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Sample records for docks secretory vesicles

  1. Morphological docking of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-dependent secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones is essential for brain function and neuroendocrine-signaling. Prior to exocytosis, neurotransmitter-containing vesicles dock to the target membrane. In electron micrographs of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, like chromaffin cells many synaptic vesicles (SVs) and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are docked. For many years the molecular identity of the morphologically docked state was unknown. Recently, we resolved the minimal docking machinery in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells using embryonic mouse model systems together with electron-microscopic analyses and also found that docking is controlled by the sub-membrane filamentous (F-)actin. Currently it is unclear if the same docking machinery operates in synapses. Here, I will review our docking assay that led to the identification of the LDCV docking machinery in chromaffin cells and also discuss whether identical docking proteins are required for SV docking in synapses. PMID:20577884

  2. Docking of Secretory Vesicles Is Syntaxin Dependent

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Heidi; Cornelisse, L. Niels; Toonen, Ruud F.G.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones. PMID:17205130

  3. The Role of Rab3a in Secretory Vesicle Docking Requires Association/Dissociation of Guanidine Phosphates and Munc18-1

    PubMed Central

    van Weering, Jan R.T.; Toonen, Ruud F.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2007-01-01

    Rab3a is a small GTPase that binds selectively to secretory vesicles and switches between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound conformations. In yeast, Rab and SM-genes interact genetically to promote vesicle targeting/fusion. We tested different Rab3a conformations and genetic interactions with the SM-gene munc18-1 on the docking function of Rab3a in mammalian chromaffin cells. We expressed Rab3a mutants locked in the GTP- or GDP-bound form in wild-type and munc18-1 null mutant cells and analyzed secretory vesicle distribution. We confirmed that wild-type Rab3a promotes vesicle docking in wild-type cells. Unexpectedly, both GTP- and GDP-locked Rab3a mutants did not promote docking. Furthermore, wild-type Rab3a did not promote docking in munc18-1 null cells and GTP- and GDP-Rab3a both decreased the amount of docked vesicles. The results show that GTP- and GDP-locked conformations do not support a Munc18-1 dependent role of Rab3a in docking. This suggests that nucleotide cycling is required to support docking and that this action of Rab3a is upstream of Munc18-1. PMID:17637832

  4. A syntaxin-SNAP 25-VAMP complex is formed without docking of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Taubenblatt, P; Synguelakis, M; Shiff, G

    1998-01-01

    We show herein that syntaxin is already associated with SNAP 25 and VAMP during fast axonal transport, and in isolated synaptic vesicles, before docking of these secretory organelles at the active zones. PMID:9789843

  5. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission. PMID:27342860

  6. Variable priming of a docked synaptic vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hoon; Szule, Joseph A.; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2016-01-01

    The priming of a docked synaptic vesicle determines the probability of its membrane (VM) fusing with the presynaptic membrane (PM) when a nerve impulse arrives. To gain insight into the nature of priming, we searched by electron tomography for structural relationships correlated with fusion probability at active zones of axon terminals at frog neuromuscular junctions. For terminals fixed at rest, the contact area between the VM of docked vesicles and PM varied >10-fold with a normal distribution. There was no merging of the membranes. For terminals fixed during repetitive evoked synaptic transmission, the normal distribution of contact areas was shifted to the left, due in part to a decreased number of large contact areas, and there was a subpopulation of large contact areas where the membranes were hemifused, an intermediate preceding complete fusion. Thus, fusion probability of a docked vesicle is related to the extent of its VM–PM contact area. For terminals fixed 1 h after activity, the distribution of contact areas recovered to that at rest, indicating the extent of a VM–PM contact area is dynamic and in equilibrium. The extent of VM–PM contact areas in resting terminals correlated with eccentricity in vesicle shape caused by force toward the PM and with shortness of active zone material macromolecules linking vesicles to PM components, some thought to include Ca2+ channels. We propose that priming is a variable continuum of events imposing variable fusion probability on each vesicle and is regulated by force-generating shortening of active zone material macromolecules in dynamic equilibrium. PMID:26858418

  7. Observations of Calcium Dynamics in Cortical Secretory Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Adi; Valitsky, Michael; Shani, Liora; Coorssen, Jens R.; Blank, Paul S.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Rahamimoff, Rami

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Calcium (Ca2+) dynamics were evaluated in fluorescently labeled sea urchin secretory vesicles using confocal microscopy. 71% of the vesicles examined exhibited one or more transient increases in the fluorescence signal that was damped in time. The detection of transient increases in signal was dependent upon the affinity of the fluorescence indicator; the free Ca2+ concentration in the secretory vesicles was estimated to be in the range of ~10 – 100 μM. Non-linear stochastic analysis revealed the presence of extra variance in the Ca2+ dependent fluorescence signal. This noise process increased linearly with the amplitude of the Ca2+ signal. Both the magnitude and spatial properties of this noise process were dependent upon the activity of vesicle p-type (Cav2.1) Ca2+ channels. Blocking the p-type Ca2+ channels with ω-agatoxin decreased signal variance, and altered the spatial noise pattern within the vesicle. These fluorescence signal properties are consistent with vesicle Ca2+ dynamics and not simply due to obvious physical properties such as gross movement artifacts or pH driven changes in Ca2+ indicator fluorescence. The results suggest that the free Ca2+ content of cortical secretory vesicles is dynamic; this property may modulate the exocytotic fusion process. PMID:22831912

  8. Myosin Va Transports Dense Core Secretory Vesicles in Pancreatic MIN6 β-CellsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Aniko; Tsuboi, Takashi; Rutter, Guy A.

    2005-01-01

    The role of unconventional myosins in neuroendocrine cells is not fully understood, with involvement suggested in the movement of both secretory vesicles and mitochondria. Here, we demonstrate colocalization of myosin Va (MyoVa) with insulin in pancreatic β-cells and show that MyoVa copurifies with insulin in density gradients and with the vesicle marker phogrin-enhanced green fluorescent protein upon fluorescence-activated sorting of vesicles. By contrast, MyoVa immunoreactivity was poorly colocalized with mitochondrial or other markers. Demonstrating an important role for MyoVa in the recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface, a reduction of MyoVa protein levels achieved by RNA interference caused a significant decrease in glucose- or depolarization-stimulated insulin secretion. Similarly, expression of the dominant-negative–acting globular tail domain of MyoVa decreased by ∼50% the number of vesicles docked at the plasma membrane and by 87% the number of depolarization-stimulated exocytotic events detected by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that MyoVa-driven movements of vesicles along the cortical actin network are essential for the terminal stages of regulated exocytosis in β-cells. PMID:15788565

  9. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  10. Subcellular distribution of docking/fusion proteins in neutrophils, secretory cells with multiple exocytic compartments.

    PubMed

    Brumell, J H; Volchuk, A; Sengelov, H; Borregaard, N; Cieutat, A M; Bainton, D F; Grinstein, S; Klip, A

    1995-12-15

    Neutrophils contain at least four distinct types of secretory organelles, which undergo exocytosis during infection and inflammation. The signaling pathways leading to secretion of individual granules and their kinetics of exocytosis vary greatly, causing temporal and regional differences in docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. As a step toward understanding the processes underlying differential granular secretion in neutrophils, we assessed the presence and distribution of a number of proteins reported to be involved in vesicular docking and/or fusion in other systems. Specific Abs were used for immunoblotting of cells fractionated by density gradients and free-flow electrophoresis, and for localization by confocal immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Syntaxin 1, VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)-1, synaptosome-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and cellubrevin were not detectable in human neutrophils. In contrast, syntaxin 4, VAMP-2, and the 39-kDa isoform of secretory carrier membrane protein (SCAMP) were present. SCAMP was found mainly in secondary and tertiary granules and in a fraction containing secretory vesicles, but was virtually absent from the primary (lysosomal) granules. This profile is consistent with the proposed "post-Golgi" distribution of SCAMP. VAMP-2 was largely absent from primary and secondary granules, but concentrated in tertiary granules and secretory vesicles. This pattern of distribution parallels the increasing sensitivity of these exocytic compartments to intracellular free calcium. Accordingly, ionomycin induced translocation of VAMP-2 toward the plasma membrane. Syntaxin 4 was found almost exclusively in the plasma membrane, and it accumulated in lamellipodia of migrating cells. This regional accumulation may contribute to localized secretion into the phagosomal lumen. PMID:7499863

  11. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:27537483

  12. Souffle/Spastizin Controls Secretory Vesicle Maturation during Zebrafish Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Dietmar; Schomburg, Christoph; Cerdà, Joan; Vollack, Nadine; Dosch, Roland

    2014-01-01

    During oogenesis, the egg prepares for fertilization and early embryogenesis. As a consequence, vesicle transport is very active during vitellogenesis, and oocytes are an outstanding system to study regulators of membrane trafficking. Here, we combine zebrafish genetics and the oocyte model to identify the molecular lesion underlying the zebrafish souffle (suf) mutation. We demonstrate that suf encodes the homolog of the Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) gene SPASTIZIN (SPG15). We show that in zebrafish oocytes suf mutants accumulate Rab11b-positive vesicles, but trafficking of recycling endosomes is not affected. Instead, we detect Suf/Spastizin on cortical granules, which undergo regulated secretion. We demonstrate genetically that Suf is essential for granule maturation into secretion competent dense-core vesicles describing a novel role for Suf in vesicle maturation. Interestingly, in suf mutants immature, secretory precursors accumulate, because they fail to pinch-off Clathrin-coated buds. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of the abscission regulator Dynamin leads to an accumulation of immature secretory granules and mimics the suf phenotype. Our results identify a novel regulator of secretory vesicle formation in the zebrafish oocyte. In addition, we describe an uncharacterized cellular mechanism for Suf/Spastizin activity during secretion, which raises the possibility of novel therapeutic avenues for HSP research. PMID:24967841

  13. Phosphorylation of residues inside the SNARE complex suppresses secretory vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Malmersjö, Seth; Di Palma, Serena; Diao, Jiajie; Lai, Ying; Pfuetzner, Richard A; Wang, Austin L; McMahon, Moira A; Hayer, Arnold; Porteus, Matthew; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Brunger, Axel T; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-08-15

    Membrane fusion is essential for eukaryotic life, requiring SNARE proteins to zipper up in an α-helical bundle to pull two membranes together. Here, we show that vesicle fusion can be suppressed by phosphorylation of core conserved residues inside the SNARE domain. We took a proteomics approach using a PKCB knockout mast cell model and found that the key mast cell secretory protein VAMP8 becomes phosphorylated by PKC at multiple residues in the SNARE domain. Our data suggest that VAMP8 phosphorylation reduces vesicle fusion in vitro and suppresses secretion in living cells, allowing vesicles to dock but preventing fusion with the plasma membrane. Markedly, we show that the phosphorylation motif is absent in all eukaryotic neuronal VAMPs, but present in all other VAMPs. Thus, phosphorylation of SNARE domains is a general mechanism to restrict how much cells secrete, opening the door for new therapeutic strategies for suppression of secretion. PMID:27402227

  14. Formation of secretory vesicles in permeabilized cells: a salt extract from yeast membranes promotes budding of nascent secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network of endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W L; Shields, D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of secretory-vesicle formation from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) of endocrine cells is poorly understood. To identify cytosolic activities that facilitate the formation and fission of nascent secretory vesicles, we treated permeabilized pituitary GH3 cells with high salt to remove endogenous budding factors. Using this cell preparation, secretory-vesicle budding from the TGN required addition of exogenous cytosol and energy. Mammalian cytosols (GH3 cells and bovine brain) promoted post-TGN vesicle formation. Most significantly, a salt extract of membranes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a cell lacking a regulated secretory pathway, stimulated secretory vesicle budding in the absence of mammalian cytosolic factors. These results demonstrate that the factors which promote secretory-vesicle release from the TGN are conserved between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:8615761

  15. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-02-15

    The Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro-scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2-dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  16. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D. Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J.; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro­scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2–dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  17. Mammalian exocyst complex is required for the docking step of insulin vesicle exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Ravier, Magalie A; Xie, Hao; Ewart, Marie-Ann; Gould, Gwyn W; Baldwin, Stephen A; Rutter, Guy A

    2005-07-01

    Glucose stimulates insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells by inducing the recruitment and fusion of insulin vesicles to the plasma membrane. However, little is currently known about the mechanism of the initial docking or tethering of insulin vesicles prior to fusion. Here, we examined the role of the SEC6-SEC8 (exocyst) complex, implicated in trafficking of secretory vesicles to fusion sites in the plasma membrane in yeast and in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic MIN6 beta cells. We show first that SEC6 is concentrated on insulin-positive vesicles, whereas SEC5 and SEC8 are largely confined to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane, respectively. Overexpression of truncated, dominant-negative SEC8 or SEC10 mutants decreased the number of vesicles at the plasma membrane, whereas expression of truncated SEC6 or SEC8 inhibited overall insulin secretion. When single exocytotic events were imaged by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, the fluorescence of the insulin surrogate, neuropeptide Y-monomeric red fluorescent protein brightened, diffused, and then vanished with kinetics that were unaffected by overexpression of truncated SEC8 or SEC10. Together, these data suggest that the exocyst complex serves to selectively regulate the docking of insulin-containing vesicles at sites of release close to the plasma membrane. PMID:15878854

  18. Sec35p, a Novel Peripheral Membrane Protein, Is Required for ER to Golgi Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    VanRheenen, Susan M.; Cao, Xiaochun; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Barlowe, Charles; Gerard Waters, M.

    1998-01-01

    SEC35 was identified in a novel screen for temperature-sensitive mutants in the secretory pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Wuestehube et al., 1996. Genetics. 142:393–406). At the restrictive temperature, the sec35-1 strain exhibits a transport block between the ER and the Golgi apparatus and accumulates numerous vesicles. SEC35 encodes a novel cytosolic protein of 32 kD, peripherally associated with membranes. The temperature-sensitive phenotype of sec35-1 is efficiently suppressed by YPT1, which encodes the rab-like GTPase required early in the secretory pathway, or by SLY1-20, which encodes a dominant form of the ER to Golgi target -SNARE–associated protein Sly1p. Weaker suppression is evident upon overexpression of genes encoding the vesicle-SNAREs SEC22, BET1, or YKT6. The cold-sensitive lethality that results from deleting SEC35 is suppressed by YPT1 or SLY1-20. These genetic relationships suggest that Sec35p acts upstream of, or in conjunction with, Ypt1p and Sly1p as was previously found for Uso1p. Using a cell-free assay that measures distinct steps in vesicle transport from the ER to the Golgi, we find Sec35p is required for a vesicle docking stage catalyzed by Uso1p. These genetic and biochemical results suggest Sec35p acts with Uso1p to dock ER-derived vesicles to the Golgi complex. PMID:9606204

  19. Mapping organelle motion reveals a vesicular conveyor belt spatially replenishing secretory vesicles in stimulated chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this "conveyor belt" towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:24489879

  20. Regulation of Synaptic Vesicle Docking by Different Classes of Macromolecules in Active Zone Material

    PubMed Central

    Szule, Joseph A.; Harlow, Mark L.; Jung, Jae Hoon; De-Miguel, Francisco F.; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2012-01-01

    The docking of synaptic vesicles at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of axon terminals is essential for their fusion with the membrane and exocytosis of their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Dense networks of macromolecules, called active zone material, (AZM) are attached to the presynaptic membrane next to docked vesicles. Electron tomography has shown that some AZM macromolecules are connected to docked vesicles, leading to the suggestion that AZM is somehow involved in the docking process. We used electron tomography on the simply arranged active zones at frog neuromuscular junctions to characterize the connections of AZM to docked synaptic vesicles and to search for the establishment of such connections during vesicle docking. We show that each docked vesicle is connected to 10–15 AZM macromolecules, which fall into four classes based on several criteria including their position relative to the presynaptic membrane. In activated axon terminals fixed during replacement of docked vesicles by previously undocked vesicles, undocked vesicles near vacated docking sites on the presynaptic membrane have connections to the same classes of AZM macromolecules that are connected to docked vesicles in resting terminals. The number of classes and the total number of macromolecules to which the undocked vesicles are connected are inversely proportional to the vesicles’ distance from the presynaptic membrane. We conclude that vesicle movement toward and maintenance at docking sites on the presynaptic membrane are directed by an orderly succession of stable interactions between the vesicles and distinct classes of AZM macromolecules positioned at different distances from the membrane. Establishing the number, arrangement and sequence of association of AZM macromolecules involved in vesicle docking provides an anatomical basis for testing and extending concepts of docking mechanisms provided by biochemistry. PMID:22438915

  1. Rab27b regulates exocytosis of secretory vesicles in acinar epithelial cells from the lacrimal gland

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Lilian; Ngo, Julie; Schechter, Joel E.; Karvar, Serhan; Tolmachova, Tanya; Seabra, Miguel C.; Hume, Alistair N.

    2011-01-01

    Tear proteins are supplied by the regulated fusion of secretory vesicles at the apical surface of lacrimal gland acinar cells, utilizing trafficking mechanisms largely yet uncharacterized. We investigated the role of Rab27b in the terminal release of these secretory vesicles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of primary cultured rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells revealed that Rab27b was enriched on the membrane of large subapical vesicles that were significantly colocalized with Rab3D and Myosin 5C. Stimulation of cultured acinar cells with the secretagogue carbachol resulted in apical fusion of these secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. Evaluation of morphological changes by transmission electron microscopy of lacrimal glands from Rab27b−/− and Rab27ash/ash/Rab27b−/− mice, but not ashen mice deficient in Rab27a, showed changes in abundance and organization of secretory vesicles, further confirming a role for this protein in secretory vesicle exocytosis. Glands lacking Rab27b also showed increased lysosomes, damaged mitochondria, and autophagosome-like organelles. In vitro, expression of constitutively active Rab27b increased the average size but retained the subapical distribution of Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b redistributed this protein from membrane to the cytoplasm. Functional studies measuring release of a cotransduced secretory protein, syncollin-GFP, showed that constitutively active Rab27b enhanced, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b suppressed, stimulated release. Disruption of actin filaments inhibited vesicle fusion to the apical membrane but did not disrupt homotypic fusion. These data show that Rab27b participates in aspects of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretory vesicle formation and release. PMID:21525430

  2. Binding of the vesicle docking protein p115 to the GTPase Rab1b regulates membrane recruitment of the COPI vesicle coat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D

    2014-01-01

    Membrane recruitment of the COPI vesicle coat is fundamental to its function and contributes to compartment identity in the early secretory pathway. COPI recruitment is triggered by guanine nucleotide exchange activating the Arf1 GTPase, but the key exchange factor, GBF1, is a peripheral membrane component whose membrane association is dependent on another GTPase, Rab1. Inactive Rab GTPases are in a soluble complex with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) and activation of Rab GTPases by exchange factors can be enhanced by GDI dissociation factors (GDFs). In the present study, we investigated the vesicle docking protein p115 and it’s binding to the Rab1 isoform Rab1b. Inhibition of p115 expression induced dissociation of Rab1b from Golgi membranes. Rab1b bound the cc2 domain of p115 and p115 lacking this domain failed to recruit Rab1b. Further, p115 inhibition blocked association of the COPI coat with Golgi membranes and this was suppressed by constitutive activation of Rab1b. These findings show p115 enhancement of Rab1b activation leading to COPI recruitment suggesting a connection between the vesicle docking machinery and the vesicle coat complex during the establishment of post-ER compartment identity. PMID:25332841

  3. Actin- and Myosin-Dependent Vesicle Loading of Presynaptic Docking Sites Prior to Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takafumi; Malagon, Gerardo; Pulido, Camila; Llano, Isabel; Neher, Erwin; Marty, Alain

    2016-08-17

    Variance analysis of postsynaptic current amplitudes suggests the presence of distinct docking sites (also called release sites) where vesicles pause before exocytosis. Docked vesicles participate in the readily releasable pool (RRP), but the relation between docking site number and RRP size remains unclear. It is also unclear whether all vesicles of the RRP are equally release competent, and what cellular mechanisms underlie RRP renewal. We address here these questions at single glutamatergic synapses, counting released vesicles using deconvolution. We find a remarkably low variance of cumulative vesicle counts during action potential trains. This, combined with Monte Carlo simulations, indicates that vesicles transit through two successive states before exocytosis, so that the RRP is up to 2-fold higher than the docking site number. The transition to the second state has a very rapid rate constant, and is specifically inhibited by latrunculin B and blebbistatin, suggesting the involvement of actin and myosin. PMID:27537485

  4. Complexin arrests a pool of docked vesicles for fast Ca2+-dependent release

    PubMed Central

    Malsam, Jörg; Parisotto, Daniel; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Scheutzow, Andrea; Krause, Jean Michel; Briggs, John A G; Söllner, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis requires that the assembly of the basic membrane fusion machinery is temporarily arrested. Synchronized membrane fusion is then caused by a specific trigger—a local rise of the Ca2+ concentration. Using reconstituted giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), we have analysed the role of complexin and membrane-anchored synaptotagmin 1 in arresting and synchronizing fusion by lipid-mixing and cryo-electron microscopy. We find that they mediate the formation and consumption of docked small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) via the following sequence of events: Synaptotagmin 1 mediates v-SNARE-SUV docking to t-SNARE-GUVs in a Ca2+-independent manner. Complexin blocks vesicle consumption, causing accumulation of docked vesicles. Together with synaptotagmin 1, complexin synchronizes and stimulates rapid fusion of accumulated docked vesicles in response to physiological Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, the reconstituted assay resolves both the stimulatory and inhibitory function of complexin and mimics key aspects of synaptic vesicle fusion. PMID:22705946

  5. Secretory vesicle rebound hyperacidification and increased quantal size due to prolonged methamphetamine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy; Mosharov, Eugene V.; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D.; Sulzer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acute exposure to amphetamines collapses secretory vesicle pH gradients, which increases cytosolic catecholamine levels while decreases the quantal size of catecholamine release during fusion events. Amphetamine and methamphetamine, however, are retained in tissues over long durations. We used optical and electron microscopic probes to measure the effects of long-term methamphetamine exposure on secretory vesicle pH, and amperometry and intracellular patch electrochemistry to observe the effects on neurosecretion and cytosolic catecholamines in cultured rat chromaffin cells. In contrast to acute methamphetamine effects, exposure to the drug for 6–48 h at 10 μM and higher concentrations produced a concentration-dependent rebound hyperacidification of secretory vesicles. At 5–10 μM levels, methamphetamine increased the quantal size and reinstated exocytotic catecholamine release, although very high (>100 μM) levels of the drug, while continuing to produce rebound hyperacidification, did not increase quantal size. Secretory vesicle rebound hyperacidification was temperature dependent with optimal response at ~ 37°C, was not blocked by the transcription inhibitor, puromycin, and appears to be a general compensatory response to prolonged exposure with membranophilic weak bases, including amphetamines, methylphenidate, cocaine, and ammonia. Thus, under some conditions of prolonged exposure, amphetamines and other weak bases can enhance, rather than deplete, the vesicular release of catecholamines via a compensatory response resulting in vesicle acidification. PMID:19014382

  6. Munc18-1 domain-1 controls vesicle docking and secretion by interacting with syntaxin-1 and chaperoning it to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gayoung A.; Malintan, Nancy T.; Saw, Ner Mu Nar; Li, Lijun; Han, Liping; Meunier, Frederic A.; Collins, Brett M.; Sugita, Shuzo

    2011-01-01

    Munc18-1 plays pleiotropic roles in neurosecretion by acting as 1) a molecular chaperone of syntaxin-1, 2) a mediator of dense-core vesicle docking, and 3) a priming factor for soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor–mediated membrane fusion. However, how these functions are executed and whether they are correlated remains unclear. Here we analyzed the role of the domain-1 cleft of Munc18-1 by measuring the abilities of various mutants (D34N, D34N/M38V, K46E, E59K, K46E/E59K, K63E, and E66A) to bind and chaperone syntaxin-1 and to restore the docking and secretion of dense-core vesicles in Munc18-1/-2 double-knockdown cells. We identified striking correlations between the abilities of these mutants to bind and chaperone syntaxin-1 with their ability to restore vesicle docking and secretion. These results suggest that the domain-1 cleft of Munc18-1 is essential for binding to syntaxin-1 and thereby critical for its chaperoning, docking, and secretory functions. Our results demonstrate that the effect of the alleged priming mutants (E59K, D34N/M38V) on exocytosis can largely be explained by their reduced syntaxin-1–chaperoning functions. Finally, our data suggest that the intracellular expression and distribution of syntaxin-1 determines the level of dense-core vesicle docking. PMID:21900502

  7. Tracking individual secretory vesicles during exocytosis reveals an ordered and regulated process

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kirk W.

    2015-01-01

    Post-Golgi secretory vesicle trafficking is a coordinated process, with transport and regulatory mechanisms to ensure appropriate exocytosis. While the contributions of many individual regulatory proteins to this process are well studied, the timing and dependencies of events have not been defined. Here we track individual secretory vesicles and associated proteins in vivo during tethering and fusion in budding yeast. Secretory vesicles tether to the plasma membrane very reproducibly for ∼18 s, which is extended in cells defective for membrane fusion and significantly lengthened and more variable when GTP hydrolysis of the exocytic Rab is delayed. Further, the myosin-V Myo2p regulates the tethering time in a mechanism unrelated to its interaction with exocyst component Sec15p. Two-color imaging of tethered vesicles with Myo2p, the GEF Sec2p, and several exocyst components allowed us to document a timeline for yeast exocytosis in which Myo2p leaves 4 s before fusion, whereas Sec2p and all the components of the exocyst disperse coincident with fusion. PMID:26169352

  8. Functional asymmetry of the sodium-D-glucose cotransporter expressed in yeast secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Firnges, M A; Lin, J T; Kinne, R K

    2001-01-15

    The sodium-D-glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) was expressed in a yeast mutant strain NY 17 (sec6-4) that accumulates secretory vesicles at a nonpermissive temperature because of a block in the delivery of these vesicles to the plasma membrane. By differential centrifugation a microsomal fraction enriched in secretory vesicles was prepared with a high specific activity of the vanadate-sensitive H+-ATPase and invertase. In this membrane fraction one protein band of an apparent molecular weight of 55 kDa representing the nonglycosylated SGLT1 protein could be detected by immunochemical analysis. In addition, higher molecular weight protein bands probably representing dimers and aggregates were found. In transport studies with the microsomes D-glucose fluxes showed asymmetric properties: efflux experiments revealed the typical properties of the SGLT1 such as sodium dependence, inhibition by phlorizin and potential dependence. Influx of D-glucose showed no dependence on sodium and was not inhibited by phlorizin. Furthermore, the transporter exhibited a striking asymmetry with regard to the D-glucose affinity and the sugar specificity. These results suggest that the orientation of the SGLT1 expressed in yeast secretory vesicles is, indeed, inverted with regard to its configuration in the plasma membrane of epithelial cells. Moreover, there are striking functional differences between the periplasmic and cytoplasmic face of the transporter. PMID:11220364

  9. The role of Sec3p in secretory vesicle targeting and exocyst complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guangzuo; Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wei

    2014-01-01

    During membrane trafficking, vesicular carriers are transported and tethered to their cognate acceptor compartments before soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein (SNARE)-mediated membrane fusion. The exocyst complex was believed to target and tether post-Golgi secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. However, no definitive experimental evidence is available to support this notion. We developed an ectopic targeting assay in yeast in which each of the eight exocyst subunits was expressed on the surface of mitochondria. We find that most of the exocyst subunits were able to recruit the other members of the complex there, and mistargeting of the exocyst led to secretion defects in cells. On the other hand, only the ectopically located Sec3p subunit is capable of recruiting secretory vesicles to mitochondria. Our assay also suggests that both cytosolic diffusion and cytoskeleton-based transport mediate the recruitment of exocyst subunits and secretory vesicles during exocytosis. In addition, the Rab GTPase Sec4p and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sec2p regulate the assembly of the exocyst complex. Our study helps to establish the role of the exocyst subunits in tethering and allows the investigation of the mechanisms that regulate vesicle tethering during exocytosis. PMID:25232005

  10. Complexin-1 Enhances the On-Rate of Vesicle Docking via Simultaneous SNARE and Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In synaptic terminals, complexin is thought to have inhibitory and activating roles for spontaneous “mini” release and evoked synchronized neurotransmitter release, respectively. We used single vesicle–vesicle microscopy imaging to study the effect of complexin-1 on the on-rate of docking between vesicles that mimic synaptic vesicles and the plasma membrane. We found that complexin-1 enhances the on-rate of docking of synaptic vesicle mimics containing full-length synaptobrevin-2 and full-length synaptotagmin-1 to plasma membrane-mimicking vesicles containing full-length syntaxin-1A and SNAP-25A. This effect requires the C-terminal domain of complexin-1, which binds to the membrane, the presence of PS in the membrane, and the core region of complexin-1, which binds to the SNARE complex. PMID:24083833

  11. Structural Basis for Membrane Binding and Remodeling by the Exomer Secretory Vesicle Cargo Adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cargo adaptor subunits of vesicle coat protein complexes sort transmembrane proteins to distinct membrane compartments in eukaryotic cells. The exomer complex is the only cargo adaptor known to sort proteins at the trans-Golgi network into secretory vesicles. Exomer function is regulated by the Arf1 GTPase, a master regulator of trafficking at the Golgi. We report the structure of exomer bound to two copies of Arf1. Exomer interacts with each Arf1 molecule via two surfaces; one is a non-canonical interface that regulates GTP hydrolysis. The structure uncovers an unexpected membrane-proximal hydrophobic element that exomer uses in cooperation with Arf1 to remodel membranes. Given the constrained motion of the exomer hinge region, we envision that exomer dynamically positions multiple membrane insertion elements to drive membrane fission. In contrast to other known cargo adaptors, exomer therefore couples two functions, cargo sorting and membrane fission, into a single complex. PMID:25203211

  12. Chibby promotes ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during airway cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Cyge, Benjamin; Arashiro, Takeshi; Brechbuhl, Heather M; Chen, Xingwang; Siller, Saul S; Weiss, Matthew A; O'Connell, Christopher B; Love, Damon; Westlake, Christopher J; Reynolds, Susan D; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-13

    Airway multiciliated epithelial cells play crucial roles in the mucosal defense system, but their differentiation process remains poorly understood. Mice lacking the basal body component Chibby (Cby) exhibit impaired mucociliary transport caused by defective ciliogenesis, resulting in chronic airway infection. In this paper, using primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells, we show that Cby facilitates basal body docking to the apical cell membrane through proper formation of ciliary vesicles at the distal appendage during the early stages of ciliogenesis. Cby is recruited to the distal appendages of centrioles via physical interaction with the distal appendage protein CEP164. Cby then associates with the membrane trafficking machinery component Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rab8, to promote recruitment of Rab8 and efficient assembly of ciliary vesicles. Thus, our study identifies Cby as a key regulator of ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during the differentiation of airway ciliated cells. PMID:25313408

  13. Activity-driven relaxation of the cortical actomyosin II network synchronizes Munc18-1-dependent neurosecretory vesicle docking.

    PubMed

    Papadopulos, Andreas; Gomez, Guillermo A; Martin, Sally; Jackson, Jade; Gormal, Rachel S; Keating, Damien J; Yap, Alpha S; Meunier, Frederic A

    2015-01-01

    In neurosecretory cells, secretory vesicles (SVs) undergo Ca(2+)-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane to release neurotransmitters. How SVs cross the dense mesh of the cortical actin network to reach the plasma membrane remains unclear. Here we reveal that, in bovine chromaffin cells, SVs embedded in the cortical actin network undergo a highly synchronized transition towards the plasma membrane and Munc18-1-dependent docking in response to secretagogues. This movement coincides with a translocation of the cortical actin network in the same direction. Both effects are abolished by the knockdown or the pharmacological inhibition of myosin II, suggesting changes in actomyosin-generated forces across the cell cortex. Indeed, we report a reduction in cortical actin network tension elicited on secretagogue stimulation that is sensitive to myosin II inhibition. We reveal that the cortical actin network acts as a 'casting net' that undergoes activity-dependent relaxation, thereby driving tethered SVs towards the plasma membrane where they undergo Munc18-1-dependent docking. PMID:25708831

  14. CCDC41 is required for ciliary vesicle docking to the mother centriole

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kwangsic; Kim, Chang Gun; Lee, Mi-Sun; Moon, Hyun-Yi; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Mi Jeong; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Park, Woong-Yang; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Kim, Joon

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of primary cilium assembly entails the docking of ciliary vesicles presumably derived from the Golgi complex to the distal end of the mother centriole. Distal appendages, which anchor the mother centriole to the plasma membrane, are thought to be involved in the docking process. However, little is known about the molecular players and mechanisms that mediate the vesicle–centriole association. Here we report that coiled-coil domain containing 41 (CCDC41) is required for the docking of ciliary vesicles. CCDC41 specifically localizes to the distal end of the mother centriole and interacts with centrosomal protein 164 (Cep164), a distal appendage component. In addition, a pool of CCDC41 colocalizes with intraflagellar transport protein 20 (IFT20) subunit of the intraflagellar transport particle at the Golgi complex. Remarkably, knockdown of CCDC41 inhibits the recruitment of IFT20 to the centrosome. Moreover, depletion of CCDC41 or IFT20 inhibits ciliogenesis at the ciliary vesicle docking step, whereas intraflagellar transport protein 88 (IFT88) depletion interferes with later cilium elongation steps. Our results suggest that CCDC41 collaborates with IFT20 to support the vesicle–centriole association at the onset of ciliogenesis. PMID:23530209

  15. In Candida albicans hyphae, Sec2p is physically associated with SEC2 mRNA on secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Lima, David; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Wilson, Stuart A; Sudbery, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans hyphae grow in a highly polarized fashion from their tips. This polarized growth requires the continuous delivery of secretory vesicles to the tip region. Vesicle delivery depends on Sec2p, the Guanine Exchange Factor (GEF) for the Rab GTPase Sec4p. GTP bound Sec4p is required for the transit of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi to sites of polarized growth. We previously showed that phosphorylation of Sec2p at residue S584 was necessary for Sec2p to support hyphal, but not yeast growth. Here we show that on secretory vesicles SEC2 mRNA is physically associated with Sec2p. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation of S584 allows SEC2 mRNA to dissociate from Sec2p and we speculate that this is necessary for Sec2p function and/or translation. During hyphal extension, the growing tip may be separated from the nucleus by up to 15 μm. Transport of SEC2 mRNA on secretory vesicles to the tip localizes SEC2 translation to tip allowing a sufficient accumulation of this key protein at the site of polarized growth. PMID:25231350

  16. Sphingomyelin is sorted at the trans Golgi network into a distinct class of secretory vesicle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongqiang; Rivera-Molina, Felix E; Toomre, Derek K; Burd, Christopher G

    2016-06-14

    One of the principal functions of the trans Golgi network (TGN) is the sorting of proteins into distinct vesicular transport carriers that mediate secretion and interorganelle trafficking. Are lipids also sorted into distinct TGN-derived carriers? The Golgi is the principal site of the synthesis of sphingomyelin (SM), an abundant sphingolipid that is transported. To address the specificity of SM transport to the plasma membrane, we engineered a natural SM-binding pore-forming toxin, equinatoxin II (Eqt), into a nontoxic reporter termed Eqt-SM and used it to monitor intracellular trafficking of SM. Using quantitative live cell imaging, we found that Eqt-SM is enriched in a subset of TGN-derived secretory vesicles that are also enriched in a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. In contrast, an integral membrane secretory protein (CD8α) is not enriched in these carriers. Our results demonstrate the sorting of native SM at the TGN and its transport to the plasma membrane by specific carriers. PMID:27247384

  17. Munc13-1-mediated vesicle priming contributes to secretory amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Steffen; Fuchsbrunner, Katrin; Lange-Dohna, Christine; Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Bigl, Volker; Betz, Andrea; Reim, Kerstin; Brose, Nils

    2004-07-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) gives rise toc beta-amyloid peptides, which are the main constituents of senile plaques in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Non-amyloidogenic processing of the APP can be stimulated by phorbol esters (PEs) and by intracellular diacylglycerol (DAG) generation. This led to the hypothesis that classical and novel protein kinase Cs (PKCs), which are activated by DAG/PEs, regulate APP processing. However, in addition to PKCs, there are other DAG/PE receptors present in neurons that may participate in the modulation of APP processing. Munc13-1, a presynaptic protein with an essential role in synaptic vesicle priming, represents such an alternative target of the DAG second messenger pathway. Using Munc13-1 knock-out mice and knock-in mice expressing a Munc13-1(H567K) variant deficient in DAG/PE binding, we determined the relative contributions of PKCs and Munc13-1 to PE-stimulated secretory APP processing. We establish that, in addition to PKC, Munc13-1 significantly contributes to the regulation of secretory APP metabolism. PMID:15123597

  18. Vacuolar H+-ATPase subunits Voa1 and Voa2 cooperatively regulate secretory vesicle acidification, transmitter uptake, and storage

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Ner Mu Nar; Kang, Soo-Young Ann; Parsaud, Leon; Han, Gayoung Anna; Jiang, Tiandan; Grzegorczyk, Krzysztof; Surkont, Michael; Sun-Wada, Ge-Hong; Wada, Yoh; Li, Lijun; Sugita, Shuzo

    2011-01-01

    The Vo sector of the vacuolar H+-ATPase is a multisubunit complex that forms a proteolipid pore. Among the four isoforms (a1–a4) of subunit Voa, the isoform(s) critical for secretory vesicle acidification have yet to be identified. An independent function of Voa1 in exocytosis has been suggested. Here we investigate the function of Voa isoforms in secretory vesicle acidification and exocytosis by using neurosecretory PC12 cells. Fluorescence-tagged and endogenous Voa1 are primarily localized on secretory vesicles, whereas fluorescence-tagged Voa2 and Voa3 are enriched on the Golgi and early endosomes, respectively. To elucidate the functional roles of Voa1 and Voa2, we engineered PC12 cells in which Voa1, Voa2, or both are stably down-regulated. Our results reveal significant reductions in the acidification and transmitter uptake/storage of dense-core vesicles by knockdown of Voa1 and more dramatically of Voa1/Voa2 but not of Voa2. Overexpressing knockdown-resistant Voa1 suppresses the acidification defect caused by the Voa1/Voa2 knockdown. Unexpectedly, Ca2+-dependent peptide secretion is largely unaffected in Voa1 or Voa1/Voa2 knockdown cells. Our data demonstrate that Voa1 and Voa2 cooperatively regulate the acidification and transmitter uptake/storage of dense-core vesicles, whereas they might not be as critical for exocytosis as recently proposed. PMID:21795392

  19. Physical analysis of ejaculate to evaluate the secretory activity of the seminal vesicles and prostate.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Rocha, Fernando Tadeu

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether analysis of the physical properties of ejaculate also has any diagnostic potential for evaluating the function of these accessory sex glands. Diverse normal and abnormal states of coagulation, liquefaction, volume, viscosity and pH were studied with regard to the levels of biochemical markers of the seminal vesicles (fructose and inorganic phosphorus) and prostate (calcium, zinc and acid phosphatase). Fructose and inorganic phosphorus were significantly decreased in samples with absent or poor coagulation (p<0.001), volume < 2.0 mL (p=0.009 and p<0.001, respectively), hypoviscosity (p=0.013 and p<0.001), hyperviscosity (p=0.006 and p<0.001) and pH < or = 7.1 (p=0.018 and p<0.001). Also, fructose and inorganic phosphorus were significantly decreased in samples with liquefaction > 120 min (p=0.003) and pH > 8.0 (p<0.001), respectively. Calcium, zinc and acid phosphatase activity were significantly increased in samples with absent or poor coagulation (p<0.001), and significantly decreased in samples with volume > 5.0 mL (p=0.007, p=0.034 and p=0.011) and pH > 8.0 (p<0.001). Also, calcium and zinc were significantly increased in hypoviscous samples (p=0.012 and p=0.003), whereas the zinc concentration was significantly lower in hyperviscous samples (p=0.026). Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, pH showed the highest predictive power to identify prostate dysfunction (83.6%) and simultaneous prostate and seminal vesicle dysfunction (98.8%). Physical analysis of ejaculate was also found to be clinically useful for evaluating the secretory activity of the seminal vesicles and prostate. Abnormal coagulation, liquefaction, volume, viscosity and pH strongly suggest gland dysfunction. PMID:16232086

  20. Selective screening of secretory vesicle-associated proteins for autoantigens in type 1 diabetes: VAMP2 and NPY are new minor autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroki; Miura, Junnosuke; Hu, Yafang; Larsson, Helena; Larsson, Karin; Lernmark, Ake; Ivarsson, Sten-A; Wu, Tianxia; Kingman, Albert; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Notkins, Abner L

    2008-06-01

    The four major autoantigens (IA-2, IA-2 beta, GAD65 and insulin) of type 1 diabetes are all associated with dense core or synaptic vesicles. This raised the possibility that other secretory vesicle-associated proteins might be targets of the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes. To test this hypothesis 56 proteins, two-thirds of which are associated with secretory vesicles, were prepared by in vitro transcription/translation and screened for autoantibodies by liquid phase radioimmunoprecipitation. Two secretory vesicle-associated proteins, VAMP2 and NPY, were identified as new minor autoantigens with 21% and 9%, respectively, of 200 type 1 diabetes sera reacting positively. These findings add support to the hypothesis that secretory vesicle-associated proteins are particularly important, but not the exclusive, targets of the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes. Selective screening of the human proteome offers a useful approach for identifying new autoantigens in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18359275

  1. The synaptobrevin homologue Snc2p recruits the exocyst to secretory vesicles by binding to Sec6p.

    PubMed

    Shen, David; Yuan, Hua; Hutagalung, Alex; Verma, Avani; Kümmel, Daniel; Wu, Xudong; Reinisch, Karin; McNew, James A; Novick, Peter

    2013-08-01

    A screen for mutations that affect the recruitment of the exocyst to secretory vesicles identified genes encoding clathrin and proteins that associate or colocalize with clathrin at sites of endocytosis. However, no significant colocalization of the exocyst with clathrin was seen, arguing against a direct role in exocyst recruitment. Rather, these components are needed to recycle the exocytic vesicle SNAREs Snc1p and Snc2p from the plasma membrane into new secretory vesicles where they act to recruit the exocyst. We observe a direct interaction between the exocyst subunit Sec6p and the latter half of the SNARE motif of Snc2p. An snc2 mutation that specifically disrupts this interaction led to exocyst mislocalization and a block in exocytosis in vivo without affecting liposome fusion in vitro. Overexpression of Sec4p partially suppressed the exocyst localization defects of mutations in clathrin and clathrin-associated components. We propose that the exocyst is recruited to secretory vesicles by the combinatorial signals of Sec4-GTP and the Snc proteins. This could help to confer both specificity and directionality to vesicular traffic. PMID:23897890

  2. The synaptobrevin homologue Snc2p recruits the exocyst to secretory vesicles by binding to Sec6p

    PubMed Central

    Shen, David; Yuan, Hua; Hutagalung, Alex; Verma, Avani; Kümmel, Daniel; Wu, Xudong; Reinisch, Karin; McNew, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A screen for mutations that affect the recruitment of the exocyst to secretory vesicles identified genes encoding clathrin and proteins that associate or colocalize with clathrin at sites of endocytosis. However, no significant colocalization of the exocyst with clathrin was seen, arguing against a direct role in exocyst recruitment. Rather, these components are needed to recycle the exocytic vesicle SNAREs Snc1p and Snc2p from the plasma membrane into new secretory vesicles where they act to recruit the exocyst. We observe a direct interaction between the exocyst subunit Sec6p and the latter half of the SNARE motif of Snc2p. An snc2 mutation that specifically disrupts this interaction led to exocyst mislocalization and a block in exocytosis in vivo without affecting liposome fusion in vitro. Overexpression of Sec4p partially suppressed the exocyst localization defects of mutations in clathrin and clathrin-associated components. We propose that the exocyst is recruited to secretory vesicles by the combinatorial signals of Sec4-GTP and the Snc proteins. This could help to confer both specificity and directionality to vesicular traffic. PMID:23897890

  3. UNC-31/CAPS docks and primes dense core vesicles in C. elegans neurons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Guang; Ming, Min; Chen, Mao-Rong; Niu, Wei-Pin; Zhang, Yong-Deng; Liu, Bei; Jiu, Ya-Ming; Yu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Tao; Wu, Zheng-Xing

    2010-07-01

    UNC-31 or its mammalian homologue, Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS), is indispensable for exocytosis of dense core vesicle (DCV) and synaptic vesicle (SV). From N- to the C-terminus, UNC-31 contains putative functional domains, including dynactin 1 binding domain (DBD), C2, PH, (M)UNC-13 homology domain (MHD) and DCV binding domain (DCVBD), the last four we examined in this study. We employed UNC-31 null mutant C. elegans worms to examine whether UNC-31 functions could be rescued by ectopic expression of full length UNC-31 vs each of these four domain-deleted mutants. Full length UNC-31 cDNA rescued the phenotypes of C. elegans null mutants in response to Ca(2+)-elevation in ALA neurons. Surprisingly, MHD deletion also rescued UNC-31 exocytotic function in part because the relatively high Ca(2+) level (pre-flash Ca(2+) was 450 nM) used in the capacitance study could bypass the MHD defect. Nonetheless, the three other domain-truncation cDNAs had almost no rescue on Ca(2+) evoked secretion. Importantly, this genetic null mutant rescue strategy enabled physiological studies at levels of whole organism to single cells, such as locomotion assay, pharmacological study of neurotransmission at neuromuscular junction, in vivo neuropeptide release measurement and analysis of vesicular docking. Our results suggest that each of these UNC-31 domains support distinct sequential molecular actions of UNC-31 in vesicular exocytosis, including steps in vesicle tethering and docking that bridge vesicle with plasma membrane, and subsequently priming vesicle by initiating the formation of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) core complex. PMID:20515653

  4. Imaging of Dynamic Secretory Vesicles in Living Pollen Tubes of Picea meyeri Using Evanescent Wave Microscopy1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Teng, Yan; Wang, Qinli; Li, Xiaojuan; Sheng, Xianyong; Zheng, Maozhong; Šamaj, Jozef; Baluška, František; Lin, Jinxing

    2006-01-01

    Evanescent wave excitation was used to visualize individual, FM4-64-labeled secretory vesicles in an optical slice proximal to the plasma membrane of Picea meyeri pollen tubes. A standard upright microscope was modified to accommodate the optics used to direct a laser beam at a variable angle. Under evanescent wave microscopy or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorophores localized near the surface were excited with evanescent waves, which decay exponentially with distance from the interface. Evanescent waves with penetration depths of 60 to 400 nm were generated by varying the angle of incidence of the laser beam. Kinetic analysis of vesicle trafficking was made through an approximately 300-nm optical section beneath the plasma membrane using time-lapse evanescent wave imaging of individual fluorescently labeled vesicles. Two-dimensional trajectories of individual vesicles were obtained from the resulting time-resolved image stacks and were used to characterize the vesicles in terms of their average fluorescence and mobility, expressed here as the two-dimensional diffusion coefficient D2. The velocity and direction of vesicle motions, frame-to-frame displacement, and vesicle trajectories were also calculated. Analysis of individual vesicles revealed for the first time, to our knowledge, that two types of motion are present, and that vesicles in living pollen tubes exhibit complicated behaviors and oscillations that differ from the simple Brownian motion reported in previous investigations. Furthermore, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton had a much more pronounced effect on vesicle mobility than did disruption of the microtubules, suggesting that actin cytoskeleton plays a primary role in vesicle mobility. PMID:16798949

  5. POSVP21, a major secretory androgen-dependent protein from sand rat seminal vesicles, identified as a transgelin

    PubMed Central

    Kaci-Ouchfoun, Naïma; Incamps, Anne; Hadj-Bekkouche, Fatima; Abbadi, Mohamed Cherif; Bellanger, Laurent; Gernigon-Spychalowicz, Thérèse

    2010-01-01

    The seminal vesicles of adult sand rat contain a major secretory protein band (MW 21 kDa) designated as Psammomys obesus seminal vesicles protein of 21 kDa (POSVP21). This protein is abundant in secretions, regulated by androgens and also present in the vaginal plug. POSVP21 accounts for over 22.3% of soluble proteins from homogenate during the breeding season, 13.3% during the middle season and 5.3% during the hormonal regression season. It is absent during the non-breeding season. POSVP21 is localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells and in secretory products in the lumen. It presents an immunological homology with two epididymal proteins with the same molecular weight and a high degree of homology with transgelin from rat (Rattus norvegicus). PMID:20400972

  6. Porosome: The Universal Secretory Portal in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Bhanu

    2012-10-01

    In the past 50 years it was believed that during cell secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles completely merge at the cell plasma membrane resulting in the diffusion of intra-vesicular contents to the cell exterior and the compensatory retrieval of the excess membrane by endocytosis. This explanation made no sense or logic, since following cell secretion partially empty vesicles accumulate as demonstrated in electron micrographs. Furthermore, with the ``all or none'' mechanism of cell secretion by complete merger of secretory vesicle membrane at the cell plasma membrane, the cell is left with little regulation and control of the amount of content release. Moreover, it makes no sense for mammalian cells to possess such `all or none' mechanism of cell secretion, when even single-cell organisms have developed specialized and sophisticated secretory machinery, such as the secretion apparatus of Toxoplasma gondii, the contractile vacuoles in paramecium, or the various types of secretory structures in bacteria. Therefore, in 1993 in a News and Views article in Nature, E. Neher wrote ``It seems terribly wasteful that, during the release of hormones and neurotransmitters from a cell, the membrane of a vesicle should merge with the plasma membrane to be retrieved for recycling only seconds or minutes later.'' This conundrum in the molecular mechanism of cell secretion was finally resolved in 1997 following discovery of the ``Porosome,'' the universal secretory machinery in cells. Porosomes are supramolecular lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release inravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have all been elucidated. Since porosomes in exocrine and neuroendocrine cells measure 100-180 nm

  7. Osh4p is needed to reduce the level of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate on secretory vesicles as they mature

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Yading; Hayano, Scott; Novick, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) is produced on both the Golgi and the plasma membrane. Despite extensive vesicular traffic between these compartments, genetic analysis suggests that the two pools of PI4P do not efficiently mix with one another. Several lines of evidence indicate that the PI4P produced on the Golgi is normally incorporated into secretory vesicles, but the fate of that pool has been unclear. We show here that in yeast the oxysterol-binding proteins Osh1–Osh7 are collectively needed to maintain the normal distribution of PI4P and that Osh4p is critical in this function. Osh4p associates with secretory vesicles at least in part through its interaction with PI4P and is needed, together with lipid phosphatases, to reduce the level of PI4P as vesicles approach sites of exocytosis. This reduction in PI4P is necessary for a switch in the regulation of the Sec4p exchange protein, Sec2p, from an interaction with the upstream Rab, Ypt31/32, to an interaction with a downstream Sec4p effector, Sec15p. Spatial regulation of PI4P levels thereby plays an important role in vesicle maturation. PMID:25165144

  8. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  9. Dynamin and clathrin are required for the biogenesis of a distinct class of secretory vesicles in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; David, Doris; Gerst, Jeffrey E

    2002-02-15

    Yeast produce two classes of secretory vesicles (SVs) that differ in both density and cargo protein content. In late-acting secretory mutants (e.g. snc1(ala43) and sec6-4), both low- (LDSV) and high-density (HDSV) classes of vesicles accumulate at restrictive temperatures. Here, we have found that disruptions in the genes encoding a dynamin-related protein (VPS1) or clathrin heavy chain (CHC1) abolish HDSV production, yielding LDSVs that contain all secreted cargos. Interestingly, disruption of the PEP12 gene, which encodes the t-SNARE that mediates all Golgi to pre-vacuolar compartment (PVC) transport, also abolishes HDSV production. In contrast, deletions in genes that selectively confer vacuolar hydrolase sorting to the PVC or protein transport to the vacuole (i.e. VPS34 and VAM3, respectively) have no effect. Thus, one branch of the secretory pathway in yeast involves an intermediate sorting compartment and has a specific requirement for clathrin and a dynamin-related protein in SV biogenesis. PMID:11847108

  10. Antigenic homogeneity of male Müllerian gland (MG) secretory proteins of a caecilian amphibian with secretory proteins of the mammalian prostate gland and seminal vesicles: evidence for role of the caecilian MG as a male accessory reproductive gland.

    PubMed

    Radha, Arumugam; Sree, Sreesha; Faisal, Kunnathodi; Kumar, G Pradeep; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2014-10-01

    Whereas in all other vertebrates the Müllerian ducts of genetic males are aborted during development, under the influence of Müllerian-inhibiting substance, in the caecilian amphibians they are retained as a pair of functional glands. It has long been speculated that the Müllerian gland might be the male accessory reproductive gland but there has been no direct evidence to this effect. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the caecilian Müllerian gland secretory proteins would bear antigenic similarity to secretory proteins of the prostate gland and/or the seminal vesicles of a mammal. The secretory proteins of the Müllerian gland of Ichthyophis tricolor were evaluated for cross-reactivity with antisera raised against rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle secretory proteins, adopting SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblot techniques. Indeed there was a cross-reaction of five Müllerian gland secretory protein fractions with prostatic protein antiserum and of three with seminal vesicle protein antiserum. A potential homology exists because in mammals the middle group of the prostate primordia is derived from a diverticulum of the Müllerian duct. Thus this study, by providing evidence for expression of prostatic and seminal vesicle proteins in the Müllerian gland, substantiates the point that in caecilians the Müllerian glands are the male accessory reproductive glands. PMID:25160003

  11. Measurement of secretory vesicle pH reveals intravesicular alkalinization by vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 resulting in inhibition of prohormone cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Colin G; Varro, Andrea; Dimaline, Rod; Bishop, Lisa; Gallacher, David V; Dockray, Graham J

    2001-01-01

    The acidic interior of neuroendocrine secretory vesicles provides both an energy gradient for amine-proton exchangers (VMATs) to concentrate small transmitter molecules, for example catecholamines, and an optimal pH for the prohormone convertases which cleave hormone precursors. There is evidence that VMAT activity modulates prohormone cleavage, but in the absence of measurements of pH in secretory vesicles in intact cells, it has not been possible to establish whether these effects are attributable to raised intravesicular pH due to proton transport through VMATs. Clones were generated of the hamster insulinoma cell line HIT-T15 expressing a pH-sensitive form of green fluorescent protein (GFP-F64L/S65T) targeted to secretory vesicles, with and without co-expression of VMAT2. In order to study prohormone cleavage, further clones were generated that expressed preprogastrin with and without co-expression of VMAT2. Confocal microscopy of GFP fluorescence indicated that the pH in the secretory vesicles was 5.6 in control cells, compared with 6.6 in cells expressing VMAT2; the latter was reduced to 5.8 by the VMAT inhibitor reserpine. Using a pulse-chase labelling protocol, cleavage of 34-residue gastrin (G34) was found to be inhibited by co-expression with VMAT2, and this was reversed by reserpine. Similar effects on vesicle pH and G34 cleavage were produced by ammonium chloride. We conclude that VMAT expression confers the linked abilities to store biogenic amines and modulate secretory vesicle pH over a range influencing prohormone cleavage and therefore determining the identity of regulatory peptide secretory products. PMID:11251044

  12. Distinct N-terminal regions of the exomer secretory vesicle cargo Chs3 regulate its trafficking itinerary

    PubMed Central

    Weiskoff, Amanda M.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Cells transport integral membrane proteins between organelles by sorting them into vesicles. Cargo adaptors act to recognize sorting signals in transmembrane cargos and to interact with coat complexes that aid in vesicle biogenesis. No coat proteins have yet been identified that generate secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane, but the exomer complex has been identified as a cargo adaptor complex that mediates transport of several proteins in this pathway. Chs3, the most well-studied exomer cargo, cycles between the TGN and the plasma membrane in synchrony with the cell cycle, providing an opportunity to study regulation of proteins that cycle in response to signaling. Here we show that different segments of the Chs3 N-terminus mediate distinct trafficking steps. Residues 10–27, known to mediate retention, also appear to play a role in internalization. Residues 28–52 are involved in transport to the plasma membrane and recycling out of endosomes to prevent degradation in the vacuole. We also present the crystal structure of residues 10–27 bound to the exomer complex, suggesting different cargo adaptors could compete for binding to this segment, providing a potential mechanism for regulation. PMID:25364754

  13. Human pyramidal to interneuron synapses are mediated by multi-vesicular release and multiple docked vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Holderith, Noémi; Barzó, Pál; Nusser, Zoltan; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Classic theories link cognitive abilities to synaptic properties and human-specific biophysical features of synapses might contribute to the unparalleled performance of the human cerebral cortex. Paired recordings and multiple probability fluctuation analysis revealed similar quantal sizes, but 4-times more functional release sites in human pyramidal cell to fast-spiking interneuron connections compared to rats. These connections were mediated on average by three synaptic contacts in both species. Each presynaptic active zone (AZ) contains 6.2 release sites in human, but only 1.6 in rats. Electron microscopy (EM) and EM tomography showed that an AZ harbors 4 docked vesicles in human, but only a single one in rats. Consequently, a Katz’s functional release site occupies ~0.012 μm2 in the human presynaptic AZ and ~0.025 μm2 in the rat. Our results reveal a robust difference in the biophysical properties of a well-defined synaptic connection of the cortical microcircuit of human and rodents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18167.001 PMID:27536876

  14. SNARE and regulatory proteins induce local membrane protrusions to prime docked vesicles for fast calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Malsam, Jörg; Hagen, Wim J H; Scheutzow, Andrea; Söllner, Thomas H; Briggs, John A G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane in response to Ca2+ influx, thereby releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. The protein machinery that mediates this process, consisting of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and regulatory proteins, is well known, but the mechanisms by which these proteins prime synaptic membranes for fusion are debated. In this study, we applied large-scale, automated cryo-electron tomography to image an in vitro system that reconstitutes synaptic fusion. Our findings suggest that upon docking and priming of vesicles for fast Ca2+-triggered fusion, SNARE proteins act in concert with regulatory proteins to induce a local protrusion in the plasma membrane, directed towards the primed vesicle. The SNAREs and regulatory proteins thereby stabilize the membrane in a high-energy state from which the activation energy for fusion is profoundly reduced, allowing synchronous and instantaneous fusion upon release of the complexin clamp. PMID:24493260

  15. Membrane retrieval in the guinea-pig neurohypophysis. Isolation and characterization of secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles after radiolabel incorporation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saermark, T; Jones, P M; Robinson, I C

    1984-03-01

    We have developed small-scale methods for the isolation and biochemical characterization of subcellular fractions from single guinea-pig posterior-pituitary glands. Secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles produced in this way were of similar purity to those isolated from large amounts of tissue by conventional ultracentrifugation. [35S]Cysteine injected into the hypothalamus was found in the soluble contents of secretory vesicles isolated from the neural lobes 24 h later. High-pressure liquid-chromatographic analysis revealed that the radiolabel was incorporated into the expected neurosecretory products (oxytocin, vasopressin and neurophysin) and also into a biosynthetic intermediate in the vasopressin system. The membranes of secretory vesicles were labelled with [3H]choline 24 h after its hypothalamic injection. Little or no [3H]choline could be demonstrated in coated microvesicles at this time, although these structures were labelled 5 days after injection. Stimulating hormone secretion by chronic dehydration produced a significant fall in [3H]choline content of the secretory-vesicle membranes without any transfer of label into coated microvesicles, suggesting that coated microvesicles are not involved in membrane retrieval in the neurohypophysis. PMID:6712633

  16. Membrane retrieval in the guinea-pig neurohypophysis. Isolation and characterization of secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles after radiolabel incorporation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Saermark, T; Jones, P M; Robinson, I C

    1984-01-01

    We have developed small-scale methods for the isolation and biochemical characterization of subcellular fractions from single guinea-pig posterior-pituitary glands. Secretory vesicles and coated microvesicles produced in this way were of similar purity to those isolated from large amounts of tissue by conventional ultracentrifugation. [35S]Cysteine injected into the hypothalamus was found in the soluble contents of secretory vesicles isolated from the neural lobes 24 h later. High-pressure liquid-chromatographic analysis revealed that the radiolabel was incorporated into the expected neurosecretory products (oxytocin, vasopressin and neurophysin) and also into a biosynthetic intermediate in the vasopressin system. The membranes of secretory vesicles were labelled with [3H]choline 24 h after its hypothalamic injection. Little or no [3H]choline could be demonstrated in coated microvesicles at this time, although these structures were labelled 5 days after injection. Stimulating hormone secretion by chronic dehydration produced a significant fall in [3H]choline content of the secretory-vesicle membranes without any transfer of label into coated microvesicles, suggesting that coated microvesicles are not involved in membrane retrieval in the neurohypophysis. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6712633

  17. Annexin A2–dependent actin bundling promotes secretory granule docking to the plasma membrane and exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Marion; Delavoie, Franck; Demais, Valérie; Royer, Cathy; Bailly, Yannick; Vitale, Nicolas; Bader, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Annexin A2, a calcium-, actin-, and lipid-binding protein involved in exocytosis, mediates the formation of lipid microdomains required for the structural and spatial organization of fusion sites at the plasma membrane. To understand how annexin A2 promotes this membrane remodeling, the involvement of cortical actin filaments in lipid domain organization was investigated. 3D electron tomography showed that cortical actin bundled by annexin A2 connected docked secretory granules to the plasma membrane and contributed to the formation of GM1-enriched lipid microdomains at the exocytotic sites in chromaffin cells. When an annexin A2 mutant with impaired actin filament–bundling activity was expressed, the formation of plasma membrane lipid microdomains and the number of exocytotic events were decreased and the fusion kinetics were slower, whereas the pharmacological activation of the intrinsic actin-bundling activity of endogenous annexin A2 had the opposite effects. Thus, annexin A2–induced actin bundling is apparently essential for generating active exocytotic sites. PMID:26323692

  18. Secretory expression, characterization and docking study of glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase from B. subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chamoli, Shivangi; Kumar, Piyush; Navani, Naveen Kumar; Verma, Ashok Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The thermostable, glucose tolerant β-glucosidase gene (bgl) of Glycoside hydrolase family 1, isolated from Bacillus subtilis, was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The bgl has open reading frame of 1,407 bp, encoding 469 amino acids with predicted molecular weight of 53 kDa. The recombinant protein (BGL) was purified 10.76 fold to homogeneity with specific activity of 54.04U/mg and recovery of 38.67%. The purified BGL was optimally active at pH 6.0 and temperature 60°C. The enzyme retained more than 85% of maximum activity after 1h preincubation at 60°C. The kinetic analysis indicated that BGL has highest catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) against p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (654.58 mM(-1)s(-1)) followed by p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (292.53 mM(-1)s(-1)) and p-nitrophenyl-β-d-galactopyranoside (61.17 mM(-1)s(-1)). The Ki value for glucose and δ-gluconolactone was determined to be 1.9 mM and 0.018 mM, respectively. The BGL exhibited high tolerance against detergents and organic solvents. The homology modeling revealed that protein has 19 α-helices and 4 β-sheets and adopted (α/β)8 TIM barrel structure. Substrate docking and LigPlot analysis depicted the amino acids of active site involved in hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions with substrates. The efficient BGL secretion with exploration of structural and functional relationship offer vistas for large scale production and various industrial applications. PMID:26772920

  19. More Docked Vesicles and Larger Active Zones at Basket Cell-to-Granule Cell Synapses in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Yamawaki, Ruth; Thind, Khushdev

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common and challenging clinical problem, and its pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is insufficient inhibition in the hippocampal formation where seizures tend to initiate. Normally, hippocampal basket cells provide strong and reliable synaptic inhibition at principal cell somata. In a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy, basket cell-to-granule cell (BC→GC) synaptic transmission is more likely to fail, but the underlying cause is unknown. At some synapses, probability of release correlates with bouton size, active zone area, and number of docked vesicles. The present study tested the hypothesis that impaired GABAergic transmission at BC→GC synapses is attributable to ultrastructural changes. Boutons making axosomatic symmetric synapses in the granule cell layer were reconstructed from serial electron micrographs. BC→GC boutons were predicted to be smaller in volume, have fewer and smaller active zones, and contain fewer vesicles, including fewer docked vesicles. Results revealed the opposite. Compared with controls, epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats displayed boutons with over twice the average volume, active zone area, total vesicles, and docked vesicles and with more vesicles closer to active zones. Larger active zones in epileptic rats are consistent with previous reports of larger amplitude miniature IPSCs and larger BC→GC quantal size. Results of this study indicate that transmission failures at BC→GC synapses in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats are not attributable to smaller boutons or fewer docked vesicles. Instead, processes following vesicle docking, including priming, Ca2+ entry, or Ca2+ coupling with exocytosis, might be responsible. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT One in 26 people develops epilepsy, and temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form. Up to one-third of patients are resistant to currently available treatments. This study tested a potential underlying mechanism for previously reported

  20. Secretory organelles in ECL cells of the rat stomach: an immunohistochemical and electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C M; Chen, D; Lintunen, M; Panula, P; Håkanson, R

    1999-12-01

    ECL cells are numerous in the rat stomach. They produce and store histamine and chromogranin-A (CGA)-derived peptides such as pancreastatin and respond to gastrin with secretion of these products. Numerous electron-lucent vesicles of varying size and a few small, dense-cored granules are found in the cytoplasm. Using confocal and electron microscopy, we examined these organelles and their metamorphosis as they underwent intracellular transport from the Golgi area to the cell periphery. ECL-cell histamine was found to occur in both cytosol and secretory vesicles. Histidine decarboxylase, the histamine-forming enzyme, was in the cytosol, while pancreastatin (and possibly other peptide products) was confined to the dense cores of granules and secretory vesicles. Dense-cored granules and small, clear microvesicles were more numerous in the Golgi area than in the docking zone, i.e. close to the plasma membrane. Secretory vesicles were numerous in both Golgi area and docking zone, where they were sometimes seen to be attached to the plasma membrane. Upon acute gastrin stimulation, histamine was mobilized and the compartment size (volume density) of secretory vesicles in the docking zone was decreased, while the compartment size of microvesicles was increased. Based on these findings, we propose the following life cycle of secretory organelles in ECL cells: small, electron-lucent microvesicles (pro-granules) bud off the trans Golgi network, carrying proteins and secretory peptide precursors (such as CGA and an anticipated prohormone). They are transformed into dense-cored granules (approximate profile diameter 100 nm) while still in the trans Golgi area. Pro-granules and granules accumulate histamine, which leads to their metamorphosis into dense-cored secretory vesicles. In the Golgi area the secretory vesicles have an approximate profile diameter of 150 nm. By the time they reach their destination in the docking zone, their profile diameter is between 200 and 500 nm

  1. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the synaptic vesicle protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Basurto, José; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I.; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L.; Pérez-González, Óscar A.; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam and its racetam analogs. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D) model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns) with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression. PMID:25914622

  2. WDR8 is a centriolar satellite and centriole-associated protein that promotes ciliary vesicle docking during ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Wang, Wenbo; Ruppert, Thomas; Neuner, Annett; Cerikan, Berati; Viol, Linda; Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Gruss, Oliver J; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-02-01

    Ciliogenesis initiates at the mother centriole through a series of events that include membrane docking, displacement of cilia-inhibitory proteins and axoneme elongation. Centriolar proteins, in particular at distal and subdistal appendages, carry out these functions. Recently, cytoplasmic complexes named centriolar satellites have also been shown to promote ciliogenesis. Little is known about the functional and molecular relationship between appendage proteins, satellites and cilia biogenesis. Here, we identified the WD-repeat protein 8 (WDR8, also known as WRAP73) as a satellite and centriolar component. We show that WDR8 interacts with the satellite proteins SSX2IP and PCM1 as well as the centriolar proximal end component Cep135. Cep135 is required for the recruitment of WDR8 to centrioles. Depletion experiments revealed that WDR8 and Cep135 have strongly overlapping functions in ciliogenesis. Both are indispensable for ciliary vesicle docking to the mother centriole and for unlocking the distal end of the mother centriole from the ciliary inhibitory complex CP110-Cep97. Our data thus point to an important function of centriolar proximal end proteins in ciliary membrane biogenesis, and establish WDR8 and Cep135 as two factors that are essential for the initial steps of ciliation. PMID:26675238

  3. Vesicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... pox Contact dermatitis (may be caused by poison ivy) Herpes simplex (cold sores, genital herpes ) Herpes zoster ( ... for certain conditions that cause vesicles, including poison ivy and cold sores.

  4. The 11S rat seminal vesicle mRNA directs the in vitro synthesis of two precursors of the major secretory protein IV.

    PubMed Central

    Metafora, S; Guardiola, J; Paonessa, G; Abrescia, P

    1984-01-01

    The 11s mRNA extracted from the rat seminal vesicles directs the synthesis of two different precursors of the major secretory protein RSV-IV. These two precursors are not interconvertible and seemingly originate from different translational events. Sucrose gradients, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and positive hybridization translation experiments do not allow the separation of the two putatively different mRNAs. It is concluded that the two RSV-IV precursors either derive from two extremely similar, but physically not separable mRNA species, or from two different modes of translation of the same mRNA molecule. Images PMID:6701092

  5. Caspase-8 Binding to Cardiolipin in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles Provides a Functional Docking Platform for Bid

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark; Granjon, Thierry; Gonzalvez, François; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ayala-Sanmartin, Jesus; Klösgen, Beate; Schwille, Petra; Petit, Patrice X.

    2013-01-01

    Caspase-8 is involved in death receptor-mediated apoptosis in type II cells, the proapoptotic programme of which is triggered by truncated Bid. Indeed, caspase-8 and Bid are the known intermediates of this signalling pathway. Cardiolipin has been shown to provide an anchor and an essential activating platform for caspase-8 at the mitochondrial membrane surface. Destabilisation of this platform alters receptor-mediated apoptosis in diseases such as Barth Syndrome, which is characterised by the presence of immature cardiolipin which does not allow caspase-8 binding. We used a simplified in vitro system that mimics contact sites and/or cardiolipin-enriched microdomains at the outer mitochondrial surface in which the platform consisting of caspase-8, Bid and cardiolipin was reconstituted in giant unilamellar vesicles. We analysed these vesicles by flow cytometry and confirm previous results that demonstrate the requirement for intact mature cardiolipin for caspase-8 activation and Bid binding and cleavage. We also used confocal microscopy to visualise the rupture of the vesicles and their revesiculation at smaller sizes due to alteration of the curvature following caspase-8 and Bid binding. Biophysical approaches, including Laurdan fluorescence and rupture/tension measurements, were used to determine the ability of these three components (cardiolipin, caspase-8 and Bid) to fulfil the minimal requirements for the formation and function of the platform at the mitochondrial membrane. Our results shed light on the active functional role of cardiolipin, bridging the gap between death receptors and mitochondria. PMID:23418437

  6. A Putative Small Solute Transporter Is Responsible for the Secretion of G377 and TRAP-Containing Secretory Vesicles during Plasmodium Gamete Egress and Sporozoite Motility

    PubMed Central

    Kehrer, Jessica; Singer, Mirko; Lemgruber, Leandro; Silva, Patricia A. G. C.; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R.

    2016-01-01

    Regulated protein secretion is required for malaria parasite life cycle progression and transmission between the mammalian host and mosquito vector. During transmission from the host to the vector, exocytosis of highly specialised secretory vesicles, such as osmiophilic bodies, is key to the dissolution of the red blood cell and parasitophorous vacuole membranes enabling gamete egress. The positioning of adhesins from the TRAP family, from micronemes to the sporozoite surface, is essential for gliding motility of the parasite and transmission from mosquito to mammalian host. Here we identify a conserved role for the putative pantothenate transporter PAT in Plasmodium berghei in vesicle fusion of two distinct classes of vesicles in gametocytes and sporozoites. PAT is a membrane component of osmiophilic bodies in gametocytes and micronemes in sporozoites. Despite normal formation and trafficking of osmiophilic bodies to the cell surface upon activation, PAT-deficient gametes fail to discharge their contents, remain intraerythrocytic and unavailable for fertilisation and further development in the mosquito. Sporozoites lacking PAT fail to secrete TRAP, are immotile and thus unable to infect the subsequent rodent host. Thus, P. berghei PAT appears to regulate exocytosis in two distinct populations of vesicles in two different life cycle forms rather than acting as pantothenic transporter during parasite transmission. PMID:27427910

  7. Binding contribution between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins in neurons: an AFM study.

    PubMed

    Sritharan, K C; Quinn, A S; Taatjes, D J; Jena, B P

    1998-01-01

    The final step in the exocytotic process is the docking and fusion of membrane-bound secretory vesicles at the cell plasma membrane. This docking and fusion is brought about by several participating vesicle membrane, plasma membrane and soluble cytosolic proteins. A clear understanding of the interactions between these participating proteins giving rise to vesicle docking and fusion is essential. In this study, the binding force profiles between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins have been examined for the first time using the atomic force microscope. Binding force contributions of a synaptic vesicle membrane protein VAMP1, and the plasma membrane proteins SNAP-25 and syntaxin, are also implicated from these studies. Our study suggests that these three proteins are the major, if not the only contributors to the interactive binding force that exist between the two membranes. PMID:10452835

  8. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 regulates exocytosis, vesicle docking, readily releasable pool size and fusion pore stability in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Kimberly D; Duffield, Michael D; Peiris, Heshan; Phillips, Lucy; Zanin, Mark P; Teo, Ee Hiok; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Keating, Damien J

    2014-01-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) was initially established as a neuronal binding partner of huntingtin, mutations in which underlie Huntington's disease. Subcellular localization and protein interaction data indicate that HAP1 may be important in vesicle trafficking and cell signalling. In this study, we establish that HAP1 is important in several steps of exocytosis in adrenal chromaffin cells. Using carbon-fibre amperometry, we measured single vesicle exocytosis in chromaffin cells obtained from HAP1−/− and HAP1+/+ littermate mice. Numbers of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent full fusion events in HAP1−/− cells are significantly decreased compared with those in HAP1+/+ cells. We observed no change in the frequency of ‘kiss-and-run’ fusion events or in Ca2+ entry. Whereas release per full fusion event is unchanged in HAP1−/− cells, early fusion pore duration is prolonged, as indicated by the increased duration of pre-spike foot signals. Kiss-and-run events have a shorter duration, indicating opposing roles for HAP1 in the stabilization of the fusion pore during full fusion and transient fusion, respectively. We use electron microscopy to demonstrate a reduction in the number of vesicles docked at the plasma membrane of HAP1−/− cells, where membrane capacitance measurements reveal the readily releasable pool of vesicles to be reduced in size. Our study therefore illustrates that HAP1 regulates exocytosis by influencing the morphological docking of vesicles at the plasma membrane, the ability of vesicles to be released rapidly upon stimulation, and the early stages of fusion pore formation. PMID:24366265

  9. Munc13-4 Is a Rab11-binding Protein That Regulates Rab11-positive Vesicle Trafficking and Docking at the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Kiosses, William B; Zhang, Jinzhong; Catz, Sergio D

    2016-02-12

    The small GTPase Rab11 and its effectors control trafficking of recycling endosomes, receptor replenishment and the up-regulation of adhesion and adaptor molecules at the plasma membrane. Despite recent advances in the understanding of Rab11-regulated mechanisms, the final steps mediating docking and fusion of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane are not fully understood. Munc13-4 is a docking factor proposed to regulate fusion through interactions with SNAREs. In hematopoietic cells, including neutrophils, Munc13-4 regulates exocytosis in a Rab27a-dependent manner, but its possible regulation of other GTPases has not been explored in detail. Here, we show that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11 and regulates the trafficking of Rab11-containing vesicles. Using a novel Time-resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (TR-FRET) assay, we demonstrate that Munc13-4 binds to Rab11a but not to dominant negative Rab11a. Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the specificity of the interaction between Munc13-4 and Rab11, and super-resolution microscopy studies support the interaction of endogenous Munc13-4 with Rab11 at the single molecule level in neutrophils. Vesicular dynamic analysis shows the common spatio-temporal distribution of Munc13-4 and Rab11, while expression of a calcium binding-deficient mutant of Munc13-4 significantly affected Rab11 trafficking. Munc13-4-deficient neutrophils showed normal endocytosis, but the trafficking, up-regulation, and retention of Rab11-positive vesicles at the plasma membrane was significantly impaired. This correlated with deficient NADPH oxidase activation at the plasma membrane in response to Rab11 interference. Our data demonstrate that Munc13-4 is a Rab11-binding partner that regulates the final steps of Rab11-positive vesicle docking at the plasma membrane. PMID:26637356

  10. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin-2 is associated with dense core secretory granules in PC12 neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Papini, E; Rossetto, O; Cutler, D F

    1995-01-20

    The presence and intracellular distribution of vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1) and VAMP-2 were investigated in the PC12 neuroendocrine cell line using isotype-specific polyclonal antibodies. VAMP-2 was detected in the total membrane fraction, while VAMP-1 was undetectable. Subcellular fractionation demonstrates that a substantial amount of the VAMP-2 (24-36%) is associated with dense core, catecholamine-containing granules (DCGs). This was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The L chain of tetanus neurotoxin, known to inhibit granule mediated secretion in permeabilized PC12 cells, as well as botulinum neurotoxins F and G, effectively cleaved DCG-associated VAMP-2. These data demonstrate that VAMP-2 is present on the secretory granules of PC12 cells. PMID:7836399

  11. Lipids implicated in the journey of a secretory granule: from biogenesis to fusion.

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Emeline; Carmon, Ophélie; Wang, Qili; Jeandel, Lydie; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Montero-Hadjadje, Maité; Vitale, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    The regulated secretory pathway begins with the formation of secretory granules by budding from the Golgi apparatus and ends by their fusion with the plasma membrane leading to the release of their content into the extracellular space, generally following a rise in cytosolic calcium. Generation of these membrane-bound transport carriers can be classified into three steps: (i) cargo sorting that segregates the cargo from resident proteins of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) membrane budding that encloses the cargo and depends on the creation of appropriate membrane curvature, and (iii) membrane fission events allowing the nascent carrier to separate from the donor membrane. These secretory vesicles then mature as they are actively transported along microtubules toward the cortical actin network at the cell periphery. The final stage known as regulated exocytosis involves the docking and the priming of the mature granules, necessary for merging of vesicular and plasma membranes, and the subsequent partial or total release of the secretory vesicle content. Here, we review the latest evidence detailing the functional roles played by lipids during secretory granule biogenesis, recruitment, and exocytosis steps. In this review, we highlight evidence supporting the notion that lipids play important functions in secretory vesicle biogenesis, maturation, recruitment, and membrane fusion steps. These effects include regulating various protein distribution and activity, but also directly modulating membrane topology. The challenges ahead to understand the pleiotropic functions of lipids in a secretory granule's journey are also discussed. This article is part of a mini review series on Chromaffin cells (ISCCB Meeting, 2015). PMID:26877188

  12. Vesicle Associated Membrane Protein 8 (VAMP8)-mediated Zymogen Granule Exocytosis Is Dependent on Endosomal Trafficking via the Constitutive-Like Secretory Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Scott W; Falkowski, Michelle A.; Thomas, Diana D. H.; Jones, Elaina K.; Hong, Wanjin; Giasano, Herbert Y.; Boulis, Nicholas M.; Groblewski, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Acinar cell zymogen granules (ZG) express 2 isoforms of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family (VAMP2 and -8) thought to regulate exocytosis. Expression of tetanus toxin to cleave VAMP2 in VAMP8 knock-out (−/−) acini confirmed that VAMP2 and -8 are the primary VAMPs for regulated exocytosis, each contributing ∼50% of the response. Analysis of VAMP8−/− acini indicated that although stimulated secretion was significantly reduced, a compensatory increase in constitutive secretion maintained total secretion equivalent to wild type (WT). Using a perifusion system to follow secretion over time revealed VAMP2 mediates an early rapid phase peaking and falling within 2–3 min, whereas VAMP8 controls a second prolonged phase that peaks at 4 min and slowly declines over 20 min to support the protracted secretory response. VAMP8−/− acini show increased expression of the endosomal proteins Ti-VAMP7 (2-fold) and Rab11a (4-fold) and their redistribution from endosomes to ZGs. Expression of GDP-trapped Rab11a-S25N inhibited secretion exclusively from the VAMP8 but not the VAMP2 pathway. VAMP8−/− acini also showed a >90% decrease in the early endosomal proteins Rab5/D52/EEA1, which control anterograde trafficking in the constitutive-like secretory pathway. In WT acini, short term (14–16 h) culture also results in a >90% decrease in Rab5/D52/EEA1 and a complete loss of the VAMP8 pathway, whereas VAMP2-secretion remains intact. Remarkably, rescue of Rab5/D52/EEA1 expression restored the VAMP8 pathway. Expressed D52 shows extensive colocalization with Rab11a and VAMP8 and partially copurifies with ZG fractions. These results indicate that robust trafficking within the constitutive-like secretory pathway is required for VAMP8- but not VAMP2-mediated ZG exocytosis. PMID:25138214

  13. Inhibition of neurotransmitter and hormone transport into secretory vesicles by 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine: both compounds act as uncouplers and dissipate the electrochemical gradient of protons.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Y; Amakatsu, K; Yamada, H; Park, M Y; Futai, M

    1991-10-01

    2-(4-Phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH-5183) and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine, known inhibitors of the transport of acetylcholine and L-glutamate, respectively, into synaptic vesicles, inhibited the ATP-dependent uptake of dopamine in parallel with the dissipation of the electrochemical gradient of protons in chromaffin granule membrane vesicles. These compounds induced the release of accumulated dopamine from the vesicles. They also inhibited the ATP-dependent formation of the electrochemical gradient of protons in liposomes reconstituted with chromaffin H(+)-ATPase without affecting the activities for ATP hydrolysis, and ATP-dependent uptakes of dopamine, gamma-aminobutyrate, and glutamate into synaptic vesicles. These results indicated that 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine acted as uncouplers in the secretory vesicles. PMID:1680315

  14. Actin depolymerisation and crosslinking join forces with myosin II to contract actin coats on fused secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Miklavc, Pika; Ehinger, Konstantin; Sultan, Ayesha; Felder, Tatiana; Paul, Patrick; Gottschalk, Kay-Eberhard; Frick, Manfred

    2015-03-15

    In many secretory cells actin and myosin are specifically recruited to the surface of secretory granules following their fusion with the plasma membrane. Actomyosin-dependent compression of fused granules is essential to promote active extrusion of cargo. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms regulating actin coat formation and contraction. Here, we provide a detailed kinetic analysis of the molecules regulating actin coat contraction on fused lamellar bodies in primary alveolar type II cells. We demonstrate that ROCK1 and myosin light chain kinase 1 (MLCK1, also known as MYLK) translocate to fused lamellar bodies and activate myosin II on actin coats. However, myosin II activity is not sufficient for efficient actin coat contraction. In addition, cofilin-1 and α-actinin translocate to actin coats. ROCK1-dependent regulated actin depolymerisation by cofilin-1 in cooperation with actin crosslinking by α-actinin is essential for complete coat contraction. In summary, our data suggest a complementary role for regulated actin depolymerisation and crosslinking, and myosin II activity, to contract actin coats and drive secretion. PMID:25637593

  15. Porosome: the secretory NanoMachine in cells.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2013-01-01

    Cells synthesize and store within membranous sacs products such as hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, or digestive enzymes, for release on demand. As recently as just 15 years ago, it was believed that during cell secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles completely merge at the cell plasma membrane resulting in the diffusion of intravesicular contents to the cell exterior and the compensatory retrieval of the excess membrane by endocytosis. This explanation, however, failed to explain the generation of partially empty vesicles observed in electron micrographs following secretion. Logically therefore, in a 1993 News and Views article in the journal Nature, Prof. Erwin Neher wrote "It seems terribly wasteful that, during the release of hormones and neurotransmitters from a cell, the membrane of a vesicle should merge with the plasma membrane to be retrieved for recycling only seconds or minutes later." The discovery of permanent secretory portals or nanomachines at the cell plasma membrane called POROSOMES, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release intravesicular contents to the cell exterior, has finally resolved this conundrum. Following this discovery, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics visualized with high-resolution imaging techniques atomic force and electron microscopy, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane have provided a molecular understanding of cell secretion. In agreement, it has been demonstrated that "secretory granules are recaptured largely intact after stimulated exocytosis in cultured endocrine cells" (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:2070-2075, 2003); that "single synaptic vesicles fuse transiently and successively without loss of identity" (Nature 423:643-647, 2003); and that "zymogen granule exocytosis is characterized by long fusion pore openings and preservation of vesicle lipid identity" (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:6774-6779, 2004). It made no

  16. Myosin IIA participates in docking of Glut4 storage vesicles with the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Le Thi Kim; Hosaka, Toshio; Harada, Nagakatsu; Jambaldorj, Bayasgalan; Fukunaga, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Yuka; Teshigawara, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Tohru; Nakaya, Yutaka; Funaki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    In adipocytes and myocytes, insulin stimulation translocates glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) storage vesicles (GSVs) from their intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane (PM) where they dock with the PM. Then, Glut4 is inserted into the PM and initiates glucose uptake into these cells. Previous studies using chemical inhibitors demonstrated that myosin II participates in fusion of GSVs and the PM and increase in the intrinsic activity of Glut4. In this study, the effect of myosin IIA on GSV trafficking was examined by knocking down myosin IIA expression. Myosin IIA knockdown decreased both glucose uptake and exposures of myc-tagged Glut4 to the cell surface in insulin-stimulated cells, but did not affect insulin signal transduction. Interestingly, myosin IIA knockdown failed to decrease insulin-dependent trafficking of Glut4 to the PM. Moreover, in myosin IIA knockdown cells, insulin-stimulated binding of GSV SNARE protein, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) to PM SNARE protein, syntaxin 4 was inhibited. These data suggest that myosin IIA plays a role in insulin-stimulated docking of GSVs to the PM in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through SNARE complex formation.

  17. Granuphilin exclusively mediates functional granule docking to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Fujita, Takuji; Gomi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    In regulated exocytosis, it is generally assumed that vesicles must stably “dock” at the plasma membrane before they are primed to become fusion-competent. However, recent biophysical analyses in living cells that visualize fluorescent secretory granules have revealed that exocytic behaviors are not necessarily uniform: some granules beneath the plasma membrane are resistant to Ca2+ -triggered release, while others are accelerated to fuse without a pause for stable docking. These findings suggest that stable docking is unnecessary, and can even be inhibitory or nonfunctional, for fusion. Consistently, pancreatic β cells deficient in the Rab27 effector, granuphilin, lack insulin granules directly attached to the plasma membrane in electron micrographs but nevertheless exhibit augmented exocytosis. Here we directly compare the exocytic behaviors between granuphilin-positive and -negative insulin granules. Although granuphilin makes granules immobile and fusion-reluctant beneath the plasma membrane, those granuphilin-positive, docked granules release a portion of granuphilin upon fusion, and fuse at a frequency and time course similar to those of granuphilin-negative undocked granules. Furthermore, granuphilin forms a 180-nm cluster at the site of each docked granule, along with granuphilin-interacting Rab27a and Munc18-1 clusters. These findings indicate that granuphilin is an exclusive component of the functional and fusion-inhibitory docking machinery of secretory granules. PMID:27032672

  18. Secretory autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ponpuak, Marisa; Mandell, Michael A; Kimura, Tomonori; Chauhan, Santosh; Cleyrat, Cédric; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy, once viewed exclusively as a cytoplasmic auto-digestive process, has its less intuitive but biologically distinct non-degradative roles. One manifestation of these functions of the autophagic machinery is the process termed secretory autophagy. Secretory autophagy facilitates unconventional secretion of the cytosolic cargo such as leaderless cytosolic proteins, which unlike proteins endowed with the leader (N-terminal signal) peptides cannot enter the conventional secretory pathway normally operating via the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Secretory autophagy may also export more complex cytoplasmic cargo and help excrete particulate substrates. Autophagic machinery and autophagy as a process also affect conventional secretory pathways, including the constitutive and regulated secretion, as well as promote alternative routes for trafficking of integral membrane proteins to the plasma membrane. Thus, autophagy and autophagic factors are intimately intertwined at many levels with secretion and polarized sorting in eukaryotic cells. PMID:25988755

  19. Neuronal porosome - The secretory portal at the nerve terminal: Its structure-function, composition, and reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Bhanu P.

    2014-09-01

    Cup-shaped secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane called porosomes mediate secretion from cells. Membrane bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the cytosolic compartment of the porosome base to expel intravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the structure, isolation, composition, and functional reconstitution of the neuronal porosome complex has been accomplished providing a molecular understanding of its structure-function. Neuronal porosomes are 15 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein structures composed of nearly 40 proteins; compared to the 120 nm nuclear pore complex comprised of over 500 protein molecules composed of 30 different proteins. Being a membrane-associated supramolecular complex has precluded determination of the atomic structure of the porosome. However recent studies using small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS), provide at sub-nanometer resolution, the native 3D structure of the neuronal porosome complex associated with docked synaptic vesicle at the nerve terminal. Additionally, results from the SAXS study and earlier studies using atomic force microscopy, provide the possible molecular mechanism involved in porosome-mediated neurotransmitter release at the nerve terminal.

  20. Alpha-synuclein Toxicity in the Early Secretory Pathway: How It Drives Neurodegeneration in Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Hay, Jesse C.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein is a predominant player in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease. However, despite extensive study for two decades, its physiological and pathological mechanisms remain poorly understood. Alpha-synuclein forms a perplexing web of interactions with lipids, trafficking machinery, and other regulatory factors. One emerging consensus is that synaptic vesicles are likely the functional site for alpha-synuclein, where it appears to facilitate vesicle docking and fusion. On the other hand, the dysfunctions of alpha-synuclein are more dispersed and numerous; when mutated or over-expressed, alpha-synuclein affects several membrane trafficking and stress pathways, including exocytosis, ER-to-Golgi transport, ER stress, Golgi homeostasis, endocytosis, autophagy, oxidative stress, and others. Here we examine recent developments in alpha-synuclein's toxicity in the early secretory pathway placed in the context of emerging themes from other affected pathways to help illuminate its underlying pathogenic mechanisms in neurodegeneration. PMID:26617485

  1. The Xanthomonas Ax21 protein is processed by the general secretory system and is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Liu, Furong; Ruan, Randy; Fontaine-Bodin, Lisa; Koebnik, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play an important role in detecting invading pathogens and mounting a robust defense response to restrict infection. In rice, one of the best characterized PRRs is XA21, a leucine rich repeat receptor-like kinase that confers broad-spectrum resistance to multiple strains of the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). In 2009 we reported that an Xoo protein, called Ax21, is secreted by a type I-secretion system and that it serves to activate XA21-mediated immunity. This report has recently been retracted. Here we present data that corrects our previous model. We first show that Ax21 secretion does not depend on the predicted type I secretion system and that it is processed by the general secretion (Sec) system. We further show that Ax21 is an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. Finally, we provide data showing that ax21 knockout strains do not overcome XA21-mediated immunity. PMID:24482761

  2. Neuronal Porosome-The Secretory Portal at the Nerve Terminal: It’s Structure-Function, Composition, and Reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bhanu P.

    2015-01-01

    Cup-shaped secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane called porosomes mediate secretion from cells. Membrane bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse at the cytosolic compartment of the porosome base to expel intravesicular contents to the outside during cell secretion. In the past decade, the structure, isolation, composition, and functional reconstitution of the neuronal porosome complex has been accomplished providing a molecular understanding of its structure-function. Neuronal porosomes are 15 nm cup-shaped lipoprotein structures composed of nearly 40 proteins. Being a membrane-associated supramolecular complex has precluded determination of the atomic structure of the porosome. However recent studies using small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS), provide at sub-nanometer resolution, the native 3D structure of the neuronal porosome complex associated with docked synaptic vesicle at the nerve terminal. Additionally, results from the SAXS study and earlier studies using atomic force microscopy, provide the possible molecular mechanism involved in porosome-mediated neurotransmitter release at the nerve terminal. PMID:26412873

  3. LYST controls the biogenesis of the endosomal compartment required for secretory lysosome function.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Fernando E; Burgess, Agathe; Heiligenstein, Xavier; Goudin, Nicolas; Ménager, Mickaël M; Romao, Maryse; Côte, Marjorie; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Fischer, Alain; Raposo, Graça; Ménasché, Gaël; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    2015-02-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding LYST protein, the function of which remains poorly understood. Prominent features of CHS include defective secretory lysosome exocytosis and the presence of enlarged, lysosome-like organelles in several cell types. In order to get further insight into the role of LYST in the biogenesis and exocytosis of cytotoxic granules, we analyzed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from patients with CHS. Using confocal microscopy and correlative light electron microscopy, we showed that the enlarged organelle in CTLs is a hybrid compartment that contains proteins components from recycling-late endosomes and lysosomes. Enlargement of cytotoxic granules results from the progressive clustering and then fusion of normal-sized endolysosomal organelles. At the immunological synapse (IS) in CHS CTLs, cytotoxic granules have limited motility and appear docked while nevertheless unable to degranulate. By increasing the expression of effectors of lytic granule exocytosis, such as Munc13-4, Rab27a and Slp3, in CHS CTLs, we were able to restore the dynamics and the secretory ability of cytotoxic granules at the IS. Our results indicate that LYST is involved in the trafficking of the effectors involved in exocytosis required for the terminal maturation of perforin-containing vesicles into secretory cytotoxic granules. PMID:25425525

  4. Characterization of Phospholipids in Insulin Secretory Granules and Mitochondria in Pancreatic Beta Cells and Their Changes with Glucose Stimulation*

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Michael J.; Ade, Lacmbouh; Ntambi, James M.; Ansari, Israr-Ul H.; Stoker, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The lipid composition of insulin secretory granules (ISG) has never previously been thoroughly characterized. We characterized the phospholipid composition of ISG and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells without and with glucose stimulation. The phospholipid/protein ratios of most phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids were higher in ISG than in whole cells and in mitochondria. The concentrations of negatively charged phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol in ISG were 5-fold higher than in the whole cell. In ISG phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin, fatty acids 12:0 and 14:0 were high, as were phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol containing 18-carbon unsaturated FA. With glucose stimulation, the concentration of many ISG phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylinositols increased; unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylserine increased; and most phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and lysophosphatidylcholines were unchanged. Unsaturation and shorter fatty acid length in phospholipids facilitate curvature and fluidity of membranes, which favors fusion of membranes. Recent evidence suggests that negatively charged phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, act as coupling factors enhancing the interaction of positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in synaptic or secretory vesicle membrane lipid bilayers with positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane lipid bilayer to facilitate docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. The results indicate that ISG phospholipids are in a dynamic state and are consistent with the idea that changes in ISG phospholipids facilitate fusion of ISG with the plasma membrane-enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin exocytosis. PMID:25762724

  5. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  6. Synaptic Vesicle Pools: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or “pools”. We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are “fixed”. Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  7. Synaptic vesicle pools: an update.

    PubMed

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or "pools". We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are "fixed". Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  8. Temporal separation of vesicle release from vesicle fusion during exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Kevin P; Wightman, R Mark

    2002-08-01

    During exocytosis, vesicles in secretory cells fuse with the cellular membrane and release their contents in a Ca2+-dependent process. Release occurs initially through a fusion pore, and its rate is limited by the dissociation of the matrix-associated contents. To determine whether this dissociation is promoted by osmotic forces, we have examined the effects of elevated osmotic pressure on release and extrusion from vesicles at mast and chromaffin cells. The identity of the molecules released and the time course of extrusion were measured with fast scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon fiber microelectrodes. In external solutions of high osmolarity, release events following entry of divalent ions (Ba2+ or Ca2+) were less frequent. However, the vesicles appeared to be fused to the membrane without extruding their contents, since the maximal observed concentrations of events were less than 7% of those evoked in isotonic media. Such an isolated, intermediate fusion state, which we term "kiss-and-hold," was confirmed by immunohistochemistry at chromaffin cells. Transient exposure of cells in the kiss and hold state to isotonic solutions evoked massive release. These results demonstrate that an osmotic gradient across the fusion pore is an important driving force for exocytotic extrusion of granule contents from secretory cells following fusion pore formation. PMID:12034731

  9. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko; Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana ; Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G.; Zorec, Robert; Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  10. Impaired maturation of large dense-core vesicles in muted-deficient adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhenhua; Wei, Lisi; Feng, Yaqin; Chen, Xiaowei; Du, Wen; Ma, Jing; Zhou, Zhuan; Chen, Liangyi; Li, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The large dense-core vesicle (LDCV), a type of lysosome-related organelle, is involved in the secretion of hormones and neuropeptides in specialized secretory cells. The granin family is a driving force in LDCV biogenesis, but the machinery for granin sorting to this biogenesis pathway is largely unknown. The mu mutant mouse, which carries a spontaneous null mutation on the Muted gene (also known as Bloc1s5), which encodes a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), is a mouse model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Here, we found that LDCVs were enlarged in mu adrenal chromaffin cells. Chromogranin A (CgA, also known as CHGA) was increased in mu adrenals and muted-knockdown cells. The increased CgA in mu mice was likely due a failure to export this molecule out of immature LDCVs, which impairs LDCV maturation and docking. In mu chromaffin cells, the size of readily releasable pool and the vesicle release frequency were reduced. Our studies suggest that the muted protein is involved in the selective export of CgA during the biogenesis of LDCVs. PMID:25673877

  11. SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTEIN TRAFFICKING AT THE GLUTAMATE SYNAPSE

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Magda S.; Li, Haiyan; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Expression of the integral and associated proteins of synaptic vesicles is subject to regulation over time, by region, and in response to activity. The process by which changes in protein levels and isoforms result in different properties of neurotransmitter release involves protein trafficking to the synaptic vesicle. How newly synthesized proteins are incorporated into synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic bouton is poorly understood. During synaptogenesis, synaptic vesicle proteins sort through the secretory pathway and are transported down the axon in precursor vesicles that undergo maturation to form synaptic vesicles. Changes in protein content of synaptic vesicles could involve the formation of new vesicles that either mix with the previous complement of vesicles or replace them, presumably by their degradation or inactivation. Alternatively, new proteins could individually incorporate into existing synaptic vesicles, changing their functional properties. Glutamatergic vesicles likely express many of the same integral membrane proteins and share certain common mechanisms of biogenesis, recycling, and degradation with other synaptic vesicles. However, glutamatergic vesicles are defined by their ability to package glutamate for release, a property conferred by the expression of a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). VGLUTs are subject to regional, developmental, and activity-dependent changes in expression. In addition, VGLUT isoforms differ in their trafficking, which may target them to different pathways during biogenesis or after recycling, which may in turn sort them to different vesicle pools. Emerging data indicate that differences in the association of VGLUTs and other synaptic vesicle proteins with endocytic adaptors may influence their trafficking. These observations indicate that independent regulation of synaptic vesicle protein trafficking has the potential to influence synaptic vesicle protein composition, the maintenance of synaptic vesicle

  12. Magnetic capture docking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Nathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Hai D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism uses a magnetic field to dock a satellite to a host vehicle. A docking component of the mechanism residing on the host vehicle has a magnet that is used to induce a coupled magnetic field with a docking component of the mechanism residing on the satellite. An alignment guide axially aligns the docking component of the satellite with the docking component of the host device dependent on the coupled magnetic field. Rotational alignment guides are used to rotationally align the docking component of the satellite with the docking component of the host device. A ball-lock mechanism is used to mechanically secure the docking component of the host vehicle and the docking component of the satellite.

  13. Characterization of Yeast Extracellular Vesicles: Evidence for the Participation of Different Pathways of Cellular Traffic in Vesicle Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Luna S.; Guimarães, Allan J.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Cordero, Radames J. B.; Frases, Susana; Casadevall, Arturo; Almeida, Igor C.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles in yeast cells are involved in the molecular traffic across the cell wall. In yeast pathogens, these vesicles have been implicated in the transport of proteins, lipids, polysaccharide and pigments to the extracellular space. Cellular pathways required for the biogenesis of yeast extracellular vesicles are largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized extracellular vesicle production in wild type (WT) and mutant strains of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using transmission electron microscopy in combination with light scattering analysis, lipid extraction and proteomics. WT cells and mutants with defective expression of Sec4p, a secretory vesicle-associated Rab GTPase essential for Golgi-derived exocytosis, or Snf7p, which is involved in multivesicular body (MVB) formation, were analyzed in parallel. Bilayered vesicles with diameters at the 100–300 nm range were found in extracellular fractions from yeast cultures. Proteomic analysis of vesicular fractions from the cells aforementioned and additional mutants with defects in conventional secretion pathways (sec1-1, fusion of Golgi-derived exocytic vesicles with the plasma membrane; bos1-1, vesicle targeting to the Golgi complex) or MVB functionality (vps23, late endosomal trafficking) revealed a complex and interrelated protein collection. Semi-quantitative analysis of protein abundance revealed that mutations in both MVB- and Golgi-derived pathways affected the composition of yeast extracellular vesicles, but none abrogated vesicle production. Lipid analysis revealed that mutants with defects in Golgi-related components of the secretory pathway had slower vesicle release kinetics, as inferred from intracellular accumulation of sterols and reduced detection of these lipids in vesicle fractions in comparison with WT cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that both conventional and unconventional pathways of secretion are required for

  14. SNARE-Driven, 25-Millisecond Vesicle Fusion In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Tucker, Ward C.; Bhalla, Akhil; Chapman, Edwin R.; Weisshaar, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Docking and fusion of single proteoliposomes reconstituted with full-length v-SNAREs (synaptobrevin) into planar lipid bilayers containing binary t-SNAREs (anchored syntaxin associated with SNAP25) was observed in real time by wide-field fluorescence microscopy. This enabled separate measurement of the docking rate kdock and the unimolecular fusion rate kfus. On low t-SNARE-density bilayers at 37°C, docking is efficient: kdock = 2.2 × 107 M−1 s−1, ∼40% of the estimated diffusion limited rate. Full vesicle fusion is observed as a prompt increase in fluorescence intensity from labeled lipids, immediately followed by outward radial diffusion (Dlipid = 0.6 μm2 s−1); ∼80% of the docked vesicles fuse promptly as a homogeneous subpopulation with kfus = 40 ± 15 s−1 (τfus = 25 ms). This is 103–104 times faster than previous in vitro fusion assays. Complete lipid mixing occurs in <15 ms. Both the v-SNARE and the t-SNARE are necessary for efficient docking and fast fusion, but Ca2+ is not. Docking and fusion were quantitatively similar on syntaxin-only bilayers lacking SNAP25. At present, in vitro fusion driven by SNARE complexes alone remains ∼40 times slower than the fastest, submillisecond presynaptic vesicle population response. PMID:16055544

  15. Coarse-Grained Model of SNARE-Mediated Docking

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, Nicole; Singh, Pankaj; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Jagota, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic transmission requires that vesicles filled with neurotransmitter molecules be docked to the plasma membrane by the SNARE protein complex. The SNARE complex applies attractive forces to overcome the long-range repulsion between the vesicle and membrane. To understand how the balance between the attractive and repulsive forces defines the equilibrium docked state we have developed a model that combines the mechanics of vesicle/membrane deformation with an apparently new coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex. The coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex is calibrated by comparison with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as by force measurements in laser tweezer experiments. The model for vesicle/membrane interactions includes the forces produced by membrane deformation and hydration or electrostatic repulsion. Combining these two parts, the coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex with membrane mechanics, we study how the equilibrium docked state varies with the number of SNARE complexes. We find that a single SNARE complex is able to bring a typical synaptic vesicle to within a distance of ∼3 nm from the membrane. Further addition of SNARE complexes shortens this distance, but an overdocked state of >4–6 SNAREs actually increases the equilibrium distance. PMID:25954883

  16. Coarse-Grained Model of SNARE-Mediated Docking.

    PubMed

    Fortoul, Nicole; Singh, Pankaj; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Jagota, Anand

    2015-05-01

    Synaptic transmission requires that vesicles filled with neurotransmitter molecules be docked to the plasma membrane by the SNARE protein complex. The SNARE complex applies attractive forces to overcome the long-range repulsion between the vesicle and membrane. To understand how the balance between the attractive and repulsive forces defines the equilibrium docked state we have developed a model that combines the mechanics of vesicle/membrane deformation with an apparently new coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex. The coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex is calibrated by comparison with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as by force measurements in laser tweezer experiments. The model for vesicle/membrane interactions includes the forces produced by membrane deformation and hydration or electrostatic repulsion. Combining these two parts, the coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex with membrane mechanics, we study how the equilibrium docked state varies with the number of SNARE complexes. We find that a single SNARE complex is able to bring a typical synaptic vesicle to within a distance of ∼ 3 nm from the membrane. Further addition of SNARE complexes shortens this distance, but an overdocked state of >4-6 SNAREs actually increases the equilibrium distance. PMID:25954883

  17. Kinesin-related Smy1 enhances the Rab-dependent association of myosin-V with secretory cargo.

    PubMed

    Lwin, Kyaw Myo; Li, Donghao; Bretscher, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms by which molecular motors associate with specific cargo is a central problem in cell organization. The kinesin-like protein Smy1 of budding yeast was originally identified by the ability of elevated levels to suppress a conditional myosin-V mutation (myo2-66), but its function with Myo2 remained mysterious. Subsequently, Myo2 was found to provide an essential role in delivery of secretory vesicles for polarized growth and in the transport of mitochondria for segregation. By isolating and characterizing myo2 smy1 conditional mutants, we uncover the molecular function of Smy1 as a factor that enhances the association of Myo2 with its receptor, the Rab Sec4, on secretory vesicles. The tail of Smy1-which binds Myo2-its central dimerization domain, and its kinesin-like head domain are all necessary for this function. Consistent with this model, overexpression of full-length Smy1 enhances the number of Sec4 receptors and Myo2 motors per transporting secretory vesicle. Rab proteins Sec4 and Ypt11, receptors for essential transport of secretory vesicles and mitochondria, respectively, bind the same region on Myo2, yet Smy1 functions selectively in the transport of secretory vesicles. Thus a kinesin-related protein can function intimately with a myosin-V and its receptor in the transport of a specific cargo. PMID:27307583

  18. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David R.; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP) and a slowly releasable (SRP) pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation, and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles. PMID:21423410

  19. Secretory protein traffic. Chromogranin A contains a dominant targeting signal for the regulated pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, R J; Xi, X P; Wu, H J; Helman, L J; Petz, L N

    1993-01-01

    Secretory proteins are targeted into either constitutive (secreted upon synthesis) or regulated (stored in vesicles and released in response to a secretagogue) pathways. To investigate mechanisms of protein targeting into catecholamine storage vesicles (CSV), we stably expressed human chromogranin A (CgA), the major soluble protein in human CSV, in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cell line. Chromaffin cell secretagogues (0.1 mM nicotinic cholinergic agonist, 55 mM K+, or 2 mM Ba++) caused cosecretion of human CgA and catecholamines from human CgA-expressing cells. Sucrose gradients colocalized human CgA and catecholamines to subcellular particles of the same buoyant density. Chimeric proteins, in which human CgA (either full-length [457 amino acids] or truncated [amino-terminal 226 amino acids]) was fused in-frame to the ordinarily nonsecreted protein chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), were expressed transiently in PC-12 cells. Both constructs directed CAT activity into regulated secretory vesicles, as judged by secretagogue-stimulated release. These data demonstrate that human CgA expressed in PC-12 cells is targeted to regulated secretory vesicles. In addition, human CgA can divert an ordinarily non-secreted protein into the regulated secretory pathway, consistent with the operation of a dominant targeting signal for the regulated pathway within the peptide sequence of CgA. Images PMID:8394383

  20. Docking system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A mechanism for the docking of a space vehicle to a space station where a connection for transfer of personnel and equipment is desired. The invention comprises an active docking structure on a space vehicle 10 and a passive docking structure on a station 11. The passive structure includes a docking ring 50 mounted on a tunnel structure 35 fixed to the space station. The active structure including a docking ring 18 carried by actuator-attenuator devices 20, each attached at one end to the ring 18 and at its other end in the vehicle's payload bay 12. The devices 20 respond to command signals for moving the docking ring 18 between a stowed position in the space vehicle to a deployed position suitable for engagement with the docking ring 50. The devices 20 comprise means responsive to signals of sensed loadings to absorb impact energy and retraction means for drawing the coupled space vehicle and station into final docked configuration and moving the tunnel structure to a berthed position in the space vehicle 10. Latches 60 couple the space vehicle and space station upon contact of docking rings 18 and 50 and latches 41-48 establish a structural tie between the spacecraft when retracted.

  1. Docking system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A mechanism is disclosed for the docking of a spacecraft to a space station where a connection for transfer of personnel and equipment is desired. The invention comprises an active docking structure on a spacecraft and a passive docking structure on the station. The passive structure includes a docking ring mounted on a tunnel structure fixed to the space station. The active structure includes a docking ring carried by an actuator-attenuator devices, each attached at one end to the ring and at its other end in the spacecraft payload bay. The devices respond to command signals for moving the docking ring between a stowed position in the spacecraft to a deployed position suitable for engagement with the docking ring. The devices comprise means responsive to signals of sensed loadings to absorb impact energy and retraction means for drawing the coupled spacecraft and station into final docked configuration and moving the tunnel structure to a berthed position in the spacecraft. Latches couple the spacecraft and space station upon contact of the docking rings and latches establish a structural tie between the spacecraft when retracted.

  2. Use of fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting for isolation of Naked2-associated, basolaterally targeted exocytic vesicles for proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Li, Cunxi; Higginbotham, James N; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Tabb, David L; Graves-Deal, Ramona; Hill, Salisha; Cheek, Kristin; Jerome, W Gray; Lapierre, Lynne A; Goldenring, James R; Ham, Amy-Joan L; Coffey, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    By interacting with the cytoplasmic tail of a Golgi-processed form of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha), Naked2 coats TGFalpha-containing exocytic vesicles and directs them to the basolateral corner of polarized epithelial cells where the vesicles dock and fuse in a Naked2 myristoylation-dependent manner. These TGFalpha-containing Naked2-associated vesicles are not directed to the subapical Sec6/8 exocyst complex as has been reported for other basolateral cargo, and thus they appear to represent a distinct set of basolaterally targeted vesicles. To identify constituents of these vesicles, we exploited our finding that myristoylation-deficient Naked2 G2A vesicles are unable to fuse at the plasma membrane. Isolation of a population of myristoylation-deficient, green fluorescent protein-tagged G2A Naked2-associated vesicles was achieved by biochemical enrichment followed by flow cytometric fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting. The protein content of these plasma membrane de-enriched, flow-sorted fluorescent G2A Naked2 vesicles was determined by LC/LC-MS/MS analysis. Three independent isolations were performed, and 389 proteins were found in all three sets of G2A Naked2 vesicles. Rab10 and myosin IIA were identified as core machinery, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha1 was identified as an additional cargo within these vesicles. As an initial validation step, we confirmed their presence and that of three additional proteins tested (annexin A1, annexin A2, and IQGAP1) in wild-type Naked2 vesicles. To our knowledge, this is the first large scale protein characterization of a population of basolaterally targeted exocytic vesicles and supports the use of fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting as a useful tool for isolation of cellular organelles for comprehensive proteomics analysis. PMID:18504258

  3. Charting the Secretory Pathway in a Simple Eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    George Palade, a founding father of cell biology and of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), established the ultrastructural framework for an analysis of how proteins are secreted and membranes are assembled in eukaryotic cells. His vision inspired a generation of investigators to probe the molecular mechanisms of protein transport. My laboratory has dissected these pathways with complementary genetic and biochemical approaches. Peter Novick, one of my first graduate students, isolated secretion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and through cytological analysis of single and double mutants and molecular cloning of the corresponding SEC genes, we established that yeast cells use a secretory pathway fundamentally conserved in all eukaryotes. A biochemical reaction that recapitulates the first half of the secretory pathway was used to characterize Sec proteins that comprise the polypeptide translocation channel in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (Sec61) and the cytoplasmic coat protein complex (COPII) that captures cargo proteins into transport vesicles that bud from the ER. PMID:21079008

  4. Astrocytes as secretory cells of the central nervous system: idiosyncrasies of vesicular secretion.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Matteoli, Michela; Parpura, Vladimir; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Zorec, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes are housekeepers of the central nervous system (CNS) and are important for CNS development, homeostasis and defence. They communicate with neurones and other glial cells through the release of signalling molecules. Astrocytes secrete a wide array of classic neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and hormones, as well as metabolic, trophic and plastic factors, all of which contribute to the gliocrine system. The release of neuroactive substances from astrocytes occurs through several distinct pathways that include diffusion through plasmalemmal channels, translocation by multiple transporters and regulated exocytosis. As in other eukaryotic cells, exocytotic secretion from astrocytes involves divergent secretory organelles (synaptic-like microvesicles, dense-core vesicles, lysosomes, exosomes and ectosomes), which differ in size, origin, cargo, membrane composition, dynamics and functions. In this review, we summarize the features and functions of secretory organelles in astrocytes. We focus on the biogenesis and trafficking of secretory organelles and on the regulation of the exocytotic secretory system in the context of healthy and diseased astrocytes. PMID:26758544

  5. Dry Dock No. 3. View of head of Dry Dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry Dock No. 3. View of head of Dry Dock with stair to right of shot. View facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 3, On northern shoreline of shipyard, west of Dry Dock Nos. 1 & 2, near the intersection of Avenue G and Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Docking mechanism for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Gregory A. (Inventor); Mcmanamen, John P. (Inventor); Schliesing, John A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is presented for docking a space vehicle to a space station where a connecting tunnel for in-flight transfer of personnel is required. Cooperable coupling mechanisms include docking rings on the space vehicle and space station. The space station is provided with a tunnel structure, a retraction mechanism, and a docking ring. The vehicle coupling mechanism is designed to capture the station coupling mechanism, arrest relative spacecraft motions while limiting loads to acceptable levels, and then realign the spacecraft for final docking and tunnel interconnection. The docking ring of the space vehicle coupling mechanism is supported by linear attentuator actuator devices, each of which is controlled by a control system which receives loading information signals and attenuator stroke information signals from each device and supplies output signals for controlling its linear actuation to attenuate impact loading or to realign the spacecraft for final docking and tunnel interconnection. The retraction mechanism is used to draw the spacecraft together after initial contact and coupling. Tunnel trunnions, cooperative with the latches on the space vehicle constitute the primary structural tie between the spacecraft in final docked configuration.

  7. Engineered Asymmetric Synthetic Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic vesicles are small, fluid-filled spheres that are enclosed by a bilayer of lipid molecules. They can be used as models for investigating membrane biology and as delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals. In practice, it is difficult to simultaneously control membrane asymmetry, unilamellarity, vesicle size, vesicle-to-vesicle uniformity, and luminal content. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the bilayer is composed of different lipids, is of particular importance as it is a feature of most natural membranes. In this study, we leverage microfluidic technology to build asymmetric vesicles at high-throughput. We use the precise flow control offered by microfluidic devices to make highly uniform emulsions, with controlled internal content, that serve as templates to build the synthetic vesicles. Flow focusing, dielectrophoretic steering, and interfacial lipid self-assembly are critical procedures performed on-chip to produce the vesicles. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy are used to evaluate the vesicle characteristics.

  8. Final steps in exocytosis observed in a cell with giant secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Breckenridge, L J; Almers, W

    1987-01-01

    Secretion by single mast cells was studied in normal and beige mice, a mutant with grossly enlarged secretory vesicles or granules. During degranulation, the membrane capacitance increased in steps, as single secretory vesicles fused with the cell membrane. The average step size was 10 times larger in beige than in normal mice, in agreement with the different granule sizes measured microscopically in the two preparations. Following individual capacitance steps in beige mice, individual granules of the appropriate size were observed to swell rapidly. Capacitance steps are frequently followed by the stepwise loss of a fluorescent dye loaded into the vesicles. Stepwise capacitance increases were occasionally intermittent before they became permanent, indicating the existence of an early, reversible, and incomplete state of vesicle fusion. During such "capacitance flicker," loss of fluorescent dye from vesicles did not occur, suggesting that the earliest aqueous connection between vesicle interior and cell exterior is a narrow channel. Our results support the view that the reversible formation of such a channel, which we term the fusion pore, is an early step in exocytosis. Images PMID:3470768

  9. Spacecraft Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghofranian, Siamak (Inventor); Chuang, Li-Ping Christopher (Inventor); Motaghedi, Pejmun (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for docking a spacecraft. The apparatus comprises elongate members, movement systems, and force management systems. The elongate members are associated with a docking structure for a spacecraft. The movement systems are configured to move the elongate members axially such that the docking structure for the spacecraft moves. Each of the elongate members is configured to move independently. The force management systems connect the movement systems to the elongate members and are configured to limit a force applied by the each of the elongate members to a desired threshold during movement of the elongate members.

  10. Expedition 30 Docking

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Soyuz TMA-03M spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Don Pettit, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko and European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers docks to the International Space Station’s Rass...

  11. Munc13-1 acts as a priming factor for large dense-core vesicles in bovine chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri; Varoqueaux, Frederique; Voets, Thomas; Betz, Andrea; Thakur, Pratima; Koch, Henriette; Neher, Erwin; Brose, Nils; Rettig, Jens

    2000-01-01

    In chromaffin cells the number of large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) which can be released by brief, intense stimuli represents only a small fraction of the ‘morphologically docked’ vesicles at the plasma membrane. Recently, it was shown that Munc13-1 is essential for a post-docking step of synaptic vesicle fusion. To investigate the role of Munc13-1 in LDCV exocytosis, we overexpressed Munc13-1 in chromaffin cells and stimulated secretion by flash photolysis of caged calcium. Both components of the exocytotic burst, which represent the fusion of release-competent vesicles, were increased by a factor of three. The sustained component, which represents vesicle maturation and subsequent fusion, was increased by the same factor. The response to a second flash, however, was greatly reduced, indicating a depletion of release-competent vesicles. Since there was no apparent change in the number of docked vesicles, we conclude that Munc13-1 acts as a priming factor by accelerating the rate constant of vesicle transfer from a pool of docked, but unprimed vesicles to a pool of release-competent, primed vesicles. PMID:10899113

  12. Extracellular Vesicles as New Players in Cellular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Urbanelli, Lorena; Buratta, Sandra; Sagini, Krizia; Tancini, Brunella; Emiliani, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Cell senescence is associated with the secretion of many factors, the so-called "senescence-associated secretory phenotype", which may alter tissue microenvironment, stimulating the organism to clean up senescent cells and replace them with newly divided ones. Therefore, although no longer dividing, these cells are still metabolically active and influence the surrounding tissue. Much attention has been recently focused not only on soluble factors released by senescent cells, but also on extracellular vesicles as conveyors of senescence signals outside the cell. Here, we give an overview of the role of extracellular vesicles in biological processes and signaling pathways related to senescence and aging. PMID:27571072

  13. Imaging Exocytosis of Single Synaptic Vesicles at a Fast CNS Presynaptic Terminal.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic vesicles are tethered to the active zone where they are docked/primed so that they can fuse rapidly upon Ca(2+) influx. To directly study these steps at a CNS presynaptic terminal, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at the live isolated calyx of Held terminal and measured the movements of single synaptic vesicle just beneath the plasma membrane. Only a subset of vesicles within the TIRF field underwent exocytosis. Following exocytosis, new vesicles (newcomers) approached the membrane and refilled the release sites slowly with a time constant of several seconds. Uniform elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) using flash photolysis elicited an exocytotic burst followed by the sustained component, representing release of the readily releasable vesicles and vesicle replenishment, respectively. Surprisingly, newcomers were not released within a second of high Ca(2+). Instead, already-tethered vesicles became release-ready and mediated the replenishment. Our results reveal an important feature of conventional synapses. PMID:26539890

  14. Secretory end-feet, extracerebral cells, and cerebral sense organs in certain limicole oligochaete annelids.

    PubMed

    Golding, D W; Whittle, A C

    1975-01-01

    Secretory end-feet (or SEF) systems are present in Limnodrilus and Stylodrilus but are less highly organized than those of polychaetes. SEF contain secretory vesicles and abundant mitochondria. Typical neurosecretory terminals are not found within the brain although "neurosecretory" perikarya are present in all four species studied. In Limnodrilus, Stylodrilus and Enchytraeus extracerebral cells, of probable neurosecretory function, are invested by the pericapsular epithelium. Characteristically such cells bear several cilia. In these species and in Stylaria a pair of sensory cell groups is located anteriorly within the brain. These cells are ciliated but lack associated supporting cells. PMID:170709

  15. Secretory protein trafficking in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Adrian B; Marti, Matthias

    2004-07-01

    Early diverged extant organisms, which may serve as convenient laboratory models to look for and study evolutionary ancient features of eukaryotic cell biology, are rare. The diplomonad Giardia intestinalis, a protozoan parasite known to cause diarrhoeal disease, has become an increasingly popular object of basic research in cell biology, not least because of a genome sequencing project nearing completion. Commensurate with its phylogenetic status, the Giardia trophozoite has a very basic secretory system and even lacks hallmark structures such as a morphologically identifiable Golgi apparatus. The cell's capacity for protein sorting is nevertheless unimpeded, exemplified by its ability to cope with massive amounts of newly synthesized cyst wall proteins and glycans, which are sorted to dedicated Golgi-like compartments termed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs) generated from endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived transport intermediates. This soluble bulk cargo is kept strictly separate from constitutively transported variant surface proteins during export, a function that is dependent on the stage-specific recognition of trafficking signals. Encysting Giardia therefore provide a unique system for the study of unconventional, Golgi-independent protein trafficking mechanisms in the broader context of eukaryotic endomembrane organization and evolution. PMID:15225300

  16. The organization of the secretory machinery in chromaffin cells as a major factor in modeling exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, José; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina J.; Gil, Amparo; González-Vélez, Virginia; Segura, Javier; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    The organization of cytoplasm in excitable cells was a largely ignored factor when mathematical models were developed to understand intracellular calcium and secretory behavior. Here we employed a combination of fluorescent evanescent and transmitted light microscopy to explore the F-actin cytoskeletal organization in the vicinity of secretory sites in cultured bovine chromaffin cells. This technique and confocal fluorescent microscopy show chromaffin granules associated with the borders of cortical cytoskeletal cages forming an intricate tridimensional network. Furthermore, the overexpression of SNAP-25 in these cells also reveals the association of secretory machinery clusters with the borders of these cytoskeletal cages. The importance of these F-actin cage borders is stressed when granules appear to interact and remain associated during exocytosis visualized in acridin orange loaded vesicles. These results will prompt us to propose a model of cytoskeletal cages, where the secretory machinery is associated with its borders. Both the calcium level and the secretory response are enhanced in this geometrical arrangement when compared with a random distribution of the secretory machinery that is not restricted to the borders of the cage. PMID:20885775

  17. Productive Hemifusion Intermediates in Fast Vesicle Fusion Driven by Neuronal SNAREs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Wang, Tingting; Chapman, Edwin R.; Weisshaar, James C.

    2008-01-01

    An in vitro fusion assay uses fluorescence microscopy of labeled lipids to monitor single v-SNARE vesicle docking and fusion events on a planar lipid bilayer containing t-SNAREs. For vesicles and bilayer comprising phosphatidylcholine (POPC, 84–85% by mol) and phosphatidylserine (DOPS, 15% by mol), previous work demonstrated prompt, full fusion (τfus = 25 ms). Substitution of 20–60% phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) for phosphatidylcholine in the v-SNARE vesicle with either 0 or 20% DOPE included in the t-SNARE bilayer gives rise to hemifusion events. Labeled lipids diffuse into the planar bilayer as two temporally distinct waves, presumably hemifusion of the outer leaflet followed by inner leaflet (core) fusion. The fusion kinetics with DOPE is markedly heterogeneous. Some vesicle/docking site pairs exhibit prompt, full fusion while others exhibit hemifusion. Hemifusion events are roughly half productive (leading to subsequent core fusion within 20 s) and half dead-end. In qualitative accord with expectations from studies of protein-free vesicle-vesicle fusion, the hemifusion rate khemi is 15–20 times faster than the core fusion rate kcore, and the fraction of hemifusion events increases with increasing percentage of DOPE. This suggests similar underlying molecular pathways for protein-free and neuronal SNARE-driven fusion. Removal of phosphatidylserine from the v-SNARE vesicle has no effect on docking or fusion. PMID:17951297

  18. Smart tunnel: Docking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schliesing, John A. (Inventor); Edenborough, Kevin L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A docking mechanism is presented for the docking of a space vehicle to a space station comprising a flexible tunnel frame structure which is deployable from the space station. The tunnel structure comprises a plurality of series connected frame sections, one end section of which is attached to the space station and the other end attached to a docking module of a configuration adapted for docking in the payload bay of the space vehicle. The docking module is provided with trunnions, adapted for latching engagement with latches installed in the vehicle payload bay and with hatch means connectable to a hatch of the crew cabin of the space vehicle. Each frame section comprises a pair of spaced ring members, interconnected by actuator-attenuator devices which are individually controllable by an automatic control means to impart relative movement of one ring member to the other in six degrees of freedom of motion. The control means includes computer logic responsive to sensor signals of range and attitude information, capture latch condition, structural loads, and actuator stroke for generating commands to the onboard flight control system and the individual actuator-attenuators to deploy the tunnel to effect a coupling with the space vehicle and space station after coupling. A tubular fluid-impervious liner, preferably fabric, is disposed through the frame sections of a size sufficient to accommodate the passage of personnel and cargo.

  19. Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mobility of vesicles capturing anti-VGLUT1 antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stenovec, Matjaz Kreft, Marko Grilc, Sonja Potokar, Maja Kreft, Mateja Erdani Pangrsic, Tina Zorec, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Several aspects of secretory vesicle cycle have been studied in the past, but vesicle trafficking in relation to the fusion site is less well understood. In particular, the mobility of recaptured vesicles that traffic back toward the central cytoplasm is still poorly defined. We exposed astrocytes to antibodies against the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), a marker of glutamatergic vesicles, to fluorescently label vesicles undergoing Ca{sup 2+}-dependent exocytosis and examined their number, fluorescence intensity, and mobility by confocal microscopy. In nonstimulated cells, immunolabeling revealed discrete fluorescent puncta, indicating that VGLUT1 vesicles, which are approximately 50 nm in diameter, cycle slowly between the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm. When the cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} level was raised with ionomycin, the number and fluorescence intensity of the puncta increased, likely because the VGLUT1 epitopes were more accessible to the extracellularly applied antibodies following Ca{sup 2+}-triggered exocytosis. In nonstimulated cells, the mobility of labeled vesicles was limited. In stimulated cells, many vesicles exhibited directional mobility that was abolished by cytoskeleton-disrupting agents, indicating dependence on intact cytoskeleton. Our findings show that postfusion vesicle mobility is regulated and may likely play a role in synaptic vesicle cycle, and also more generally in the genesis and removal of endocytic vesicles.

  20. The key target of neuroprotection after the onset of ischemic stroke: secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-hua; Tian, Xiang-rong; Hu, Zhi-ping

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms of cytoplasmic Ca2+ after myocardial infarction-induced Ca2+ overload involve secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase 1 and the Golgi apparatus and are well understood. However, the effect of Golgi apparatus on Ca2+ overload after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion remains unclear. Four-vessel occlusion rats were used as animal models of cerebral ischemia. The expression of secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase 1 in the cortex and hippocampus was detected by immunoblotting, and Ca2+ concentrations in the cytoplasm and Golgi vesicles were determined. Results showed an overload of cytoplasmic Ca2+ during ischemia and reperfusion that reached a peak after reperfusion. Levels of Golgi Ca2+ showed an opposite effect. The expression of Golgi-specific secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase 1 in the cortex and hippocampus decreased before ischemia and reperfusion, and increased after reperfusion for 6 hours. This variation was similar to the alteration of calcium in separated Golgi vesicles. These results indicate that the Golgi apparatus participates in the formation and alleviation of calcium overload, and that secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase 1 tightly responds to ischemia and reperfusion in nerve cells. Thus, we concluded that secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase 1 plays an essential role in cytosolic calcium regulation and its expression can be used as a marker of Golgi stress, responding to cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. The secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPase 1 can be an important neuroprotective target of ischemic stroke. PMID:26487855

  1. Autonomous docking ground demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Steve L.; Le, Thomas Quan; Othon, L. T.; Prather, Joseph L.; Eick, Richard E.; Baxter, Jim M.; Boyd, M. G.; Clark, Fred D.; Spehar, Peter T.; Teters, Rebecca T.

    1991-01-01

    The Autonomous Docking Ground Demonstration is an evaluation of the laser sensor system to support the docking phase (12 ft to contact) when operated in conjunction with the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) software. The docking mechanism being used was developed for the Apollo/Soyuz Test Program. This demonstration will be conducted using the 6-DOF Dynamic Test System (DTS). The DTS simulates the Space Station Freedom as the stationary or target vehicle and the Orbiter as the active or chase vehicle. For this demonstration, the laser sensor will be mounted on the target vehicle and the retroflectors will be on the chase vehicle. This arrangement was chosen to prevent potential damage to the laser. The laser sensor system, GN&C, and 6-DOF DTS will be operated closed-loop. Initial conditions to simulate vehicle misalignments, translational and rotational, will be introduced within the constraints of the systems involved.

  2. Proteolysis in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.E.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    Many secretory proteins are degraded intracellularly rather than secreted, however the location of this catabolic process is not known. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the degradation occurs in the organelles of the secretory pathway. Slices of rat liver were incubated with (/sup 14/C)leucine for 3 h and then incubated under chase conditions for 30 min. The tissue was homogenized and the Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The organelles were incubated in 0.3M sucrose-50 mM citrate (pH 4) for 8-12 h at 37 C; control samples were incubated at 4 C. Percent degradation was calculated as the amount of acid soluble radioactivity released relative to total radioactivity in the sample. Proteolysis in the organelles incubated at 37 C was as follows: Golgi: 15-25%; sER: 10-20%; rER: 10-20%. Proteolysis at 4 C was negligible in all cases. These results support the hypothesis that the compartments of the secretory pathway are capable of degrading newly synthesized secretory proteins.

  3. 9. Southeast end, dock no. 492. Dock no. 493 in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Southeast end, dock no. 492. Dock no. 493 in background. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  4. Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 and 5. Floor plans (Navy Yard Public Works Office 1941). In files of Cushman & Wakefield, building 501. Philadelphia Naval Business Center. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Service Building, Dry Docks No. 4 & 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. Suitlock Docking Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Philip, Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An environmental protective suit used for hazardous clean-up or space applications includes a suitlock docking mechanism that allows for easy egress and ingress of a crew member between a sealed vessel and a possibly contaminated environment. The suitlock docking mechanism comprises a single actuator that controls latches which, in turn, respectfully control rack and pinion assemblies that allow for easy removal and attachment of a life support equipment enclosure shell to the environmental protective suit or to the vehicle from which the operator performs his/her duties.

  6. Secretory Pathway of Trypanosomatid Parasites

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Malcolm J.; Mullin, Kylie A.; Ilgoutz, Steven C.; Teasdale, Rohan D.

    2002-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae comprise a large group of parasitic protozoa, some of which cause important diseases in humans. These include Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness and nagana in cattle), Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas' disease in Central and South America), and Leishmania spp. (the causative agent of visceral and [muco]cutaneous leishmaniasis throughout the tropics and subtropics). The cell surfaces of these parasites are covered in complex protein- or carbohydrate-rich coats that are required for parasite survival and infectivity in their respective insect vectors and mammalian hosts. These molecules are assembled in the secretory pathway. Recent advances in the genetic manipulation of these parasites as well as progress with the parasite genome projects has greatly advanced our understanding of processes that underlie secretory transport in trypanosomatids. This article provides an overview of the organization of the trypanosomatid secretory pathway and connections that exist with endocytic organelles and multiple lytic and storage vacuoles. A number of the molecular components that are required for vesicular transport have been identified, as have some of the sorting signals that direct proteins to the cell surface or organelles in the endosome-vacuole system. Finally, the subcellular organization of the major glycosylation pathways in these parasites is reviewed. Studies on these highly divergent eukaryotes provide important insights into the molecular processes underlying secretory transport that arose very early in eukaryotic evolution. They also reveal unusual or novel aspects of secretory transport and protein glycosylation that may be exploited in developing new antiparasite drugs. PMID:11875130

  7. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T.; Baeck, Nils; Andersson, Leif C.

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  8. Cholinergic synaptic vesicle heterogeneity: evidence for regulation of acetylcholine transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gracz, L.M.; Wang, W.; Parsons, S.M.

    1988-07-12

    Crude cholinergic synaptic vesicles from a homogenate of the electric organ of Torpedo californica were centrifuged to equilibrium in an isosmotic sucrose density gradient. The classical VP/sub 1/ synaptic vesicles banding at 1.055 g/mL actively transported (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (AcCh). An organelle banding at about 1.071 g/mL transported even more (/sup 3/H)AcCh. Transport by both organelles was inhibited by the known AcCh storage blockers trans-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (vesamicol, formerly AH5183) and nigericin. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the denser organelle was slightly smaller as shown by size-exclusion chromatography. It is concluded that the denser organelle corresponds to the recycling VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicle originally described in intact Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The properties of the receptor for vesamicol were studied by measuring binding of (/sup 3/H)vesamicol, and the amount of SV2 antigen characteristic of secretory vesicles was assayed with a monoclonal antibody directed against it. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the VP/sub 2/ vesicles had a ratio of (/sup 3/H)AcCh transport activity to vesamicol receptor concentration that typically was 4-7-fold higher, whereas the ratio of SV2 antigen concentration to vesamicol receptor concentration was about 2-fold higher. The Hill coefficients ..cap alpha../sub H/ and equilibrium dissociation constants K for vesamicol binding to VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ vesicles were essentially the same. The positive Hill coefficient suggests that the vesamicol receptor exists as a homotropic oligomeric complex. The results demonstrate that VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicles exhibit functional differences in the AcCh transport system, presumably as a result of regulatory phenomena.

  9. The native structure of cytoplasmic dynein at work translocating vesicles in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaki; Aihara, Marilynn S; Allen, Richard D; Fok, Agnes K

    2011-01-01

    In Paramecium multimicronucleatum, the discoidal vesicles, the acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles are involved in phagosome formation, phagosome acidification and endosomal processing, respectively. Numerous cross bridges link these vesicles to the kinetic side of the microtubules of a cytopharyngeal microtubular ribbon. Vesicles are translocated along these ribbons in a minus-end direction towards the cytopharynx. A monoclonal antibody specific for the light vanadate-photocleaved fragment of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein was used to show that this dynein is located between the discoidal vesicles and the ribbons as well as on the cytosolic surface of the acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles. This antibody inhibited the docking of the vesicles to the microtubular ribbons so that the transport of discoidal vesicles and acidosomes were reduced by 60% and 70%, respectively. It had little effect on the dynein's velocity of translocation. These results show that cytoplasmic dynein is the motor for vesicle translocation and its location, between the vesicles and the ribbons, indicates that the cross bridges seen at this location in thin sections and in quick-frozen, deep-etched replicas are apparently the working dyneins. Such a working dynein cross bridge, as preserved by ultra-rapid freezing, is 54 nm long and has two legs arising from a globular head that appears to be firmly bound to its cargo vesicle and each leg consists of ≥3 beaded subunits with the last subunit making contact with the microtubular ribbon. PMID:20837374

  10. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  11. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  12. Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurons in the Hippocampus Exhibit Molecularly Distinct Large Dense Core Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Franco, José J.; Munoz-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Luján, Rafael; Jurado, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal interneurons comprise a diverse family of inhibitory neurons that are critical for detailed information processing. Along with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), interneurons secrete a myriad of neuroactive substances via secretory vesicles but the molecular composition and regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we have carried out an immunohistofluorescence analysis to describe the molecular content of vesicles in distinct populations of hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that phogrin, an integral protein of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells, is highly enriched in parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Consistently, immunoelectron microscopy revealed phogrin staining in axon terminals of symmetrical synapses establishing inhibitory contacts with cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, phogrin is highly expressed in CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) interneurons which are both positive for PV and neuropeptide Y. Surprisingly, chromogranin B a canonical large dense core vesicle marker, is excluded from inhibitory cells in the hippocampus but highly expressed in excitatory CA3 pyramidal neurons and DG granule cells. Our results provide the first evidence of phogrin expression in hippocampal interneurons and suggest the existence of molecularly distinct populations of secretory vesicles in different types of inhibitory neurons.

  13. Vesicle trafficking via the Spitzenkörper during hyphal tip growth in Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Dijksterhuis, Jan; Molenaar, Douwe

    2013-04-01

    Growing hyphae of Rhizoctonia solani were stained with the endocytic marker dye FM4-64 and imaged by confocal microscopy. Staining of the plasma membrane was followed by labeling of organelles in the cytoplasm (after ~1 min) and of the Spitzenkörper (Spk; after ~2 min). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of the stained Spk demonstrated the vectorial flow of secretory vesicles from the apical cytoplasm to the Spk. This flux was modelled in a two-compartment model. The turnover time of the vesicles of the Spk was estimated to be 1.3-2.5 min. These results are roughly consistent with the expected flux of vesicles through the Spk based on the number of secretory vesicles within the Spk and the number of secretory vesicles that would be necessary to fuse with the apical plasma membrane to maintain hyphal extension rates. These results suggest that membrane retrieval via endocytosis is not as significant as previously suggested. PMID:23334442

  14. Isolation of Functional Golgi-derived Vesicles with a Possible Role in Retrograde Transport

    PubMed Central

    Love, Harold D.; Lin, Chung-Chih; Short, Craig S.; Ostermann, Joachim

    1998-01-01

    Secretory proteins enter the Golgi apparatus when transport vesicles fuse with the cis-side and exit in transport vesicles budding from the trans-side. Resident Golgi enzymes that have been transported in the cis-to-trans direction with the secretory flow must be recycled constantly by retrograde transport in the opposite direction. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of Golgi-derived transport vesicles that were isolated from tissue culture cells. We found that under the steady-state conditions of a living cell, a fraction of resident Golgi enzymes was found in vesicles that could be separated from cisternal membranes. These vesicles appeared to be depleted of secretory cargo. They were capable of binding to and fusion with isolated Golgi membranes, and after fusion their enzymatic contents most efficiently processed cargo that had just entered the Golgi apparatus. Those results indicate a possible role for these structures in recycling of Golgi enzymes in the Golgi stack. PMID:9456315

  15. Magnetic docking aid for orbiter to ISS docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C.; Nagy, Kornel; Schliesing, John A.

    1996-01-01

    The present docking system for the Orbiter uses mechanical capture latches that are actuated by contact forces. The forces are generated when the two approaching masses collide at the docking mechanism. There is always a trade-off between having high enough momentum to effect capture and low enough momentum to avoid structural overload or unacceptable angular displacements. The use of the present docking system includes a contact thrusting maneuver that causes high docking loads to be included into Space Station. A magnetic docking aid has been developed to reduce the load s during docking. The magnetic docking aid is comprised of two extendible booms that are attached adjacent to the docking structure with electromagnets attached on the end of the boom. On the mating vehicle, two steel plates are attached. As the Orbiter approaches Space Station, the booms are extended, and the magnets attach to the actuated (without thrusting), by slowly driving the extendible booms to the stowed position, thus reacting the load into the booms. This results in a docking event that has lower loads induced into Space Station structure. This method also greatly simplifies the Station berthing tasks, since the Shuttle Remote Manipulation System (SRMS) arm need only place the element to be berthed on the magnets (no load required), rather than firing the Reaction Control System (RCS) jets to provide the required force for capture latch actuation. The Magnetic Docking Aid was development testing on a six degree-of-freedom (6 DOF) system at JSC.

  16. Gamma-COP, a coat subunit of non-clathrin-coated vesicles with homology to Sec21p.

    PubMed

    Stenbeck, G; Schreiner, R; Herrmann, D; Auerbach, S; Lottspeich, F; Rothman, J E; Wieland, F T

    1992-12-14

    Constitutive secretory transport in eukaryotes is likely to be mediated by non-clathrin-coated vesicles, which have been isolated and characterized [(1989) Cell 58, 329-336; (1991) Nature 349, 215-220]. They contain a set of coat proteins (COPs) which are also likely to exist in a preformed cytosolic complex named coatomer [(1991) Nature 349, 248-250]. From peptide sequence and cDNA structure comparisons evidence is presented that one of the subunits of coatomer, gamma-COP, is a true constituent of non-clathrin-coated vesicles, and that gamma-COP is related to sec 21, a secretory mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae. PMID:1360908

  17. Immunocytochemical Evidence for Golgi Vesicle Involvement in Milk Fat Globule Secretion.

    PubMed

    Wooding, F B Peter; Sargeant, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    The exact mechanism of secretion of the milk fat globule (MFG) from the mammary secretory cell is still controversial. We have previously suggested close involvement of Golgi vesicles in this process. This paper provides direct immunocytochemical evidence that butyrophilin is present in the Golgi stack and vesicles in ovine and caprine mammary glands. We suggest that it is the butyrophilin in the Golgi vesicle membrane that forms the specific association with the adipophilin on the lipid surface in the cytoplasm. Exocytosis of the associated Golgi vesicle will then initiate the process of MFG secretion. Further exocytosis of associated Golgi vesicles will continue and complete the process. Areas of the plasmalemma that have butyrophilin delivered by previous non-lipid associated Golgi exocytoses may also contribute to the process of forming the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). PMID:26374828

  18. Myosin Vc Is Specialized for Transport on a Secretory Superhighway.

    PubMed

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Krementsova, Elena B; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2016-08-22

    A hallmark of the well-studied vertebrate class Va myosin is its ability to take multiple steps on actin as a single molecule without dissociating, a feature called "processivity." Therefore, it was surprising when kinetic and single-molecule assays showed that human myosin Vc (MyoVc) was not processive on single-actin filaments [1-3]. We explored the possibility that MyoVc is processive only under conditions that resemble its biological context. Recently, it was shown that zymogen vesicles are transported on actin "superhighways" composed of parallel actin cables nucleated by formins from the plasma membrane [4]. Loss of these cables compromises orderly apical targeting of vesicles. MyoVc has been implicated in transporting secretory vesicles to the apical membrane [5]. We hypothesized that actin cables regulate the processive properties of MyoVc. We show that MyoVc is unique in taking variable size steps, which are frequently in the backward direction. Results obtained with chimeric constructs implicate the lever arm/rod of MyoVc as being responsible for these properties. Actin bundles allow single MyoVc motors to move processively. Remarkably, even teams of MyoVc motors require actin bundles to move continuously at physiological ionic strength. The irregular stepping pattern of MyoVc, which may result from flexibility in the lever arm/rod of MyoVc, appears to be a unique structural adaptation that allows the actin track to spatially restrict the activity of MyoVc to specialized actin cables in order to co-ordinate and target the final stages of vesicle secretion. PMID:27498562

  19. Beta cells transfer vesicles containing insulin to phagocytes for presentation to T cells.

    PubMed

    Vomund, Anthony N; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Hughes, Jing; Calderon, Boris; Valderrama, Carolina; Ferris, Stephen T; Wan, Xiaoxiao; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Carrero, Javier A; Urano, Fumihiko; Unanue, Emil R

    2015-10-01

    Beta cells from nondiabetic mice transfer secretory vesicles to phagocytic cells. The passage was shown in culture studies where the transfer was probed with CD4 T cells reactive to insulin peptides. Two sets of vesicles were transferred, one containing insulin and another containing catabolites of insulin. The passage required live beta cells in a close cell contact interaction with the phagocytes. It was increased by high glucose concentration and required mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Live images of beta cell-phagocyte interactions documented the intimacy of the membrane contact and the passage of the granules. The passage was found in beta cells isolated from islets of young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and nondiabetic mice as well as from nondiabetic humans. Ultrastructural analysis showed intraislet phagocytes containing vesicles having the distinct morphology of dense-core granules. These findings document a process whereby the contents of secretory granules become available to the immune system. PMID:26324934

  20. Beta cells transfer vesicles containing insulin to phagocytes for presentation to T cells

    PubMed Central

    Vomund, Anthony N.; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Hughes, Jing; Calderon, Boris; Valderrama, Carolina; Ferris, Stephen T.; Wan, Xiaoxiao; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Carrero, Javier A.; Urano, Fumihiko; Unanue, Emil R.

    2015-01-01

    Beta cells from nondiabetic mice transfer secretory vesicles to phagocytic cells. The passage was shown in culture studies where the transfer was probed with CD4 T cells reactive to insulin peptides. Two sets of vesicles were transferred, one containing insulin and another containing catabolites of insulin. The passage required live beta cells in a close cell contact interaction with the phagocytes. It was increased by high glucose concentration and required mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Live images of beta cell–phagocyte interactions documented the intimacy of the membrane contact and the passage of the granules. The passage was found in beta cells isolated from islets of young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and nondiabetic mice as well as from nondiabetic humans. Ultrastructural analysis showed intraislet phagocytes containing vesicles having the distinct morphology of dense-core granules. These findings document a process whereby the contents of secretory granules become available to the immune system. PMID:26324934

  1. Bacterial Vesicle Secretion and the Evolutionary Origin of the Eukaryotic Endomembrane System.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sven B; Garg, Sriram G; Martin, William F

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotes possess an elaborate endomembrane system with endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus, Golgi, lysosomes, peroxisomes, autophagosomes, and dynamic vesicle traffic. Theories addressing the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic endomembranes have overlooked the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that bacteria, archaea, and mitochondria secrete into their surroundings. We propose that the eukaryotic endomembrane system originated from bacterial OMVs released by the mitochondrial ancestor within the cytosol of its archaeal host at eukaryote origin. Confined within the host's cytosol, OMVs accumulated naturally, fusing either with each other or with the host's plasma membrane. This matched the host's archaeal secretory pathway for cotranslational protein insertion with outward bound mitochondrial-derived vesicles consisting of bacterial lipids, forging a primordial, secretory endoplasmic reticulum as the cornerstone of the eukaryotic endomembrane system. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27040918

  2. Intermembrane Docking Reactions Are Regulated by Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Kunding, Andreas H.; Mortensen, Michael W.; Christensen, Sune M.; Bhatia, Vikram K.; Makarov, Ivan; Metzler, Ralf; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    The polymorphism of eukaryotic cellular membranes is a tightly regulated and well-conserved phenotype. Recent data have revealed important regulatory roles of membrane curvature on the spatio-temporal localization of proteins and in membrane fusion. Here we quantified the influence of membrane curvature on the efficiency of intermembrane docking reactions. Using fluorescence microscopy, we monitored the docking of single vesicle–vesicle pairs of different diameter (30–200 nm) and therefore curvature, as mediated by neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and streptavidin-biotin. Surprisingly, the intermembrane docking efficiency exhibited an ∼30–60 fold enhancement as a function of curvature. In comparison, synaptotagmin and calcium accelerate SNARE-mediated fusion in vitro by a factor of 2–10. To explain this finding, we formulated a biophysical model. On the basis of our findings, we propose that membrane curvature can regulate intermembrane tethering reactions and consequently any downstream process, including the fusion of vesicles and possibly viruses with their target membranes. PMID:22261058

  3. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P.; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N.; Bayer, K. Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J.; Klip, Amira

    2012-01-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding–deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  4. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N; Bayer, K Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira

    2012-10-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding-deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  5. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta

    PubMed Central

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B.; Buck, Amy H.; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F.; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J.; Whitelaw, C. Bruce A.; Knox, David P.; McNeilly, Tom N.

    2016-01-01

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. PMID:27084478

  6. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    PubMed

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Buck, Amy H; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Knox, David P; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-05-15

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. PMID:27084478

  7. Space tug automatic docking control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, J.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the space tug automatic docking control capabilities. The subjects considered are: (1) docking sensor requirements, (2) the influence of the docking mechanism, and (3) the implications and effects of a docking abort. A digital computer simulation, was developed which included the primary aspects of the docking maneuver.

  8. Combined docking and grasping device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Johnston, J. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A combined docking and grasping device for use with a manipulator arm on a docking vehicle and the like for mechanically connecting a docking vehicle with an orbital payload having a receptacle for receiving the device is described. The device includes a pair of opposing jaw members having opposing serrated surfaces for grasping an object and a triangular cam portion on an outer surface for insertion and interlocking with an orbital payload.

  9. PC12 Cells that Lack Synaptotagmin I Exhibit Loss of a Subpool of Small Dense Core Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert D.; Harkins, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons communicate by releasing neurotransmitters that are stored in intracellular vesicular compartments. PC12 cells are frequently used as a model secretory cell line that is described to have two subpools of vesicles: small clear vesicles and dense core vesicles. We measured transmitter molecules released from vesicles in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells using carbon-fiber amperometry, and relative diameters of individual vesicles using electron microscopy. Both amperometry and electron micrograph data were analyzed by statistical and machine learning methods for Gaussian mixture models. An electron microscopy size correction algorithm was used to predict and correct for observation bias of vesicle size due to tangential slices through some vesicles. Expectation maximization algorithms were used to perform maximum likelihood estimation for the Gaussian parameters of different populations of vesicles, and were shown to be better than histogram and cumulative distribution function methods for analyzing mixed populations. The Bayesian information criterion was used to determine the most likely number of vesicle subpools observed in the amperometric and electron microscopy data. From this analysis, we show that there are three major subpools, not two, of vesicles stored and released from PC12 cells. The three subpools of vesicles include small clear vesicles and two subpools of dense core vesicles, a small and a large dense core vesicle subpool. Using PC12 cells stably transfected with short-hairpin RNA targeted to synaptotagmin I, an exocytotic Ca2+ sensor, we show that the presence and release of the small dense core vesicle subpool is dependent on synaptotagmin I. Furthermore, synaptotagmin I also plays a role in the formation and/or maintenance of the small dense core vesicle subpool in PC12 cells. PMID:25517150

  10. Spacecraft capture and docking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Kinyuen (Inventor); Rafeek, Shaheed (Inventor); Myrick, Thomas (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system for capturing and docking an active craft to a passive craft has a first docking assembly on the active craft with a first contact member and a spike projecting outwardly, a second docking assembly on the passive craft having a second contact member and a flexible net deployed over a target area with an open mesh for capturing the end of the spike of the active craft, and a motorized net drive for reeling in the net and active craft to mate with the passive craft's docking assembly. The spike has extendable tabs to allow it to become engaged with the net. The net's center is coupled to a net spool for reeling in. An alignment funnel has inclined walls to guide the net and captured spike towards the net spool. The passive craft's docking assembly includes circumferentially spaced preload wedges which are driven to lock the wedges against the contact member of the active craft. The active craft's docking assembly includes a rotary table and drive for rotating it to a predetermined angular alignment position, and mating connectors are then engaged with each other. The system may be used for docking spacecraft in zero or low-gravity environments, as well as for docking underwater vehicles, docking of ancillary craft to a mother craft in subsonic flight, in-flight refueling systems, etc.

  11. Improved signaling as a result of randomness in synaptic vesicle release

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Calvin; Peskin, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The probabilistic nature of neurotransmitter release in synapses is believed to be one of the most significant sources of noise in the central nervous system. We show how p0, the probability of release per docked vesicle when an action potential arrives, affects the dynamics of the rate of vesicle release in response to changes in the rate of arrival of action potentials. Furthermore, we examine the theoretical capability of a synapse in the estimation of desired signals using information from the stochastic vesicle release events under the framework of optimal linear filter theory. We find that a small p0, such as 0.1, reduces the error in the reconstruction of the input, or in the reconstruction of the time derivative of the input, from the time series of vesicle release events. Our results imply that the probabilistic nature of synaptic vesicle release plays a direct functional role in synaptic transmission. PMID:26627245

  12. RhoGTPase-binding proteins, the exocyst complex and polarized vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity, the asymmetric distribution of proteins and lipids, is essential for a variety of cellular functions. One mechanism orchestrating cell polarity is polarized vesicle trafficking; whereby cargo loaded secretory vesicles are specifically transported to predetermined areas of the cell. The evolutionarily conserved exocyst complex and its small GTPase regulators play crucial roles in spatiotemporal control of polarized vesicle trafficking. In studies on neuronal membrane remodeling and synaptic plasticity, conserved mechanisms of exocyst regulation and cargo recycling during polarized vesicle trafficking are beginning to emerge as well. Recently, our lab demonstrated that RhoGTPase-binding proteins in both yeast (Bem3) and mammals (Ocrl1) are also required for the efficient traffic of secretory vesicles to sites of polarized growth and signaling. Together with our studies, we highlight the evolutionary conservation of the basic elements essential for polarized vesicle traffic across different cellular functions and model systems. In conclusion, we emphasize that studies on RhoGTPase-binding proteins in these processes should be included in the next level of investigation, for a more complete understanding of their hitherto unknown roles in polarized membrane traffic and exocyst regulation. PMID:24691289

  13. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ting-Cheng; Max, Nelson L.; Ding, Jinhui; Bethel, E. Wes; Crivelli, Silvia N.

    2005-04-24

    Given two independently determined molecular structures, the molecular docking problem predicts the bound association, or best fit between them, while allowing for conformational changes of the individual molecules during construction of a molecular complex. Docking Shop is an integrated environment that permits interactive molecular docking by navigating a ligand or protein to an estimated binding site of a receptor with real-time graphical feedback of scoring factors as visual guides. Our program can be used to create initial configurations for a protein docking prediction process. Its output--the structure of aprotein-ligand or protein-protein complex--may serve as an input for aprotein docking algorithm, or an optimization process. This tool provides molecular graphics interfaces for structure modeling, interactive manipulation, navigation, optimization, and dynamic visualization to aid users steer the prediction process using their biological knowledge.

  14. How the stimulus defines the dynamics of vesicle pool recruitment, fusion mode, and vesicle recycling in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-06-01

    The pattern of stimulation defines important characteristics of the secretory process in neurons and neuroendocrine cells, including the pool of secretory vesicles being recruited, the type and amount of transmitters released, the mode of membrane retrieval, and the mechanisms associated with vesicle replenishment. This review analyzes the mechanisms that regulate these processes in chromaffin cells, as well as in other neuroendocrine and neuronal models. A common factor in these mechanisms is the spatial and temporal distribution of the Ca(2+) signal generated during cell stimulation. For instance, neurosecretory cells and neurons have pools of vesicles with different locations with respect to Ca(2+) channels, and those pools are therefore differentially recruited following different patterns of stimulation. In this regard, a brief stimulus will induce the exocytosis of a small pool of vesicles that is highly coupled to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, whereas longer or more intense stimulation will provoke a global Ca(2+) increase, promoting exocytosis irrespective of vesicle location. The pattern of stimulation, and therefore the characteristics of the Ca(2+) signal generated by the stimulus also influence the mode of exocytosis and the type of endocytosis. Indeed, low-frequency stimulation favors kiss-and-run exocytosis and clathrin-independent fast endocytosis, whereas higher frequencies promote full fusion and clathrin-dependent endocytosis. This latter type of endocytosis is accelerated at high-frequency stimulation. Synaptotagmins, calcineurin, dynamin, complexin, and actin remodeling, appear to be involved in the mechanisms that determine the response of these processes to Ca(2+) . In chromaffin cells, a brief stimulus induces the exocytosis of a small pool of vesicles that is highly coupled to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (A), whereas longer or high-frequency stimulation provokes a global Ca(2+) increase, promoting exocytosis irrespective of

  15. A single vesicle-vesicle fusion assay for in vitro studies of SNAREs and accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiajie; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Lee, Hanki; Joo, Chirlmin; Su, Zengliu; Syed, Salman; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Young; Ha, Taekjip

    2012-05-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are a highly regulated class of membrane proteins that drive the efficient merger of two distinct lipid bilayers into one interconnected structure. This protocol describes our fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based single vesicle-vesicle fusion assays for SNAREs and accessory proteins. Both lipid-mixing (with FRET pairs acting as lipophilic dyes in the membranes) and content-mixing assays (with FRET pairs present on a DNA hairpin that becomes linear via hybridization to a complementary DNA) are described. These assays can be used to detect substages such as docking, hemifusion, and pore expansion and full fusion. The details of flow cell preparation, protein-reconstituted vesicle preparation, data acquisition and analysis are described. These assays can be used to study the roles of various SNARE proteins, accessory proteins and effects of different lipid compositions on specific fusion steps. The total time required to finish one round of this protocol is 3–6 d. PMID:22582418

  16. A single vesicle-vesicle fusion assay for in vitro studies of SNAREs and accessory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jiajie; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Lee, Hanki; Joo, Chirlmin; Su, Zengliu; Syed, Salman; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Young; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are a highly regulated class of membrane proteins that drive the efficient merger of two distinct lipid bilayers into one interconnected structure. This protocol describes our fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based single vesicle-vesicle fusion assays for SNAREs and accessory proteins. Both lipid-mixing (with FRET pairs acting as lipophilic dyes in the membranes) and content-mixing assays (with FRET pairs present on a DNA hairpin that becomes linear via hybridization to a complementary DNA) are described. These assays can be used to detect substages such as docking, hemifusion, and pore expansion and full fusion. The details of flow cell preparation, protein-reconstituted vesicle preparation, data acquisition and analysis are described. These assays can be used to study the roles of various SNARE proteins, accessory proteins and effects of different lipid compositions on specific fusion steps. The total time required to finish one round of this protocol is 3–6 d. PMID:22582418

  17. Electrohydrodynamics Of Multicomponent Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gera, Prerna; Salac, David

    2015-11-01

    The addition of cholesterol into a lipid membrane induces the formation of distinct domains. These domains try to minimize the overall energy of the system by coalescence and migration. The application of electric fields will induce flow of these membrane domains and influence the rate at which they coarsen. In this work the electrohydrodynamics of multicomponent vesicles is numerically modelled. The method uses a Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model of the lipid domains restricted to a deforming three-dimensional vesicle and will be briefly discussed. Sample results will be presented and compared to experimental observations. This work supported by NSF Grant #1253739.

  18. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Pacheco-Yépez, Judith; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA) or polymeric IgA (pIgA) and the secretory component (SC), a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models) on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation. PMID:24348350

  19. DOCK 6: Impact of new features and current docking performance.

    PubMed

    Allen, William J; Balius, Trent E; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Brozell, Scott R; Moustakas, Demetri T; Lang, P Therese; Case, David A; Kuntz, Irwin D; Rizzo, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    This manuscript presents the latest algorithmic and methodological developments to the structure-based design program DOCK 6.7 focused on an updated internal energy function, new anchor selection control, enhanced minimization options, a footprint similarity scoring function, a symmetry-corrected root-mean-square deviation algorithm, a database filter, and docking forensic tools. An important strategy during development involved use of three orthogonal metrics for assessment and validation: pose reproduction over a large database of 1043 protein-ligand complexes (SB2012 test set), cross-docking to 24 drug-target protein families, and database enrichment using large active and decoy datasets (Directory of Useful Decoys [DUD]-E test set) for five important proteins including HIV protease and IGF-1R. Relative to earlier versions, a key outcome of the work is a significant increase in pose reproduction success in going from DOCK 4.0.2 (51.4%) → 5.4 (65.2%) → 6.7 (73.3%) as a result of significant decreases in failure arising from both sampling 24.1% → 13.6% → 9.1% and scoring 24.4% → 21.1% → 17.5%. Companion cross-docking and enrichment studies with the new version highlight other strengths and remaining areas for improvement, especially for systems containing metal ions. The source code for DOCK 6.7 is available for download and free for academic users at http://dock.compbio.ucsf.edu/. PMID:25914306

  20. Electron microscopic observations on the epithelium of ram seminal vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Plöen, L

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the secretory cells of the ram seminal vesicle was studied on material fixed by immersion or by vascular perfusion. The signs of apocrine secretion seen after immersion fixation did not appear after perfusion fixation and are therefore interpreted as artefacts. Instead, vacuoles with a granule in them were seen. Such vacuoles were observed in the Golgi apparatus and in the apical cytoplasm. Further indications of merocrine secretion were also found. It therefore appears that protein secretion in the ram seminal vesicle follows the typical pattern of serous glands. The possibility that fructose is extruded with the protein as the vacuoles open at the luminal cell surface is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7410195

  1. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  2. Modulation of endomembranes morphodynamics in the secretory/retrograde pathways depends on lipid diversity.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Yohann; Moreau, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Membrane lipids are crucial bricks for cell and organelle compartmentalization and their physical properties and interactions with other membrane partners (lipids or proteins) reveal lipids as key actors of the regulation of membrane morphodynamics in many cellular functions and especially in the secretory/retrograde pathways. Studies on membrane models have indicated diverse mechanisms by which membranes bend. Moreover, in vivo studies also indicate that membrane curvature can play crucial roles in the regulation of endomembrane morphodynamics, organelle morphology and transport vesicle formation. A role for enzymes of lipid metabolism and lipid-protein interactions will be discussed as crucial mechanisms in the regulation of membrane morphodynamics in the secretory/retrograde pathways. PMID:25233477

  3. Low Impact Docking System (LIDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBauve, Tobie E.

    2009-01-01

    Since 1996, NASA has been developing a docking system that will simplify operations and reduce risks associated with mating spacecraft. This effort has focused on developing and testing an original, reconfigurable, active, closed-loop, force-feedback controlled docking system using modern technologies. The primary objective of this effort has been to design a docking interface that is tunable to the unique performance requirements for all types of mating operations (i.e. docking and berthing, autonomous and piloted rendezvous, and in-space assembly of vehicles, modules and structures). The docking system must also support the transfer of crew, cargo, power, fluid, and data. As a result of the past 10 years of docking system advancement, the Low Impact Docking System or LIDS was developed. The current LIDS design incorporates the lessons learned and development experiences from both previous and existing docking systems. LIDS feasibility was established through multiple iterations of prototype hardware development and testing. Benefits of LIDS include safe, low impact mating operations, more effective and flexible mission implementation with an anytime/anywhere mating capability, system level redundancy, and a more affordable and sustainable mission architecture with reduced mission and life cycle costs. In 1996 the LIDS project, then known as the Advanced Docking Berthing System (ADBS) project, launched a four year developmental period. At the end of the four years, the team had built a prototype of the soft-capture hardware and verified the control system that will be used to control the soft-capture system. In 2001, the LIDS team was tasked to work with the X- 38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) project and build its first Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  4. Analysis of COPII Vesicles Indicates a Role for the Emp47-Ssp120 Complex in Transport of Cell Surface Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Neil G; Wilson, Joshua D; Bentivoglio, Christine M; Dhungel, Nripesh; Gitler, Aaron D; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle formation at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transports nascent secretory proteins forward to the Golgi complex. To further define the machinery that packages secretory cargo and targets vesicles to Golgi membranes, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified COPII vesicles. In addition to previously known proteins, we identified new vesicle proteins including Coy1, Sly41 and Ssp120, which were efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles for trafficking between the ER and Golgi compartments. Further characterization of the putative calcium-binding Ssp120 protein revealed a tight association with Emp47 and in emp47Δ cells Ssp120 was mislocalized and secreted. Genetic analyses demonstrated that EMP47 and SSP120 display identical synthetic positive interactions with IRE1 and synthetic negative interactions with genes involved in cell wall assembly. Our findings support a model in which the Emp47-Ssp120 complex functions in transport of plasma membrane glycoproteins through the early secretory pathway. PMID:26650540

  5. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yuana, Yuana; Koning, Roman I.; Kuil, Maxim E.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Koster, Abraham J.; Bertina, Rogier M; Osanto, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Extracellular vesicles (EV) are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited. Objectives To image EV and determine the morphology, structure and size distribution in fresh plasma by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Methods Fresh citrate- and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated plasma or EV isolated from these plasmas were rapidly cryo-immobilized by vitrification and visualized by cryo-EM. Results EV isolated from fresh plasma were highly heterogeneous in morphology and size and mostly contain a discernible lipid bilayer (lipid vesicles). In fresh plasma there were 2 types of particles with a median diameter of 30 nm (25–260 nm). The majority of these particles are electron dense particles which most likely represent lipoproteins. The minority are lipid vesicles, either electron dense or electron lucent, which most likely represent EV. Lipid vesicles were occasionally observed in close proximity of platelets in citrate and EDTA-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was employed to determine the 3D structure of platelet secretory granules. Conclusions Cryo-EM is a powerful technique that enables the characterization of EV in fresh plasma revealing structural details and considerable morphological heterogeneity. Only a small proportion of the submicron structures in fresh plasma are lipid vesicles representing EV. PMID:24455109

  6. A Hybrid Capillary-Microfluidic Device for the Separation, Lysis, and Electrochemical Detection of Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Omiatek, Donna M.; Santillo, Michael F.; Heien, Michael L; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    The primary method for neuronal communication involves the extracellular release of small molecules that are packaged in secretory vesicles. We have developed a platform to separate, lyse, and electrochemically measure the contents of single vesicles using a hybrid capillary-microfluidic device. This device incorporates a sheath-flow design at the outlet of the capillary for chemical lysis of vesicles and subsequent electrochemical detection. The effect of sheath-flow on analyte dispersion was characterized using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electrochemical detection. At increased flow rates, dispersion was minimized, leading to higher separation efficiencies, but lower detected amounts. Large unilamellar vesicles (diameter ∼ 200 nm), a model for secretory vesicles, were prepared by extrusion and loaded with an electroactive molecule. They were then separated and detected using the hybrid capillary-microfluidic device. Determination of size from internalized analyte concentration provides a method to characterize the liposomal suspension. These results were compared to an orthogonal size measurement using dynamic light scattering to validate the detection platform. PMID:19228035

  7. Identification of a Munc13-sensitive step in chromaffin cell large dense-core vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Man, Kwun Nok M; Imig, Cordelia; Walter, Alexander M; Pinheiro, Paulo S; Stevens, David R; Rettig, Jens; Sørensen, Jakob B; Cooper, Benjamin H; Brose, Nils; Wojcik, Sonja M

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unknown whether the molecular steps of large dense-core vesicle (LDCV) docking and priming are identical to the corresponding reactions in synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis. Munc13s are essential for SV docking and priming, and we systematically analyzed their role in LDCV exocytosis using chromaffin cells lacking individual isoforms. We show that particularly Munc13-2 plays a fundamental role in LDCV exocytosis, but in contrast to synapses lacking Munc13s, the corresponding chromaffin cells do not exhibit a vesicle docking defect. We further demonstrate that ubMunc13-2 and Munc13-1 confer Ca2+-dependent LDCV priming with similar affinities, but distinct kinetics. Using a mathematical model, we identify an early LDCV priming step that is strongly dependent upon Munc13s. Our data demonstrate that the molecular steps of SV and LDCV priming are very similar while SV and LDCV docking mechanisms are distinct. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10635.001 PMID:26575293

  8. How pure are your vesicles?

    PubMed

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  9. Secretory diarrhoea: mechanisms and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Donowitz, Mark; Verkman, Alan S.

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease remains a major health burden worldwide. Secretory diarrhoeas are caused by certain bacterial and viral infections, inflammatory processes, drugs and genetic disorders. Fluid secretion across the intestinal epithelium in secretory diarrhoeas involves multiple ion and solute transporters, as well as activation of cyclic nucleotide and Ca2+ signalling pathways. In many secretory diarrhoeas, activation of Cl− channels in the apical membrane of enterocytes, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, increases fluid secretion, while inhibition of Na+ transport reduces fluid absorption. Current treatment of diarrhoea includes replacement of fluid and electrolyte losses using oral rehydration solutions, and drugs targeting intestinal motility or fluid secretion. Therapeutics in the development pipeline target intestinal ion channels and transporters, regulatory proteins and cell surface receptors. This Review describes pathogenic mechanisms of secretory diarrhoea, current and emerging therapeutics, and the challenges in developing antidiarrhoeal therapeutics. PMID:26122478

  10. Autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Almand, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A storyboard display is presented which summarizes work done recently in design and simulation of autonomous video rendezvous and docking systems for spacecraft. This display includes: photographs of the simulation hardware, plots of chase vehicle trajectories from simulations, pictures of the docking aid including image processing interpretations, and drawings of the control system strategy. Viewgraph-style sheets on the display bulletin board summarize the simulation objectives, benefits, special considerations, approach, and results.

  11. Optical Docking Aid Containing Fresnel Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Cole J.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed device provides self-contained visual cues to aid in docking. Similar to devices used to guide pilots in landing on aircraft carriers. Positions and directions of beams of light give observer visual cues of position relative to docking target point. Optical assemblies generate directed, diverging beams of light that, together, mark approach path to docking point. Conceived for use in docking spacecraft at Space Station Freedom, device adapted to numerous industrial docking and alignment applications.

  12. Synaptic vesicle fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The core of the neurotransmitter release machinery is formed by SNARE complexes, which bring the vesicle and plasma membranes together and are key for fusion, and by Munc18-1, which controls SNARE-complex formation and may also have a direct role in fusion. In addition, SNARE complex assembly is likely orchestrated by Munc13s and RIMs, active-zone proteins that function in vesicle priming and diverse forms of presynaptic plasticity. Synaptotagmin-1 mediates triggering of release by Ca2+, probably through interactions with SNAREs and both membranes, as well as through a tight interplay with complexins. Elucidation of the release mechanism will require a full understanding of the network of interactions among all these proteins and the membranes. PMID:18618940

  13. Russian Docking Module is lowered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Russian-built Docking Module (DM) is lowered for installation into the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis while the spaceplane is in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2. The module will fly as a primary payload on the second Space Shuttle/Mir space station docking mission, STS-74, which is now scheduled for liftoff in the fall of 1995. During the mission, the module will first be attached with the orbiter's robot arm to the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) in the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis and then be docked with the Mir. When Atlantis undocks from the Mir, it will leave the new docking module permanently attached to the space station for use during future Shuttle Mir docking missions. The new module will simplify future Shuttle linkups with Mir by improving orbiter clearances when it serves as a bridge between the two space vehicles. The white structures attached to the module's sides are solar panels that will be attached to the Mir after the conclusion of the STS-74 mission.

  14. Enabling Exploration Through Docking Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will likely require international cooperation in order to leverage limited resources. International standards can help enable cooperative missions by providing well understood, predefined interfaces allowing compatibility between unique spacecraft and systems. The International Space Station (ISS) partnership has developed a publicly available International Docking System Standard (IDSS) that provides a solution to one of these key interfaces by defining a common docking interface. The docking interface provides a way for even dissimilar spacecraft to dock for exchange of crew and cargo, as well as enabling the assembly of large space systems. This paper provides an overview of the key attributes of the IDSS, an overview of the NASA Docking System (NDS), and the plans for updating the ISS with IDSS compatible interfaces. The NDS provides a state of the art, low impact docking system that will initially be made available to commercial crew and cargo providers. The ISS will be used to demonstrate the operational utility of the IDSS interface as a foundational technology for cooperative exploration.

  15. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction. PMID:27576579

  16. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction. PMID:27576579

  17. Poking vesicles in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Ben; Bertrand, Martin; Joos, Bela

    2014-03-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is used to poke cells and study their mechanical properties. Using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the deformation and relaxation of lipid bilayer vesicles, when poked with a constant force. The relaxation time, equilibrium area expansion, and surface tension of the vesicle membrane are studied over a range of applied forces. The relaxation time exhibits a strong force-dependence. Our force-compression curves show a strong similarity with results from a recent experiment by Schafer et al. (Langmuir, 2013). They used an AFM to ``poke'' adherent giant liposomes with constant nanonewton forces and observed the resulting deformation with a Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope. Results of such experiments, whether on vesicles or cells, are often interpreted in terms of dashpots and springs. This simple approach used to describe the response of a whole cell --complete with cytoskeleton, organelles etc.-- can be problematic when trying to measure the contribution of a single cell component. Our modeling is a first step in a ``bottom-up'' approach where we investigate the viscoelastic properties of an in silico cell prototype with constituents added step by step. Supported by NSERC (Canada).

  18. Plasmadesmatal frequency, apoplast-symplast ratio, and photosynthetic transfer in grapefruit juice vesicles. [Citrus paradisi Macf

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, K.E.; Lowell, C.A.; Avigne, W.T.

    1986-04-01

    Structure and function were examined in phloem-free vesicles and vesicle stalks of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) by light and electron microscopy and /sup 14/C-photosynthate transport in intact and dissected tissues. Plasmodesmatal frequencies were approximately 0.3 to 0.5 ..mu..m/sup -1/ cell wall interface (3 to 5 ..mu..m/sup -2/), less than that of known secretory structures but similar to root parenchyma. Cell wall or apoplast comprised 18 to 24% of the total cross-sectional area of the vesicle stalk. The mass of total photosynthate transfer through individual vesicle stalks was ca. 0.5 ..mu..g C h/sup -1/ and rate of /sup 14/C-movement 0.1 to 0.4 mm h/sup -1/. Transport continued in rows of vesicles dissected in association with a vascular bundle. If isolated from fully-expanded fruit, translocation was similar for systems with frozen vs. non-frozen vesicle stalks. Similar freezing treatment decreased transport in vesicles from younger fruit. Symplastic and apoplastic pathways may therefore both operate in this system.

  19. Individual Vesicle Fusion Events Mediated by Lipid-Anchored DNA

    PubMed Central

    van Lengerich, Bettina; Rawle, Robert J.; Bendix, Poul Martin; Boxer, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion consists of a complex rearrangement of lipids and proteins that results in the merger of two lipid bilayers. We have developed a model system that employs synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates as a surrogate for the membrane proteins involved in the biological fusion reaction. We previously showed that complementary DNA-lipids, inserted into small unilamellar vesicles, can mediate membrane fusion in bulk. Here, we use a model membrane architecture developed in our lab to directly observe single-vesicle fusion events using fluorescence microscopy. In this system, a planar tethered membrane patch serves as the target membrane for incoming vesicles. This allows us to quantify the kinetics and characteristics of individual fusion events from the perspective of the lipids or the DNA-lipids involved in the process. We find that the fusion pathways are heterogeneous, with an arrested hemi-fusion state predominating, and we quantitate the outcome and rate of fusion events to construct a mechanistic model of DNA-mediated vesicle fusion. The waiting times between docking and fusion are distributed exponentially, suggesting that fusion occurs in a single step. Our analysis indicates that when two lipid bilayers are brought into close proximity, fusion occurs spontaneously, with little or no dependence on the number of DNA hybrids formed. PMID:23870262

  20. The EARP Complex and Its Interactor EIPR-1 Are Required for Cargo Sorting to Dense-Core Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Topalidou, Irini; Cattin-Ortolá, Jérôme; Pappas, Andrea L; Cooper, Kirsten; Merrihew, Gennifer E; MacCoss, Michael J; Ailion, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The dense-core vesicle is a secretory organelle that mediates the regulated release of peptide hormones, growth factors, and biogenic amines. Dense-core vesicles originate from the trans-Golgi of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, but it is unclear how this specialized organelle is formed and acquires its specific cargos. To identify proteins that act in dense-core vesicle biogenesis, we performed a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for mutants defective in dense-core vesicle function. We previously reported the identification of two conserved proteins that interact with the small GTPase RAB-2 to control normal dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting. Here we identify several additional conserved factors important for dense-core vesicle cargo sorting: the WD40 domain protein EIPR-1 and the endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complex. By assaying behavior and the trafficking of dense-core vesicle cargos, we show that mutants that lack EIPR-1 or EARP have defects in dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting similar to those of mutants in the RAB-2 pathway. Genetic epistasis data indicate that RAB-2, EIPR-1 and EARP function in a common pathway. In addition, using a proteomic approach in rat insulinoma cells, we show that EIPR-1 physically interacts with the EARP complex. Our data suggest that EIPR-1 is a new interactor of the EARP complex and that dense-core vesicle cargo sorting depends on the EARP-dependent trafficking of cargo through an endosomal sorting compartment. PMID:27191843

  1. The EARP Complex and Its Interactor EIPR-1 Are Required for Cargo Sorting to Dense-Core Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Topalidou, Irini; Cattin-Ortolá, Jérôme; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The dense-core vesicle is a secretory organelle that mediates the regulated release of peptide hormones, growth factors, and biogenic amines. Dense-core vesicles originate from the trans-Golgi of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, but it is unclear how this specialized organelle is formed and acquires its specific cargos. To identify proteins that act in dense-core vesicle biogenesis, we performed a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for mutants defective in dense-core vesicle function. We previously reported the identification of two conserved proteins that interact with the small GTPase RAB-2 to control normal dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting. Here we identify several additional conserved factors important for dense-core vesicle cargo sorting: the WD40 domain protein EIPR-1 and the endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complex. By assaying behavior and the trafficking of dense-core vesicle cargos, we show that mutants that lack EIPR-1 or EARP have defects in dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting similar to those of mutants in the RAB-2 pathway. Genetic epistasis data indicate that RAB-2, EIPR-1 and EARP function in a common pathway. In addition, using a proteomic approach in rat insulinoma cells, we show that EIPR-1 physically interacts with the EARP complex. Our data suggest that EIPR-1 is a new interactor of the EARP complex and that dense-core vesicle cargo sorting depends on the EARP-dependent trafficking of cargo through an endosomal sorting compartment. PMID:27191843

  2. Elmo1 inhibits ubiquitylation of Dock180.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Masumi; Ichihara, Shin; Watanabe, Takuya; Sakai, Mieko; Sawa, Hirofumi; Nagashima, Kazuo; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Tanaka, Shinya

    2006-03-01

    Dock180, a member of the CDM family of proteins, plays roles in biological processes such as phagocytosis and motility through its association with the signalling adaptor protein Crk. Recently, the complex formation between Dock180 and Elmo1 was reported to function as a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac. In this study, we demonstrated that the amount of Dock180 increased when Elmo1 was co-expressed. Dock180 was found to be ubiquitylated and Dock180 protein levels could be augmented by treatment with proteasome inhibitor. The ubiquitylation of Dock180 was enhanced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), Crk and adhesion-dependent signals. Furthermore, Elmo1 inhibited ubiquitylation of Dock180, resulting in the increase in Dock180 levels. The Elmo1 mutant Delta531, which encompasses amino acids required for Dock180 binding, preserved the inhibitory effects on ubiquitylation of Dock180. Upon EGF stimulation, both Dock180 and ubiquitin were demonstrated to translocate to the cell periphery by immunofluorescence, and we found ubiquitylation of Dock180 and its inhibition by Elmo1 to occur in cellular membrane fractions by in vivo ubiquitylation assay. These data suggest that Dock180 is ubiquitylated on the plasma membrane, and also that Elmo1 functions as an inhibitor of ubiquitylation of Dock180. Therefore, an ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent protein degradation mechanism might contribute to the local activation of Rac on the plasma membrane. PMID:16495483

  3. POSE Algorithms for Automated Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Howard, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    POSE (relative position and attitude) can be computed in many different ways. Given a sensor that measures bearing to a finite number of spots corresponding to known features (such as a target) of a spacecraft, a number of different algorithms can be used to compute the POSE. NASA has sponsored the development of a flash LIDAR proximity sensor called the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS) for use by the Orion capsule in future docking missions. This sensor generates data that can be used by a variety of algorithms to compute POSE solutions inside of 15 meters, including at the critical docking range of approximately 1-2 meters. Previously NASA participated in a DARPA program called Orbital Express that achieved the first automated docking for the American space program. During this mission a large set of high quality mated sensor data was obtained at what is essentially the docking distance. This data set is perhaps the most accurate truth data in existence for docking proximity sensors in orbit. In this paper, the flight data from Orbital Express is used to test POSE algorithms at 1.22 meters range. Two different POSE algorithms are tested for two different Fields-of-View (FOVs) and two different pixel noise levels. The results of the analysis are used to predict future performance of the POSE algorithms with VNS data.

  4. CD63 is tightly associated with intracellular, secretory events chaperoning piecemeal degranulation and compound exocytosis in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Lívia A S; Bonjour, Kennedy; Ueki, Shigeharu; Neves, Josiane S; Liu, Linying; Spencer, Lisa A; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F; Melo, Rossana C N

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophil activation leads to secretion of presynthesized, granule-stored mediators that determine the course of allergic, inflammatory, and immunoregulatory responses. CD63, a member of the transmembrane-4 glycoprotein superfamily (tetraspanins) and present on the limiting membranes of eosinophil-specific (secretory) granules, is considered a potential surface marker for eosinophil degranulation. However, the intracellular secretory trafficking of CD63 in eosinophils and other leukocytes is not understood. Here, we provide a comprehensive investigation of CD63 trafficking at high resolution within human eosinophils stimulated with inflammatory stimuli, CCL11 and tumor necrosis factor α, which induce distinctly differing secretory processes in eosinophils: piecemeal degranulation and compound exocytosis, respectively. By using different transmission electron microscopy approaches, including an immunonanogold technique, for enhanced detection of CD63 at subcellular compartments, we identified a major intracellular pool of CD63 that is directly linked to eosinophil degranulation events. Transmission electron microscopy quantitative analyses demonstrated that, in response to stimulation, CD63 is concentrated within granules undergoing secretion by piecemeal degranulation or compound exocytosis and that CD63 tracks with the movements of vesicles and granules in the cytoplasm. Although CD63 was observed at the cell surface after stimulation, immunonanogold electron microscopy revealed that a strong CD63 pool remains in the cytoplasm. It is remarkable that CCL11 and tumor necrosis factor α triggered increased formation of CD63(+) large vesiculotubular carriers (eosinophil sombrero vesicles), which fused with granules in the process of secretion, likely acting in the intracellular translocation of CD63. Altogether, we identified active, intracellular CD63 trafficking connected to eosinophil granule-derived secretory pathways. This is important for understanding the

  5. Secretory function of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuryszko, J; Sławuta, P; Sapikowski, G

    2016-01-01

    There are two kinds of adipose tissue in mammals: white adipose tissue - WAT and brown adipose tissue - BAT. The main function of WAT is accumulation of triacylglycerols whereas the function of BAT is heat generation. At present, WAT is also considered to be an endocrine gland that produces bioactive adipokines, which take part in glucose and lipid metabolism. Considering its endocrine function, the adipose tissue is not a homogeneous gland but a group of a few glands which act differently. Studies on the secretory function of WAT began in 1994 after discovery of leptin known as the satiation hormone, which regulates body energy homeostasis and maintainence of body mass. Apart from leptin, the following belong to adipokines: adiponectin, resistin, apelin, visfatin and cytokines: TNF and IL 6. Adiponectin is a polypeptide hormone of antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity. It plays a key role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Resistin exerts a counter effect compared to adiponectin and its physiological role is to maintain fasting glycaemia. Visfatin stimulates insulin secretion and increases insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake by muscle cells and adipocytes. Apelin probably increases the insulin sensitivity of tissues. TNF evokes insulin resistance by blocking insulin receptors and inhibits insulin secretion. Approximately 30% of circulating IL 6 comes from adipose tissue. It causes insulin resistance by decreasing the expression of insulin receptors, decreases adipogenesis and adiponectin and visfatin secretion, and stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis. In 2004, Bays introduced the notion of adiposopathy, defined as dysfunction of the adipose tissue, whose main feature is insulin and leptin resistance as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines: TNF and IL 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein. This means that excess of adipose tissue, especially visceral adipose tissue, leads to the development of a chronic subclinical

  6. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  7. Bem1p contributes to secretory pathway polarization through a direct interaction with Exo70p

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    The exocyst serves to tether secretory vesicles to cortical sites specified by polarity determinants, in preparation for fusion with the plasma membrane. Although most exocyst components are brought to these sites by riding on secretory vesicles as they are actively transported along actin cables, Exo70p displays actin-independent localization to these sites, implying an interaction with a polarity determinant. Here we show that Exo70p directly and specifically binds to the polarity determinant scaffold protein Bem1p. The interaction involves multiple domains of both Exo70p and Bem1p. Mutations in Exo70p that disrupt its interaction with Bem1, without impairing its interactions with other known binding partners, lead to the loss of actin-independent localization. Synthetic genetic interactions confirm the importance of the Exo70p–Bem1p interaction, although there is some possible redundancy with Sec3p and Sec15p, other exocyst components that also interact with polarity determinants. Similar to Sec3p, the actin-independent localization of Exo70p requires a synergistic interaction with the phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P2. PMID:25313406

  8. The SNARE protein vti1a functions in dense-core vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Alexander M; Kurps, Julia; de Wit, Heidi; Schöning, Susanne; Toft-Bertelsen, Trine L; Lauks, Juliane; Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Weiss, Annita N; Schulz, Alexander; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele; Verhage, Matthijs; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2014-01-01

    The SNARE protein vti1a is proposed to drive fusion of intracellular organelles, but recent data also implicated vti1a in exocytosis. Here we show that vti1a is absent from mature secretory vesicles in adrenal chromaffin cells, but localizes to a compartment near the trans-Golgi network, partially overlapping with syntaxin-6. Exocytosis is impaired in vti1a null cells, partly due to fewer Ca2+-channels at the plasma membrane, partly due to fewer vesicles of reduced size and synaptobrevin-2 content. In contrast, release kinetics and Ca2+-sensitivity remain unchanged, indicating that the final fusion reaction leading to transmitter release is unperturbed. Additional deletion of the closest related SNARE, vti1b, does not exacerbate the vti1a phenotype, and vti1b null cells show no secretion defects, indicating that vti1b does not participate in exocytosis. Long-term re-expression of vti1a (days) was necessary for restoration of secretory capacity, whereas strong short-term expression (hours) was ineffective, consistent with vti1a involvement in an upstream step related to vesicle generation, rather than in fusion. We conclude that vti1a functions in vesicle generation and Ca2+-channel trafficking, but is dispensable for transmitter release. PMID:24902738

  9. Text Mining for Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Varsha D.; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly growing amount of publicly available information from biomedical research is readily accessible on the Internet, providing a powerful resource for predictive biomolecular modeling. The accumulated data on experimentally determined structures transformed structure prediction of proteins and protein complexes. Instead of exploring the enormous search space, predictive tools can simply proceed to the solution based on similarity to the existing, previously determined structures. A similar major paradigm shift is emerging due to the rapidly expanding amount of information, other than experimentally determined structures, which still can be used as constraints in biomolecular structure prediction. Automated text mining has been widely used in recreating protein interaction networks, as well as in detecting small ligand binding sites on protein structures. Combining and expanding these two well-developed areas of research, we applied the text mining to structural modeling of protein-protein complexes (protein docking). Protein docking can be significantly improved when constraints on the docking mode are available. We developed a procedure that retrieves published abstracts on a specific protein-protein interaction and extracts information relevant to docking. The procedure was assessed on protein complexes from Dockground (http://dockground.compbio.ku.edu). The results show that correct information on binding residues can be extracted for about half of the complexes. The amount of irrelevant information was reduced by conceptual analysis of a subset of the retrieved abstracts, based on the bag-of-words (features) approach. Support Vector Machine models were trained and validated on the subset. The remaining abstracts were filtered by the best-performing models, which decreased the irrelevant information for ~ 25% complexes in the dataset. The extracted constraints were incorporated in the docking protocol and tested on the Dockground unbound benchmark set

  10. Remodeling of secretory compartments creates CUPS during nutrient starvation.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Garcia, David; Curwin, Amy J; Popoff, Jean-François; Bruns, Caroline; Duran, Juan M; Malhotra, Vivek

    2014-12-22

    Upon starvation, Grh1, a peripheral membrane protein located at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit sites and early Golgi in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under growth conditions, relocates to a compartment called compartment for unconventional protein secretion (CUPS). Here we report that CUPS lack Golgi enzymes, but contain the coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle tethering protein Uso1 and the Golgi t-SNARE Sed5. Interestingly, CUPS biogenesis is independent of COPII- and COPI-mediated membrane transport. Pik1- and Sec7-mediated membrane export from the late Golgi is required for complete assembly of CUPS, and Vps34 is needed for their maintenance. CUPS formation is triggered by glucose, but not nitrogen starvation. Moreover, upon return to growth conditions, CUPS are absorbed into the ER, and not the vacuole. Altogether our findings indicate that CUPS are not specialized autophagosomes as suggested previously. We suggest that starvation triggers relocation of secretory and endosomal membranes, but not their enzymes, to generate CUPS to sort and secrete proteins that do not enter, or are not processed by enzymes of the ER-Golgi pathway of secretion. PMID:25512390

  11. Preeclampsia and Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Sarwat I; Weissgerber, Tracey L; Garovic, Vesna D; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive pregnancy disorder characterized by development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation that remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. While preeclampsia is believed to result from complex interactions between maternal and placental factors, the proximate pathophysiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Cell-to-cell communication is a critical signaling mechanism for feto-placental development in normal pregnancies. One mechanism of cellular communication relates to activated cell-derived sealed membrane vesicles called extracellular vesicles (EVs). The concentrations and contents of EVs in biological fluids depend upon their cells of origin and the stimuli which trigger their production. Research on EVs in preeclampsia has focused on EVs derived from the maternal vasculature (endothelium, vascular smooth muscle) and blood (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets), as well as placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Changes in the concentrations and contents of these EVs may contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia by accentuating the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory states of pregnancy. This review focuses on possible interactions among placental- and maternal-derived EVs and their contents in the initiation and progression of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Understanding the contributions of EVs in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia may facilitate their use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27590522

  12. Avl9p, a Member of a Novel Protein Superfamily, Functions in the Late Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schekman, Randy

    2007-01-01

    The branching of exocytic transport routes in both yeast and mammalian cells has complicated studies of the late secretory pathway, and the mechanisms involved in exocytic cargo sorting and exit from the Golgi and endosomes are not well understood. Because cargo can be sorted away from a blocked route and secreted by an alternate route, mutants defective in only one route do not exhibit a strong secretory phenotype and are therefore difficult to isolate. In a genetic screen designed to isolate such mutants, we identified a novel conserved protein, Avl9p, the absence of which conferred lethality in a vps1Δ apl2Δ strain background (lacking a dynamin and an adaptor-protein complex 1 subunit). Depletion of Avl9p in this strain resulted in secretory defects as well as accumulation of Golgi-like membranes. The triple mutant also had a depolarized actin cytoskeleton and defects in polarized secretion. Overexpression of Avl9p in wild-type cells resulted in vesicle accumulation and a post-Golgi defect in secretion. Phylogenetic analysis indicated evolutionary relationships between Avl9p and regulators of membrane traffic and actin function. PMID:17229886

  13. The Actomyosin Ring Recruits Early Secretory Compartments to the Division Site in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Vjestica, Aleksandar; Tang, Xin-Zi

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cytokinesis is to establish a membrane barrier between daughter cells. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe utilizes an actomyosin-based division ring that is thought to provide physical force for the plasma membrane invagination. Ring constriction occurs concomitantly with the assembly of a division septum that is eventually cleaved. Membrane trafficking events such as targeting of secretory vesicles to the division site require a functional actomyosin ring suggesting that it serves as a spatial landmark. However, the extent of polarization of the secretion apparatus to the division site is presently unknown. We performed a survey of dynamics of several fluorophore-tagged proteins that served as markers for various compartments of the secretory pathway. These included markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, the COPII sites, and the early and late Golgi. The secretion machinery exhibited a marked polarization to the division site. Specifically, we observed an enrichment of the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (tER) accompanied by Golgi cisternae biogenesis. These processes required actomyosin ring assembly and the function of the EFC-domain protein Cdc15p. Cdc15p overexpression was sufficient to induce tER polarization in interphase. Thus, fission yeast polarizes its entire secretory machinery to the cell division site by utilizing molecular cues provided by the actomyosin ring. PMID:18184749

  14. Kinetics of the secretory response in bovine chromaffin cells following flash photolysis of caged Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, C; Chow, R H; Neher, E; Zucker, R S

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of the secretory response in bovine chromaffin cells following flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ were studied by capacitance (Cm) measurements with millisecond time resolution. After elevation of the internal Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), Cm rises rapidly with one or more exponentials. The time constant of the fastest component decreases for higher [Ca2+]i (range 3-600 microM) over three orders of magnitude before it saturates at approximately 1 ms. The corresponding maximal rates of secretion can be as fast as 100,000 fF/s or 40,000 vesicles/s. There is a Ca(2+)-dependent delay before Cm rises, which may reflect the kinetics of multiple Ca2+ ions binding to the secretory apparatus. The initial rise in Cm is described by models containing a sequence of two to four single Ca(2+)-binding steps followed by a rate-limiting exocytosis step. The predicted Ca2+ dissociation constant (Kd) of a single Ca(2+)-binding site is between 7 and 21 microM. At [Ca2+]i > 30 microM clear indications of a fast endocytotic process complicate the analysis of the secretory response. PMID:7696493

  15. Inositol Depletion Restores Vesicle Transport in Yeast Phospholipid Flippase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Kanako; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Sakai, Shota; Mioka, Tetsuo; Sano, Takamitsu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, type 4 P-type ATPases function as phospholipid flippases, which translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Flippases function in the formation of transport vesicles, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we isolate an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, ART5, as a multicopy suppressor of the growth and endocytic recycling defects of flippase mutants in budding yeast. Consistent with a previous report that Art5p downregulates the inositol transporter Itr1p by endocytosis, we found that flippase mutations were also suppressed by the disruption of ITR1, as well as by depletion of inositol from the culture medium. Interestingly, inositol depletion suppressed the defects in all five flippase mutants. Inositol depletion also partially restored the formation of secretory vesicles in a flippase mutant. Inositol depletion caused changes in lipid composition, including a decrease in phosphatidylinositol and an increase in phosphatidylserine. A reduction in phosphatidylinositol levels caused by partially depleting the phosphatidylinositol synthase Pis1p also suppressed a flippase mutation. These results suggest that inositol depletion changes the lipid composition of the endosomal/TGN membranes, which results in vesicle formation from these membranes in the absence of flippases. PMID:25781026

  16. Toxoplasma secretory granules: one population or more?

    PubMed

    Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, dense granules are known as the storage secretory organelles of the so-called GRA proteins (for dense granule proteins), which are destined to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and the PV-derived cyst wall. Recently, newly annotated GRA proteins targeted to the host cell nucleus have enlarged this view. Here we provide an update on the latest developments on the Toxoplasma secreted proteins, which to date have been mainly studied at both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages, and we point out that recent discoveries could open the issue of a possible, yet uncharacterized, distinct secretory pathway in Toxoplasma. PMID:25599584

  17. Quality control in the secretory assembly line.

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, A

    2001-01-01

    As a rule, only proteins that have reached a native, folded and assembled structure are transported to their target organelles and compartments within the cell. In the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells, this type of sorting is particularly important. A variety of molecular mechanisms are involved that distinguish between folded and unfolded proteins, modulate their intracellular transport, and induce degradation if they fail to fold. This phenomenon, called quality control, occurs at several levels and involves different types of folding sensors. The quality control system provides a stringent and versatile molecular sorting system that guaranties fidelity of protein expression in the secretory pathway. PMID:11260794

  18. NASA Docking System (NDS) Technical Integration Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA Docking System (NDS) as NASA's implementation of the International Docking System Standard (IDSS). The goals of the NDS, is to build on proven technologies previously demonstrated in flight and to advance the state of the art of docking systems by incorporating Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) technology into the NDS. A Hardware Demonstration was included in the meeting, and there was discussion about software, NDS major system interfaces, integration information, schedule, and future upgrades.

  19. Spatial relationships between markers for secretory and endosomal machinery in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells versus those in uninfected cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E

    2011-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces extensive remodeling of the secretory apparatus to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (cVAC), where virion tegumentation and envelopment take place. We studied the structure of the cVAC by confocal microscopy to assess the three-dimensional distribution of proteins specifically associated with individual secretory organelles. In infected cells, early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive vesicles are concentrated at the center of the cVAC and, as previously seen, are distinct from structures visualized by markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and trans-Golgi network (TGN). EEA1-positive vesicles can be strongly associated with markers for recycling endosomes, to a lesser extent with markers associated with components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT III) machinery, and then with markers of late endosomes. In comparisons of uninfected and infected cells, we found significant changes in the structural associations and colocalization of organelle markers, as well as in net organelle volumes. These results provide new evidence that the HCMV-induced remodeling of the membrane transport apparatus involves much more than simple relocation and expansion of preexisting structures and are consistent with the hypothesis that the shift in identity of secretory organelles in HCMV-infected cells results in new functional profiles. PMID:21471245

  20. The juxtamembrane region of synaptotagmin 1 interacts with dynamin 1 and regulates vesicle fission during compensatory endocytosis in endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Robyn L; Varga, Kelly T; Jiang, Zhongjiao; Young, Fiona B; Blandford, Vanessa; McPherson, Peter S; Gong, Liang-Wei; Sossin, Wayne S

    2015-06-15

    Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) is a synaptic vesicle protein that is important for the kinetics of both exocytosis and endocytosis, and is thus a candidate molecule to link these two processes. Although the tandem Ca(2+)-binding C2 domains of Syt1 have important roles in exocytosis and endocytosis, the function of the conserved juxtamembrane (jxm) linker region has yet to be determined. We now demonstrate that the jxm region of Syt1 interacts directly with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the endocytic protein dynamin 1. By using cell-attached capacitance recordings with millisecond time resolution to monitor clathrin-mediated endocytosis of single vesicles in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells, we find that loss of this interaction prolongs the lifetime of the fission pore leading to defects in the dynamics of vesicle fission. These results indicate a previously undescribed interaction between two major regulatory proteins in the secretory vesicle cycle and that this interaction regulates endocytosis. PMID:25964652

  1. Lead-dependent deposits in diverse synaptic vesicles: suggestive evidence for the presence of anionic binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sulzer, D.; Piscopo, I.; Ungar, F.; Holtzman, E.

    1987-09-01

    We have observed electron dense deposits dependent on incubation of aldehyde-fixed tissues with lead ions within synaptic vesicles of several types of neurons that differ in the neurotransmitters utilized and in the secretory granules of the adrenal medulla. Evidently, vesicle components that can interact with lead ions are widespread. A plausible explanation for the occurrence of the deposits is the presence of anionic binding sites within the vesicles. This would agree well with other biochemical, cytochemical, and immunocytochemical evidence, such as that indicating the presence of sulfated macromolecules in certain synaptic vesicles. Anionic binding sites could play significant roles by participating in processes such as Ca/sup 2 +/ storage, stabilization of pH gradients, or the control of osmotic phenomena.

  2. Boom Rendezvous Alternative Docking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Space rendezvous and docking has always been attempted with primarily one philosophic methodology. The slow matching of one vehicle's orbit by a second vehicle and then a final closing sequence that ends in matching the orbits with perfect precision and with near zero relative velocities. The task is time consuming, propellant intensive, risk inherent (plume impingement, collisions, fuel depletion, etc.) and requires substantial hardware mass. The historical background and rationale as to why this approach is used is discussed in terms of the path-not-taken and in light of an alternate methodology. Rendezvous and docking by boom extension is suggested to have inherent advantages that today s technology can readily exploit. Extension from the primary spacecraft, beyond its inherent large inertia, allows low inertia connections to be made rapidly and safely. Plume contamination issues are eliminated as well as the extra propellant mass and risk required for the final thruster (docking) operations. Space vehicle connection hardware can be significantly lightened. Also, docking sensors and controls require less fidelity; allowing them to be more robust and less sensitive. It is the potential safety advantage and mission risk reduction that makes this approach attractive, besides the prospect of nominal time and mass savings.

  3. Hydra Rendezvous and Docking Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred; Carrington, Connie

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. technology to support a CEV AR&D activity is mature and was developed by NASA and supporting industry during an extensive research and development program conducted during the 1990's and early 2000 time frame at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous/docking sensor was identified early in the AR&D Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proxinity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous/docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) was developed and successfully flown on STS 87 and again on STS 95, proving the concept of a video-based sensor. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development of a new generation of video based rendezvous/docking sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation. A Demonstration Automatic Rendezvous Technology (DART) flight experiment was flown in April 2005 using AVGS as the primary proximity operations sensor. Because of the absence of a docking mechanism on the target satellite, this mission did not demonstrate the ability of the sensor to coltrold ocking. Mission results indicate that the rendezvous sensor operated successfully in "spot mode" (2 km acquisition of the target, bearing data only) but was never commanded to "acquire and track" the docking target. Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of current design AVGS units to support the NASA Exploration initiative. This flight proven AR&D technology is being modularized and upgraded with additional capabilities through the Hydra project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Hydra brings a unique engineering approach and sensor architecture to the table, to solve the continuing issues of parts obsolescence and multiple sensor integration. This paper presents an approach to

  4. Dysregulations of Synaptic Vesicle Trafficking in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Egbujo, Chijioke N; Sinclair, Duncan; Hahn, Chang-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric illness which is experienced by about 1 % of individuals worldwide and has a debilitating impact on perception, cognition, and social function. Over the years, several models/hypotheses have been developed which link schizophrenia to dysregulations of the dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin receptor pathways. An important segment of these pathways that have been extensively studied for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is the presynaptic neurotransmitter release mechanism. This set of molecular events is an evolutionarily well-conserved process that involves vesicle recruitment, docking, membrane fusion, and recycling, leading to efficient neurotransmitter delivery at the synapse. Accumulated evidence indicate dysregulation of this mechanism impacting postsynaptic signal transduction via different neurotransmitters in key brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. In recent years, after ground-breaking work that elucidated the operations of this mechanism, research efforts have focused on the alterations in the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of presynaptic neurotransmitter release molecules in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions. In this review article, we present recent evidence from schizophrenia human postmortem studies that key proteins involved in the presynaptic release mechanism are dysregulated in the disorder. We also discuss the potential impact of dysfunctional presynaptic neurotransmitter release on the various neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia. PMID:27371030

  5. The Neurospora crassa exocyst complex tethers Spitzenkörper vesicles to the apical plasma membrane during polarized growth

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Meritxell; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Callejas-Negrete, Olga; Roberson, Robert W.; Ludwig, Sarah; Beltrán-Aguilar, Alejandro; Seiler, Stephan; Novick, Peter; Freitag, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Fungal hyphae are among the most highly polarized cells. Hyphal polarized growth is supported by tip-directed transport of secretory vesicles, which accumulate temporarily in a stratified manner in an apical vesicle cluster, the Spitzenkörper. The exocyst complex is required for tethering of secretory vesicles to the apical plasma membrane. We determined that the presence of an octameric exocyst complex is required for the formation of a functional Spitzenkörper and maintenance of regular hyphal growth in Neurospora crassa. Two distinct localization patterns of exocyst subunits at the hyphal tip suggest the dynamic formation of two assemblies. The EXO-70/EXO-84 subunits are found at the peripheral part of the Spitzenkörper, which partially coincides with the outer macrovesicular layer, whereas exocyst components SEC-5, -6, -8, and -15 form a delimited crescent at the apical plasma membrane. Localization of SEC-6 and EXO-70 to the plasma membrane and the Spitzenkörper, respectively, depends on actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The apical region of exocyst-mediated vesicle fusion, elucidated by the plasma membrane–associated exocyst subunits, indicates the presence of an exocytotic gradient with a tip-high maximum that dissipates gradually toward the subapex, confirming the earlier predictions of the vesicle supply center model for hyphal morphogenesis. PMID:24523289

  6. Fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles leads to uncontrolled exocytosis in the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonhong; Ahuja, Malini; Kim, Min Seuk; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Jha, Archana; Zeng, Mei; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Zerfas, Patricia M; Eckhaus, Michael A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in TRPML1 cause the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV). The role of TRPML1 in cell function and how the mutations cause the disease are not well understood. Most studies focus on the role of TRPML1 in constitutive membrane trafficking to and from the lysosomes. However, this cannot explain impaired neuromuscular and secretory cells' functions that mediate regulated exocytosis. Here, we analyzed several forms of regulated exocytosis in a mouse model of MLIV and, opposite to expectations, we found enhanced exocytosis in secretory glands due to enlargement of secretory granules in part due to fusion with lysosomes. Preliminary exploration of synaptic vesicle size, spontaneous mEPSCs, and glutamate secretion in neurons provided further evidence for enhanced exocytosis that was rescued by re-expression of TRPML1 in neurons. These features were not observed in Niemann-Pick type C1. These findings suggest that TRPML1 may guard against pathological fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles and suggest a new approach toward developing treatment for MLIV. PMID:26682800

  7. Standard remote manipulator system docking target augmentation for automated docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W. (Inventor); Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A docking target is provided for use in automated docking of a first vehicle on which the target is located. The target comprises a pair of laterally extending arm portions lying in substantially the same plane and a central post extending outwardly from the plane of the arm portions. At least three reflectors are located on the target. Two of the reflectors are located at the outboard ends of the arms portions and another reflector is located at the end of the central post. In an important embodiment, the reflectors comprise individual pieces of retroreflective tape. The reflectors, when viewed from the front of the target, are aligned along the longitudinal center line of the target, and can take a number of different shapes including circular or square.

  8. Principles of Flexible Protein-Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Andrusier, Nelly; Mashiach, Efrat; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J.

    2008-01-01

    Treating flexibility in molecular docking is a major challenge in cell biology research. Here we describe the background and the principles of existing flexible protein-protein docking methods, focusing on the algorithms and their rational. We describe how protein flexibility is treated in different stages of the docking process: in the preprocessing stage, rigid and flexible parts are identified and their possible conformations are modeled. This preprocessing provides information for the subsequent docking and refinement stages. In the docking stage, an ensemble of pre-generated conformations or the identified rigid domains may be docked separately. In the refinement stage, small-scale movements of the backbone and side-chains are modeled and the binding orientation is improved by rigid-body adjustments. For clarity of presentation, we divide the different methods into categories. This should allow the reader to focus on the most suitable method for a particular docking problem. PMID:18655061

  9. Adhesion energy can regulate vesicle fusion and stabilize partially fused states

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand; Bykhovskaia, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Release of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals occurs by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, and this process is highly regulated. Although major molecular components that control docking and fusion of vesicles to the synaptic membrane have been identified, the detailed mechanics of this process is not yet understood. We have developed a mathematical model that predicts how adhesion forces imposed by docking and fusion molecular machinery would affect the fusion process. We have computed the membrane stress that is produced by adhesion-driven vesicle bending and find that it is compressive. Further, our computations of the membrane curvature predict that strong adhesion can create a metastable state with a partially opened pore that would correspond to the ‘kiss and run’ release mode. Our model predicts that the larger the vesicle size, the more likely the metastable state with a transiently opened pore. These results contribute to understanding the mechanics of the fusion process, including possible clamping of the fusion by increasing molecular adhesion, and a balance between ‘kiss and run’ and full collapse fusion modes. PMID:22258550

  10. Nanotube-Enabled Vesicle-Vesicle Communication: A Computational Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-07-01

    Cell-to-cell communications via the tunneling nanotubes or gap junction channels are vital for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Instead of these intrinsic communication pathways, how to design artificial communication channels between cells remains a challenging but interesting problem. Here, we perform dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to analyze the interaction between rotational nanotubes (RNTs) and vesicles so as to provide a novel design mechanism for cell-to-cell communication. Simulation results have demonstrated that the RNTs are capable of generating local disturbance and promote vesicle translocation toward the RNTs. Through ligand pattern designing on the RNTs, we can find a suitable nanotube candidate with a specific ligand coating pattern for forming the RNT-vesicle network. The results also show that a RNT can act as a bridged channel between vesicles, which facilitates substance transfer. Our findings provide useful guidelines for the molecular design of patterned RNTs for creating a synthetic channel between cells. PMID:26266730

  11. Synaptic vesicles are “primed” for fast clathrin-mediated endocytosis at the ribbon synapse

    PubMed Central

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Zhao, CongJian; Pasche, Mathias; Odermatt, Benjamin; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval of synaptic vesicles can occur 1–10 s after fusion, but the role of clathrin during this process has been unclear because the classical mode of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is an order of magnitude slower, as during retrieval of surface receptors. Classical CME is thought to be rate-limited by the recruitment of clathrin, which raises the question: how is clathrin recruited during synaptic vesicle recycling? To investigate this question we applied total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) to the synaptic terminal of retinal bipolar cells expressing fluorescent constructs of clathrin light-chain A. Upon calcium influx we observed a fast accumulation of clathrin within 100 ms at the periphery of the active zone. The subsequent loss of clathrin from these regions reflected endocytosis because the application of a potent clathrin inhibitor Pitstop2 dramatically slowed down this phase by ~3 fold. These results indicate that clathrin-dependent retrieval of synaptic vesicles is unusually fast, most probably because of a “priming” step involving a state of association of clathrin with the docked vesicle and with the endosomes and cisternae surrounding the ribbons. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that the majority of clathrin is moving with the same kinetics as synaptic vesicle proteins. Together, these results indicate that the fast endocytic mechanism operating to retrieve synaptic vesicles differs substantially from the classical mode of CME operating via formation of a coated pit. PMID:25520613

  12. Structural Evidence for Common Ancestry of the Nuclear Pore Complex and Vesicle Coats

    SciTech Connect

    Brohawn, S.; Leksa, N; Spear, E; Rajashankar, K; Schwartz, T

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) facilitate nucleocytoplasmic transport. These massive assemblies comprise an eightfold symmetric scaffold of architectural proteins and central-channel phenylalanine-glycine-repeat proteins forming the transport barrier. We determined the nucleoporin 85 (Nup85)bulletSeh1 structure, a module in the heptameric Nup84 complex, at 3.5 angstroms resolution. Structural, biochemical, and genetic analyses position the Nup84 complex in two peripheral NPC rings. We establish a conserved tripartite element, the ancestral coatomer element ACE1, that reoccurs in several nucleoporins and vesicle coat proteins, providing structural evidence of coevolution from a common ancestor. We identified interactions that define the organization of the Nup84 complex on the basis of comparison with vesicle coats and confirmed the sites by mutagenesis. We propose that the NPC scaffold, like vesicle coats, is composed of polygons with vertices and edges forming a membrane-proximal lattice that provides docking sites for additional nucleoporins.

  13. Ral-GTPase influences the regulation of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Atsuko; Shipitsin, Michail; Goi, Takanori; Feig, Larry A; Turner, Timothy J

    2002-03-01

    The Ral proteins are members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases. Because they reside in synaptic vesicles, we used transgenic mice expressing a dominant inhibitory form of Ral to investigate the role of Ral in neurosecretion. Using a synaptosomal secretion assay, we found that while K(+)-evoked secretion of glutamate was normal, protein kinase C-mediated enhancement of glutamate secretion was suppressed in the mutant mice. Since protein kinase C effects on secretion have been shown to be due to enhancement of the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles docked at the plasma membrane, we directly measured the refilling of this readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles after Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis. Refilling of the readily releasable pool was suppressed in synaptosomes from mice expressing dominant inhibitory Ral. Moreover, we found that protein kinase C and calcium-induced phosphorylation of proteins thought to influence synaptic vesicle function, such as MARCKS, synapsin, and SNAP-25, were all reduced in synaptosomes from these transgenic mice. Concomitant with these studies, we searched for new functions of Ral by detecting proteins that specifically bind to it in cells. Consistent with the phenotype of the transgenic mice described above, we found that active but not inactive RalA binds to the Sec6/8 (exocyst) complex, whose yeast counterpart is essential for targeting exocytic vesicles to specific docking sites on the plasma membrane. These findings demonstrate a role for Ral-GTPase signaling in the modulation of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles and suggest the possible involvement of Ral-Sec6/8 (exocyst) binding in modulation of synaptic strength. PMID:11865051

  14. Laser docking system flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Harry O.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments necessary in the development of the Laser Docking System (LDS) are described. The LDS would be mounted in the Orbiter payload bay, along with a grid connected by fiber optic link to a computer in the cabin. The tests would be performed to aid in the design of an operational sensor which could track a passive target accurately enough to permit soft docking. Additional data would be gained regarding the LDS performance in space, the effects of Orbiter RCS plume impingement on the target, and refinements needed for the flight hardware. A working model which includes an IR laser steered by galvanometer-driven motors for bouncing beams off retroreflectors mounted on targets is described, together with a 300 ft long indoor test facility. Tests on Orbiter flights would first be in a wholly automatic mode and then in a man-in-the-loop mode.

  15. Benzaldehyde-functionalized Polymer Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guorong; Fang, Huafeng; Cheng, Chong; Lu, Peng; Zhang, Ke; Walker, Amy V.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer vesicles with diameters of ca. 100-600 nm and bearing benzaldehyde functionalities within the vesicular walls were constructed through self assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer PEO45-b-PVBA26 in water. The reactivity of the benzaldehyde functionalities was verified by crosslinking the polymersomes, and also by a one-pot crosslinking and functionalization approach to further render the vesicles fluorescent, each via reductive amination. In vitro studies found these labelled nanostructures to undergo cell association. PMID:19309173

  16. European rendezvous and docking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pairot, J. M.; Frezet, M.; Tailhades, J.; Fehse, W.; Tobias, A.; Getzschmann, A.

    This paper first describes the major design drivers and the key features of the European RendezVous and Docking System Concept. Stemming from technology activities led by the European Space Agency (ESA) with European Industry and National Space Agencies since the beginning of the eighties, the concept has been developed and integrated in the frame of an ESA RVD System Pre-Development Programme initiated at ESTEC in 1989, with MATRA as main contractor. The objective is to verify the overall concept and the main elements within a RVD Proof of Concept Programme in order to provide an early proof of validity to the user projects, the first of which will be the Hermes manned space shuttle. The selected mission scenarii, the RVD functions addressed and the overall system architecture are described. The results of supporting safety, performance and operations analyses are presented. The paper further presents the verification objectives and the major results obtained in the RVD System Pre-Development Programme. This verification approach involves hardware breadboards, software prototypes, development of test facilities in four main development areas: test of RV sensors on a 6 d.o.f. kinematic test facility, test of a docking mechanism front-end mock-up on the docking dynamics test facility, closed-loop test of a prototype RV control software, test of man-in-the-loop concept involving both supervisory control and manual control modes.

  17. Mast cell secretory granules: armed for battle.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Sara; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells of the immune system and recent studies show that they have immunomodulatory roles in diverse processes in both health and disease. Mast cells are distinguished by their high content of electron-dense secretory granules, which are filled with large amounts of preformed and pre-activated immunomodulatory compounds. When appropriately activated, mast cells undergo degranulation, a process by which these preformed granule compounds are rapidly released into the surroundings. In many cases, the effects that mast cells have on an immune response are closely associated with the biological actions of the granule compounds that they release, as exemplified by the recent studies showing that mast cell granule proteases account for many of the protective and detrimental effects of mast cells in various inflammatory settings. In this Review, we discuss the current knowledge of mast cell secretory granules. PMID:24903914

  18. Large scale identification of Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm substrates that modulate host cell vesicle trafficking pathways

    PubMed Central

    Heidtman, Matthew; Chen, Emy J.; Moy, Man-Yu; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila replicates in a specialized vacuole within host cells. Establishment of the replication vacuole depends on the Dot/Icm translocation system that delivers a large number of protein substrates into the host cell. The functions of most substrates are unknown. Here, we analyzed a defined set of 127 confirmed or candidate Dot/Icm substrates for their effect on host cell processes using yeast as a model system. Expression of 79 candidates caused significant yeast growth defects, indicating these proteins impact essential host cell pathways. Notably, a group of 21 candidates interfered with the trafficking of secretory proteins to the yeast vacuole. Three candidates that caused yeast secretory defects (SetA, Ceg19 and Ceg9) were investigated further. These proteins impinged upon vesicle trafficking at distinct stages and had signals that allowed translocation into host cells by the Dot/Icm system. Ectopically produced SetA, Ceg19 and Ceg9 localized to secretory organelles in mammalian cells, consistent with a role for these proteins in modulating host cell vesicle trafficking. Interestingly, the ability of SetA to cause yeast phenotypes was dependent upon a functional glycosyltransferase domain. We hypothesize that SetA may glycosylate a component of the host cell vesicle trafficking machinery during L. pneumophila infection. PMID:19016775

  19. Yeast secretory expression of insulin precursors.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, T

    2000-09-01

    Since the 1980s, recombinant human insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus has been produced using either the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the prokaryote Escherichia coli. Here, development of the insulin secretory expression system in S. cerevisiae and its subsequent optimisation is described. Expression of proinsulin in S. cerevisiae does not result in efficient secretion of proinsulin or insulin. However, expression of a cDNA encoding a proinsulin-like molecule with deletion of threonine(B30) as a fusion protein with the S. cerevisiae alpha-factor prepro-peptide (leader), followed either by replacement of the human proinsulin C-peptide with a small C-peptide (e.g. AAK), or by direct fusion of lysine(B29) to glycine(A1), results in the efficient secretion of folded single-chain proinsulin-like molecules to the culture supernatant. The secreted single-chain insulin precursor can then be purified and subsequently converted to human insulin by tryptic transpeptidation in organic aqueous medium in the presence of a threonine ester. The leader confers secretory competence to the insulin precursor, and constructed (synthetic) leaders have been developed for efficient secretory expression of the insulin precursor in the yeasts S. cerevisiae and Pichia pastories. The Kex2 endoprotease, specific for dibasic sites, cleaves the leader-insulin precursor fusion protein in the late secretory pathway and the folded insulin precursor is secreted to the culture supernatant. However, the Kex2 endoprotease processing of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is incomplete and a significant part of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is secreted to the culture supernatant in a hyperglycosylated form. A spacer peptide localised between the leader and the insulin precursor has been developed to optimise Kex2 endoprotease processing and insulin precursor fermentation yield. PMID:11030562

  20. RFP tags for labeling secretory pathway proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Liyang; Zhao, Yanhua; Xu, Pingyong; Huan, Shuangyan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Membrane protein Orai1 can be used to report the fusion properties of RFPs. • Artificial puncta are affected by dissociation constant as well as pKa of RFPs. • Among tested RFPs mOrange2 is the best choice for secretory protein labeling. - Abstract: Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are useful tools for live cell and multi-color imaging in biological studies. However, when labeling proteins in secretory pathway, many RFPs are prone to form artificial puncta, which may severely impede their further uses. Here we report a fast and easy method to evaluate RFPs fusion properties by attaching RFPs to an environment sensitive membrane protein Orai1. In addition, we revealed that intracellular artificial puncta are actually colocalized with lysosome, thus besides monomeric properties, pKa value of RFPs is also a key factor for forming intracellular artificial puncta. In summary, our current study provides a useful guide for choosing appropriate RFP for labeling secretory membrane proteins. Among RFPs tested, mOrange2 is highly recommended based on excellent monomeric property, appropriate pKa and high brightness.

  1. Model Docking Using Knowledge-Level Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trewhitt, Ethan; Whitaker, Elizabeth; Briscoe, Erica; Weiss, Lora

    This paper presents an initial approach for exploring the docking of social models at the knowledge level. We have prototyped a simple blackboard environment allowing for model docking experimentation. There are research challenges in identifying which models are appropriate to dock and the concepts that they should exchange to build a richer multi-scale view of the world. Our early approach includes docking of societal system dynamics models with individual and organizational behaviors represented in agent-based models. Case-based models allow exploration of historical knowledge by other models. Our research presents initial efforts to attain opportunistic, asynchronous interactions among multi-scale models through investigation and experimentation of knowledge-level model docking. A docked system can supply a multi-scale modeling capability to support a user's what-if analysis through combinations of case-based modeling, system dynamics approaches and agent-based models working together. An example is provided for the domain of terrorist recruiting.

  2. Secretory activity is rapidly induced in stigmatic papillae by compatible pollen, but inhibited for self-incompatible pollen in the Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Safavian, Darya; Goring, Daphne R

    2013-01-01

    [In the Brassicaceae, targeted exocytosis to the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane under the compatible pollen grain is hypothesized to be essential for pollen hydration and pollen tube penetration. In contrast, polarized secretion is proposed to be inhibited in the stigmatic papillae during the rejection of self-incompatible pollen. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we performed a detailed time-course of post-pollination events to view the cytological responses of the stigmatic papillae to compatible and self-incompatible pollinations. For compatible pollinations in Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, vesicle secretion was observed at the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane under the pollen grain while Brassica napus stigmatic papillae appeared to use multivesicular bodies (MVBs) for secretion. Exo70A1, a component of the exocyst complex, has been previously implicated in the compatible pollen responses, and disruption of Exo70A1 in both A. thaliana and B. napus resulted in a loss of secretory vesicles/MVBs at the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane. Similarly, for self-incompatible pollinations, secretory vesicles/MVBs were absent from the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane in A. lyrata and B. napus; and furthermore, autophagy appeared to be induced to direct vesicles/MVBs to the vacuole for degradation. Thus, these findings support a model where the basal pollen recognition pathway in the stigmatic papilla promotes exocytosis to accept compatible pollen, and the basal pollen recognition pathway is overridden by the self-incompatibility pathway to prevent exocytosis and reject self-pollen. PMID:24386363

  3. Secretory Activity Is Rapidly Induced in Stigmatic Papillae by Compatible Pollen, but Inhibited for Self-Incompatible Pollen in the Brassicaceae

    PubMed Central

    Safavian, Darya; Goring, Daphne R.

    2013-01-01

    [In the Brassicaceae, targeted exocytosis to the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane under the compatible pollen grain is hypothesized to be essential for pollen hydration and pollen tube penetration. In contrast, polarized secretion is proposed to be inhibited in the stigmatic papillae during the rejection of self-incompatible pollen. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we performed a detailed time-course of post-pollination events to view the cytological responses of the stigmatic papillae to compatible and self-incompatible pollinations. For compatible pollinations in Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, vesicle secretion was observed at the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane under the pollen grain while Brassica napus stigmatic papillae appeared to use multivesicular bodies (MVBs) for secretion. Exo70A1, a component of the exocyst complex, has been previously implicated in the compatible pollen responses, and disruption of Exo70A1 in both A. thaliana and B. napus resulted in a loss of secretory vesicles/MVBs at the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane. Similarly, for self-incompatible pollinations, secretory vesicles/MVBs were absent from the stigmatic papillar plasma membrane in A. lyrata and B. napus; and furthermore, autophagy appeared to be induced to direct vesicles/MVBs to the vacuole for degradation. Thus, these findings support a model where the basal pollen recognition pathway in the stigmatic papilla promotes exocytosis to accept compatible pollen, and the basal pollen recognition pathway is overridden by the self-incompatibility pathway to prevent exocytosis and reject self-pollen. PMID:24386363

  4. Laser Docking System Radar flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Harry O.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments to verify the Laser Docking System Radar are discussed. The docking requirements are summarized, and the breadboarded hardware is described, emphasizing the two major scanning concepts being utilized: a mechanical scanning technique employing galvanometer beamsteerers and an electronic scanning technique using an image dissector. The software simulations used to apply hardware solutions to the docking requirements are briefly discussed, the tracking test bed is described, and the objectives of the flight experiment are reviewed.

  5. Synchronized Flashing Lights For Approach And Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Michael L.; Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Bell, Joseph L.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optoelectronic system for guiding vehicle in approaching and docking with another vehicle includes active optical targets (flashing lights) on approached vehicle synchronized with sensor and image-processing circuitry on approaching vehicle. Conceived for use in automated approach and docking of two spacecraft. Also applicable on Earth to manually controlled and automated approach and docking of land vehicles, aircraft, boats, and submersible vehicles, using GPS or terrestrial broadcast time signals for synchronization. Principal advantage: optical power reduced, with consequent enhancement of safety.

  6. Development of robotics facility docking test hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T. E.; Winkler, R. V.

    1984-01-01

    Design and fabricate test hardware for NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are reported. A docking device conceptually developed was fabricated, and two docking targets which provide high and low mass docking loads were required and were represented by an aft 61.0 cm section of a Hubble space telescope (ST) mockup and an upgrading of an existing multimission modular spacecraft (MSS) mockup respectively. A test plan is developed for testing the hardware.

  7. Scoring docking conformations using predicted protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since proteins function by interacting with other molecules, analysis of protein-protein interactions is essential for comprehending biological processes. Whereas understanding of atomic interactions within a complex is especially useful for drug design, limitations of experimental techniques have restricted their practical use. Despite progress in docking predictions, there is still room for improvement. In this study, we contribute to this topic by proposing T-PioDock, a framework for detection of a native-like docked complex 3D structure. T-PioDock supports the identification of near-native conformations from 3D models that docking software produced by scoring those models using binding interfaces predicted by the interface predictor, Template based Protein Interface Prediction (T-PIP). Results First, exhaustive evaluation of interface predictors demonstrates that T-PIP, whose predictions are customised to target complexity, is a state-of-the-art method. Second, comparative study between T-PioDock and other state-of-the-art scoring methods establishes T-PioDock as the best performing approach. Moreover, there is good correlation between T-PioDock performance and quality of docking models, which suggests that progress in docking will lead to even better results at recognising near-native conformations. Conclusion Accurate identification of near-native conformations remains a challenging task. Although availability of 3D complexes will benefit from template-based methods such as T-PioDock, we have identified specific limitations which need to be addressed. First, docking software are still not able to produce native like models for every target. Second, current interface predictors do not explicitly consider pairwise residue interactions between proteins and their interacting partners which leaves ambiguity when assessing quality of complex conformations. PMID:24906633

  8. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets. PMID:26691755

  9. Influence of colchicine and vinblastine on the intracellular migration of secretory and membrane glycoproteins: II. Inhibition of secretion of thyroglobulin in rat thyroid follicular cells as visualized by radioautography after 3H-fucose injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, G.; Bennett, G.

    1984-08-01

    Young (40 gm) rats were given a single intravenous injection of colchicine (4.0 mg) or vinblastine (2.0 mg). At 10 min after colchicine and 30 min after vinblastine administration, the rats were injected with 3H-fucose. Control rats received 3H-fucose only. All rats were sacrificed 90 min after 3H-fucose injection and their tissues processed for radioautography. In thyroid follicular cells of control animals, at this time interval, 57% of the total label was associated with colloid and secretory vesicles in the apical cytoplasm while 27% was localized in the Golgi apparatus and neighboring vesicles. In experimental animals, the proportion of label in colloid and apical vesicles was reduced by more than 69% after colchicine and more than 83% after vinblastine treatment. The proportion of label in the Golgi region, on the other hand, increased by more than 125% after colchicine and more than 179% after vinblastine treatment. Within the Golgi region, the great majority of the label was associated with secretory vesicles which accumulated adjacent to the trans face of the Golgi stacks. It is concluded that the drugs do not interfere with passage of newly synthesized thyroglobulin from the Golgi saccules to nearby secretory vesicles, but do inhibit intracellular migration of these vesicles to the cell apex. In most cells the number of vesicles in the apical cytoplasm diminished, but this was not always the case, suggesting that exocytosis may also be partially inhibited. The loss of microtubules in drug-treated cells suggests that the microtubules may be necessary for intracellular transport of thyroglobulin.

  10. Demonstration of automated proximity and docking technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Tsugawa, Roy K.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Automated spacecraft docking operations are being performed using a full scale motion based simulator and an optical sensor. This presentation will discuss the work in progress at TRW and MSFC facilities to study the problem of automated proximity and docking operations. The docking sensor used in the MSFC Optical Sensor and simulation runs are performed using the MSFC Flat Floor Facility. The control algorithms and six degrees of freedom (6DOF) simulation software were developed at TRW and integrated into the MSFC facility. Key issues being studied are the quantification of docking sensor requirements and operational constraints necessary to perform automated docking maneuvers, control algorithms capable of performing automated docking in the presence of sensitive and noisy sensor data, and sensor technologies for automated proximity and docking operations. As part of this study the MSFC sensor characteristics were analyzed and modeled so that off line simulation runs can be performed for control algorithm testing. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate full 6DOF docking capabilities with actual sensors on the MSFC motion based simulator. We present findings from actual docking simulation runs which show sensor and control loop performance as well as problem areas which require close attention. The evolution of various control algorithms using both phase plane and Clohessy-Wiltshire techniques are discussed. In addition, 6DOF target acquisition and control strategies are described.

  11. Machine learning optimization of cross docking accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum, Esben J

    2016-06-01

    Performance of small molecule automated docking programs has conceptually been divided into docking -, scoring -, ranking - and screening power, which focuses on the crystal pose prediction, affinity prediction, ligand ranking and database screening capabilities of the docking program, respectively. Benchmarks show that different docking programs can excel in individual benchmarks which suggests that the scoring function employed by the programs can be optimized for a particular task. Here the scoring function of Smina is re-optimized towards enhancing the docking power using a supervised machine learning approach and a manually curated database of ligands and cross docking receptor pairs. The optimization method does not need associated binding data for the receptor-ligand examples used in the data set and works with small train sets. The re-optimization of the weights for the scoring function results in a similar docking performance with regard to docking power towards a cross docking test set. A ligand decoy based benchmark indicates a better discrimination between poses with high and low RMSD. The reported parameters for Smina are compatible with Autodock Vina and represent ready-to-use alternative parameters for researchers who aim at pose prediction rather than affinity prediction. PMID:27179709

  12. Clathrin regenerates synaptic vesicles from endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Camacho-Pérez, Marcial; Rost, Benjamin R.; Brokowski, Bettina; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Felies, Annegret; Davis, M. Wayne; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ultrafast endocytosis can retrieve a single large endocytic vesicle as fast as 50-100 ms after synaptic vesicle fusion. However, the fate of the large endocytic vesicles is not known. Here we demonstrate that these vesicles transition to a synaptic endosome about one second after stimulation. The endosome is resolved into coated vesicles after 3 seconds, which in turn become small-diameter synaptic vesicles 5-6 seconds after stimulation. We disrupted clathrin function using RNAi and found that clathrin is not required for ultrafast endocytosis but is required to generate synaptic vesicles from the endosome. Ultrafast endocytosis fails when actin polymerization is disrupted, or when neurons are stimulated at room temperature instead of physiological temperature. In the absence of ultrafast endocytosis, synaptic vesicles are retrieved directly from the plasma membrane by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results explain in large part discrepancies among published experiments concerning the role of clathrin in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. PMID:25296249

  13. Neurotransmitter Release: The Last Millisecond in the Life of a Synaptic Vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    During an action potential, Ca2+ entering a presynaptic terminal triggers synaptic vesicle exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in less than a millisecond. How does Ca2+ stimulate release so rapidly and precisely? Work over the last decades revealed that Ca2+-binding to synaptotagmin triggers release by stimulating synaptotagmin-binding to a core machinery composed of SNARE and SM proteins that mediates membrane fusion during exocytosis. Complexin adaptor proteins assist synaptotagmin by activating and clamping this core fusion machinery. Synaptic vesicles containing synaptotagmin are positioned at the active zone, the site of vesicle fusion, by a protein complex containing RIM proteins. RIM proteins simultaneously activate docking and priming of synaptic vesicles and recruit Ca2+-channels to active zones, thereby connecting in a single complex primed synaptic vesicles to Ca2+-channels. This architecture allows direct flow of Ca2+-ions from Ca2+-channels to synaptotagmin, which then triggers fusion, thus mediating tight millisecond coupling of an action potential to neurotransmitter release. PMID:24183019

  14. Electrostatics in protein–protein docking

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Alexander; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim; Eisenstein, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    A novel geometric-electrostatic docking algorithm is presented, which tests and quantifies the electrostatic complementarity of the molecular surfaces together with the shape complementarity. We represent each molecule to be docked as a grid of complex numbers, storing information regarding the shape of the molecule in the real part and information regarding the electrostatic character of the molecule in the imaginary part. The electrostatic descriptors are derived from the electrostatic potential of the molecule. Thus, the electrostatic character of the molecule is represented as patches of positive, neutral, or negative values. The potential for each molecule is calculated only once and stored as potential spheres adequate for exhaustive rotation/translation scans. The geometric-electrostatic docking algorithm is applied to 17 systems, starting form the structures of the unbound molecules. The results—in terms of the complementarity scores of the nearly correct solutions, their ranking in the lists of sorted solutions, and their statistical uniqueness—are compared with those of geometric docking, showing that the inclusion of electrostatic complementarity in docking is very important, in particular in docking of unbound structures. Based on our results, we formulate several "good electrostatic docking rules": The geometric-electrostatic docking procedure is more successful than geometric docking when the potential patches are large and when the potential extends away from the molecular surface and protrudes into the solvent. In contrast, geometric docking is recommended when the electrostatic potential around the molecules to be docked appears homogenous, that is, with a similar sign all around the molecule. PMID:11847280

  15. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  16. Contextual view of building 110 with dry dock 2 in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of building 110 with dry dock 2 in foreground; camera facing northeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Pump House, California Avenue, east side between Dry Dock 1 & Dry Dock 2, near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  17. Contextual view of building 110 with dry dock 1 visible ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of building 110 with dry dock 1 visible on left; camera facing southeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Pump House, California Avenue, east side between Dry Dock 1 & Dry Dock 2, near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  19. Vesicle Motion during Sustained Exocytosis in Chromaffin Cells: Numerical Model Based on Amperometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jarukanont, Daungruthai; Bonifas Arredondo, Imelda; Femat, Ricardo; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chromaffin cells release catecholamines by exocytosis, a process that includes vesicle docking, priming and fusion. Although all these steps have been intensively studied, some aspects of their mechanisms, particularly those regarding vesicle transport to the active sites situated at the membrane, are still unclear. In this work, we show that it is possible to extract information on vesicle motion in Chromaffin cells from the combination of Langevin simulations and amperometric measurements. We developed a numerical model based on Langevin simulations of vesicle motion towards the cell membrane and on the statistical analysis of vesicle arrival times. We also performed amperometric experiments in bovine-adrenal Chromaffin cells under Ba2+ stimulation to capture neurotransmitter releases during sustained exocytosis. In the sustained phase, each amperometric peak can be related to a single release from a new vesicle arriving at the active site. The amperometric signal can then be mapped into a spike-series of release events. We normalized the spike-series resulting from the current peaks using a time-rescaling transformation, thus making signals coming from different cells comparable. We discuss why the obtained spike-series may contain information about the motion of all vesicles leading to release of catecholamines. We show that the release statistics in our experiments considerably deviate from Poisson processes. Moreover, the interspike-time probability is reasonably well described by two-parameter gamma distributions. In order to interpret this result we computed the vesicles’ arrival statistics from our Langevin simulations. As expected, assuming purely diffusive vesicle motion we obtain Poisson statistics. However, if we assume that all vesicles are guided toward the membrane by an attractive harmonic potential, simulations also lead to gamma distributions of the interspike-time probability, in remarkably good agreement with experiment. We also show that

  20. Isotonic water transport in secretory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Swanson, C H

    1977-01-01

    The model proposed by Diamond and Bossert [1] for isotonic water transport has received wide acceptance in recent years. It assumes that the local driving force for water transport is a standing osmotic gradient produced in the lateral intercellular spaces of the epithelial cell layer by active solute transport. While this model is based on work done in absorptive epithelia where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and the direction of net transport are the same, it has been proposed that the lateral spaces could also serve as the site of the local osmotic gradients for water transport in secretory epithelia, where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and net transport are opposed, by actively transporting solute out of the space rather than into it. Operation in the backward direction, however, requires a lower than ambient hydrostatic pressure within the lateral space which would seem more likely to cause the space to collapse with loss of function. On the other hand, most secretory epithelia are characterized by transport into a restricted ductal system which is similar to the lateral intercellular space in the absorptive epithelia in that its closed to open direction is the same as that of net transport. In vitro micropuncture studies on the exocrine pancreas of the rabbit indicate the presence of a small but statistically significant increase in juice osmolality, 6 mOsm/kg H(2)O, at the site of electrolyte and water secretion in the smallest extralobular ducts with secretin stimulation which suggests that the ductal system in the secretory epithelia rather than the lateral intercellular space is the site of the local osmotic gradients responsible for isotonic water transport. PMID:331693

  1. Psychological distress and salivary secretory immunity.

    PubMed

    Engeland, C G; Hugo, F N; Hilgert, J B; Nascimento, G G; Junges, R; Lim, H-J; Marucha, P T; Bosch, J A

    2016-02-01

    Stress-induced impairments of mucosal immunity may increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. The present study investigated the association of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and loneliness with salivary levels of secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA), the subclasses S-IgA1, S-IgA2, and their transporter molecule Secretory Component (SC). S-IgA/SC, IgA1/SC and IgA2/SC ratios were calculated to assess the differential effects of stress on immunoglobulin transport versus availability. This study involved 113 university students, in part selected on high scores on the UCLA Loneliness Scale and/or the Beck Depression Inventory. Stress levels were assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. Unstimulated saliva was collected and analysed for total S-IgA and its subclasses, as well as SC and total salivary protein. Multiple linear regression analyses, adjusted for gender, age, health behaviours, and concentration effects (total protein) revealed that higher perceived stress was associated with lower levels of IgA1 but not IgA2. Perceived stress, loneliness and depressive symptoms were all associated with lower IgA1/SC ratios. Surprisingly, higher SC levels were associated with loneliness and depressive symptoms, indicative of enhanced transport activity, which explained a lower IgA1/SC ratio (loneliness and depression) and IgA2/SC ratio (depression). This is the first study to investigate the effects of protracted psychological stress across S-IgA subclasses and its transporter SC. Psychological stress was negatively associated with secretory immunity, specifically IgA1. The lower immunoglobulin/transporter ratio that was associated with higher loneliness and depression suggested a relative immunoglobulin depletion, whereby availability was not keeping up with enhanced transport demand. PMID:26318411

  2. Autoguidance video sensor for docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Michael L.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Howard, Richard T.; Dabney, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The Automated Rendezvous and Docking system (ARAD) is composed of two parts. The first part is the sensor which consists of a video camera ringed with two wavelengths of laser diode. The second part is a standard Remote Manipulator System (RMS) target used on the Orbiter that has been modified with three circular pieces of retro-reflective tape covered by optical filters which correspond to one of the wavelengths of laser diode. The sensor is on the chase vehicle and the target is on the target vehicle. The ARAD system works by pulsing one wavelength laser diodes and taking a picture. Then the second wavelength laser diodes are pulsed and a second picture is taken. One picture is subtracted from the other and the resultant picture is thresholded. All adjacent pixels above threshold are blobbed together (X and Y centroids calculated). All blob centroids are checked to recognize the target out of noise. Then the three target spots are windowed and tracked. The three target spot centroids are used to evaluate the roll, yaw, pitch, range, azimuth, and elevation. From that a guidance routine can guide the chase vehicle to dock with the target vehicle with the correct orientation.

  3. The Rab-binding protein Noc2 is associated with insulin-containing secretory granules and is essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cheviet, Séverine; Coppola, Thierry; Haynes, Lee P; Burgoyne, Robert D; Regazzi, Romano

    2004-01-01

    The small GTPases Rab3 and Rab27 are associated with secretory granules of pancreatic beta-cells and regulate insulin exocytosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Noc2, a potential partner of these two GTPases, in insulin secretion. In the beta-cell line INS-1E wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, and Noc258A, a mutant capable of interacting with Rab27 but not Rab3, colocalized with insulin-containing vesicles. In contrast, two mutants (Noc2138S,141S and Noc2154A,155A,156A) that bind neither Rab3 nor Rab27 did not associate with secretory granules and were uniformly distributed throughout the cell cytoplasm. Overexpression of wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, or Noc258A inhibited hormone secretion elicited by insulin secretagogues. In contrast, overexpression of the mutants not targeted to secretory granules was without effect. Silencing of the Noc2 gene by RNA interference led to a strong impairment in the capacity of INS-1E cells to respond to insulin secretagogues, indicating that appropriate levels of Noc2 are essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis. The defect was already detectable in the early secretory phase (0-10 min) but was particularly evident during the sustained release phase (10-45 min). Protein-protein binding studies revealed that Noc2 is a potential partner of Munc13, a component of the machinery that controls vesicle priming and insulin exocytosis. These data suggest that Noc2 is involved in the recruitment of secretory granules at the plasma membrane possibly via the interaction with Munc13. PMID:14593078

  4. "Secretory" Carcinoma of the Skin Mimicking Secretory Carcinoma of the Breast: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sixia; Liu, Yan; Su, Jing; Liu, Jianying; Guo, Xiaoning; Mei, Fang; Zheng, Jie; Liao, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    Secretory carcinoma is a unique kind of adenocarcinoma. It has distinct histological features and a special genetic change, that is, t (12; 15) (p13; q25) translocation which leads to the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. Secretory carcinoma has been found to occur both in the breast and salivary gland. Here the authors present a case of 22-year-old woman with a unique cutaneous neoplasm located at the axilla. The tumor was characterized histologically with the formation of round to ovoid microcysts and papillary structure, which was similar to the secretory carcinoma of the breast and salivary gland. Furthermore, the gene sequence analysis of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction products demonstrated the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of secretory carcinoma from the skin which has the same genetic change as those from the breast and salivary gland. Local excision was performed on this patient. She had been followed up for nearly 1 year. No recurrence or metastasis was found yet. PMID:26981741

  5. Spacecraft Docks Under Six Hours After Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The unpiloted ISS Progress 48 Russian cargo ship docked at 9:18 p.m. EDT Aug. 1 to the Pirs docking compartment of the International Space Station. The resupply spacecraft launched at 3:35 p.m. and...

  6. Intermolecular domain docking in the hairpin ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Minako; White, Neil A.; Julien, Kristine R.; Hoogstraten, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The hairpin ribozyme is a prototype small, self-cleaving RNA motif. It exists naturally as a four-way RNA junction containing two internal loops on adjoining arms. These two loops interact in a cation-driven docking step prior to chemical catalysis to form a tightly integrated structure, with dramatic changes occurring in the conformation of each loop upon docking. We investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of the docking process using constructs in which loop A and loop B reside on separate molecules. Using a novel CD difference assay to isolate the effects of metal ions linked to domain docking, we find the intermolecular docking process to be driven by sub-millimolar concentrations of the exchange-inert Co(NH3)63+. RNA self-cleavage requires binding of lower-affinity ions with greater apparent cooperativity than the docking process itself, implying that, even in the absence of direct coordination to RNA, metal ions play a catalytic role in hairpin ribozyme function beyond simply driving loop-loop docking. Surface plasmon resonance assays reveal remarkably slow molecular association, given the relatively tight loop-loop interaction. This observation is consistent with a “double conformational capture” model in which only collisions between loop A and loop B molecules that are simultaneously in minor, docking-competent conformations are productive for binding. PMID:23324606

  7. Dynamic testing of docking system hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorland, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive dynamic testing was conducted to verify the flight readiness of the Apollo docking hardware. Testing was performed on a unique six degree-of-freedom motion simulator controlled by a computer that calculated the associated spacecraft motions. The test system and the results obtained by subjecting flight-type docking hardware to actual impact loads and resultant spacecraft dynamics are described.

  8. Self-docking analysis and velocity-aimed control for spacecraft electromagnetic docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan-wen; Yang, Le-ping; Zhu, Yan-wei; Ao, Hou-jun; Qi, Da-wei

    2016-06-01

    As a novel and potential supporting technology for on-orbit operation missions, spacecraft electromagnetic docking has not only distinct visible advantages, but also several intrinsic unconspicuous capabilities, such as the self-docking capability which could be exploited to alleviate the burden of the docking controller. Based on theoretical derivation and comparison with the near-field model and numerical simulation, the feasibility of utilizing the far-field electromagnetic force/torque model to spacecraft electromagnetic docking characteristics analysis is firstly verified. Then, the self-docking capability is studied with self-alignment and self-attraction analysis, and the necessary condition for the former and the sufficient condition for the latter are derived. Finally, a velocity-aimed electromagnetic docking control approach based on the self-docking capability and the conservation laws is put forward and verified by numerical simulations.

  9. Bem3, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, traffics to an intracellular compartment and recruits the secretory Rab GTPase Sec4 to endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Boettner, Douglas R.; Fairn, Gregory D.; Schlam, Daniel; Bonilla Valentin, Fernando J.; Michael McCaffery, J.; Hazbun, Tony; Staiger, Chris J.; Grinstein, Sergio; Lemmon, Sandra K.; Claudio Aguilar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell polarity is essential for many cellular functions including division and cell-fate determination. Although RhoGTPase signaling and vesicle trafficking are both required for the establishment of cell polarity, the mechanisms by which they are coordinated are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast RhoGAP (GTPase activating protein), Bem3, is targeted to sites of polarized growth by the endocytic and recycling pathways. Specifically, deletion of SLA2 or RCY1 led to mislocalization of Bem3 to depolarized puncta and accumulation in intracellular compartments, respectively. Bem3 partitioned between the plasma membrane and an intracellular membrane-bound compartment. These Bem3-positive structures were polarized towards sites of bud emergence and were mostly observed during the pre-mitotic phase of apical growth. Cell biological and biochemical approaches demonstrated that this intracellular Bem3 compartment contained markers for both the endocytic and secretory pathways, which were reminiscent of the Spitzenkörper present in the hyphal tips of growing fungi. Importantly, Bem3 was not a passive cargo, but recruited the secretory Rab protein, Sec4, to the Bem3-containing compartments. Moreover, Bem3 deletion resulted in less efficient localization of Sec4 to bud tips during early stages of bud emergence. Surprisingly, these effects of Bem3 on Sec4 were independent of its GAP activity, but depended on its ability to efficiently bind endomembranes. This work unveils unsuspected and important details of the relationship between vesicle traffic and elements of the cell polarity machinery: (1) Bem3, a cell polarity and peripherally associated membrane protein, relies on vesicle trafficking to maintain its proper localization; and (2) in turn, Bem3 influences secretory vesicle trafficking. PMID:23943876

  10. Purified Kinesin Promotes Vesicle Motility and Induces Active Sliding Between Microtubules In vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Raul; McNiven, Mark A.; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Murphy, Douglas B.; Kachar, Bechara

    1991-08-01

    We examined the ability of kinesin to support the movement of adrenal medullary chromaffin granules on microtubules in a defined in vitro system. We found that kinesin and ATP are all that is required to support efficient (33% vesicle motility) and rapid (0.4-0.6 μ m/s) translocation of secretory granule membranes on microtubules in the presence of a low-salt motility buffer. Kinesin also induced the formation of microtubule asters in this buffer, with the plus ends of microtubules located at the center of each aster. This observation indicates that kinesin is capable of promoting active sliding between microtubules toward their respective plus ends, a movement analogous to that of anaphase b in the mitotic spindle. The fact that vesicle translocation, microtubule sliding, and microtubule-dependent kinesin ATPase activities are all enhanced in low-salt buffer establishes a functional parallel between this translocator and other motility ATPases, myosin, and dynein.

  11. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  12. Secretory pattern of canine growth hormone

    SciTech Connect

    French, M.B.; Vaitkus, P.; Cukerman, E.; Sirek, A.; Sirek, O.V.

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to define the secretory pattern of growth hormone (GH) under basal conditions in fasted, conscious, male dogs accustomed to handling. Blood samples were withdrawn from a cephalic vein at 15-min intervals. In this way, any ultradian rhythms, if present, could be detected within the frequency range of 0.042-2 cycles/h. In addition, samples were drawn at either 1- or 2.5-min intervals for 2.5 or 5 h to determine whether frequency components greater than 2 cycles/h were present. GH was measured by radioimmunoassay and the raw data were submitted to time series analysis employing power spectral estimation by means of fast Fourier transformation techniques. Peak plasma levels were up to 12 times higher than the baseline concentration of approx. 1 ng/ml. Spectral analysis revealed an endogenous frequency of 0.22 cycles/h, i.e., a periodicity of 4.5 h/cycle. The results indicate that under basal conditions the secretory bursts of canine GH are limited to one peak every 4.5 h.

  13. Ellipsoidal relaxation of electrodeformed vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lin, Hao; Lira, Rafael; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin

    2015-11-01

    Electrodeformation has been extensively applied to investigate the mechanical behavior of vesicles and cells. While the deformation process often exhibits complex behavior and reveals interesting physics, the relaxation process post-pulsation is equally intriguing yet less frequently studied. In this work theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented, which reveal the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula, which is derived only for equilibrated shapes, is shown to be applicable to dynamic situations such as in relaxation. A closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a timescale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the ``entropic'' and the ``constant-tension'' regime. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data/model analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  14. SFTA2--a novel secretory peptide highly expressed in the lung--is modulated by lipopolysaccharide but not hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rashmi A; Hammel, Markus; Schwarz, Johannes; Heschl, Katharina M; Bretschneider, Nancy; Flemmer, Andreas W; Herber-Jonat, Susanne; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Holzinger, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-specific transcripts are likely to be of importance for the corresponding organ. While attempting to define the specific transcriptome of the human lung, we identified the transcript of a yet uncharacterized protein, SFTA2. In silico analyses, biochemical methods, fluorescence imaging and animal challenge experiments were employed to characterize SFTA2. Human SFTA2 is located on Chr. 6p21.33, a disease-susceptibility locus for diffuse panbronchiolitis. RT-PCR verified the abundance of SFTA2-specific transcripts in human and mouse lung. SFTA2 is synthesized as a hydrophilic precursor releasing a 59 amino acid mature peptide after cleavage of an N-terminal secretory signal. SFTA2 has no recognizable homology to other proteins while orthologues are present in all mammals. SFTA2 is a glycosylated protein and specifically expressed in nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium and type II pneumocytes. In accordance with other hydrophilic surfactant proteins, SFTA2 did not colocalize with lamellar bodies but colocalized with golgin97 and clathrin-labelled vesicles, suggesting a classical secretory pathway for its expression and secretion. In the mouse lung, Sfta2 was significantly downregulated after induction of an inflammatory reaction by intratracheal lipopolysaccharides paralleling surfactant proteins B and C but not D. Hyperoxia, however, did not alter SFTA2 mRNA levels. We have characterized SFTA2 and present it as a novel unique secretory peptide highly expressed in the lung. PMID:22768197

  15. Ultrasound-responsive ultrathin multiblock copolyamide vesicles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Chunyang; Huang, Tong; Xu, Shuting; Bai, Yongping; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation. PMID:26878351

  16. Expression of ODC Antizyme Inhibitor 2 (AZIN2) in Human Secretory Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Rasila, Tiina; Lehtonen, Alexandra; Kanerva, Kristiina; Mäkitie, Laura T; Haglund, Caj; Andersson, Leif C

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) antizyme inhibitor 2 (AZIN2), originally called ODCp, is a regulator of polyamine synthesis that we originally identified and cloned. High expression of ODCp mRNA was found in brain and testis. We reported that AZIN2 is involved in regulation of cellular vesicle transport and / or secretion, but the ultimate physiological role(s) of AZIN2 is still poorly understood. In this study we used a peptide antibody (K3) to human AZIN2 and by immunohistochemistry mapped its expression in various normal tissues. We found high expression in the nervous system, in type 2 pneumocytes in the lung, in megakaryocytes, in gastric parietal cells co-localized with H,K-ATPase beta subunit, in selected enteroendocrine cells, in acinar cells of sweat glands, in podocytes, in macula densa cells and epithelium of collecting ducts in the kidney. The high expression of AZIN2 in various cells with secretory or vesicle transport activity indicates that the polyamine metabolism regulated by AZIN2 is more significantly involved in these events than previously appreciated. PMID:26963840

  17. Expression of ODC Antizyme Inhibitor 2 (AZIN2) in Human Secretory Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rasila, Tiina; Lehtonen, Alexandra; Kanerva, Kristiina; Mäkitie, Laura T.; Haglund, Caj; Andersson, Leif C.

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) antizyme inhibitor 2 (AZIN2), originally called ODCp, is a regulator of polyamine synthesis that we originally identified and cloned. High expression of ODCp mRNA was found in brain and testis. We reported that AZIN2 is involved in regulation of cellular vesicle transport and / or secretion, but the ultimate physiological role(s) of AZIN2 is still poorly understood. In this study we used a peptide antibody (K3) to human AZIN2 and by immunohistochemistry mapped its expression in various normal tissues. We found high expression in the nervous system, in type 2 pneumocytes in the lung, in megakaryocytes, in gastric parietal cells co-localized with H,K-ATPase beta subunit, in selected enteroendocrine cells, in acinar cells of sweat glands, in podocytes, in macula densa cells and epithelium of collecting ducts in the kidney. The high expression of AZIN2 in various cells with secretory or vesicle transport activity indicates that the polyamine metabolism regulated by AZIN2 is more significantly involved in these events than previously appreciated. PMID:26963840

  18. Computational methods for molecular docking

    SciTech Connect

    Klebe, G.; Lengauer, T.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein can be used to derive new protein ligands with improved binding properties. This tutorial focuses on the following questions: What is its binding affinity toward a particular receptor? What are putative conformations of a ligand at the binding site? What are the similarities of different ligands in terms of their recognition capabilities? Where and in which orientation will a ligand bind to the active site? How is a new putative protein ligand selected? An overview is presented of the algorithms which are presently used to handle and predict protein-ligand interactions and to dock small molecule ligands into proteins.

  19. Advanced Docking Berthing System Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James

    2006-01-01

    In FY05 the Exploration Systems Technology Maturation Program selected the JSC advanced mating systems development to continue as an in-house project. In FY06, as a result of ESAS Study (60 Day Study) the CEV Project (within the Constellation Program) has chosen to continue the project as a GFE Flight Hardware development effort. New requirement for CEV to travel and dock with the ISS in 2011/12 in support of retiring the Shuttle and reducing the gap of time where US does not have any US based crew launch capability. As before, long-duration compatible seal-on-seal technology (seal-on-seal to support androgynous interface) has been identified as a risk mitigation item.

  20. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Mai; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Kakeyama, Masaki; Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  1. Laser docking sensor engineering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekome, Kent; Barr, Joseph M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA JSC has been involved in the development of Laser sensors for the past ten years in order to support future rendezvous and docking missions, both manned and unmanned. Although many candidate technologies have been breadboarded and evaluated, no sensor hardware designed specifically for rendezvous and docking applications has been demonstrated on-orbit. It has become apparent that representative sensors need to be flown and demonstrated as soon as possible, with minimal cost, to provide the capability of the technology in meeting NASA's future AR&C applications. Technology and commercial component reliability have progressed to where it is now feasible to fly hardware as a detailed test objective minimizing the overall cost and development time. This presentation will discuss the ongoing effort to convert an existing in-house developed breadboard to an engineering model configuration suitable for flight. The modifications include improving the ranger resolution and stability with an in-house design, replacing the rack mounted galvanometric scanner drivers with STD-bus cards, replacing the system controlling personal computer with a microcontroller, and repackaging the subsystems as appropriate. The sensor will use the performance parameters defined in previous JSC requirements working groups as design goals and be built to withstand the space environment where fiscally feasible. Testing of the in-house ranger design is expected to be completed in October. The results will be included in the presentation. Preliminary testing of the ranging circuitry indicates a range resolution of 4mm is possible. The sensor will be mounted in the payload bay on a shelf bracket and have command, control, and display capabilities using the payload general support computer via an RS422 data line.

  2. Spatial Relationships between Markers for Secretory and Endosomal Machinery in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells versus Those in Uninfected Cells▿†

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces extensive remodeling of the secretory apparatus to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (cVAC), where virion tegumentation and envelopment take place. We studied the structure of the cVAC by confocal microscopy to assess the three-dimensional distribution of proteins specifically associated with individual secretory organelles. In infected cells, early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive vesicles are concentrated at the center of the cVAC and, as previously seen, are distinct from structures visualized by markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and trans-Golgi network (TGN). EEA1-positive vesicles can be strongly associated with markers for recycling endosomes, to a lesser extent with markers associated with components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT III) machinery, and then with markers of late endosomes. In comparisons of uninfected and infected cells, we found significant changes in the structural associations and colocalization of organelle markers, as well as in net organelle volumes. These results provide new evidence that the HCMV-induced remodeling of the membrane transport apparatus involves much more than simple relocation and expansion of preexisting structures and are consistent with the hypothesis that the shift in identity of secretory organelles in HCMV-infected cells results in new functional profiles. PMID:21471245

  3. Identification of Docking Possibility Criteria including Recovery from Incomplete Grasping of Docking Mechanism for Nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ui, Kyoichi; Matunaga, Saburo

    This paper deals with a docking methodology for inspection and measurement missions with nanosatellites (less than 50kg in mass). According to the proposed docking concept where a docking procedure is divided into an approaching/grasping phase and a guiding phase, a functional test model for docking mechanism is designed and assembled to conduct verification experiments. In the paper, the docking methodology, the docking mechanism, and a docking control algorithm are introduced briefly. Three dimensional microgravity experiments using a drop shaft are conducted. In the experiments, the authors classify grasping conditions into two types called “complete grasping” and “incomplete grasping”. In the complete grasping, the docking mechanism can easily guide the nanosatellite to the docking port, but in case of the incomplete grasping, it is difficult to recover from the incomplete grasping to the complete one. The incomplete grasping condition is explained experimentally, and a guiding control algorithm for recovery from the condition is proposed. Finally, docking possibility criteria are identified, and feasibility of the methodology is clarified.

  4. Ameloblast transcriptome changes from secretory to maturation stages

    PubMed Central

    Simmer, James P.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Wang, Shih-Kai; Reid, Bryan M.; Bai, Yongsheng; Hu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Jan C.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major molecular components in the secretory and maturation stages of amelogenesis through transcriptome analyses. Ameloblasts (40 sections per age group) were laser micro-dissected from Day 5 (secretory stage) and Days 11–12 (maturation stage) first molars. PolyA+ RNA was isolated from the lysed cells, converted to cDNA, and amplified to generate a cDNA library. DNA sequences were obtained using next generation sequencing and analyzed to identify genes whose expression had increased or decreased at least 1.5-fold in maturation stage relative to secretory stage ameloblasts. Among the 9198 genes that surpassed the quality threshold, 373 showed higher expression in secretory stage, while 614 genes increased in maturation stage ameloblasts. The results were crosschecked against a previously published transcriptome generated from tissues overlying secretory and maturation stage mouse incisor enamel and 34 increasing and 26 decreasing expressers common to the two studies were identified. Expression of F2r, which encodes protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) that showed 10-fold higher expression during the secretory stage in our transcriptome analysis, was characterized in mouse incisors by immunohistochemistry. PAR1 was detected in secretory, but not maturation stage ameloblasts. We conclude that transcriptome analyses are a good starting point for identifying genes/proteins that are critical for proper dental enamel formation and that PAR1 is specifically expressed by secretory stage ameloblasts. PMID:25158176

  5. Effects of wood preservative leachates from docks

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, P.H.; Van Dolah, R.F.; Bobo, M.Y.; Mathews, T.D.

    1994-12-31

    Recent evidence indicates that the wood preservative commonly used in dock pilings (chromated copper arsenate or CCA) is highly toxic to several estuarine organisms in laboratory experiments. Increasing demand for residential docks prompted a field study intended to complement these earlier laboratory investigations. Objectives of the study were to: (1) examine concentrations of Cu, Cr, and As in sediments and oysters from intertidal locations in several creeks with and without high densities of docks; (2) examine the bioaccumulation of wood preservative leachates by laboratory-reared oysters transferred to field sites near and distant from newly constructed docks; and (3) investigate the acute toxicity of wood preservative leachates for several species of estuarine fishes and invertebrates exposed to these compounds in the field. Preliminary results indicate that sediment concentrations of all three metals were well below ER-L levels reported by Long and Morgan at all but one dock site. In an ancillary study, 24h LC{sub 50} bioassays were performed using rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) which were exposed to pore water from sediments in creeks with and without docks. Toxicities of bulk sediments from the same sites were examined using Microtox which measures decreases in bioluminescence of marine bacteria (Photobacterium phosphoreum) as a function of sediment concentration. Neither the rotifer nor the Microtox bioassays showed any significant differences in toxicity between creeks with and without docks.

  6. Advanced Docking System With Magnetic Initial Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L.; Carroll, Monty B.; Morales, Ray; Le, Thang

    2004-01-01

    An advanced docking system is undergoing development to enable softer, safer docking than was possible when using prior docking systems. This system is intended for original use in docking of visiting spacecraft and berthing the Crew Return Vehicle at the International Space Station (ISS). The system could also be adapted to a variety of other uses in outer space and on Earth, including mating submersible vehicles, assembling structures, and robotic berthing/handling of payloads and cargo. Heretofore, two large spacecraft have been docked by causing the spacecraft to approach each other at a speed sufficient to activate capture latches - a procedure that results in large docking loads and is made more difficult because of the speed. The basic design and mode of operation of the present advanced docking system would eliminate the need to rely on speed of approach to activate capture latches, thereby making it possible to reduce approach speed and thus docking loads substantially. The system would comprise an active subsystem on one spacecraft and a passive subsystem on another spacecraft with which the active subsystem will be docked. The passive subsystem would include an extensible ring containing magnetic striker plates and guide petals. The active subsystem would include mating guide petals and electromagnets containing limit switches and would be arranged to mate with the magnetic striker plates and guide petals of the passive assembly. The electromagnets would be carried on (but not rigidly attached to) a structural ring that would be instrumented with load sensors. The outputs of the sensors would be sent, along with position information, as feedback to an electronic control subsystem. The system would also include electromechanical actuators that would extend or retract the ring upon command by the control subsystem.

  7. Insulin-stimulated plasma membrane fusion of Glut4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles is regulated by phospholipase D1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M; Hou, June Chunqiu; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Frohman, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insulin signaling, and traffics with Glut4 to exocytic sites. Increasing PLD1 activity facilitates glucose uptake, whereas decreasing PLD1 activity is inhibitory. Diminished PA production does not substantially hinder trafficking of the vesicles or their docking at the plasma membrane, but it does impede fusion-mediated extracellular exposure of the transporter. The fusion block caused by RNA interference-mediated PLD1 deficiency is rescued by exogenous provision of a lipid that promotes fusion pore formation and expansion, suggesting that the step regulated by PA is late in the process of vesicle fusion. PMID:15772157

  8. From self-assembled vesicles to protocells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Irene A; Walde, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  9. From Self-Assembled Vesicles to Protocells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Irene A.; Walde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  10. Improved Ball-and-Socket Docking Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard; Bryan, Tom

    2004-01-01

    A proposed docking mechanism would form a ball-and-socket joint in the docked condition. The mechanism could tolerate significant initial misalignment because it would include an alignment cone that would guide the ball into the socket. Like other ball-and-socket joints, the joint would have three rotational degrees of freedom. This docking mechanism would be a successor to the one described in Passive Capture Joint With Three Degrees of Freedom (MFS-31146), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 7 (July 1998), page 65. It would contain most of the components of the prior mechanism, plus some additional components that would expand its capabilities.

  11. 21 CFR 866.5380 - Free secretory component immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques free secretory component (normally a portion of the secretory IgA antibody molecule) in... repetitive lung infections and other hypogammaglobulinemic conditions (low antibody levels)....

  12. Vesicle Geometries Enabled by Dynamically Trapped States.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaye; Yao, Zhenwei; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2016-02-23

    Understanding and controlling vesicle shapes is a fundamental challenge in biophysics and materials design. In this paper, we design dynamic protocols for enlarging the shape space of both fluid and crystalline vesicles beyond the equilibrium zone. By removing water from within the vesicle at different rates, we numerically produced a series of dynamically trapped stable vesicle shapes for both fluid and crystalline vesicles in a highly controllable fashion. In crystalline vesicles that are continuously dehydrated, simulations show the initial appearance of small flat areas over the surface of the vesicles that ultimately merge to form fewer flat faces. In this way, the vesicles transform from a fullerene-like shape into various faceted polyhedrons. We perform analytical elasticity analysis to show that these salient features are attributable to the crystalline nature of the vesicle. The potential to use dynamic protocols, such as those used in this study, to engineer vesicle shape transformations is helpful for exploiting the richness of vesicle geometries for desired applications. PMID:26795199

  13. Effect of colchicine on the transport of precursor enamel protein in secretory ameloblasts studied by /sup 3/H-proline radioautography in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, S.; Takano, Y.; Wakisaka, S.; Ichikawa, H.; Nishikawa, S.; Akai, M.

    1988-08-01

    The incorporation of 3H-proline into the secretory ameloblasts of rat molar tooth germs cultured with or without colchicine was studied by light and electron microscope radioautography to determine the function of microtubules in the transport of precursor enamel protein from the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum (rER) to the Golgi cisternae. The grain counts over the transitional vesicles, which accumulated in various cellular regions with colchicine treatment, continued to increase with chase time, unlike in controls. At 30 and 90 min chase, these counts were significantly higher than in controls. Moreover, the total grain count over the organelles (rER, pale granules, and transitional vesicles), which are positioned before the Golgi cisternae in the synthetic pathway, maintained a significantly higher level at 90 min chase in colchicine-treated tooth germs than in controls. The transport of synthesized protein to the Golgi cisternae via transitional vesicles was suppressed in colchicine-treated tooth germs. Some grains appeared with time over pale granular materials that appeared in the intercellular spaces of secretory ameloblasts with colchicine treatment. However, at each chase period, the grain count over pale granular materials was not so high as the count over the enamel in control. The present results indicate that colchicine affects the transport of newly synthesized protein from the rER to the Golgi cisterna via transitional vesicles, probably by interfering with the oriented transport related to microtubular function. It is suggested that the microtubular system may be concerned with the movement of the transitional vesicles.

  14. 1. Full SW side of dock as viewed from shore ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Full SW side of dock as viewed from shore at the Oil/Creosote Unloading Dock. This view formed a panorama with photo WA-131-H-5, which shows the Oil/Creosote Unloading Dock. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, West Dock, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  15. Dry Dock No. 3. Detail view of sidewall, near center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry Dock No. 3. Detail view of sidewall, near center of dock with stair leading to grade level. View facing east-southeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 3, On northern shoreline of shipyard, west of Dry Dock Nos. 1 & 2, near the intersection of Avenue G and Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Dry Dock No. 3 general overview. Looking toward head of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry Dock No. 3 general overview. Looking toward head of dock. View facing southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 3, On northern shoreline of shipyard, west of Dry Dock Nos. 1 & 2, near the intersection of Avenue G and Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S.; Olson, Arthur J.; Sanner, Michel F.

    2015-01-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR–AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 –a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 –a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that

  18. Use of the docking dynamics test facility for rendezvous and docking final approach verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirault, P.; Pairot, J. M.

    1991-12-01

    The Docking and Dynamics Test Facility (DDTF) and its current areas of investigation are reviewed. The following topics are described: tests of an automatic scenario with a closed loop control of the approach to docking using a RV (Rendezvous) sensor breadboard; tests with a representative mockup of the future Docking/Berthing System (DBS), to derive relevant allocation between the GNC (Guidance, Navigation, and Control) system performances and the DBS capabilities; and tests on the last 5 m translation with full human control of the chaser for the Hermes/Columbus mission, where astronauts performed the docking mission. Some recommendations for a future dynamical test bench are given in conclusion.

  19. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S; Olson, Arthur J; Sanner, Michel F

    2015-12-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR-AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 -a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 -a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that down

  20. Design and Preliminary Testing of the International Docking Adapter's Peripheral Docking Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Christopher W.; Blaschak, Johnathan; Eldridge, Erin A.; Brazzel, Jack P.; Spehar, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    The International Docking Adapter's Peripheral Docking Target (PDT) was designed to allow a docking spacecraft to judge its alignment relative to the docking system. The PDT was designed to be compatible with relative sensors using visible cameras, thermal imagers, or Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) technologies. The conceptual design team tested prototype designs and materials to determine the contrast requirements for the features. This paper will discuss the design of the PDT, the methodology and results of the tests, and the conclusions pertaining to PDT design that were drawn from testing.

  1. GPU.proton.DOCK: Genuine Protein Ultrafast proton equilibria consistent DOCKing.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2011-07-01

    GPU.proton.DOCK (Genuine Protein Ultrafast proton equilibria consistent DOCKing) is a state of the art service for in silico prediction of protein-protein interactions via rigorous and ultrafast docking code. It is unique in providing stringent account of electrostatic interactions self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. GPU.proton.DOCK is the first server offering such a crucial supplement to protein docking algorithms--a step toward more reliable and high accuracy docking results. The code (especially the Fast Fourier Transform bottleneck and electrostatic fields computation) is parallelized to run on a GPU supercomputer. The high performance will be of use for large-scale structural bioinformatics and systems biology projects, thus bridging physics of the interactions with analysis of molecular networks. We propose workflows for exploring in silico charge mutagenesis effects. Special emphasis is given to the interface-intuitive and user-friendly. The input is comprised of the atomic coordinate files in PDB format. The advanced user is provided with a special input section for addition of non-polypeptide charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. The output is comprised of docked complexes in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. GPU.proton.DOCK server can be accessed at http://gpudock.orgchm.bas.bg/. PMID:21666258

  2. New Expedition 27 Trio Docks to Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The International Space Station welcomed three new flight engineers when they docked Wednesday April 6, 2011 at 7:09 p.m. EDT in the Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft. Flight Engineers Ron Garan, Alexander S...

  3. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates. PMID:27490497

  4. Protein Flexibility in Docking and Surface Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Lexa, Katrina W.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based drug design has become an essential tool for rapid lead discovery and optimization. As available structural information has increased, researchers have become increasingly aware of the importance of protein flexibility for accurate description of the native state. Typical protein–ligand docking efforts still rely on a single rigid receptor, which is an incomplete representation of potential binding conformations of the protein. These rigid docking efforts typically show the best performance rates between 50 and 75%, while fully flexible docking methods can enhance pose prediction up to 80–95%. This review examines the current toolbox for flexible protein–ligand docking and receptor surface mapping. Present limitations and possibilities for future development are discussed. PMID:22569329

  5. Recent Advances in DOCK8 Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Jing, Huie; Su, Helen C

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of the genetic basis of DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome (DIDS) in 2009, several hundred patients worldwide have been reported, validating and extending the initial clinical descriptions. Importantly, the beneficial role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for this disease has emerged, providing impetus for improved diagnosis. Additionally, several groups have further elucidated the biological functions of DOCK8 in the immune system that help explain disease pathogenesis. Here, we summarize these recent developments. PMID:27207373

  6. Automated rendezvous and docking: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for achieving autonomous rendezvous and docking of two orbiting space vehicles is described. Results of a digital computer simulation of the technique are presented and used to evaluate its performance under a wide variety of conditions, including docking with tumbling spacecraft. The interrelationships between initial range, tumbling rates, fuel consumption, and time requirements are explored. Factors which limit performance are identified and beneficial modifications proposed.

  7. Presynaptic Calcium Channel Localization and Calcium Dependent Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Regulated by the Fuseless Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. Ashleigh; Kim, Eunju; Leung, Hung-Tat; Woodruff, Elvin; An, Lingling; Doerge, R. W.; Pak, William L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Summary A systematic forward genetic Drosophila screen for electroretinogram mutants lacking synaptic transients identified the fuseless (fusl) gene, which encodes a predicted 8-pass transmembrane protein in the presynaptic membrane. Null fusl mutants display >75% reduction in evoked synaptic transmission but, conversely, a ~3-fold increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion events. These neurotransmission defects are rescued by a wildtype fusl transgene targeted only to the presynaptic cell, demonstrating a strictly presynaptic requirement for Fusl function. Defects in FM dye turnover at the synapse show a severely impaired exo-endo synaptic vesicle cycling pool. Consistently, ultrastructural analyses reveal accumulated vesicles arrested in clustered and docked pools at presynaptic active zones. In the absence of Fusl, calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release is dramatically compromised and there is little enhancement of synaptic efficacy with elevated external Ca2+ concentrations. These defects are causally linked with severe loss of the Cacophony voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which fail to localize normally at presynaptic active zone domains in the absence of Fusl. These data indicate that Fusl regulates assembly of the presynaptic active zone Ca2+ channel domains required for efficient coupling of the Ca2+ influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis during neurotransmission. PMID:18385325

  8. AutoDock Vina: improving the speed and accuracy of docking with a new scoring function, efficient optimization and multithreading

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Oleg; Olson, Arthur J.

    2011-01-01

    AutoDock Vina, a new program for molecular docking and virtual screening, is presented. AutoDock Vina achieves an approximately two orders of magnitude speed-up compared to the molecular docking software previously developed in our lab (AutoDock 4), while also significantly improving the accuracy of the binding mode predictions, judging by our tests on the training set used in AutoDock 4 development. Further speed-up is achieved from parallelism, by using multithreading on multi-core machines. AutoDock Vina automatically calculates the grid maps and clusters the results in a way transparent to the user. PMID:19499576

  9. Dockomatic - automated ligand creation and docking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The application of computational modeling to rationally design drugs and characterize macro biomolecular receptors has proven increasingly useful due to the accessibility of computing clusters and clouds. AutoDock is a well-known and powerful software program used to model ligand to receptor binding interactions. In its current version, AutoDock requires significant amounts of user time to setup and run jobs, and collect results. This paper presents DockoMatic, a user friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) application that eases and automates the creation and management of AutoDock jobs for high throughput screening of ligand to receptor interactions. Results DockoMatic allows the user to invoke and manage AutoDock jobs on a single computer or cluster, including jobs for evaluating secondary ligand interactions. It also automates the process of collecting, summarizing, and viewing results. In addition, DockoMatic automates creation of peptide ligand .pdb files from strings of single-letter amino acid abbreviations. Conclusions DockoMatic significantly reduces the complexity of managing multiple AutoDock jobs by facilitating ligand and AutoDock job creation and management. PMID:21059259

  10. Triangulation methods for automated docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, John W.

    1996-01-01

    An automated docking system must have a reliable method for determining range and orientation of the passive (target) vehicle with respect to the active vehicle. This method must also provide accurate information on the rates of change of range to and orientation of the passive vehicle. The method must be accurate within required tolerances and capable of operating in real time. The method being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center employs a single TV camera, a laser illumination system and a target consisting, in its minimal configuration, of three retro-reflectors. Two of the retro-reflectors are mounted flush to the same surface, with the third retro-reflector mounted to a post fixed midway between the other two and jutting at a right angle from the surface. For redundancy, two additional retroreflectors are mounted on the surface on a line at right angles to the line containing the first two retro-reflectors, and equally spaced on either side of the post. The target vehicle will contain a large target for initial acquisition and several smaller targets for close range.

  11. Spontaneous vesicle recycling in the synaptic bouton

    PubMed Central

    Truckenbrodt, Sven; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-01-01

    The trigger for synaptic vesicle exocytosis is Ca2+, which enters the synaptic bouton following action potential stimulation. However, spontaneous release of neurotransmitter also occurs in the absence of stimulation in virtually all synaptic boutons. It has long been thought that this represents exocytosis driven by fluctuations in local Ca2+ levels. The vesicles responding to these fluctuations are thought to be the same ones that release upon stimulation, albeit potentially triggered by different Ca2+ sensors. This view has been challenged by several recent works, which have suggested that spontaneous release is driven by a separate pool of synaptic vesicles. Numerous articles appeared during the last few years in support of each of these hypotheses, and it has been challenging to bring them into accord. We speculate here on the origins of this controversy, and propose a solution that is related to developmental effects. Constitutive membrane traffic, needed for the biogenesis of vesicles and synapses, is responsible for high levels of spontaneous membrane fusion in young neurons, probably independent of Ca2+. The vesicles releasing spontaneously in such neurons are not related to other synaptic vesicle pools and may represent constitutively releasing vesicles (CRVs) rather than bona fide synaptic vesicles. In mature neurons, constitutive traffic is much dampened, and the few remaining spontaneous release events probably represent bona fide spontaneously releasing synaptic vesicles (SRSVs) responding to Ca2+ fluctuations, along with a handful of CRVs that participate in synaptic vesicle turnover. PMID:25538561

  12. Distinct stages in the recognition, sorting, and packaging of proTGFα into COPII-coated transport vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengcheng; Schekman, Randy

    2016-06-15

    In addition to its role in forming vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the coat protein complex II (COPII) is also responsible for selecting specific cargo proteins to be packaged into COPII transport vesicles. Comparison of COPII vesicle formation in mammalian systems and in yeast suggested that the former uses more elaborate mechanisms for cargo recognition, presumably to cope with a significantly expanded repertoire of cargo that transits the secretory pathway. Using proTGFα, the transmembrane precursor of transforming growth factor α (TGFα), as a model cargo protein, we demonstrate in cell-free assays that at least one auxiliary cytosolic factor is specifically required for the efficient packaging of proTGFα into COPII vesicles. Using a knockout HeLa cell line generated by CRISPR/Cas9, we provide functional evidence showing that a transmembrane protein, Cornichon-1 (CNIH), acts as a cargo receptor of proTGFα. We show that both CNIH and the auxiliary cytosolic factor(s) are required for efficient recruitment of proTGFα to the COPII coat in vitro. Moreover, we provide evidence that the recruitment of cargo protein by the COPII coat precedes and may be distinct from subsequent cargo packaging into COPII vesicles. PMID:27122606

  13. Distinct stages in the recognition, sorting, and packaging of proTGFα into COPII-coated transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengcheng; Schekman, Randy

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role in forming vesicles from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the coat protein complex II (COPII) is also responsible for selecting specific cargo proteins to be packaged into COPII transport vesicles. Comparison of COPII vesicle formation in mammalian systems and in yeast suggested that the former uses more elaborate mechanisms for cargo recognition, presumably to cope with a significantly expanded repertoire of cargo that transits the secretory pathway. Using proTGFα, the transmembrane precursor of transforming growth factor α (TGFα), as a model cargo protein, we demonstrate in cell-free assays that at least one auxiliary cytosolic factor is specifically required for the efficient packaging of proTGFα into COPII vesicles. Using a knockout HeLa cell line generated by CRISPR/Cas9, we provide functional evidence showing that a transmembrane protein, Cornichon-1 (CNIH), acts as a cargo receptor of proTGFα. We show that both CNIH and the auxiliary cytosolic factor(s) are required for efficient recruitment of proTGFα to the COPII coat in vitro. Moreover, we provide evidence that the recruitment of cargo protein by the COPII coat precedes and may be distinct from subsequent cargo packaging into COPII vesicles. PMID:27122606

  14. Golgi- and trans-Golgi network-mediated vesicle trafficking is required for wax secretion from epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Heather E; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Yang, Weili; Huang, Yan; Ohlrogge, John; Samuels, A Lacey

    2014-03-01

    Lipid secretion from epidermal cells to the plant surface is essential to create the protective plant cuticle. Cuticular waxes are unusual secretory products, consisting of a variety of highly hydrophobic compounds including saturated very-long-chain alkanes, ketones, and alcohols. These compounds are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but must be trafficked to the plasma membrane for export by ATP-binding cassette transporters. To test the hypothesis that wax components are trafficked via the endomembrane system and packaged in Golgi-derived secretory vesicles, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stem wax secretion was assayed in a series of vesicle-trafficking mutants, including gnom like1-1 (gnl1-1), transport particle protein subunit120-4, and echidna (ech). Wax secretion was dependent upon GNL1 and ECH. Independent of secretion phenotypes, mutants with altered ER morphology also had decreased wax biosynthesis phenotypes, implying that the biosynthetic capacity of the ER is closely related to its structure. These results provide genetic evidence that wax export requires GNL1- and ECH-dependent endomembrane vesicle trafficking to deliver cargo to plasma membrane-localized ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:24468625

  15. Presence of secretory IgA in human periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Torres, J O; Torabinejad, M; Matiz, R A; Mantilla, E G

    1994-02-01

    The concentration of secretory IgA in fluids present in the canals of 33 teeth was determined by the rocket immunoelectrophoresis technique. Except for the presence or absence of communication between the oral cavity and the root canals of the affected teeth, no other clinical finding showed significant statistical correlation with the presence of secretory IgA. The canals which were open to the oral flora had significantly higher concentrations of secretory IgA. Leaving canals open to the oral cavity may result in formation of periapical cysts. PMID:8006572

  16. Mast cell procarboxypeptidase A. Molecular modeling and biochemical characterization of its processing within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Springman, E B; Dikov, M M; Serafin, W E

    1995-01-20

    Previously, we characterized murine mast cell procarboxypeptidase A (MC-proCPA) as an inactive zymogen. To investigate the mechanisms for this lack of enzymatic activity and the processing of the zymogen to the active form, we now have performed molecular modeling of the tertiary structure of murine MC-proCPA based on the x-ray crystallographic structures of porcine pancreatic procarboxypeptidases A and B. Our model predicts that MC-proCPA retains a high degree of structural similarity to its pancreatic homologues. The globular propeptide physically blocks access to the fully formed active site of the catalytic domain and contains a salt bridge to the substrate-binding region that precludes docking of even small substrates. Based on consideration of the predicted tertiary structure and charge field characteristics of the model, the activation site (between GluA94 and Ile1) appears to be highly exposed even after MC-proCPA binds to secretory granule proteoglycans. Based on the steady-state levels of MC-proCPA versus MC-CPA, cycloheximide inhibition of protein synthesis, and brefeldin A blockage of protein sorting, we show that MC-proCPA is processed rapidly in murine mast cell line KiSV-MC14 with a half-life of 26 +/- 5 min (mean +/- S.D., n = 3), and the processing occurs within the secretory granules. The enzyme responsible for this processing may be a thiol protease since treatment of the KiSV-MC14 with 200 microM E-64d, a selective thiol-protease inhibitor, increases MC-proCPA by 2.7 +/- 0.2-fold (mean +/- S.D., n = 3) within 6 h of application. PMID:7836395

  17. Tail docking in pigs: acute physiological and behavioural responses.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, M A; Bryer, P J; Krebs, N; McGlone, J J

    2008-02-01

    Tail docking of piglets is a routine procedure on farms to control tail-biting behaviour; however, docking can cause an acute stress response. The objectives of this research were to determine the stress responses to tail docking in piglets and to compare two methods of tail docking; cautery iron (CAUT) and the more commonly used blunt trauma cutters (BT). At approximately 6 days of age, piglets were tail docked using CAUT (n = 20), BT (n = 20) or sham tail docked with their tails remaining intact (CON; n = 40). Blood samples were taken prior to tail docking and at 30, 60 and 90 min after tail docking to evaluate the effect of tail docking on white blood cell (WBC) measures and cortisol concentrations. The above experiment was repeated to observe behaviour without the periodic blood sampling, so as not to confound the effects of blood sampling on piglet behaviour. Piglet behaviour was recorded in the farrowing crate using 1 min scan-samples via live observations for 60 min prior to and 90 min after tail docking. Total WBC counts were reduced (P > 0.05) among BT and CAUT compared with CON piglets 30 min after tail docking. Cortisol concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) among BT compared with CON and CAUT piglets 60 min after tail docking. Cautery and BT-docked piglets spent more (P < 0.05) time posterior scooting compared with CON piglets between 0 and 15 min, and 31 and 45 min after tail docking. Piglets tail docked using CAUT and BT tended to spend more (P < 0.07) time sitting than CON piglets between 0 and 15 min post tail docking. Elevated blood cortisol can be reduced by the use of the CAUT rather than the BT method of tail docking. Although the tail docking-induced rise in cortisol was prevented by using CAUT, the behavioural response to BT and CAUT docking methods was similar. PMID:22445023

  18. DOCK2 and DOCK5 Act Additively in Neutrophils To Regulate Chemotaxis, Superoxide Production, and Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mayuki; Terasawa, Masao; Miyano, Kei; Yanagihara, Toyoshi; Uruno, Takehito; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Côté, Jean-François; Sumimoto, Hideki; Fukui, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are highly motile leukocytes that play important roles in the innate immune response to invading pathogens. Neutrophils rapidly migrate to the site of infections and kill pathogens by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Neutrophil chemotaxis and ROS production require activation of Rac small GTPase. DOCK2, an atypical guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), is one of the major regulators of Rac in neutrophils. However, because DOCK2 deficiency does not completely abolish fMLF-induced Rac activation, other Rac GEFs may also participate in this process. In this study, we show that DOCK5 acts with DOCK2 in neutrophils to regulate multiple cellular functions. We found that fMLF- and PMA-induced Rac activation were almost completely lost in mouse neutrophils lacking both DOCK2 and DOCK5. Although β2 integrin–mediated adhesion occurred normally even in the absence of DOCK2 and DOCK5, mouse neutrophils lacking DOCK2 and DOCK5 exhibited a severe defect in chemotaxis and ROS production. Similar results were obtained when human neutrophils were treated with CPYPP, a small-molecule inhibitor of these DOCK GEFs. Additionally, we found that DOCK2 and DOCK5 regulate formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Because NETs are involved in vascular inflammation and autoimmune responses, DOCK2 and DOCK5 would be a therapeutic target for controlling NET-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:25339677

  19. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  20. Ultrasound-responsive ultrathin multiblock copolyamide vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Chunyang; Huang, Tong; Xu, Shuting; Bai, Yongping; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation.This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experiments and characterization, and FT-IR, TEM, DPD, FL and micro-DSC results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08596a

  1. Deformation of vesicles flowing through capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkova, V.; Mader, M.; Podgorski, T.

    2004-11-01

    The flow of giant lipid vesicles through cylindrical capillaries is experimentally investigated. Vesicles are deflated with reduced volumes between 0.8 and 1, corresponding to prolate spheroidal equilibrium shapes. Both interior and exterior fluids are sugar solutions with viscosities close to 10-3 Pa s. Vesicles are aspirated into a capillary tube with a diameter close to the vesicle size and a constant flow rate is imposed. Significant deformation of the membrane occurs and increases when the velocity, confinement or deflation of the vesicle are increased. The mobility of vesicles, defined as the ratio of their velocity to the average velocity of the fluid is a decreasing function of confinement. Our experimental system provides a controllable and flexible tool to investigate deformability effects responsible for crucial aspects of blood rheology in capillaries.

  2. Optogenetic Acidification of Synaptic Vesicles and Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grauel, M. Katharina; Wozny, Christian; Bentz, Claudia; Blessing, Anja; Rosenmund, Tanja; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Acidification is required for the function of many intracellular organelles, but methods to acutely manipulate their intraluminal pH have not been available. Here we present a targeting strategy to selectively express the light-driven proton pump Arch3 on synaptic vesicles. Our new tool, pHoenix, can functionally replace endogenous proton pumps, enabling optogenetic control of vesicular acidification and neurotransmitter accumulation. Under physiological conditions, glutamatergic vesicles are nearly full, as additional vesicle acidification with pHoenix only slightly increased the quantal size. By contrast, we found that incompletely filled vesicles exhibited a lower release probability than full vesicles, suggesting preferential exocytosis of vesicles with high transmitter content. Our subcellular targeting approach can be transferred to other organelles, as demonstrated for a pHoenix variant that allows light-activated acidification of lysosomes. PMID:26551543

  3. GalaxyDock2: protein-ligand docking using beta-complex and global optimization.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Deok-Soo; Seok, Chaok

    2013-11-15

    In this article, an enhanced version of GalaxyDock protein-ligand docking program is introduced. GalaxyDock performs conformational space annealing (CSA) global optimization to find the optimal binding pose of a ligand both in the rigid-receptor mode and the flexible-receptor mode. Binding pose prediction has been improved compared to the earlier version by the efficient generation of high-quality initial conformations for CSA using a predocking method based on a beta-complex derived from the Voronoi diagram of receptor atoms. Binding affinity prediction has also been enhanced by using the optimal combination of energy components, while taking into consideration the energy of the unbound ligand state. The new version has been tested in terms of binding mode prediction, binding affinity prediction, and virtual screening on several benchmark sets, showing improved performance over the previous version and AutoDock, on which the GalaxyDock energy function is based. GalaxyDock2 also performs better than or comparable to other state-of-the-art docking programs. GalaxyDock2 is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/softwares/galaxydock.html. PMID:24108416

  4. Docking screens: right for the right reasons?

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Peter; Irwin, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas docking screens have emerged as the most practical way to use protein structure for ligand discovery, an inconsistent track record raises questions about how well docking actually works. In its favor, a growing number of publications report the successful discovery of new ligands, often supported by experimental affinity data and controls for artifacts. Few reports, however, actually test the underlying structural hypotheses that docking makes. To be successful and not just lucky, prospective docking must not only rank a true ligand among the top scoring compounds, it must also correctly orient the ligand so the score it receives is biophysically sound. If the correct binding pose is not predicted, a skeptic might well infer that the discovery was serendipitous. Surveying over 15 years of the docking literature, we were surprised to discover how rarely sufficient evidence is presented to establish whether docking actually worked for the right reasons. The paucity of experimental tests of theoretically predicted poses undermines confidence in a technique that has otherwise become widely accepted. Of course, solving a crystal structure is not always possible, and even when it is, it can be a lot of work, and is not readily accessible to all groups. Even when a structure can be determined, investigators may prefer to gloss over an erroneous structural prediction to better focus on their discovery. Still, the absence of a direct test of theory by experiment is a loss for method developers seeking to understand and improve docking methods. We hope this review will motivate investigators to solve structures and compare them with their predictions whenever possible, to advance the field. PMID:19754393

  5. Crusader Automated Docking System Phase 3 report

    SciTech Connect

    Jatko, W.B.; Goddard, J.S.; Ferrell, R.K.; Gleason, S.S.; Hicks, J.S.; Varma, V.K.

    1996-03-01

    The US Army is developing the next generation of battlefield artillery vehicles, including an advanced, self-propelled howitzer and a companion resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to rendezvous with the howitzer near the battlefront and to upload ammunition to the howitzer. The Army has recommended that the vehicles incorporate robotics to increase safety, by allowing the crew to remain inside their vehicles during resupply operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed an autonomous docking system for a 6-D.F. robotic, ammunition transfer arm. The docking system augments the operator`s abilities by determining the position and orientation (pose) of a docking port. The pose is the location of the x, y, and z reference axes in 3-D space; and the orientation is the rotations--roll, pitch, and yaw--about those axes. Bye precisely determining the pose of the docking port, the robot can be instructed to move to the docking position without operator intervention. The system uses a video camera and frame grabber to digitize images of the special docking port. Custom algorithms were developed to recognize the port in the camera image, to determine the pose from its image features, and to distribute the results to the robot control computer. The system is loosely coupled to the robot and can be easily adapted to different mechanical configurations. The system has successfully demonstrated autonomous docking on a 24-in. tabletop robot and a 12-ft ammunition resupply robot. The update rate, measurement accuracy, continuous operation, and accuracy with obstructed view have been determined experimentally.

  6. DockQ: A Quality Measure for Protein-Protein Docking Models

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art to assess the structural quality of docking models is currently based on three related yet independent quality measures: Fnat, LRMS, and iRMS as proposed and standardized by CAPRI. These quality measures quantify different aspects of the quality of a particular docking model and need to be viewed together to reveal the true quality, e.g. a model with relatively poor LRMS (>10Å) might still qualify as 'acceptable' with a descent Fnat (>0.50) and iRMS (<3.0Å). This is also the reason why the so called CAPRI criteria for assessing the quality of docking models is defined by applying various ad-hoc cutoffs on these measures to classify a docking model into the four classes: Incorrect, Acceptable, Medium, or High quality. This classification has been useful in CAPRI, but since models are grouped in only four bins it is also rather limiting, making it difficult to rank models, correlate with scoring functions or use it as target function in machine learning algorithms. Here, we present DockQ, a continuous protein-protein docking model quality measure derived by combining Fnat, LRMS, and iRMS to a single score in the range [0, 1] that can be used to assess the quality of protein docking models. By using DockQ on CAPRI models it is possible to almost completely reproduce the original CAPRI classification into Incorrect, Acceptable, Medium and High quality. An average PPV of 94% at 90% Recall demonstrating that there is no need to apply predefined ad-hoc cutoffs to classify docking models. Since DockQ recapitulates the CAPRI classification almost perfectly, it can be viewed as a higher resolution version of the CAPRI classification, making it possible to estimate model quality in a more quantitative way using Z-scores or sum of top ranked models, which has been so valuable for the CASP community. The possibility to directly correlate a quality measure to a scoring function has been crucial for the development of scoring functions for protein structure

  7. Protein-Protein Docking with F2Dock 2.0 and GB-Rerank

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rezaul; Rasheed, Muhibur; Keidel, Donald; Moussalem, Maysam; Olson, Arthur; Sanner, Michel; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Computational simulation of protein-protein docking can expedite the process of molecular modeling and drug discovery. This paper reports on our new F2 Dock protocol which improves the state of the art in initial stage rigid body exhaustive docking search, scoring and ranking by introducing improvements in the shape-complementarity and electrostatics affinity functions, a new knowledge-based interface propensity term with FFT formulation, a set of novel knowledge-based filters and finally a solvation energy (GBSA) based reranking technique. Our algorithms are based on highly efficient data structures including the dynamic packing grids and octrees which significantly speed up the computations and also provide guaranteed bounds on approximation error. Results The improved affinity functions show superior performance compared to their traditional counterparts in finding correct docking poses at higher ranks. We found that the new filters and the GBSA based reranking individually and in combination significantly improve the accuracy of docking predictions with only minor increase in computation time. We compared F2 Dock 2.0 with ZDock 3.0.2 and found improvements over it, specifically among 176 complexes in ZLab Benchmark 4.0, F2 Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution as the top prediction for 22 complexes; where ZDock 3.0.2 does so for 13 complexes. F2 Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution within the top 1000 predictions for 106 complexes as opposed to 104 complexes for ZDock 3.0.2. However, there are 17 and 15 complexes where F2 Dock 2.0 finds a solution but ZDock 3.0.2 does not and vice versa; which indicates that the two docking protocols can also complement each other. Availability The docking protocol has been implemented as a server with a graphical client (TexMol) which allows the user to manage multiple docking jobs, and visualize the docked poses and interfaces. Both the server and client are available for download. Server: http

  8. DockQ: A Quality Measure for Protein-Protein Docking Models.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sankar; Wallner, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art to assess the structural quality of docking models is currently based on three related yet independent quality measures: Fnat, LRMS, and iRMS as proposed and standardized by CAPRI. These quality measures quantify different aspects of the quality of a particular docking model and need to be viewed together to reveal the true quality, e.g. a model with relatively poor LRMS (>10Å) might still qualify as 'acceptable' with a descent Fnat (>0.50) and iRMS (<3.0Å). This is also the reason why the so called CAPRI criteria for assessing the quality of docking models is defined by applying various ad-hoc cutoffs on these measures to classify a docking model into the four classes: Incorrect, Acceptable, Medium, or High quality. This classification has been useful in CAPRI, but since models are grouped in only four bins it is also rather limiting, making it difficult to rank models, correlate with scoring functions or use it as target function in machine learning algorithms. Here, we present DockQ, a continuous protein-protein docking model quality measure derived by combining Fnat, LRMS, and iRMS to a single score in the range [0, 1] that can be used to assess the quality of protein docking models. By using DockQ on CAPRI models it is possible to almost completely reproduce the original CAPRI classification into Incorrect, Acceptable, Medium and High quality. An average PPV of 94% at 90% Recall demonstrating that there is no need to apply predefined ad-hoc cutoffs to classify docking models. Since DockQ recapitulates the CAPRI classification almost perfectly, it can be viewed as a higher resolution version of the CAPRI classification, making it possible to estimate model quality in a more quantitative way using Z-scores or sum of top ranked models, which has been so valuable for the CASP community. The possibility to directly correlate a quality measure to a scoring function has been crucial for the development of scoring functions for protein structure

  9. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  10. Endosomal vesicles as vehicles for viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is the principal cell entry pathway for large cargo and pathogens. Among the wide variety of specialized lipid structures within endosomes, the intraluminal vesicles formed in early endosomes and transferred to late endosomal compartments are emerging as critical effectors of viral infection and immune recognition. Various viruses deliver their genomes into these intraluminal vesicles, which serve as vehicles to transport the genome to the nuclear periphery for replication. When secreted as exosomes, intraluminal vesicles containing viral genomes can infect permissive cells, or activate immune responses in myeloid cells. We therefore propose that endosomal intraluminal vesicles and exosomes are key effectors of viral pathogenesis. PMID:24746011

  11. Autonomous movement of a chemically powered vesicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shivam; Sreeja, K. K.; Thakur, Snigdha

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the diffusio-phoretic motion of a deformable vesicle. A vesicle is built from the linked catalytic and noncatalytic vertices that consumes fuel in the environment and utilize the resulting self-generated concentration gradient to exhibit propulsive motion. Under nonequilibrium conditions it is found that the self-propulsion velocity of the vesicle depends on its shape, which in turn is controlled by the bending rigidity of the membrane and solvent density around it. The self-propulsion velocity of the vesicle for different shapes has been calculated and the factors which affect the velocity are identified.

  12. Probing Rotational Viscosity in Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zeigler, Maxwell B.; Allen, Peter B.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle (SV) is a central organelle in neurotransmission, and previous studies have suggested that SV protein 2 (SV2) may be responsible for forming a gel-like matrix within the vesicle. Here we measured the steady-state rotational anisotropy of the fluorescent dye, Oregon Green, within individual SVs. By also measuring the fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green in SVs, we determined the mean rotational viscosity to be 16.49 ± 0.12 cP for wild-type (WT) empty mice vesicles (i.e., with no neurotransmitters), 11.21 ± 0.12 cP for empty vesicles from SV2 knock-out mice, and 11.40 ± 0.65 cP for WT mice vesicles loaded with the neurotransmitter glutamate (Glu). This measurement shows that SV2 is an important determinant of viscosity within the vesicle lumen, and that the viscosity decreases when the vesicles are filled with Glu. The viscosities of both empty SV2 knock-out vesicles and Glu-loaded WT vesicles were significantly different from that of empty WT SVs (p < 0.05). This measurement represents the smallest enclosed volume in which rotational viscosity has been measured thus far. PMID:21641331

  13. Vesicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... poison ivy) Herpes simplex (cold sores, genital herpes ) Herpes zoster (shingles) Impetigo Fungal infections Burns Home Care It is ... disease on the soles Herpes simplex - close-up Herpes zoster (shingles) - close-up of lesion Poison ivy on ...

  14. Secretory pathway of cellulase: a mini-review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cellulase plays an important role in modern industry and holds great potential in biofuel production. Many different types of organisms produce cellulase, which go through secretory pathways to reach the extracellular space, where enzymatic reactions take place. Secretory pathways in various cells have been the focus of many research fields; however, there are few studies on secretory pathways of cellulases in the literature. It is therefore necessary and important to review the current knowledge on the secretory pathways of cellulases. In this mini-review, we address the subcellular locations of cellulases in different organisms, discuss the secretory pathways of cellulases in different organisms, and examine the secretory mechanisms of cellulases. These sections start with a description of general secreted proteins, advance to the situation of cellulases, and end with the knowledge of cellulases, as documented in UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). Finally, gaps in existing knowledge are highlighted, which may shed light on future studies for biofuel engineering. PMID:24295495

  15. Mother Centriole Distal Appendages Mediate Centrosome Docking at the Immunological Synapse and Reveal Mechanistic Parallels with Ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, Jane C; Randzavola, Lyra O; Angus, Karen L; Mantell, Judith M; Verkade, Paul; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2015-12-21

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are highly effective serial killers capable of destroying virally infected and cancerous targets by polarized release from secretory lysosomes. Upon target contact, the CTL centrosome rapidly moves to the immunological synapse, focusing microtubule-directed release at this point [1-3]. Striking similarities have been noted between centrosome polarization at the synapse and basal body docking during ciliogenesis [1, 4-8], suggesting that CTL centrosomes might dock with the plasma membrane during killing, in a manner analogous to primary cilia formation [1, 4]. However, questions remain regarding the extent and function of centrosome polarization at the synapse, and recent reports have challenged its role [9, 10]. Here, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography analysis to show that, as in ciliogenesis, the distal appendages of the CTL mother centriole contact the plasma membrane directly during synapse formation. This is functionally important as small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting of the distal appendage protein, Cep83, required for membrane contact during ciliogenesis [11], impairs CTL secretion. Furthermore, the regulatory proteins CP110 and Cep97, which must dissociate from the mother centriole to allow cilia formation [12], remain associated with the mother centriole in CTLs, and neither axoneme nor transition zone ciliary structures form. Moreover, complete centrosome docking can occur in proliferating CTLs with multiple centriole pairs. Thus, in CTLs, centrosomes dock transiently with the membrane, within the cell cycle and without progression into ciliogenesis. We propose that this transient centrosome docking without cilia formation is important for CTLs to deliver rapid, repeated polarized secretion directed by the centrosome. PMID:26670998

  16. Mutants defective in secretory/vacuolar pathways in the EUROFAN collection of yeast disruptants.

    PubMed

    Avaro, Sandrine; Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Sibella-Argüelles, Carla; Volland, Christiane; Haguenauer-Tsapis, Rosine

    2002-03-15

    We have screened the EUROFAN (European Functional Analysis Network) deletion strain collection for yeast mutants defective in secretory/vacuolar pathways and/or associated biochemical modifications. We used systematic Western immunoblotting to analyse the electrophoretic pattern of several markers of the secretory/vacuolar pathways, the soluble alpha-factor, the periplasmic glycoprotein invertase, the plasma membrane GPI-anchored protein Gas1p, and two vacuolar proteins, the soluble carboxypeptidase Y and the membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase, which are targeted to the vacuole by different pathways. We also used colony immunoblotting to monitor the secretion of carboxypeptidase Y into the medium, to identify disruptants impaired in vacuolar targeting. We identified 25 mutants among the 631 deletion strains. Nine of these mutants were disrupted in genes identified in recent years on the basis of their involvement in trafficking (VPS53, VAC7, VAM6, APM3, SYS1), or glycosylation (ALG12, ALG9, OST4, ROT2). Three of these genes were identified on the basis of trafficking defects by ourselves and others within the EUROFAN project (TLG2, RCY1, MON2). The deletion of ERV29, which encodes a COPII vesicle protein, impaired carboxypeptidase Y trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. We also identified eight unknown ORFs, the deletion of which reduced Golgi glycosylation or impaired the Golgi to vacuole trafficking of carboxypeptidase Y. YJR044c, which we identified as a new VPS gene, encodes a protein with numerous homologues of unknown function in sequence databases. PMID:11870858

  17. Protein docking using case-based reasoning.

    PubMed

    Ghoorah, Anisah W; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Smaïl-Tabbone, Malika; Ritchie, David W

    2013-12-01

    Protein docking algorithms aim to calculate the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein complex starting from its unbound components. Although ab initio docking algorithms are improving, there is a growing need to use homology modeling techniques to exploit the rapidly increasing volumes of structural information that now exist. However, most current homology modeling approaches involve finding a pair of complete single-chain structures in a homologous protein complex to use as a 3D template, despite the fact that protein complexes are often formed from one or more domain-domain interactions (DDIs). To model 3D protein complexes by domain-domain homology, we have developed a case-based reasoning approach called KBDOCK which systematically identifies and reuses domain family binding sites from our database of nonredundant DDIs. When tested on 54 protein complexes from the Protein Docking Benchmark, our approach provides a near-perfect way to model single-domain protein complexes when full-homology templates are available, and it extends our ability to model more difficult cases when only partial or incomplete templates exist. These promising early results highlight the need for a new and diverse docking benchmark set, specifically designed to assess homology docking approaches. PMID:24123156

  18. Protein-protein docking with backbone flexibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chu; Bradley, Philip; Baker, David

    2007-10-19

    Computational protein-protein docking methods currently can create models with atomic accuracy for protein complexes provided that the conformational changes upon association are restricted to the side chains. However, it remains very challenging to account for backbone conformational changes during docking, and most current methods inherently keep monomer backbones rigid for algorithmic simplicity and computational efficiency. Here we present a reformulation of the Rosetta docking method that incorporates explicit backbone flexibility in protein-protein docking. The new method is based on a "fold-tree" representation of the molecular system, which seamlessly integrates internal torsional degrees of freedom and rigid-body degrees of freedom. Problems with internal flexible regions ranging from one or more loops or hinge regions to all of one or both partners can be readily treated using appropriately constructed fold trees. The explicit treatment of backbone flexibility improves both sampling in the vicinity of the native docked conformation and the energetic discrimination between near-native and incorrect models. PMID:17825317

  19. Proteomics of extracellular vesicles: Exosomes and ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Almost all bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic cells shed extracellular vesicles either constitutively or in a regulated manner. These nanosized membrane vesicles are spherical, bilayered proteolipids that harbor specific subsets of proteins, DNAs, RNAs, and lipids. Recent research has facilitated conceptual advancements in this emerging field that indicate that extracellular vesicles act as intercellular communicasomes by transferring signals to their target cell via surface ligands and delivering receptors and functional molecules. Recent progress in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles derived from diverse cell types and body fluids has resulted in the identification of several thousand vesicular proteins that provide us with essential clues to the molecular mechanisms involved in vesicle cargo sorting and biogenesis. Furthermore, cell-type- or disease-specific vesicular proteins help us to understand the pathophysiological functions of extracellular vesicles and contribute to the discovery of diagnostic and therapeutic target proteins. This review focuses on the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles (i.e., exosomes and ectosomes), EVpedia (a free web-based integrated database of high-throughput data for systematic analyses of extracellular vesicles; http://evpedia.info), and the intravesicular protein-protein interaction network analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles. The goal of this article is to encourage further studies to construct a comprehensive proteome database for extracellular vesicles that will help us to not only decode the biogenesis and cargo-sorting mechanisms during vesicle formation but also elucidate the pathophysiological roles of these complex extracellular organelles. PMID:24421117

  20. Electrical synapse formation disrupts calcium-dependent exocytosis, but not vesicle mobilization.

    PubMed

    Neunuebel, Joshua P; Zoran, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Electrical coupling exists prior to the onset of chemical connectivity at many developing and regenerating synapses. At cholinergic synapses in vitro, trophic factors facilitated the formation of electrical synapses and interfered with functional neurotransmitter release in response to photolytic elevations of intracellular calcium. In contrast, neurons lacking trophic factor induction and electrical coupling possessed flash-evoked transmitter release. Changes in cytosolic calcium and postsynaptic responsiveness to acetylcholine were not affected by electrical coupling. These data indicate that transient electrical synapse formation delayed chemical synaptic transmission by imposing a functional block between the accumulation of presynaptic calcium and synchronized, vesicular release. Despite the inability to release neurotransmitter, neurons that had possessed strong electrical coupling recruited secretory vesicles to sites of synaptic contact. These results suggest that the mechanism by which neurotransmission is disrupted during electrical synapse formation is downstream of both calcium influx and synaptic vesicle mobilization. Therefore, electrical synaptogenesis may inhibit synaptic vesicles from acquiring a readily releasable state. We hypothesize that gap junctions might negatively interact with exocytotic processes, thereby diminishing chemical neurotransmission. PMID:15765535

  1. Mannose 6-Phosphate Receptors Regulate the Formation of Clathrin-coated Vesicles in the TGN

    PubMed Central

    Borgne, Roland Le; Hoflack, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    The transport of the two mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPRs) from the secretory pathway to the endocytic pathway is mediated by carrier vesicles coated with the AP-1 Golgi-specific assembly protein and clathrin. Using an in vitro assay that reconstitutes the ARF-1–dependent translocation of cytosolic AP-1 onto membranes of the TGN, we have previously reported that the MPRs are key components for the efficient recruitment of AP-1 (Le Borgne, R., G. Griffiths, and B. Hoflack. 1996. J. Biol. Chem. 271:2162–2170). Using a polyclonal antibody against the mouse γ-adaptin, we have now examined the steady state distribution of AP-1 after subcellular fractionation of mouse fibroblasts lacking both MPRs or reexpressing physiological levels of either MPR. We report that the amount of AP-1 bound to membranes and associated with clathrin-coated vesicles depends on the expression level of the MPRs and on the integrity of their cytoplasmic domains. Thus, these results indicate that the concentration of the MPRs, i.e., the major transmembrane proteins sorted toward the endosomes, determines the number of clathrin-coated vesicles formed in the TGN. PMID:9128246

  2. Effect of the Secretory Small GTPase Rab27B on Breast Cancer Growth, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, An; Maynard, Dawn; Pauwels, Patrick; Braems, Geert; Denys, Hannelore; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Lambert, Jo; Van Belle, Simon; Cocquyt, Veronique; Gespach, Christian; Bracke, Marc; Seabra, Miguel C.; Gahl, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Secretory GTPases like Rab27B control vesicle exocytosis and deliver critical proinvasive growth regulators into the tumor microenvironment. The expression and role of Rab27B in breast cancer were unknown. Methods Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused with wild-type Rab3D, Rab27A, or Rab27B, or Rab27B point mutants defective in GTP/GDP binding or geranylgeranylation, or transient silencing RNA to the same proteins was used to study Rab27B in estrogen receptor (ER)–positive human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75.1). Cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry, western blotting, and measurement of cell proliferation rates, and invasion was assessed using Matrigel and native type I collagen substrates. Orthotopic tumor growth, local invasion, and metastasis were analyzed in mouse xenograft models. Mass spectrometry identified proinvasive growth regulators that were secreted in the presence of Rab27B. Rab27B protein levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 59 clinical breast cancer specimens, and Rab3D, Rab27A, and Rab27B mRNA levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 20 specimens. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results Increased expression of Rab27B promoted G1 to S phase cell cycle transition, proliferation and invasiveness of cells in culture, and invasive tumor growth and hemorrhagic ascites production in a xenograft mouse model (n = 10; at 10 weeks, survival of MCF-7 GFP- vs GFP-Rab27B–injected mice was 100% vs 62.5%, hazard ratio = 0.26, 95% confidence interval = 0.08 to 0.88, P = .03). Mass spectrometric analysis of purified Rab27B-secretory vesicles identified heat-shock protein 90α as key proinvasive growth regulator. Heat-shock protein 90α secretion was Rab27B-dependent and was required for matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation. All Rab27B-mediated functional responses were GTP- and geranylgeranyl-dependent. Presence of endogenous Rab27B mRNA and protein, but

  3. Proteolysis sensitizes LDL particles to phospholipolysis by secretory phospholipase A2 group V and secretory sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Plihtari, Riia; Hurt-Camejo, Eva; Öörni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2010-01-01

    LDL particles that enter the arterial intima become exposed to proteolytic and lipolytic modifications. The extracellular hydrolases potentially involved in LDL modification include proteolytic enzymes, such as chymase, cathepsin S, and plasmin, and phospholipolytic enzymes, such as secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2-IIa and sPLA2-V) and secretory acid sphingomyelinase (sSMase). Here, LDL was first proteolyzed and then subjected to lipolysis, after which the effects of combined proteolysis and lipolysis on LDL fusion and on binding to human aortic proteoglycans (PG) were studied. Chymase and cathepsin S led to more extensive proteolysis and release of peptide fragments from LDL than did plasmin. sPLA2-IIa was not able to hydrolyze unmodified LDL, and even preproteolysis of LDL particles failed to enhance lipolysis by this enzyme. However, preproteolysis with chymase and cathepsin S accelerated lipolysis by sPLA2-V and sSMase, which resulted in enhanced fusion and proteoglycan binding of the preproteolyzed LDL particles. Taken together, the results revealed that proteolysis sensitizes the LDL particles to hydrolysis by sPLA2-V and sSMase. By promoting fusion and binding of LDL to human aortic proteoglycans, the combination of proteolysis and phospholipolysis of LDL particles potentially enhances extracellular accumulation of LDL-derived lipids during atherogenesis. PMID:20124257

  4. COMPARABLE OUTCOMES IN NON-SECRETORY AND SECRETORY MULTIPLE MYELOMA AFTER AUTOLOGOUS STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Pérez, Waleska S.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Ballen, Karen; Bashey, Asad; To, L. Bik; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Elfenbein, Gerald J.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Kyle, Robert A.; Lacy, Martha Q.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Milone, Gustavo A.; Moreb, Jan S.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Reece, Donna E.; Vesole, David H.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hari, Parameswaran

    2008-01-01

    Non-secretory myeloma (NSM) accounts for <5% of cases of multiple myeloma (MM). The outcome of these patients following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has not been evaluated in clinical trials. We compared the outcomes after ASCT for patients with NSM reported to the CIBMTR between 1989 and 2003, to a matched group of 438 patients (4 controls for each patient) with secretory myeloma (SM). The patients were matched using propensity scores calculated using age, Durie-Salmon stage, sensitivity to pre-transplant therapy, time from diagnosis to transplant and year of transplant. Disease characteristics were similar in both groups at diagnosis and at transplant except higher risk of anemia, hypoalbuminemia and marrow plasmacytosis (in SM) and plasmacytoma (more in NSM). Cumulative incidence of TRM, relapse, PFS and OS were similar between the groups. In multivariate analysis, based on a Cox model stratified on matched pairs and adjusted for covariates not considered in the propensity score, we found no difference in outcome between the NSM and SM groups. In this large cohort of patients undergoing ASCT, we found no difference in outcomes of patients with NSM compared to those with SM. PMID:18804043

  5. Progressive quality control of secretory proteins in the early secretory compartment by ERp44

    PubMed Central

    Sannino, Sara; Anelli, Tiziana; Cortini, Margherita; Masui, Shoji; Degano, Massimo; Fagioli, Claudio; Inaba, Kenji; Sitia, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    ERp44 is a pH-regulated chaperone of the secretory pathway. In the acidic milieu of the Golgi, its C-terminal tail changes conformation, simultaneously exposing the substrate-binding site for cargo capture and the RDEL motif for ER retrieval via interactions with cognate receptors. Protonation of cysteine 29 in the active site allows tail movements in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that also conserved histidines in the C-terminal tail regulate ERp44 in vivo. Mutants lacking these histidines are hyperactive in retaining substrates. Surprisingly, they are also O-glycosylated and partially secreted. Co-expression of client proteins prevents secretion of the histidine mutants, forcing tail opening and RDEL accessibility. Client-induced RDEL exposure allows retrieval of proteins from distinct stations along the secretory pathway, as indicated by the changes in O-glycosylation patterns upon over-expression of different partners. The ensuing gradients may help optimising folding and assembly of different cargoes. Endogenous ERp44 is O-glycosylated and secreted by human primary endometrial cells, suggesting possible pathophysiological roles of these processes. PMID:25097228

  6. Overview of LIDS Docking Seals Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Pat; Steinetz, Bruce; Daniels, Chris

    2008-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit, the Moon, and Mars. This mechanism, called the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS), is designed to connect pressurized space vehicles and structures including the Crew Exploration Vehicle, International Space Station, and lunar lander. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this new docking system. These seals will be approximately 147 cm (58 in.) in diameter. GRC is evaluating the performance of candidate seal designs under simulated operating conditions at both sub-scale and full-scale levels. GRC is ultimately responsible for delivering flight hardware seals to NASA Johnson Space Center around 2013 for integration into LIDS flight units.

  7. Electrical shock absorber for docking control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Shohei; Suzuki, Masayuki; Hibino, Ryoichi; Ito, Mitsuo

    Results are reported from a preliminary experimental study examining an electromechanical actuator for a docking system in space, with emphasis on the attenuation and shock-absorbing characteristics of the actuator. A laboratory prototype of an electromechanical docking system which uses a sonar ranging system as a substitute for the laser range sensor and is controlled by a microprocessor is presented. The configuration of the experimental system consists of a rack and pinion gear actuator, a servo motor, sensors, a digital controller and an air-lifted docking target. For the design of the attenuator controller, the linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control design method is applied. For the purpose of attenuation on a specified frequency band, the application of a frequency-weighted LQG method and frequency domain method such as H2 and H-infinity control theory are considered.

  8. Electro-optical rendezvous and docking sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, David J.; Kesler, Lynn O.; Sirko, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Electro-optical sensors provide unique and critical functionality for space missions requiring rendezvous, docking, and berthing. McDonnell Douglas is developing a complete rendezvous and docking system for both manned and unmanned missions. This paper examines our sensor development and the systems and missions which benefit from rendezvous and docking sensors. Simulation results quantifying system performance improvements in key areas are given, with associated sensor performance requirements. A brief review of NASA-funded development activities and the current performance of electro-optical sensors for space applications is given. We will also describe current activities at McDonnell Douglas for a fully functional demonstration to address specific NASA mission needs.

  9. Transcriptomic comparison of Aspergillus niger growing on two different sugars reveals coordinated regulation of the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Thomas R; Goosen, Theo; van den Hondel, Cees AMJJ; Ram, Arthur FJ; Iversen, Jens JL

    2009-01-01

    Background The filamentous fungus, Aspergillus niger, responds to nutrient availability by modulating secretion of various substrate degrading hydrolases. This ability has made it an important organism in industrial production of secreted glycoproteins. The recent publication of the A. niger genome sequence and availability of microarrays allow high resolution studies of transcriptional regulation of basal cellular processes, like those of glycoprotein synthesis and secretion. It is known that the activities of certain secretory pathway enzymes involved N-glycosylation are elevated in response to carbon source induced secretion of the glycoprotein glucoamylase. We have investigated whether carbon source dependent enhancement of protein secretion can lead to upregulation of secretory pathway elements extending beyond those involved in N-glycosylation. Results This study compares the physiology and transcriptome of A. niger growing at the same specific growth rate (0.16 h-1) on xylose or maltose in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. Transcription profiles were obtained using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis of six replicate cultures for each of the two growth-limiting carbon sources. The production rate of extracellular proteins per gram dry mycelium was about three times higher on maltose compared to xylose. The defined culture conditions resulted in high reproducibility, discriminating even low-fold differences in transcription, which is characteristic of genes encoding basal cellular functions. This included elements in the secretory pathway and central metabolic pathways. Increased protein secretion on maltose was accompanied by induced transcription of > 90 genes related to protein secretion. The upregulated genes encode key elements in protein translocation to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), folding, N-glycosylation, quality control, and vesicle packaging and transport between ER and Golgi. The induction effect of maltose resembles the unfolded protein response

  10. Secretory sphingomyelinase in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Rhein, Cosima; Müller, Christian P; Mühle, Christiane

    2015-06-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism, hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. In mammals, the expression of a single gene, SMPD1, results in two forms of the enzyme that differ in several characteristics. Lysosomal ASM (L-ASM) is located within the lysosome, requires no additional Zn2+ ions for activation and is glycosylated mainly with high-mannose oligosaccharides. By contrast, the secretory ASM (S-ASM) is located extracellularly, requires Zn2+ ions for activation, has a complex glycosylation pattern and has a longer in vivo half-life. In this review, we summarize current knowledge regarding the physiology and pathophysiology of S-ASM, including its sources and distribution, molecular and cellular mechanisms of generation and regulation and relevant in vitro and in vivo studies. Polymorphisms or mutations of SMPD1 lead to decreased S-ASM activity, as detected in patients with Niemann-Pick disease B. Thus, lower serum/plasma activities of S-ASM are trait markers. No genetic causes of increased S-ASM activity have been identified. Instead, elevated activity is the result of enhanced release (e.g., induced by lipopolysaccharide and cytokine stimulation) or increased enzyme activation (e.g., induced by oxidative stress). Increased S-ASM activity in serum or plasma is a state marker of a wide range of diseases. In particular, high S-ASM activity occurs in inflammation of the endothelium and liver. Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between S-ASM activity and mortality induced by severe inflammatory diseases. Serial measurements of S-ASM reveal prolonged activation and, therefore, the measurement of this enzyme may also provide information on past inflammatory processes. Thus, S-ASM may be both a promising clinical chemistry marker and a therapeutic target. PMID:25803076

  11. AnchorDock: Blind and Flexible Anchor-Driven Peptide Docking.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Niv, Masha Y

    2015-05-01

    The huge conformational space stemming from the inherent flexibility of peptides is among the main obstacles to successful and efficient computational modeling of protein-peptide interactions. Current peptide docking methods typically overcome this challenge using prior knowledge from the structure of the complex. Here we introduce AnchorDock, a peptide docking approach, which automatically targets the docking search to the most relevant parts of the conformational space. This is done by precomputing the free peptide's structure and by computationally identifying anchoring spots on the protein surface. Next, a free peptide conformation undergoes anchor-driven simulated annealing molecular dynamics simulations around the predicted anchoring spots. In the challenging task of a completely blind docking test, AnchorDock produced exceptionally good results (backbone root-mean-square deviation ≤ 2.2Å, rank ≤15) for 10 of 13 unbound cases tested. The impressive performance of AnchorDock supports a molecular recognition pathway that is driven via pre-existing local structural elements. PMID:25914054

  12. SAMPL4 & DOCK3.7: Lessons for automated docking procedures

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ryan G.; Sterling, Teague; Weiss, Dahlia R.

    2014-01-01

    The SAMPL4 challenges were used to test current automated methods for solvation energy, virtual screening, pose and affinity prediction of the molecular docking pipeline DOCK 3.7. Additionally, first-order models of binding affinity were proposed as milestones for any method predicting binding affinity. Several important discoveries about the molecular docking software were made during the challenge: 1) Solvation energies of ligands were five-fold worse than any other method used in SAMPL4, including methods that were similarly fast, 2) HIV Integrase is a challenging target, but automated docking on the correct allosteric site performed well in terms of virtual screening and pose prediction (compared to other methods) but affinity prediction, as expected, was very poor, 3) Molecular docking grid sizes can be very important, serious errors were discovered with default settings that have been adjusted for all future work. Overall, lessons from SAMPL4 suggest many changes to molecular docking tools, not just DOCK 3.7, that could improve the state of the art. Future difficulties and projects will be discussed. PMID:24515818

  13. Synaptic vesicle distribution by conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-03-01

    The equal distribution of synaptic vesicles among synapses along the axon is critical for robust neurotransmission. Wong et al. show that the continuous circulation of synaptic vesicles throughout the axon driven by molecular motors ultimately yields this even distribution. PMID:22385955

  14. Molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle pool heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Devon C; Kavalali, Ege T

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal communication relies on chemical synaptic transmission for information transfer and processing. Chemical neurotransmission is initiated by synaptic vesicle fusion with the presynaptic active zone resulting in release of neurotransmitters. Classical models have assumed that all synaptic vesicles within a synapse have the same potential to fuse under different functional contexts. In this model, functional differences among synaptic vesicle populations are ascribed to their spatial distribution in the synapse with respect to the active zone. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that synaptic vesicles are not a homogenous population of organelles, and they possess intrinsic molecular differences and differential interaction partners. Recent studies have reported a diverse array of synaptic molecules that selectively regulate synaptic vesicles' ability to fuse synchronously and asynchronously in response to action potentials or spontaneously irrespective of action potentials. Here we discuss these molecular mediators of vesicle pool heterogeneity that are found on the synaptic vesicle membrane, on the presynaptic plasma membrane, or within the cytosol and consider some of the functional consequences of this diversity. This emerging molecular framework presents novel avenues to probe synaptic function and uncover how synaptic vesicle pools impact neuronal signaling. PMID:25620674

  15. Dynamical simulations of vesicle growth and division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Prebiotic cells constitute a beautiful and intriguing example of self-replicating vesicles. How these cells managed to grow and divide without sophisticated machinery is still an open question. The properties of these primitive vesicles can shed light on the ways modern cells have evolved by exploiting those characteristics to develop their replication mechanisms. The equilibrium configurations of elastic shells are well understood, however the dynamical behavior during growth still lacks of a deep theoretical understanding. To study vesicle growth from a general perspective, we have developed a minimal generic model where vesicles are represented by a 2D spring network and characterized by a minimum set of magnitudes: growth rate, permeability, bending stiffness, viscosity and temperature. We have performed hybrid molecuar dynamic simulations as a function of a reduced set of dimensionless parameters. Three main outcomes were observed: vesicles that grow without division, vesicles that divide symmetrically, and vesicles that act as generators of daughter vesicles. The type of outcome depends on the system parameters and specifically on its dynamics via two timescales. Furthermore, we found sets of parameters where the system shows size homeostasis. TRH was supported by Ramon Areces Foundation.

  16. Feruloyl Dioleoyglycerol Antioxidant Capacity in Phospholipid Vesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl dioleoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molecule was incorporated into single-lamellar vesicles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine at ...

  17. Transport of Ions through Vesicle Bilayers

    PubMed

    Kaiser; Hoffmann

    1996-12-01

    Stopped flow measurements to determine the permeability of vesicles are presented. The kinetics of the reaction between FeSCN2+ and F- ions is used to monitor the permeability of vesicles. Samples with vesicles that have been equilibrated with the iron complex are mixed with F- solutions. The reaction is followed by UV/VIS absorption. The influence of temperature and surfactant concentration on the membrane permeability of large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles was studied. A dramatic increase of the permeability of the LUVs is observed when 30 to 40 mol% of the surfactant OP-10 (main component of Triton X-100) is added to the lipid. It is assumed that the increased permeability is due to the stabilization of transient defects in the bilayers of the vesicles as shown previously by other groups. Furthermore, a strong binding of the iron (III) thiocyanate complex to the phospholipid is observed by UV/VIS spectroscopy and zeta-potential measurements. Additional experiments with vesicles from a fluorocarbon surfactant show a much higher permeability than the phospholipid system. Models for the diffusion of either the iron (III) complex or the fluoride ions through the vesicles bilayer are discussed for LUV as well as for vesicles from a fluorocarbon surfactant. The results indicate that the rate-determining step is the diffusion of the iron complex through the membrane. PMID:8954634

  18. Functional Advantages of Porphyromonas gingivalis Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Meng-Hsuan; Chen, Chin-Ho; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Wang, Bing-Yan; Xie, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen of periodontitis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been considered as both offense and defense components of this bacterium. Previous studies indicated that like their originating cells, P. gingivalis vesicles, are able to invade oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts, in order to promote aggregation of some specific oral bacteria and to induce host immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the invasive efficiency of P. gingivalis OMVs and compared results with that of the originating cells. Results revealed that 70–90% of human primary oral epithelial cells, gingival fibroblasts, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells carried vesicles from P. gingivalis 33277 after being exposed to the vesicles for 1 h, while 20–50% of the host cells had internalized P. gingivalis cells. We also detected vesicle-associated DNA and RNA and a vesicle-mediated horizontal gene transfer in P. gingivalis strains, which represents a novel mechanism for gene transfer between P. gingivalis strains. Moreover, purified vesicles of P. gingivalis appear to have a negative impact on biofilm formation and the maintenance of Streptococcus gordonii. Our results suggest that vesicles are likely the best offence weapon of P. gingivalis for bacterial survival in the oral cavity and for induction of periodontitis. PMID:25897780

  19. Molecular Underpinnings of Synaptic Vesicle Pool Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Devon C.; Kavalali, Ege T.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal communication relies on chemical synaptic transmission for information transfer and processing. Chemical neurotransmission is initiated by synaptic vesicle fusion with the presynaptic active zone resulting in release of neurotransmitters. Classical models have assumed that all synaptic vesicles within a synapse have the same potential to fuse under different functional contexts. In this model, functional differences among synaptic vesicle populations are ascribed to their spatial distribution in the synapse with respect to the active zone. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that synaptic vesicles are not a homogenous population of organelles, and they possess intrinsic molecular differences and differential interaction partners. Recent studies have reported a diverse array of synaptic molecules that selectively regulate synaptic vesicles' ability to fuse synchronously and asynchronously in response to action potentials or spontaneously irrespective of action potentials. Here we discuss these molecular mediators of vesicle pool heterogeneity that are found on the synaptic vesicle membrane, on the presynaptic plasma membrane, or within the cytosol and consider some of the functional consequences of this diversity. This emerging molecular framework presents novel avenues to probe synaptic function and uncover how synaptic vesicle pools impact neuronal signaling. PMID:25620674

  20. Nanoplasmonic ruler to measure lipid vesicle deformation.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Špačková, Barbora; Linardy, Eric; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Homola, Jiří; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A nanoplasmonic ruler method is presented in order to measure the deformation of adsorbed, nm-scale lipid vesicles on solid supports. It is demonstrated that single adsorbed vesicles undergo greater deformation on silicon oxide over titanium oxide, offering direct experimental evidence to support membrane tension-based theoretical models of supported lipid bilayer formation. PMID:26466086

  1. A new quantitative (two-photon extracellular polar-tracer imaging-based quantification (TEPIQ)) analysis for diameters of exocytic vesicles and its application to mouse pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Haruo; Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Kishimoto, Takuya; Liu, Ting-Ting; Nemoto, Tomomi; Takahashi, Noriko

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an imaging approach to estimate the diameter of exocytic vesicles that are smaller than the resolution of an optical microscope and present within intact tissue. This approach is based on two-photon excitation imaging of polar tracers in the extracellular medium, is designated TEPIQ (two-photon extracellular polar-tracer imaging-based quantification), and has three variants. TEPIQ analysis of ΔV measures vesicle volume with a fluid-phase tracer, sulforhodamine B (SRB). TEPIQ analysis of ΔS determines vesicle surface area with a polar membrane tracer, FM1-43. TEPIQ analysis of ΔV/ΔS estimates vesicle diameter from the SRB/FM1-43 fluorescence ratio. TEPIQ analysis is insensitive to microscope settings because the same setup is used for calibration and actual experiments. We tested the validity of TEPIQ with glucose-induced exocytosis from beta-cells within pancreatic islets. The three TEPIQ variants yielded estimates for the mean diameter of exocytic vesicles of between 340 and 390 nm, consistent with the size of insulin granules. TEPIQ analysis relies on the combination of two-photon excitation imaging, the narrow intercellular spaces of intact tissue, and the presence of diffusible polar tracers in the extracellular medium. It allows quantitative imaging of exocytosis within secretory organs, yielding estimates of vesicle diameter with nanometer resolution. PMID:16150799

  2. A new quantitative (two-photon extracellular polar-tracer imaging-based quantification (TEPIQ)) analysis for diameters of exocytic vesicles and its application to mouse pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Haruo; Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Kishimoto, Takuya; Liu, Ting-Ting; Nemoto, Tomomi; Takahashi, Noriko

    2005-11-01

    We have developed an imaging approach to estimate the diameter of exocytic vesicles that are smaller than the resolution of an optical microscope and present within intact tissue. This approach is based on two-photon excitation imaging of polar tracers in the extracellular medium, is designated TEPIQ (two-photon extracellular polar-tracer imaging-based quantification), and has three variants. TEPIQ analysis of DeltaV measures vesicle volume with a fluid-phase tracer, sulforhodamine B (SRB). TEPIQ analysis of DeltaS determines vesicle surface area with a polar membrane tracer, FM1-43. TEPIQ analysis of DeltaV/DeltaS estimates vesicle diameter from the SRB/FM1-43 fluorescence ratio. TEPIQ analysis is insensitive to microscope settings because the same setup is used for calibration and actual experiments. We tested the validity of TEPIQ with glucose-induced exocytosis from beta-cells within pancreatic islets. The three TEPIQ variants yielded estimates for the mean diameter of exocytic vesicles of between 340 and 390 nm, consistent with the size of insulin granules. TEPIQ analysis relies on the combination of two-photon excitation imaging, the narrow intercellular spaces of intact tissue, and the presence of diffusible polar tracers in the extracellular medium. It allows quantitative imaging of exocytosis within secretory organs, yielding estimates of vesicle diameter with nanometer resolution. PMID:16150799

  3. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein-ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2012-07-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein-ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments-the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein-ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html. PMID:22669908

  4. Apollo-Soyuz test project docking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, W. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The United States and Soviet Union in July 1975 successfully completed a joint space mission utilizing each country's spacecraft and the compatible docking system designed and fabricated by each country. The compatible docking system is described, along with the extensive research, development, and testing leading up to the successful mission. It also describes the formulation and implementation of methods for breaking the language barrier, bridging the extensive distances for communication and travel, and adjusting to each country's different culture during the three-year development program.

  5. Proximity Operations and Docking Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Brewster, Linda L.; Lee, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) has been under development for the last three years as a long-range proximity operations and docking sensor for use in an Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) system. The first autonomous rendezvous and docking in the history of the U.S. Space Program was successfully accomplished by Orbital Express, using the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) as the primary docking sensor. That flight proved that the United States now has a mature and flight proven sensor technology for supporting Crew Exploration Vehicles (CEV) and Commercial Orbital Transport Systems (COTS) Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D). NASA video sensors have worked well in the past: the AVGS used on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission operated successfully in spot mode out to 2 km, and the first generation rendezvous and docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on Space Shuttle flights in 1997 and 1998. 12 Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of more AVGS units, and the next generation sensor was updated to allow it to support the CEV and COTS programs. The flight proven AR&D sensor has been redesigned to update parts and add additional capabilities for CEV and COTS with the development of the Next Generation AVGS at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The obsolete imager and processor are being replaced with new radiation tolerant parts. In addition, new capabilities include greater sensor range, auto ranging capability, and real-time video output. This paper presents some sensor hardware trades, use of highly integrated laser components, and addresses the needs of future vehicles that may rendezvous and dock with the International Space Station (ISS) and other Constellation vehicles. It also discusses approaches for upgrading AVGS to address parts obsolescence, and concepts for minimizing the sensor footprint, weight, and power requirements

  6. Visualizing synaptic vesicle turnover and pool refilling driven by calcium nanodomains at presynaptic active zones of ribbon synapses.

    PubMed

    Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Matthews, Gary

    2014-06-10

    Ribbon synapses of photoreceptor cells and second-order bipolar neurons in the retina are specialized to transmit graded signals that encode light intensity. Neurotransmitter release at ribbon synapses exhibits two kinetically distinct components, which serve different sensory functions. The faster component is depleted within milliseconds and generates transient postsynaptic responses that emphasize changes in light intensity. Despite the importance of this fast release for processing temporal and spatial contrast in visual signals, the physiological basis for this component is not precisely known. By imaging synaptic vesicle turnover and Ca(2+) signals at single ribbons in zebrafish bipolar neurons, we determined the locus of fast release, the speed and site of Ca(2+) influx driving rapid release, and the location where new vesicles are recruited to replenish the fast pool after it is depleted. At ribbons, Ca(2+) near the membrane rose rapidly during depolarization to levels >10 µM, whereas Ca(2+) at nonribbon locations rose more slowly to the lower level observed globally, consistent with selective positioning of Ca(2+) channels near ribbons. The local Ca(2+) domain drove rapid exocytosis of ribbon-associated synaptic vesicles nearest the plasma membrane, accounting for the fast component of neurotransmitter release. However, new vesicles replacing those lost arrived selectively at the opposite pole of the ribbon, distal to the membrane. Overall, the results suggest a model for fast release in which nanodomain Ca(2+) triggers exocytosis of docked vesicles, which are then replaced by more distant ribbon-attached vesicles, creating opportunities for new vesicles to associate with the ribbon at membrane-distal sites. PMID:24912160

  7. The distribution of PAX-2 immunoreactivity in the prostate gland, seminal vesicle, and ejaculatory duct: comparison with prostatic adenocarcinoma and discussion of prostatic zonal embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Quick, Charles M; Gokden, Neriman; Sangoi, Ankur R; Brooks, James D; McKenney, Jesse K

    2010-08-01

    PAX-2 is a homeogene strongly expressed during development of the genitourinary tract, including the kidney and both wolffian- and müllerian-derived tissues. Expression of PAX-2 by immunohistochemistry has been studied mainly in renal epithelial neoplasms with little attention to the lower male genitourinary tract. We studied PAX-2 expression in epithelium of normal seminal vesicle, normal ejaculatory duct, normal prostatic secretory epithelium, and prostatic adenocarcinoma to define its immunoreactivity pattern throughout the prostate gland and to evaluate its potential diagnostic role in the discrimination of seminal vesicle/ejaculatory duct epithelium from prostatic adenocarcinoma. In addition, given that PAX-2 is highly expressed in tissues of wolffian duct embryologic origin, we also sought to confirm the divergent embryogenesis of the central zone, seminal vesicle, and ejaculatory duct from other regions of the prostate. Prostatectomy specimens from 12 patients were reviewed to identify blocks containing seminal vesicle, ejaculatory duct, periurethral glands, benign prostatic glands, and prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. A total of 35 blocks from the 12 patients were evaluated. In addition, 2 tissue microarrays representing 15 additional seminal vesicles and 45 prostatic adenocarcinomas, 7 whole sections from prostatic adenocarcinomas of the central zone, and 5 core needle biopsies of seminal vesicle were also evaluated with anti-PAX-2 antibody. In the 12 radical prostatectomy whole sections, nuclear reactivity for PAX-2 was identified in 12 (100%) of 12 of the seminal vesicle epithelium, 9 (90%) of 10 of the ejaculatory duct epithelium, 0 of 12 of the prostatic adenocarcinoma, and 0 of 6 of the high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. All 20 total additional seminal vesicles were positive for PAX-2 in the tissue microarray and biopsies; and all 52 additional prostatic adenocarcinomas were negative, including 7 of central zone origin. The staining

  8. Membrane tensiometer for heavy giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, P.-H.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2004-10-01

    One key parameter of giant-vesicles adhesion is their membrane tension, σ. A theoretically simple but delicate way to impose (and measure) it is to use micropipette manipulation techniques. But usually, the vesicles are free and their tension is unknown, until an adhesion patch grows. σ can be deduced from the detailed profile of the membrane close to the substrate, but this method is limited to very low tensions. We present here a rather simple way to estimate the membrane tension of heavy vesicles, which sediment close to a surface, by observing by RIM the size of the flat region of the vesicle. As an application, we follow the slow flattening of vesicles, when the surrounding sugar solution is evaporating, and their light-induced tensioning.

  9. [Transvesical Removal of Seminal Vesicle Cystadenoma].

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Kenta; Harada, Jiro; Kawa, Gen; Ota, Syuichi; Sakurai, Takanori

    2015-07-01

    Primary tumors of the seminal vesicles are extremely rare. There have been 25 reports of this tumor from overseas and most cases are cystadenoma. We report a case of seminal vesicle cystadenoma in a 70-year-old man who presented with lower abdominal pain and urinary frequency. A digital rectal examination detected a projecting and hard mass in the right side of the prostate. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 15 cm multiple cystic mass continuous with the right seminal vesicle. A transrectal needle biopsy revealed benign tissue. The tumor was resected using an open transvesical approach that enabled full exposure of the seminal vesicle without damaging the nerves and blood supply of the bladder. Pathology was consistent with a benign seminal vesicle cystadenoma. We describe the natural history, pathology,and surgical approach in this case. PMID:26278217

  10. New links between vesicle coats and Rab-mediated vesicle targeting

    PubMed Central

    Angers, Cortney G.; Merz, Alexey J.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking is a highly regulated process that transports proteins and other cargoes through eukaryotic cells while maintaining cellular organization and compartmental identity. In order for cargo to reach the correct destination, each step of trafficking must impart specificity. During vesicle formation, this is achieved by coat proteins, which selectively incorporate cargo into the nascent vesicle. Classically, vesicle coats are thought to dissociate shortly after budding. However, recent studies suggest that coat proteins can remain on the vesicle en route to their destination, imparting targeting specificity by physically and functionally interacting with Rab-regulated tethering systems. This review focuses on how interactions among Rab GTPases, tethering factors, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coats contribute to vesicle targeting, fusion, and coat dynamics. PMID:20643221

  11. 11. Northeast front, dock no. 493. View to west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Northeast front, dock no. 493. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  12. 5. Southwest front, dock no. 492. View to east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Southwest front, dock no. 492. View to east. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. 12. View to north along recovery dock along east side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View to north along recovery dock along east side of firing pier. Steel brackets originally supported a sheltering canopy over the dock. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  14. 3. Top surface of dock including railroad tracks; looking NW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Top surface of dock including railroad tracks; looking NW from shore end. Paving block mill location is partially visible on right one half of photo. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, West Dock, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  15. 20. VIEW OF EAST END OF SPERRY OCEAN DOCK, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF EAST END OF SPERRY OCEAN DOCK, SHOWING SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATION, INCLUDING PORTION OF THE SPERRY OCEAN DOCK DECK, LOOKING NORTH - Puget Sound Flouring Mills, 611 Schuster Parkway, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  16. DETAIL OF NOSE DOCK DOOR ON NORTH (FRONT) ELEVATION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NOSE DOCK DOOR ON NORTH (FRONT) ELEVATION OF BUILDING. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Aircraft Maintenance Dock, Alabama Avenue at Arkansas Street, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  17. View south, wharf B, showing western docking structure, decking detail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south, wharf B, showing western docking structure, decking detail - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  18. 19. View of initiation of docking for the USS ENTERPRISE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of initiation of docking for the USS ENTERPRISE, showing vessel approaching entrance to dock (11/28/85). - Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 4, East terminus of Palou Avenue, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. 23. View, looking east, of USS ENTERPRISE in Dry Dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. View, looking east, of USS ENTERPRISE in Dry Dock No. 4 with dock pumped down (11/86). - Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 4, East terminus of Palou Avenue, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. 22. GENERAL VIEW OF DOCK, TAKEN FROM THE ROOF OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. GENERAL VIEW OF DOCK, TAKEN FROM THE ROOF OF THE POWER HOUSE, LOOKING NORTH. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. 4. South (shore) end of dock as viewed from shore ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. South (shore) end of dock as viewed from shore looking north includes section of creosote pipe as it leaves the shore. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Oil-Creosote Unloading Dock, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  2. A New Scoring Function for Molecular Docking Based on AutoDock and AutoDock Vina.

    PubMed

    Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Tanin, Volodymyr O; Vovk, Andriy I; Poda, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Molecular docking of small molecules in the protein binding sites is the most widely used computational technique in modern structure-based drug discovery. Although accurate prediction of binding modes of small molecules can be achieved in most cases, estimation of their binding affinities remains mediocre at best. As an attempt to improve the correlation between the inhibitory constants, pKi, and scoring, we created a new, hybrid scoring function. The new function is a linear combination of the terms of the scoring functions of AutoDock and AutoDock Vina. It was trained on 2,412 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBbind database (www.pdbbind.org.cn, version 2012) and validated on a set of 313 complexes released in the 2013 version as a test set. The new function was included in a modified version of AutoDock. The hybrid scoring function showed a statistically significant improvement in both training and test sets in terms of correlation with and root mean square and mean absolute errors in prediction of pKi values. It was also tested on the CSAR 2014 Benchmark Exercise dataset (team T) and produced reasonably good results. PMID:26302746

  3. Question 7: new aspects of interactions among vesicles.

    PubMed

    Stano, Pasquale

    2007-10-01

    In this short article I discuss the relevance of two aspects of vesicle reactivity that are germane to understand the role of compartments in the origin of early cells. Studies of vesicle self-reproduction indicate that simple vesicles can grow and divide, maintaining inside most of their content and giving rise to a simple autopoietic system. New aspects of vesicle reactivity are also introduced, such as selection and competition processes within vesicle populations, emphasizing the concepts of vesicle diversity, inter-vesicles and vesicles-environment interactions, intended as synthetic analogs of primitive 'ecological' processes. PMID:17610045

  4. Cholesterol and synaptic vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Fratangeli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Lipids may affect synaptic function in at least two ways: by acting as ligands for effector proteins [e.g., phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate, diacylglycerol-mediated signaling] or by modifying the physicochemical properties and molecular organization of synaptic membranes. One that acts in the latter manner is cholesterol, an essential structural component of plasma membranes that is largely enriched in the membranes of synapses and synaptic vesicles, in which it may be involved in lipid-lipid and protein-lipid interactions. Cholesterol is an important constituent of the “membrane rafts” that may play a role in recruiting and organizing the specific proteins of the exocytic pathways. Furthermore, many synaptic proteins bind directly to cholesterol. The regulation of cholesterol and lipid levels may therefore influence the specific interactions and activity of synaptic proteins, and have a strong impact on synaptic functions. PMID:20798824

  5. Morphometric studies on venom secretory cells from Bothrops jararacussu (Jararacuçu) before and after venom extraction.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, S M; Pinto, V R; Jared, C; Lula, L A; Faria, F P; Sesso, A

    1991-01-01

    A comparative morphometrical analysis was carried out on secretory cells from Bothrops jararacussu venom glands, before manual extraction of the venom (milking) and 4 and 8 days after milking. At the 8th day after milking, the cytoplasmic volume increased by 160%. The rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) volume density increase, up to the 8th day after milking, is mainly due to widening of the intra-scisternal space. The total volume and membrane surface of the RER. Golgi apparatus and subcomponents, secretory vesicles and mitochondria, increased during the experimental period while the volume and surface densities of these organelles, with the exception of the RER, did not vary. The numerical density of Golgi-associated microvesicles per Golgi volume unit also increased. The greatest relative increments in these parameters occurred within the first 4 days. These results are compatible with an increased rate of membrane synthesis and transport in the milked glands and suggest that the membrane biogenesis, degradation and circulation that takes place in the first week after milking is achieved through coordinated cellular mechanisms that maintain the rate between total membrane surface and total cytoplasmic volume unaltered. PMID:1926160

  6. 4. Southwest fronts, dock nos. 491 and 492. Southeast end, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Southwest fronts, dock nos. 491 and 492. Southeast end, dock no. 492. View to north. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Nose Docks, On either side of Hangar Access Apron at Northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  7. 1. Aerial view looking south at Dry Docks 2 and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Aerial view looking south at Dry Docks 2 and 3. A battleship (possibly the USS PENNSYLVANIA or USS ARIZONA) is in Dock 3. Future Dry Dock 4 site and Point Avisadero is in the upper right corner of photo (1935). Photographer unknown. - Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 4, East terminus of Palou Avenue, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. Dry Dock No. 3 general overview. Looking toward caisson end. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry Dock No. 3 general overview. Looking toward caisson end. View facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 3, On northern shoreline of shipyard, west of Dry Dock Nos. 1 & 2, near the intersection of Avenue G and Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. View of head of dry dock with stair to left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of head of dry dock with stair to left of shot. View facing south - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 2, On northern shoreline of Shipyard, between Dry Dock Nos. 1 & 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Dry Dock No. 3 general overview. Looking toward caisson end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry Dock No. 3 general overview. Looking toward caisson end with crane tracks in view. View facing north-northeast - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 3, On northern shoreline of shipyard, west of Dry Dock Nos. 1 & 2, near the intersection of Avenue G and Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Cross Coupling Between Attenuators In A Docking Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmberg, Arthur; Schmidt, Matthew S.; Ghofranian, Siamak

    1996-01-01

    Cross coupling between motion attenuators on opposite sides of docking mechanism proposed as means of increasing capture envelope. Prototype system for application of cross-coupling concept is one used for docking of Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft; however, given widespread use of docking mechanisms, concept may prove useful in many terrestrial applications as well.

  12. Service building. Cross section thru dry dock nos. 4 & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Service building. Cross section thru dry dock nos. 4 & 5 showing service bldg & 20-75-150 ton cranes (dry dock associates, May 23, 1941). In files of Cushman & Wakefield, building no. 501, Philadelphia Naval Business Center. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Service Building, Dry Docks No. 4 & 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. 6. Looking west showing top of dock: steaming frozen ore ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Looking west showing top of dock: steaming frozen ore which had been put in pockets in December 1959, May 6, 1990. Photographer: unknown - Marquette Ore Dock No. 6, Ore Dock, On pilings in Marquette City Lower Harbor, Marquette, Marquette County, MI

  14. 17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. CovalentDock Cloud: a web server for automated covalent docking.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Xuchang; Zhou, Shuo; Ge, Zemei; Li, Runtao; Kwoh, Chee Keong

    2013-07-01

    Covalent binding is an important mechanism for many drugs to gain its function. We developed a computational algorithm to model this chemical event and extended it to a web server, the CovalentDock Cloud, to make it accessible directly online without any local installation and configuration. It provides a simple yet user-friendly web interface to perform covalent docking experiments and analysis online. The web server accepts the structures of both the ligand and the receptor uploaded by the user or retrieved from online databases with valid access id. It identifies the potential covalent binding patterns, carries out the covalent docking experiments and provides visualization of the result for user analysis. This web server is free and open to all users at http://docking.sce.ntu.edu.sg/. PMID:23677616

  16. Vision-guided heterogeneous mobile robot docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spofford, John R.; Blitch, John; Klarquist, William N.; Murphy, Robin R.

    1999-08-01

    Teams of heterogeneous mobile robots are a key aspect of future unmanned system for operations in complex and dynamic urban environments, such as that envisioned by DARPA's Tactical Mobile Robotics program. One examples of an interaction among such team members is the docking of small robot of limited sensory and processing capability with a larger, more capable robot. Applications for such docking include the transfer of power, data, and materia, as well as physically combined maneuver or manipulation. A two-robot system is considered in this paper. The smaller 'throwable' robot contains a video camera capable of imaging the larger 'packable' robot and transmitting the imagery. The packable robot can both sense the throwable robot through an onboard camera, as well as sense itself through the throwable robot's transmitted video, and is capable of processing imagery from either source. This paper describes recent results in the development of control and sensing strategies for automatic mid-range docking of these two robots. Decisions addressed include the selection of which robot's image sensor to use and which robot to maneuver. Initial experimental results are presented for docking using sensor data from each robot.

  17. DOCK8 deficiency in six Iranian patients.

    PubMed

    Saghafi, Shiva; Pourpak, Zahra; Nussbaumer, Franziska; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Houshmand, Massoud; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Nabavi, Mohammad; Parvaneh, Nima; Grimbacher, Bodo; Moin, Mostafa; Glocker, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    DOCK8 deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive combined immunodeficiency with high IgE level, eosinophilia, severe eczema, extensive cutaneous viral, and respiratory bacterial infections, mostly in populations with higher prevalence of consanguinity. Molecular diagnosis of this gene is a useful approach for early diagnosis and timely HSCT due to deleterious consequences. PMID:27398204

  18. Accurate Prediction of Docked Protein Structure Similarity.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2015-09-01

    One of the major challenges for protein-protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate nativelike structures. The protein docking community agrees on the existence of a relationship between various favorable intermolecular interactions (e.g. Van der Waals, electrostatic, desolvation forces, etc.) and the similarity of a conformation to its native structure. Different docking algorithms often formulate this relationship as a weighted sum of selected terms and calibrate their weights against specific training data to evaluate and rank candidate structures. However, the exact form of this relationship is unknown and the accuracy of such methods is impaired by the pervasiveness of false positives. Unlike the conventional scoring functions, we propose a novel machine learning approach that not only ranks the candidate structures relative to each other but also indicates how similar each candidate is to the native conformation. We trained the AccuRMSD neural network with an extensive dataset using the back-propagation learning algorithm. Our method achieved predicting RMSDs of unbound docked complexes with 0.4Å error margin. PMID:26335807

  19. Autonomous docking ground demonstration (category 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Steve L.; Eick, Richard E.; Baxter, James M.; Boyd, M. G.; Clark, Fred D.; Lee, Thomas Q.; Othon, L. T.; Prather, Joseph L.; Spehar, Peter T.; Teders, Rebecca J.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) is involved in the development of an autonomous docking ground demonstration. The demonstration combines the technologies, expertise and facilities of the JSC Tracking and Communications Division (EE), Structures and Mechanics Division (ES), and the Navigation, Guidance and Control Division (EG) and their supporting contractors. The autonomous docking ground demonstration is an evaluation of the capabilities of the laser sensor system to support the docking phase (12ft to contact) when operated in conjunction with the Guidance, Navigation and Control Software. The docking mechanism being used was developed for the Apollo Soyuz Test Program. This demonstration will be conducted using the Six-Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF) Dynamic Test System (DTS). The DTS environment simulates the Space Station Freedom as the stationary or target vehicle and the Orbiter as the active or chase vehicle. For this demonstration the laser sensor will be mounted on the target vehicle and the retroreflectors on the chase vehicle. This arrangement was used to prevent potential damage to the laser. The sensor system. GN&C and 6-DOF DTS will be operated closed-loop. Initial condition to simulate vehicle misalignments, translational and rotational, will be introduced within the constraints of the systems involved. Detailed description of each of the demonstration components (e.g., Sensor System, GN&C, 6-DOF DTS and supporting computer configuration) including their capabilities and limitations will be discussed. A demonstration architecture drawing and photographs of the test configuration will be presented.

  20. Pharmacophore-Based Similarity Scoring for DOCK

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein–ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK. PMID:25229837

  1. Docking-mechanism attenuator with electromechanical damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syromyatnikov, V. S.

    1971-01-01

    Theoretical and practical problems involved in the application of electromechanical damping for spacecraft docking-mechanism attenuation are discussed. Some drawbacks of hydraulic dampers used for the purpose are pointed out. The basic scheme of the attenuator with the electromechanical damper is given.

  2. Potential and limitations of ensemble docking.

    PubMed

    Korb, Oliver; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Bowden, Simon J; Hall, Richard J; Verdonk, Marcel L; Liebeschuetz, John W; Cole, Jason C

    2012-05-25

    A major problem in structure-based virtual screening applications is the appropriate selection of a single or even multiple protein structures to be used in the virtual screening process. A priori it is unknown which protein structure(s) will perform best in a virtual screening experiment. We investigated the performance of ensemble docking, as a function of ensemble size, for eight targets of pharmaceutical interest. Starting from single protein structure docking results, for each ensemble size up to 500,000 combinations of protein structures were generated, and, for each ensemble, pose prediction and virtual screening results were derived. Comparison of single to multiple protein structure results suggests improvements when looking at the performance of the worst and the average over all single protein structures to the performance of the worst and average over all protein ensembles of size two or greater, respectively. We identified several key factors affecting ensemble docking performance, including the sampling accuracy of the docking algorithm, the choice of the scoring function, and the similarity of database ligands to the cocrystallized ligands of ligand-bound protein structures in an ensemble. Due to these factors, the prospective selection of optimum ensembles is a challenging task, shown by a reassessment of published ensemble selection protocols. PMID:22482774

  3. Docking automation related technology, Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    Jatko, W.B.; Goddard, J.S.; Gleason, S.S.; Ferrell, R.K.

    1995-04-01

    This report generalizes the progress for Phase II of the Docking Automated Related Technologies task component within the Modular Artillery Ammunition Delivery System (MAADS) technology demonstrator of the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV) project. This report also covers development activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period from January to July 1994.

  4. STALK : an interactive virtual molecular docking system.

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, D.; Facello, M.; Hallstrom, P.; Reeder, G.; Walenz, B.; Stevens, F.; Univ. of Illinois

    1997-04-01

    Several recent technologies-genetic algorithms, parallel and distributed computing, virtual reality, and high-speed networking-underlie a new approach to the computational study of how biomolecules interact or 'dock' together. With the Stalk system, a user in a virtual reality environment can interact with a genetic algorithm running on a parallel computer to help in the search for likely geometric configurations.

  5. Closed-loop autonomous docking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W. (Inventor); Howard, Richard T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An autonomous docking system is provided which produces commands for the steering and propulsion system of a chase vehicle used in the docking of that chase vehicle with a target vehicle. The docking system comprises a passive optical target affixed to the target vehicle and comprising three reflective areas including a central area mounted on a short post, and tracking sensor and process controller apparatus carried by the chase vehicle. The latter apparatus comprises a laser diode array for illuminating the target so as to cause light to be reflected from the reflective areas of the target; a sensor for detecting the light reflected from the target and for producing an electrical output signal in accordance with an image of the reflected light; a signal processor for processing the electrical output signal in accordance with an image of the reflected light; a signal processor for processing the electrical output signal and for producing, based thereon, output signals relating to the relative range, roll, pitch, yaw, azimuth, and elevation of the chase and target vehicles; and a docking process controller, responsive to the output signals produced by the signal processor, for producing command signals for controlling the steering and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  6. Modification of a Hydrophobic Layer by a Point Mutation in Syntaxin 1A Regulates the Rate of Synaptic Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lagow, Robert D; Bao, Hong; Cohen, Evan N; Daniels, Richard W; Zuzek, Aleksej; Williams, Wade H; Macleod, Gregory T; Sutton, R. Bryan; Zhang, Bing

    2007-01-01

    Both constitutive secretion and Ca2+-regulated exocytosis require the assembly of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes. At present, little is known about how the SNARE complexes mediating these two distinct pathways differ in structure. Using the Drosophila neuromuscular synapse as a model, we show that a mutation modifying a hydrophobic layer in syntaxin 1A regulates the rate of vesicle fusion. Syntaxin 1A molecules share a highly conserved threonine in the C-terminal +7 layer near the transmembrane domain. Mutation of this threonine to isoleucine results in a structural change that more closely resembles those found in syntaxins ascribed to the constitutive secretory pathway. Flies carrying the I254 mutant protein have increased levels of SNARE complexes and dramatically enhanced rate of both constitutive and evoked vesicle fusion. In contrast, overexpression of the T254 wild-type protein in neurons reduces vesicle fusion only in the I254 mutant background. These results are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations of the SNARE core complex, suggesting that T254 serves as an internal brake to dampen SNARE zippering and impede vesicle fusion, whereas I254 favors fusion by enhancing intermolecular interaction within the SNARE core complex. PMID:17341138

  7. Premature Ejaculation – Dose and Duration Dependent Effect of Fluoxetine: A Histological Study on Seminal Vesicle of Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jethani, SL; Rohatagi, RK; Kalra, Juhi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fluoxetine is a prototype drug of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. Its active demethylated metabolite has a half life of 7-10 d. Fluoxetine is used to treat depression and is also prescribed in premature ejaculation. Aim: In the present study dose and duration dependent effects of Fluoxetine on histology of seminal vesicle of the albino rats were observed. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 36 adult male albino rats. Fluoxetine was administered intraperitoneally for 2 wk, 4 wk and 12 wk with mild (10mg/kg/day), moderate (20mg/kg/day) and severe doses (40mg/kg/day). Histological slides of Seminal vesicle were prepared and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. Results: On examination through the light microscope, the proliferation of primary, secondary and tertiary villi, increased crypt/alveoli, increased thickness of lamina propria, decreased epithelial cell height, metaplasia, changes in the amount of luminal eosinophilic secretory material in the form of scanty secretion in lumen of seminal vesicle. Conclusion: Low doses for long duration and high doses for short duration of Fluoxetine produce histological changes in seminal vesicle of albino rats. PMID:25386416

  8. Co-delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in the same vesicle for coordinated fungal cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Higuchi, Yujiro; Hacker, Christian; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Gurr, Sarah J; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are surrounded by an extracellular cell wall. This complex matrix of proteins and polysaccharides protects against adverse stresses and determines the shape of fungal cells. The polysaccharides of the fungal wall include 1,3-β-glucan and chitin, which are synthesized by membrane-bound synthases at the growing cell tip. A hallmark of filamentous fungi is the class V chitin synthase, which carries a myosin-motor domain. In the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, the myosin-chitin synthase Mcs1 moves to the plasma membrane in secretory vesicles, being delivered by kinesin-1 and myosin-5. The myosin domain of Mcs1 enhances polar secretion by tethering vesicles at the site of exocytosis. It remains elusive, however, how other cell-wall-forming enzymes are delivered and how their activity is coordinated post secretion. Here, we show that the U. maydis class VII chitin synthase and 1,3-β-glucan synthase travel in Mcs1-containing vesicles, and that their apical secretion depends on Mcs1. Once in the plasma membrane, anchorage requires enzyme activity, which suggests co-synthesis of chitin and 1,3-β-glucan polysaccharides at sites of exocytosis. Thus, delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in Mcs1 vesicles ensures local foci of fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27563844

  9. Compartmentalization of the exocyst complex in lipid rafts controls Glut4 vesicle tethering.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mayumi; Chiang, Shian-Huey; Chang, Louise; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Saltiel, Alan R

    2006-05-01

    Lipid raft microdomains act as organizing centers for signal transduction. We report here that the exocyst complex, consisting of Exo70, Sec6, and Sec8, regulates the compartmentalization of Glut4-containing vesicles at lipid raft domains in adipocytes. Exo70 is recruited by the G protein TC10 after activation by insulin and brings with it Sec6 and Sec8. Knockdowns of these proteins block insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Moreover, their targeting to lipid rafts is required for glucose uptake and Glut4 docking at the plasma membrane. The assembly of this complex also requires the PDZ domain protein SAP97, a member of the MAGUKs family, which binds to Sec8 upon its translocation to the lipid raft. Exocyst assembly at lipid rafts sets up targeting sites for Glut4 vesicles, which transiently associate with these microdomains upon stimulation of cells with insulin. These results suggest that the TC10/exocyst complex/SAP97 axis plays an important role in the tethering of Glut4 vesicles to the plasma membrane in adipocytes. PMID:16525015

  10. Presynaptic Mechanisms of Lead Neurotoxicity: Effects on Vesicular Release, Vesicle Clustering and Mitochondria Number

    PubMed Central

    McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Stansfield, Kirstie H.; Stanton, Patric K.; Guilarte, Tomás R.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  11. Presynaptic mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity: effects on vesicular release, vesicle clustering and mitochondria number.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Guariglia, Sara R; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Stanton, Patric K; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development. PMID:26011056

  12. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal ‘circuitry’ and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a ‘vesicle modification’ of the archetypal CBC ‘billiard ball model’ of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle ‘programming’ in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing. PMID:26431435

  13. Extracellular vesicles as emerging intercellular communicasomes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2014-01-01

    All living cells release extracellular vesicles having pleiotropic functions in intercellular communication. Mammalian extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes and microvesicles, are spherical bilayered proteolipids composed of various bioactive molecules, including RNAs, DNAs, proteins, and lipids. Extracellular vesicles directly and indirectly control a diverse range of biological processes by transferring membrane proteins, signaling molecules, mRNAs, and miRNAs, and activating receptors of recipient cells. The active interaction of extracellular vesicles with other cells regulates various physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent developments in high-throughput proteomics, transcriptomics, and lipidomics tools have provided ample data on the common and specific components of various types of extracellular vesicles. These studies may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in vesicular cargo sorting and the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, and, further, to the identification of disease-specific biomarkers. This review focuses on the components, functions, and therapeutic and diagnostic potential of extracellular vesicles under various pathophysiological conditions. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(10): 531-539] PMID:25104400

  14. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing. PMID:26431435

  15. Docking and scoring protein interactions: CAPRI 2009.

    PubMed

    Lensink, Marc F; Wodak, Shoshana J

    2010-11-15

    Protein docking algorithms are assessed by evaluating blind predictions performed during 2007-2009 in Rounds 13-19 of the community-wide experiment on critical assessment of predicted interactions (CAPRI). We evaluated the ability of these algorithms to sample docking poses and to single out specific association modes in 14 targets, representing 11 distinct protein complexes. These complexes play important biological roles in RNA maturation, G-protein signal processing, and enzyme inhibition and function. One target involved protein-RNA interactions not previously considered in CAPRI, several others were hetero-oligomers, or featured multiple interfaces between the same protein pair. For most targets, predictions started from the experimentally determined structures of the free (unbound) components, or from models built from known structures of related or similar proteins. To succeed they therefore needed to account for conformational changes and model inaccuracies. In total, 64 groups and 12 web-servers submitted docking predictions of which 4420 were evaluated. Overall our assessment reveals that 67% of the groups, more than ever before, produced acceptable models or better for at least one target, with many groups submitting multiple high- and medium-accuracy models for two to six targets. Forty-one groups including four web-servers participated in the scoring experiment with 1296 evaluated models. Scoring predictions also show signs of progress evidenced from the large proportion of correct models submitted. But singling out the best models remains a challenge, which also adversely affects the ability to correctly rank docking models. With the increased interest in translating abstract protein interaction networks into realistic models of protein assemblies, the growing CAPRI community is actively developing more efficient and reliable docking and scoring methods for everyone to use. PMID:20806235

  16. pyDockSAXS: protein-protein complex structure by SAXS and computational docking.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Brian; Pons, Carles; Svergun, Dmitri I; Bernadó, Pau; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Structural characterization of protein-protein interactions at molecular level is essential to understand biological processes and identify new therapeutic opportunities. However, atomic resolution structural techniques cannot keep pace with current advances in interactomics. Low-resolution structural techniques, such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), can be applied at larger scale, but they miss atomic details. For efficient application to protein-protein complexes, low-resolution information can be combined with theoretical methods that provide energetic description and atomic details of the interactions. Here we present the pyDockSAXS web server (http://life.bsc.es/pid/pydocksaxs) that provides an automatic pipeline for modeling the structure of a protein-protein complex from SAXS data. The method uses FTDOCK to generate rigid-body docking models that are subsequently evaluated by a combination of pyDock energy-based scoring function and their capacity to describe SAXS data. The only required input files are structural models for the interacting partners and a SAXS curve. The server automatically provides a series of structural models for the complex, sorted by the pyDockSAXS scoring function. The user can also upload a previously computed set of docking poses, which opens the possibility to filter the docking solutions by potential interface residues or symmetry restraints. The server is freely available to all users without restriction. PMID:25897115

  17. VORFFIP-driven dock: V-D2OCK, a fast and accurate protein docking strategy.

    PubMed

    Segura, Joan; Marín-López, Manuel Alejandro; Jones, Pamela F; Oliva, Baldo; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis

    2015-01-01

    The experimental determination of the structure of protein complexes cannot keep pace with the generation of interactomic data, hence resulting in an ever-expanding gap. As the structural details of protein complexes are central to a full understanding of the function and dynamics of the cell machinery, alternative strategies are needed to circumvent the bottleneck in structure determination. Computational protein docking is a valid and valuable approach to model the structure of protein complexes. In this work, we describe a novel computational strategy to predict the structure of protein complexes based on data-driven docking: VORFFIP-driven dock (V-D2OCK). This new approach makes use of our newly described method to predict functional sites in protein structures, VORFFIP, to define the region to be sampled during docking and structural clustering to reduce the number of models to be examined by users. V-D2OCK has been benchmarked using a validated and diverse set of protein complexes and compared to a state-of-art docking method. The speed and accuracy compared to contemporary tools justifies the potential use of VD2OCK for high-throughput, genome-wide, protein docking. Finally, we have developed a web interface that allows users to browser and visualize V-D2OCK predictions from the convenience of their web-browsers. PMID:25763838

  18. VORFFIP-Driven Dock: V-D2OCK, a Fast and Accurate Protein Docking Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Marín-López, Manuel Alejandro; Jones, Pamela F.; Oliva, Baldo; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis

    2015-01-01

    The experimental determination of the structure of protein complexes cannot keep pace with the generation of interactomic data, hence resulting in an ever-expanding gap. As the structural details of protein complexes are central to a full understanding of the function and dynamics of the cell machinery, alternative strategies are needed to circumvent the bottleneck in structure determination. Computational protein docking is a valid and valuable approach to model the structure of protein complexes. In this work, we describe a novel computational strategy to predict the structure of protein complexes based on data-driven docking: VORFFIP-driven dock (V-D2OCK). This new approach makes use of our newly described method to predict functional sites in protein structures, VORFFIP, to define the region to be sampled during docking and structural clustering to reduce the number of models to be examined by users. V-D2OCK has been benchmarked using a validated and diverse set of protein complexes and compared to a state-of-art docking method. The speed and accuracy compared to contemporary tools justifies the potential use of VD2OCK for high-throughput, genome-wide, protein docking. Finally, we have developed a web interface that allows users to browser and visualize V-D2OCK predictions from the convenience of their web-browsers. PMID:25763838

  19. Side docking of the da Vinci robotic system for radical prostatectomy: advantages over traditional docking.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Andrea; Ferrari, Matteo; Zanoni, Matteo; Sangalli, Mattia; Ghezzi, Massimo; Fabbri, Fabio; Sozzi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio

    2015-09-01

    The standard low lithotomic position, used during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), with prolonged positioning in stirrups together with steep Trendelenburg may expose the patient to neurapraxia phenomena of the lower limbs and can rarely be used in patients with problems of hip abduction. To overcome these hurdles, we evaluated the clinical benefits of "side docking" (SD) of the da Vinci(®) robotic system in comparison to "traditional docking" (TD). A cohort of 120 patients submitted to RARP were prospectively randomized into two groups by docking approach: SD with the patient supine with lower limbs slightly abducted on the operating table, and TD docking time, intraoperative number of collisions between the robotic arms and postoperative neurological problems in the lower limbs were noted. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze outcomes. Docking time was shorter for the SD group [SD: median 13 min (range 10-18); TD: median 21 min (range 15-34)]. None in the SD group and six of 60 patients (10%) in the TD group suffered from temporary (<30 days) unilateral neurological deficits of the lower limbs. In both groups no collisions between the robotic arms occurred. The SD approach is technically feasible. It does not cause collisions between the robotic arms, and is a reliable method for reducing the setup time of RARP. The supine position of the patient may prevent neurological complications of the lower limbs. Based on these results, SD has become the standard docking technique used by our department. PMID:26531205

  20. Overview of the NASA Docking System (NDS) and the International Docking System Standard (IDSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA/JSC Engineering Directorate has been developing the technology for a Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) for many years. LIDS had been chosen to be the Constellation Program baseline. In February 2009, the International Space Station (ISS) Multilateral control Board (MCB) began an initiative to develop an International Docking System Standard (IDSS) to facilitate greater international cooperation in space and enable emergency crew rescue missions. Discussions as to whether the LIDS could be made compatible with the IDSS were under way. With the cancellation of the Constellation Program, NASA made a policy decision to convert both of the docking ports on the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) to IDSS ports and NASA moved the LIDS project under the ISS Program. LIDS was redesigned to become the NASA implementation of the emerging IDSS, and its name was changed to the NASA Docking System (NDS). The NDS design will be certified as a gblack box h which can be integrated onto vehicles planning to dock to the ISS IDSS ports. This presentation will discuss the evolution of the IDSS from both the LIDS and the Androgynous Peripheral Assembly System (APAS) and outline the interface requirements which are given in the IDSS Interface Definition Document (IDD). It also will give an overview of the current NDS design, and touch on ISS plans for converting its docking ports to be IDSS compliant.

  1. BetaDock: shape-priority docking method based on beta-complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Soo; Kim, Chong-Min; Won, Chung-In; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Ryu, Joonghyun; Cho, Youngsong; Lee, Changhee; Bhak, Jong

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents an approach and a software, BetaDock, to the docking problem by putting the priority on shape complementarity between a receptor and a ligand. The approach is based on the theory of the β-complex. Given the Voronoi diagram of the receptor whose topology is stored in the quasi-triangulation, the β-complex corresponding to water molecule is computed. Then, the boundary of the β-complex defines the β-shape which has the complete proximity information among all atoms on the receptor boundary. From the β-shape, we first compute pockets where the ligand may bind. Then, we quickly place the ligand within each pocket by solving the singular value decomposition problem and the assignment problem. Using the conformations of the ligands within the pockets as the initial solutions, we run the genetic algorithm to find the optimal solution for the docking problem. The performance of the proposed algorithm was verified through a benchmark test and showed that BetaDock is superior to a popular docking software AutoDock 4. PMID:21696235

  2. pyDockSAXS: protein–protein complex structure by SAXS and computational docking

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-García, Brian; Pons, Carles; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Bernadó, Pau; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of protein–protein interactions at molecular level is essential to understand biological processes and identify new therapeutic opportunities. However, atomic resolution structural techniques cannot keep pace with current advances in interactomics. Low-resolution structural techniques, such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), can be applied at larger scale, but they miss atomic details. For efficient application to protein–protein complexes, low-resolution information can be combined with theoretical methods that provide energetic description and atomic details of the interactions. Here we present the pyDockSAXS web server (http://life.bsc.es/pid/pydocksaxs) that provides an automatic pipeline for modeling the structure of a protein–protein complex from SAXS data. The method uses FTDOCK to generate rigid-body docking models that are subsequently evaluated by a combination of pyDock energy-based scoring function and their capacity to describe SAXS data. The only required input files are structural models for the interacting partners and a SAXS curve. The server automatically provides a series of structural models for the complex, sorted by the pyDockSAXS scoring function. The user can also upload a previously computed set of docking poses, which opens the possibility to filter the docking solutions by potential interface residues or symmetry restraints. The server is freely available to all users without restriction. PMID:25897115

  3. Self-docking capability and control strategy of electromagnetic docking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan-Wen; Yang, Le-Ping; Zhu, Yan-Wei; Ren, Xian-Hai; Huang, Huan

    2011-12-01

    Electromagnetic docking technology has lots of advantages, such as no propellant consumption and plume contamination, as well as continuous, reversible and synchronous controllability, ensuring a broad prospect of application in regular on-orbit servicing missions. However, the advantages come at the cost of inherent highly nonlinear and coupled dynamics, and the far-field electromagnetic force/torque models are uncertain because of the gradually decreasing relative distance, making the control problem very challenging. From the daily phenomenon of automatic magnetic attraction and some similar results of electromagnetic experiments, this paper firstly attempts to study the self-docking capability of electromagnetic docking technology, from ground research to on-orbit research with both theoretical analysis and simulation verification. Making advantage of the self-docking capability, the paper secondly studies the control strategy to better resolve the inherent control problems. A novel control strategy that combines the merits of Artificial Potential Function Method (APFM), Lyapunov theory and Extended State Observer (ESO) is put forward, and a simple coplanar docking example is presented. Theoretical analysis and simulation results verify the existence of self-docking capability, as well as the feasibility of this novel control strategy.

  4. Protein-RNA Complexes and Efficient Automatic Docking: Expanding RosettaDock Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot-Gaudeffroy, Adrien; Froidevaux, Christine; Azé, Jérôme; Bernauer, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes provide a wide range of essential functions in the cell. Their atomic experimental structure solving, despite essential to the understanding of these functions, is often difficult and expensive. Docking approaches that have been developed for proteins are often challenging to adapt for RNA because of its inherent flexibility and the structural data available being relatively scarce. In this study we adapted the RosettaDock protocol for protein-RNA complexes both at the nucleotide and atomic levels. Using a genetic algorithm-based strategy, and a non-redundant protein-RNA dataset, we derived a RosettaDock scoring scheme able not only to discriminate but also score efficiently docking decoys. The approach proved to be both efficient and robust for generating and identifying suitable structures when applied to two protein-RNA docking benchmarks in both bound and unbound settings. It also compares well to existing strategies. This is the first approach that currently offers a multi-level optimized scoring approach integrated in a full docking suite, leading the way to adaptive fully flexible strategies. PMID:25268579

  5. Protein-RNA complexes and efficient automatic docking: expanding RosettaDock possibilities.

    PubMed

    Guilhot-Gaudeffroy, Adrien; Froidevaux, Christine; Azé, Jérôme; Bernauer, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes provide a wide range of essential functions in the cell. Their atomic experimental structure solving, despite essential to the understanding of these functions, is often difficult and expensive. Docking approaches that have been developed for proteins are often challenging to adapt for RNA because of its inherent flexibility and the structural data available being relatively scarce. In this study we adapted the RosettaDock protocol for protein-RNA complexes both at the nucleotide and atomic levels. Using a genetic algorithm-based strategy, and a non-redundant protein-RNA dataset, we derived a RosettaDock scoring scheme able not only to discriminate but also score efficiently docking decoys. The approach proved to be both efficient and robust for generating and identifying suitable structures when applied to two protein-RNA docking benchmarks in both bound and unbound settings. It also compares well to existing strategies. This is the first approach that currently offers a multi-level optimized scoring approach integrated in a full docking suite, leading the way to adaptive fully flexible strategies. PMID:25268579

  6. Interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans Extracellular Vesicles with the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie M.; Espadas-Moreno, Javier; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces extracellular vesicles containing a variety of cargo, including virulence factors. To become extracellular, these vesicles not only must be released from the plasma membrane but also must pass through the dense matrix of the cell wall. The greatest unknown in the area of fungal vesicles is the mechanism by which these vesicles are released to the extracellular space given the presence of the fungal cell wall. Here we used electron microscopy techniques to image the interactions of vesicles with the cell wall. Our goal was to define the ultrastructural morphology of the process to gain insights into the mechanisms involved. We describe single and multiple vesicle-leaving events, which we hypothesized were due to plasma membrane and multivesicular body vesicle origins, respectively. We further utilized melanized cells to “trap” vesicles and visualize those passing through the cell wall. Vesicle size differed depending on whether vesicles left the cytoplasm in single versus multiple release events. Furthermore, we analyzed different vesicle populations for vesicle dimensions and protein composition. Proteomic analysis tripled the number of proteins known to be associated with vesicles. Despite separation of vesicles into batches differing in size, we did not identify major differences in protein composition. In summary, our results indicate that vesicles are generated by more than one mechanism, that vesicles exit the cell by traversing the cell wall, and that vesicle populations exist as a continuum with regard to size and protein composition. PMID:24906412

  7. Production of secretory and extracellular N-linked glycoproteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Adam C; Haitjema, Charles H; Guarino, Cassandra; Çelik, Eda; Endicott, Christine E; Reading, Craig A; Merritt, Judith H; Ptak, A Celeste; Zhang, Sheng; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2011-02-01

    The Campylobacter jejuni pgl gene cluster encodes a complete N-linked protein glycosylation pathway that can be functionally transferred into Escherichia coli. In this system, we analyzed the interplay between N-linked glycosylation, membrane translocation and folding of acceptor proteins in bacteria. We developed a recombinant N-glycan acceptor peptide tag that permits N-linked glycosylation of diverse recombinant proteins expressed in the periplasm of glycosylation-competent E. coli cells. With this "glycosylation tag," a clear difference was observed in the glycosylation patterns found on periplasmic proteins depending on their mode of inner membrane translocation (i.e., Sec, signal recognition particle [SRP], or twin-arginine translocation [Tat] export), indicating that the mode of protein export can influence N-glycosylation efficiency. We also established that engineered substrate proteins targeted to environments beyond the periplasm, such as the outer membrane, the membrane vesicles, and the extracellular medium, could serve as substrates for N-linked glycosylation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C. jejuni N-glycosylation machinery is compatible with distinct secretory mechanisms in E. coli, effectively expanding the N-linked glycome of recombinant E. coli. Moreover, this simple glycosylation tag strategy expands the glycoengineering toolbox and opens the door to bacterial synthesis of a wide array of recombinant glycoprotein conjugates. PMID:21131519

  8. Modulation of the Activity of Secretory Phospholipase A2 by Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxia; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2003-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides magainin 2, indolicidin, and temporins B and L were found to modulate the hydrolytic activity of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) from bee venom and in human lacrimal fluid. More specifically, hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes by bee venom sPLA2 at 10 μM Ca2+ was attenuated by these peptides while augmented product formation was observed in the presence of 5 mM Ca2+. The activity of sPLA2 towards anionic liposomes was significantly enhanced by the antimicrobial peptides at low [Ca2+] and was further enhanced in the presence of 5 mM Ca2+. Similarly, with 5 mM Ca2+ the hydrolysis of anionic liposomes was enhanced significantly by human lacrimal fluid sPLA2, while that of PC liposomes was attenuated. These results indicate that concerted action of antimicrobial peptides and sPLA2 could improve the efficiency of the innate response to infections. Interestingly, inclusion of a cationic gemini surfactant in the vesicles showed an essentially similar pattern on sPLA2 activity, suggesting that the modulation of the enzyme activity by the antimicrobial peptides may involve also charge properties of the substrate surface. PMID:12604528

  9. A secretory kinase complex regulates extracellular protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jixin; Xiao, Junyu; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Rahdar, Meghdad; Dixon, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous extracellular phosphoproteins have been identified, the protein kinases within the secretory pathway have only recently been discovered, and their regulation is virtually unexplored. Fam20C is the physiological Golgi casein kinase, which phosphorylates many secreted proteins and is critical for proper biomineralization. Fam20A, a Fam20C paralog, is essential for enamel formation, but the biochemical function of Fam20A is unknown. Here we show that Fam20A potentiates Fam20C kinase activity and promotes the phosphorylation of enamel matrix proteins in vitro and in cells. Mechanistically, Fam20A is a pseudokinase that forms a functional complex with Fam20C, and this complex enhances extracellular protein phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanism by which Fam20C and Fam20A collaborate to control enamel formation, and provide the first insight into the regulation of secretory pathway phosphorylation. PMID:25789606

  10. Intestinal secretory mechanisms in irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Although diarrhea is the predominant bowel dysfunction in as many as one-third of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), it is unclear whether there is a specific disorder of intestinal fluid or electrolyte secretion in IBS. Diarrhea is generally considered a result of accelerated colonic transit in patients with IBS. Although a primary secretory diathesis has not been well-documented in patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), several mechanisms that could potentially contribute to intestinal secretion have been reported. Some of these mechanisms also influence motor and secretory dysfunctions that contribute to the pathophysiology of IBS-D. We review the evidence supporting secretion in IBS-D caused by peptides and amines produced by enteroendocrine cells or submucosal neurons, enterocyte secretory processes, and intraluminal factors (bile acids and short-chain fatty acids). Understanding these mechanisms and developing clinical methods for their identification could improve management of patients with IBS-D. PMID:25041862

  11. Control systems and coordination protocols of the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Luini, Alberto; Mavelli, Gabriella; Jung, Juan; Cancino, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Like other cellular modules, the secretory pathway and the Golgi complex are likely to be supervised by control systems that support homeostasis and optimal functionality under all conditions, including external and internal perturbations. Moreover, the secretory apparatus must be functionally connected with other cellular modules, such as energy metabolism and protein degradation, via specific rules of interaction, or "coordination protocols". These regulatory devices are of fundamental importance for optimal function; however, they are generally "hidden" at steady state. The molecular components and the architecture of the control systems and coordination protocols of the secretory pathway are beginning to emerge through studies based on the use of controlled transport-specific perturbations aimed specifically at the detection and analysis of these internal regulatory devices. PMID:25374666

  12. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for tracking and imaging extracellular vesicles in vivo and critically discuss their systemic distribution, targeting, and kinetics based on up-to-date evidence in the literature. PMID:27084088

  13. SFTA2—A Novel Secretory Peptide Highly Expressed in the Lung—Is Modulated by Lipopolysaccharide but Not Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rashmi A.; Hammel, Markus; Schwarz, Johannes; Heschl, Katharina M.; Bretschneider, Nancy; Flemmer, Andreas W.; Herber-Jonat, Susanne; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Holzinger, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-specific transcripts are likely to be of importance for the corresponding organ. While attempting to define the specific transcriptome of the human lung, we identified the transcript of a yet uncharacterized protein, SFTA2. In silico analyses, biochemical methods, fluorescence imaging and animal challenge experiments were employed to characterize SFTA2. Human SFTA2 is located on Chr. 6p21.33, a disease-susceptibility locus for diffuse panbronchiolitis. RT-PCR verified the abundance of SFTA2-specific transcripts in human and mouse lung. SFTA2 is synthesized as a hydrophilic precursor releasing a 59 amino acid mature peptide after cleavage of an N-terminal secretory signal. SFTA2 has no recognizable homology to other proteins while orthologues are present in all mammals. SFTA2 is a glycosylated protein and specifically expressed in nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium and type II pneumocytes. In accordance with other hydrophilic surfactant proteins, SFTA2 did not colocalize with lamellar bodies but colocalized with golgin97 and clathrin-labelled vesicles, suggesting a classical secretory pathway for its expression and secretion. In the mouse lung, Sfta2 was significantly downregulated after induction of an inflammatory reaction by intratracheal lipopolysaccharides paralleling surfactant proteins B and C but not D. Hyperoxia, however, did not alter SFTA2 mRNA levels. We have characterized SFTA2 and present it as a novel unique secretory peptide highly expressed in the lung. PMID:22768197

  14. Experimental validation of docking and capture using space robotics testbeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spofford, John

    Docking concepts include capture, berthing, and docking. The definitions of these terms, consistent with AIAA, are as follows: (1) capture (grasping)--the use of a manipulator to make initial contact and attachment between transfer vehicle and a platform; (2) berthing--positioning of a transfer vehicle or payload into platform restraints using a manipulator; and (3) docking--propulsive mechanical connection between vehicle and platform. The combination of the capture and berthing operations is effectively the same as docking; i.e., capture (grasping) + berthing = docking. These concepts are discussed in terms of Martin Marietta's ability to develop validation methods using robotics testbeds.

  15. Experimental validation of docking and capture using space robotics testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spofford, John

    1991-01-01

    Docking concepts include capture, berthing, and docking. The definitions of these terms, consistent with AIAA, are as follows: (1) capture (grasping)--the use of a manipulator to make initial contact and attachment between transfer vehicle and a platform; (2) berthing--positioning of a transfer vehicle or payload into platform restraints using a manipulator; and (3) docking--propulsive mechanical connection between vehicle and platform. The combination of the capture and berthing operations is effectively the same as docking; i.e., capture (grasping) + berthing = docking. These concepts are discussed in terms of Martin Marietta's ability to develop validation methods using robotics testbeds.

  16. 13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. THE DOCK FEATURED FOUR HULETT UNLOADERS, EACH WITH A BUCKET CAPACITY OF 17 TONS; A 15-TON CAPACITY ORE STOCKING AND REHANDLING BRIDGE; AND A ONE-MILLION-TON CAPACITY ORE STORAGE YARD. THE WILLIAM-SEAVER-MORGAN COMPANY OF CLEVELAND BUILT THE DOCK EQUIPMENT. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. Expression of familial Alzheimer disease presenilin 1 gene attenuates vesicle traffic and reduces peptide secretion in cultured astrocytes devoid of pathologic tissue environment.

    PubMed

    Stenovec, Matjaž; Trkov, Saša; Lasič, Eva; Terzieva, Slavica; Kreft, Marko; Rodríguez Arellano, José Julio; Parpura, Vladimir; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Zorec, Robert

    2016-02-01

    In the brain, astrocytes provide metabolic and trophic support to neurones. Failure in executing astroglial homeostatic functions may contribute to the initiation and propagation of diseases, including Alzheimer disease (AD), characterized by a progressive loss of neurones over years. Here, we examined whether astrocytes from a mice model of AD isolated in the presymptomatic phase of the disease exhibit alterations in vesicle traffic, vesicular peptide release and purinergic calcium signaling. In cultured astrocytes isolated from a newborn wild-type (wt) and 3xTg-AD mouse, secretory vesicles and acidic endosomes/lysosomes were labeled by transfection with plasmid encoding atrial natriuretic peptide tagged with mutant green fluorescent protein (ANP.emd) and by LysoTracker, respectively. The intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was monitored with Fluo-2 and visualized by confocal microscopy. In comparison with controls, spontaneous mobility of ANP- and LysoTracker-labeled vesicles was diminished in 3xTg-AD astrocytes; the track length (TL), maximal displacement (MD) and directionality index (DI) were all reduced in peptidergic vesicles and in endosomes/lysosomes (P < 0.001), as was the ATP-evoked attenuation of vesicle mobility. Similar impairment of peptidergic vesicle trafficking was observed in wt rat astrocytes transfected to express mutated presenilin 1 (PS1M146V). The ATP-evoked ANP discharge from single vesicles was less efficient in 3xTg-AD and PS1M146V-expressing astrocytes than in respective wt controls (P < 0.05). Purinergic stimulation evoked biphasic and oscillatory [Ca(2+)]i responses; the latter were less frequent (P < 0.001) in 3xTg-AD astrocytes. Expression of PS1M146V in astrocytes impairs vesicle dynamics and reduces evoked secretion of the signaling molecule ANP; both may contribute to the development of AD. PMID:26462451

  18. Accumulation of amyloid-like Aβ1–42 in AEL (autophagy–endosomal–lysosomal) vesicles: potential implications for plaque biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Daijun; Magallanes, Martha; Salvaterra, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of Aβ (amyloid β) within AEL (autophagy–endosomal–lysosomal) vesicles is a prominent neuropathological feature of AD (Alzheimer's disease), but the mechanism of accumulation within vesicles is not clear. We express secretory forms of human Aβ1–40 or Aβ1–42 in Drosophila neurons and observe preferential localization of Aβ1–42 within AEL vesicles. In young animals, Aβ1–42 appears to associate with plasma membrane, whereas Aβ1–40 does not, suggesting that recycling endocytosis may underlie its routing to AEL vesicles. Aβ1–40, in contrast, appears to partially localize in extracellular spaces in whole brain and is preferentially secreted by cultured neurons. As animals become older, AEL vesicles become dysfunctional, enlarge and their turnover appears delayed. Genetic inhibition of AEL function results in decreased Aβ1–42 accumulation. In samples from older animals, Aβ1–42 is broadly distributed within neurons, but only the Aβ1–42 within dysfunctional AEL vesicles appears to be in an amyloid-like state. Moreover, the Aβ1–42-containing AEL vesicles share properties with AD-like extracellular plaques. They appear to be able to relocate to extracellular spaces either as a consequence of age-dependent neurodegeneration or a non-neurodegenerative separation from host neurons by plasma membrane infolding. We propose that dysfunctional AEL vesicles may thus be the source of amyloid-like plaque accumulation in Aβ1–42-expressing Drosophila with potential relevance for AD. PMID:24521233

  19. [Physiology of secretory cells in the mouse mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Iu A; Markov, A G

    2000-08-01

    Secretory cells' membrane potential and transepithelial potential difference in the mouse mammary gland diminish within 2.5 hours following breast-feeding of the litter. The transepithelial resistance for up to 20 hours after the feeding did not drop below 40-70 k omega. The secret pressure in the mammary gland does not grow during this period. Therefore an increase of interval between litter feeding up to 20 hours does not entail any mechanical lesion of the secretory epithelium. The latter's cells seem to secrete organic and inorganic substances in concentrations which do not change significantly during their transfer along the outgoing ducts. PMID:11059022

  20. Ultrastructural features of goat oviductal secretory cells at follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    ABE, HIROYUKI; ONODERA, MASAKAZU; SUGAWARA, SHICHIRO; SATOH, TAKESHI; HOSHI, HIROYOSHI

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ultrastructure of secretory cells in the various regions of the goat oviduct during the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle. During the follicular phase in the fimbriae, the secretory cells contained small secretory granules with electron-dense matrices. In the luteal phase, the secretory granules disappeared and cytoplasmic protrusions, extending beyond the luminal border of the ciliated cells and often containing the nucleus, were predominant. During the follicular phase in ampullary secretory cells, numerous secretory granules with moderately electron-dense matrices were present in the supranuclear cytoplasm and exocytosis of secretory granules was observed. The number of secretory granules was dramatically reduced in the ampullary secretory cells at the luteal phase. Conspicuous cytoplasmic protrusions of secretory cells were observed similar to those of the fimbrial epithelium. Isthmic cells were almost free of secretory granules and lysosome-like bodies were found both at the follicular and luteal phases. In conclusion, our ultrastructural observations of goat oviduct revealed marked cyclic changes in the ultrastructural features of secretory cells and the ultrastructural features and the numbers of secretory granules were distinctive for each particular segment. PMID:10634690

  1. Effect of cholinergic stimulation of the medial septal area on the secretory properties of atrial myocardial fibers.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M J; Moreira, J E; Kohler, F W; Gonçalves, R P; Franci, C R

    1990-01-01

    Adult male Wistar rats weighing 240-260 g were implanted with stainless steel guide cannulae into the medial septal area (MSA). Cholinergic stimulation of the MSA increased natriuresis (344.6 +/- 13.8 vs 22.2 +/- 2.1 microEq for the controls), the number of atrial specific granules (61.0 +/- 6.7 vs 43.8 +/- 3.5 granules/100 microns 2 sarcoplasma for the controls), and the number of electron-dense vesicles near the sarcolemma or appearing to undergo exocytotic extrusion (50.0 +/- 2.3 vs 21.4 +/- 5.7 vesicles/100 microns sarcolemma for the controls). It is not yet clear how cholinergic stimulation of the MSA changes the secretory characteristics of atrial myocardial fibers. However, the present study provides evidence that release of an atrial natriuretic factor may be controlled by the central nervous system (CNS). This may occur through the sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation of the heart or through the release of some substance produced by the CNS or produced at another site whose release is controlled by the CNS. PMID:2143683

  2. Casein phosphopeptides drastically increase the secretion of extracellular proteins in Aspergillus awamori. Proteomics studies reveal changes in the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The secretion of heterologous animal proteins in filamentous fungi is usually limited by bottlenecks in the vesicle-mediated secretory pathway. Results Using the secretion of bovine chymosin in Aspergillus awamori as a model, we found a drastic increase (40 to 80-fold) in cells grown with casein or casein phosphopeptides (CPPs). CPPs are rich in phosphoserine, but phosphoserine itself did not increase the secretion of chymosin. The stimulatory effect is reduced about 50% using partially dephosphorylated casein and is not exerted by casamino acids. The phosphopeptides effect was not exerted at transcriptional level, but instead, it was clearly observed on the secretion of chymosin by immunodetection analysis. Proteomics studies revealed very interesting metabolic changes in response to phosphopeptides supplementation. The oxidative metabolism was reduced, since enzymes involved in fermentative processes were overrepresented. An oxygen-binding hemoglobin-like protein was overrepresented in the proteome following phosphopeptides addition. Most interestingly, the intracellular pre-protein enzymes, including pre-prochymosin, were depleted (most of them are underrepresented in the intracellular proteome after the addition of CPPs), whereas the extracellular mature form of several of these secretable proteins and cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes was greatly overrepresented in the secretome of phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Another important 'moonlighting' protein (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which has been described to have vesicle fusogenic and cytoskeleton formation modulating activities, was clearly overrepresented in phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Conclusions In summary, CPPs cause the reprogramming of cellular metabolism, which leads to massive secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:22234238

  3. The casein kinases Yck1p and Yck2p act in the secretory pathway, in part, by regulating the Rab exchange factor Sec2p

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Danièle; Novick, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Sec2p is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Sec4p, the final Rab GTPase of the yeast secretory pathway. Sec2p is recruited to secretory vesicles by the upstream Rab Ypt32p acting in concert with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI(4)P). Sec2p also binds to the Sec4p effector Sec15p, yet Ypt32p and Sec15p compete against each other for binding to Sec2p. We report here that the redundant casein kinases Yck1p and Yck2p phosphorylate sites within the Ypt32p/Sec15p binding region and in doing so promote binding to Sec15p and inhibit binding to Ypt32p. We show that Yck2p binds to the autoinhibitory domain of Sec2p, adjacent to the PI(4)P binding site, and that addition of PI(4)P inhibits Sec2p phosphorylation by Yck2p. Loss of Yck1p and Yck2p function leads to accumulation of an intracellular pool of the secreted glucanase Bgl2p, as well as to accumulation of Golgi-related structures in the cytoplasm. We propose that Sec2p is phosphorylated after it has been recruited to secretory vesicles and the level of PI(4)P has been reduced. This promotes Sec2p function by stimulating its interaction with Sec15p. Finally, Sec2p is dephosphorylated very late in the exocytic reaction to facilitate recycling. PMID:26700316

  4. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane: correlation with transcriptome profiling of neutrophil precursors.

    PubMed

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels H H; Borregaard, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable in the innate immune defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils contain SVs and several subsets of granules that are essential for their function. Proteins present in neutrophil SVs and granules are synthesized during terminal granulopoiesis in the bone marrow. The heterogeneity of granules, as determined by marker proteins characteristic of each granule subset, is thought to result from differences in the biosynthetic windows of major classes of granule proteins, a process referred to as targeting by timing. Qualitative proteomic analysis of neutrophil granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in-gel-digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analyzed using LTQ Orbitrap XL tandem MS. A total of 1292 unique proteins were identified and grouped, according to the neutrophil fraction, in which they displayed maximal expression. In addition to various known neutrophil proteins, several uncharacterized proteins were found, as well as proteins not described previously in neutrophils. To study the correlation between mRNA expression in neutrophil precursors and the localization of their cognate proteins, the distribution of 126 identified proteins was compared with their mRNA expression profiles. The neutrophil subcellular proteome profiles presented here may be used as a database in combination with the mRNA array database to predict and test the presence and localization of proteins in neutrophil granules and membranes. PMID:23650620

  5. Porin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induces Apoptosis in an Epithelial Cell Line Derived from Rat Seminal Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Buommino, Elisabetta; Morelli, Francesco; Metafora, Salvatore; Rossano, Fabio; Perfetto, Brunella; Baroni, Adone; Tufano, Maria Antonietta

    1999-01-01

    Micromolar concentrations of porin, purified from the outer membranes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, induced in vitro the classic morphological and biochemical signs of apoptosis in an epithelial cell line (SVC1) derived from the rat seminal vesicle secretory epithelium. The programmed cell death (PCD) was p53 independent and associated with significant decrease of bcl-2 expression, a marked increase of c-myc transcriptional activity, and an absence of the mRNA coding for tissue transglutaminase. The Ca2+ influx, caused by the porin treatment of SVC1 cells, appears to play an important role in the triggering of apoptosis in our biological model. The possibility that the porin property of inducing PCD plays a role in the infertility of individuals chronically infected by gram-negative bacteria is discussed. PMID:10456933

  6. Kinetics of particle wrapping by a vesicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2013-07-01

    We present theoretical results on kinetics for the passive wrapping of a single, rigid particle by a flexible membrane. Using a simple geometric ansatz for the shape of the membrane/particle complex we first compute free energy profiles as a function of the particle size, attraction strength between the particle and vesicle, and material properties of the vesicle—bending stiffness and stretching modulus. The free energy profiles thus computed are taken as input to a stochastic model of the wrapping process, described by a Fokker-Planck equation. We compute average uptake rates of the particle into the vesicle. We find that the rate of particle uptake falls to zero outside of a thermodynamically allowed range of particle sizes. Within the thermodynamically allowed range of particle size, the rate of uptake is variable and we compute the optimal particle size and maximal uptake rate as a function of the attraction strength, the vesicle size, and vesicle material properties.

  7. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-07-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  8. Stability of Spherical Vesicles in Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The stability of spherical vesicles in alternating (ac) electric fields is studied theoretically for asymmetric conductivity conditions across their membranes. The vesicle deformation is obtained from a balance between the curvature elastic energies and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. The present theory describes and clarifies the mechanisms for the four types of morphological transitions observed experimentally on vesicles exposed to ac fields in the frequency range from 500 to 2 × 107 Hz. The displacement currents across the membranes redirect the electric fields toward the membrane normal to accumulate electric charges by the Maxwell−Wagner mechanism. These accumulated electric charges provide the underlying molecular mechanism for the morphological transitions of vesicles as observed on the micrometer scale. PMID:20575588

  9. Transformation of oil droplets into giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Li; Kurihara, Kensuke

    2016-06-14

    We propose a protocell model in which compartments are constructed via a new process involving the formation of robust vesicles using an autocatalytic, self-reproducing oil droplet system as a 'scaffold'. PMID:27152371

  10. Regulation of Immune Responses by Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Paul D.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including exosomes, are small membrane vesicles derived from multivesicular bodies or from the plasma membrane. Most, if not all, cell types release EVs that then enter the bodily fluids. These vesicles contain a subset of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that are derived from the parent cell. It is postulated that EVs have important roles in intercellular communication, both locally and systemically, by transferring their contents, including protein, lipids and RNAs, between cells. EVs are involved in numerous physiological processes, and vesicles from both non-immune and immune cells have important roles in immune regulation. Moreover, EV-based therapeutics are being developed and tested clinically for treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and cancer. Given the tremendous therapeutic potential of EVs this review focuses on the role of EVs in modulating immune responses and the therapeutic applications. PMID:24566916

  11. Dynamics of a compound vesicle: numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan; Young, Yuan-Nan; Vlahovska, Petia; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2010-11-01

    Vesicles (self-enclosing lipid membranes) in simple linear flows are known to exhibit rich dynamics such as tank-treading, tumbling, trembling (swinging), and vacillating breathing. Recently, vesicles have been used as a multi-functional platform for drug-delivery. In this work, the dynamics of simplified models for such compound vesicles is investigated numerically using a state-of-the-art boundary-integral code that has been validated with high accuracy and efficiency. Results show that for a vesicle enclosing a rigid particle in a simple shear flow, transition from tank-treading to tumbling is possible even in the absence of viscosity mismatch in the interior and exterior fluids. We will discuss the shape transformations, multiple particle interactions and the flow properties. Comparison with results from analytical modeling gives insights to the underlying physics for such novel dynamics.

  12. Extracellular vesicles in parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marcilla, Antonio; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Trelis, Maria; de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Osuna, Antonio; Bernal, Dolores; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Almeida, Igor C.; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect billions of people and are considered a major public health issue. Close to 400 species are estimated to parasitize humans, of which around 90 are responsible for great clinical burden and mortality rates. Unfortunately, they are largely neglected as they are mainly endemic to poor regions. Of relevance to this review, there is accumulating evidence of the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in parasitic diseases, acting both in parasite–parasite inter-communication as well as in parasite–host interactions. EVs participate in the dissemination of the pathogen and play a role in the regulation of the host immune systems. Production of EVs from parasites or parasitized cells has been described for a number of parasitic infections. In this review, we provide the most relevant findings of the involvement of EVs in intercellular communication, modulation of immune responses, involvement in pathology, and their potential as new diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents in some of the major human parasitic pathogens. PMID:25536932

  13. New mechanisms of vesicles migration.

    PubMed

    Aursulesei, Viviana; Vasincu, Decebal; Timofte, Daniel; Vrajitoriu, Lucia; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan D; Ghizdovat, Vlad; Buzea, Calin; Agop, Maricel

    2016-07-01

    In multicellular organisms, both health and disease are defined by means of communication patterns involving the component cells. Despite the intricate networks of soluble mediators, cells are also programed to exchange complex messages pre-assembled as multimolecular cargo of membranous structures known as extracellular vesicles (EVs). Several biogenetic pathways produce EVs with different properties able to orchestrate neighboring cell reactions or to establish an environment ripe for spreading tumor cells. Such an effect is in fact an extension of similar physiological roles played by exosomes in guiding cell migration under nontumoral tissue remodeling and organogenesis. We start with a biological thought experiment equivalent to Bénard's experiment, involving a fluid layer of EVs adherent to an extracellular matrix, in a haptotactic gradient, then, we build and present the first Lorenz model for EVs migration. Using Galerkin's method of reducing a system of partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, a biological Lorenz system is developed. Such a physical frame distributing individual molecular or exosomal type cell-guiding cues in the extracellular matrix space could serve as a guide for tissue neoformation of the budding pattern in nontumoral or tumoral instances. PMID:27045674

  14. A possible route to prebiotic vesicle reproduction.

    PubMed

    Luisi, Pier Luigi; Rasi, Pasquale Stano Silvia; Mavelli, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    Spherical bounded structures such as those formed by surfactant aggregates (mostly micelles and vesicles), with an inside that is chemically and physically different from the outside medium, can be seen as primitive cell models. As such, they are fundamental structures for the theory of autopoiesis as originally formulated by Varela and Maturana. In particular, since self-reproduction is a very important feature of minimal cellular life, the study of self-reproduction of micelles and vesicles represents a quite challenging bio-mimetic approach. Our laboratory has put much effort in recent years into implementing self-reproduction of vesicles as models for self-reproduction of cellular bounded structures, and this article is a further contribution in this direction. In particular, we deal with the so-called matrix effect of vesicles, related to the fact that when fresh surfactant is added to an aqueous solution containing preformed vesicles of a very narrow size distribution, the newly formed vesicles (instead of being polydisperse, as is usually the case) have dimensions very close to those of the preformed ones. In practice, this corresponds to a mechanism of reproduction of vesicles of the same size. In this article, the matrix effect is re-elaborated in the perspective of the origin of life, and in particular in terms of the prebiotic mechanisms that might permit the growth and reproduction of vesicles. The data are analyzed by dynamic light scattering with a new program that permits the calculation of the number-weighted size distribution. It is shown that, on adding a stoichiometric amount of oleate micelles to preformed oleate vesicles extruded at 50 and 100 nm, the final distribution contains about twice the initial number of particles, centered around 50 and 100 nm. The same holds when oleate is added to preformed phospholipid liposomes. By contrast, when the same amount of oleate is added to an aqueous solution (as a control experiment), a very broad

  15. VoteDock: Consensus Docking Method for Prediction of Protein–Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Michałłaźniewski; Von Grotthuss, Marcin; Rychlewski, Leszek; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Molecular recognition plays a fundamental role in all biological processes, and that is why great efforts have been made to understand and predict protein–ligand interactions. Finding a molecule that can potentially bind to a target protein is particularly essential in drug discovery and still remains an expensive and time-consuming task. In silico, tools are frequently used to screen molecular libraries to identify new lead compounds, and if protein structure is known, various protein–ligand docking programs can be used. The aim of docking procedure is to predict correct poses of ligand in the binding site of the protein as well as to score them according to the strength of interaction in a reasonable time frame. The purpose of our studies was to present the novel consensus approach to predict both protein–ligand complex structure and its corresponding binding affinity. Our method used as the input the results from seven docking programs (Surflex, LigandFit, Glide, GOLD, FlexX, eHiTS, and AutoDock) that are widely used for docking of ligands. We evaluated it on the extensive benchmark dataset of 1300 protein–ligands pairs from refined PDBbind database for which the structural and affinity data was available. We compared independently its ability of proper scoring and posing to the previously proposed methods. In most cases, our method is able to dock properly approximately 20% of pairs more than docking methods on average, and over 10% of pairs more than the best single program. The RMSD value of the predicted complex conformation versus its native one is reduced by a factor of 0.5 Å. Finally, we were able to increase the Pearson correlation of the predicted binding affinity in comparison with the experimental value up to 0.5. PMID:20812324

  16. Lipid Mixing and Content Release in Single-Vesicle, SNARE-Driven Fusion Assay with 1–5 ms Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Smith, Elizabeth A.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Weisshaar, James C.

    2009-01-01

    A single-vesicle, fluorescence-based, SNARE-driven fusion assay enables simultaneous measurement of lipid mixing and content release with 5 ms/frame, or even 1 ms/frame, time resolution. The v-SNARE vesicles, labeled with lipid and content markers of different color, dock and fuse with a planar t-SNARE bilayer supported on glass. A narrow (<5 ms duration), intense spike of calcein fluorescence due to content release and dequenching coincides with inner-leaflet lipid mixing within 10 ms. The spike provides more sensitive detection of productive hemifusion events than do lipid labels alone. Consequently, many fast events previously thought to be prompt, full fusion events are now reclassified as productive hemifusion. Both full fusion and hemifusion occur with a time constant of 5–10 ms. At 60% phosphatidylethanolamine lipid composition, productive and dead-end hemifusion account for 65% of all fusion events. However, quantitative analysis shows that calcein is released into the space above the bilayer (vesicle bursting), rather than the thin aqueous space between the bilayer and glass. Evidently, at the instant of inner-leaflet mixing, flattening of the vesicle increases the internal pressure beyond the bursting point. This may be related to in vivo observations suggesting that membrane lysis often competes with membrane fusion. PMID:19450483

  17. Pep7p provides a novel protein that functions in vesicle-mediated transport between the yeast Golgi and endosome.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, G C; Zhang, J; Garlow, S J; Wesp, A; Riezman, H; Jones, E W

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae pep7 mutants are defective in transport of soluble vacuolar hydrolases to the lysosome-like vacuole. PEP7 is a nonessential gene that encodes a hydrophilic protein of 515 amino acids. A cysteine-rich tripartite motif in the N-terminal half of the polypeptide shows striking similarity to sequences found in many other eukaryotic proteins. Several of these proteins are thought to function in the vacuolar/lysosomal pathway. Mutations that change highly conserved cysteine residues in this motif lead to a loss of Pep7p function. Kinetic studies demonstrate that Pep7p function is required for the transport of the Golgi-precursors of the soluble hydrolases carboxypeptidase Y, proteinase A, and proteinase B to the endosome. Integral membrane hydrolase alkaline phosphatase is transported to the vacuole by a parallel intracellular pathway that does not require Pep7p function. pep7 mutants accumulate a 40-60-nm vesicle population, suggesting that Pep7p functions in a vesicle consumption step in vesicle-mediated transport of soluble hydrolases to the endosome. Whereas pep7 mutants demonstrate no defects in endocytic uptake at the plasma membrane, the mutants demonstrate defects in transport of receptor-mediated macromolecules through the endocytic pathway. Localization studies indicate that Pep7p is found both as a soluble cytoplasmic protein and associated with particulate fractions. We conclude that Pep7p functions as a novel regulator of vesicle docking and/or fusion at the endosome. Images PMID:9168472

  18. Identification of Regulatory and Cargo Proteins of Endosomal and Secretory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by Proteomic Dissection*

    PubMed Central

    Heard, William; Sklenář, Jan; Tomé, Daniel F. A.; Robatzek, Silke; Jones, Alexandra M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The cell's endomembranes comprise an intricate, highly dynamic and well-organized system. In plants, the proteins that regulate function of the various endomembrane compartments and their cargo remain largely unknown. Our aim was to dissect subcellular trafficking routes by enriching for partially overlapping subpopulations of endosomal proteomes associated with endomembrane markers. We selected RABD2a/ARA5, RABF2b/ARA7, RABF1/ARA6, and RABG3f as markers for combinations of the Golgi, trans-Golgi network (TGN), early endosomes (EE), secretory vesicles, late endosomes (LE), multivesicular bodies (MVB), and the tonoplast. As comparisons we used Golgi transport 1 (GOT1), which localizes to the Golgi, clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) labeling clathrin-coated vesicles and pits and the vesicle-associated membrane protein 711 (VAMP711) present at the tonoplast. We developed an easy-to-use method by refining published protocols based on affinity purification of fluorescent fusion constructs to these seven subcellular marker proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We present a total of 433 proteins, only five of which were shared among all enrichments, while many proteins were common between endomembrane compartments of the same trafficking route. Approximately half, 251 proteins, were assigned to one enrichment only. Our dataset contains known regulators of endosome functions including small GTPases, SNAREs, and tethering complexes. We identify known cargo proteins such as PIN3, PEN3, CESA, and the recently defined TPLATE complex. The subcellular localization of two GTPase regulators predicted from our enrichments was validated using live-cell imaging. This is the first proteomic dataset to discriminate between such highly overlapping endomembrane compartments in plants and can be used as a general proteomic resource to predict the localization of proteins and identify the components of regulatory complexes and provides a useful tool for the identification of new protein

  19. Spontaneous unilamellar polymer vesicles in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Song, Chaeyeon; Han, Young-Soo; Jang, Jong-Dae; Choi, Myung Chul

    2014-01-21

    A unilamellar polymeric vesicle is a self-assembled structure of a block copolymer that forms a spherical single bilayer structure with a hydrophobic interlayer and a hydrophilic surface. Due to their enhanced colloidal stability and mechanical property, controllable surface functionality, or tunable membrane thickness, polymeric vesicles are useful in nano and bio-science, providing potential applications as nanosized carriers for catalysts, drugs, and enzymes. For fabrication of a unilamellar vesicle, however, preparative procedures with a few steps are inherently required. Herein, without complicated preparative procedures, we report spontaneous unilamellar polymeric vesicles with nanometer sizes (<100 nm), which are prepared by simply mixing a triblock copolymer, Pluronic P85 (PEO26PPO40PEO26), and an organic derivative, 5-methyl salicylic acid (5mS), in aqueous solution. Depending on the 5mS concentration and the temperature, the P85-5mS mixtures presented various self-assembled nanostructures such as spherical and cylindrical micelles or vesicles, which were characterized by small angle neutron scattering and cryo-TEM, resulting in a phase diagram drawn as a function of temperature and the 5mS concentration. Interestingly the critical temperature for the micelle-to-vesicle phase transition was easily controlled by varying the 5mS concentration, i.e. it was decreased with increasing the 5mS concentration. PMID:24652418

  20. Elastic energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2011-01-01

    In recent experiments the spontaneous formation of hollow bilayer vesicles with polyhedral symmetry has been observed. On the basis of the experimental phenomenology it was suggested that the mechanism for the formation of bilayer polyhedra is minimization of elastic bending energy. Motivated by these experiments, we study the elastic bending energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles. In agreement with experiments, and provided that excess amphiphiles exhibiting spontaneous curvature are present in sufficient quantity, we find that polyhedral bilayer vesicles can indeed be energetically favorable compared to spherical bilayer vesicles. Consistent with experimental observations we also find that the bending energy associated with the vertices of bilayer polyhedra can be locally reduced through the formation of pores. However, the stabilization of polyhedral bilayer vesicles over spherical bilayer vesicles relies crucially on molecular segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges rather than the vertices of bilayer polyhedra. Furthermore, our analysis implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the icosahedron does not minimize elastic bending energy among arbitrary polyhedral shapes and sizes. Instead, we find that, for large polyhedron sizes, the snub dodecahedron and the snub cube both have lower total bending energies than the icosahedron. PMID:21797397

  1. Telerobotic rendezvous and docking vision system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravely, Ben; Myers, Donald; Moody, David

    1992-01-01

    This research program has successfully demonstrated a new target label architecture that allows a microcomputer to determine the position, orientation, and identity of an object. It contains a CAD-like database with specific geometric information about the object for approach, grasping, and docking maneuvers. Successful demonstrations were performed selecting and docking an ORU box with either of two ORU receptacles. Small, but significant differences were seen in the two camera types used in the program, and camera sensitive program elements have been identified. The software has been formatted into a new co-autonomy system which provides various levels of operator interaction and promises to allow effective application of telerobotic systems while code improvements are continuing.

  2. GWIDD: Genome-wide protein docking database

    PubMed Central

    Kundrotas, Petras J.; Zhu, Zhengwei; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2010-01-01

    Structural information on interacting proteins is important for understanding life processes at the molecular level. Genome-wide docking database is an integrated resource for structural studies of protein–protein interactions on the genome scale, which combines the available experimental data with models obtained by docking techniques. Current database version (August 2009) contains 25 559 experimental and modeled 3D structures for 771 organisms spanned over the entire universe of life from viruses to humans. Data are organized in a relational database with user-friendly search interface allowing exploration of the database content by a number of parameters. Search results can be interactively previewed and downloaded as PDB-formatted files, along with the information relevant to the specified interactions. The resource is freely available at http://gwidd.bioinformatics.ku.edu. PMID:19900970

  3. MSFC Three Point Docking Mechanism design review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Otto; Ambrosio, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    In the next few decades, we will be launching expensive satellites and space platforms that will require recovery for economic reasons, because of initial malfunction, servicing, repairs, or out of a concern for post lifetime debris removal. The planned availability of a Three Point Docking Mechanism (TPDM) is a positive step towards an operational satellite retrieval infrastructure. This study effort supports NASA/MSFC engineering work in developing an automated docking capability. The work was performed by the Grumman Space & Electronics Group as a concept evaluation/test for the Tumbling Satellite Retrieval Kit. Simulation of a TPDM capture was performed in Grumman's Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS) using mockups of both parts (the mechanism and payload). Similar TPDM simulation activities and more extensive hardware testing was performed at NASA/MSFC in the Flight Robotics Laboratory and Space Station/Space Operations Mechanism Test Bed (6-DOF Facility).

  4. Laser space rendezvous and docking tradeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S.; Levinson, S.; Raber, P.; Weindling, F.

    1974-01-01

    A spaceborne laser radar (LADAR) was configured to meet the requirements for rendezvous and docking with a cooperative object in synchronous orbit. The LADAR, configurated using existing pulsed CO2 laser technology and a 1980 system technology baseline, is well suited for the envisioned space tug missions. The performance of a family of candidate LADARS was analyzed. Tradeoff studies as a function of size, weight, and power consumption were carried out for maximum ranges of 50, 100, 200, and 300 nautical miles. The investigation supports the original contention that a rendezvous and docking LADAR can be constructed to offer a cost effective and reliable solution to the envisioned space missions. In fact, the CO2 ladar system offers distinct advantages over other candidate systems.

  5. BP-Dock: a flexible docking scheme for exploring protein-ligand interactions based on unbound structures.

    PubMed

    Bolia, Ashini; Gerek, Z Nevin; Ozkan, S Banu

    2014-03-24

    Molecular docking serves as an important tool in modeling protein-ligand interactions. However, it is still challenging to incorporate overall receptor flexibility, especially backbone flexibility, in docking due to the large conformational space that needs to be sampled. To overcome this problem, we developed a novel flexible docking approach, BP-Dock (Backbone Perturbation-Dock) that can integrate both backbone and side chain conformational changes induced by ligand binding through a multi-scale approach. In the BP-Dock method, we mimic the nature of binding-induced events as a first-order approximation by perturbing the residues along the protein chain with a small Brownian kick one at a time. The response fluctuation profile of the chain upon these perturbations is computed using the perturbation response scanning method. These response fluctuation profiles are then used to generate binding-induced multiple receptor conformations for ensemble docking. To evaluate the performance of BP-Dock, we applied our approach on a large and diverse data set using unbound structures as receptors. We also compared the BP-Dock results with bound and unbound docking, where overall receptor flexibility was not taken into account. Our results highlight the importance of modeling backbone flexibility in docking for recapitulating the experimental binding affinities, especially when an unbound structure is used. With BP-Dock, we can generate a wide range of binding site conformations realized in nature even in the absence of a ligand that can help us to improve the accuracy of unbound docking. We expect that our fast and efficient flexible docking approach may further aid in our understanding of protein-ligand interactions as well as virtual screening of novel targets for rational drug design. PMID:24380381

  6. Phase-Field Modeling of Lipid Vesicles With Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Saman; Salac, David

    2013-11-01

    The formation and annihilation of pores in a lipid vesicle membrane is critical to a number of biotechnologies, such as drug delivery. Previous models of vesicle behavior have ignored the influence of topological changes in the vesicle membrane. Here the entire Helfrich model of a vesicle membrane is considered. Topological changes in the vesicle membrane, such as the formation of a pore, are captured through the use of an embedded phase-field model. The numerical method and sample results will be presented.

  7. Clinical applications of the radioimmunoassay of secretory tuberculoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, E; Wu, N; Quraishi, M A; Levine, S

    1981-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay that measures a specific secretory tuberculoprotein was used to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 9 of 30 liquid cultures of sputum. The accumulation of immunoreactive material in liquid cultures containing isoniazid was shown to reflect in vitro susceptibility of mycobacteria to the antibiotic effects of the drug. PMID:6789332

  8. The transcriptional corepressor MTGR1 regulates intestinal secretory lineage allocation.

    PubMed

    Parang, Bobak; Rosenblatt, Daniel; Williams, Amanda D; Washington, Mary K; Revetta, Frank; Short, Sarah P; Reddy, Vishruth K; Hunt, Aubrey; Shroyer, Noah F; Engel, Michael E; Hiebert, Scott W; Williams, Christopher S

    2015-03-01

    Notch signaling largely determines intestinal epithelial cell fate. High Notch activity drives progenitors toward absorptive enterocytes by repressing secretory differentiation programs, whereas low Notch permits secretory cell assignment. Myeloid translocation gene-related 1 (MTGR1) is a transcriptional corepressor in the myeloid translocation gene/Eight-Twenty-One family. Given that Mtgr1(-/-) mice have a dramatic reduction of intestinal epithelial secretory cells, we hypothesized that MTGR1 is a key repressor of Notch signaling. In support of this, transcriptome analysis of laser capture microdissected Mtgr1(-/-) intestinal crypts revealed Notch activation, and secretory markers Mucin2, Chromogranin A, and Growth factor-independent 1 (Gfi1) were down-regulated in Mtgr1(-/-) whole intestines and Mtgr1(-/-) enteroids. We demonstrate that MTGR1 is in a complex with Suppressor of Hairless Homolog, a key Notch effector, and represses Notch-induced Hairy/Enhancer of Split 1 activity. Moreover, pharmacologic Notch inhibition using a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) rescued the hyperproliferative baseline phenotype in the Mtgr1(-/-) intestine and increased production of goblet and enteroendocrine lineages in Mtgr1(-/-) mice. GSI increased Paneth cell production in wild-type mice but failed to do so in Mtgr1(-/-) mice. We determined that MTGR1 can interact with GFI1, a transcriptional corepressor required for Paneth cell differentiation, and repress GFI1 targets. Overall, the data suggest that MTGR1, a transcriptional corepressor well characterized in hematopoiesis, plays a critical role in intestinal lineage allocation. PMID:25398765

  9. Study on propellant dynamics during docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, G. C.; Robertson, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    The marker-and-cell numerical technique was applied to the study of axisymmetric and two-dimensional flow of liquid in containers under low gravity conditions. The purpose of the study was to provide the capability for numerically simulating liquid propellant motion in partially filled containers during a docking maneuver in orbit. A computer program to provide this capability for axisymmetric and two-dimensional flow was completed and computations were made for a number of hypothetical flow conditions.

  10. Selectivity of docking sites in MAPK kinases.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, A Jane; Frankson, Erlynn; Bardwell, Lee

    2009-05-01

    Protein kinases often recognize their substrates and regulators through docking interactions that occur outside of the active site; these interactions can help us to understand kinase networks, and to target kinases with drugs. During mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, the ability of MAPK kinases (MKKs, or MEKs) to recognize their cognate MAPKs is facilitated by a short docking motif (the D-site) in the MKK N terminus, which binds to a complementary region on the MAPK. MAPKs then recognize many of their targets using the same strategy, because many MAPK substrates also contain D-sites. The extent to which docking contributes to the specificity of MAPK transactions is incompletely understood. Here we characterize the selectivity of the interaction between MKK-derived D-sites and MAPKs by measuring the ability of D-site peptides to inhibit MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of D-site-containing substrates. We find that all MKK D-sites bind better to their cognate MAPKs than they do to non-cognate MAPKs. For instance, the MKK3 D-site peptide, which is a remarkably potent inhibitor of p38alpha (IC(50) < 10 nm), does not inhibit JNK1 or JNK2. Likewise, MAPKs generally bind as well or better to cognate D-sites than to non-cognate D-sites. For instance, JNK1 and JNK2 do not appreciably bind to any D-sites other than their cognate D-sites from MKK4 and MKK7. In general, cognate, within-pathway interactions are preferred about an order of magnitude over non-cognate interactions. However, the selectivity of MAPKs and their cognate MKK-derived D-sites for each other is limited in some cases; in particular, ERK2 is not very selective. We conclude that MAPK-docking sites in MAPK kinases bind selectively to their cognate MAPKs. PMID:19196711

  11. Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This document consists of the presentation submitted at the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (ARD) Conference. It contains three volumes: ARD hardware technology; ARD software technology; and ARD operations. The purpose of this conference is to identify the technologies required for an on orbit demonstration of the ARD, assess the maturity of these technologies, and provide the necessary insight for a quality assessment of the programmatic management, technical, schedule, and cost risks.

  12. Identification of a vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-like membrane protein in zymogen granules of the rat exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Braun, J E; Fritz, B A; Wong, S M; Lowe, A W

    1994-02-18

    Zymogen granules of the exocrine pancreas are the secretory organelles responsible for the regulated secretion of digestive enzymes. Several proteins are associated with or are integral components of the lipid bilayer that forms the zymogen granule membrane. These proteins likely represent important components in the regulated secretion of digestive enzymes. VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins)/synaptobrevins are a family of 18-kDa integral membrane proteins originally characterized in synaptic vesicles. Polyclonal antisera raised against either a VAMP/glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein or rat brain synaptic vesicles, detected an 18-kDa immunoreactive protein in zymogen granule membranes that co-migrates electrophorectically with rat brain synaptic vesicle VAMP. Rat brain synaptic vesicle VAMP was detected by both antisera. Botulinum-B toxin treatment of zymogen granule membranes did not result in cleavage of zymogen granule membrane VAMP, indicating that exocrine pancreatic VAMP is either VAMP1 or a novel VAMP-isoform. Immunofluorescent studies demonstrated that exocrine pancreatic VAMP localized with GP2, a zymogen granule membrane protein, to the apical region of pancreatic acinar cells. No significant labeling was observed in basolateral regions of pancreatic acinar cells. These results establish the presence of a VAMP protein in the zymogen granule of the rat pancreas and suggest that VAMPs have a role in exocrine secretion. PMID:8106518

  13. Molecular docking using the molecular lipophilicity potential as hydrophobic descriptor: impact on GOLD docking performance.

    PubMed

    Nurisso, Alessandra; Bravo, Juan; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Daina, Antoine

    2012-05-25

    GOLD is a molecular docking software widely used in drug design. In the initial steps of docking, it creates a list of hydrophobic fitting points inside protein cavities that steer the positioning of ligand hydrophobic moieties. These points are generated based on the Lennard-Jones potential between a carbon probe and each atom of the residues delimitating the binding site. To thoroughly describe hydrophobic regions in protein pockets and properly guide ligand hydrophobic moieties toward favorable areas, an in-house tool, the MLP filter, was developed and herein applied. This strategy only retains GOLD hydrophobic fitting points that match the rigorous definition of hydrophobicity given by the molecular lipophilicity potential (MLP), a molecular interaction field that relies on an atomic fragmental system based on 1-octanol/water experimental partition coefficients (log P(oct)). MLP computations in the binding sites of crystallographic protein structures revealed that a significant number of points considered hydrophobic by GOLD were actually polar according to the MLP definition of hydrophobicity. To examine the impact of this new tool, ligand-protein complexes from the Astex Diverse Set and the PDB bind core database were redocked with and without the use of the MLP filter. Reliable docking results were obtained by using the MLP filter that increased the quality of docking in nonpolar cavities and outperformed the standard GOLD docking approach. PMID:22462609

  14. Golgi- and Trans-Golgi Network-Mediated Vesicle Trafficking Is Required for Wax Secretion from Epidermal Cells1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Heather E.; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Yang, Weili; Huang, Yan; Ohlrogge, John; Samuels, A. Lacey

    2014-01-01

    Lipid secretion from epidermal cells to the plant surface is essential to create the protective plant cuticle. Cuticular waxes are unusual secretory products, consisting of a variety of highly hydrophobic compounds including saturated very-long-chain alkanes, ketones, and alcohols. These compounds are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but must be trafficked to the plasma membrane for export by ATP-binding cassette transporters. To test the hypothesis that wax components are trafficked via the endomembrane system and packaged in Golgi-derived secretory vesicles, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stem wax secretion was assayed in a series of vesicle-trafficking mutants, including gnom like1-1 (gnl1-1), transport particle protein subunit120-4, and echidna (ech). Wax secretion was dependent upon GNL1 and ECH. Independent of secretion phenotypes, mutants with altered ER morphology also had decreased wax biosynthesis phenotypes, implying that the biosynthetic capacity of the ER is closely related to its structure. These results provide genetic evidence that wax export requires GNL1- and ECH-dependent endomembrane vesicle trafficking to deliver cargo to plasma membrane-localized ATP-binding cassette transporters. PMID:24468625

  15. Transmembrane flux and receptor desensitization measured with membrane vesicles. Homogeneity of vesicles investigated by computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cash, D J; Langer, R M; Subbarao, K; Bradbury, J R

    1988-01-01

    The use of membrane vesicles to make quantitative studies of transmembrane transport and exchange processes involves an assumption of homogeneity of the membrane vesicles. In studies of 86Rb+ exchange mediated by acetylcholine receptor from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus and of 36Cl- exchange mediated by GABA receptor from rat brain, measurements of ion exchange and receptor desensitization precisely followed first order kinetics in support of this assumption. In other measurements a biphasic decay of receptor activity was seen. To elucidate the molecular properties of receptors from such measurements it is important to appreciate what the requirements of vesicle monodispersity are for meaningful results and what the effect of vesicle heterogeneity would be. The experiments were simulated with single vesicle populations with variable defined size distributions as well as with mixtures of different populations of vesicles. The properties of the receptors and their density in the membrane could be varied. Different receptors could be present on the same or different membrane vesicles. The simulated measurements were not very sensitive to size dispersity. A very broad size distribution of a single vesicle population was necessary to give rise to detectable deviations from first order kinetics or errors in the determined kinetic constants. Errors could become significant with mixtures of different vesicle populations, where the dispersity in initial ion exchange rate constant, proportional to the receptor concentration per internal volume, became large. In this case the apparent rate of receptor desensitization would diverge in opposite directions from the input value when measured by two different methods, suggesting an experimental test for such kinetic heterogeneity. A biphasic decrease of receptor activity could not be attributed to vesicle heterogeneity and must be due to desensitization processes with different rates. Significant errors would not

  16. Structural templates for comparative protein docking

    PubMed Central

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Tuzikov, Alexander V.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of protein-protein interactions is important for understanding life processes. Because of the inherent limitations of experimental techniques, such characterization requires computational approaches. Along with the traditional protein-protein docking (free search for a match between two proteins), comparative (template-based) modeling of protein-protein complexes has been gaining popularity. Its development puts an emphasis on full and partial structural similarity between the target protein monomers and the protein-protein complexes previously determined by experimental techniques (templates). The template-based docking relies on the quality and diversity of the template set. We present a carefully curated, non-redundant library of templates containing 4,950 full structures of binary complexes and 5,936 protein-protein interfaces extracted from the full structures at 12Å distance cut-off. Redundancy in the libraries was removed by clustering the PDB structures based on structural similarity. The value of the clustering threshold was determined from the analysis of the clusters and the docking performance on a benchmark set. High structural quality of the interfaces in the template and validation sets was achieved by automated procedures and manual curation. The library is included in the Dockground resource for molecular recognition studies at http://dockground.bioinformatics.ku.edu. PMID:25488330

  17. Combined Immunodeficiency Associated with DOCK8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Davis, Jeremiah C.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Jing, Huie; Favreau, Amanda J.; Matthews, Helen F.; Davis, Joie; Turner, Maria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.; Su, Helen C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections with elevated serum levels of IgE are features of some variants of combined immunodeficiency. The genetic causes of these variants are unknown. METHODS We collected longitudinal clinical data on 11 patients from eight families who had recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections. We performed comparative genomic hybridization arrays and targeted gene sequencing. Variants with predicted loss-of-expression mutations were confirmed by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase –polymerase-chain-reaction assay and immunoblotting. We evaluated the number and function of lymphocytes with the use of in vitro assays and flow cytometry. RESULTS Patients had recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonias; recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin infections with otitis externa; recurrent, severe herpes simplex virus or herpes zoster infections; extensive and persistent infections with molluscum contagiosum; and human papillomavirus infections. Most patients had severe atopy with anaphylaxis; several had squamous-cell carcinomas, and one had T-cell lymphoma –leukemia. Elevated serum IgE levels, hypereosinophilia, low numbers of T cells and B cells, low serum IgM levels, and variable IgG antibody responses were common. Expansion in vitro of activated CD8 T cells was impaired. Novel homozygous or compound heterozygous deletions and point mutations in the gene encoding the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) led to the absence of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS Autosomal recessive DOCK8 deficiency is associated with a novel variant of combined immunodeficiency. PMID:19776401

  18. Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator. Francis B. Smith, described the simulator as follows: 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.' Published in Barton C. Hacker and James M. Grimwood, On the Shoulders of Titans: A History of Project Gemini, NASA SP-4203; Francis B. Smith, 'Simulators for Manned Space Research,' Paper presented at the 1966 IEEE International convention, March 21-25, 1966.

  19. Isolated rat hepatocyte couplets: a primary secretory unit for electrophysiologic studies of bile secretory function.

    PubMed

    Graf, J; Gautam, A; Boyer, J L

    1984-10-01

    Hepatocyte couplets were isolated by collagenase perfusion from rat liver. Between adjacent cells, the bile canaliculus forms a closed space into which secretion occurs. As in intact liver, Mg2+-ATPase is localized at the canalicular lumen, the organic anion fluorescein is excreted, and secretion is modified by osmotic gradients. By passing a microelectrode through one cell into the canalicular vacuole, a transepithelial potential profile was obtained. In 27 cell couplets the steady-state intracellular (-26.3 +/- 5.3 mV) and intracanalicular (-5.9 +/- 3.3 mV) potentials were recorded at 37 degrees C with reference to the external medium. Input resistances were determined within the cell (86 +/- 23 M omega) and in the bile canalicular lumen (32 +/- 17 M omega) by passing current pulses through the microelectrode. These data define electrical driving forces for ion transport across the sinusoidal, canalicular, and paracellular barriers and indicate ion permeation across a leaky paracellular junctional pathway. These findings indicate that the isolated hepatocyte couplet is an effective model for electrophysiologic studies of bile secretory function. PMID:6149546

  20. Rapid flexible docking using a stochastic rotamer library of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feng; Yin, Shuangye; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2010-01-01

    Existing flexible docking approaches model the ligand and receptor flexibility either separately or in a loosely-coupled manner, which captures the conformational changes inefficiently. Here, we propose a flexible docking approach, MedusaDock, which models both ligand and receptor flexibility simultaneously with sets of discrete rotamers. We develop an algorithm to build the ligand rotamer library “on-the-fly” during docking simulations. MedusaDock benchmarks demonstrate a rapid sampling efficiency and high prediction accuracy in both self-docking (to the co-crystallized state) and cross-docking (to a state co-crystallized with a different ligand), the latter of which mimics the virtual-screening procedure in computational drug discovery. We also perform a virtual-screening test of four flexible kinase targets including cyclin-dependent kinase 2, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, HIV reverse transcriptase, and HIV protease. We find significant improvements of virtual-screening enrichments when compared to rigid-receptor methods. The predictive power of MedusaDock in cross-docking and preliminary virtual-screening benchmarks highlights the importance to model both ligand and receptor flexibility simultaneously in computational docking. PMID:20712341

  1. The transcriptional corepressor MTGR1 regulates intestinal secretory lineage allocation

    PubMed Central

    Parang, Bobak; Rosenblatt, Daniel; Williams, Amanda D.; Washington, Mary K.; Revetta, Frank; Short, Sarah P.; Reddy, Vishruth K.; Hunt, Aubrey; Shroyer, Noah F.; Engel, Michael E.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Williams, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling largely determines intestinal epithelial cell fate. High Notch activity drives progenitors toward absorptive enterocytes by repressing secretory differentiation programs, whereas low Notch permits secretory cell assignment. Myeloid translocation gene-related 1 (MTGR1) is a transcriptional corepressor in the myeloid translocation gene/Eight-Twenty-One family. Given that Mtgr1−/− mice have a dramatic reduction of intestinal epithelial secretory cells, we hypothesized that MTGR1 is a key repressor of Notch signaling. In support of this, transcriptome analysis of laser capture microdissected Mtgr1−/− intestinal crypts revealed Notch activation, and secretory markers Mucin2, Chromogranin A, and Growth factor-independent 1 (Gfi1) were down-regulated in Mtgr1−/− whole intestines and Mtgr1−/− enteroids. We demonstrate that MTGR1 is in a complex with Suppressor of Hairless Homolog, a key Notch effector, and represses Notch-induced Hairy/Enhancer of Split 1 activity. Moreover, pharmacologic Notch inhibition using a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) rescued the hyperproliferative baseline phenotype in the Mtgr1−/− intestine and increased production of goblet and enteroendocrine lineages in Mtgr1−/− mice. GSI increased Paneth cell production in wild-type mice but failed to do so in Mtgr1−/− mice. We determined that MTGR1 can interact with GFI1, a transcriptional corepressor required for Paneth cell differentiation, and repress GFI1 targets. Overall, the data suggest that MTGR1, a transcriptional corepressor well characterized in hematopoiesis, plays a critical role in intestinal lineage allocation.—Parang, B., Rosenblatt, D., Williams, A. D., Washington, M. K., Revetta, F., Short, S. P., Reddy, V. K., Hunt, A., Shroyer, N. F., Engel, M. E., Hiebert, S. W., Williams, C. S. The transcriptional corepressors MTGR1 regulates intestinal secretory lineage allocation. PMID:25398765

  2. Multi-core vesicle nanoparticles based on vesicle fusion for delivery of chemotherapic drugs.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Soon Hong; Oh, Keun Sang; Koo, Heebeom; Jeon, Hyesung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2011-11-01

    The Pluronic nanoparticles (NPs) composed of Pluronic (F-68) and liquid polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular wt: 400) containing docetaxel (DTX) were stabilized with the vesicle fusion. When DTX-loaded Pluronic NPs were mixed with vesicles in the aqueous medium, DTX-loaded Pluronic NPs were incorporated into vesicles to form multi-core vesicle NPs. The morphology and size distribution of multi-core vesicle NPs were observed using FE-SEM, cryo-TEM and a particle size analyzer. To apply multi-core vesicle NPs as a delivery system for DTX, a model anti-cancer drug, the release pattern of DTX was observed and the tumor growth was monitored by injecting the DTX-loaded multi-core vesicle NPs into the tail veins of tumor-bearing mice. We also evaluated the time-dependent excretion profile, in vivo biodistribution, circulation time, and tumor targeting capability of multi-core vesicle NPs using a non-invasive live animal imaging technology. PMID:21784512

  3. Expression of two membrane fusion proteins, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, I; Burkart, A; Szmydynger-Chodobska, J; Dodd, K A; Trimble, W S; Miller, K V; Shim, M; Chodobski, A

    2003-01-01

    25 kDa homologue, synaptosome-associated protein of 23 kDa, is also expressed in the rat choroid plexus, which was confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Our findings suggest that synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein are involved in secretion of polypeptides from the choroid plexus epithelium. The presence of synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and its homologue as well as multiple isoforms of vesicle-associated membrane protein in choroidal epithelium may play a role in the apical versus basolateral targeting of secretory vesicles. PMID:12559091

  4. GeauxDock: A novel approach for mixed-resolution ligand docking using a descriptor-based force field.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; Fang, Ye; Feinstein, Wei P; Ramanujam, Jagannathan; Koppelman, David M; Moreno, Juana; Brylinski, Michal; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-10-15

    Molecular docking is an important component of computer-aided drug discovery. In this communication, we describe GeauxDock, a new docking approach that builds on the ideas of ligand homology modeling. GeauxDock features a descriptor-based scoring function integrating evolutionary constraints with physics-based energy terms, a mixed-resolution molecular representation of protein-ligand complexes, and an efficient Monte Carlo sampling protocol. To drive docking simulations toward experimental conformations, the scoring function was carefully optimized to produce a correlation between the total pseudoenergy and the native-likeness of binding poses. Indeed, benchmarking calculations demonstrate that GeauxDock has a strong capacity to identify near-native conformations across docking trajectories with the area under receiver operating characteristics of 0.85. By excluding closely related templates, we show that GeauxDock maintains its accuracy at lower levels of homology through the increased contribution from physics-based energy terms compensating for weak evolutionary constraints. GeauxDock is available at http://www.institute.loni.org/lasigma/package/dock/. PMID:26250822

  5. HybridDock: A Hybrid Protein-Ligand Docking Protocol Integrating Protein- and Ligand-Based Approaches.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-You; Li, Min; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2016-06-27

    Structure-based molecular docking and ligand-based similarity search are two commonly used computational methods in computer-aided drug design. Structure-based docking tries to utilize the structural information on a drug target like protein, and ligand-based screening takes advantage of the information on known ligands for a target. Given their different advantages, it would be desirable to use both protein- and ligand-based approaches in drug discovery when information for both the protein and known ligands is available. Here, we have presented a general hybrid docking protocol, referred to as HybridDock, to utilize both the protein structures and known ligands by combining the molecular docking program MDock and the ligand-based similarity search method SHAFTS, and evaluated our hybrid docking protocol on the CSAR 2013 and 2014 exercises. The results showed that overall our hybrid docking protocol significantly improved the performance in both binding affinity and binding mode predictions, compared to the sole MDock program. The efficacy of the hybrid docking protocol was further confirmed using the combination of DOCK and SHAFTS, suggesting an alternative docking approach for modern drug design/discovery. PMID:26317502

  6. InterEvDock: a docking server to predict the structure of protein-protein interactions using evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinchao; Vavrusa, Marek; Andreani, Jessica; Rey, Julien; Tufféry, Pierre; Guerois, Raphaël

    2016-07-01

    The structural modeling of protein-protein interactions is key in understanding how cell machineries cross-talk with each other. Molecular docking simulations provide efficient means to explore how two unbound protein structures interact. InterEvDock is a server for protein docking based on a free rigid-body docking strategy. A systematic rigid-body docking search is performed using the FRODOCK program and the resulting models are re-scored with InterEvScore and SOAP-PP statistical potentials. The InterEvScore potential was specifically designed to integrate co-evolutionary information in the docking process. InterEvDock server is thus particularly well suited in case homologous sequences are available for both binding partners. The server returns 10 structures of the most likely consensus models together with 10 predicted residues most likely involved in the interface. In 91% of all complexes tested in the benchmark, at least one residue out of the 10 predicted is involved in the interface, providing useful guidelines for mutagenesis. InterEvDock is able to identify a correct model among the top10 models for 49% of the rigid-body cases with evolutionary information, making it a unique and efficient tool to explore structural interactomes under an evolutionary perspective. The InterEvDock web interface is available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/services/InterEvDock/. PMID:27131368

  7. Effects of tail docking and docking length on neuroanatomical changes in healed tail tips of pigs.

    PubMed

    Herskin, M S; Thodberg, K; Jensen, H E

    2015-04-01

    In pig production, piglets are tail docked at birth in order to prevent tail biting later in life. In order to examine the effects of tail docking and docking length on the formation of neuromas, we used 65 pigs and the following four treatments: intact tails (n=18); leaving 75% (n=17); leaving 50% (n=19); or leaving 25% (n=11) of the tail length on the pigs. The piglets were docked between day 2 and 4 after birth using a gas-heated apparatus, and were kept under conventional conditions until slaughter at 22 weeks of age, where tails were removed and examined macroscopically and histologically. The tail lengths and diameters differed at slaughter (lengths: 30.6±0.6; 24.9±0.4; 19.8±0.6; 8.7±0.6 cm; P<0.001; tail diameter: 0.5±0.03; 0.8±0.02; 1.0±0.03; 1.4±0.04 cm; P<0.001, respectively). Docking resulted in a higher proportion of tails with neuromas (64 v. 0%; P<0.001), number of neuromas per tail (1.0±0.2 v. 0; P<0.001) and size of neuromas (1023±592 v. 0 μm; P<0.001). The results show that tail docking piglets using hot-iron cautery causes formation of neuromas in the outermost part of the tail tip. The presence of neuromas might lead to altered nociceptive thresholds, which need to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:25482535

  8. Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock: a new gaussian-based score function suitable for docking in homology modelled protein structures.

    PubMed

    Tøndel, Kristin; Anderssen, Endre; Drabløs, Finn

    2006-03-01

    Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock is a new empirical score function suitable for virtual library screening using homology modelled protein structures. Here, the score function is used in combination with the geometry search method Tabu search. A description of the protein binding site is generated using gaussian property fields like in Protein Alpha Shape Similarity Analysis (PASSA). Gaussian property fields are also used to describe the ligand properties. The overlap between the receptor and ligand hydrophilicity and lipophilicity fields is maximised, while minimising steric clashes. Gaussian functions introduce a smoothing of the property fields. This makes the score function robust against small structural variations, and therefore suitable for use with homology models. This also makes it less critical to include protein flexibility in the docking calculations. We use a fast and simplified version of the score function in the geometry search, while a more detailed version is used for the final prediction of the binding free energies. This use of a two-level scoring makes PAS-Dock computationally efficient, and well suited for virtual screening. The PAS-Dock score function is trained on 218 X-ray structures of protein- ligand complexes with experimental binding affinities. The performance of PAS-Dock is compared to two other docking methods, AutoDock and MOE-Dock, with respect to both accuracy and computational efficiency. According to this study, PAS-Dock is more computationally efficient than both AutoDock and MOE-Dock, and gives a better prediction of the free energies of binding. PAS-Dock is also more robust against structural variations than AutoDock. PMID:16652207

  9. Docking Screens for Novel Ligands Conferring New Biology.

    PubMed

    Irwin, John J; Shoichet, Brian K

    2016-05-12

    It is now plausible to dock libraries of 10 million molecules against targets over several days or weeks. When the molecules screened are commercially available, they may be rapidly tested to find new leads. Although docking retains important liabilities (it cannot calculate affinities accurately nor even reliably rank order high-scoring molecules), it can often can distinguish likely from unlikely ligands, often with hit rates above 10%. Here we summarize the improvements in libraries, target quality, and methods that have supported these advances, and the open access resources that make docking accessible. Recent docking screens for new ligands are sketched, as are the binding, crystallographic, and in vivo assays that support them. Like any technique, controls are crucial, and key experimental ones are reviewed. With such controls, docking campaigns can find ligands with new chemotypes, often revealing the new biology that may be docking's greatest impact over the next few years. PMID:26913380

  10. In Vitro Reconstitution of Rab GTPase-dependent Vesicle Clustering by the Yeast Lethal Giant Larvae/Tomosyn Homolog, Sro7*

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Guendalina; Watson, Kelly; Demonch, Mallory; Temple, Brenda; Brennwald, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular traffic in yeast between the Golgi and the cell surface is mediated by vesicular carriers that tether and fuse in a fashion that depends on the function of the Rab GTPase, Sec4. Overexpression of either of two Sec4 effectors, Sro7 or Sec15, results in the formation of a cluster of post-Golgi vesicles within the cell. Here, we describe a novel assay that recapitulates post-Golgi vesicle clustering in vitro utilizing purified Sro7 and vesicles isolated from late secretory mutants. We show clustering in vitro closely replicates the in vivo clustering process as it is highly dependent on both Sro7 and GTP-Sec4. We also make use of this assay to characterize a novel mutant form of Sro7 that results in a protein that is specifically defective in vesicle clustering both in vivo and in vitro. We show that this mutation acts by effecting a conformational change in Sro7 from the closed to a more open structure. Our analysis demonstrates that the N-terminal propeller needs to be able to engage the C-terminal tail for vesicle clustering to occur. Consistent with this, we show that occupancy of the N terminus of Sro7 by the t-SNARE Sec9, which results in the open conformation of Sro7, also acts to inhibit vesicle cluster formation by Sro7. This suggests a model by which a conformational switch in Sro7 acts to coordinate Rab-mediated vesicle tethering with SNARE assembly by requiring a single conformational state for both of these processes to occur. PMID:25404740

  11. Botulinum neurotoxin dose-dependently inhibits release of neurosecretory vesicle-vargeted luciferase from neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Genz, Lara; Püchel, Gerhard P

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a bacterial toxin that inhibits neurotransmitter release from neurons and thereby causes a flaccid paralysis. It is used as drug to treat a number of serious ailments and, more frequently, for aesthetic medical interventions. Botulinum toxin for pharmacological applications is isolated from bacterial cultures. Due to partial denaturation of the protein, the specific activity of these preparations shows large variations.Because of its extreme potential toxicity, pharmacological preparations must be carefully tested for their activity. For the current gold standard, the mouse lethality assay, several hundred thousand mice are killed per year. Alternative methods have been developed that suffer from one or more of the following deficits: In vitro enzyme assays test only the activity of the catalytic subunit of the toxin. Enzymatic and cell based immunological assays are specific for just one of the different serotypes. The current study takes a completely different approach that overcomes these limitations: Neuronal cell lines were stably transfected with plasmids coding for luciferases of different species, which were N-terminally tagged with leader sequences that redirect the luciferase into neuro-secretory vesicles. From these vesicles, luciferases were released upon depolarization of the cells. The depolarization-dependent release was efficiently inhibited by of botulinum toxin in a concentration range (1 to 100 pM) that is used in pharmacological preparations. The new assay might thus be an alternative to the mouse lethality assay and the immunological assays already in use. PMID:26389683

  12. Proteomics unravels extracellular vesicles as carriers of classical cytoplasmic proteins in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Llama-Palacios, Arancha; Parra, Claudia Marcela; Vivanco, Fernando; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    The commensal fungus Candida albicans secretes a considerable number of proteins and, as in different fungal pathogens, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have also been observed. Our report contains the first proteomic analysis of EVs in C. albicans and a comparative proteomic study of the soluble secreted proteins. With this purpose, cell-free culture supernatants from C. albicans were separated into EVs and EV-free supernatant and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. A total of 96 proteins were identified including 75 and 61 proteins in EVs and EV-free supernatant, respectively. Out of these, 40 proteins were found in secretome by proteomic analysis for the first time. The soluble proteins were enriched in cell wall and secreted pathogenesis related proteins. Interestingly, more than 90% of these EV-free supernatant proteins were classical secretory proteins with predicted N-terminal signal peptide, whereas all the leaderless proteins involved in metabolism, including some moonlighting proteins, or in the exocytosis and endocytosis process were exclusively cargo of the EVs. We propose a model of the different mechanisms used by C. albicans secreted proteins to reach the extracellular medium. Furthermore, we tested the potential of the Bgl2 protein, identified in vesicles and EV-free supernatant, to protect against a systemic candidiasis in a murine model. PMID:25367658

  13. Getting to know the extracellular vesicle glycome.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jared Q; Griffin, Matthew D

    2016-04-22

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a diverse population of complex biological particles with diameters ranging from approximately 20 to 1000 nm. Tremendous interest in EVs has been generated following a number of recent, high-profile reports describing their potential utility in diagnostic, prognostic, drug delivery, and therapeutic roles. Subpopulations, such as exosomes, are now known to directly participate in cell-cell communication and direct material transfer. Glycomics, the 'omic' portion of the glycobiology field, has only begun to catalog the surface oligosaccharide and polysaccharide structures and also the carbohydrate-binding proteins found on and inside EVs. The EV glycome undoubtedly contains vital clues essential to better understanding the function, biogenesis, release and transfer of vesicles, however getting at this information is technically challenging and made even more so because of the small physical size of the vesicles and the typically minute yield from physiological-scale biological samples. Vesicle micro-heterogeneity which may be related to specific vesicle origins and functions presents a further challenge. A number of primary studies carried out over the past decade have turned up specific and valuable clues regarding the composition and roles of glycan structures and also glycan binding proteins involved EV biogenesis and transfer. This review explores some of the major EV glycobiological research carried out to date and discusses the potential implications of these findings across the life sciences. PMID:26888195

  14. Haloarchaea and the formation of gas vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic Archaea (Haloarchaea) thrive in salterns containing sodium chloride concentrations up to saturation. Many Haloarchaea possess genes encoding gas vesicles, but only a few species, such as Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax mediterranei, produce these gas-filled, proteinaceous nanocompartments. Gas vesicles increase the buoyancy of cells and enable them to migrate vertically in the water body to regions with optimal conditions. Their synthesis depends on environmental factors, such as light, oxygen supply, temperature and salt concentration. Fourteen gas vesicle protein (gvp) genes are involved in their formation, and regulation of gvp gene expression occurs at the level of transcription, including the two regulatory proteins, GvpD and GvpE, but also at the level of translation. The gas vesicle wall is solely formed of proteins with the two major components, GvpA and GvpC, and seven additional accessory proteins are also involved. Except for GvpI and GvpH, all of these are required to form the gas permeable wall. The applications of gas vesicles include their use as an antigen presenter for viral or pathogen proteins, but also as a stable ultrasonic reporter for biomedical purposes. PMID:25648404

  15. Activation of calcineurin by phosphotidylserine containing vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Politino, M.; King, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) is a Ca/sup 2 +/- and calmodulin-regulated phosphatase. Recent findings suggested an association of CaN with biological membranes and prompted the present investigation into the interactions of the phosphatase with phospholipids in vitro. In the absence of calmodulin, sonicated preparations of phosphatidylserine (PS) provided a five-fold activation of the Ni- and Mn-supported activities of CaN towards (/sup 32/P) histone Hl; activation in the presence of calmodulin was much less pronounced. Half-maximal activation in the absence of calmodulin required approximately 0.1 mg/ml of PS. Activation of CaN was also observed with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC) containing 20% PS but not with PC alone, or with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Molecular sieve chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 34 provided further evidence that CaN associates with phospholipid vesicles composed of PS, or PC containing 20% PS, but not with vesicles of PC or PE. Complete association with medium sized vesicles of PS and PC/PS required Ca/sup 2 +/ ions; in the absence of the metal ion at least 60% of the enzyme failed to interact with the lipids while the remainder preferentially migrated with larger vesicles. These results suggest a role for Ca/sup 2 +/ in regulating CaN's interaction with phospholipids.

  16. Haloarchaea and the Formation of Gas Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic Archaea (Haloarchaea) thrive in salterns containing sodium chloride concentrations up to saturation. Many Haloarchaea possess genes encoding gas vesicles, but only a few species, such as Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax mediterranei, produce these gas-filled, proteinaceous nanocompartments. Gas vesicles increase the buoyancy of cells and enable them to migrate vertically in the water body to regions with optimal conditions. Their synthesis depends on environmental factors, such as light, oxygen supply, temperature and salt concentration. Fourteen gas vesicle protein (gvp) genes are involved in their formation, and regulation of gvp gene expression occurs at the level of transcription, including the two regulatory proteins, GvpD and GvpE, but also at the level of translation. The gas vesicle wall is solely formed of proteins with the two major components, GvpA and GvpC, and seven additional accessory proteins are also involved. Except for GvpI and GvpH, all of these are required to form the gas permeable wall. The applications of gas vesicles include their use as an antigen presenter for viral or pathogen proteins, but also as a stable ultrasonic reporter for biomedical purposes. PMID:25648404

  17. Synaptic vesicle recycling: steps and principles

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle recycling is one of the best-studied cellular pathways. Many of the proteins involved are known, and their interactions are becoming increasingly clear. However, as for many other pathways, it is still difficult to understand synaptic vesicle recycling as a whole. While it is generally possible to point out how synaptic reactions take place, it is not always easy to understand what triggers or controls them. Also, it is often difficult to understand how the availability of the reaction partners is controlled: how the reaction partners manage to find each other in the right place, at the right time. I present here an overview of synaptic vesicle recycling, discussing the mechanisms that trigger different reactions, and those that ensure the availability of reaction partners. A central argument is that synaptic vesicles bind soluble cofactor proteins, with low affinity, and thus control their availability in the synapse, forming a buffer for cofactor proteins. The availability of cofactor proteins, in turn, regulates the different synaptic reactions. Similar mechanisms, in which one of the reaction partners buffers another, may apply to many other processes, from the biogenesis to the degradation of the synaptic vesicle. PMID:24596248

  18. A Comparison of Candidate Seal Designs for Future Docking Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick, H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce, M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, and other destinations. A key component of this system is the seal at the main docking interface which inhibits the loss of cabin air once docking is complete. Depending on the mission, the seal must be able to dock in either a seal-on-flange or seal-on-seal configuration. Seal-on-flange mating would occur when a docking system equipped with a seal docks to a system with a flat metal flange. This would occur when a vehicle docks to a node on the International Space Station. Seal-on-seal mating would occur when two docking systems equipped with seals dock to each other. Two types of seal designs were identified for this application: Gask-O-seals and multi-piece seals. Both types of seals had a pair of seal bulbs to satisfy the redundancy requirement. A series of performance assessments and comparisons were made between the candidate seal designs indicating that they meet the requirements for leak rate and compression and adhesion loads under a range of operating conditions. Other design factors such as part count, integration into the docking system tunnel, seal-on-seal mating, and cost were also considered leading to the selection of the multi-piece seal design for the new docking system. The results of this study can be used by designers of future docking systems and other habitable volumes to select the seal design best-suited for their particular application.

  19. Astronaut Richard Truly seen working with Apollo docking mechanism model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Richard H. Truly, an Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) spacecraft communicator, is seen working with an Apollo docking mechanism in the Mission Control Center during the joint U.S.-USSR ASTP docking in Earth orbit mission. Astronaut Truly, a member of the American ASTP crew support team, was working on the docking probe problem. The crew had notified ground control that there was a problem with removing the probe from the tunnel of the Apollo Command Module.

  20. Magnet-Based System for Docking of Miniature Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Nathan; Nguyen, Hai D.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype system for docking a miniature spacecraft with a larger spacecraft has been developed by engineers at the Johnson Space Center. Engineers working on Mini AERCam, a free-flying robotic camera, needed to find a way to successfully dock and undock their miniature spacecraft to refuel the propulsion and recharge the batteries. The subsystems developed (see figure) include (1) a docking port, designed for the larger spacecraft, which contains an electromagnet, a ball lock mechanism, and a service probe; and (2) a docking cluster, designed for the smaller spacecraft, which contains either a permanent magnet or an electromagnet. A typical docking operation begins with the docking spacecraft maneuvering into position near the docking port on the parent vehicle. The electromagnet( s) are then turned on, and, if necessary, the docking spacecraft is then maneuvered within the capture envelope of the docking port. The capture envelope for this system is approximated by a 5-in. (12.7-cm) cube centered on the front of the docking-port electromagnet and within an angular misalignment of <30 . Thereafter, the magnetic forces draw the smaller spacecraft toward the larger one and this brings the spacecraft into approximate alignment prior to contact. Mechanical alignment guides provide the final rotational alignment into one of 12 positions. Once the docking vehicle has been captured magnetically in the docking port, the ball-lock mechanism is activated, which locks the two spacecraft together. At this point the electromagnet( s) are turned off, and the service probe extended if recharge and refueling are to be performed. Additionally, during undocking, the polarity of one electromagnet can be reversed to provide a gentle push to separate the two spacecraft. This system is currently being incorporated into the design of Mini AERCam vehicle.

  1. 9. North Plant, View of Canopied Loading Dock with Powerhouse ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. North Plant, View of Canopied Loading Dock with Powerhouse to Left, Looking Northwest - Atwater Kent Manufacturing Company, North Plant, 5000 Wissahickon Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. 10. View along North Plant Southwest Elevation, Showing Loading Dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View along North Plant Southwest Elevation, Showing Loading Dock and Powerhouse (right rear) - Atwater Kent Manufacturing Company, North Plant, 5000 Wissahickon Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. 21. ORE DOCK, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THIS VIEW SHOWS THE WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. ORE DOCK, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THIS VIEW SHOWS THE WEST END OF THE DOCK. EMPTY CARS ARE MOVED IN FROM THE WEST BY 'SHUNT CARS,' PUT INTO PLACE AS NEEDED BENEATH THE HULETTS, FILLED, THEN SHUNTED TO THE EAST END OF THE YARD WHERE THEY ARE MADE UP INTO TRAINS. THE POWER HOUSE (WITH TALL ARCHED WINDOWS) AND THE TWO-STORY DOCK OFFICE CAN BE SEEN HERE. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. Biochemical and Functional Studies of Cortical Vesicle Fusion: The SNARE Complex and Ca2+ Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Coorssen, Jens R.; Blank, Paul S.; Tahara, Masahiro; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    1998-01-01

    Cortical vesicles (CV) possess components critical to the mechanism of exocytosis. The homotypic fusion of CV centrifuged or settled into contact has a sigmoidal Ca2+ activity curve comparable to exocytosis (CV–PM fusion). Here we show that Sr2+ and Ba2+ also trigger CV–CV fusion, and agents affecting different steps of exocytotic fusion block Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+-triggered CV–CV fusion. The maximal number of active fusion complexes per vesicle, Max, was quantified by NEM inhibition of fusion, showing that CV–CV fusion satisfies many criteria of a mathematical analysis developed for exocytosis. Both Max and the Ca2+ sensitivity of fusion complex activation were comparable to that determined for CV–PM fusion. Using Ca2+-induced SNARE complex disruption, we have analyzed the relationship between membrane fusion (CV–CV and CV–PM) and the SNARE complex. Fusion and complex disruption have different sensitivities to Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, the complex remains Ca2+- sensitive on fusion-incompetent CV, and disruption does not correlate with the quantified activation of fusion complexes. Under conditions which disrupt the SNARE complex, CV on the PM remain docked and fusion competent, and isolated CV still dock and fuse, but with a markedly reduced Ca2+ sensitivity. Thus, in this system, neither the formation, presence, nor disruption of the SNARE complex is essential to the Ca2+-triggered fusion of exocytotic membranes. Therefore the SNARE complex alone cannot be the universal minimal fusion machine for intracellular fusion. We suggest that this complex modulates the Ca2+ sensitivity of fusion. PMID:9864359

  5. Cytochemical calcium distribution in secretory ameloblasts of the rat in relation to enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Eisenmann, D R; Zaki, A E; Ashrafi, S H

    1986-01-01

    Calcium distribution in secretory ameloblasts was studied in rat incisor enamel in which mineralization was temporarily disturbed by injection of either fluoride or cobalt. Pyroantimonate precipitates of calcium were analysed morphometrically in regions of the cell membranes, mitochondria and secretory granules. The disturbances in mineralization were characterized by accumulations of unmineralized enamel matrix at the secretory regions of Tomes' process within 1 h after injection. Fluoride-induced disturbances in mineralization were not accompanied by marked changes in calcium concentration and distribution. It may be that fluoride causes alterations in the synthesis and secretion of the organic matrix which affects its ability to mineralize. Secretory ameloblasts treated with cobalt showed a broad basis for interference with calcium, in particular that which is associated with cell membranes and secretory granules. Secretory ameloblasts may be actively controlling the availability of calcium to enamel by mechanisms involving the cell membrane as well as the secretory granules. PMID:3739601

  6. CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles to fusion competence at CA3–CA1 synapses in adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Yo; Ishii, Chiaki; Fukazawa, Yugo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Ishii, Yuki; Sano, Yoshitake; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and of synaptic vesicles in neurons. However, the synaptic function of CAPS1 in the mature brain is unclear because Caps1 knockout (KO) results in neonatal death. Here, using forebrain-specific Caps1 conditional KO (cKO) mice, we demonstrate, for the first time, a critical role of CAPS1 in adult synapses. The amplitude of synaptic transmission at CA3–CA1 synapses was strongly reduced, and paired-pulse facilitation was significantly increased, in acute hippocampal slices from cKO mice compared with control mice, suggesting a perturbation in presynaptic function. Morphological analysis revealed an accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the presynapse without any overall morphological change. Interestingly, however, the percentage of docked vesicles was markedly decreased in the Caps1 cKO. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles, thereby enhancing neurotransmitter release at hippocampal synapses. PMID:27545744

  7. Dynamics of fibers growing inside soft vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenduzzo, D.; Orlandini, E.

    2007-11-01

    We present 3D stochastic dynamic simulations of the growth of a semiflexible polymer inside a soft vesicle. We find that very stiff fibers stall soon and lock the membrane into a strongly deformed prolate shape. Fibers of intermediate stiffness buckle and form a toroidal configuration which distorts the membrane into an oblate shape. Finally, more flexible polymers form massive spool-like condensates with ordered domains, while the vesicle inflates isotropically. We discuss our results with respect to observations on cell shape in sickle red blood cells, developing erythrocytes, and genome packing inside bacteriophages. We quantify how the force felt by the fiber tip, and the vesicle aspect ratio, change during growth, and we discuss possible "synthetic biology" experiments to validate our results.

  8. Directed vesicle transport by diffusio-osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michler, D.; Shahidzadeh, N.; Sprik, R.; Bonn, D.

    2015-04-01

    We present a study on surfactant vesicles that spontaneously move towards an oil droplet that is deposited on a glass substrate. Tracer particles in the surfactant solution show that the motion is not self-propelled: the vesicles are entrained by a macroscopic hydrodynamic flow. Measurements of the flow velocity suggest that the flow is of diffusio-osmotic nature. The surfactant is observed to move into the oil phase which creates a gradient in ion concentration in the vicinity of the droplet. As the diffusion coefficients of the surfactant's co- and counter-ions differ, a charge separation takes place and an electric field arises. This electric field then generates a hydrodynamic flow along the charged glass substrate in which the vesicles are entrained.

  9. Computational algorithms for vesicle electrohydrodyna- mics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we discuss a new integral equation method for simulating the electrohydrodynamics of a suspension of vesicles. The classical Taylor-Melcher leaky-dielectric model is employed for the electric response of each vesicle and the Helfrich energy model combined with local inextensibility is employed for its elastic response. The coupled governing equations for the vesicle position and its transmembrane electric potential are solved using a numerical method that is spectrally accurate in space and first-order in time. The method uses a semi-implicit time-stepping scheme to overcome the numerical stiffness associated with the governing equations. We will present new results on the suspension rheology, two-body interactions and pattern formation. This is joint work with Bowei Wu. This work was sponsored by NSF under grants DMS-1224656 and DMS-1418964.

  10. Functions and importance of mycobacterial extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, G Marcela; Prados-Rosales, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    The release of cellular factors by means of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is conserved in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. EVs are released by growing bacteria as part of their interaction with their environment and, for pathogenic bacteria, constitute an important component of their interactions with the host. While EVs released by gram-negative bacteria have been extensively studied, the vesicles released by thick cell wall microorganisms like mycobacteria were recognized only recently and are less well understood. Nonetheless, studies of mycobacterial EVs have already suggested roles in pathogenesis, opening exciting new avenues of research aimed at understanding their biogenesis and potential use in antitubercular strategies. In this minireview, we discuss the discovery of mycobacterial vesicles, the current understanding of their nature, content, regulation, and possible functions, as well as their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:27020292

  11. Subpopulations of liver coated vesicles resolved by preparative agarose gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Kedersha, N.L.; Hill, D.F.; Kronquist, K.E.; Rome, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver clathrin coated vesicles (CVs) were separated into several distinct subpopulations using non-sieving concentrations of agarose, which allowed the separation of species differing primarily in surface charge. Using preparative agarose electrophoresis, the CVs were recovered and analyzed for differences in morphology, coat protein composition, and stripped vesicle protein composition. Coat proteins from difference populations appeared identical on SDS PAGE, and triskelions stripped from the different populations showed the same mobility on the agarose gel, suggesting that the mobility differences observed in intact CVs were due to differences in the surface charge of underlying vesicles rather than to variations in their clathrin coats. Stripped CVs exhibited considerable heterogeneity when analyzed by Western blotting: the fast-migrating population was enriched in the mannose 6-phosphate receptor, secretory acetyl-choline esterase, and an M/sub r/ 195,000 glycoprotein. The slow-migrating population of CVs was enriched in the asialoglycoprotein receptor, and it appeared to contain all detectable concanavalin A-binding polypeptides as well as the bulk of detectable WGA-binding proteins. When CVs were prepared from /sup 125/I-asialoorosomucoid-perfused rat liver, ligand was found in the slow-migrating CVs, suggesting that these were endocytic in origin. Morphological differences were also observed: the fast-migrating population was enriched in smaller CVs, whereas the slow-migrating population exhibited an enrichment in larger CVs. As liver consists largely of hepatocytes, these subpopulations appear to originate from the same cell type and probably represent CVs of different intracellular origin and destination.

  12. Optoelectronic Sensor System for Guidance in Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Book, Michael L.; Jackson, John L.

    2004-01-01

    The Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) system is an optoelectronic sensor that provides automated guidance between two vehicles. In the original intended application, the two vehicles would be spacecraft docking together, but the basic principles of design and operation of the sensor are applicable to aircraft, robots, vehicles, or other objects that may be required to be aligned for docking, assembly, resupply, or precise separation. The system includes a sensor head containing a monochrome charge-coupled- device video camera and pulsed laser diodes mounted on the tracking vehicle, and passive reflective targets on the tracked vehicle. The lasers illuminate the targets, and the resulting video images of the targets are digitized. Then, from the positions of the digitized target images and known geometric relationships among the targets, the relative position and orientation of the vehicles are computed. As described thus far, the VGS system is based on the same principles as those of the system described in "Improved Video Sensor System for Guidance in Docking" (MFS-31150), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 21, No. 4 (April 1997), page 9a. However, the two systems differ in the details of design and operation. The VGS system is designed to operate with the target completely visible within a relative-azimuth range of +/-10.5deg and a relative-elevation range of +/-8deg. The VGS acquires and tracks the target within that field of view at any distance from 1.0 to 110 m and at any relative roll, pitch, and/or yaw angle within +/-10deg. The VGS produces sets of distance and relative-orientation data at a repetition rate of 5 Hz. The software of this system also accommodates the simultaneous operation of two sensors for redundancy

  13. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table computer program NASA Advanced Docking System (NADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Jantz, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program was developed to describe the three-dimensional motion of the Dynamic Docking Test System active table. The input consists of inertia and geometry data, actuator structural data, forcing function data, hydraulics data, servo electronics data, and integration control data. The output consists of table responses, actuator bending responses, and actuator responses.

  14. Rendezvous and docking with remote piloted vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheal, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The man-in-the-loop control system requirements for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are examined. Since many similarities exist between the Teleoperator Retrieval System (TRS) and the unfolding OMV concept, a review of the TRS control system baseline along with selected design trades which led to that baseline are discussed. TRS program issues relevant to the man-in-the-loop control system design include thruster size, communication delays and TV bandwidth compression, range/range rate radar, tumbling targets, shimmed docking interface, and control system definition. A TRS vs. OMV simulation comparative study is summarized, and the major issues currently facing the control system designer on OMV are discussed.

  15. Digital simulation for post-docking response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. R.; Todd, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The digital program, 2BODY, which simulates the translational and rotational motion of two connected rigid bodies and provides both digital and plot output is described. Relative rotation of the bodies at the connection is allowed, thereby providing a model suitable for studying system stability and response during a soft-dock regime. A users manual for the program is given as well as all the details and background pertaining to the equations of motion and mathematical models, integration scheme, and input/output routines.

  16. Secretory function in subplate neurons during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shinichi; Al-Hasani, Hannah; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Wang, Wei Zhi; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Subplate cells are among the first generated neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex and have been implicated in the establishment of cortical wiring. In rodents some subplate neurons persist into adulthood. Here we would like to highlight several converging findings which suggest a novel secretory function of subplate neurons during cortical development. Throughout the postnatal period in rodents, subplate neurons have highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are under an ER stress condition. By comparing gene expression between subplate and layer 6, we found that several genes encoding secreted proteins are highly expressed in subplate neurons. One of these secreted proteins, neuroserpin, encoded by the serpini1 gene, is localized to the ER in subplate cells. We propose that subplate might influence cortical circuit formation through a transient secretory function. PMID:25859180

  17. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically. PMID:26465512

  18. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    PubMed Central

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  19. Forty Years of Clathrin-coated Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Margaret S

    2015-12-01

    The purification of coated vesicles and the discovery of clathrin by Barbara Pearse in 1975 was a landmark in cell biology. Over the past 40 years, work from many labs has uncovered the molecular details of clathrin and its associated proteins, including how they assemble into a coated vesicle and how they select cargo. Unexpected connections have been found with signalling, development, neuronal transmission, infection, immunity and genetic disorders. But there are still a number of unanswered questions, including how clathrin-mediated trafficking is regulated and how the machinery evolved. PMID:26403691

  20. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes).

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper's group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253