrosome overduplication and the underlying mechanism. Methods and Materials: Carbon and iron ion beams (13-200 keV/μm) and γ-rays (0.5 keV/μm) were used as radiation sources. To count centrosomes after IR exposure, human U2OS and mouse NIH3T3 cells were immunostained with antibodies of γ-tubulin and centrin 2. Similarly, Nbs1-, Brca1-, Ku70-, and DNA-PKcs-deficient mouse cells and their counterpart wild-type cells were used for measurement of centrosome overduplication. Results: The number of excess centrosome-containing cells at interphase and the resulting multipolar spindle at mitosis were amplified with increased LET, reaching a maximum level of 100 keV/μm, followed by sharp decrease in frequency. Interestingly, Ku70 and DNA-PKcs deficiencies marginally affected the induction of centrosome overduplication, whereas the cell killings were significantly enhanced. This was in contrast to observation that high LET radiation significantly enhanced frequencies of centrosome overduplication in Nbs1- and Brca1-deficient cells. Because NBS1/BRCA1 is implicated in monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin, we subsequently tested whether it is affected by high LET radiation. As a result, monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin was abolished in 48 to 72 hours after exposure to high LET radiation, although γ-ray exposure slightly decreased it 48 hours postirradiation and was restored to a normal level at 72 hours. Conclusions: High LET radiation significantly reduces NBS1/BRCA1-mediated monoubiquitination of γ-tubulin and amplifies centrosome overduplication with a peak at 100 keV/μm. In contrast, Ku70 and DNA-PKcs

  17. Prep1 (pKnox1)-deficiency leads to spontaneous tumor development in mice and accelerates EmuMyc lymphomagenesis: a tumor suppressor role for Prep1.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, E; Iotti, G; Di Rosa, P; Mejetta, S; Bianchi, F; Fernandez-Diaz, L C; Micali, N; Nuciforo, P; Lenti, E; Ponzoni, M; Doglioni, C; Caniatti, M; Di Fiore, P P; Blasi, F

    2010-04-01

    The Prep1 homeodomain transcription factor is essential for embryonic development. 25% of hypomorphic Prep1(i/i) embryos, expressing the gene at 2% of the normal levels, survive pregnancy and live a normal-length life. Later in life, however, these mice develop spontaneous pre-tumoral lesions or solid tumors (lymphomas and carcinomas). In addition, transplantation of E14.5 fetal liver (FL) Prep1(i/i) cells into lethally irradiated mice induces lymphomas. In agreement with the above data, haploinsufficiency of a different Prep1-deficient (null) allele accelerates EmuMyc lymphoma growth. Therefore Prep1 has a tumor suppressor function in mice. Immunohistochemistry on tissue micrroarrays (TMA) generated from three distinct human cohorts comprising a total of some 1000 human tumors revealed that 70% of the tumors express no or extremely low levels of Prep1, unlike normal tissues. Our data in mice are thus potentially relevant to human cancer. PMID:20106730

  18. COL6A3 protein deficiency in mice leads to muscle and tendon defects similar to human collagen VI congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Te-Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Zhu; Markova, Dessislava; Arita, Machiko; Zhang, Yejia; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir S; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2013-05-17

    Collagen VI is a ubiquitously expressed extracellular microfibrillar protein. Its most common molecular form is composed of the α1(VI), α2(VI), and α3(VI) collagen α chains encoded by the COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3 genes, respectively. Mutations in any of the three collagen VI genes cause congenital muscular dystrophy types Bethlem and Ullrich as well as intermediate phenotypes characterized by muscle weakness and connective tissue abnormalities. The α3(VI) collagen α chain has much larger N- and C-globular domains than the other two chains. Its most C-terminal domain can be cleaved off after assembly into microfibrils, and the cleavage product has been implicated in tumor angiogenesis and progression. Here we characterize a Col6a3 mutant mouse that expresses a very low level of a non-functional α3(VI) collagen chain. The mutant mice are deficient in extracellular collagen VI microfibrils and exhibit myopathic features, including decreased muscle mass and contractile force. Ultrastructurally abnormal collagen fibrils were observed in tendon, but not cornea, of the mutant mice, indicating a distinct tissue-specific effect of collagen VI on collagen I fibrillogenesis. Overall, the mice lacking normal α3(VI) collagen chains displayed mild musculoskeletal phenotypes similar to mice deficient in the α1(VI) collagen α chain, suggesting that the cleavage product of the α3(VI) collagen does not elicit essential functions in normal growth and development. The Col6a3 mouse mutant lacking functional α3(VI) collagen chains thus serves as an animal model for COL6A3-related muscular dystrophy. PMID:23564457

  19. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, Siti Amanlina; Libau, Eshele Anak; Lee, Pei Xuan; St. John, Ashley L.; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that most of the severe dengue cases occur upon a secondary heterologous infection. Furthermore, babies born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk of developing severe disease upon primary infection with a heterologous or homologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype when maternal antibodies reach sub-neutralizing concentrations. These observations have been explained by the antibody mediated disease enhancement (ADE) phenomenon whereby heterologous antibodies or sub-neutralizing homologous antibodies bind to but fail to neutralize DENV particles, allowing Fc-receptor mediated entry of the virus-antibody complexes into host cells. This eventually results in enhanced viral replication and heightened inflammatory responses. In an attempt to replicate this ADE phenomenon in a mouse model, we previously reported that upon DENV2 infection 5-week old type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors-deficient mice (AG129) born to DENV1-immune mothers displayed enhancement of disease severity characterized by increased virus titers and extensive vascular leakage which eventually led to the animals’ death. However, as dengue occurs in immune competent individuals, we sought to reproduce this mouse model in a less immunocompromised background. Here, we report an ADE model that is mediated by maternal antibodies in type I IFN receptor-deficient A129 mice. We show that 5-week old A129 mice born to DENV1-immune mothers succumbed to a DENV2 infection within 4 days that was sub-lethal in mice born to naïve mothers. Clinical manifestations included extensive hepatocyte vacuolation, moderate vascular leakage, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Anti-TNFα therapy totally protected the mice and correlated with healthy hepatocytes. In contrast, blocking IL-6 did not impact the virus titers or disease outcome. This A129 mouse model of ADE may help dissecting the mechanisms involved in dengue pathogenesis and evaluate the efficacy of vaccine and

  20. Targeted Knockdown of GDCH in Rice Leads to a Photorespiratory-Deficient Phenotype Useful as a Building Block for C4 Rice.

    PubMed

    Lin, HsiangChun; Karki, Shanta; Coe, Robert A; Bagha, Shaheen; Khoshravesh, Roxana; Balahadia, C Paolo; Ver Sagun, Julius; Tapia, Ronald; Israel, W Krystler; Montecillo, Florencia; de Luna, Albert; Danila, Florence R; Lazaro, Andrea; Realubit, Czarina M; Acoba, Michelle G; Sage, Tammy L; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Furbank, Robert T; Cousins, Asaph B; Hibberd, Julian M; Quick, W Paul; Covshoff, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) plays a critical role in the photorespiratory C2 cycle of C3 species by recovering carbon following the oxygenation reaction of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Loss of GDC from mesophyll cells (MCs) is considered a key early step in the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. To assess the impact of preferentially reducing GDC in rice MCs, we decreased the abundance of OsGDCH (Os10g37180) using an artificial microRNA (amiRNA) driven by a promoter that preferentially drives expression in MCs. GDC H- and P-proteins were undetectable in leaves of gdch lines. Plants exhibited a photorespiratory-deficient phenotype with stunted growth, accelerated leaf senescence, reduced chlorophyll, soluble protein and sugars, and increased glycine accumulation in leaves. Gas exchange measurements indicated an impaired ability to regenerate ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate in photorespiratory conditions. In addition, MCs of gdch lines exhibited a significant reduction in chloroplast area and coverage of the cell wall when grown in air, traits that occur during the later stages of C4 evolution. The presence of these two traits important for C4 photosynthesis and the non-lethal, down-regulation of the photorespiratory C2 cycle positively contribute to efforts to produce a C4 rice prototype. PMID:26903527

  1. Retrograde Ductal Administration of the Adenovirus-mediated NDRG2 Gene Leads to Improved Sialaden Hypofunction in Estrogen-deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liu, Changhao; Hou, Wugang; Li, Yang; Ma, Ji; Lin, Kaifeng; Situ, Zhenqiang; Xiong, Lize; Li, Shaoqing; Yao, Libo

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common oral manifestations of menopause is xerostomia. Oral dryness can profoundly affect quality of life and interfere with basic daily functions, such as chewing, deglutition, and speaking. Although the feeling of oral dryness can be ameliorated after estrogen supplementation, the side effects of estrogen greatly restrict its application. We previously found that N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is involved in estrogen-mediated ion and fluid transport in a cell-based model. In the present study, we used an ovariectomized rat model to mimic xerostomia in menopausal women and constructed two adenovirus vectors bearing NDRG2 to validate their therapeutic potential. Ovariectomized rats exhibited severe sialaden hypofunction, including decreased saliva secretion and ion reabsorption as well as increased water intake. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of NDRG2 and Na+ reabsorption-related Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channels (EnaC) decreased in ovariectomized rat salivary glands. We further showed that the localized delivery of NDRG2 improved the dysfunction of Na+ and Cl− reabsorption. In addition, the saliva flow rate and water drinking recovered to normal. This study elucidates the mechanism of estrogen deficiency-mediated xerostomia or sialaden hypofunction and provides a promising strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24343104

  2. Failure to Suppress the Expansion of the Activated Cd4 T Cell Population in Interferon γ–Deficient Mice Leads to Exacerbation of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Cong-Qiu; Wittmer, Susan; Dalton, Dyana K.

    2000-01-01

    Mice deficient in interferon (IFN)-γ or IFN-γ receptor develop progressive and fatal experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We demonstrate that CD4 T cells lacking IFN-γ production were required to passively transfer EAE, indicating that they were disease-mediating cells in IFN-γ knockout (KO) mice. IFN-γ KO mice accumulated 10–16-fold more activated CD4 T cells (CD4+CD44hi) than wild-type mice in the central nervous system during EAE. CD4+CD44hi T cells in the spleen and central nervous system of IFN-γ KO mice during EAE showed markedly increased in vivo proliferation and significantly decreased ex vivo apoptosis compared with those of wild-type mice. IFN-γ KO CD4+CD44hi T cells proliferated extensively to antigen restimulation in vitro and accumulated larger numbers of live CD4+ CD44hi T cells. IFN-γ completely suppressed proliferation and significantly induced apoptosis of CD4+CD44hi T cells responding to antigen and hence inhibited accumulation of live, activated CD4 T cells. We thus present novel in vivo and in vitro evidence that IFN-γ may limit the extent of EAE by suppressing expansion of activated CD4 T cells. PMID:10880533

  3. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 1 lead to defective trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. J ... short stature, and natural killer cell deficiency in humans. J Clin Invest. 2012 Mar;122(3):814- ...

  4. Levels of iron, silver, zinc, and lead in oranges and avocados from two gold-rich towns compared with levels in an adjacent gold-deficient town

    SciTech Connect

    Golow, A.A.; Laryea, J.N. )

    1994-09-01

    Fruits such as oranges and avocados are important sources of drinks and food in the Ghanaian Society. If such fruits contain various types of metals they may augument the types and amounts of them in the human body. The metals in fruits may depend on what is in the soils from which they are grown. If the soils contain toxic metals like lead, mercury and cadmium then the consumers may be poisoned as happened in the [open quotes]Ouchi - ouchi[close quotes], disease in Japan and similar episodes. In the area under study, the Geological Survey indicates the presence of 2.5 ppm of lead, 10 - 20 ppm of copper and less than 15 ppm of nickel. Silver, not reported in commercial amounts, is a byproduct of gold productions at Obuasi. Since copper and nickel are presented in the area traces of silver will certainly occur. In the same manner zinc is usually associated with lead as sulphide of zinc blend trace amounts of it are likely to occur in the area. Of the four metals measured, iron and zinc essential for citrus. The extractable iron and zinc in the area of study were 90 and 1.8 mg/kg, levels on the low side for the healthy growth of crops. The investigation reported here is the comparison of the levels of some metals in oranges and avocados from farms in Obuasi and Konongo with those from farms in Kumasi City. This is a part of a project aimed at finding out differences in the metal contents of various food crops grown in various regions of the country. Konongo and Obuasi have soils which are rich in gold but Kumasi city, which is not too distant from these towns, does not have gold in its soil. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Deficiencies of effectiveness of intervention studies in veterinary medicine: a cross-sectional survey of ten leading veterinary and medical journals.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Meursinge Reynders, Reint

    2016-01-01

    The validity of studies that assess the effectiveness of an intervention (EoI) depends on variables such as the type of study design, the quality of their methodology, and the participants enrolled. Five leading veterinary journals and 5 leading human medical journals were hand-searched for EoI studies for the year 2013. We assessed (1) the prevalence of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) among EoI studies, (2) the type of participants enrolled, and (3) the methodological quality of the selected studies. Of 1707 eligible articles, 590 were EoI articles and 435 RCTs. Random allocation to the intervention was performed in 52% (114/219; 95%CI:45.2-58.8%) of veterinary EoI articles, against 87% (321/371; 82.5-89.7%) of human EoI articles (adjusted OR:9.2; 3.4-24.8). Veterinary RCTs were smaller (median: 26 animals versus 465 humans) and less likely to enroll real patients, compared with human RCTs (OR:331; 45-2441). Only 2% of the veterinary RCTs, versus 77% of the human RCTs, reported power calculations, primary outcomes, random sequence generation, allocation concealment and estimation methods. Currently, internal and external validity of veterinary EoI studies is limited compared to human medical ones. To address these issues, veterinary interventional research needs to improve its methodology, increase the number of published RCTs and enroll real clinical patients. PMID:26835187

  6. Deficiencies of effectiveness of intervention studies in veterinary medicine: a cross-sectional survey of ten leading veterinary and medical journals

    PubMed Central

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint

    2016-01-01

    The validity of studies that assess the effectiveness of an intervention (EoI) depends on variables such as the type of study design, the quality of their methodology, and the participants enrolled. Five leading veterinary journals and 5 leading human medical journals were hand-searched for EoI studies for the year 2013. We assessed (1) the prevalence of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) among EoI studies, (2) the type of participants enrolled, and (3) the methodological quality of the selected studies. Of 1707 eligible articles, 590 were EoI articles and 435 RCTs. Random allocation to the intervention was performed in 52% (114/219; 95%CI:45.2–58.8%) of veterinary EoI articles, against 87% (321/371; 82.5–89.7%) of human EoI articles (adjusted OR:9.2; 3.4–24.8). Veterinary RCTs were smaller (median: 26 animals versus 465 humans) and less likely to enroll real patients, compared with human RCTs (OR:331; 45–2441). Only 2% of the veterinary RCTs, versus 77% of the human RCTs, reported power calculations, primary outcomes, random sequence generation, allocation concealment and estimation methods. Currently, internal and external validity of veterinary EoI studies is limited compared to human medical ones. To address these issues, veterinary interventional research needs to improve its methodology, increase the number of published RCTs and enroll real clinical patients. PMID:26835187

  7. Common and unique genetic interactions of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases PARP1 and PARP2 with DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajib; Roy, Sanchita; Kamyab, Johan; Dantzer, Francoise; Franco, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    In mammalian cells, chromatin poly(ADP-ribos)ylation (PARylation) at sites of DNA Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs) is mediated by two highly related enzymes, PARP1 and PARP2. However, enzyme-specific genetic interactions with other DSB repair factors remain largely undefined. In this context, it was previously shown that mice lacking PARP1 and H2AX, a histone variant that promotes DSB repair throughout the cell cycle, or the core nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) factor Ku80 are not viable, while mice lacking PARP1 and the noncore NHEJ factor DNA-PKcs are severely growth retarded and markedly lymphoma-prone. Here, we have examined the requirement for PARP2 in these backgrounds. We find that, like PARP1, PARP2 is essential for viability in mice lacking H2AX. Moreover, treatment of H2AX-deficient primary fibroblasts or B lymphocytes with PARP inhibitors leads to activation of the G2/M checkpoint and accumulation of chromatid-type breaks in a lineage- and gene-dose dependent manner. In marked contrast to PARP1, loss of PARP2 does not result in additional phenotypes in growth, development or tumorigenesis in mice lacking either Ku80 or DNA-PKcs. Altogether these findings highlight specific nonoverlapping functions of PARP1 and PARP2 at H2AX-deficient chromatin during replicative phases of the cell cycle and uncover a unique requirement for PARP1 in NHEJ-deficient cells. PMID:27373144

  8. Plastidial Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Leads to Altered Root Development and Affects the Sugar and Amino Acid Balance in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales-Miñana, Borja; Mulet, Jose Miguel; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Pozueta-Romero, Javier; Kuhn, Josef M.; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2009-01-01

    Glycolysis is a central metabolic pathway that, in plants, occurs in both the cytosol and the plastids. The glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate with concomitant reduction of NAD+ to NADH. Both cytosolic (GAPCs) and plastidial (GAPCps) GAPDH activities have been described. However, the in vivo functions of the plastidial isoforms remain unresolved. In this work, we have identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) chloroplast/plastid-localized GAPDH isoforms (GAPCp1 and GAPCp2). gapcp double mutants display a drastic phenotype of arrested root development, dwarfism, and sterility. In spite of their low gene expression level as compared with other GAPDHs, GAPCp down-regulation leads to altered gene expression and to drastic changes in the sugar and amino acid balance of the plant. We demonstrate that GAPCps are important for the synthesis of serine in roots. Serine supplementation to the growth medium rescues root developmental arrest and restores normal levels of carbohydrates and sugar biosynthetic activities in gapcp double mutants. We provide evidence that the phosphorylated pathway of Ser biosynthesis plays an important role in supplying serine to roots. Overall, these studies provide insights into the in vivo functions of the GAPCps in plants. Our results emphasize the importance of the plastidial glycolytic pathway, and specifically of GAPCps, in plant primary metabolism. PMID:19675149

  9. Deficiency of the Novel Exopolyphosphatase Rv1026/PPX2 Leads to Metabolic Downshift and Altered Cell Wall Permeability in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Yu-Min; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Rifat, Dalin; Rubin, Harvey; Bader, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium tuberculosis can persist for decades in the human host. Stringent response pathways involving inorganic polyphosphate [poly(P)], which is synthesized and hydrolyzed by polyphosphate kinase (PPK) and exopolyphosphatase (PPX), respectively, are believed to play a key regulatory role in bacterial persistence. We show here that M. tuberculosis poly(P) accumulation is temporally linked to bacillary growth restriction. We also identify M. tuberculosis Rv1026 as a novel exopolyphosphatase with hydrolytic activity against long-chain poly(P). Using a tetracycline-inducible expression system to knock down expression of Rv1026 (ppx2), we found that M. tuberculosis poly(P) accumulation leads to slowed growth and reduced susceptibility to isoniazid, increased resistance to heat and acid pH, and enhanced intracellular survival during macrophage infection. By transmission electron microscopy, the ppx2 knockdown strain exhibited increased cell wall thickness, which was associated with reduced cell wall permeability to hydrophilic drugs rather than induction of drug efflux pumps or altered biofilm formation relative to the empty vector control. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis revealed a metabolic downshift of the ppx2 knockdown characterized by reduced transcription and translation and a downshift of glycerol-3-phosphate levels. In summary, poly(P) plays an important role in M. tuberculosis growth restriction and metabolic downshift and contributes to antibiotic tolerance through altered cell wall permeability. PMID:25784702

  10. AMA1-Deficient Toxoplasma gondii Parasites Transiently Colonize Mice and Trigger an Innate Immune Response That Leads to Long-Lasting Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lagal, Vanessa; Dinis, Márcia; Cannella, Dominique; Bargieri, Daniel; Gonzalez, Virginie; Andenmatten, Nicole; Meissner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) protein was believed to be essential for the perpetuation of two Apicomplexa parasite genera, Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, until we genetically engineered viable parasites lacking AMA1. The reduction in invasiveness of the Toxoplasma gondii RH-AMA1 knockout (RH-AMA1KO) tachyzoite population, in vitro, raised key questions about the outcome associated with these tachyzoites once inoculated in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In this study, we used AMNIS technology to simultaneously quantify and image the parasitic process driven by AMA1KO tachyzoites. We report their ability to colonize and multiply in mesothelial cells and in both resident and recruited leukocytes. While the RH-AMA1KO population amplification is rapidly lethal in immunocompromised mice, it is controlled in immunocompetent hosts, where immune cells in combination sense parasites and secrete proinflammatory cytokines. This innate response further leads to a long-lasting status immunoprotective against a secondary challenge by high inocula of the homologous type I or a distinct type II T. gondii genotypes. While AMA1 is definitively not an essential protein for tachyzoite entry and multiplication in host cells, it clearly assists the expansion of parasite population in vivo. PMID:25847964

  11. Deficient Production of Reactive Oxygen Species Leads to Severe Chronic DSS-Induced Colitis in Ncf1/p47phox-Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Sousa, Tiago; Ladeirinha, Ana Filipa; Santiago, Ana Raquel; Carvalheiro, Helena; Raposo, Bruno; Alarcão, Ana; Cabrita, António; Holmdahl, Rikard; Carvalho, Lina; Souto-Carneiro, M. Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Background Colitis is a common clinical complication in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency caused by impaired oxidative burst. Existing experimental data from NADPH-oxidase knockout mice propose contradictory roles for the involvement of reactive oxygen species in colitis chronicity and severity. Since genetically controlled mice with a point-mutation in the Ncf1 gene are susceptible to chronic inflammation and autoimmunity, we tested whether they presented increased predisposition to develop chronic colitis. Methods Colitis was induced in Ncf1-mutant and wild-type mice by a 1st 7-days cycle of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), intercalated by a 7-days resting period followed by a 2nd 7-days DSS-cycle. Cytokines were quantified locally in the colon inflammatory infiltrates and in the serum. Leukocyte infiltration and morphological alterations of the colon mucosa were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Clinical scores demonstrated a more severe colitis in Ncf1-mutant mice than controls, with no recovery during the resting period and a severe chronic colitis after the 2nd cycle, confirmed by histopathology and presence of infiltrating neutrophils, macrophages, plasmocytes and lymphocytes in the colon. Severe colitis was mediated by increased local expression of cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17A) and phosphorylation of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Serological cytokine titers of those inflammatory cytokines were more elevated in Ncf1-mutant than control mice, and were accompanied by systemic changes in functional subsets of monocytes, CD4+T and B cells. Conclusion This suggests that an ineffective oxidative burst leads to severe chronic colitis through local accumulation of peroxynitrites, pro-inflammatory cytokines and lymphocytes and systemic immune deregulation similar to CGD. PMID:24873968

  12. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  13. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Urushihara, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Kenshi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2012-12-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after {gamma}-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci after {gamma}-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after {gamma}-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the

  14. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  15. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes. PMID:26467175

  16. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  17. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron deficiency is a global nutritional problem affecting up to 52% of pregnant women. Many of these women are symptomatic. Lack of proper weight gain during pregnancy is an important predictor of iron deficiency. PMID:25719576

  18. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  19. TRIP13 promotes error-prone nonhomologous end joining and induces chemoresistance in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rajat; Russo, Nickole; Liu, Min; Basrur, Venkatesha; Bellile, Emily; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Scanlon, Christina S.; van Tubergen, Elizabeth; Inglehart, Ronald C.; Metwally, Tarek; Mani, Ram-Shankar; Yocum, Anastasia; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Castilho, Rogerio M.; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (SCCHN) is a common, aggressive, treatment-resistant cancer with a high recurrence rate and mortality, but the mechanism of treatment-resistance remains unclear. Here we describe a mechanism where the AAA-ATPase TRIP13 promotes treatment-resistance. Overexpression of TRIP13 in non-malignant cells results in malignant transformation. High expression of TRIP13 in SCCHN leads to aggressive, treatment-resistant tumors and enhanced repair of DNA damage. Using mass spectrometry, we identify DNA-PKcs complex proteins that mediate non homologous end joining (NHEJ), as TRIP13 binding partners. Using repair-deficient reporter systems, we show that TRIP13 promotes NHEJ, even when homologous recombination is intact. Importantly, overexpression of TRIP13 sensitizes SCCHN to an inhibitor of DNA-PKcs. Thus, this study defines a new mechanism of treatment resistance in SCCHN and underscores the importance of targeting NHEJ to overcome treatment failure in SCCHN and potentially in other cancers that overexpress TRIP13. PMID:25078033

  20. Type I factor XIII deficiency is caused by a genetic defect of its b subunit: insertion of triplet AAC in exon III leads to premature termination in the second Sushi domain.

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Hashiguchi, T; Castaman, G; Tosetto, A; Rodeghiero, F; Girolami, A; Ichinose, A

    1996-04-01

    Factor XIII deficiency has been classified into two categories: type I deficiency, characterized by the lack of both the a and b subunits; and type II deficiency, characterized by the lack of the a subunit alone. To clarify the genetic bases of these diseases, previously reported cases of the type I deficiency were examined at the DNA level. DNA sequence analysis showed that a nucleotide triplet (AAC) was inserted within the codon for Tyr-80 in exon III of the gene for a female proband's b subunit, resulting in the creation of a stop codon. Restriction digestion of amplified DNAs confirmed that the proband and her sister were homozygotes, and their family members were heterozygotes of this mutant allele. A truncated protein composed of 79 amino acids could be synthesized by these homozygotes; however, such a protein would not be secreted or it would degrade quickly, because there were normal amounts of the mutant mRNA, but no b subunit was detected in these patients. The a subunit deficiency of these patients must be a secondary to the b subunit deficiency, as their gene for the a subunit was intact, and the a subunit in their platelets was present within normal levels. PMID:8639893

  1. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Erin K; Colman, Roberta F; Patterson, David

    2006-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency is a disease of purine metabolism which affects patients both biochemically and behaviorally. The symptoms are variable and include psychomotor retardation, autistic features, hypotonia, and seizures. Patients also accumulate the substrates of ADSL in body fluids. Both the presence of normal levels of ADSL enzyme activities in some patient tissues and the absence of a clear correlation between mutations, biochemistry, and behavior show that the system has unexplored biochemical and/or genetic complexity. It is unclear whether the pathological mechanisms of this disease result from a deficiency of purines, a toxicity of intermediates, or perturbation of another pathway or system. A patient with autistic features and mild psychomotor delay carries two novel mutations in this gene, E80D and D87E. The creation of a mouse model of this disease will be an important step in elucidating the in vivo mechanisms of the disease. Mice carrying mutations that cause ADSL deficiency in humans will be informative as to the effects of these mutations both during embryogenesis and on the brain, possibly leading to therapies for this disease in the future. PMID:16839792

  2. Wortmannin potentiates the combined effect of etoposide and cisplatin in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Pastwa, Elzbieta; Poplawski, Tomasz; Lewandowska, Urszula; Somiari, Stella B; Blasiak, Janusz; Somiari, Richard I

    2014-08-01

    The combination of etoposide and cisplatin represents a common modality for treating of glioma patients. These drugs directly and indirectly produce the most lethal DNA double-stand breaks (DSB), which are mainly repaired by non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ). Drugs that can specifically inhibit the kinase activity of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), the major component of NHEJ, are of special interest in cancer research. These small molecule inhibitors can effectively enhance the efficacy of current cancer treatments that generate DNA damage. In this study, we investigated the effect of DNA-PKcs inhibitor, wortmannin, on the cytotoxic mechanism of etoposide and cisplatin in MO59K and MO59J human glioblastoma cell lines. These cell lines are proficient and deficient in DNA-PKcs, respectively. Wortmannin synergistically increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and etoposide, when combined, in NHEJ-proficient MO59K cells. Surprisingly, wortmannin sensitizing effect was also observed in DNA-PKcs-deficient MO59J cells. These data suggest that wortmannin sensitization to etoposide and cisplatin in human glioma cells is mediated by inhibition of not only DNA-PKcs activity but other enzymes from PI3-K family, e.g. ATM and ATR. A concentration-dependent increase in etoposide and cisplatin-induced DSB levels was potentiated by inhibitor in both cell lines. Moreover, drug-induced accumulation in the G2/M checkpoint and S-phase was increased by wortmannin. Wortmannin significantly inhibited drug-induced DSB repair in MO59 cells and this effect was more pronounced in MO59J cells. We conclude that the mechanism of wortmannin potentiation of etoposide and cisplatin cytotoxicity involves DSBs induction, DSBs repair inhibition, G2/M checkpoint arrest and inhibition of not only DNA-PKcs activity. PMID:24953561

  3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase T-786C Mutation, Prothrombin Gene Mutation (G-20210-A) and Protein S Deficiency Could Lead to Myocardial Infarction in a Very Young Male Adult

    PubMed Central

    Klincheva, Milka; Vilarova, Elena Ambarkova; Angjusheva, Tanja; Milev, Ivan; Idoski, Enver; Mitrev, Zan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Myocardial infarction is a rare medical event in young people. The main reasons include congenital coronary abnormalities, coronary artery spasm, and coronary thrombosis due to hypercoagulable states (hereditary and acquired). AIM: We present a case of a young male adult with myocardial infarction caused by a combination of gene mutations and anticoagulation protein deficiency. CASE PRESENTATION: A 19 years old young man was admitted to our hospital complaining of chest pain during the last two weeks. The patient did not have any known cardiovascular risk factors, except a positive family anamnesis. Subacute inferior nonST segment myocardial infarction was diagnosed according to the patient’s history, electrocardiographic and laboratory findings. Coronary angiography revealed suboclusive thrombus in the proximal, medial and distal part of the right coronary artery (TIMI 2). Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. Anticoagulant and antiagregant therapy (heparin, acetilsalicilic acid and clopidogrel) according to protocol was started. The hospital stay was uneventful. Homozygous endothelial nitric oxid synthase (eNOS) T-786-C mutation, heterozygote prothrombin gene mutation (G-20210-A), and protein S deficiency were verified from the thrombophilia testing. Other trombophilic tests were normal. Three months after discharge from hospital another coronary angiography was performed. It revealed normal coronary arteries. Four years after the attack, the patient is free of symptoms and another cardiovascular event. CONCLUSION: Combination of genetic mutations and anticoagulation protein deficiency could be a reasonable cause for myocardial infarction in a very young male adult without any other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27275349

  4. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics of iron deficiency in soybean leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is an important agricultural concern leading to lower yields and crop quality. A better understanding of the condition, at the metabolome level, could contribute to the design of strategies to ameliorate Fe deficiency problems. Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient soybean leaf extract...

  6. Where Will LEAD Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    After setting forth eight assumptions concerning the education of educational administrators, findings about the Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD) program are discussed. The analysis is based on the first-year applications, telephone conversations with staff at a majority of the project sites, and additional material…

  7. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  8. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  9. SCID dogs: similar transplant potential but distinct intra-uterine growth defects and premature replicative senescence compared with SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Meek, Katheryn; Jutkowitz, Ari; Allen, Lisa; Glover, Jillian; Convery, Erin; Massa, Alisha; Mullaney, Tom; Stanley, Bryden; Rosenstein, Diana; Bailey, Susan M; Johnson, Cheri; Georges, George

    2009-08-15

    We have previously described DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) mutations in horses and dogs that result in deficits in V(D)J recombination, DNA repair, and SCID. In this paper, we document substantial developmental growth defects in DNA-PKcs-deficient dogs that are not apparent in SCID mice. Fibroblast cell strains derived from either fetal or adult SCID dogs proliferate poorly in culture and undergo premature replicative senescence, somewhat reminiscent of cells derived from Ku-deficient mice. A limited number of animals have been immune reconstituted (by bone marrow transplantation) so that they can be maintained in a normal environment for long periods. Several of these animals have developed conditions associated with premature ageing at 2-3 years of age, roughly 20% of their expected lifespan. These conditions include intestinal malabsorption and primary neural cell neoplasia. These results suggest that DNA-PKcs deficiency is not tolerated equally in all species, perhaps providing insight into why DNA-PKcs deficiency has not been observed in humans. Finally, this study demonstrates the feasibility of maintaining SCID dogs for extended periods of time and documents their utility for bone marrow transplantation studies and as hosts for the propagation of xenografts. In sum, SCID dogs may present researchers with new possibilities for the development of animal models of human disease. PMID:19635917

  10. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  11. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  12. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  13. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  14. A cell-based screen identifies ATR inhibitors with synthetic lethal properties for cancer-associated mutations

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Luis I.; Murga, Matilde; Zur, Rafal; Soria, Rebeca; Rodriguez, Antonio; Martinez, Sonia; Oyarzabal, Julen; Pastor, Joaquin; Bischoff, James R.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogene activation has been shown to generate replication-born DNA damage, also known as replicative stress (RS). Notably, the ATR kinase –and not ATM- is the primary responder to RS. One limitation for the study of ATR is the lack of potent inhibitors. We here describe a cell-based screening strategy that has allowed us to identify compounds with ATR inhibitory activity in the nanomolar range. Pharmacological inhibition of ATR generates RS, leading to chromosomal breakage in the presence of conditions that stall replication forks. Moreover, ATR inhibition is particularly toxic for p53 deficient cells, this toxicity being exacerbated by RS-generating conditions such as the overexpression of cyclin E. Importantly, one of the compounds is NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor that is currently being tested for cancer chemotherapy, but which we now show is also very potent against ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs. PMID:21552262

  15. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  16. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Anouk; Jacquemyn, Yves; Kinget, Kristof; Eyskens, François

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations. PMID:26113999

  17. Netherton syndrome associated with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Banu Küçükemre; Baş, Firdevs; Tamay, Zeynep; Kılıç, Gürkan; Süleyman, Ayşe; Bundak, Rüveyde; Saka, Nurçin; Özkaya, Esen; Güler, Nermin; Darendeliler, Feyza

    2014-01-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosiform scaling, hair abnormalities, and variable atopic features. Mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 5 (SPINK5) gene leading to lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI) deficiency cause NS. Growth retardation is a classic feature of NS, but growth hormone (GH) deficiency with subsequent response to GH therapy is not documented in the literature. It is proposed that a lack of inhibition of proteases due to a deficiency of LEKTI in the pituitary gland leads to the overprocessing of human GH in NS. Herein we report three patients with NS who had growth retardation associated with GH deficiency and responded well to GH therapy. PMID:24015757

  18. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU Lead Poisoning Kids Homepage Topics Pollution Lead Poisoning What is ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was used ...

  19. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  20. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead Poisoning What is it and who is affected? Lead is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which ... and children can suffer from the effects of lead poisoning, but childhood lead poisoning is much more frequent. ...

  1. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Greene, Catherine M; Marciniak, Stefan J; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Brantly, Mark L; Lomas, David A; Stoller, James K; McElvaney, Noel G

    2016-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is an inherited disorder caused by mutations in SERPINA1, leading to liver and lung disease. It is not a rare disorder but frequently goes underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or cryptogenic liver disease. The most frequent disease-associated mutations include the S allele and the Z allele of SERPINA1, which lead to the accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in hepatocytes, endoplasmic reticulum stress, low circulating levels of α1-antitrypsin and liver disease. Currently, there is no cure for severe liver disease and the only management option is liver transplantation when liver failure is life-threatening. A1ATD-associated lung disease predominately occurs in adults and is caused principally by inadequate protease inhibition. Treatment of A1ATD-associated lung disease includes standard therapies that are also used for the treatment of COPD, in addition to the use of augmentation therapy (that is, infusions of human plasma-derived, purified α1-antitrypsin). New therapies that target the misfolded α1-antitrypsin or attempt to correct the underlying genetic mutation are currently under development. PMID:27465791

  2. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements.

    PubMed

    Finner, Andreas M

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicle cells have a high turnover. A caloric deprivation or deficiency of several components, such as proteins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and vitamins, caused by inborn errors or reduced uptake, can lead to structural abnormalities, pigmentation changes, or hair loss, although exact data are often lacking. The diagnosis is established through a careful history, clinical examination of hair loss activity, and hair quality and confirmed through targeted laboratory tests. Examples of genetic hair disorders caused by reduced nutritional components are zinc deficiency in acrodermatitis enteropathica and copper deficiency in Menkes kinky hair syndrome. PMID:23159185

  3. Dietary Vitamin D Deficiency in Rats from Middle- to Old-age Leads to Elevated Tyrosine Nitration and Proteomics Changes in Levels of Key Proteins in Brain: Implications for Low Vitamin D-dependent Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Jeriel T. R.; Förster, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Brewer, Lawrence D.; Latimer, Caitlin S.; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Porter, Nada M.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-known effects of vitamin D (VitD) in maintaining bone health, there is increasing appreciation that this vitamin may serve important roles in other organs and tissues, including the brain. Given that VitD deficiency is especially widespread among the elderly, it is important to understand how the range of serum VitD levels that mimic those found in humans (from low to high) affects the brain during aging from middle-age to old-age. To address this issue, twenty-seven male F344 rats were split into three groups and fed isocaloric diets containing low (100 IU/kg food), control (1000 IU/kg food), or high (10000 IU/kg food) VitD beginning at middle-age (12 months) and continued for a period of 4–5 months. We compared the effects of these dietary VitD manipulations on oxidative and nitrosative stress measures in posterior brain cortices. The low VitD group showed global elevation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) compared to control and high VitD treated groups. Further investigation showed that this elevation may involve dysregulation of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway and NF-κB mediated transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as indicated by translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus and elevation of iNOS levels. Proteomic techniques were used to provide insights into potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Several brain proteins were found at significantly elevated levels in low VitD group compared to the control and high VitD groups. Three of these proteins, 6-phosphofructokinase, triosephosphate isomerase, and pyruvate kinase, are involved directly in glycolysis. Two others, peroxiredoxin-3 and DJ-1/PARK7, have peroxidase activity and are found in mitochondria. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIA or cyclophilin A) has been shown to have multiple roles including protein folding, regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and redox

  4. Dietary vitamin D deficiency in rats from middle to old age leads to elevated tyrosine nitration and proteomics changes in levels of key proteins in brain: implications for low vitamin D-dependent age-related cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Jeriel T R; Förster, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Brewer, Lawrence D; Latimer, Caitlin S; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Porter, Nada M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the well-known effects of vitamin D (VitD) in maintaining bone health, there is increasing appreciation that this vitamin may serve important roles in other organs and tissues, including the brain. Given that VitD deficiency is especially widespread among the elderly, it is important to understand how the range of serum VitD levels that mimic those found in humans (from low to high) affects the brain during aging from middle age to old age. To address this issue, 27 male F344 rats were split into three groups and fed isocaloric diets containing low (100 IU/kg food), control (1000 IU/kg food), or high (10,000 IU/kg food) VitD beginning at middle age (12 months) and continued for a period of 4-5 months. We compared the effects of these dietary VitD manipulations on oxidative and nitrosative stress measures in posterior brain cortices. The low-VitD group showed global elevation of 3-nitrotyrosine compared to control and high-VitD-treated groups. Further investigation showed that this elevation may involve dysregulation of the nuclear factor κ-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway and NF-κB-mediated transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as indicated by translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus and elevation of iNOS levels. Proteomics techniques were used to provide insight into potential mechanisms underlying these effects. Several brain proteins were found at significantly elevated levels in the low-VitD group compared to the control and high-VitD groups. Three of these proteins, 6-phosphofructokinase, triose phosphate isomerase, and pyruvate kinase, are involved directly in glycolysis. Two others, peroxiredoxin-3 and DJ-1/PARK7, have peroxidase activity and are found in mitochondria. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (cyclophilin A) has been shown to have multiple roles, including protein folding, regulation of protein kinases and phosphatases, immunoregulation, cell signaling, and redox status. Together, these

  5. Mutations in the X-linked E{sub 1}{alpha} subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase: Exon skipping, insertion of duplicate sequence, and missense mutations leading to the deficiency of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, K.; Mackay, N.; Petrova-Benedict, P.; Robinson, B.H.; Federico, A.; Fois, A.; Cole, D.E.C.; Robertson, E.

    1995-03-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-complex deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism that is extremely heterogeneous in its presentation and clinical course. In a study of 14 patients (7 females and 7 males), we have found a mutation in the coding region of the E{sub 1}{alpha} gene in all 14 patients. Two female patients had the same 7-bp deletion at nt 927; another female patient had a 3-bp deletion at nt 931. Another female patient was found to have a deletion of exon 6 in her cDNA. Two other female patients were found to have insertions, one of 13 bp at nt 981 and one of 46 bp at nucleotide 1078. Two male patients were found to have a 4-bp insertion at nucleotide 1163. The remaining six patients all had missense mutations. A male patient and a female patient both had an A1133G mutation. The other missense mutations were C214T, C615A, and C787G (two patients). Five of these mutations are novel mutations, five had been previously reported in other patients, and two were published observations in other patients in an E{sub 1}{alpha}-mutation summary. In the four cases where parent DNA was available, only one mother was found to be a carrier of the same mutation as her child. 61 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Creatine deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Andreas

    2003-02-01

    Since the first description of a creatine deficiency syndrome, the guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency, in 1994, the two further suspected creatine deficiency syndromes--the creatine transporter (CrT1) defect and the arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency were disclosed. GAMT and AGAT deficiency have autosomal-recessive traits, whereas the CrT1 defect is a X-linked disorder. All patients reveal developmental delay/regression, mental retardation, and severe disturbance of their expressive and cognitive speech. The common feature of all creatine deficiency syndromes is the severe depletion of creatine/phosphocreatine in the brain. Only the GAMT deficiency is in addition characterized by accumulation of guanidinoacetic acid in brain and body fluids. Guanidinoacetic acid seems to be responsible for intractable seizures and the movement disorder, both exclusively found in GAMT deficiency. Treatment with oral creatine supplementation is in part successful in GAMT and AGAT deficiency, whereas in CrT1 defect it is not able to replenish creatine in the brain. Treatment of combined arginine restriction and ornithine substitution in GAMT deficiency is capable to decrease guanidinoacetic acid permanently and improves the clinical outcome. The lack of the creatine/phosphocreatine signal in the patient's brain by means of in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the common finding and the diagnostic clue in all three diseases. In AGAT deficiency guanidinoacetic acid is decreased, whereas creatine in blood was found to be normal. On the other hand the CrT1 defect is characterized by an increased concentration of creatine in blood and urine whereas guanidinoacetic acid concentration is normal. The increasing number of patients detected very recently suffering from a creatine deficiency syndrome and the unfavorable outcome highlights the need of further attempts in early recognition of affected individuals and in optimizing its treatment

  7. Evaluation and treatment of iron deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elizabeth M

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency is prevalent in populations seen in primary practices. It is easily evaluated and treated, but often undiagnosed. Iron deficiency can lead not only to anemia but to decreased work capacity, abnormal neurotransmitter function, and altered immunologic and inflammatory defenses. Risk for iron deficiency is a function of iron loss, iron intake, iron absorption, and physiologic demands. Women of child-bearing age are at especially high risk for iron deficiency due to ongoing menstrual blood losses. This article presents and describes a simple algorithm incorporating dietary considerations for evaluation and treatment of iron deficiency in primary care settings. PMID:12455223

  8. L-serine deficiency caused by genetic Phgdh deletion leads to robust induction of 4E-BP1 and subsequent repression of translation initiation in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sayano, Tomoko; Kawakami, Yuriko; Kusada, Wataru; Suzuki, Takeshi; Kawano, Yuki; Watanabe, Akihiro; Takashima, Kana; Arimoto, Yashiho; Esaki, Kayoko; Wada, Akira; Yoshizawa, Fumiaki; Watanabe, Masahiko; Okamoto, Masahiro; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2013-03-01

    Targeted disruption in mice of the gene encoding D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) results in embryonic lethality associated with a striking reduction in free L-serine and growth retardation including severe brain malformation. We previously observed a severe impairment in neurogenesis of the central nervous system of Phgdh knockout (KO) embryos and a reduction in the protein content of their brains. Although these findings suggest that L-serine deficiency links attenuation of mRNA translation to severe developmental malformation of the central nervous system, the underlying key molecular event remains unexplored. Here we demonstrate that mRNA of Eif4ebp1 encoding eukaryotic initiation factor 4 binding protein 1 and its protein, 4E-BP1, are markedly induced in the central nervous system of Phgdh KO embryos, whereas a modest induction is observed in the liver. The increase in 4E-BP1 was associated with a decrease in the cap initiation complex in the brain, as shown by lower levels of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G bound to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and increased eIF4E interaction with 4E-BP1 based on 7-methyl-GTP chromatography. eIF4E protein and polysomes were also diminished in Phgdh KO embryos. Induction of Eif4ebp1 mRNA and of 4E-BP1 was reproduced in mouse embryonic fibroblasts established from Phgdh KO embryos under the condition of L-serine deprivation. Induction of Eif4ebp1 mRNA was suppressed only when L-serine was supplemented in the culture medium, indicating that reduced L-serine availability regulates the induction of Eif4ebp1/4E-BP1. These data suggest that elevated levels of 4E-BP1 may be involved in a mechanism to arrest brain development in Phgdh KO embryos. PMID:23350942

  9. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  10. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  11. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallows a lead object or breathes in lead dust, some of the poison can stay in the ... a health problem. Lead is everywhere, including dirt, dust, new toys, and old house paint. Unfortunately, you ...

  12. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... homes. • Most people, especially children, who suffer from lead poisoning are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or ... and six if they are at risk of lead poisoning (see: ). Who can I call to get more ...

  13. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  14. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. PMID:25681484

  15. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... our environment. Much of it comes from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may still have lead paint. You could be exposed to lead by Eating food or drinking water that contains lead. Water pipes in older homes ...

  16. Lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Rekus, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    Construction workers who weld, cut or blast structural steel coated with lead-based paint are at significant risk of lead poisoning. Although technology to control these exposures may not have existed when the lead standard was promulgated, it is available today. Employers who do not take steps to protect their employees from lead exposure may be cited and fined severely for their failure.

  17. Deficiency or dementia? Exploring B12 deficiency after urostomy.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle; Bryan, Sandra; Dukes, Suzie

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can be misdiagnosed as a variety of other illnesses, and if left untreated can lead to irreversible damage to the brain and nervous system. This article discusses the case of a 70-year-old female with a urostomy, well known to the stoma care department, who shortly after a routine parastomal hernia repair developed severe confusion, immobility and was unable to communicate. Subsequent investigations ruled out a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and a diagnosis of rapidly progressing vascular dementia was made. An incidental finding of a low vitamin B12 level was identified and treatment commenced. She was transferred to a community hospital and her family were told to 'prepare for the worst'. It was, in fact, the vitamin B12 deficiency that was causing her symptoms of vascular dementia, and once treatment was established she underwent a 'miraculous' improvement, returning to normal life. This article discusses vitamin B12 deficiency and why patients with a urostomy are at risk of developing it; highlights the key role of the stoma care nurse and his or her knowledge of the patient; explores the importance of testing vitamin B12 levels in this group of patients; and discusses key learning and recommendations for practice. PMID:26067796

  18. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  19. Vitamin deficiencies and excesses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamins are essential nutrients that must be supplied exogenously either as part of a well balanced diet or as supplements. Deficiency states are uncommon in developed countries except, perhaps, among some food insecure families. In contrast, deficiency states are quite common in many developing ...

  20. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  1. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  2. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  3. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  4. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  5. G6PD Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  6. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Churchill Livingston; 2008:chap 45. Golan DER. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects. In: Goldman ...

  8. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead is still found in some modern faucets. Soil contaminated by decades of car exhaust or years ... house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil near highways and houses. Hobbies involving soldering, stained ...

  9. Betaine deficiency in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma, C. ); Rich, P.J.; Ju, G.C.; Yang, Wenju; Rhodes, D. ); Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline {r arrow} betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde.

  10. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-03-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms "iron deficiency" and "iron deficiency anemia" are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow's milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  11. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  12. Iodine Deficiency in Australia: Be Alarmed. Opinions & Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElduff, Aidan; Beange, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Iodine deficiency, the leading preventable cause of intellectual impairment in the world (World Health Organization, 1999), has reappeared in Australia. Recently, we identified the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in Sydney (Gunton, Hams, Fiegert & McElduff, 1999). This has been confirmed locally (Li, Ma, Boyages & Eastman, 2001) and…

  13. Iron deficiency: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Polin, Vanessa; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Abitbol, Vered; Leblanc, Sarah; Prat, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-10-01

    Iron deficiency is the most frequent cause of anaemia worldwide. It impairs quality of life, increases asthenia and can lead to clinical worsening of patients. In addition, iron deficiency has a complex mechanism whose pathologic pathway is recently becoming better understood. The discovery of hepcidin has allowed a better clarification of iron metabolism regulation. Furthermore, the ratio of concentration of soluble transferrin receptor to the log of the ferritin level, has been developed as a tool to detect iron deficiency in most situations. The cause of iron deficiency should always be sought because the underlying condition can be serious. This review will summarize the current knowledge regarding diagnostic algorithms for iron deficiency anaemia. The majority of aetiologies occur in the digestive tract, in men and postmenopausal women, and justify morphological examination of the gut. First line investigations are upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy, and when negative, the small bowel should be explored; newer tools such as video capsule endoscopy have also been developed. The treatment of iron deficiency is aetiological if possible and iron supplementation whether in oral or in parenteral form. New parenteral formulations are available and seem to have promising results in terms of efficacy and safety. PMID:23582772

  14. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and white-colored blood vessels in the retinas Pancreatitis that keeps returning Yellowing of the eyes and ... discuss your diet needs with a registered dietitian. Pancreatitis that is related to lipoprotein lipase deficiency responds ...

  15. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  16. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor ... You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions ... These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

  17. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  18. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  19. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those <5 years of age. Folic acid taken in early pregnancy can prevent neural tube defects. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, and deficiency results in macrocytic anemia. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of blindness worldwide and also impairs immune function and cell differentiation. Single MNDs rarely occur alone; often, multiple MNDs coexist. The long-term consequences of MNDs are not only seen at the individual level but also have deleterious impacts on the economic development and human capital at the country level. Perhaps of greatest concern is the cycle of MNDs that persists over generations and the intergenerational consequences of MNDs that we are only beginning to understand. Prevention of MNDs is critical and traditionally has been accomplished through supplementation, fortification, and food-based approaches including diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the

  20. The neurology of folic acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, E H

    2014-01-01

    The metabolism of folic acid and the metabolism of vitamin B12 are intimately linked such that deficiency of either vitamin leads to an identical megaloblastic anemia. The neurologic manifestations of folate deficiency overlap with those of vitamin B12 deficiency and include cognitive impairment, dementia, depression, and, less commonly, peripheral neuropathy and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. In both deficiency states there is often dissociation between the neuropsychiatric and the hematologic complications. There is a similar overlap and dissociation between neurologic and hematologic manifestations of inborn errors of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Low folate and raised homocysteine levels are risk factors for dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Even when folate deficiency is secondary to psychiatric illness due to apathy or poor diet it may eventually aggravate the underlying disorder in a vicious circle effect. Clinical responses to treatment with folates are usually slow over weeks and months, probably due to the efficient blood-brain barrier mechanism for the vitamin, perhaps in turn related to the experimentally demonstrated excitatory properties of folate derivatives. The inappropriate administration of folic acid in the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency may lead to both neurologic and, later, hematologic relapse. Impaired maternal folate intake and status increases the risk of neural tube defects. Periconceptual prophylactic administration of the vitamin reduces, but does not eliminate the risk of neural tube defects even in the absence of folate deficiency. Folates and vitamin B12 have fundamental roles in central nervous system function at all ages, especially in purine, thymidine, neucleotide, and DNA synthesis, genomic and nongenomic methylation and, therefore, in tissue growth, differentiation and repair. There is interest in the potential role of both vitamins in the prevention of disorders of central

  1. Lead Pencils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    A study, undertaken to determine the lead content of paint on various pencils in the Goddard supply system, is reported. The survey found that lead content varied from .04 mg per pencil for carmine colored pencils to approximately 43 mg per pencil for yellow colored pencils. Results also show that yellow pencils had higher lead content than other colors analyzed. More detailed results are given in tabular form.

  2. VERMILION-DEFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Bridges, C B

    1919-07-20

    In May, 1916, a culture of Drosophila melanogaster showed that a new sex-linked lethal had arisen. The linkage relations indicated that the position of the lethal was in the neighborhood of the sex-linked recessive "vermilion," whose locus in the X chromosome is at 33.0. When females heterozygous for the lethal were outcrossed to vermilion males, all the daughters that received the lethal-bearing chromosome showed vermilion eye-color, though, from the pedigree, vermilion was known to be absent from the ancestry of the mother. The lethal action and the unexpected appearance of vermilion both suggested that this was another instance of the phenomenon called "deficiency;" that is, the loss or "inactivation" of the genes of a section of the X chromosome. The lethal action would then be due to the deficient region including one or more genes necessary for the life of the individual. The appearance of vermilion in females carrying only one vermilion gene would be explainable on the ground that the deficient-bearing females are virtually haploid for the region including the vermilion locus. Linkage tests showed that the amount of crossing over in the neighborhood of the deficiency was cut down by about five units. Part of this may be attributed to the actual length of the "deficient" region, within which it is probable that no crossing over occurs, and part (probably most) to an alteration in the synaptic relations in the regions immediately adjacent. In more remote regions there was no disturbance or perhaps a slight rise in the frequency of crossing over. Both the local fall and the possible rise in more distant regions would seem to argue that a "pucker" at synapsis had been caused by an actual shortening of the deficient chromosome. That the deficient region extends to the left of the locus of vermilion was indicated by a test in which it was observed that the presence of an extra piece of chromosome including the loci for vermilion and sable ("vermilion

  3. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  4. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN COPPER-DEFICIENT MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copper deficiency (CuD) leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in various experimental models. The morphological, electrophysiological and molecular aspects of this hypertrophy have been under investigation for a long time. However, the transition from compensated hypertrophy to decompensated heart fa...

  5. Systemic hypertension in two patients with ASL deficiency: A result of nitric oxide deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Erez, Ayelet; Shchelochkov, Oleg; Craigen, William; Lee, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    Argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA) is an inborn error of ureagenesis which if untreated leads to hyperammonemia, accumulation of argininosuccinic acid and arginine depletion. The presence of high blood pressure in patients with ASA has been reported so far as transient in one newborn. We describe the first two patients, one child and one young adult, with ASA and persistent systemic hypertension. Extensive evaluation of both patients excluded secondary causes of systemic hypertension. The intriguing link between nitric oxide (NO) production and hypertension lead us to hypothesize that endogenous synthesized arginine deficiency caused by ASL deficiency is responsible for the increased blood pressure. PMID:19592285

  6. Leading Democratically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  7. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow’s milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  8. Homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining repair pathways regulate fragile site stability.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Zlotorynski, Eitan; Goldberg, Michal; Ozeri, Efrat; Rahat, Ayelet; le Sage, Carlos; Chen, Benjamin P C; Chen, David J; Agami, Reuven; Kerem, Batsheva

    2005-11-15

    Common fragile sites are specific loci that form gaps and constrictions on metaphase chromosomes exposed to replication stress, which slows DNA replication. These sites have a role in chromosomal rearrangements in tumors; however, the molecular mechanism of their expression is unclear. Here we show that replication stress leads to focus formation of Rad51 and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs, key components of the homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, respectively. Down-regulation of Rad51, DNA-PKcs, or Ligase IV, an additional component of the NHEJ repair pathway, leads to a significant increase in fragile site expression under replication stress. Replication stress also results in focus formation of the DSB markers, MDC1 and gammaH2AX. These foci colocalized with those of Rad51 and phospho-DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, gammaH2AX and phospho-DNA-PKcs foci were localized at expressed fragile sites on metaphase chromosomes. These findings suggest that DSBs are formed at common fragile sites as a result of replication perturbation. The repair of these breaks by both HR and NHEJ pathways is essential for chromosomal stability at these sites. PMID:16291645

  9. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  10. 42 CFR 3.108 - Correction of deficiencies, revocation, and voluntary relinquishment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correction of deficiencies, revocation, and... Requirements and Agency Procedures § 3.108 Correction of deficiencies, revocation, and voluntary relinquishment. (a) Process for correction of a deficiency and revocation—(1) Circumstances leading to...

  11. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left. PMID:25759629

  12. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  13. Natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer, and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of individuals who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically-defined congenital immunodeficiency of which there are over forty presently known to impair NK cells. The abnormality of NK cells, however, in certain cases represents the majority immunological defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in three different genes that can cause NK cell deficiency as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation. PMID:23993353

  14. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  15. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease. Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  16. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  17. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  18. Tetraethyl lead

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Tetraethyl lead ; CASRN 78 - 00 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  19. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aydin HI, Sennaroğlu L, Belgin E, Jensen K, Wolf B. Hearing loss in biotinidase deficiency: genotype-phenotype ... corrected to Aydin, Halil Ibrahim]. Citation on PubMed Wolf B. Biotinidase deficiency: "if you have to have ...

  20. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube. Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Exams and Tests Factor XII deficiency is most often found when ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: pseudocholinesterase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is a condition that results in increased sensitivity to certain muscle relaxant drugs used during general ... People with pseudocholinesterase deficiency may also have increased sensitivity to certain other drugs, including the local anesthetic ...

  2. Transient partial growth hormone deficiency due to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Aihara, K; Fujie, A; Kihara, M

    1989-04-01

    We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly. His poor dietary intake resulted in chronic mild zinc deficiency, which in turn could be the cause of a further loss of appetite and growth retardation. There was also a possibility of renal zinc wasting which may have contributed to zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency should be carefully ruled out in patients with growth retardation. PMID:2708733

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz ...

  4. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) is a severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism first described in 1978. It is characterized by a neonatal presentation of intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, microcephaly with brain atrophy and coarse facial features. MoCD results in deficiency of the molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes sulfite oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase and mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component. The resultant accumulation of sulfite, taurine, S-sulfocysteine and thiosulfate contributes to the severe neurological impairment. Recently, initial evidence has demonstrated early treatment with cyclic PMP can turn MoCD type A from a previously neonatal lethal condition with only palliative options, to near normal neurological outcomes in affected patients. We review MoCD and focus on describing the currently published evidence of this exciting new therapeutic option for MoCD type A caused by pathogenic variants in MOCD1. PMID:26653176

  5. Effects of dietary calcium on lead absorption, distribution, and elimination kinetics in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Aungst, B.J.; Fung, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic analysis of lead absorption, distribution, and elimination was conducted in rats maintained on calcium-deficient, control, and calcium-supplemented diets. Dietary calcium affected lead disposition in a number of ways. Systematic lead clearance after a 10-mg/kg intracardiac lead dose was approximately 25% lower than control in rats administered dietary calcium supplements. In rats maintained on a calcium-deficient diet, systemic lead clearance was estimated to be 40% less than control. The apparent volume of lead distribution was increased. The apparent systemic availability of 1-, 10-, and 100-mg.kg oral lead doses was three- to fourfold greater than control in calcium-deficient rats. The percentage absorption was dose-dependent in control and calcium-deficient rats. The observed changes in lead absorption and systemic clearance associated with the calcium-deficient diet represent synergistic effects that could elevate blood lead accumulation and thus potentially influence susceptibility to lead toxicity.

  6. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  8. Learning the oral and cutaneous signs of micronutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Mitchell V; Drinane, James J

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that is influenced by multiple systemic factors, including nutritional status. While nutritional support is commonly recognized as an important aspect of comprehensive wound management, the focus is typically on replacement of macronutrients, specifically calories and protein. Our experience strongly suggests that micronutrients are equally important, that micronutrient deficiencies are common, and that correction of these deficiencies frequently leads to wound healing when incorporated into a comprehensive wound management program. This article provides guidelines for assessment and management of micronutrient deficiencies. PMID:24595176

  9. Overview of Inherited Zinc Deficiency in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Taiho; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Ishida, Riko; Miyazaki, Shiho

    2015-01-01

    Zinc nutrition is of special practical importance in infants and children. Poor zinc absorption causes zinc deficiency, which leads to a broad range of consequences such as alopecia, diarrhea, skin lesions, taste disorders, loss of appetite, impaired immune function and neuropsychiatric changes and growth retardation, thus potentially threatening life in infants and children. In addition to dietary zinc deficiency, inherited zinc deficiency, which rarely occurs, is found during the infant stage and early childhood. Recent molecular genetic studies have identified responsible genes for two inherited zinc deficiency disorders, acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) and transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD), clarifying the pathological mechanisms. Both of these zinc deficiencies are caused by mutations of zinc transporters, although the mechanisms are completely different. AE is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the ZIP4 gene, consequently resulting in defective absorption of zinc in the small intestine. In contrast, TNZD is a disorder caused by mutations of the ZnT2 gene, which results in low zinc breast milk in the mother, consequently causing zinc deficiency in the breast-fed infant. In both cases, zinc deficiency symptoms are ameliorated by a daily oral zinc supplementation for the patients. Zinc is definitely one of the key factors for the healthy growth of infants and children, and thus zinc nutrition should receive much attention. PMID:26598882

  10. Mouse model for molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B recapitulates the phenotype observed in molybdenum cofactor deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubiczka-Smorag, Joanna; Santamaria-Araujo, Jose Angel; Metz, Imke; Kumar, Avadh; Hakroush, Samy; Brueck, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Guenter; Burfeind, Peter; Reiss, Jochen; Smorag, Lukasz

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive disorder, mainly caused by mutations in MOCS1 (MoCo deficiency type A) or MOCS2 (MoCo deficiency type B) genes; the absence of active MoCo results in a deficiency in all MoCo-dependent enzymes. Patients with MoCo deficiency present with neonatal seizures, feeding difficulties, severe developmental delay, brain atrophy and early childhood death. Although substitution therapy with cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate (cPMP) has been successfully used in both Mocs1 knockout mice and in patients with MoCo deficiency type A, there is currently no Mocs2 knockout mouse and no curative therapy for patients with MoCo deficiency type B. Therefore, we generated and characterized a Mocs2-null mouse model of MoCo deficiency type B. Expression analyses of Mocs2 revealed a ubiquitous expression pattern; however, at the cellular level, specific cells show prominent Mocs2 expression, e.g., neuronal cells in cortex, hippocampus and brainstem. Phenotypic analyses demonstrated that Mocs2 knockout mice failed to thrive and died within 11 days after birth. None of the tested MoCo-dependent enzymes were active in Mocs2-deficient mice, leading to elevated concentrations of purines, such as hypoxanthine and xanthine, and non-detectable levels of uric acid in the serum and urine. Moreover, elevated concentrations of S-sulfocysteine were measured in the serum and urine. Increased levels of xanthine resulted in bladder and kidney stone formation, whereas increased concentrations of toxic sulfite triggered neuronal apoptosis. In conclusion, Mocs2-deficient mice recapitulate the severe phenotype observed in humans and can now serve as a model for preclinical therapeutic approaches for MoCo deficiency type B. PMID:27138983

  11. [Prevention of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in tropical areas].

    PubMed

    Dillon, J C

    2000-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most widespread nutritional disease in the World. It is prevalent in tropical areas especially in pregnant women and children. The main cause in these areas is consumption of foods containing inhibitors of iron absorption resulting in insufficient bioavailability. In advanced stages of iron deficiency, low hemoglobin levels lead to anemia. Functional consequences of anemia depend on age including mental and physical retardation in children and work disability in adults. Although other disorders including parasitic, infectious, genetic, and nutritional diseases may be involved in anemia in tropical areas, iron deficiency is always a factor because of nutritional conditions. The WHO has proposed laboratory criteria for use in establishing the incidence of iron deficiency and related anemia in a given population. Based on several surveys, four preventive strategies have been developed, i.e., dietary diversification, iron supplementation, general public health measures, and food fortification. Each of these strategies has advantages and disadvantages. The prevailing consensus is that coordinated use of these approaches holds forth the only hope of impacting the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in tropical regions. PMID:10989795

  12. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  13. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  14. Antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Durai, Shivani; Tan, Lay Kok; Lim, Serene

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 39-year-old, gravida 3 para 2, Chinese female with a history of inherited type 1 Antithrombin deficiency and multiple prior episodes of venous thromboembolism. She presented at 29+4 weeks' gestation with severe pre-eclampsia complicated by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. She subsequently underwent an emergency caesarean section for non-reassuring fetal status, which was complicated by postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony, requiring a B-Lynch suture intraoperatively. PMID:27207982

  15. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  16. Disialotransferrin developmental deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansson, B; Andersson, M; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Seven mentally deficient children and adolescents (three pairs of siblings and one singleton) were studied. A peculiar external appearance, a characteristic neurohepatosubcutaneous tissue impairment syndrome and, as a biological marker, an abnormal sialic acid transferrin pattern were characteristic features. All seven seemed odd from birth and prone to acute cerebral dysfunction during catabolic states. Abnormal lower neurone, cerebellar, and retinal functions dominated from later childhood. The disialotransferrin pattern found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid is thought to be the biological marker of a newly discovered inborn error of glycoprotein metabolism with autosomal recessive inheritance. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 p74-b PMID:2466439

  17. Selenium deficiency mitigates hypothyroxinemia in iodine-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Vanderpas, J B; Contempré, B; Duale, N L; Deckx, H; Bebe, N; Longombé, A O; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Dumont, J E

    1993-02-01

    Studies were performed to assess the role of combined selenium and iodine deficiency in the etiology of endemic myxedematous cretinism in a population in Zaire. One effect of selenium deficiency may be to lower glutathione peroxidase activity in the thyroid gland, thus allowing hydrogen peroxide produced during thyroid hormone synthesis to be cytotoxic. In selenium-and-iodine-deficient humans, selenium supplementation may aggravate hypothyroidism by stimulating thyroxin metabolism by the selenoenzyme type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Selenium supplementation is thus not indicated without iodine or thyroid hormone supplementation in cases of combined selenium and iodine deficiencies. PMID:8427203

  18. Iron deficiency in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Lawrence P

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and related anaemia (IDA) during pregnancy are highly prevalent worldwide in both developed and developing nations although the causes are often different. At conception, many women lack sufficient iron stores to meet the increased requirements of pregnancy, which are calculated at approximately 1200 mg. Appraisal of iron status in pregnant women is problematic, however the most reliable available diagnostic test is a serum ferritin < 20 µg/L. ID is often associated with other nutritional disorders, and there is frequently a secondary cause or association. A greater oral intake is usually insufficient to meet the increased demands of pregnancy, however regular oral supplements (given either daily or intermittently) can often meet maternal needs and avoid associated neonatal complications of IDA. Over-treatment with iron should be avoided, but intravenous administration is useful when deficiency is discovered late, is severe, or if the woman is intolerant of oral formulations. This paper reviews the current literature, and addresses differences in the prevalence and causes of ID betwen developed and developing nations. It examines gestational iron requirements, distinguishes between ID and IDA, and highlights difficulties in diagnostic testing. Finally, it appraises the evidence for and against different treatment regimens, ranging from food fortification to intravenous iron infusions, according to availability and to need.

  19. Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Alshishtawy, Moeness Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    Recently, scientists have generated a strong body of evidence providing new information about the preventive effect of vitamin D on a broad range of disorders. This evidence suggests that vitamin D is much more than a nutrient needed for bone health; it is an essential hormone required for regulation of a large number of physiological functions. Sufficient concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is essential for optimising human health. This article reviews the present state-of-the-art knowledge about vitamin D’s status worldwide and refers to recent articles discussing some of the general background of vitamin D, including sources, benefits, deficiencies, and dietary requirements, especially in pregnancy. They offer evidence that vitamin D deficiency could be a major public health burden in many parts of the world, mostly because of sun deprivation. The article also discusses the debate about optimal concentration of circulating serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and explores different views on the amount of vitamin D supplementation required to achieve and maintain this concentration. PMID:22548132

  20. Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Ziai, James; Hui, Pei

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome, an autosomal dominant inherited disorder, is caused by inactivating mutations involving DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This leads to profound genetic instability, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased risk for cancer development, particularly colon and endometrial malignancies. Clinical testing of tumor tissues for the presence of MMR gene deficiency is standard practice in clinical oncology, with immunohistochemistry and PCR-based microsatellite instability analysis used as screening tests to identify potential Lynch syndrome families. The ultimate diagnosis of Lynch syndrome requires documentation of mutation within one of the four MMR genes (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6) or EPCAM, currently achieved by comprehensive sequencing analysis of germline DNA. In this review, the genetic basis of Lynch syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome, are discussed. PMID:26895074

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: importance of early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fattal-Valevski, A; Bassan, H; Korman, S H; Lerman-Sagie, T; Gutman, A; Harel, S

    2000-08-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency is the most common inborn error of folate metabolism and should be suspected when homocystinuria is combined with hypomethioninemia. The main clinical findings are neurologic signs such as severe developmental delay, marked hypotonia, seizures, microcephaly, apnea, and coma. Most patients present in early life. The infantile form is severe, with rapid deterioration leading to death usually within 1 year. Treatment with betaine has been shown to be efficient in lowering homocysteine concentrations and returning methionine to normal, but the clinical response is variable. We report two brothers with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: the first was undiagnosed and died at 8 months of age from neurologic deterioration and apnea, while his brother, who was treated with betaine from the age of 4 months, is now 3 years old and has developmental delay. PMID:10961793

  2. Dyserythropoiesis in a child with pyruvate kinase deficiency and coexistent unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Haija, Marwa Abu El; Qian, You-Wen; Muthukumar, Akila

    2014-08-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is the commonest enzyme deficiency in the glycolytic pathway leading to hemolytic anemia secondary to decreased Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in the red cells. synthesis. PK deficiency due to mutations in the PKLR (1q21) gene leads to highly variable clinical presentation ranging from severe fetal anemia to well compensated anemia in adults. We describe dyserythropoiesis in the bone marrow of a child with transfusion dependent anemia and unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) mimicking Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type I (CDA type I). Persistently low erythrocyte PK levels and double heterozygous mutations present in the PKLR gene confirmed the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:24481986

  3. Zinc deficiency and eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Humphries, L; Vivian, B; Stuart, M; McClain, C J

    1989-12-01

    Decreased food intake, a cyclic pattern of eating, and weight loss are major manifestations of zinc deficiency. In this study, zinc status was evaluated in 62 patients with bulimia and 24 patients with anorexia nervosa. Forty percent of patients with bulimia and 54% of those with anorexia nervosa had biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. The authors suggest that for a variety of reasons, such as lower dietary intake of zinc, impaired zinc absorption, vomiting, diarrhea, and binging on low-zinc foods, patients with eating disorders may develop zinc deficiency. This acquired zinc deficiency could then add to the chronicity of altered eating behavior in those patients. PMID:2600063

  4. Lead effects on corn mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, D E; Miller, R J

    1970-03-01

    Oxidation of exogenous nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide and succinate by corn mitochondria was measured as a function of lead chloride concentration. Lead chloride (50 to 62 micromoles per liter) stimulated oxidation of exogenous reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide by 174 to 640 percent depending on the reaction mediums, whereas lead chloride (12.5 micromoles per liter) inhibited succinate oxidation by more than 80 percent. When inorganic phosphate was included in reaction mediums the subsequent addition of lead was without effect due to the low solubility of lead phosphate. If addition of lead was followed by addition of phosphate the inhibition of succinate oxidation by lead was released, but there was no reduction in the stimulation of oxidation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide by lead. The effects of lead on plant growth might be accentuated under conditions of phosphate deficiency. PMID:4189813

  5. A WRKY Transcription Factor Regulates Fe Translocation under Fe Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing Ying; Li, Chun Xiao; Sun, Li; Ren, Jiang Yuan; Li, Gui Xin; Ding, Zhong Jie; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-07-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects plant growth and development, leading to reduction of crop yields and quality. Although the regulation of Fe uptake under Fe deficiency has been well studied in the past decade, the regulatory mechanism of Fe translocation inside the plants remains unknown. Here, we show that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 is involved in response to Fe deficiency. Lack of WRKY46 (wrky46-1 and wrky46-2 loss-of-function mutants) significantly affects Fe translocation from root to shoot and thus causes obvious chlorosis on the new leaves under Fe deficiency. Gene expression analysis reveals that expression of a nodulin-like gene (VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER1-LIKE1 [VITL1]) is dramatically increased in wrky46-1 mutant. VITL1 expression is inhibited by Fe deficiency, while the expression of WRKY46 is induced in the root stele. Moreover, down-regulation of VITL1 expression can restore the chlorosis phenotype on wrky46-1 under Fe deficiency. Further yeast one-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that WRKY46 is capable of binding to the specific W-boxes present in the VITL1 promoter. In summary, our results demonstrate that WRKY46 plays an important role in the control of root-to-shoot Fe translocation under Fe deficiency condition via direct regulation of VITL1 transcript levels. PMID:27208259

  6. Erythrocyte membrane proteins in copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.T.; Kramer, T.R.

    1987-05-01

    Increased osmotic stability and decreased survivability of erythrocytes caused by Cu deficiency suggest that low copper status may lead to modification in the organization of erythrocyte membrane proteins. Accordingly Cu deficiency was produced in rats by feeding a diet containing < 1 ppm Cu. The effects of low copper status on erythrocyte membrane proteins were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacylamide electrophoresis. A 170,000 dalton protein (170K) amounted to 2.68 +/- 0.11% of the total membrane protein in erythrocytes from copper-deficient rats (n = 25) and 1.42 +/- 0.10% in erythrocytes from rats fed adequate Cu. When erythrocyte membranes from copper-deficient rats were extracted with 0.5% (v/v) Triton X-100, 170K remained associated with the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin. Thus, copper deficiency can alter the composition of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Furthermore, hematocrit levels in copper-deficient rats were negatively correlated to the amount of 170K suggesting that alteration of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton may be a factor that contributes to the anemia associated with copper deficiency.

  7. Gas deficiency in cluster galaxies - A comparison of nine clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The available 21 cm line data in the literature for galaxies in nine clusters is combined with new high-sensitivity observations of 51 galaxies in five of the nine clusters in order to test for discriminating circumstances between those clusters which show H I deficiency among their spiral population and those which do not. An H I deficiency for the complete cluster sample is derived employing a comparison sample of galaxies chosen from the Catalog of Isolated Galaxies. The deficiency and its radial dependence is summarized for each cluster and a composite. A comparison of the environments in different clusters leads to the conclusion that the occurrence of H I deficiency is correlated with the presence of a hot X-ray intracluster medium, and that an ongoing interaction process is active through the cores of X-ray clusters.

  8. Infant case of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: Wolman's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukhan, Meghmala; Saha, Amit; Vara, Roshni; Bhaduri, Bim

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which causes two distinct clinical phenotypes: Wolman's disease and cholesterol ester storage disease. LAL hydrolyses LDL-derived triglycerides and cholesterol esters to glycerol or cholesterol and free fatty acids. Its deficiency leads to accumulation of intracellular triglycerides and/or cholesterol esters. In early onset LAL deficiency, clinical manifestations start in the first few weeks of life with persistent vomiting, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, liver dysfunction and hepatic failure. Adrenal calcification is a striking feature but is present in only about 50% of cases. We report a case of an infant presenting with vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatosplenomegaly and poor weight gain that was subsequently diagnosed as Wolman's disease. He was entered into a clinical trial for LAL replacement therapy. This case reinforces that early onset LAL deficiency should be considered in a baby presenting with failure to thrive, gastrointestinal symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. PMID:24832708

  9. Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and basic skills deficiencies are discussed in 12 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. Titles and authors are as follows: "Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies" (Susanne D. Roueche, with responses by Gary B. Donart, Betty Harris, and James Nordyke); "Is Higher Education an…

  10. Nutritional deficiencies in the pediatric age group in a multicultural developed country, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Haimi, Motti; Lerner, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient deficiencies are prevalent worldwide. Diseases and morbid conditions have been described to result from nutritional deficiencies. It is essential to address nutrient deficiencies as these may lead to chronic long-term health problems such as rickets, iron deficiency anemia, goiter, obesity, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer and osteoporosis. In the present review we surveyed the extent and severity of nutritional deficiencies in Israel through a selective and comprehensive Medline review of previous reports and studies performed during the last 40 years. Israeli populations have multiple nutritional deficiencies, including iron, calcium, zinc, folic acid, and vitamins B12, C, D and E, spanning all age groups, several minorities, and specific regions. In Israel, some of the nutrients are mandatorily implemented and many of them are implemented voluntarily by local industries. We suggest ways to prevent and treat the nutritional deficiencies, as a step to promote food fortification in Israel. PMID:24868510

  11. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. It leads to problems with blood clotting (coagulation). Factor II is also known as prothrombin. ... blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or ...

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  13. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  14. Inherited IL-12p40 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prando, Carolina; Samarina, Arina; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Cobat, Aurelie; Picard, Capucine; AlSum, Zobaida; Al-Jumaah, Suliman; Al-Hajjar, Sami; Frayha, Husn; Al-Mousa, Hamoud; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Adimi, Parisa; Feinberg, Jacqueline; de Suremain, Maylis; Jannière, Lucile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Mansouri, Nahal; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Nallusamy, Revathy; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Bloorsaz, Mohamad Reza; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Elloumi-Zghal, Houda; Chemli, Jalel; Bouguila, Jihene; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Alaki, Emadia; AlFawaz, Tariq S.; Al Idrissi, Eman; ElGhazali, Gehad; Pollard, Andrew J.; Murugasu, Belinda; Wah Lee, Bee; Halwani, Rabih; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed; Al Shehri, Mohammed A.; Al-Zahrani, Mofareh; Bin-Hussain, Ibrahim; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Parvaneh, Nima; Abel, Laurent; Mansouri, Davood; Barbouche, Ridha; Al-Muhsen, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive interleukin (IL)-12 p40 (IL-12p40) deficiency is a rare genetic etiology of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). We report the genetic, immunologic, and clinical features of 49 patients from 30 kindreds originating from 5 countries (India, Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Tunisia). There are only 9 different mutant alleles of the IL12B gene: 2 small insertions, 3 small deletions, 2 splice site mutations, and 1 large deletion, each causing a frameshift and leading to a premature stop codon, and 1 nonsense mutation. Four of these 9 variants are recurrent, affecting 25 of the 30 reported kindreds, due to founder effects in specific countries. All patients are homozygous and display complete IL-12p40 deficiency. As a result, the patients lack detectable IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 and have low levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The clinical features are characterized by childhood onset of bacille Calmette-Guérin (attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain) (BCG) and Salmonella infections, with recurrences of salmonellosis (36.4%) more common than recurrences of mycobacterial disease (25%). BCG vaccination led to BCG disease in 40 of the 41 patients vaccinated (97.5%). Multiple mycobacterial infections were rare, observed in only 3 patients, whereas the association of salmonellosis and mycobacteriosis was observed in 9 patients. A few other infections were diagnosed, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (n = 3), nocardiosis (n = 2), and klebsiellosis (n = 1). IL-12p40 deficiency has a high but incomplete clinical penetrance, with 33.3% of genetically affected relatives of index cases showing no symptoms. However, the prognosis is poor, with mortality rates of up to 28.6%. Overall, the clinical phenotype of IL-12p40 deficiency closely resembles that of interleukin 12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) deficiency. In conclusion, IL-12p40 deficiency is more common than initially thought and should be considered worldwide in patients

  15. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  16. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) deficiency is a disorder characterized by abnormal ...

  18. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is an inherited disease. "Inherited" ... have AAT deficiency inherit two faulty AAT genes, one from each parent. These genes tell cells in ...

  19. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein C deficiency protein C deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein C deficiency is a disorder that increases the ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: protein S deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions protein S deficiency protein S deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Protein S deficiency is a disorder of blood clotting. People ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions factor V deficiency factor V deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. The signs ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  4. PRKDC mutations associated with immunodeficiency, granuloma, and autoimmune regulator–dependent autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Verronese, Estelle; Rice, Gillian I.; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bertrand, Yves; Picard, Capucine; Chansel, Marie; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Butte, Manish J.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Csomos, Krisztian; Chen, David J.; Chen, Karin; Delgado, Ana; Rigal, Chantal; Bardin, Christine; Schuetz, Catharina; Moshous, Despina; Reumaux, Héloïse; Plenat, François; Phan, Alice; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Balme, Brigitte; Viel, Sébastien; Bienvenu, Jacques; Cochat, Pierre; van der Burg, Mirjam; Caux, Christophe; Kemp, E. Helen; Rouvet, Isabelle; Malcus, Christophe; Méritet, Jean-Francois; Lim, Annick; Crow, Yanick J.; Fabien, Nicole; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Walzer, Thierry; Belot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background PRKDC encodes for DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a kinase that forms part of a complex (DNA-dependent protein kinase [DNA-PK]) crucial for DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. In mice DNA-PK also interacts with the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (AIRE) to promote central T-cell tolerance. Objective We sought to understand the causes of an inflammatory disease with granuloma and autoimmunity associated with decreasing T- and B-cell counts over time that had been diagnosed in 2 unrelated patients. Methods Genetic, molecular, and functional analyses were performed to characterize an inflammatory disease evocative of a combined immunodeficiency. Results We identified PRKDC mutations in both patients. These patients exhibited a defect in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Whole-blood mRNA analysis revealed a strong interferon signature. On activation, memory T cells displayed a skewed cytokine response typical of TH2 and TH1 but not TH17. Moreover, mutated DNA-PKcs did not promote AIRE-dependent transcription of peripheral tissue antigens in vitro. The latter defect correlated in vivo with production of anti–calcium-sensing receptor autoantibodies, which are typically found in AIRE-deficient patients. In addition, 9 months after bone marrow transplantation, patient 1 had Hashimoto thyroiditis, suggesting that organ-specific autoimmunity might be linked to nonhematopoietic cells, such as AIRE-expressing thymic epithelial cells. Conclusion Deficiency of DNA-PKcs, a key AIRE partner, can present as an inflammatory disease with organ-specific autoimmunity, suggesting a role for DNA-PKcs in regulating autoimmune responses and maintaining AIRE-dependent tolerance in human subjects. PMID:25842288

  5. [Physiopathology of iodine deficiency].

    PubMed

    Pinchera, A; Rago, T; Vitti, P

    1998-01-01

    The process of goitrogenesis is likely to be the consequence of an increased TSH stimulation linked to an initial reduction of circulating thyroid hormone caused by iodine deficiency (ID). Other growth factors associated to TSH may have a role in the pathogenesis of goiter. Natural history of goiter is the evolution towards nodularity and functional autonomy. This phenomenon is due to the heterogeneity of thyroid follicular cells, some of which, with an intrinsic elevated growth rate, under the stimulation of ID progress to nodule formation and hyperfunction. In multinodular goiter TSH receptor mutations activating adenylate cyclase-cAMP pathway were found. In a recent epidemiological survey it was shown that nodular goiter increased with the age, being about 1% in schoolchildren and 23% in the adults (56-75 years). Also nodular autonomy and hyperthyroidism were more frequent in the 36-75 year age group. Severe ID is also cause of endemic cretinism. In Europe minor neuropsychological impairments and cognitive deficits were described in areas of moderate ID. The exposure to a mild ID during fetal life causes minor neuropsychological damage. In conclusion, ID is responsible of goiter and its evolution towards nodularity and functional autonomy. Severe ID is also cause of endemic cretinism, while cognitive deficits and minor neuropsychological impairments were found in mild to moderate ID. PMID:10052165

  6. Iodine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T C

    1987-01-01

    Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD) affects 800 million people in the world, yet iodine supplementation is one of the most cost-effective nutritional interventions known. Iodine is incorporated into thyroid hormones, necessary for regulating metabolic rate, growth, and development of the brain and nervous system. IDD may appear as goiter in adults, usually not a serious problem, or in cretinism in children, which is marked by severe mental and physical retardation, with irreversible hearing and speech defects and either deaf-mutism, squint and paralysis, or stunting and edema. Children supplemented by age 1 or 2 can sometimes be helped. Foods contain variable amounts of iodine dependent on the soil where they are grown, hence mountainous and some inland regions have high goiter and IDD incidence. There are also goitrogenic foods, typically those of the cabbage family. Diagnosis is clinical or by blood tests for thyroid hormone levels and ratios. Finger-stick methods are available. Prevention of IDD is simple with either iodized salt or flour, iodinated central water supplies, injectable or oral iodine-containing oil. All cost about $.04 per person per year, except injections, which cost about $1 per person, but have the advantage that they could be combined with immunizations. Local problems with supplements are loss of iodine in salt with storage in tropics, and local production of cheaper uniodinated salt. Emphasis should be given to pregnant women and young children. There is no harm in giving pregnant women iodine injections in 2nd or 3rd trimester. PMID:12343033

  7. Betaine Deficiency in Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerma, Claudia; Rich, Patrick J.; Ju, Grace C.; Yang, Wen-Ju; Hanson, Andrew D.; Rhodes, David

    1991-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency (D Rhodes, PJ Rich [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 102-108). This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline → betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde. PMID:16668098

  8. Are brain and heart tissue prone to the development of thiamine deficiency?

    PubMed

    Klooster, Astrid; Larkin, James R; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Gans, Reinold O B; Thornalley, Paul J; Navis, Gerjan; van Goor, Harry; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2013-05-01

    Thiamine deficiency is a continuing problem leading to beriberi and Wernicke's encephalopathy. The symptoms of thiamine deficiency develop in the heart, brain and neuronal tissue. Yet, it is unclear how rapid thiamine deficiency develops and which organs are prone to development of thiamine deficiency. We investigated these issues in a thiamine deficient animal model. Twenty-four male Lewis rats were fed a thiamine deficient diet, which contained 0.04% of normal thiamine intake. Six control rats were fed 200 μg of thiamine per day. Every week a group of six rats on the thiamine-deficient diet was sacrificed and blood, urine and tissue were stored. Blood and tissue transketolase activity, thiamine and thiamine metabolites were measured and PCR of thiamine transporter-1 (ThTr-1) was performed. Transketolase activity was significantly reduced in red blood cells, liver, lung, kidney and spleen tissue after two weeks of thiamine deficient diet. In brain tissue, transketolase activity was not reduced after up to four weeks of thiamine deficient diet. The amount of thiamine pyrophosphate was also significantly conserved in brain and heart tissue (decrease of 31% and 28% respectively), compared to other tissues (decrease of ~70%) after four weeks of thiamine deficient diet. There was no difference between tissues in ThTr-1 expression after four weeks of thiamine deficient diet. Despite the fact that the heart and the brain are predilection sites for complications from thiamine deficiency, these tissues are protected against thiamine deficiency. Other organs could be suffering from thiamine deficiency without resulting in clinical signs of classic thiamine deficiency in beriberi and Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:23357554

  9. "Myelodysplasia," myeloneuropathy, and copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Elliott, Michelle A; Hoyer, James D; Harper, Charles M; Ahlskog, J Eric; Phyliky, Robert L

    2005-07-01

    We describe a patient with a suspected myelodysplastic syndrome that developed in association with a neurologic disorder resembling subacute combined degeneration but without vitamin B12 deficiency. Ultimately, the hematologic manifestations and the neurologic syndrome were linked to severe copper deficiency. Prompt and complete reversal of the hematologic abnormalities occurred with copper replacement. Serum copper determination should be included in the work-up of patients with anemia and leukopenia of unclear etiology who have associated myeloneuropathy. The hematologic picture can resemble sideroblastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Hyperzincemia can be an accompanying abnormality even without exogenous zinc ingestion. The reason for the copper deficiency may not be evident. PMID:16007901

  10. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  11. Genetics of growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mullis, Primus E

    2007-03-01

    When a child is not following the normal, predicted growth curve, an evaluation for underlying illness and central nervous system abnormalities is required and appropriate consideration should be given to genetic defects causing growth hormone (GH) deficiency. This article focuses on the GH gene, the various gene alterations, and their possible impact on the pituitary gland. Transcription factors regulating pituitary gland development may cause multiple pituitary hormone deficiency but may present initially as GH deficiency. The role of two most important transcription factors, POU1F1 (Pit-1) and PROP 1, is discussed. PMID:17336732

  12. [Immune deficiencies in nutritional anemias].

    PubMed

    Bonnet Gajdos, M; Navarro, J; Belas, F; Traineau, R

    1982-12-16

    A transient cellular immunologic defect caused by folic acid deficiency was seen in a goat-milk-fed infant with severe enterocolitis. Data on the immunologic consequences of folic acid, protein and iron deficiencies were reviewed in the medical literature. Investigations are difficult because of the patients' poor general condition. Results are difficult to interpret as many etiologic factors are often combined and mechanisms of immunologic responses are complex. Attention is drawn to the danger of iron therapy in patients with transferrin deficiency. PMID:6297076

  13. Marginal Copper Deficiency Increases Liver Neutrophil Accumulation After Ischemia/Reperfusion in Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copper deficiency can lead to an augmented inflammatory response through effects on both neutrophils and the microvascular endothelium. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of marginal copper deficiency on the inflammatory injury response to hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. Male weanlin...

  14. Iron Deficiency's Long-Term Effects: An Interview with Pediatrician Betsy Lozoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Betsy Lozoff is among the world's leading experts on iron deficiency and its effects on infant brain development and behavior. Iron deficiency is the most common single nutrient disorder in the world, affecting more than half of the world's infants and young children. Research by Lozoff and others has shown that there are long-lasting…

  15. Causes of growth failure in growth failure in a model of neonatal zinc (Zn) deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zn deficiency is a common cause of growth failure in children in developing countrie,s and Zn supplementation can significantly improve growth of at-risk populations. Although Zn deficiency leads to anorexia and poor growth, it is unclear whether anorexia is the sole cause of poor growth. Our object...

  16. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  17. Deficient Critical Thinking Skills among College Graduates: Implications for Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Kevin L.; Matkin, Gina S.; Burbach, Mark E.; Quinn, Courtney E.; Harding, Heath

    2012-01-01

    Although higher education understands the need to develop critical thinkers, it has not lived up to the task consistently. Students are graduating deficient in these skills, unprepared to think critically once in the workforce. Limited development of cognitive processing skills leads to less effective leaders. Various definitions of critical…

  18. Genetics Home Reference: tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3. Citation on PubMed Liu TT, Chiang SH, Wu SJ, Hsiao KJ. Tetrahydrobiopterin-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia in the ... Citation on PubMed Wang L, Yu WM, He C, Chang M, Shen M, Zhou Z, Zhang Z, ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes the amino acid arginine (a building block of proteins) and ammonia ... links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary urea cycle abnormality Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: prekallikrein deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... a role in a process called the intrinsic coagulation pathway (also called the contact activation pathway). This ... functional plasma kallikrein, which likely impairs the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Researchers suggest that this lack (deficiency) of ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... An abnormally small head size ( microcephaly ) and autistic behaviors that affect communication and social interaction also occur ... deficiency MalaCards: dihydropyrimidinuria Merck Manual Professional Version: Pyrimidine ... Dihydropyrimidinuria Patient Support and Advocacy Resources ( ...

  2. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  3. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  4. Detecting Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoller, James K

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a widely underrecognized condition, with evidence of persisting long diagnostic delays and patients' frequent need to see multiple physicians before initial diagnosis. Reasons for underrecognition include inadequate understanding of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency by physicians and allied health care providers; failure to implement available, guideline-based practice recommendations; and the belief that effective therapy is unavailable. Multiple studies have described both the results of screening and targeted detection of individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, with both varying strategies employed to identify at-risk individuals and varying results of testing. Also, various strategies to enhance detection of affected individuals have been examined, including use of the electronic medical record to prompt testing and empowerment of allied health providers, especially respiratory therapists, to promote testing for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Such efforts are likely to enhance detection with the expected result that the harmful effects of delayed diagnosis can be mitigated. PMID:27564667

  5. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients and Caregivers: How Blood Clots Orphanet: Congenital factor II deficiency University of Iowa Health Care: Prothrombin Gene Mutation Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Canadian Hemophilia Society National Hemophilia Foundation: Factor II ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Prothrombin ...

  6. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    PubMed

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  7. Potential Mechanisms of Progranulin-deficient FTLD

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael Emmerson

    2013-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) is the most common cause of dementia in patients younger than 60 years of age, and causes progressive neurodegeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes usually accompanied by devastating changes in language or behavior in affected individuals. Mutations in the progranulin (GRN) gene account for a significant fraction of familial FTLD, and in the vast majority of cases, these mutations lead to reduced expression of progranulin via nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Progranulin is a secreted glycoprotein that regulates a diverse range of cellular functions including cell proliferation, cell migration, and inflammation. Recent fundamental discoveries about progranulin biology, including the findings that sortilin and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) are high affinity progranulin receptors, are beginning to shed light on the mechanism(s) by which progranulin deficiency causes FTLD. This review will explore how alterations in basic cellular functions due to PGRN deficiency, both intrinsic and extrinsic to neurons, might lead to the development of FTLD. PMID:21892758

  8. Interactions between zinc deficiency and environmental enteropathy in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, Greta W; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Prendergast, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency affects one-fifth of the world's population and leads to substantial morbidity and mortality. Environmental enteropathy (EE), a subclinical pathology of altered intestinal morphology and function, is almost universal among people living in developing countries and affects long-term growth and health. This review explores the overlapping nature of these 2 conditions and presents evidence for their interaction. EE leads to impaired zinc homeostasis, predominantly due to reduced absorptive capacity arising from disturbed intestinal architecture, and zinc deficiency exacerbates several of the proposed pathways that underlie EE, including intestinal permeability, enteric infection, and chronic inflammation. Ongoing zinc deficiency likely perpetuates the adverse outcomes of EE by worsening malabsorption, reducing intestinal mucosal immune responses, and exacerbating systemic inflammation. Although the etiology of EE is predominantly environmental, zinc deficiency may also have a role in its pathogenesis. Given the impact of both EE and zinc deficiency on morbidity and mortality in developing countries, better understanding the relation between these 2 conditions may be critical for developing combined interventions to improve child health. PMID:24425714

  9. Zinc and its deficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Evans, G W

    1986-01-01

    The pervasive role of zinc in the metabolic function of the body results from its function as a cofactor of a multitude of enzymes. Zinc is found in every tissue in the body, and because zinc metalloenzymes are found in every known class of enzymes, the metal has a function in every conceivable type of biochemical pathway. Symptoms resulting from zinc deficiency are as diverse as the enzymes with which the metal is associated. If chronic, severe, and untreated, zinc deficiency can be fatal. Less drastic symptoms include infections, hypogonadism, weight loss, emotional disturbance, dermatitis, alopecia, impaired taste acuity, night blindness, poor appetite, delayed wound healing, and elevated blood ammonia levels. Many symptoms of zinc deficiency result from poor diet consumption, but often the most severe symptoms result from other factors including excessive alcohol use, liver diseases, malabsorption syndromes, renal disease, enteral or parenteral alimentation, administration of sulfhydryl-containing drugs, and sickle cell disease. The most severe symptoms of zinc deficiency occur in young children affected with the autosomal-recessive trait, acrodermatitis enteropathica. This disease results in decreased synthesis of picolinic acid which causes an impaired ability to utilize zinc from common food. Because simple laboratory analyses are often not reliable in determining zinc nutriture of a patient, those symptoms caused by suspected zinc deficiency are best verified by the oral administration of zinc dipicolinate. This zinc compound is efficacious and safe and would provide an accurate means of identifying symptoms that do result from zinc deficiency. PMID:3514057

  10. 33 CFR 154.1070 - Deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipment or records maintained in connection with this subpart. (b) Deficiencies shall be corrected within... who disagrees with a deficiency issued by the COTP may appeal the deficiency to the cognizant COTP within 7 days or the time specified by the COTP to correct the deficiency, whichever is less. This...

  11. Anterior Segment Findings in Vitamin A Deficiency: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Rubino, Pierangela; Mora, Paolo; Ungaro, Nicola; Gandolfi, Stefano A.; Orsoni, Jelka G.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is a rare but vision threatening disorder in the developed world, which can lead to blindness for severe keratomalacia with cornea scarring and perforation or night blindness due to impaired dark adaptation. Conversely, the disease is quite common in developing countries, as a consequence of chronic malnutrition. The correct diagnosis and therapy with prompt vitamin A supplementation avoid blindness. We report a series of 3 local cases with different age and causes for vitamin A deficiency. The diagnostic workup, therapy, and prognosis are discussed. PMID:26509090

  12. Advances in clinical determinants and neurological manifestations of B vitamin deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Sechi, GianPietro; Sechi, Elia; Fois, Chiara; Kumar, Neeraj

    2016-05-01

    B vitamin deficiency is a leading cause of neurological impairment and disability throughout the world. Multiple B vitamin deficiencies often coexist, and thus an understanding of the complex relationships between the different biochemical pathways regulated in the brain by these vitamins may facilitate prompter diagnosis and improved treatment. Particular populations at risk for multiple B vitamin deficiencies include the elderly, people with alcoholism, patients with heart failure, patients with recent obesity surgery, and vegetarians/vegans. Recently, new clinical settings that predispose individuals to B vitamin deficiency have been highlighted. Moreover, other data indicate a possible pathogenetic role of subclinical chronic B vitamin deficiency in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In light of these findings, this review examines the clinical manifestations of B vitamin deficiency and the effect of B vitamin deficiency on the adult nervous system. The interrelationships of multiple B vitamin deficiencies are emphasized, along with the clinical phenotypes related to B vitamin deficiencies. Recent advances in the clinical determinants and diagnostic clues of B vitamin deficiency, as well as the suggested therapies for B vitamin disorders, are described. PMID:27034475

  13. IL-12 receptor 1β deficiency with features of autoimmunity and photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ling, Galina; Ling, Eduard; Broides, Arnon; Poran Feldman, Hagit; Levy, Jacov; Garty, Ben-Zion; Nahum, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiences are often accompanied by autoimmune phenomena. IL-12 receptor deficiency is a well characterized primary immunodeficiency that leads to propensity to intracellular infections mainly with mycobacteria and Salmonella. We report on two patients with IL-12 receptor β1 deficiency that presented with autoimmune manifestations and photosensitivity dermatitis and describe possible pathogenetic mechanisms leading to development of clinically significant autoimmune phenomena. PMID:26761636

  14. Recruitment and activation of the ATM kinase in the absence of DNA damage sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hartlerode, Andrea J.; Morgan, Mary J.; Wu, Yipin; Buis, Jeffrey; Ferguson, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Two kinases, ATM and DNA-PKcs, control rapid responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The paradigm for ATM control is recruitment and activation by the Mre11–Rad50–NBS1 (MRN) sensor complex, whereas DNA-PKcs requires the sensor Ku (Ku70–Ku80). Using Mus musculus cells harboring targeted mutant alleles of Mre11 and/or Ku70, together with pharmacologic kinase inhibition we demonstrate that ATM can in fact be activated by DSBs in the absence of MRN. When MRN is deficient, DNA-PKcs efficiently substitutes for ATM in facilitating local chromatin responses. Strikingly, in the absence of both MRN and Ku, ATM is recruited to chromatin, phosphorylates H2AX, and triggers the G2/M cell cycle checkpoint, but DNA repair functions of MRN are not restored. This implies that a complex interplay between sensors plays a significant role in ATM control, rather than straightforward recruitment and activation by MRN. PMID:26280532

  15. Characterization of ATM and DNA-PK wild-type and mutant cell lines upon DSB induction in the presence and absence of CK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Birgitte B; Fritz, Gerhard; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2012-02-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is involved in several cellular processes and has lately also been linked to the DNA damage response through phosphorylations and interactions. Herein, we have analysed two sets of mouse cell lines, one pair, which is proficient and deficient in ATM and the other set expressing or lacking a functional catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). Both kinases are implicated in the downstream phosphorylation of the signaling molecules such as BID and AKT1 in response to DNA damage. BID and AKT1 are also targets of CK2, hence the four cell lines were treated with the three established CK2 inhibitors DMAT, TBB and resorufin in the absence and presence of the radiomimetic drug neocarzinostatin, which induces DNA double-strand breaks. We show that there are differences with respect to the effect of the CK2 inhibitors on the phosphorylation of AKT1 at S473 and its downstream target GSK3β as well as between the two sets of cell lines. However, no such change was seen with BID phosphorylation. The most notably difference was the higher expression of CK2α' and CK2β in DNA-PKcs defective cells compared to the DNA-PKcs proficient cells. PMID:21993375

  16. Enhanced induction of apoptosis in a radio-resistant bladder tumor cell line by combined treatments with X-rays and wortmannin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Trinidad; Burguillos, Miguel Angel; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Herrador, Miguel; González, Isabel; Piñero, Joaquín

    2008-11-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of wortmannin (WM) treatment during and after irradiation was studied in radioresistant bladder tumor cell lines with normal (MGH-U1 cells) or defective p53 activity (RT112 cells). WM modulated G(2)/M cell cycle arrest induced by higher X-ray doses (10 Gy) in both cell lines, although the alteration was significant only in RT112 cells. The observation suggests that WM activity is independent of p53. Constitutive expression of DNA-PKcs was found to be higher in RT112 cells than in MGH-U1. Treatment with WM enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis significantly in RT112 cells while it had no effect on MGH-U1 cells. Although a variety of PI3-kinases and PI3-K like kinases (including ATM) could be inhibited by WM, our observation of increased early lethality by WM treatment in RT112 is in agreement with previous results. They suggest that the WM-dependent radiosensitization of RT112 is a direct consequence of the inhibition of DNA-PK, resulting in the inhibition of DSB repair in the fast component. This early effect in the p53 deficient cell line could also indicate that processes other than apoptosis may contribute to the increased radiosensitization. In our opinion, the expression level of DNA-PKcs in human tumor cells may be a good predictor for the success of DNA-PKcs inhibitors when used as radiosensitizers. PMID:18787832

  17. Lead-acid cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hradcovsky, R.J.; Kozak, O.R.

    1980-12-09

    A lead-acid storage battery is described that has a lead negative electrode, a lead dioxide positive electrode and a sulfuric acid electrolyte having an organic catalyst dissolved therein which prevents dissolution of the electrodes into lead sulfate whereby in the course of discharge, the lead dioxide is reduced to lead oxide and the lead is oxidized.

  18. Health consequences of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Umesh

    2007-12-01

    Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) are one of the biggest worldwide public health problem of today. Their effect is hidden and profoundly affects the quality of human life. Iodine deficiency occurs when the soil is poor in iodine, causing a low concentration in food products and insufficient iodine intake in the population. When iodine requirements are not met, the thyroid may no longer be able to synthesize sufficient amounts of thyroid hormone. The resulting low-level of thyroid hormones in the blood is the principal factor responsible for the series of functional and developmental abnormalities, collectively referred to as IDD. Iodine deficiency is a significant cause of mental developmental problems in children, including implications on reproductive functions and lowering of IQ levels in school-aged children. The consequence of iodine deficiency during pregnancy is impaired synthesis of thyroid hormones by the mother and the foetus. An insufficient supply of thyroid hormones to the developing brain may result in mental retardation. Brain damage and irreversible mental retardation are the most important disorders induced by iodine deficiency. Daily consumption of salt fortified with iodine is a proven effective strategy for prevention of IDD. PMID:21748117

  19. Zinc deficiency in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Fitzgerald, J T; Hess, J W; Kaplan, J; Pelen, F; Dardenne, M

    1993-01-01

    Zinc is needed for growth and development, DNA synthesis, neurosensory functions, and cell-mediated immunity. Although zinc intake is reduced in elderly people, its deficiency and effects on cell-mediated immunity of the elderly have not been established. Subjects enrolled in "A Model Health Promotion and Intervention Program for Urban Middle Aged and Elderly Americans" were assessed for nutrition and zinc status. One hundred eighty healthy subjects were randomly selected for the study. Their mean dietary zinc intake was 9.06 mg/day, whereas the recommended dietary allowance is 15 mg/day. Plasma zinc was normal, but zinc in granulocytes and lymphocytes were decreased compared with younger control subjects. Of 118 elderly subjects in whom zinc levels in both granulocytes and lymphocytes were available, 36 had deficient levels. Plasma copper was increased, and interleukin 1 (IL-1) production was significantly decreased. Reduced response to the skin-test antigen panel and decreased taste acuity were observed. Thirteen elderly zinc-deficient subjects were supplemented with zinc, and various variables were assessed before and after zinc supplementation. Zinc supplementation corrected zinc deficiency and normalized plasma copper levels. Serum thymulin activity, IL-1 production, and lymphocyte ecto-5'-nucleotidase increased significantly after supplementation. Improvement in response to skin-test antigens and taste acuity was observed after zinc supplementation. A mild zinc deficiency appears to be a significant clinical problem in free-living elderly people. PMID:8353362

  20. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Lead Home Calendar of Events National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week Archived Materials CDC's Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Advisory Committee (ACCLPP) Current Activities Blood ...

  1. [Carcinogenesis theory based on estrogen deficiency].

    PubMed

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2009-06-21

    Earlier, estrogens were considered simply the most important hormones involved in female physiology and reproduction. Nowadays it has become familiar that they have pivotal roles in gene regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. There are many contradictions concerning the associations of female sexual steroids and cancer. Cancers of the highly estrogen dependent organs are in the forefront of tumors as they are regarded as hormone associated ones. However, re-evaluation of earlier results supporting the carcinogenic capacity of estrogen exhibited many shortcomings and controversies. Recently, the clinical studies on hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women justified beneficial anticancer effects in several organs even in the female breast. The newly revealed association between estrogen deficiency and oral cancer risk also means a contradiction of the traditional concept of estrogen-induced cancer. Distinction between cancers of moderately and highly estrogen dependent tumors can be based on their different epidemiological features. The vast majority of the so-called smoking associated malignancies of the moderately estrogen dependent organs occur typically in the late postmenopausal life of women when the ovarian estrogen production is fairly decreased. However cancers of the highly estrogen dependent organs such as breast, endometrium and ovary exhibit both premenopausal and postmenopausal occurrence. In spite of the different epidemiological data of these two groups of cancers the mechanism of gene regulation disorder in the background of tumor initiation cannot act through quite opposite pathways. This suggests that in moderately estrogen sensitive organs a serious, in the highly estrogen dependent sites even a mild estrogen deficiency is enough to provoke gene regulation disorders. The new findings both on smoking associated and hormone related cancers might lead to the same conversion; not estrogen but rather its deficiency may provoke

  2. Recognizing the musculoskeletal manifestations of vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    JONES, ANDREA N.; HANSEN, KAREN E.

    2011-01-01

    A disruption in any part of the vitamin D physiological pathway can result in vitamin D deficiency, which may lead to bone pain, muscle weakness, falls, low bone mass, and fractures. Recognizing the signs and symptoms helps physicians make a proper diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Physicians should suspect osteomalacia in patients who have prolonged vitamin D deficiency, a low serum calcium level, or a low serum phosphorus level. Patients with cystic fibrosis are at increased risk for deficiencies in fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamin D. Secondary hyperparathyroidism can develop in patients with chronic kidney disease as a result of low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels or impaired conversion to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Patients may experience abnormal vitamin D metabolism as a result of taking anticonvulsants and other medications. PMID:21984863

  3. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue. PMID:27040960

  5. Clotting Factor Deficiency in Early Trauma-Associated Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rizoli, Sandro B.; Scarpelini, Sandro; Callum, Jeannie; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Mann, Kenneth G.; Pinto, Ruxandra; Jansen, Jan; Tien, Homer

    2011-01-01

    Background Coagulopathic bleeding is a leading cause of in-hospital death after injury. A recently proposed transfusion strategy calls for early and aggressive frozen plasma transfusion to bleeding trauma patients, thus addressing trauma-associated coagulopathy (TAC) by transfusing clotting factors (CF). This strategy may dramatically improve survival of bleeding trauma patients. However, other studies suggest that early TAC occurs by protein C activation and is independent of CF deficiency. The present study investigated whether CF deficiency is associated with early trauma-associated coagulopathy. Methods Prospective observational cohort study of severely traumatized patients (ISS ≥16) admitted shortly after injury, receiving minimal fluids and no prehospital blood. Blood was assayed for CF levels, thromboelastography and routine coagulation tests. Critical CF deficiency was defined as ≤30% activity of any CF. Results Of 110 patients, 22 (20%) had critical CF deficiency: critically low factor V level was evident in all these patients. INR, aPTT and TEG were abnormal in 32%, 36% and 35% respectively of patients with any critically low CF. Patients with critical CF deficiency suffered more severe injuries, were more acidotic, received more blood transfusions and showed a trend towards higher mortality (32% vs. 18% p=.23). Computational modelling showed coagulopathic patients had pronounced delays and quantitative deficits in generating thrombin. Conclusions 20% of all severely injured patients had critical clotting factor deficiency on admission, particularly of factor V. The observed factor V deficit aligns with current understanding of the mechanisms underlying early TAC. Critical deficiency of factor V impairs thrombin generation and profoundly affects hemostasis. PMID:22071999

  6. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  7. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23. PMID:26813504

  8. Miro1 deficiency in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Wenzhang; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Liu, Yingchao; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Keji; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Wang, Xinglong

    2015-01-01

    Proper transportation of mitochondria to sites with high energy demands is critical for neuronal function and survival. Impaired mitochondrial movement has been repeatedly reported in motor neurons of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and indicated as an important mechanism contributing to motor neuron degeneration in ALS. Miro1, a RhoGTPase also referred to as Rhot1, is a key regulator of mitochondrial movement linking mitochondria and motor proteins. In this study, we investigated whether the expression of Miro1 was altered in ALS patients and ALS animal models. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Miro1 was significantly reduced in the spinal cord tissue of ALS patients. Consistently, the decreased expression of Miro1 was also noted only in the spinal cord, and not in the brain tissue of transgenic mice expressing ALS-associated SOD1 G93A or TDP-43 M337V. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS, and we found that excessive glutamate challenge lead to significant reduction of Miro1 expression in spinal cord motor neurons both in vitro and in mice. Taken together, these findings show Miro1 deficiency in ALS patients and ALS animal models and suggest glutamate excitotoxicity as a likely cause of Miro1 deficiency. PMID:26074815

  9. Renalase deficiency aggravates ischemic myocardial damage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanling; Xu, Jianchao; Velazquez, Heino; Wang, Peili; Li, Guoyong; Liu, Dinggang; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Quelhas-Santos, Janete; Russell, Kerry; Russell, Raymond; Flavell, Richard A; Pestana, Manuel; Giordano, Frank; Desir, Gary V

    2011-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to an 18-fold increase in cardiovascular complications not fully explained by traditional risk factors. Levels of renalase, a recently discovered oxidase that metabolizes catecholamines, are decreased in CKD. Here we show that renalase deficiency in a mouse knockout model causes increased plasma catecholamine levels and hypertension. Plasma blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and aldosterone were unaffected. However, knockout mice had normal systolic function and mild ventricular hypertrophy but tolerated cardiac ischemia poorly and developed myocardial necrosis threefold more severe than that found in wild-type mice. Treatment with recombinant renalase completely rescued the cardiac phenotype. To gain insight into the mechanisms mediating this cardioprotective effect, we tested if gene deletion affected nitrate and glutathione metabolism, but found no differences between hearts of knockout and wild-type mice. The ratio of oxidized (NAD) to reduced (NADH) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in cardiac tissue, however, was significantly decreased in the hearts of renalase knockout mice, as was plasma NADH oxidase activity. In vitro studies confirmed that renalase metabolizes NADH and catecholamines. Thus, renalase plays an important role in cardiovascular pathology and its replacement may reduce cardiac complications in renalase-deficient states such as CKD. PMID:21178975

  10. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Ray Chaudhuri, Arnab; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia; Gogola, Ewa; Duarte, Alexandra A; Lee, Ji-Eun; Wong, Nancy; Lafarga, Vanessa; Calvo, Jennifer A; Panzarino, Nicholas J; John, Sam; Day, Amanda; Crespo, Anna Vidal; Shen, Binghui; Starnes, Linda M; de Ruiter, Julian R; Daniel, Jeremy A; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Cortez, David; Cantor, Sharon B; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Ge, Kai; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Sharan, Shyam K; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-07-21

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3/4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11 nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations. Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of replication fork protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumour cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance. PMID:27443740

  11. Iodine-deficient vegetarians: a hypothetical perchlorate-susceptible population?

    PubMed

    Fields, Cheryl; Dourson, Michael; Borak, Jonathan

    2005-06-01

    Recent risk assessments of environmental perchlorate have been subject to much debate. A particular concern is whether appropriate susceptible sub-populations have been identified. Iodine-deficient pregnant women, especially vegetarians, have been proposed as such a potential susceptible sub-population, but there is no evidence of iodine deficiency in the US population and the adequacy of iodine nutrition has not been studied in US vegetarians. To understand the possibility that US vegetarians might be iodine deficient, we reviewed the prevalence, demography, and lifestyle characteristics of US vegetarians as well as the world literature on iodine nutrition in vegetarians. Our findings indicate that strict vegetarians and vegans, who comprise probably less than 0.1% of the US population, have higher education, higher incomes, and healthier lifestyles than the general population. Field studies indicate that vegetarian diets need not lead to iodine deficiency and vegans may suffer excess iodine intake. It is remains uncertain whether there are iodine-deficient vegans or pregnant women in the US. Of more general concern is whether the 10-fold default uncertainty factor is needed for intraspecies (i.e., within human) variability to protect such hypothetical susceptible sub-populations. PMID:15896441

  12. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ermertcan, Aylin Türel; Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebı; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-09-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  13. Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia Associated with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Ali; Kayhan, Tuba Çelebİ; Gülen, Hüseyin; Ertan, Pelin

    2011-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a syndrome characterized by hypodontia, hypotrichosis, and partial or total ecrine sweat gland deficiency. The most prevalent form of HED is inherited as an X linked pattern. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease, which leads to hemolytic anemia and jaundice. It is expressed in males, while heterozygous females are usually clinically normal. A 12-year-old boy with the complaints of hair and eyebrow disturbances, teeth disfigurement, decreased sweating, and xerosis presented to the outpatient clinic. Dermatological examination revealed sparse hair and eyebrows, conical-shaped teeth, xerosis, syndactylia, transverse grooves, and discoloration of nails. Laboratory findings indicated anemia. His 3-year-old sister also had sparse hair and eyebrows, xerosis, and syndactylia. We learned that the patient had a previous history of neonatal jaundice and a diagnosis of G-6-PD deficiency. Although it has been shown that loci of ectodermal dysplasia and G-6-PD deficiency genes are near to one another, we did not find any case study reporting on occurrence of these two genetic diseases together. With the aspect of this rare and interesting case, the relationship between HED and G-6-PD deficiency was defined. PMID:22028581

  14. Iron deficiency in sports - definition, influence on performance and therapy.

    PubMed

    Clénin, German; Cordes, Mareike; Huber, Andreas; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Noack, Patrick; Scales, John; Kriemler, Susi

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is frequent among athletes. All types of iron deficiency may affect physical performance and should be treated. The main mechanisms by which sport leads to iron deficiency are increased iron demand, elevated iron loss and blockage of iron absorption due to hepcidin bursts. As a baseline set of blood tests, haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean cellular volume, mean cellular haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels help monitor iron deficiency. In healthy male and female athletes >15 years, ferritin values <15 mcg are equivalent to empty, values from 15 to 30 mcg/l to low iron stores. Therefore a cut-off of 30 mcg/l is appropriate. For children aged from 6-12 years and younger adolescents from 12-15 years, cut-offs of 15 and 20 mcg/l, respectively, are recommended. As an exception in adult elite sports, a ferritin value of 50 mcg/l should be attained in athletes prior to altitude training, as iron demands in these situations are increased. Treatment of iron deficiency consists of nutritional counselling, oral iron supplementation or, in specific cases, by intravenous injection. Athletes with repeatedly low ferritin values benefit from intermittent oral substitution. It is important to follow up the athletes on an individual basis, repeating the baseline blood tests listed above twice a year. A long-term daily oral iron intake or i.v. supplementation in the presence of normal or even high ferritin values does not make sense and may be harmful. PMID:26512429

  15. Effect of selenium supplementation in hypothyroid subjects of an iodine and selenium deficient area: the possible danger of indiscriminate supplementation of iodine-deficient subjects with selenium.

    PubMed

    Contempre, B; Dumont, J E; Ngo, B; Thilly, C H; Diplock, A T; Vanderpas, J

    1991-07-01

    Selenium and seleno dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX) deficiency has been described in endemias of myxedematous cretinism. In northern Zaire, a selenium supplementation trial has been conducted. Beside correcting the GPX activity, two months of selenium supplementation was shown to modify the serum thyroid hormones parameters in clinically euthyroid subjects and to induce a dramatic fall of the already impaired thyroid function in clinically hypothyroid subjects. These results further support a role of selenium in thyroid hormone metabolism. In an iodine deficient area, this selenium deficiency could lead to opposite clinical consequences: protect the general population and the fetus against iodine deficiency and brain damage; and in turn, favour the degenerative process of the thyroid gland leading to myxoedematous cretinism. PMID:2045471

  16. Where Will LEAD Lead? An Update on My LEAD Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    Issues in the future of a federal collaborative program, Leadership in Educational Administration Development (LEAD), are discussed in this paper. Problems attributed to LEAD are its antagonistic posture to educational administration programs in higher education and political conflicts of interest. Methodology involved analysis of successful LEAD…

  17. The cultural parameters of lead poisoning: A medical anthropologist's view of intervention in environmental lead exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Trotter, R.T. II )

    1990-11-01

    This article identifies four culturally shaped sources of lead exposure in human societies: modern and historic technological sources; food habits; culturally defined health beliefs; and beauty practices. Examples of these potential sources of lead poisoning are presented from current cultures. They include the use of lead-glazed cooking pottery in Mexican-American households; folk medical use of lead in Hispanic, Arabic, South Asian, Chinese, and Hmong communities; as well as the use of lead as a cosmetic in the Near East, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. Four interacting cultural conditions that create barriers to the reduction of lead exposure and lead poisoning are identified and discussed. These are knowledge deficiencies, communication resistance, cultural reinterpretations, and incongruity of explanatory models.

  18. The cultural parameters of lead poisoning: a medical anthropologist's view of intervention in environmental lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, R T

    1990-01-01

    This article identifies four culturally shaped sources of lead exposure in human societies: modern and historic technological sources: food habits; culturally defined health beliefs; and beauty practices. Examples of these potential sources of lead poisoning are presented from current cultures. They include the use of lead-glazed cooking pottery in Mexican-American households; folk medical use of lead in Hispanic, Arabic, South Asian, Chinese, and Hmong communities; as well as the use of lead as a cosmetic in the Near East, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. Four interacting cultural conditions that create barriers to the reduction of lead exposure and lead poisoning are identified and discussed. These are knowledge deficiencies, communication resistance, cultural reinterpretations, and incongruity of explanatory models. PMID:2088759

  19. Lead in petrol. The isotopic lead experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Facchetti, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Many studies were dedicated to the evaluation of the impact of automotive lead on the environment and to the assessment of its absorption in the human population. They can be subdivided into two groups, those based on changes of air and blood lead concentrations and those based on changes of air and blood lead isotopic compositions. According to various authors, 50-66% of the lead added to petrol is mobilized in the atmosphere, while most of the remainder adheres to the walls of the exhaust system from which it is expelled by mechanical and thermal shocks in the forms of easily sedimented particles. The fraction directly emitted by engine exhaust fumes is found in the form of fine particles, which can be transferred a long way from the emitting sources. However important the contribution of petrol lead to the total airborne lead may be, our knowledge does not permit a straightforward calculation of the percentage of petrol lead in total blood lead, which of course can also originate from other sources (e.g., industrial, natural). To evaluate this percentage in 1973, the idea of the Isotopic Lead Experiment (ILE project) was conceived to label, on a regional scale, petrol with a nonradioactive lead of an isotopic composition sufficiently different from that of background lead and sufficiently stable in time. This Account summarizes the main results obtained by the ILE project.

  20. Molecular basis of human transcobalamin II deficiency in an affected family

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Seetharam, S.; Seetharam, B.

    1994-09-01

    Transcobalamin II (TC II) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease leading to cobalamin (Cbl, Vitamin B{sub 12}) deficiency. Patients with this disorder fail to absorb and transport Cbl across cellular membranes and develop Cbl deficiency, symptoms of which include failure to thrive, megaloblastic anemia, impaired immunodefence and neurological disorders. The molecular basis for this disease is not known. By means of Southern blotting and sequence analysis of TC II, cDNA amplified from fibroblasts of an affected child and his parents, we have identified two mutant TC II alleles. The maternally derived allele had a gross deletion, while the paternally derived allele had a 4-nucleotide ({sup 1023}TCTG) deletion which caused a reading frame shift and generation of a premature termination codon, 146 nucleotides downstream from the deletion. Both these deletions caused markedly reduced levels of TC II mRNA and protein. In addition, these two deletions were unique to this family and were not detected in four other unrelated TC II deficient patients who also exhibited the same (TC II protein/mRNA deficiency) phenotypes. Based on this study we suggest, (1) that the molecular defect in the most common form of human TC II deficiency (lack of immunoprecipitable plasma TC II) is heterogeneous and (2) these mutations cause TC II mRNA and protein deficiency leading to defective plasma transport of Cbl and the development of Cbl deficiency.

  1. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the content of chemical elements in the soil and thyroid morbidity in the population of the region. The assessment of the prevalence of iodine deficiency and iodine deficiency diseases was carried out on the basis of the impact of the priority environmental toxic (strontium, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, tin) and essential (nickel, iron, germanium, molybdenum, zinc, selenium) trace elements on the level of iodine deficiency diseases. The level of thyroid pathology in the territory of Primorye was established to be the highest one in areas characterized by the severe iodine deficiency (Northwest geochemical zones), where the structure of thyroid diseases is presented mainly by diffuse nontoxic goiter. Thyroid diseases associated with iodine deficiency in the population of different age groups are the result of multiple and combined imbalance of trace elements, which causes a relative (secondary) iodine deficiency. Thyroid disease in Primorye are environmentally caused diseases of technogenic origin, they are a consequence of the relative iodine deficiency, when on the background of normal iodine supply an imbalance of zinc, iron, cobalt, manganese with excess of such toxic trace elements as lead, strontium, nickel and chromium takes place. Thyroid pathology associated with iodine deficiency, along with other environmentally dependent diseases can be considered as a marker of ecological environment trouble. PMID:25831939

  2. Dysferlin deficiency confers increased susceptibility to coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Wong, Jerry; Fung, Gabriel; Shi, Junyan; Deng, Haoyu; Zhang, Jingchun; Bernatchez, Pascal; Luo, Honglin

    2015-10-01

    Coxsackievirus infection can lead to viral myocarditis and its sequela, dilated cardiomyopathy, which represent major causes of cardiovascular mortality worldwide in children. Yet, the host genetic susceptible factors and the underlying mechanisms by which viral infection damages cardiac function remain to be fully resolved. Dysferlin is a transmembrane protein highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. In humans, mutations in the dysferlin gene can cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. Dysferlin deficiency has also been linked to cardiomyopathy. Defective muscle membrane repair has been suggested to be an important mechanism responsible for muscle degeneration in dysferlin-deficient patients and animals. Using both naturally occurring and genetically engineered dysferlin-deficient mice, we demonstrated that loss of dysferlin confers increased susceptibility to coxsackievirus infection and myocardial damage. More interestingly, we found that dysferlin is cleaved following coxsackieviral infection through the proteolytic activity of virally encoded proteinases, suggesting an important mechanism underlying virus-induced cardiac dysfunction. Our results in this study not only identify dysferlin deficiency as a novel host risk factor for viral myocarditis but also reveal a key mechanism by which coxsackievirus infection impairs cardiac function, leading to the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26073173

  3. SIRT6 deficiency culminates in low-turnover osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Sugatani, Toshifumi; Agapova, Olga; Malluche, Hartmut H; Hruska, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    Deficiency of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a chromatin-related deacetylase, in mice reveals severe premature aging phenotypes including osteopenia. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of SIRT6 in bone metabolism are unknown. Here we show that SIRT6 deficiency in mice produces low-turnover osteopenia caused by impaired bone formation and bone resorption, which are mechanisms similar to those of age-related bone loss. Mechanistically, SIRT6 interacts with runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osterix (Osx), which are the two key transcriptional regulators of osteoblastogenesis, and deacetylates histone H3 at Lysine 9 (H3K9) at their promoters. Hence, excessively elevated Runx2 and Osx in SIRT6(-/-) osteoblasts lead to impaired osteoblastogenesis. In addition, SIRT6 deficiency produces hyperacetylation of H3K9 in the promoter of dickkopf-related protein 1 (Dkk1), a potent negative regulator of osteoblastogenesis, and osteoprotegerin, an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the resulting up-regulation of Dkk1 and osteoprotegerin levels contribute to impaired bone remodeling, leading to osteopenia with a low bone turnover in SIRT6-deficient mice. These results establish a new link between SIRT6 and bone remodeling that positively regulates osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26189760

  4. Hereditary cancer syndromes: utilizing DNA repair deficiency as therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Fan, Tiffany; Silberstein, Peter Todd

    2016-07-01

    Human cells have numerous repair mechanisms to counteract various insults incurred on the DNA. Any mutation in these repair mechanisms can lead to accumulation of DNA errors and carcinogenesis. This review aims to discuss the therapeutic options in the two most common DNA repair deficient cancer syndromes, namely Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) and breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) associated ovarian and breast cancer. Deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms renders these tumors with increased sensitivity to platinum agents. There has been increasing amount of information on the utility of the defects in DNA repair as targets for cancer therapy in these syndromes. Novel therapies like poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are one of such example where the induction of double stranded breaks in DNA leads to tumoricidal effect in patients with homologous DNA repair deficiency. Interestingly, patients with DNA repair deficiencies tend to have a more favorable prognosis than sporadic malignancies. In microsatellite high colorectal cancer patients, this has been attributed to increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes in tumor microenvironment. However, these tumors are able to limit the host immune response by activation of immune checkpoints that seem like attractive targets of therapy in the future. PMID:26873719

  5. Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy Caused by Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    Carnitine is an essential co-factor in fatty acid metabolism. Carnitine deficiency can impair fatty acid oxidation, rarely leading to hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman who developed acute mental status changes, asterixis, and diffuse muscle weakness. Her ammonia level was elevated at 276 μg/dL. Traditional ammonia-reducing therapies were initiated, but proved ineffective. Pharmacologic, microbial, and autoimmune causes for the hyperammonemia were excluded. The patient was severely malnourished and her carnitine level was found to be extremely low. After carnitine supplementation, ammonia levels normalized and the patient’s mental status returned to baseline. In the setting of refractory hyperammonemia, this case illustrates how careful investigation may reveal a treatable condition. PMID:18080167

  6. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values. PMID:26963317

  7. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-01-01

    In the genetic airway disease cystic fibrosis (CF), deficiency or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alters anion transport in respiratory epithelium and consequently disrupts mucociliary clearance. An enriched understanding of the role of CFTR in the maintenance of normal epithelial function has revealed that mild and variable CFTR mutations play a causative role in a number of diseases not classically associated with CF. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that acquired defects in wild-type CFTR protein processing, endocytic recycling and function can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this chapter, we discuss emerging findings implicating acquired CFTR dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis and propose a new and leading edge approach to future CRS therapy using CFTR potentiators. PMID:27466849

  8. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  9. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Senard, Jean-Michel; Rouet, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH) deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS). Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance. PMID:16722595

  10. Iodine deficiency disorders in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, H K; Quazi, S; Kahn, M R; Mohiduzzaman, M; Nahar, B; Rahman, M M; Islam, M N; Khan, M A; Shahidullah, M; Hoque, T; Baquer, M; Pandav, C S

    1996-01-01

    An extensive iodine deficiency disorders survey was conducted in Bangladesh in 1993 to assess the latest iodine nutriture status of the country. The clinical variables of the survey were goitre and cretinism, and the biochemical variable was urinary iodine. The "EPI-30 cluster" sampling methodology was followed for selecting the survey sites. In each survey site, the study population consisted of boys and girls, aged 5-11 years, and men and women, aged 15-44 years, in about equal populations. The total number of survey sites was 78 and the total number of respondents was 30,072. The total number of urine samples was 4512 (15% sub-sample). The current total goitre rate (grade 1 + grade 2) in Bangladesh is 47.1% (hilly, 44.4%; flood-prone, 50.7%; and plains, 45.6%). The prevalence of cretinism in the country is 0.5% (hilly, 0.8%; flood-prone, 0.5%; and plains, 0.3%). Nearly 69% of Bangladeshi population have biochemical iodine deficiency (urinary iodine excretion [UIE] < 10 mg/dl) (hilly, 84.4; flood-prone, 67.1%; and plains 60.4%). Women and children are more affected that men, in terms of both goitre prevalence and UIE. The widespread severe iodine deficiency in all ecological zones indicates that the country as a whole is an iodine-deficient region. Important recommendations of global interest are made from the experience of the survey. PMID:10829973

  11. Growth hormone deficiency: an update.

    PubMed

    Audí, L; Fernández-Cancio, M; Camats, N; Carrascosa, A

    2013-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) in humans manifests differently according to the individual developmental stage (early after birth, during childhood, at puberty or in adulthood), the cause or mechanism (genetic, acquired or idiopathic), deficiency intensity and whether it is the only pituitary-affected hormone or is combined with that of other pituitary hormones or forms part of a complex syndrome. Growing knowledge of the genetic basis of GH deficiency continues to provide us with useful information to further characterise mutation types and mechanisms for previously described and new candidate genes. Despite these advances, a high proportion of GH deficiencies with no recognisable acquired basis continue to be labelled as idiopathic, although less frequently when they are congenital and/or familial. The clinical and biochemical diagnoses continue to be a conundrum despite efforts to harmonise biochemical assays for GH and IGF-1 analysis, probably because the diagnosis based on the so-called GH secretion stimulation tests will prove to be of limited usefulness for predicting therapy indications. PMID:23435439

  12. VISUAL DEFICIENCIES AND READING DISABILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROSEN, CARL L.

    THE ROLE OF VISUAL SENSORY DEFICIENCIES IN THE CAUSATION READING DISABILITY IS DISCUSSED. PREVIOUS AND CURRENT RESEARCH STUDIES DEALING WITH SPECIFIC VISUAL PROBLEMS WHICH HAVE BEEN FOUND TO BE NEGATIVELY RELATED TO SUCCESSFUL READING ACHIEVEMENT ARE LISTED--(1) FARSIGHTEDNESS, (2) ASTIGMATISM, (3) BINOCULAR INCOORDINATIONS, AND (4) FUSIONAL…

  13. Psychological Problems in Mental Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarason, Seymour B.; Doris, John

    A statement of goals and the rationale for organization precede a historical discussion of mental deficiency and society. The problem of labels like IQ and brain injured and the consequences of the diagnostic process are illustrated by case histories; case studies are also used to examine the criteria used to decide who is retarded and to discuss…

  14. Micronutrient deficiency in urban Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Schultink, W

    1997-06-01

    The economic situation of Indonesia is characterized by a large increase in the gross national product which has been on average 7% annually during the last ten years. This was accompanied by rapid urbanization. With the economic improvement, "First World" and "Third World" health and nutrition problems are coexisting in Indonesia. In 1992, the most common of death cause was cardiovascular disease whereas tuberculosis was the second ranking. About 40% of the preschool children are stunted. The main stable food and energy source is rice, although the urban population has a more diverse food pattern than the rural population. In Jakarta, many children receive too late colostrum feeding and mothers are not aware about the importance of correct breastfeeding practices after delivery. Three studies had shown that about one fifth of preschool children and one fourth of elderly take micronutrient supplements. Nevertheless, micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in Jakarta. About one third of women suffer from moderate vitamin A deficiency (plasma retinol < 0.70 mmol/L) and 50% of pregnant women are anemic. More information is necessary on other micronutrient deficiencies. For example, a small study revealed that nearly two thirds of non-institutionalized elderly living in Jakarta experience thiamine deficiency. Appropriate interventions to reduce micronutrient deficiencies should sensitize the urban population to the fact that the government should restrict itself to use its resources to assist only the poorest individuals and groups, whereas it must be expected from the middle class to spend more time and money to solve their own problems. PMID:9659420

  15. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  16. Complex III deficiency due to an in-frame MT-CYB deletion presenting as ketotic hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Mari; Goldstein, Jennifer; Young, Sarah P.; Bossen, Edward H.; Shoffner, John; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Complex III deficiency due to a MT-CYB mutation has been reported in patients with myopathy. Here, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with metabolic acidosis, ketotic hypoglycemia and carnitine deficiency. Electron transport chain analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing on muscle tissue lead to the eventual diagnosis of complex III deficiency. This case demonstrates the critical role of muscle biopsies in a myopathy work-up, and the clinical efficacy of supplement therapy. PMID:26937408

  17. Complex III deficiency due to an in-frame MT-CYB deletion presenting as ketotic hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mari; Goldstein, Jennifer; Young, Sarah P; Bossen, Edward H; Shoffner, John; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2015-09-01

    Complex III deficiency due to a MT-CYB mutation has been reported in patients with myopathy. Here, we describe a 15-year-old boy who presented with metabolic acidosis, ketotic hypoglycemia and carnitine deficiency. Electron transport chain analysis and mitochondrial DNA sequencing on muscle tissue lead to the eventual diagnosis of complex III deficiency. This case demonstrates the critical role of muscle biopsies in a myopathy work-up, and the clinical efficacy of supplement therapy. PMID:26937408

  18. Lead and the Romans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who consumed the…

  19. Genetics Home Reference: complement factor I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Baracho GV, Nudelman V, Isaac L. Molecular characterization of homozygous hereditary factor I deficiency. Clin Exp ... G, Sánchez-Corral P, López-Trascasa M. Molecular characterization of Complement Factor I deficiency in two Spanish ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... diagnosis or management of GM3 synthase deficiency: American Epilepsy Society: Find a Doctor Clinic for Special Children ( ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency is an inherited disorder that affects the adrenal glands . The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and ... body. In people with 21-hydroxylase deficiency , the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. ...

  2. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? ...

  3. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Treated? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has no cure, but its ... of these treatments are the same as the ones used for a lung disease called COPD (chronic ...

  4. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Werder, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1) Which patients should be tested? (2) What test should be ordered? (3) How are inferences made from such testing? (4) In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5) Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6) What is to be expected from treatment? (7) How is B12 deficiency treated? Methods On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment) and then reviewed in answering the above questions. Results The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed. Discussion Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test: 200 picograms per milliliter or less is low, and 201 to 350 picograms per milliliter is borderline low. Other tests may be indicated, including plasma

  5. Deformation properties of lead isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Borzov, I. N.; Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Saperstein, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    The deformation properties of a long lead isotopic chain up to the neutron drip line are analyzed on the basis of the energy density functional (EDF) in the FaNDF0 Fayans form. The question of whether the ground state of neutron-deficient lead isotopes can have a stable deformation is studied in detail. The prediction of this deformation is contained in the results obtained on the basis of the HFB-17 and HFB-27 Skyrme EDF versions and reported on Internet. The present analysis reveals that this is at odds with experimental data on charge radii and magnetic moments of odd lead isotopes. The Fayans EDF version predicts a spherical ground state for all light lead isotopes, but some of them (for example, 180Pb and 184Pb) prove to be very soft—that is, close to the point of a phase transition to a deformed state. Also, the results obtained in our present study are compared with the predictions of some other Skyrme EDF versions, including SKM*, SLy4, SLy6, and UNE1. By and large, their predictions are closer to the results arising upon the application of the Fayans functional. For example, the SLy4 functional predicts, in just the same way as the FaNDF0 functional, a spherical shape for all nuclei of this region. The remaining three Skyrme EDF versions lead to a deformation of some light lead isotopes, but their number is substantially smaller than that in the case of the HFB-17 and HFB-27 functionals. Moreover, the respective deformation energy is substantially lower, which gives grounds to hope for the restoration of a spherical shape upon going beyond the mean-field approximation, which we use here. Also, the deformation properties of neutron-rich lead isotopes are studied up to the neutron drip line. Here, the results obtained with the FaNDF0 functional are compared with the predictions of the HFB-17, HFB-27, SKM*, and SLy4 Skyrme EDF versions. All of the EDF versions considered here predict the existence of a region where neutron-rich lead isotopes undergo

  6. Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (Late Onset) Due to Deficiency of Biotinidase

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Debadatta; Das, Manoj Kumar; Dhar, Sandipan; Mukhopadhyay, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase is a ubiquitous mammalian cell enzyme occurring in liver, serum and kidney. It cleaves biotin from biocytin, which is a cofactor for biotin dependent enzymes, namely the human carboxylases. Biotinidase deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological, dermatological, immunological and ophthalmological abnormalities. This is a case of a 3-year-old boy presenting with delayed developmental milestones, tachypnea, progressively increasing ataxia, alopecia and dermatitis, all which dramatically responded to high doses of biotin. PMID:25284861

  7. Bone lead mobilization in lactating mice and lead transfer to suckling offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, C.A.; Doherty, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Drinking water containing 200 ..mu..g/ml lead (labeled with /sup 210/Pb) was provided to adult female mice for 105 days prior to the date of mating or for 105 days prior to mating and during the periods of gestation and lactation (160 days total exposure). During lactation there was an increased rate of lead elimination from adult mice exposed prior to mating compared to nonlactating female mice. The magnitude of the additional lead elimination during lactation was similar to the magnitude of the decrease in femur ash weights during lactation. These data support the hypothesis that lead mobilization during lactation is the result of bone mineral mobilization. Approximately 3% of the lead body burden of mothers exposed to lead prior to mating was retained in litters of suckling pups as a result of lead transferred in milk. The magnitude of lead mobilized from maternal bone during lactation was not increased by a diet which was moderately calcium deficient. Continuous ingestion of lead by mothers during lactation significantly increased the net transfer of lead to suckled pups. Lead transferred from mother to offspring during lactation greatly exceeded transfer during gestation for all treatment groups. These data indicate that both prior and current maternal lead exposure should be considered in assessing potential lead exposure of suckling infants.

  8. Lead levels - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children who ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the environment, ...

  9. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  10. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction underlies the progressive lymphocytopenia in XLF/Cernunnos deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Avagyan, Serine; Churchill, Michael; Yamamoto, Kenta; Crowe, Jennifer L.; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J.; Zheng, Tian; Mukherjee, Siddhartha

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF/Cernunnos) is a component of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of double-strand DNA break repair. XLF-deficient patients develop a severe progressive lymphocytopenia. Although NHEJ is required for V(D)J recombination and lymphocyte development, XLF-deficient mice have normal V(D)J recombination, highlighting the need for an alternative mechanism for the lymphocytopenia. Here, we report that XLF-deficient mice recapitulate the age-dependent lymphocytopenia of patients. We show that XLF deficiency leads to premature aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), measured by decreased functional capacity in transplantation assays, preferential myeloid reconstitution, and reduced self-renewal at a young age. We propose that premature aging of HSCs, together with previously reported defects in class-switch recombination and memory immune response, underlies the progressive and severe lymphocytopenia in XLF-deficient patients in the absence of measurable V(D)J recombination defects. PMID:25075129

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction underlies the progressive lymphocytopenia in XLF/Cernunnos deficiency.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Serine; Churchill, Michael; Yamamoto, Kenta; Crowe, Jennifer L; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J; Zheng, Tian; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Zha, Shan

    2014-09-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF/Cernunnos) is a component of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of double-strand DNA break repair. XLF-deficient patients develop a severe progressive lymphocytopenia. Although NHEJ is required for V(D)J recombination and lymphocyte development, XLF-deficient mice have normal V(D)J recombination, highlighting the need for an alternative mechanism for the lymphocytopenia. Here, we report that XLF-deficient mice recapitulate the age-dependent lymphocytopenia of patients. We show that XLF deficiency leads to premature aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), measured by decreased functional capacity in transplantation assays, preferential myeloid reconstitution, and reduced self-renewal at a young age. We propose that premature aging of HSCs, together with previously reported defects in class-switch recombination and memory immune response, underlies the progressive and severe lymphocytopenia in XLF-deficient patients in the absence of measurable V(D)J recombination defects. PMID:25075129

  13. Intraperitoneal Hemorrhage in a Pregnant Woman with Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Vitamin K Deficiency as a Possible Cause

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Yosuke; Morisawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Koyomi; Rifu, Kazuma

    2016-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can cause various vitamin deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency can lead to coagulopathy or hemorrhagic diathesis. A nulliparous Japanese woman with hyperemesis gravidarum at 105/7 weeks was admitted with giant myoma, intestinal obstruction, and abdominal pain. Treatment for a degenerative myoma was instituted with intravenous antibiotics. The abdominal pain ameliorated, but intestinal obstruction persisted. At 166/7 weeks, we performed laparotomy for release of intestinal obstruction, when intraabdominal bleeding of 110 mL existed. Blood tests revealed coagulopathy secondary to vitamin K deficiency. The coagulopathy responded to intravenous vitamin K injection. Coagulopathy due to vitamin K deficiency can occur with hyperemesis gravidarum, and coexisting intestinal obstruction and broad-spectrum antibiotics can aggravate the deficiency. PMID:27597910

  14. Intraperitoneal Hemorrhage in a Pregnant Woman with Hyperemesis Gravidarum: Vitamin K Deficiency as a Possible Cause.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yosuke; Morisawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Koyomi; Takahashi, Hironori; Rifu, Kazuma; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can cause various vitamin deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency can lead to coagulopathy or hemorrhagic diathesis. A nulliparous Japanese woman with hyperemesis gravidarum at 10(5/7) weeks was admitted with giant myoma, intestinal obstruction, and abdominal pain. Treatment for a degenerative myoma was instituted with intravenous antibiotics. The abdominal pain ameliorated, but intestinal obstruction persisted. At 16(6/7) weeks, we performed laparotomy for release of intestinal obstruction, when intraabdominal bleeding of 110 mL existed. Blood tests revealed coagulopathy secondary to vitamin K deficiency. The coagulopathy responded to intravenous vitamin K injection. Coagulopathy due to vitamin K deficiency can occur with hyperemesis gravidarum, and coexisting intestinal obstruction and broad-spectrum antibiotics can aggravate the deficiency. PMID:27597910

  15. Lamin A Is an Endogenous SIRT6 Activator and Promotes SIRT6-Mediated DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shrestha; Liu, Baohua; Wang, Yi; Hao, Quan; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2015-11-17

    The nuclear lamins are essential for various molecular events in the nucleus, such as chromatin organization, DNA replication, and provision of mechanical support. A specific point mutation in the LMNA gene creates a truncated prelamin A termed progerin, causing Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). SIRT6 deficiency leads to defective genomic maintenance and accelerated aging similar to HGPS, suggesting a potential link between lamin A and SIRT6. Here, we report that lamin A is an endogenous activator of SIRT6 and facilitates chromatin localization of SIRT6 upon DNA damage. Lamin A promotes SIRT6-dependent DNA-PKcs (DNA-PK catalytic subunit) recruitment to chromatin, CtIP deacetylation, and PARP1 mono-ADP ribosylation in response to DNA damage. The presence of progerin jeopardizes SIRT6 activation and compromises SIRT6-mediated molecular events in response to DNA damage. These data reveal a critical role for lamin A in regulating SIRT6 activities, suggesting that defects in SIRT6 functions contribute to impaired DNA repair and accelerated aging in HGPS. PMID:26549451

  16. Iodine deficiency disorders in Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Delange, F.; Bürgi, H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data on iodine excretion in the urine of adults, adolescents and newborns and on the iodine content of breast milk indicate a high prevalence of iodine deficiency (moderate in many cases and severe in a few) in many European countries. These cases may manifest as subclinical hypothyroidism in neonates and as goitre in adolescents and adults. Lack of iodine causes not only goitre, but also mental deficiency, hearing loss and other neurological impairments, and short stature due to thyroid insufficiency during fetal development and childhood. Although iodinated salt is available theoretically in most countries where it is needed, its quality and share of the market are often unsatisfactory. In many countries where only household salt is iodinated the iodine content has been set too low owing to an overestimation of household salt consumption. Governments are therefore urged to pass legislation and provide means for efficient iodination of salt wherever this is necessary. PMID:2670299

  17. Iodine: deficiency and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lyn

    2008-06-01

    Iodine deficiency is generally recognized as the most commonly preventable cause of mental retardation and the most common cause of endocrinopathy (goiter and primary hypothyroidism). Iodine deficiency becomes particularly critical in pregnancy due to the consequences for neurological damage during fetal development as well as during lactation. The safety of therapeutic doses of iodine above the established safe upper limit of 1 mg is evident in the lack of toxicity in the Japanese population that consumes 25 times the median intake of iodine consumption in the United States. Japan's population suffers no demonstrable increased incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis or hypothyroidism. Studies using 3.0- to 6.0-mg doses to effectively treat fibrocystic breast disease may reveal an important role for iodine in maintaining normal breast tissue architecture and function. Iodine may also have important antioxidant functions in breast tissue and other tissues that concentrate iodine via the sodium iodide symporter. PMID:18590348

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  19. Mitochondrial deficiency in Cockayne syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by accelerated aging, cachectic dwarfism and many other features. Recent work has implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of this disease. This is particularly interesting since mitochondrial deficiencies are believed to be important in the aging process. In this review, we will discuss recent findings of mitochondrial pathology in Cockayne syndrome and suggest possible mechanisms for the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23435289

  20. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  1. Multiple Peroxisomal Enzymatic Deficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, Joseph; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Van Hoof, François; Misson, Jean-Paul; Evrard, Philippe; Verellen, Gaston; Eyssen, Hendrik J.; Van Eldere, Johan; Schutgens, Ruud B. H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Roels, Frank; Goldfischer, Sidney L.

    1986-01-01

    Biologic, morphologic, and biochemical investigations performed in 2 patients demonstrate multiple peroxisomal deficiencies in the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome of Zellweger (CHRS) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD). Very long chain fatty acids, abnormal bile acids, including bile acid precursors (di- and trihydroxycoprostanoic acids), and C29-dicarboxylic acid accumulated in plasma in both patients. Generalized hyperaminoaciduria was also present. Peroxisomes could not be detected in CHRS liver and kidney; however, in the NALD patient, small and sparse cytoplasmic bodies resembling altered peroxisomes were found in hepatocytes. Hepatocellular and Kupffer cell lysosomes were engorged with ferritin and contained clefts and trilaminar structures believed to represent very long chain fatty acids. Enzymatic deficiencies reflected the peroxisomal defects. Hepatic glycolate oxidase and palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activities were deficient. No particle-bound catalase was found in cultured fibroblasts, and ether glycerolipid (plasmalogen) biosynthesis was markedly reduced. Administration of phenobarbital and clofibrate, an agent that induces peroxisomal proliferation and enzymatic activities, to the NALD patient did not bring about any changes in plasma metabolites, liver peroxisome population, or oxidizing activities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:2879480

  2. Functional consequences of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    McClain, C J; Kasarskis, E J; Allen, J J

    1985-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element necessary for over 200 zinc metalloenzymes and required for normal nucleic acid, protein, and membrane metabolism. During the past two decades there has been a rapid expansion of knowledge concerning zinc metabolism in both normal and disease situations, including mechanisms for zinc absorption, excretion and internal redistribution of zinc after stress or trauma. Acrodermatitis enteropathica has been recognized to be a disease of impaired zinc absorption in man. A host of disease processes now are recognized to be complicated by zinc deficiency including alcoholic liver disease, sickle cell anemia, protein calorie malnutrition, and a variety of intestinal diseases including Crohn's disease, sprue, short bowel syndrome and after jejunal ileal bypass. Zinc has proved to be an extremely interesting mineral to nutritionists and physicians because of its importance in normal physiology and biochemistry and because of the diverse presenting features of zinc deficiency. This paper reviews ten functional consequences of zinc deficiency and emphasizes certain consequences in which there have been new discoveries concerning their mechanism (e.g., anorexia) or their clinical importance (e.g., immune dysfunction). PMID:3911268

  3. Vitamin D recommendations: beyond deficiency.

    PubMed

    Biesalski, Hans K

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in regular bone growth and in adequate function of the innate immune system, including barrier functions of mucous membranes. A sufficient supply during pregnancy and lactation protects the child from infectious diseases. Clinical symptoms of severe vitamin D deficiency (rickets) are well known and can be easily detected. Signs and symptoms beyond deficiency, however, remain to be elucidated. Based on clinical and observational data, the plasma level of 25(OH)D may serve as a 'marker' to detect or define a subclinical deficiency. Levels below 50 nmol/l might be insufficient to maintain the non-bone-related activities of vitamin D. Finally, it has to be considered that all of the nonbone activities of vitamin D are in concert with vitamin A (9-cis retinoic acid). Studies combining both vitamins in sufficient amounts (cod liver oil) demonstrated a beneficial effect on the prevention of respiratory tract infections. Consequently, it should be strongly recommended to increase the intake of vitamin D and to ensure a daily intake of vitamin A as counseled. PMID:22123631

  4. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  5. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  6. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  7. Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency Share | Flu Vaccine Guidance for Patients with Immune Deficiency This article ... should patients with immune deficiency be given the vaccine? Immune deficient patients have a decreased resistance to ...

  8. Lead Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on lead exposure is presented including forms of lead, sources, hematologic effects, neurologic effects, endocrine effects, renal effects, and reproductive and developmental effects. The purpose of the Lead Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Lead Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  9. Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) and their eradication.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, B S

    1983-11-12

    Disorders resulting from severe iodine deficiency affect more than 400 million people in Asia alone. These disorders include stillbirths, abortions, and congenital anomalies; endemic cretinism, characterised most commonly by mental deficiency, deaf mutism, and spastic diplegia and lesser degrees of neurological defect related to fetal iodine deficiency; and impaired mental function in children and adults with goitre associated with subnormal concentrations of circulating thyroxine. Use of the term iodine deficiency disorders, instead of "goitre", would help to bridge the serious gap between knowledge and its application. Iodised salt and iodised oil (by injection or by mouth) are suitable for the correction of iodine deficiency on a mass scale. A single dose of iodised oil can correct severe iodine deficiency for 3-5 years. Iodised oil offers a satisfactory immediate measure for primary care services until an iodised salt programme can be implemented. The complete eradication of iodine deficiency is therefore feasible within 5-10 years. PMID:6138653

  10. Effects of Boron Deficiency on 86Rubidium Uptake and Photosynthesis in the Diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Douglas A.; Dugger, W. Mack

    1980-01-01

    Culturing the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis under boron-deficient conditions leads to changes in 86Rb uptake and photosynthesis prior to any effect on the rate of cell division. The influx rate of 86Rb into boron-deficient cells was 79% of the control rate after 5 to 5.5 hours culture. Despite lowered 86Rb influx, however, boron-deficient diatoms accumulated more 86Rb than did control cells; this was due to the deficient cells' lower efflux rate. After 24 hours culture, boron-deficient cells had accumulated 30% more 86Rb than had control cells, while releasing 86Rb at only one-half the control rate. Increased photosynthetic rates were another effect of boron deficiency during this early stage of culture. Prior to 20 hours boron-deficient culture, diatoms had photosynthetic rates 37% greater than those of control cells. Corresponding to the increase in photosynthesis, boron-deficient diatoms had 12% more carbohydrate than control cells after 16 hours culture. PMID:16661504

  11. Metabolic Adaptations of White Lupin Roots and Shoots under Phosphorus Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Julia; Gödde, Victoria; Niehaus, Karsten; Zörb, Christian

    2015-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is highly adapted to phosphorus-diminished soils. P-deficient white lupin plants modify their root architecture and physiology to acquire sparingly available soil phosphorus. We employed gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling of P-deficient white lupins, to investigate biochemical pathways involved in the P-acquiring strategy. After 14 days of P-deficiency, plants showed reduced levels of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in shoots. Phosphorylated metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, myo-inositol-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate were reduced in both shoots and roots. After 22 days of P-deficiency, no effect on shoot or root sugar metabolite levels was found, but the levels of phosphorylated metabolites were further reduced. Organic acids, amino acids and several shikimate pathway products showed enhanced levels in 22-day-old P-deficient roots and shoots. These results indicate that P-deficient white lupins adapt their carbohydrate partitioning between shoot and root in order to supply their growing root system as an early response to P-deficiency. Organic acids are released into the rhizosphere to mobilize phosphorus from soil particles. A longer period of P-deficiency leads to scavenging of Pi from P-containing metabolites and reduced protein anabolism, but enhanced formation of secondary metabolites. The latter can serve as stress protection molecules or actively acquire phosphorus from the soil. PMID:26635840

  12. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  13. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  14. A case of 17 alpha-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Mee

    2015-01-01

    17α-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase are enzymes encoded by the CYP17A1 gene and are required for the synthesis of sex steroids and cortisol. In 17α-hydroxylase deficiency, there are low blood levels of estrogens, androgens, and cortisol, and resultant compensatory increases in adrenocorticotrophic hormone that stimulate the production of 11-deoxycorticosterone and corticosterone. In turn, the excessive levels of mineralocorticoids lead to volume expansion and hypertension. Females with 17α-hydroxylase deficiency are characterized by primary amenorrhea and delayed puberty, with accompanying hypertension. Affected males usually have female external genitalia, a blind vagina, and intra-abdominal testes. The treatment of this disorder is centered on glucocorticoid and sex steroid replacement. In patients with 17α-hydroxylase deficiency who are being raised as females, estrogen should be supplemented, while genetically female patients with a uterus should also receive progesterone supplementation. Here, we report a case of a 21-year-old female with 17α-hydroxylase deficiency who had received inadequate treatment for a prolonged period of time. We also include a brief review of the recent literature on this disorder. PMID:26161337

  15. Portal vein thrombosis with protein C-S deficiency in a non-cirrhotic patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Gustavo A; Morán, Segundo; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto; Brom-Valladares, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    There are several conditions that can lead to portal vein thrombosis (PVT), including including infection, malignancies, and coagulation disorders. Anew condition of interest is protein C and S deficiencies, associated with hypercoagulation and recurrent venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a non-cirrhotic 63-year-old male diagnosed with acute superior mesenteric vein thrombosis and PVT and combined deficiencies in proteins C and S, recanalized by short-term low molecular heparin plus oral warfarin therapy. PMID:25068006

  16. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. PMID:26728130

  17. Toxicokinetics of bone lead.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, M B

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses bone as a source of lead to the rest of the body and as a record of past lead exposure. Bone lead levels generally increase with age at rates dependent on the skeletal site and lead exposure. After occupational exposure, the slow decline in blood lead, a 5- to 19-year half-life, reflects the long skeletal half-life. Repeated measurements of bone lead demonstrate the slow elimination of lead from bone. Stable isotope ratios have revealed many details of skeletal uptake and subsequent release. The bulk turnover rates for compact bone are about 2% per year and 8% for spine. Turnover activity varies with age and health. Even though lead approximates calcium, radium, strontium, barium, fluorine, and other bone seekers, the rates for each are different. A simple, two-pool (bone and blood) kinetic model is presented with proposed numerical values for the changes in blood lead levels that occur with changes in turnover rates. Two approaches are offered to further quantify lead turnover. One involves a study of subjects with known past exposure. Changes in the ratio of blood lead to bone lead with time would reflect the course of bone lead availability. Also, stable isotopes and subjects who move from one geographical area to another offer opportunities. Sequential isotope measurements would indicate how much of the lead in blood is from current exposure or bone stores, distinct from changes in absorption or excretion. PMID:2040248

  18. Coronary Sinus Lead Extraction.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Edmond M; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2015-12-01

    Expanded indications for cardiac resynchronization therapy and the increasing incidence of cardiac implantable electronic device infection have led to an increased need for coronary sinus (CS) lead extraction. The CS presents unique anatomical obstacles to successful lead extraction. Training and facility requirements for CS lead extraction should mirror those for other leads. Here we review the indications, technique, and results of CS lead extraction. Published success rates and complications are similar to those reported for other leads, although multiple techniques may be required. Re-implantation options may be limited, which should be incorporated into pre-procedural decision making. PMID:26596810

  19. The Enteropathy of Prostaglandin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Phillips, John A.; Cogan, Joy D.; Iverson, Tina M.; Stein, Jeffrey A.; Brenner, David A.; Morrow, Jason D.; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Small intestinal ulcers are frequent complications of therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We present here a genetic deficiency of eicosanoid biosynthesis that illuminates the mechanism of NSAID-induced ulcers of the small intestine. Methods Eicosanoids and metabolites were measured by isotope-dilution with mass spectrometry. cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription and sequenced following amplification with RT-PCR. Results We investigated the cause of chronic recurrent small intestinal ulcers, small bowel perforations, and gastrointestinal blood loss in a 45 year old male who was not taking any cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Prostaglandin metabolites in urine were significantly depressed. Serum thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production was 4.6% of normal controls (p<0.006) and serum 12-HETE was 1.3% of controls (p<0.005). Optical platelet aggregation with simultaneous monitoring of ATP release demonstrated absent granule secretion in response to ADP and a blunted aggregation response to ADP and collagen, but normal response to arachidonic acid (AA). LTB4 biosynthesis by ionophore activated leukocytes was only 3% of controls and urinary LTE4 was undetectable. These findings suggested deficient AA release from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A2-α (cPLA2-α) which regulates cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase mediated eicosanoid production by catalyzing the release of their substrate, AA. Sequencing of cPLA2-α cDNA demonstrated 2 heterozygous non-synonymous single base pair mutations: Ser111Pro (S111P) and Arg485His (R485H), as well as a known SNP: Lys651Arg (K651R). Conclusion Characterization of this cPLA2-α deficiency provides support for the importance of prostaglandins in protecting small intestinal integrity, and indicates that loss of prostaglandin biosynthesis is sufficient to produce small intestinal ulcers. PMID:19148786

  20. The changing epidemiology of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Eastman, Creswell J

    2012-07-01

    Globally, about 2 thousand million people are affected by iodine deficiency. Although endemic goitre is the most visible sign of iodine deficiency, its most devastating consequence is brain damage causing mental retardation in children. The relationship between iodine deficiency and brain damage was not clearly established until the 1980s when the term iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs), which encompass a spectrum of conditions caused by iodine deficiency, was introduced. This paradigm shift in the understanding of the clinical consequences of iodine deficiency led to a change in iodine deficiency assessment. The median urinary iodine excretion level has been recommended as the preferred indicator for monitoring population iodine deficiency status since 2001. The 2007 WHO urinary iodine data in schoolchildren from 130 countries revealed that iodine intake is still insufficient in 47 countries. Furthermore, about one-third of countries lack national estimates of the prevalence of iodine deficiency. The picture that has emerged from available data worldwide over the past two decades is that IDDs are not confined to remote, mountainous areas in developing countries, but are a global public health problem that affects most countries, including developed countries and island nations. The recognition of the universality of iodine deficiency highlights the need to develop and apply new strategies to establish and maintain sustainable IDD elimination and strengthen regular monitoring programmes. PMID:22473332

  1. [LCAT deficiency: a nephrological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Boscutti, Giuliano; Calabresi, Laura; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Boer, Emanuela; Bosco, Manuela; Mattei, Piero Luigi; Martone, Massimiliano; Milutinovic, Neva; Berbecar, Dorina; Beltram, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Guido

    2011-01-01

    A genetic mendelian autosomal recessive condition of deficiency of lecithin- cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) can produce two different diseases: one highly interesting nephrologic picture of complete enzymatic deficiency (lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency; OMIM ID #245900; FLD), characterized by the association of dyslipidemia, corneal opacities, anemia and progressive nephropathy; and a partial form (fish eye disease; OMIM ID #136120; FED) with dyslipidemia and progressive corneal opacities only. The diagnosis of FLD falls first of all under the competence of nephrologists, because end-stage renal disease appears to be its most severe outcome. The diagnostic suspicion is based on clinical signs (corneal opacities, more severe anemia than expected for the degree of chronic renal failure, progressive proteinuric nephropathy) combined with histology obtained by kidney biopsy (glomerulopathy evolving toward sclerosis with distinctive lipid deposition). However, the final diagnosis, starting with a finding of extremely low levels of HDL-cholesterol, requires collaboration with lipidology Centers that can perform sophisticated investigations unavailable in common laboratories. To be heterozygous for a mutation of the LCAT gene is one of the monogenic conditions underlying primary hypoalphalipoproteinemia (OMIM ID #604091). This disease, which is characterized by levels of HDL-cholesterol below the 5th percentile of those of the examined population (<28 mg/dL for Italians), has heritability estimates between 40% and 60% and is considered to be a predisposing condition for coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, some monogenic forms, and especially those associated with LCAT deficiency, seem to break the rule, confirming once more the value of a proper diagnosis before drawing prognostic conclusions from a laboratory marker. As in many other rare illnesses, trying to discover all the existing cases will contribute to allow studies broad enough to pave the

  2. Pathogenetic considerations of pica in lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Pueschel, S M; Cullen, S M; Howard, R B; Cullinane, M M

    An important factor associated with lead poisoning in children is the habit of eating non-food substances, a condition termed pica. In search for underlying mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of pica, this investigation presents evidence in support of the hypothesis that in many families failure of normal mother-child interaction, paternal deprivation, culturally dependent maternal oral interests and significant stress factors in the home where abundant lead-containing material is available are etiologically related to the development of pica in lead poisoning. Other factors, which have been thought to be associated with pica, are nutritional deficiencies and maladaptive behavior patterns. A multifocal treatment approach is considered to be most effective. PMID:649261

  3. Neuromuscular junction immaturity and muscle atrophy are hallmarks of the ColQ-deficient mouse, a model of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acetylcholinesterase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sigoillot, Séverine M; Bourgeois, Francine; Karmouch, Jennifer; Molgó, Jordi; Dobbertin, Alexandre; Chevalier, Catherine; Houlgatte, Rémi; Léger, Jean; Legay, Claire

    2016-06-01

    The collagen ColQ anchors acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the synaptic cleft of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). It also binds MuSK and perlecan/dystroglycan, 2 signaling platforms of the postsynaptic domain. Mutations in ColQ cause a congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) with AChE deficiency. Because the absence of AChE does not fully explain the complexity of the syndrome and there is no curative treatment for the disease, we explored additional potential targets of ColQ by conducting a large genetic screening of ColQ-deficient mice, a model for CMS with AChE deficiency, and analyzed their NMJ and muscle phenotypes. We demonstrated that ColQ controls the development and the maturation of the postsynaptic domain by regulating synaptic gene expression. Notably, ColQ deficiency leads to an up-regulation of the 5 subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR), leading to mixed mature and immature AChRs at the NMJ of adult mice. ColQ also regulates the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. However, whereas the ECM mRNAs were down-regulated in vitro, compensation seemed to occur in vivo to maintain normal levels of these mRNAs. Finally, ColQ deficiency leads to a general atrophic phenotype and hypoplasia that affect fast muscles. This study points to new specific hallmarks for this CMS.-Sigoillot, S. M., Bourgeois, F., Karmouch, J., Molgó, J., Dobbertin, A., Chevalier, C., Houlgatte, R., Léger, J., Legay, C. Neuromuscular junction immaturity and muscle atrophy are hallmarks of the ColQ-deficient mouse, a model of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acetylcholinesterase deficiency. PMID:26993635

  4. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  5. VOLUMETRIC LEAD ASSAY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua; David Roelant; Sachin Kumar

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a system for handling and radioassay of lead, consisting of a robot, a conveyor, and a gamma spectrometer. The report also presents a cost-benefit analysis of options: radioassay and recycling lead vs. disposal as waste.

  6. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead soldered cans goes into effect. If imported wine containers have a lead foil wrapper, wipe the ... a towel moistened with lemon juice, vinegar, or wine before using. DO NOT store wine, spirits, or ...

  7. Lead - nutritional considerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in some containers and cooking utensils . Old paint poses the greatest danger for lead poisoning , especially ... leach out into the liquid. Other important recommendations: Paint over old leaded paint if it is in ...

  8. Lead and tap water

    MedlinePlus

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water and requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports, which include information about lead amounts, are available to consumers. For ...

  9. Transplacental transport of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Neurotoxicity is the major health effect from exposure to lead for infants and young children, and there is current concern regarding possible toxic effects of lead on the child while in utero. there is no placental-fetal barrier to lead transport. Maternal and fetal blood lead levels are nearly identical, so lead passes through the placenta unencumbered. Lead has been measured in the fetal brain as early as the end of the first trimester (13 weeks). There is a similar rate of increase in brain size and lead content throughout pregnancy in the fetus of mothers in the general population, so concentration of lead probably does not differ greatly during gestation unless exposure of the mother changes. Cell-specific sensitivity to the toxic effects of lead, however, may be greater the younger the fetus. Lead toxicity to the nervous system is characterized by edema or swelling of the brain due to altered permeability of capillary endothelial cells. Experimental studies suggest that immature endothelial cells forming the capillaries of the developing brain are less resistant to the effects of lead, permitting fluid and cations including lead to reach newly formed components of the brain, particularly astrocytes and neurons. Also, the ability of astrocytes and neurons to sequester lead in the form of lead protein complexes occurs only in the later stages of fetal development, permitting lead in maturing brain cells to interact with vital subcellular organelles, particularly mitochondria, which are the major cellular energy source. Intracellular lead also affects binding sites for calcium which, in turn, may affect numerous cell functions including neurotransmitter release.

  10. Solving the lead dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper discusses the widespread problem of lead poisoning among children. The perils of deleading are addressed and several methods of deleading currently in use are detailed and analyzed. These include the traditional method of burning or sanding off leaded paint, the Baltimore Model involving extensive refabrication of infected dwellings, and encapsulation by which leaded surfaces in the home are covered to prevent the escape of lead dust.

  11. PHOTOEMISSION PROPERTIES OF LEAD.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; RAO,T.; WARREN,J.; SEKUTOWICZ,J.; LEFFERTS,R.; LIPSKI,A.

    2004-07-05

    In this paper we present a study of the photoemission properties of lead at several UV wavelengths, including a study of the damage threshold of electroplated lead under laser cleaning. A quantum efficiency in excess of 0.1% has been achieved for a laser cleaned, electroplated lead sample with a laser wavelength of 193 nm. Niobium cathodes have been measured for comparison, and lead is found to be a superior photoemitter for all measured wavelengths.

  12. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  13. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important to ...

  14. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Roger L.

    1986-01-01

    Urban children are exposed to lead through the air they breathe, the water they drink, and the food and nonfood substances they ingest. The history, diagnosis, and treatment of lead poisoning in these children are discussed. Includes information on the toxicology of lead and the various risk classes. (JN)

  15. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  16. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Determine if your family is at risk for lead poisoning with the Lead Poisoning Home Checklist (PDF) . Top of page What do I do if I think my child or I have been exposed to lead? Talk to your pediatrician, general physician, or local ...

  17. Lead and children

    PubMed Central

    Abelsohn, Alan R.; Sanborn, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to screening for and preventing children’s exposure to lead. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using terms relevant to lead exposure and poisoning. We reviewed English-language articles published in 2003 to 2008. Most cited studies provide level 2 or 3 evidence. MAIN MESSAGE Lead is a developmental neurotoxin. Children are most commonly exposed and they are most vulnerable. Lead exposure has been associated with many cognitive and motor deficits, as well as distractibility and other characteristics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Although children’s blood lead levels have declined considerably over the past 3 decades with removal of lead from gasoline and paint, children can still be exposed to lead from lead paint in older homes, toys, and other sources. Because post-exposure treatment cannot reverse the cognitive effects of lead exposure, preventing lead exposure is essential. CONCLUSION Family physicians have an important role in screening for children at high risk of lead exposure, and in educating families to prevent the exposure of children to lead. PMID:20547517

  18. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  19. Lead Poisoning in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyaux, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Overexposure to lead can permanently impair a child's mental and physical development. This article discusses sources of lead paint, survey and testing methods, management and abatement plans, drinking water contamination, and associated federal standards. Although lead is present in soil and in art, theater, and vocational programs, no federal…

  20. Zinc deficiency in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Katz, R L; Keen, C L; Litt, I F; Hurley, L S; Kellams-Harrison, K M; Glader, L J

    1987-09-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa were evaluated for clinical and biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency. To assess whether these patients would benefit from zinc supplementation, a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The mean zinc intake of the anorexic group calculated on the basis of three-day dietary records was 7.7 +/- 5.2 mg/day, which is significantly below the recommended daily allowance of 15 mg for adolescents (p less than 0.001). The mean urinary zinc excretion in the anorexic group was 257.1 +/- 212.7 micrograms/24 hours compared to 749.9 +/- 897.8 micrograms/24 hours in the control group (p less than 0.005). This result suggests that the zinc status of anorexia nervosa patients may be compromised due to an inadequate zinc intake. Zinc supplementation (50 mg elemental zinc/day) was followed by a decrease in the level of depression and anxiety as assessed by the Zung Depression Scale (p less than 0.05) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (p less than 0.05), respectively. Our data suggest that individuals with anorexia nervosa may be at risk for zinc deficiency and may respond favorably after zinc supplementation. PMID:3312133

  1. Age-associated mosaic respiratory chain deficiency causes trans-neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Eric; Terzioglu, Mügen; Sterky, Fredrik Hansson; Sörensen, Lene; Galter, Dagmar; Olson, Lars; Wilbertz, Johannes; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2008-05-15

    Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (mutations present only in a subset of cellular mtDNA copies) arise de novo during the normal ageing process or may be maternally inherited in pedigrees with mitochondrial disease syndromes. A pathogenic mtDNA mutation causes respiratory chain deficiency only if the fraction of mutated mtDNA exceeds a certain threshold level. These mutations often undergo apparently random mitotic segregation and the levels of normal and mutated mtDNA can vary considerably between cells of the same tissue. In human ageing, segregation of somatic mtDNA mutations leads to mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in a variety of tissues, such as brain, heart and skeletal muscle. A similar pattern of mutation segregation with mosaic respiratory chain deficiency is seen in patients with mitochondrial disease syndromes caused by inherited pathogenic mtDNA mutations. We have experimentally addressed the role of mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing and mitochondrial disease by creating mouse chimeras with a mixture of normal and respiratory chain-deficient neurons in cerebral cortex. We report here that a low proportion (>20%) of respiratory chain-deficient neurons in the forebrain are sufficient to cause symptoms, whereas premature death of the animal occurs only if the proportion is high (>60-80%). The presence of neurons with normal respiratory chain function does not only prevent mortality but also delays the age at which onset of disease symptoms occur. Unexpectedly, respiratory chain-deficient neurons have adverse effect on normal adjacent neurons and induce trans-neuronal degeneration. In summary, our study defines the minimal threshold level of respiratory chain-deficient neurons needed to cause symptoms and also demonstrate that neurons with normal respiratory chain function ameliorate disease progression. Finally, we show that respiratory chain-deficient neurons induce death of normal neurons by a trans-neuronal degeneration

  2. Bone matrix hypermineralization in prolyl-3 hydroxylase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Vranka, Janice A; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Rauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Lack of prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) due to mutations in P3H1 results in severe forms of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta. In the present study, we investigated the bone tissue characteristics of P3H1 null mice. Histomorphometric analyses of cancellous bone in the proximal tibia and lumbar vertebra in 1-month and 3-month old mice demonstrated that P3H1 deficient mice had low trabecular bone volume and low mineral apposition rate, but normal osteoid maturation time and normal osteoblast and osteoclast surfaces. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging revealed that the bone mineralization density distribution was shifted towards higher values, indicating hypermineralization of bone matrix. It thus appears that P3H1 deficiency leads to decreased deposition of extracellular matrix by osteoblasts and increased incorporation of mineral into the matrix. PMID:26808442

  3. Characteristic kidney pathology, gene abnormality and treatments in LCAT deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hirashio, Shuma; Ueno, Toshinori; Naito, Takayuki; Masaki, Takao

    2014-04-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a key enzyme involved in reverse cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to the liver. LCAT deficiency, in which this enzyme is congenitally absent, is a genetic disease that impairs the esterification of free cholesterol in the plasma, leading to accumulation of phospholipids, including lecithin, in the organs of the body; the clinical manifestations include corneal opacities, normochromic anemia, renal disorder, etc. The prognosis is determined by the degree of renal dysfunction, and renal biopsy specimens reveal characteristic light- and electron-microscopic findings. The disease, transmitted by autosomal recessive inheritance, is extremely rare. There have only been 88 gene mutations of the LCAT gene reported around the world, and 13 of them are from Japan. One of the characteristics of LCAT deficiency is the strong correlations among the patterns, extent and phenotypes of these gene mutations. PMID:24174160

  4. Biotinidase deficiency: a treatable genetic disorder in the Saudi population.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S; al-Essa, M A; Archibald, A; Ozand, P T

    1999-11-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder which is not uncommon in the Saudi population. Biotinidase is responsible for biotin recycling and biotin is an essential cofactor for activation of the carboxylase enzymes. Absence of biotinidase leads to infantile or early childhood encephalopathy, seizure disorder, dermatitis, alopecia, neural deafness and optic atrophy. The disease can be diagnosed by simple fluorometric enzyme assay. Treatment with biotin is both cheap and simple, resulting in rewarding clinical recovery and normalization of the biochemical, neuroradiological and neurophysiological parameters. If neglected, however, a patient may die of acute metabolic acidosis or may suffer from permanent neural deafness and optic atrophy, with mental and motor handicap. We describe the detection and treatment of 20 cases of biotinidase deficiency in our hospital and recommend the introduction of a neonatal screening programme for this disorder. PMID:11924114

  5. Space shuttle orbiter leading-edge flight performance compared to design goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.; Johnson, D. W.; Kelly, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Thermo-structural performance of the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia's leading-edge structural subsystem for the first five (5) flights is compared with the design goals. Lessons learned from thse initial flights of the first reusable manned spacecraft are discussed in order to assess design maturity, deficiencies, and modifications required to rectify the design deficiencies. Flight data and post-flight inspections support the conclusion that the leading-edge structural subsystem hardware performance was outstanding for the initial five (5) flights.

  6. Lead in the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  7. Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the tibia.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, D A; Loder, R T; Crandall, R C

    2003-01-01

    We performed a clinical and radiographic review of 15 patients (19 limbs) with longitudinal deficiency of the tibia treated between 1981 and 2001. Ten limbs with Kalamchi type I deficiencies were managed by through-knee amputation. Five type II deficiencies were treated by foot ablation and tibiofibular synostosis, either at the same time or staged, but prosthetic problems may arise from varus alignment and prominence of the proximal fibula. Patients with type III deficiencies (four cases) were treated by foot ablation. Prosthetic problems relating to proximal or distal tibiofibular instability may necessitate additional surgical intervention. PMID:12879290

  8. Neonatal mass screening for 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshihiro; Fukushi, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia(CAH)due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder. Its incidence is 1 in 10,000 to 20,000 worldwide. This disease shows phenotypic differences, and it is divided into three forms i.e., the salt wasting (SW), simple virilizing (SV), and nonclassic (NC) forms. The most severe form of SW manifests in the first months of life with life-threatening adrenal insufficiency, leading to death. To prevent death by adrenal insufficiency in neonates with the SW form and wrong gender assignment of 46,XX female patients with SW and SV, neonatal mass screening of 21-OHD is performed in several countries including Japan. However, the positive predictive value (PPV) remains low, especially in preterm infants. To reduce the false positive rate and increase the PPV, liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) as a second-tier test may be useful. In this review, the current knowledge on neonatal mass screening of 21-OHD is summarized. PMID:26865749

  9. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  10. Soil Aeration deficiencies in urban sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltecke, Katharina; Gaertig, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    Soil aeration deficiencies in urban sites Katharina Weltecke and Thorsten Gaertig On urban tree sites reduction of soil aeration by compaction or sealing is an important but frequently underestimated factor for tree growth. Up to 50% of the CO2 assimilated during the vegetation period is respired in the root space (Qi et al. 1994). An adequate supply of the soil with oxygen and a proper disposal of the exhaled carbon dioxide are essential for an undisturbed root respiration. If the soil surface is smeared, compacted or sealed, soil aeration is interrupted. Several references show that root activity and fine root growth are controlled by the carbon dioxide concentration in soil air (Qi et al.1994, Burton et al. 1997). Gaertig (2001) found that decreasing topsoil gas permeability leads to reduced fine root density and hence to injury in crown structure of oaks. In forest soils a critical CO2 concentration of more than 0.6 % indicates a bad aeration status (Gaertig 2001). The majority of urban tree sites are compacted or sealed. The reduction of soil aeration may lead to dysfunctions in the root space and consequently to stress during periods of drought, which has its visible affects in crown structure. It is reasonable to assume that disturbances in soil aeration lead to reduced tree vigour and roadworthiness, resulting in high maintenance costs. The assessment of soil aeration in urban sites is difficult. In natural ecosystems the measurement of gas diffusivity and the gas-chromatical analysis of CO2 in soil air are accepted procedures in analyzing the state of aeration (Schack-Kirchner et al. 2001, Gaertig 2001). It has been found that these methods can also be applied for analyzing urban sites. In particular CO2 concentration in the soil atmosphere can be considered as a rapidly assessable, relevant and integrating indicator of the aeration situation of urban soils. This study tested the working hypothesis that soil aeration deficiencies lead to a decrease of fine

  11. Sensitive Detection of Phosphorus Deficiency in Plants Using Chlorophyll a Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Frydenvang, Jens; van Maarschalkerweerd, Marie; Carstensen, Andreas; Mundus, Simon; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Pedas, Pai Rosager; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Schjoerring, Jan K; Husted, Søren

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a finite natural resource and an essential plant macronutrient with major impact on crop productivity and global food security. Here, we demonstrate that time-resolved chlorophyll a fluorescence is a unique tool to monitor bioactive P in plants and can be used to detect latent P deficiency. When plants suffer from P deficiency, the shape of the time-dependent fluorescence transients is altered distinctively, as the so-called I step gradually straightens and eventually disappears. This effect is shown to be fully reversible, as P resupply leads to a rapid restoration of the I step. The fading I step suggests that the electron transport at photosystem I (PSI) is affected in P-deficient plants. This is corroborated by the observation that differences at the I step in chlorophyll a fluorescence transients from healthy and P-deficient plants can be completely eliminated through prior reduction of PSI by far-red illumination. Moreover, it is observed that the barley (Hordeum vulgare) mutant Viridis-zb(63), which is devoid of PSI activity, similarly does not display the I step. Among the essential plant nutrients, the effect of P deficiency is shown to be specific and sufficiently sensitive to enable rapid in situ determination of latent P deficiency across different plant species, thereby providing a unique tool for timely remediation of P deficiency in agriculture. PMID:26162430

  12. [Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency-induced schizophrenia in a school-age boy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Yu-Peng; Li, Xi-Yuan; Ma, Yan-Yan; Wu, Tong-Fei; Ding, Yuan; Song, Jin-Qing; Wang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Yan-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It is known that MTHFR deficiency may result in hyperhomocysteinemia, but MTHFR deficiency-induced schizophrenia has been rarely reported. Here we present the clinical course, biochemical and genetic characteristics of schizophrenia resulted from MTHFR deficiency in a school-age boy. He was 13 years old. He was admitted with a two-year history of fear, auditory hallucination, learning difficulty, sleeping problems, irascibility, drowsing and giggling. At admission, he had significantly elevated plasma and urine levels of total homocysteine, significantly decreased levels of folate in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, and a normal blood concentration of methionine. Further DNA sequencing analysis showed 665C>T homozygous mutations in the MTHFR gene. The patient was diagnosed with MTHFR deficiency-associated schizophrenia and treatment with calcium folinate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, and betaine was initiated. After the treatment for 1 week, his plasma and urine levels of homocysteine were decreased to a normal range and the clinical symptoms were significantly improved. After 3 months of treatment, the patient returned to school. He is now living with normal school life. In summary, children with late-onset MTHFR deficiency and secondary cerebral folate deficiency may lead to schizophrenia. This rare condition can be early diagnosed through analyses of blood and urine total homocysteine, amino acids in blood and folate in blood and cerebral fluid and successfully treated with folinic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and betaine. PMID:24461181

  13. A WRKY Transcription Factor Regulates Fe Translocation under Fe Deficiency1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing Ying; Li, Chun Xiao; Sun, Li; Ren, Jiang Yuan; Li, Gui Xin

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects plant growth and development, leading to reduction of crop yields and quality. Although the regulation of Fe uptake under Fe deficiency has been well studied in the past decade, the regulatory mechanism of Fe translocation inside the plants remains unknown. Here, we show that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 is involved in response to Fe deficiency. Lack of WRKY46 (wrky46-1 and wrky46-2 loss-of-function mutants) significantly affects Fe translocation from root to shoot and thus causes obvious chlorosis on the new leaves under Fe deficiency. Gene expression analysis reveals that expression of a nodulin-like gene (VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER1-LIKE1 [VITL1]) is dramatically increased in wrky46-1 mutant. VITL1 expression is inhibited by Fe deficiency, while the expression of WRKY46 is induced in the root stele. Moreover, down-regulation of VITL1 expression can restore the chlorosis phenotype on wrky46-1 under Fe deficiency. Further yeast one-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that WRKY46 is capable of binding to the specific W-boxes present in the VITL1 promoter. In summary, our results demonstrate that WRKY46 plays an important role in the control of root-to-shoot Fe translocation under Fe deficiency condition via direct regulation of VITL1 transcript levels. PMID:27208259

  14. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W; Blom, Henk J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders. PMID:27446930

  15. Biomarkers and Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Lysne, Vegard; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Behringer, Sidney; Grünert, Sarah C.; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Jacobsen, Donald W.; Blom, Henk J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl, B12) is an indispensable water-soluble micronutrient that serves as a coenzyme for cytosolic methionine synthase (MS) and mitochondrial methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). Deficiency of Cbl, whether nutritional or due to inborn errors of Cbl metabolism, inactivate MS and MCM leading to the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA), respectively. In conjunction with total B12 and its bioactive protein-bound form, holo-transcobalamin (holo-TC), Hcy, and MMA are the preferred serum biomarkers utilized to determine B12 status. Clinically, vitamin B12 deficiency leads to neurological deterioration and megaloblastic anemia, and, if left untreated, to death. Subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency (usually defined as a total serum B12 of <200 pmol/L) presents asymptomatically or with rather subtle generic symptoms that oftentimes are mistakenly ascribed to unrelated disorders. Numerous studies have now established that serum vitamin B12 has limited diagnostic value as a stand-alone marker. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 not always represent deficiency, and likewise, severe functional deficiency of the micronutrient has been documented in the presence of normal and even high levels of serum vitamin B12. This review discusses the usefulness and limitations of current biomarkers of B12 status in newborn screening, infant and adult diagnostics, the algorithms utilized to diagnose B12 deficiency and unusual findings of vitamin B12 status in various human disorders. PMID:27446930

  16. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  17. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Müller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A.

    2006-03-01

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. (γ, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained.

  18. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis. PMID:11375427

  19. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  20. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  1. Vitamin A deficiency in quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestler, R.B.; Bailey, W.W.

    1943-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the symptoms of avitaminosis A in growing and adolescent bobwhites. Chicks from parents that have received a diet rich in vitamin A may have enough stored to carry them a week or ten days on a growing diet deficient in vitamin A before symptoms of deficiency occur. The first sign is ruffled feathering, with the wing primaries standing out from the body and drooping. Ophthalmia in one or both eyes occurs and may close the eyes completely, but this condition is not severe in all cases and may not even be noticeable. Birds show poor growth, loss of appetite, and weakness before death. Under the conditions of the experiments discussed herein, death may occur in the fourth or fifth week, and mortality is high......Postmortem examination may reveal visceral gout with thick deposits of urates on the kidneys, in the ureters, on the heart, in the proventriculus, and occasionally covering all the viscera. There may also be hemorrhage of the heart and other organs....Adolescent quail reared on a diet rich in vitamin A may be able to live through the winter on a maintenance diet low in this vitamin without showing symptoms of avitaminosis, but some individuals whose storage of vitamin A in the liver is not as great as that of others may succumb to visceral gout.....A growing mash for quail which contains sufficient vitamin A when fresh may, after a period of storage, lose enough of the vitamin to cause the characteristic symptoms of avitaminosis A to appear.

  2. Lead Poison Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    With NASA contracts, Whittaker Corporations Space Science division has developed an electro-optical instrument to mass screen for lead poisoning. Device is portable and detects protoporphyrin in whole blood. Free corpuscular porphyrins occur as an early effect of lead ingestion. Also detects lead in urine used to confirm blood tests. Test is inexpensive and can be applied by relatively unskilled personnel. Similar Whittaker fluorometry device called "drug screen" can measure morphine and quinine in urine much faster and cheaper than other methods.

  3. Lead poisoning: case studies.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J N; Taylor, A; Bennett, P N

    2002-05-01

    Early clinical features of lead toxicity are non-specific and an occupational history is particularly valuable. Lead in the body comprises 2% in the blood (t1/2 35 days) and 95% in bone and dentine (t1/2 20-30 years). Blood lead may remain elevated for years after cessation from long exposure, due to redistribution from bone. Blood lead concentration is the most widely used marker for inorganic lead exposure. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) concentration in blood usefully reflects lead exposure over the prior 3 months. Symptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 micromol l-1 (50 microg dl-1) or in any event >3.8 micromol l-1 (80 microg dl-1) should receive sodium calciumedetate i.v., followed by succimer by mouth for 19 days. Asymptomatic patients with blood lead concentration >2.4 micromol l-1 (50 microg dl-1) may be treated with succimer alone. Sodium calciumedetate should be given with dimercaprol to treat lead encephalopathy. PMID:11994050

  4. The effects of MyD88 deficiency on disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice: role of endogenous TLR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ampong, Beryl; Sali, Arpana; Vandermeulen, Jack; Wei, Benjamin; Creeden, Brittany; Huynh, Tony; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    An absence of dysferlin leads to activation of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and skeletal muscle inflammation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is a key mediator of TLR-dependent innate immune signalling. We hypothesized that endogenous TLR ligands released from the leaking dysferlin-deficient muscle fibres engage TLRs on muscle and immune cells and contribute to disease progression. To test this hypothesis, we generated and characterized dysferlin and MyD88 double-deficient mice. Double-deficient mice exhibited improved body weight, grip strength, and maximum muscle contractile force at 6–8 months of age when compared to MyD88-sufficient, dysferlin-deficient A/J mice. Double-deficient mice also showed a decrease in total fibre number, which contributed to the observed increase in the number of central nuclei/fibres. These results indicate that there was less regeneration in the double-deficient mice. We next tested the hypothesis that endogenous ligands, such as single-stranded ribonucleic acids (ssRNAs), released from damaged muscle cells bind to TLR-7/8 and perpetuate the disease progression. We found that injection of ssRNA into the skeletal muscle of pre-symptomatic mice (2 months old) resulted in a significant increase in degenerative fibres, inflammation, and regenerating fibres in A/J mice. In contrast, characteristic histological features were significantly decreased in double-deficient mice. These data point to a clear role for the TLR pathway in the pathogenesis of dysferlin deficiency and suggest that TLR-7/8 antagonists may have therapeutic value in this disease. PMID:23857504

  5. The effects of MyD88 deficiency on disease phenotype in dysferlin-deficient A/J mice: role of endogenous TLR ligands.

    PubMed

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ampong, Beryl; Sali, Arpana; Vandermeulen, Jack; Wei, Benjamin; Creeden, Brittany; Huynh, Tony; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Rayavarapu, Sree; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-10-01

    An absence of dysferlin leads to activation of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and skeletal muscle inflammation. Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is a key mediator of TLR-dependent innate immune signalling. We hypothesized that endogenous TLR ligands released from the leaking dysferlin-deficient muscle fibres engage TLRs on muscle and immune cells and contribute to disease progression. To test this hypothesis, we generated and characterized dysferlin and MyD88 double-deficient mice. Double-deficient mice exhibited improved body weight, grip strength, and maximum muscle contractile force at 6-8 months of age when compared to MyD88-sufficient, dysferlin-deficient A/J mice. Double-deficient mice also showed a decrease in total fibre number, which contributed to the observed increase in the number of central nuclei/fibres. These results indicate that there was less regeneration in the double-deficient mice. We next tested the hypothesis that endogenous ligands, such as single-stranded ribonucleic acids (ssRNAs), released from damaged muscle cells bind to TLR-7/8 and perpetuate the disease progression. We found that injection of ssRNA into the skeletal muscle of pre-symptomatic mice (2 months old) resulted in a significant increase in degenerative fibres, inflammation, and regenerating fibres in A/J mice. In contrast, characteristic histological features were significantly decreased in double-deficient mice. These data point to a clear role for the TLR pathway in the pathogenesis of dysferlin deficiency and suggest that TLR-7/8 antagonists may have therapeutic value in this disease. PMID:23857504

  6. Neonatal carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency: failure of treatment despite prolonged survival

    PubMed Central

    Hissink-Muller, Petra; Lopriore, Enrico; Boelen, Carolien; Klumper, Frans; Duran, Marinus; Walther, Frans

    2009-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) deficiencies are disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO). In fatty acid oxidation, long-chain fatty acids need the carnitine cycle to be transported from the cytosol to the mitochondria. In CPT II deficiency, long-chain acylcarnitines cannot be metabolised to carnitine and acyl-CoA, leading to accumulation of toxic long-chain acylcarnitines. Three clinical presentations of CPT II deficiency have been identified: the adult form, the infantile form and the neonatal form. The neonatal form of CPT II is the most severe and all reported patients died within a few days to 6 weeks after birth. The first case of a patient with neonatal CPT II deficiency surviving beyond the neonatal period is described. Unfortunately, the infant died at the age of 6 months due to untreatable cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21709843

  7. Roles of chemical signals in regulation of the adaptive responses to iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing Xing; He, Xiao Lin; Jin, Chong Wei

    2016-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for plants but is not readily accessible in most calcareous soils. Although the adaptive responses of plants to iron deficiency have been well documented, the signals involved in the regulatory cascade leading to their activation are not well understood to date. Recent studies revealed that chemical compounds, including sucrose, auxin, ethylene and nitric oxide, positively regulated the Fe-deficiency-induced Fe uptake processes in a cooperative manner. Nevertheless, cytokinins, jasmonate and abscisic acid were shown to act as negative signals in transmitting the iron deficiency information. The present mini review is to briefly address the roles of chemical signals in regulation of the adaptive responses to iron deficiency based on the literatures published in recent years. PMID:27110729

  8. 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report of a treatable cause of seizures.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Turgay; Aydin, Halil Ibrahim; Kiliç, Mustafa; Dursun, Ali; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Topaloğlu, Haluk; Karli-Oğuz, Kader; de Koning, Tom J

    2009-01-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are a new group of neurometabolic diseases resulting from a deficiency in one of the three enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of L-serine. Deficiency of the enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH), which catalyzes the first step in the biosynthetic pathway, leads to congenital microcephaly, severe psychomotor retardation, and intractable seizures. We report a 4 1/2-year-old boy who presented with congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, hypertonia, strabismus, and drug-resistant seizures due to 3-PGDH deficiency. His seizures responded to L-serine and glycine supplementation only. This potentially treatable disease should be borne in mind in patients with congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation and seizures. A timely diagnosis based on the detection of low cerebrospinal fluid levels of L-serine and glycine is expected to further increase the success of L-serine and glycine supplementation in these patients. PMID:20196394

  9. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  10. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  11. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  12. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  13. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  14. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  15. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  16. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  17. 36 CFR 1120.26 - Deficient descriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deficient descriptions. 1120.26 Section 1120.26 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Information Available Upon Request § 1120.26 Deficient descriptions. (a) If the description of...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: triosephosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of triosephosphate isomerase deficiency. Eur J Haematol. 2011 Mar;86(3):265-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0609.2010.01484.x. Citation on PubMed Orosz F, Oláh J, Ovádi J. Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency: facts and doubts. IUBMB Life. 2006 Dec;58(12):703-15. Review. Citation ...

  19. Academic Deficiency: Student Experiences of Institutional Labeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barouch-Gilbert, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Limited existing research examines how undergraduate students in the United States experience the process of being identified as deficient due to their academic performance. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of college students on academic probation who were labeled academically deficient. Students…

  20. An update on serine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    van der Crabben, S N; Verhoeven-Duif, N M; Brilstra, E H; Van Maldergem, L; Coskun, T; Rubio-Gozalbo, E; Berger, R; de Koning, T J

    2013-07-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive polyneuropathy in adult patients. There are three defects that cause serine deficiency of which 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency, the defect affecting the first step in the pathway, has been reported most frequently. The other two disorders in L-serine biosynthesis phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) deficiency and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) deficiency have been reported only in a limited number of patients. The biochemical hallmarks of all three disorders are low concentrations of serine in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. Prompt recognition of affected patients is important, since serine deficiency disorders are treatable causes of neurometabolic disorders. The use of age-related reference values for serine in CSF and plasma can be of great help in establishing a correct diagnosis of serine deficiency, in particular in newborns and young children. PMID:23463425